CMS for Authors

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CMS for Authors : Course overview
This course equips people to undertake an Author role for their unit’s website within the University
of Sydney’s Content Management System (CMS).

By the end of this course, you should be able to:
            Understand the function of the CMS
            Understand the roles of Webmaster, Author and Approver
            Liaise with your unit’s webmaster to determine what work needs to be undertaken on
             your website
            Log in to the CMS using WebDesk from your browser
            Update pages in the CMS
            Edit pages in the CMS
            Preview pages in WebDesk prior to submission
            Submit pages for approval
            Rework rejected pages

What is the Content Management System (CMS)?

Main features
The Content Management System, or CMS (definition p56), is a website management system
which allows
       Non-techies to easily add and maintain Web content
       Information architecture to be determined and maintained by a local, designated
        Webmaster
       Approval process for all content published (by designated local “Approvers” for each area)
       Versioning, archiving and rollback of websites
       Opt-in (non-compulsory) participation by faculties, departments and organisational groups
        within the University
       All editing can be done via a web browser, reducing the need for buying web development
        software and training staff in its use

Benefits
Groups within the University are encouraged to use the CMS but are not obliged to do so. Benefits
to using the CMS include:
            Ease of information entry and update for non-techies
            Easier participation by subject experts in writing their own webpages (for example, an
             academic could easily build and update his or her own research page as necessary
             without having to resort to an administrative or technical intermediary).
            The built-in workflows (definition p65) which require all material (either newly created or
             updated) to be approved by a designated Approver (definition p53). This can help your
             area to ensure it is providing suitable, accurate, clearly presented information.


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            Site archiving, allowing for site rollback (definition p61) and searching of past material
            Automatic notification when content expires. This can help your area to maintain and
             improve the currency of the information on your website.
            Improved search results through the addition of metadata, searchable by the
             University’s search engine

The CMS software
There are numerous CMS software packages available. After tendering and testing, the University
selected a package called TeamSite from Interwoven. The system has been extensively
customised to suit the University’s environment and work processes. The University of New South
Wales also uses Interwoven for its website.

Finding out more
Find out more at http://www.mpg.usyd.edu.au/osd/cms/resources.shtml or by contacting Barb
McLean bmclean@mail.usyd.edu.au .

Overview of the web development process using the CMS

Steps to getting a page on the web: Webmasters, Authors, and Approvers
When a group has decided to use the CMS,
            A Webmaster (definition p64) is appointed and an Information Architecture (IA)
             (definition p58) is developed.
            Authors (definition p54) and Approvers (definition p53) are identified and given logins to
             the CMS
            The Webmaster creates folders and the pages within them which make up the website

Then, to get a page on the web:
   1. New page creation
        1.1. The webmaster creates a new, page in the website. The page may be blank or contain
             a few lines of text explaining what information the Author will need to place on the
             page.
        1.2. The webmaster adds tabs, menus and breadcrumbs (for definitions see “Navigation”,
             p59 or Figure 1 on p4) to the page
        1.3. The webmaster informs the appropriate Author that there is a page ready for editing.
             Usually, this will be done by email, and the webmaster should include details of:
                   What information the page needs to contain (that is, the page’s function within the
                     website)
                   The name and location within the website of the page that needs to be updated
   2. Editing
        2.1. The Author edits the page as necessary, adding information, formatting, links, and
             sometimes images
        2.2. The Author previews the page with WebDesk. When the page is ready, the Author
             submits it in WebDesk for approval by the nominated Approver for that area of the
             website



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         2.3. On submission, the Author is prompted to fill in metadata (definition p59) for the page’s
                                 Title (appears in the browser’s titlebar and in the Bookmarks or
                                  Favourites list when the page is bookmarked)
                                 Keywords (help classify a page, particularly for search engines)
                                 Description (short description of a page’s content)
    3. Approval
         3.1. The Approver will receive an email alerting them to new web content. They accept the
              approval task in WebDesk
         3.2. The Approver checks the page information and appearance, then approves or rejects
              the page
              3.2.1.         If approved, the page proceeds to publishing.
              3.2.2.    If rejected, the page becomes a new task in the Author’s WebDesk task
                   pane and the Author receives an email alerting them to this fact.
    4. Deployment (Publishing)
         4.1. Once the page has been approved, the page is published (“deployed”) on the group’s
              website at the place defined by the webmaster.
               Depending on settings made by the webmaster, the page will either be published
               immediately on approval, or at a specified time.
               The page is now visible to anyone browsing the web. Remember to Shift + Reload your
               page in the browser so you can be sure you are seeing the latest copy of the page.

What is the Author’s role?
As an Author, you are expected to:
             Write copy for web pages within your group’s website that are assigned to you by the
              Webmaster for editing and updating
             Clearly communicate information relevant to your group’s web audience(s)
             Structure information on webpages for ease of reading and comprehension
             Judiciously add basic formatting and images to pages
             Keep information current and correct on pages assigned to you

What is the Approver’s role?
Approvers are nominated staff members responsible for approving content before it is published to
the Unit’s Website. This nominated staff member is someone aware of their Unit’s role and
activities and of the University’s legal responsibilities with regard to the publishing of information.

There may be multiple Approvers for a given area of a website.

Approvers review submitted files (both text and images) for:
    Factual correctness
    Suitability of the information provided (given legal, professional and marketing
      considerations, as appropriate)
    Clear phrasing and communication
    Correct grammar and spelling

Approvers are expected to:


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       Review submitted material in a timely fashion
       Provide an “Accept” or “Reject” response in the Approval workflow, accompanied by a short
        description of the required revisions if the file has been rejected.


What is the Webmaster’s role?
The Webmaster is the person responsible for devising and maintaining the information architecture
(IA) (definition p58) for a given website.

The Webmaster is expected to:
Create and maintain the site’s information architecture
Create pages and files within the site and assign for editing / updating to suitable Authors
Liaise with the CMS team and support to assist Approvers and Authors in their CMS tasks if
needed.


What does a finished CMS webpage typically look like?
The overall look and feel of a finished CMS webpage will depend greatly on what has been set up
for your area. However, all CMS webpages are likely to share some of the characteristics of the
main University website pages, as per Figure 1.




Figure 1 - Sample page from the main uni website, showing common CMS features: breadcrumbs,
tabs, menus, etc.

Key elements of a typical CMS page
A typical CMS page will contain the following elements (see Figure 1):

Breadcrumbs



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         Breadcrumbs are a navigation feature which allows users to see where they are within the
         overall University website. Users can click on any breadcrumb in the list to jump to that part
         of the site.

Tabs
         Tabs represent the main categories within your website. As such, they provide the primary
         navigation for your site, allowing users to jump to its different sections.

         For example, the tabs for the “Current Students” section of the main University site are:
                My Study
                Communicate
                Student Life
                Services & Assistance
                Campuses
                News & Events

Menus
         Menus represent all materials within a given category of your website. Tabs represent
         categories, and for each tab, there will be a different menu.

         For example, within the University’s main “Current Students” site, the menus for the first tab
         / category, “My Study”, are:
                   Student self-administration & FlexSIS
                   Online services
                   Course information
                   Learn online
                   Library services

Site name
       The site name for your website appears on the top right of the browser window, and will
       usually simply be the name of your faculty, department, or organisational unit.

Footer
         The footer for your site is the standard text that appears at the bottom of the page, and
         often includes:
                   A contact email address allowing users to easily contact someone in your area
                   A copyright notice for the material on the page
                   A link to a legal disclaimer
                 A link to a privacy policy if personal details of users are being collected or used
              anywhere on the site




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        Figure 2 - The footer for the main University site.



System requirements: computer / browser specifications

Recommended setup
While the CMS can be used on a wide range of systems, it is most likely to run well on Windows
2000 with Internet Explorer 5.

Computer requirements

OS
The CMS can be used with most operating systems, including Mac OS9, Mac OSX, Windows (any
version), and UNIX/Linux variants. However, you may need to install the Sun Java Virtual Machine
(p6), particularly if your machine is running:
     MacOS (any variant, including MacOSX)
     Windows 95, 98, ME or NT4


Java Virtual Machine
If you get Java errors (Figure 3) during file editing, or if WebDesk simply does not respond to some
commands (such as “Save”), you may need to install the Sun Java Virtual Machine (JVM). This
goes for both Macintosh and Windows machines.




Figure 3 - Java errors may occur depending on what Java Virtual Machine (JVM) you have installed.




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The installer can be downloaded from http://www.java.com/ . The installation process is very
simple, but if you’re uncomfortable with doing software installations, you may want to ask your
Computer Systems Officer (CSO) or local tech person to help you with this.

Browser requirements
WebDesk can be logged into using most java-capable browsers (if in doubt, fire up your browser
and try- it can’t hurt!). However, Internet Explorer 5 is recommended by the CMS team.


Common tasks for Authors

Logging into the CMS via WebDesk
WebDesk (definition p64) is the main interface to the CMS for authors and approvers. Once you
log in to WebDesk, you can accept tasks (definition p63) and work with the pages within your
website.

To log into the CMS via WebDesk,

1. Open your browser (“Browser requirements”, p7) and surf to http://cms-dev.ucc.usyd.edu.au

2. A login screen will appear as in Figure 4. Enter your CMS username and password, which
   should be the same as your UniKey account.

   Leave the “Login as” field on the default, “Author”. Leave “Interface” ticked.

3. Click the “Login” button.




        Figure 4 - TeamSite / WebDesk login screen.


4. Once you are logged in, you have two tabs (Figure 5) to choose between: Tasks (Figure 6) and
   Files (Figure 7):




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   Figure 5 - Tasks and Files tabs.



        a. The Tasks pane shows current tasks requiring action on your behalf. This is most useful
           for Approvers, who will see files awaiting approval after submission by an Author, as in
           Figure 6.




                  Figure 6 - Task pane, showing task details for the second task in the list.



        b. The Files pane is most useful for Authors, as it will show you all files available to you. In
           Figure 7, we see a list of DCRs, or Document Content Records (definition p56),
           contained in the main content folder, /templatedata/corporate/content/data.




             Figure 7 - Files pane, showing files in /templatedata/corporate/content/data.



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Find the pages to edit
When you want to edit or update a page, you need to find its DCR, or Document Content Record
(definition p56).

Most people will find the content files for your area under templatedata/corporate/content/data/
(Figure 8).




Figure 8 - SSDU's content files are stored under templatedata/corporate/content/data and its
subfolders.


This may vary depending on:
            How your area’s site is set up
                       For example, your website may be contained in a subfolder of
                        templatedata/corporate/content/data
            Which templates your area is using
                       If you are using the “corporate” templates, your files will be somewhere under
                        templatedata/corporate/content/data. . “Corporate” templates are templates
                        that were developed for the main University website (the “corporate site”).
                        If you were using a different template, say a new one called “science”, then
                        your files would be somewhere under templatedata/science/content/data


If in doubt, consult your webmaster as to where to find the content files you need to work on.

TIP: To move quickly to folders you often use, you may like to add them to your WebDesk
Favourites list (p10).




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What are all the other files and folders within the CMS?
Your workarea in the CMS will have a number of different folders, all for different types of files. The
main folders of interest to Authors are:

 Finished webpages (linking)
Location                        /htdocs
File type                       *.shtml
What are they?                  These are the finished webpages, put together by the site’s Webmaster
                                from various DCR files.
You need to look in             ... you’re linking from one file in your website to another, and you need to
here when...                    figure out the path (DEFINE) to put in the link.

 Images for use in the website
Location                        /htdocs/images/content
File type                       *.jpg, *.gif, *.png
What are they?
You need to look in             ...you’re adding an image to the website, or adding an image to a page.
here when...

 Page content files (editing & updating)
Location                        /templatedata/corporate/content/data
File type                       *.dcr (data capture record)
What are they?
You need to look in             ...you’re editing, updating, or otherwise working with page content files.
here when...                    These are the main files used by Authors.


Adding folders to your WebDesk Favourites list
1. Log into WebDesk
2. Navigate to the folder you wish to add to the list
3. Look for the “Add to Favourites” button (Figure 9) to the upper-right of your WebDesk window
   (just to the right of the Directory field)




    Figure 9 - Add to Favourites button.


    4. The location will now appear as an in your Favourites list and can be used to quickly get to
       that folder.


         Using your WebDesk Favourites list
    1. Log into WebDesk
    2. Click on the Browse button in the upper-left of your WebDesk window
    3. A drop-down menu will appear (Figure 10). Click on Favourites.




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    Figure 10 - Browse button & menu.


    4. Your list of Favourite folders will appear in the left-hand column of the Files tab (Figure
       11).Click on the desired folder to see its contents listed in the right-hand column.




              Figure 11 - Browsing the Favourites list.


    5. Work on files as usual.
    6. If you want to see files outside your Favourite folders, click on the Browse button again and
       choose Directories.

    Open a page for editing
    Navigate to your content directory so you can see the files you want to work with (see section:
    “Find the pages to edit”, p9).




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    Figure 12 - List of files ready for editing.


    To the right of each file, you will see three links, as in Figure 13:
             Edit
             Tag
             Details




    Figure 13 - Links for editing, tagging and viewing details for a file.


    To edit the page, click on the Edit link. A new browser window will open displaying that page in
    editing mode. During editing, the page will appear quite different to the way the page will look
    on the Web. Each page element (headings, paragraphs, images and so on) will be expressed
    as a set of text fields, as seen in Figure 14.




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    Figure 14 - Page ready for editing, showing filled section header, subheader, and plain text fields.


    Once you have opened the file for editing, you can correct information in existing page
    elements and add or delete page elements as described in the section “Editing new or updating
    existing pages” on p13.

    If you make changes to the page, you must save the page by clicking on the Save button at the
    upper left of the page window (see Figure 14). The save process will take a few seconds,
    during which time the word “Saving...” will be visible above the Save button.

    Once the file has been saved, you can close it by clicking on the Close button at the upper right
    of the page window (see Figure 14). At this point, WebDesk will ask you whether you wish to
    submit the file for approval. Click Yes to submit if wished (full details on submitting files can be
    found in the section “Submitting a file for approval” on p47). After you have clicked Yes or No,
    the page window will disappear.


    Editing new or updating existing pages

    Add page heading
    The page heading is the main heading for the page. It should reflect
             the page’s function within the website, and
             the information / area the page covers.


    Your webmaster may already have added a page title before notifying you that the page was
    ready for editing.

    The first thing you will need to add to the page is a page heading (Figure 15).



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    Figure 15 - Previewed page, showing page heading (“Staff Profile: Richard Kerr”) and
    subheadings (e.g. “Role”).


    To do this,

    1. Look for the Page Section header (Figure 16) on your page.




         Figure 16 - A page section header.


    2. Click the Plus button and a field labelled “Section Header Text” will appear.




         Figure 17 - Section header fields create the largest heading you can have on a page (usually
         you use one of these per page).


    3. Type in the page heading you want.

    4. Save (p42) & preview (p43) your work if appropriate. For an example of what your page
       heading may look like, see Figure 15.


    Add subheading
    1. Find one of the grey “Page Element” headers (Figure 18) (not a Page Section header (see
       Figure 16 on p14)),




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         Figure 18 - A page element header. Page elements can be headings, paragraphs, images, and
         so on.


         on the page and click the Plus button to its right.

    2. A drop-down menu of page elements will appear as in Figure 19. Select “Sub Header Text”
       by double-clicking on its entry in the list.




         Figure 19 - Add page element menu; choose "sub header text".


    3. A sub header field will appear on the page, as in Figure 20.




         Figure 20 - Adding a subheading.


    4. Add text, as in Figure 21.




         Figure 21 - Filled subheader field.


    5. You may like to preview the page (remember to save first- full instructions: p43) to see how
       your subheading fits into the overall document, as in Figure 22.




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         Figure 22 - Previewing a page to see how the newly added page elements fit within the
         broader document.



    Add body text (plain text)
1. Find one of the grey “Page Element” headers (Figure 23)




    Figure 23 - A page element header. Page elements can be headings, paragraphs, images, and so
    on.


    (not a Page Section header (see 16 on p14)) on the page and click the Plus button to its right.

2. A drop-down menu of page elements will appear (Figure 24). Select “Plain text” by double-
   clicking on its entry in the list.




    Figure 24 - Add page element menu; choose "plain text".




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3. A plain text field will appear on the page, as per Figure 25.




    Figure 25 - Plain text field with entry.


4. Enter the text you wish to appear on the page.

5. You may like to save (p42) and preview (p43) the page to see how your text looks, as in Figure
   26.




    Figure 26 - Previewed plain text (body text).



Add anchors and hyperlinks anywhere in page
Hyperlinks allow to you to link:
    from one web document to another in your own website (internal links) or outside (external
    links)
    to email addresses (email links),
    to specific locations (marked with “named anchors”) within a webpage.



Named anchors
Named anchors are invisible page elements which can be used for linking to a specific location
within a page. For example, when you insert an anchor in a subheading, you can link to that
anchor from another place in the page.

Named anchors are typically used to create “Table of Content”-style blocks of links at the
beginning of long documents (essays, studies, policy documents and so on). For example, see
Figure 27.




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Figure 27 - A list of links pointing to different sections marked with named anchors of a document.
You can see this particular set of links yourself by browsing to
http://www.usyd.edu.au/su/personnel/ir/awards/acad_staff/#coa


To insert a named anchor in a CMS page,

1. Find the place you would like to insert an anchor (often a subheader)
2. At the beginning of the field, insert the following:

[[anchor||anchor_name]]

where anchor_name is the name (no spaces allowed) you wish to give the anchor. E.g.: Figure 28.




Figure 28 - Inserting a named anchor in a subheading (edit view).


Anchors should ideally be given names which reflect the area of the document they are linking to.
For example, a good anchor name for a subheading “Orange campus” would be “orange” or
“orange_campus”.

For instructions on how to link to named anchors, see section “Linking to anchors” on p21.


Hyperlinks
Hyperlinks are used to link from one web document to another (Figure 29). You can place
hyperlinks in almost any field within your page.




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   Figure 29 - A link to the Summer School website in a "feature pane" box.


   To add a hyperlink anywhere in text,

1. Find the text you wish to make into a link (Figure 30).




   Figure 30 - Plain text prior to being linked. We will link the phrase "La Trobe University" to the main
   La Trobe website.


   Surround the word or phrase with double square brackets, [[ ]]. These will act as the “containers”
   for your link and link text ().




   Figure 31 - Beginning to hyperlink a phrase by surrounding it with double square brackets [[ ]].



2. In front of the text you wish to link, and within the square brackets, type two “pipe” or “bar” symbols,
   || (Figure 32). You should be able to find the “pipe” symbol on your keyboard above the Enter key.




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     Figure 32 - Place the double-pipes, ||, in front of the text you wish to link.


3. Inside the double square brackets, in front of the double-pipes, type the address of the page or
   resource to which you wish to link.

a. For external links (links to pages outside your own website), you will need to supply a full web
   address, including http://. See Figure 33 for an example.




     Figure 33 - Finally, type the full URL (web address) in front of the double-pipes.

b. For internal links (links to pages within you own website), give a path to the file. For more
   information, see section “Internal links” on p20.


c.       For links to named anchors, give a hash symbol and the anchor name (e.g. #intro). For more
     information: see section “Linking to anchors” on p21.

4. Your finished link should have structure along the lines of: [[http://www.latrobe.edu.au||La Trobe
   University]].

5. Save (p42) and preview (p43) your work. Click on the link to test that it brings up the intended page.
   (Figure 34).




     Figure 34 - Preview and test your link to check it works correctly.


     Internal links
     Internal links are links to other pages within your own site.

     To make an internal link, follow for the process for general hyperlinking as discussed on p18.
     Where you would normally put in the web address (URL, definition p64) of the page you want to
     link to, you need to put a path to the document instead. This can be done in two different ways:




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a.            Absolute linking. This uses the path to the page in reference to the top level of your website, or
         “site root”. For the purpose of creating hyperlinks, the root of your website is considered to be the
         htdocs folder (). For an example of this type of linking, see Figure 35.




         Figure 35 - Absolute linking to pages within one's own website (edit view).


b.           Relative linking. This uses the path to the page to link to from the page you are linking from.
         For examples, see Figure 36 and Figure 37.




         Figure 36 - Relative linking to another page in the same folder as the one being edited (a).




         Figure 37 - Relative linking to another page in the same folder as the one being edited (b).



         In relative linking,
            Giving a filename on its own means “look for a file with this name in the same folder as the
           current file”
            Beginning a filename with ./ (dot slash) means “look for a file with this name in the same
           folder as the current file”
            Beginning a filename with ../ (dot dot slash) means “look for a file with this name one level
           up in the file hierarchy”. You can use as many “dot dot slash”es as are needed to get up to the
           level of the file you want to link to (e.g. to get two levels up, you would
           type ../../enrol_form.shtml.



         Linking to anchors
         Link as for external or internal links, except that where you would normally put the page name,
         place a hash symbol, #, and then the name of the anchor (Figure 38).




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   Figure 38 - Making a link to an anchor (location in the same page. The anchors in this case are
   named "attend" and “talk”.


   The link produced looks and functions like any other link (Figure 39), except that instead of taking
   you to another page, it will take you to a particular location within the current page.




   Figure 39 - Links to anchors look like any other hyperlink.


   You can also link to anchors in other pages. To do this, give the page name first, then (without
   spaces)a hash and the anchor name. For example, if I wanted to link to a section with anchor
   name “conclusion” in a page called “essay.html”, I would give the link location as
   “essay.html#conclusion”.


   Add a list of links (hyperlink block)
   For instructions on how to add a single hyperlink within most fields in your page, see “Add anchors
   and hyperlinks anywhere in ” on p17.

   You can also add a list of links (1-3 columns), or “hyperlink block”, using the “hyperlink block” field
   in WebDesk. See Figure 40 for an example of the end result:




   Figure 40 - Hyperlink block, previewed.



   To add a hyperlink block,

1. Find one of the grey “Page Element” headers (Figure 49)




   Figure 41 - A page element header. Page elements can be headings, paragraphs, images, and so on.


   (not a Page Section header (see 16 on p14)) on the page and click the Plus button to its right.


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2. A drop-down menu of page elements will appear (Figure 49). Select “Hyperlink Block” by double-
   clicking on its entry in the list.




    Figure 42 - Add page element menu; choose "bullet list" or "numbered list" as appropriate.



3. A hyperlink block field will appear on the page, as per Figure 43:




    Figure 43 - Empty hyperlink block field, column menu showing.


4. In the field “Number of Hyperlink Columns”, use the drop-down menu to choose between 1 and 3
   columns (Figure 43).

5. If you wish, use the “Column heading” 1 to 3 fields to give the columns headings (Figure 43).

6. Fill in the first Hyperlink field (“Hyperlink fields.-1”) as per Figure 44:

a. In the “Hyperlink Text” field, add text to be linked. E.g.: “Institute for Teaching & Learning”.

b. In the “Hyperlink URL” field, add the full web address. E.g.: http://www.itl.usyd.edu.au .

c. In the “Column Number” field, use the drop-down menu to place the link in column 1, 2 or 3.




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   Figure 44 - Hyperlink block of two columns, one link added to column 1.


7. To add more links, click on the plus button next to any of the “Hyperlink field” headers (Figure 45).




   Figure 45 - Hyperlink field header within a Hyperlink Block element. Use the plus button on the right
   to add further hyperlink fields.


8. Continue to add fields and allocate them to columns as needed (Figure 46).




   Figure 46 - Hyperlink block with three links filled (two in column 1; one in column 2).




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9. Save (p42) and preview (p43) your page to check the look and correct functioning of your hyperlink
   block (Figure 47).




   Figure 47 - Previewed hyperlink block with subheading "Related groups and organisations" above.



   Add a bulleted or numbered list
1. Find one of the grey “Page Element” headers (Figure 49)




   Figure 48 - A page element header. Page elements can be headings, paragraphs, images, and so on.


   (not a Page Section header (see 16 on p14)) on the page and click the Plus button to its right.


2. A drop-down menu of page elements will appear (Figure 49). Select “Bullet List” or “Numbered
   List” by double-clicking on the appropriate entry in the list.




   Figure 49 - Add page element menu; choose "bullet list" or "numbered list" as appropriate.



3. A list field will appear on the page:




   Figure 50 - Bullet List page element.



4. Enter the text which you wish to appear as a bulleted / numbered list in the list field, as per Figure
   51.


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   Figure 51 - Bulleted list field. Each item must start on a new line, with a blank line in between.


   The bullets / numbers will not appear on the page while you are editing it (but will show up when
   you preview the page, as in Figure 52).




   Figure 52 - Previewed bullet list.


   Each entry in the list needs to be on its own line, with a blank line between each item (two carriage
   returns / newlines) as per Figure 51.

5. Save your work (p42) and preview it (p43) to see how your list looks as part of the overall page.


   Add formatting
   Most of the formatting within the CMS will be done automatically for you by the stylesheets (CSS)
   defined for your area. However, bolding or italicising text must be done by hand, as must adding
   en- or em- dashes.

   Bolding




   Figure 53 - Bolding text (final sentence), edit view.


   To make text bold,


        Find the text you wish to make bold
        Surround it with double square brackets, [[ ]].
        Within the double square brackets, place the word “bold” and follow it with double pipes (or
        “bars”), ||.


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    Your finished text should look something like this:
         A place will be reserved for you in the course.                    [[bold||Note: your
         place is not yet confirmed at this stage.]]
    Save (p42) and preview (p43) your work to check that the bolding is showing up correctly.




Figure 54 - Previewed bolded text.



Italicising




Figure 55 - Italics, as created in the CMS page editing view.


To italicise text,


    Find the text you wish to italicise,
    Surround it with double square brackets, [[ ]].
    Within the double square brackets, place the word “italic” and follow it with double pipes (or
    “bars”), ||.
    Your finished text should look something like this:
         [[italic||Phone:]] +61 2 9351 5871
         [[italic||Email:]] admin@ssdu.usyd.edu.au
    Save (p42) and preview (p43) your work to check that the italics are showing up correctly.




Figure 56 - Italics, as seen in a page preview.



En- and Em-dashes
Sometimes you may wish to use en- and em- dashes in your pages.




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     En-dashes typically used to hyphenate words or to separate ranges of numbers. They are half
     the width of an em-dash.




     Figure 57 - - En dash, as seen in a previewed CMS page.


     Em-dashes are typically used to interrupt the flow of a sentence (indicate a break in thought).



     Figure 58 - Em dash, as seen in a previewed CMS page.


    To enter a normal dash in the CMS, type a single dash character, -.


    To enter an en-dash, type two dash characters, --.



    Figure 59 - En dash, as written in the CMS editing view.


    To enter an em-dash, type three dash characters, ---.




    Figure 60 - Em dash, as written in the CMS editing view.


Save (p42) and preview (p43) your work to check that the dashes are showing up correctly.



Add an image
If you want to use images in your pages, they need to be present in the htdocs/images/content
folder. Depending on how your area’s website is set up, you may be able to add an image to the
website yourself (p28), or you may need to email the image to your webmaster (p32) to have it
added to the website. Images must be approved before they are available for use in pages.


Add an image to the website yourself

1. Find the image you wish to use on the page and save a copy on your computer.

2. The image should:
             have a filename without spaces or symbols
             be in *.gif or *.jpg format, and




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                  be optimised for the web (have as small a file size as possible: 2kb to 50kb is generally
                   acceptable, depending on the size and importance of the image and the number of
                   them which need to be on the page (the more on the page, the smaller each should be,
                   so the cumulative file size doesn’t become huge).
     3. Log into WebDesk and navigate to the htdocs/images/content folder (Figure 61)




     Figure 61 - Images files are usually found in the htdocs/images/content/ folder.


1.       Click on the File button and choose Import from the drop-down menu (Figure 62).




     Figure 62 - Choose Import from the File menu.


2.       A file-chooser dialogue will open (Figure 63).




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     Figure 63 - File chooser dialogue.


3.      Navigate through the file system until you can see the image file you wish to import in the top
     panel (Figure 64).




     Figure 64 - File chooser dialogue, one file ready to be added to the bottom panel for importing.


4.       Click to select the file and click the Add button. The file will appear in the bottom panel (Figure
     65).




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     Figure 65 - File chooser dialogue, one file (bottom panel) ready to be imported.


5.      Add further files in the same manner if desired, then click the Import button. An import dialogue
     box will appear briefly while all the nominated files are being imported into the CMS.


6.      Once the images have been imported, you should be able to see them in the
     htdocs/images/content/ folder (Figure 66).




     Figure 66 - Images are usually found in the htdocs/images/content/ folder.

7.       You will need to submit the files for approval before they will be available for use in pages. Turn
     to p47 for instructions on submitting files for approval.


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   Add an image to the website via the webmaster
   If your webmaster has informed you they will be the one adding images to the website, email them
   the image you wish to have added to the site.

   Ideally, the image will:
        have a filename without spaces or symbols
        be in *.gif or *.jpg format, and
        be optimised for the web (have as small a file size as possible: 2kb to 50kb is generally
        acceptable, depending on the size and importance of the image and the number of them which
        need to be on the page (the more on the page, the smaller each should be, so the cumulative
        file size doesn’t become huge).

   The webmaster should add the image to the site and submit it for approval. Once it is approved,
   the image will be available for use in your pages. The webmaster should let you know once it has
   been approved.


   Add an image to the page
   Once an image is present in the htdocs/images folder, and it has been both submitted and
   approved, you can use it in pages.

   To do this,

1. Find one of the grey “Page Element” headers (Figure 68)




   Figure 67 - A page element header. Page elements can be headings, paragraphs, images, and so on.


   (not a Page Section header (see 16 on p14)) on the page and click the Plus button to its right.

2. A drop-down menu of page elements will appear (Figure 68). Select “Graphic” by double-clicking
   on its entry in the list.




   Figure 68 - Adding a page element. Choose Graphic to place a picture in your page.


3. An image entry will appear on the page:




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     Figure 69 - A new Graphic page element.


     for which you will need to enter the following details:

a.       Image name: tells the CMS where to find the image and what its filename is. Type in the path
     to the image if you know it, or browse to the file as follows:

          i.       Click on the File Browser button to the right of the Image Name field

         ii.       A custard-yellow dialogue box will appear asking you to browse to the image. At this
               point, you will be looking at the staging server (definition p62), so you’ll only see files which
               have been approved (definition p53). The path will be given in red up the top of the window.
               It end with something like STAGING/htdocs/images:




               Figure 70 - Browsing to an image on the staging server, step 1.


        iii.      First, you will probably need to enter the “content” folder by double-clicking (depending
               on where your image has been placed by you or the webmaster).

        iv.        Next, find your image in the list by clicking in the round radio button to its left, as in
               Figure 71. (If you cannot find the image on the staging server, it is likely the image has not
               yet been approved).

               Once you have made your selection, click Select.




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               Figure 71 - Browsing to an image on the staging server, step 2.


        v.        The dialogue box will then disappear and the Image Name field on the page will have
               been filled with the appropriate value (path and filename of the image).




              vi.        In the “Alt description” field, give a short description (2 - 5 words) of what the image
                     represents. This assists people viewing the page without images, such the visually
                     impaired, those with non-graphical browsers, or those who have turned off image
                     loading to achive faster page loading (for example on a very slow connection).

             vii.       Use the “Graphic justification” buttons to align your image to the right (RHS), left
                     (LHS), or centre.

             viii.        Use the “Wrap text” buttons to wrap text around the image or to have the image on
                     a line on its own.

6. Save (p42) and preview (p43) your work to see how the image looks ().



   Import a file (so that you can link to documents and presentations)
   You can import files other than webpages, such as:
        PowerPoint presentations
        Forms and other PDFs
        Word documents


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         Most files you can think of that you would normally include on a website or make available to
         people online

     To import a file into the CMS,

1.       At the WebDesk file pane (Figure 72), navigate through the folders until you are in the folder
     into which you wish to import the file.




     Figure 72 - WebDesk File pane.


     This will probably be /templatedata/corporate/content/data/, or one of its subfolders.


     2. Click the Import button (Figure 73)




     Figure 73 - Buttons at the top of the WebDesk file pane.


3.       This will bring up a file chooser dialogue, as seen in Figure 74.




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     Figure 74 - File chooser dialogue. Navigate through the filesystem until you find the file(s) you wish
     to import.



4.        Browse through your computer (and any connected servers or network drives) until you find the
     file you want (Figure 75, Figure 76, Figure 77).




     Figure 75 - Navigating the file system (a).




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     Figure 76 - Navigating the file system (b).




     Figure 77 - Navigating the file system (c).



5.       Once you can see the file you want to import, click the file’s name in the upper panel (Figure
     78), then click the Add button.




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     Figure 78 - Select the file you wish to add to the list of files to import, and click "Add"


6.      The file name will appear in the lower pane as per Figure 79. Add any more files you wish to
     import at this time, then click the Import button.




     Figure 79 - One file (bottom pane), ready for importing.


7.      A small Java dialogue will pop up telling you the files are being imported, and shortly (1-2
     minutes) you should see the files appear in the folder you nominated earlier (Figure 80).




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     Figure 80 - File panel showing newly imported file, "ssdu_report_2002.pdf".


8.      The files must be submitted (p47) and approved before they will be available online (although
     you can link to them straight away).

     Add a feature pane (Related Information)
     You can add a feature pane, or “breakout box” type page division, to the right of any WebDesk
     page (Figure 81 and Figure 82).

     Feature panes are often used for:
         Providing links to related information, resources, or organisations
         Giving a quote or short case study about the main topic of the page
         Providing a small image to complement the main topic of the page




     Figure 81 - Feature pane on the current Alumni pages.     Figure 82 - Feature pane on a page the
                                                               current “future students” pages.




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     To add a feature pane:

1. Look toward the bottom of the file editing window and you will see a Feature Pane header, as per
   Figure 83 (not a Page section or Page element header). Click the plus button to its right.




     Figure 83 - Feature pane header.


2. Once you have clicked on the plus button, the header will change to “Feature Pane -1” and offer
   you pane settings (Figure 84) for:


                  Feature pane width in pixels DEFINE
                  Feature pane border (turn off offered)




     Figure 84 - Feature pane settings.


3. To add content to the feature pane, clik on the plus button to the right of the “Feature Pane
   Element” headers (Figure 84 and Figure 85).




     Figure 85 - Feature pane elements.


4.   A drop-down menu will appear (Figure 86) to let you insert a field for:
    Plain text
    Header text
    Bulleted list
    Numbered list
    Graphic




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   Figure 86 - Drop-down menu to add fields to a Feature Pane.


5. Choose the field you wish to insert, such as a plain text field.

6. Fill in as you would for a field in the rest of the page (details: plain text p16; header p14; numbered
   or bulleted list p25; graphic p32).



7. If you wish to add further feature panes on the same page, click on the plus button to the right of
   any feature pane header (Figure 83) and the menu will appear (Figure 86) again to allow you to
   choose a field to insert.

8. Save (p42) and preview (p43) your work to check that the feature pane works well with the rest of
   the page.




   Figure 87 - Faeture pane, previewed.

   Remove an item from the page
   To remove an item from the page,

1. Find its element header and look for the buttons at the right-hand side (Figure 88). To remove the
   item, click the cross button.

   Caution! This action is not undoable, and if you remove the wrong thing you will need to contact
   CMS support (details in “Resources” section, p53) for rollback???, or re-type that field yourself.


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Figure 88 - Page element header for a hyperlink block.



Move items around the page (change item order)
To move a field to a different location on the page, use the up and down arrows to the right of the
field header (Figure 89) by clicking on them. Each click will move the element one step up or down
in the page.




Figure 89 - Subheader page element and header. To move the element around the page, use the
arrow buttons to the right of the grey header bar.



Save your changes
Whenever you make a change to a file you are working, you need to save it. You should be doing
this frequently!

When you have a file open for editing (p11), there are buttons at the top of the file editing window,
as seen in Figure 90:




Figure 90 - Buttons seen at the top of a file editing window.


To save your changes, use the “Save” or “Save & Close” buttons.


Close the file when you’re done
Once you’re finished with editing a file, you should save (p) and close the file.

To do this, look for the buttons at the top of the file editing window, as seen in Figure 91:




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    Figure 91 - File editing window. The buttons can be seen toward the top.


    Use the “Save & Close” or “Close” button as appropriate.


    Previewing a page
    There are two main ways to preview a file:
   Previewing file content only
   Previewing both file content and appearance


    Preview from the Files tab

    Preview content only (files listing)
    To preview a file’s content from the Files tab,

1. Open the Files tab, as per Figure 92:




    Figure 92 - WebDesk Files tab, showing content files.



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2. Find the file whose content you wish to preview. Look for:

                 Content files in /templatedata/corporate/content/data/ or subfolders thereof
                 Image files in /htdocs/images/content/ or subfolders thereof.
                 Finished web pages in /htdocs/ or subfolders thereof.

3. Click on the name of the file, as seen in Figure 93:




   Figure 93 - Filename, as seen in the WebDesk Files tab.


   A window will appear which will show you the file’s content (text only () except for images()):




   Figure 94 - File content preview.




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   Figure 95 - Image content preview.


4. Once you’re done, close the window and continue working.


   Preview content and appearance (File edit window)
   To preview a file’s content and appearance (that is, see it almost as it will appear once published
   online),
   1. Open the file for editing (“Open a page for editing”, p11)

   2. Click on the preview button toward the top of the file editing window PIC

   3. A preview window will open, showing you the page as it will appear on the web, minus its
      menus and tabs (definitions, see “Navigation”, p59).

   4. When you’re done, close the preview window and continue working.



   Preview from the Tasks tab
   If you have a task (perhaps if a file you submitted for approval has been rejected and needs
   reworking), you can preview the file from its task listing.




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Figure 96 - Tasks tab showing one task, with the same file in .inc and .dcr forms attached (at bottom).


To do this,

1. click on the task description Figure 97 to bring up the details for that task in the bottom part of
   the window Figure 98.




    Figure 97 - Task listing.




    Figure 98 - Task files.


2. In the task details, click on the “Task Files” tab to bring the details of the files to the front.

3. To view the file, click on the filename of either:

         a. The INC file (definition p58), to preview the file as a finished page (content +
            appearance) PIC;
         b. The DCR file (definition p56), to preview the file’s content only PIC.

4. When you’re done previewing, close the window and continue working.


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Submitting a file for approval
Once a file is ready for publication, you will need to submit it for approval by a designated Approver
for your area. Once it has been approved, the file can be published to your area’s website.

If the file you are working on is part of a page which has already been published (e.g. you are
updating a page), submission will result in the page being automatically updated as soon as your
file is approved.

If the file you are working on is not yet part of a page, submission will mean that the file is available
for inclusion in a page once it has been approved. However, for the file to be available on the web,
your webmaster will need to create a page which uses your file, and submit the page itself for
approval.

If you are unsure about whether your file is available on the web, the best way to find out is by
surfing to your website and checking! If you aren’t sure whereabouts to find the file within the
website, consult your webmaster.

To do this,

1. Locate the file in the CMS from the files panel (Figure 99).




    Figure 99 - WebDesk Files panel.


2. Put a tick in the box to the left of its filename (Figure 100).




    Figure 100 - File listing, ticked for actioning.




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3. Click the “Submit” button at the top of the WebDesk window (Figure 101).




    Figure 101 - File management buttons at the top of teh WebDesk window.


4. The file submission process now begins:

         1. Firstly, you need to choose the appropriate workflow template for the file you are
            submitting (Figure 102). Generally, you will want to choose “Content” for normal page
            files, or “Generic” for image files.




              Figure 102 - Choosing the approriate workflow template for the file you are submitting for
              approval.


         2. Secondly, you need to provide a short description either of the file’s content, or of the
            changes you’ve amde. This will assist the approver in deciding whether the file (or
            updates to it) are approriate. SHOW EML WHERE THESE DESCS SAHOW UP




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              Figure 103 - Give a brief description of the submitted file, or what you've updated within
              it.
         3. Thirdly, for content files, you need to create metadata for the file. The first time a file is
            submitted, you must do this from scratch; thereafter you may simply update the
            metadata as approproiate.

              For an explanation of metadata, see the secttion “About metadata” on p50.

              The CMS requires you to provide the following metadata for a file being submitted:


                              Title (more about setting a good page title:p50)
                              Subject (Keywords) (more about setting a good page title:p)
                              Description (more about setting a good page title:p)




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              Figure 104 - Setting the metadata for a file during the submission process.


5. Wait for approval of DCR

6. Wait for approval of SHTML


 About metadata
During the submission process (p47), you will need to set the metadata for content files. For how to
set metadata, see p49.

Metadata is data which describes the file. It is generally not displayed for users, but is used by
other computers to catalogue the file for purposes such as web searching. If you are interested in
learning more, the University of Sydney Library has an excellent page about metadata at
http://staff.library.usyd.edu.au/webman/metaguide.html .


Title
The title has two main purposes:
   a. It is displayed in the title bar at the top of the browser window
   b. It is the text which appears in the “Bookmarks” or “Favourites” list of the browser when a
        user bookmarks your page.

Aim: Allow people to easily find their way back to your page once bookmarked.
It is good practice to provide a reasonably short title so that it will fit comfortably into the user’s
Bookmarks list. Ideally, the title should take the form:



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  University : Faculty, Dept or Unit : Page topic

For example,


             Biggest to smallest (Economics & Business)

         Usyd: Faculty of E+B: Research Expertise: Research in the Faculty
         of Economics and Business


             Other way around (Science):

         Current Students > Faculty of Science > University of Sydney


             Shorter, leaving out the “USYD” aspect (Microbiology):
      Note: a potential problem with this system is that it assumes users are only bookmarking pages from
      the University of Sydney. This might be a reasonable assumption for current staff and students;
      however when dealing with those outside the organisation, particulalry prospective students, it is useful
      to mention “University of Sydney” or “USYD” somewhere in the page title.

         MMB - School Seminars


Subject (Keywords)
(How to enter keywords for a page: p49)
Aim: Categorise your pages so that search engines can find them when an appropriate
query is done.
The subject, or keywords (as they are more traditionally known) for a document help classify it in
search engines databases. The more accurate your subject terrems / keywords are, the more likely
it is that your page will be brought up when a user does a search on your page’s subject.

When choosing subject terms or keywords, choose words which:
             Accurately capture the content of your document (as if you were classifying it for
              shleving a library- specifically, its Dublin Core Subject)
             Correspond to terms which users interseted in your page are likelty to search for
              (colloquialisms, layperson terms, and so on)


For example,

Site / page                             Subject / Keywords
                                        "University, Sydney, NSW, Australia, study, education,
Main USYD site, front page              research, tertiary"
                                        "university of sydney, sydney, australia, new south
Science faculty site, future            wales, university, postgraduate, undergraduate,
students page                           research, faculty, higher education, courses,
                                        enrolment, science”
                                        “USyd, Economics, Business, Accounting, University of
Economics & Business                    Sydney, Faculty”
faculty site, inductry &
careers page


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                                        "University of Sydney, medicine, health, graduates,
Medicine faculty site, front            medical education, postgraduate, online learning,
page                                    problem based learning, phd, medical degree, medical
                                        school, anaesthesia, anatomy, histology, behavioural
                                        sciences in medicine, biochemistry, ophthalmology,
                                        experimental medicine, general practice, infectious
                                        diseases, obstetrics, gynaecology, paediatrics,
                                        pathology, pharmacology, physiology, psychology, public
                                        health, radiology, rural health, surgery, science."




Description
Aim: Summarise the function of the page in a sentence or two, so that in search engines
which show page desciptions, the right people will be attracted to your page.

Examples:

Site / Page                             Description
                                        "List of all faculties at the University of Sydney"
Main USYD site, faculties
page
                                        "The Faculty of Medicine at the University of Sydney:
Medicine faculty site, front            an overview of academic and research programs, news and
page                                    events. We are a Faculty on the move, responding to the
                                        evidence about what constitutes best educational
                                        practice, expanding our capacity in IT based
                                        communication and delivery, seeking new commercial
                                        partnerships in research development and for our
                                        educational products, and strongly committed to the
                                        improvement of health through direct leadership in
                                        clincal care and health policy development."

                                        "The Faculty of Science, University of Sydney,
Sceince faculty site, front             Australia. Discover.”
page
                                        "We offer 2 undergraduate degrees. At the graduate
Architecture faculty site,              level, we offer 14 coursework Masters, Diplomas and
front page                              Certificates. If you are interested in research, we
                                        offers Honours, MPhil and PhD degrees"




If your file is rejected
If your file is rejected, you’ll get an email letting you know PIC. The email should include a short
message from the Approver explaining why the file was rejected, such as spelling or factual errors.
You will also see an entry in the Tasks tab PIC for the rejected files, from which you can read the
comments from the Approver (Details or Comments tabs CONFIRM) or preview the files in
question (Files tab), as described in REF TO PREVIEW SECTION.

You need to address the reasons for the file being rejected before resubmitting the file for approval.
Depending on the reasons for the rejection, this may best be done by contacting the Approver to
discuss the matter with them, or by opening the file and making changes to the file.




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NOT SURE HOW TO WORK WITH REJECTED FILES- must one do something special from the
Tasks tab after Take, or is it enough to work on the file from File and then hit Submit as usual? If
so, what happens to the Tasks entry?

Resources for support, reference and further learning

CMS Phone / Email Support
     For phone or email support in using the CMS, please contact either your webmaster or the
     ITS Helpdesk:

         Ph: +61 2 9351 6000 (during business hours)
         Email: support@isu.usyd.edu.au (response within 2 business days)

CMS Built-In Help
              http://???/

CMS How-To pages
           http://???

CMS courses for authors and approvers
     Free courses in using the CMS are available through SSDU. For details, see:
     http://www.ssdu.usyd.edu.au/timetable.html

CMS courses for webmasters
     Contact the Online Services Delivery (OSD) team to organise training for CMS webmasters:
     Barb McLean, ph: +61 2 9351 5200, bmclean@usyd.edu.au


Glossary
For the latest version of this glossary, please see:
       http://www.mpg.usyd.edu.au/osd/about/glossary.shtml


Administrator
The owner of a branch, responsible for the websites being developed on it. An Administrator can
perform all the functions that an Author or an Editor can, and can also create and delete new sub-
branches and work areas on their branch. Administrators exercise control over workflow.
Advanced File Merging
TeamSite can automatically merge two separately modified versions of a file, producing a new file
containing the changes made by both Authors/Editors. Advanced File Merging is completely
automatic if the edits were made to different parts of the file (non-conflicting edits).
Approver
A workflow role. Workflow may nominate staff responsible for approving content before it is
deployed to the web.

Approvers are nominated staff members responsible for approving content before it is deployed to
the Web. This nominated staff member is someone aware of their Unit’s role and activities and of
the University’s legal responsibilities with regard to the publishing of information.

See also: Notify (p60)
Audience



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See User
Authentication
Authentication is the process of determining whether someone or something is, in fact, who or
what it is declared to be. Authentication for the portal is done through the Directory by the use of
UniKey (logon name and password). Logically, authentication precedes authorisation (although
they may often seem to be combined).
Author
Staff member who enters and maintains content using the Content Management System.
Authorisation
Authorisation is the process of giving someone permission to do or have something. The system
administrator defines for the system which users are allowed access to the system and what
privileges of use (such as access to which file directories, hours of access, amount of allocated
storage space, and so forth). Logically, authorization is preceded by authentication.
Branch
A single branch contains archived copies of the Web site as editions, a staging area for content
integration, and individual workareas where users may develop content without disturbing one
another. Branches can also contain sub-branches, so that teams may keep alternate paths of
development separate from each other. Content can easily be shared and synchronised across
branches and sub-branches. Users may work on one branch or on several. The number of
branches on a system is not limited. It is recommended that all development take place on sub-
branches because the main branch requires master privileges to administer. Also, as TeamSite at
the University is developing multiple web sites, development of one Web site on the main branch
and other web sites on sub-branches may create a false hierarchy of sub-branches to branch.
Browser
Computer software used to view and navigate documents on the Internet. Browsers supported by
the CMS include:
             On Windows OS - Netscape 4.7x and I.E. 5.0 to 5.5 and I.E. 6.0
             On UNIX OS - Netscape 4.7x
             On MacOS - I.E. 5.1

Business Support Model
The Business Support Model is the iterative methodology used by the Online Services Delivery
Team to rollout the TeamSite Content Management System across the University Web Presence.
CGI
The common gateway interface (CGI) is a standard way for a Web server to pass a Web user's
request to an application program and to receive data back to forward to the user. When the user
requests a Web page (for example, by clicking on a highlighted word or entering a Web site
address), the server sends back the requested page. However, when a user fills out a form on a
Web page and sends it in, it usually needs to be processed by an application program. The Web
server typically passes the form information to a small application program that processes the data
and may send back a confirmation message. This method or convention for passing data back and
forth between the server and the application is called the common gateway interface (CGI). It is
part of the Web's Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).
CMS
See Content Management System
Channel

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A role and area constrained set of information e.g. Student/News
Client Software
A client is the requesting program on the user's computer in a client/server relationship. The
computer handling the request and sending back the HTML file is a server.
Clients
See Community of Users
Community of Users
The AXS User Needs Analysis identified 20 University Communities:
    1. Prospective Students - Local
    2. Prospective Students - International
    3. Parents of Prospective Students
    4. School Principals/Careers Advisors
    5. Current Undergraduates
    6. Current Postgraduates
    7. Current Students enrolled in Non-Standard Teaching Periods
    8. Current Staff - Academic
    9. Visiting Staff - Academic
    10. Current Staff - General
    11. Current Staff - Contract
    12. Prospective Staff
    13. Alumni
    14. Benefactors/Donors
    15. Foundations/Charities
    16. Community
    17. Government Bodies
    18. Universities/Research Institutes
    19. Media
    20. Business

Configuration
Generally, a configuration is the arrangement - or the process of making the arrangement - of the
parts that make up a whole.
In installing hardware and software, configuration is the methodical process of defining options that
are provided.
In computers and computer networks, a configuration refers to the specific hardware and software
details in terms of devices attached, capacity or capability, and exactly what the system is made up
of.
In networks, a configuration means the network topology.
Consistent Sign on



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Password synchronisation allowing users to only have to remember one enterprise password to
gain access to multiple systems.
Content Creator
See Author
Content Inventory
See Information Architecture
Content Management System
Software that allows content owners to create and publish content (content may include documents,
files, reports, databases and applications) to the web without HTML knowledge, while allowing the
University through the Publications Office to maintain control over the site's look and feel by the
use of presentation templates. Templates are also used to insert metadata tags to improve the
response time and accuracy of the retrieval of content by a search engine.
Content Owner
Owner of section/sections of a website or channel/channels in a portal.
Content Provider
See Editor
Cookie
The term cookie refers to information sent from a web site to your computer's hard disk. Cookies
can contain information such as log-ins or registration information and user preferences. The
cookie is then sent back to the web server. Users must give permission for cookies to be saved for
them.
Cross Platform Deployment
Content is published to both NT server and UNIX server
CSS
Cascading style sheets (CSS) allow the development of Web pages from multiple sources to
increase the control over the display of a Web page rather than defaulting to that determined by
the browser. 3WC recommend the use of external CSS rather than embedded CSS - this permits
Disabled users to override and insert their own display style sheets.
DCR
See Data Capture Record
Data Capture Record
A type of file which may hold:
             Information which will be displayed on a web page (“copy”). Usually these DCRs are
              found in /templatedata/corporate/content/data/, or subfolders thereof. These DCRs are
              edited by Authors.
             A list of INC files to be compiled into a page. Usually these DCRs are found in
              /templatedata/corporate/pageBuilder/data/, or subfolders thereof. These DCRs are
              edited by Webmasters.

DCT
See Data Capture Template
Data Capture Template



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The type of template used by Authors in the TeamSite Content Management System to insert and
maintain Web content.
Deployment
The processes and practices by which web content that has been reviewed and approved is
copied from the Staging Area to Production Systems at the right location at the appropriate time.
See also Immediate Deployment, Open Deploy and Scheduled Deployment
DNS
The domain name system (DNS) is the way that Internet domain names are located and translated
into Internet Protocol addresses.
Domain
See Community of Users
Domain Name
The domain name is used to locate an entity on the Internet. The term refers to the complete
address, for example www.usyd.edu.au. It is also the part of your email address on the right of the
@ sign, for example intranet@isu.usyd.au.
Dynamic Content
Database-driven content.
Editor
A workflow role. Supplies content or instructions to an Author and edits and approves content
within a website. This role often overlaps with that of the Website Sponsor.
Fail Over
Fail over is a backup operational mode in which the functions of a system component are
undertaken by secondary system components when the primary component becomes unavailable
through either failure or scheduled down time. Used to make systems more fault-tolerant, fail over
is typically an integral part of mission-critical systems that must be constantly available. The
procedure involves automatically offloading tasks to a standby system component so that the
procedure is as seamless as possible to the end user.
Firewall
Firewall is a term used to describe the software and hardware used to separate a network from
other networks. Essentially, a firewall is microprocessor separates the actual computers that users
employ, and the outside world. This prevents devious parties from accessing or damaging
information held on the users' computers.
Front-Office
A MS Office interface to TeamSite that allows Authors and Editors to deploy content not only to the
Web but also to paper and other formats.
Global Navigation
See Navigation
HTML
HTML stands for "Hypertext Markup Language". This is the standard computer language used to
format, display, and link the information contained in web pages.
Home Page
The first and main page of any organisation presented on the World Wide Web. This provides a
virtual front door.


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ICQ
('I Seek You') is a program you can download that will let you know when employees, friends or
contacts are also online on the Internet. You can then page them and chat with them. You can
send messages, documents and files directly to your colleagues' desktops.
Immediate Deployment
If end-of-workflow deployment is enabled, web sites are immediately deployed from the Staging
Area to Production Systems.
INC
See “Include file”.
Include file (INC)
Include files, or INCs, are DCR files (p56) which have been processed by the Content
Management System to be ready for inclusion in webpages. Within the CMS, Server-Side Includes
(p62) are used by Webmasters to weave together several INC files to make a complete webpage.
Information Architecture (IA)
Website design of organization and navigation systems to help people find and manage
information more successfully.


             Information Architecture (IA) is the art and science of organizing information on a
              website to help people using that site to efficiently find the information they require.
              This statement implies that Information Architecture is comprised of 3 elements:
                       1. Users of the website
                       2. Web content
                       3. Website navigation


Java
Java is an object oriented programming language invented by Sun Microsystems. It was designed
for creating programs for the Internet. Programmers can create applications that run on a single
computer or many networked servers and clients. One of the main advantages of Java is that
programs written in Java can run on most operating systems. Java also facilitates the creation of
applets, which make it possible for a user to interact with a web page.
Job
A set of interdependent tasks. Each job is a specific instance of a workflow model.
LaunchPad
While TeamSite is a thin-client interface not requiring the installation of any other client software.
However in order to directly edit HTML files through TeamSite requires the installation of a utility
called LaunchPad.
LDAP Directory
LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is a software protocol for enabling anyone to locate
organizations, individuals and other resources such as files and devices in a network, whether on
the public Internet or on a corporate intranet.
License Agreement
A License Agreement is a legal contract between a software application Author or publisher and
the user of that application. The License Agreement, often referred to as the "software license," is
similar to a rental agreement; the user agrees to pay for the privilege of using the software, and


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promises the software Author or publisher to comply with all restrictions stated in the License
Agreement.
Load Balance
Load balancing is dividing the amount of work that a computer has to do between two or more
computers so that more work gets done in the same amount of time and, in general, all users get
served faster. There are several approaches to load balancing Web traffic. One approach is to
route each request in turn to a different server host address in a domain name system (DNS) table,
round-robin fashion. Usually, if two servers are used to balance a workload, a third server is
needed to determine which server to assign the work to. Since load balancing requires multiple
servers, it is usually combined with failover and backup services.
Locking
Restricting file access within a branch. Locking a file reduces the possibility of conflicting edits but
also reduces the team's ability to work on files simultaneously. Every time a file is locked, the
version in the Work Area is compared with the version in the Staging Area and the latest is taken
(although this can be overridden). The locking model is defined at the branch level by the
Administrator.
See also: Submit Locking, Optional Write Locking and Mandatory Write Locking.


Mandatory Write Locking
A type of Locking where Authors and Editors are required to lock a file in order to edit it. Until an
Author or Editor locks a file, all files in the Work Area are read only. Taking the Write Lock allows
only a single person to modify the file at a given time, ensuring serial development and eliminating
conflicting edits.
Merging
The process of reconciling conflicts between versions of a file that have been edited by two people.
The two versions can be merged in the Staging Area to produce a new version of the file,
incorporating changes made by both Authors/Editors. Merging can be automated with TeamSite's
Advanced File Merging.
Metadata
Information about a document added to the search engine to improve speed and accuracy of
document retrieval e.g. the 15 core data tags of Dublin Core - title, author, subject or keywords,
description, publisher, date, etc.)
Meta Directory
The University of Sydney has purchased the Sun ONE Meta-Directory to consolidate and integrate
identity information spread throughout the University into a single profile. The Meta-Directory will
also help to improve the quality of information within the diverse applications through bi-directional
synchronization. When changes to an identity are made to one application, other University
applications are automatically updated.
Navigation
The University of Sydney has adopted the practice of having multiple methods of navigation
around the University Web Presence:
             Global Navigation (on the top right e.g. Home, Search, Site Map, etc.)
             Breadcrumbs (on the top left - clicks away from Home)
             Tabs (across the top under Global Navigation and Breadcrumbs)
             Menu (down the left hand side of the page)



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             Related Links (down the right hand side of the page)

Notify
A workflow role. Email notification should be set to on by default with an option to turn-off at the
beginning of workflow. The Author/Editor will always receive email notification when any of the
Approvers reject or when there is a timeout. Instead of holding up deployment of web content
waiting for content approval, the workflow process may specify staff to be notified of newly
deployed web content.
Object Oriented Programming
Object oriented programming refers to a method of computer programming in which independent
pieces of code are created to interact with each other. Java is an example of an object oriented
programming language.
Open Deploy
The Open Deploy facility in TeamSite automates the entire distribution process, eliminating
traditionally manual, customized, inefficient distribution processes. It ensures that code and content
reflected in applications are accurate, secure and easily synchronized between different websites
and/or website and hard copy.
Operating System
An operating system is the program installed within a computer that manages all the other
programs or applications run on that computer. The term operating system is often abbreviated to
'OS'.

TeamSite (vanilla) uses the following OS:
             Windows 98, NT, 2000 and XP
             UNIX only with Netscape 4.7x
             MacOS only with Internet Explorer 5.1

TeamSite Front-Office requires the following OS:
             Windows 98
             Windows NT 4 with Service Pack 5 or later
             Windows 2000
             Windows XP

Optional Write Locking
The type of Locking in which Authors and Editors can choose to lock a file to ensure no other users
edit the file, even within their own Work Areas. When an Author or Editor locks a file in this fashion
it becomes read-only to all other Author or Editors. Optional Write Locking ensures serial
development of files and reduces the risk of conflicting edits.
Owner
See Content Owner
Permissions
In TeamSite, security is achieved by limiting access by the use of native operating system file and
directory permissions.
Portal


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Portals are websites targeted at specific community of users. They provide the potential for content
aggregation and delivery, personalisation, collaboration and self-service to encourage the
development of electronic communities.
Portlet
Portlets are the application building blocks of a portal, are in many ways very much like Windows
applications. A Windows application presents its data in a window. A portlet also presents its data
in a window-like display. The title bar of a Windows application contains controls that let users
expand (maximize), and shrink (minimize) the application. Portlets have title bars and similar
controls.
Presentation Template
In addition to Data Capture Templates, TeamSite allows for Presentation Templates. Presentation
Templates wrap around DCTs and ensure a consistent look and feel providing the University with
two advantages:
Consistent branding
Predictability of how to use a site
Publish
See Deployment
Re-authentication
The Enterprise Directory Service will store authorisation information about University students and
staff; it will also store security/access information for University systems. This means that once the
user has established their identity they will automatically be provided with their appropriate system
access - they will not have to login to multiple systems, and if their system times-out, they will only
have to confirm their login. See also Single Signon
Response Time
The elapsed time between the end of an inquiry or demand on a computer system and the
beginning of a response; for example, the length of the time between an indication of the end of an
inquiry and the display of the first character of the response at a user terminal.
Role
A subcategory of Community of Users e.g. Current Undergraduates in the Faculty of Science
Rollback
Ability to pick a recent known good version of the website or portal and to reset the production site
to that state.
Scalable
A scalable network can support growth without having to be radically redesigned. It can handle
both the addition of users, network nodes or sites and the addition of new applications with
increased bandwidth needs.
Scheduled Deployment
Deployment to Production Systems from the Staging Area may be scheduled to occur on a specific
date and time.
Secondary Navigation
The horizontal panel at the top of the web page that contains important site links.
Security



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Security involves ensuring that private information stays that way. It also entails protecting your
computer from viruses. The use of passwords, anti-virus software and firewalls are three examples
of common security measures.
Server-Side Include
A server-side include, or SSI, is a variable value (for example, a file "Last modified" date) that a
server can include in an HTML file before it sends it to the requestor. You can think of a server-side
include as a limited form of common gateway interface application. In fact, the CGI is not used.
The server simply searches the server-side include file for CGI environment variables, and inserts
the variable information in the places in the file where the "include" statements have been inserted.
Session
A session is a series of interactions between two communication end points that occur during the
span of a single connection.
Session Management
Session Management manages the server-side objects of:
             Client - encapsulates information about a client/application pair, allowing that
              information to last longer than a single HTTP request
             Lock - provides functionality for safely sharing data among requests, clients, and
              applications
             Project - encapsulates information about an application that lasts until the application is
              stopped on the server
             Request - encapsulates information about a single HTTP request
             Server - encapsulates global information about the server that lasts until the server is
              stopped

Single Signon
Single signon is a session/user authentication process that permits a user to enter one name and
password in order to access multiple applications. The single signon, which is requested at the
initiation of the session, authenticates the user to access all the applications they have been given
the rights to on the server, and eliminates future authentication prompts when the user switches
applications during that particular session.
Software Development Life Cycle
The typical stages of Software Development Life Cycle include Analysis, Design, Implementation,
Data Conversion, Testing, Training, Post Implementation Review and ongoing maintenance.
Sponsor
See Website Sponsor
SSI
See Server-Side Include
Staging Area
The Staging Area holds a copy of web sites before they are deployed to Production. Approved
              content is submitted from Work Areas to the Staging Area for:
             compilation of version information (the person submitting content to the Staging Area,
              the work area, the submission time and comments), and
             deployment to production



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Each Branch has its own Staging Area.
See also: Immediate Deployment Scheduled Deployment
Static Website
Static websites are websites that act as online or electronic brochures. They display University
information and services with a combination of images, logos and text. Whilst they do not provide
ecommerce facilities or searchable databases, they can provide your existing and potential
students and staff with important information about the University and can be produced at low cost.
Student
"A student is a person who is enrolled in an official Award or Non Award course at the University,
including undergraduates, postgraduates by coursework and research, International students,
Summer and Winter School students, exchange students from other institutions and University of
Sydney students on exchange programs. Continuing education and professional development
students should obtain information from websites not the portal, because they are not official
"students" of the University. Students doing non-standard teaching period units are necessarily
"official students" of the University since they are enrolled as Award or Non award students." David
Bowan, Director Student Centre
Sub-branch
A branch subordinate to a major branch. To separate development efforts among teams or team
members, an Administrator can create sub-branches. The sub-branch receives its own unique
staging area and workareas and generates its own editions. Editions published on a sub-branch
can be integrated back into work on a higher branch, or released as standalone web sites.
Submit
A term to describe movement through the Workflow process:
from Author to Editor/Website Sponsor
from Work Area to Staging Area
Submit Locking
A type of locking in which Authors and Editors can choose to lock a file to ensure that their
changes will be submitted to the Staging Area. While a file is locked, other Authors and Editors can
edit their own version of the locked file within their Work Area, but they cannot submit to the
Staging Area. Once the lock holder has released the file lock, other users can merge their
modifications with the new file version.
Task
A unit of work performed by a single user or process. Each task in a job is associated with a
particular work area and carries a set of files with it.
TeamSite
TeamSite is the name of the enterprise-wide Content Management System used at the University
of Sydney. It allows University Authors and Editors to select the TeamSite variation appropriate for
their situation:
             WebDeskPro
             WebDesk
             FrontOffice
             VisualFormat

Template
Within a Content Management System templates:


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             enable Authors to maintain web content without requiring them to use a web authoring
              tool (data entry template)
             wrap web content with an adopted "look and feel"
             attach metadata to web content

Timeout
Each task in the workflow will have a timeout. The task will revert back to the author/editor after a
designated period has passed without any action. The person who initiates the job will have the
ability to change the default timeout period for the job. The timeouts will be in the number of
elapsed days. All steps within a given job will have the same timeouts. The timeouts will be in
effect and cannot be changed throughout the 'life' of the workflow
University Web Presence
The University Web Presence is comprised of every website containing "usyd.edu.au" somewhere
in its address. This does not equate with the Corporate Website, which are all the pages at that
address maintained by the Publications Office.
URL
Universal Resource Location, the address of a Web page.
User
An individual member of a Community of Users (p55).
Utility
A utility is a small program that provides an addition to the capabilities provided by the operating
system.
Versioning
Capturing a snapshot of the website
VisualFormat
VisualFormat is a WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) html editor which is available
through TeamSite templating environment and allows content Authors to easily create web content
without needing to know HTML.
WebDesk
Web interface to TeamSite for Authors only
WebDesk Pro
Web-based interface to TeamSite for Authors, Editors, Administrators and Content Owners.
Webmaster
A technical member of staff responsible for the server, software and deployment of the site
Website Owner
See Website Sponsor
Website Sponsor
Member of staff who owns/controls a website and the workflow to add, maintain and withdraw
content
Work Area
An independent copy of web content used to add, remove and modify web content. CMS allows
multiple work areas


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Workflow
The automation of a business process, in whole or part, during which web content is passed from
one participant to another for action (review and/or approval), according to a set of procedural rules
- a virtual assembly line. Activities in the Workflow process take place in the Work Area. Once
approval is achieved, content is submitted to the Staging Area for Deployment.
WYSIWYG
Pronounced 'wizzywig', this term means 'what you see is what you get'. Essentially it means that
what you see on your screen when working with a document is what you will have on paper when
you print the document.




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