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					                             IMPACT   IMPACT for
                                      Administrators:
                                      A Resource for
                                      Evaluating Media
                                      and Technology
                                      Programs and
                                      Personnel




      September 2001
Instructional Technologies Division
Public Schools of North Carolina
State Board of Education
Department of Public Instruction
 IMPACT                                 for Administrators
                     A Resource for Evaluating Media and Technology
                                           Programs and Personnel




       September, 2001
Instructional Technology Division
Public Schools of North Carolina
State Board of Education
Department of Public Instruction
             ubl                                  aro
                                                 Car in
           P ubl i c S c h o o l s o f N o r t h Car o l i n a
            State Board of Education                                          Department of Public Instruction
            Phillip J. Kirk, Jr., Chairman                                    Michael E. Ward, State Superintendent

            www.ncpublicschools.org




                                                   July 19, 2001

North Carolina Administrators:

It is with great pleasure that I commend to you IMPACT: Guidelines for School Library Media
and Instructional Technology Programs. The acknowledgement of the equal importance of
both the school library media and the instructional technology programs in teaching and
learning is the premise of these guidelines.

We know that school library media and instructional technology programs are the foundation
of a twenty-first century education. The access to information that they afford makes the
difference between the textbook-bound classroom of the past and the far-reaching, resource-
based curriculum of today and tomorrow. Research tells us that instructional technology, used
appropriately, results in higher test scores. It is remarkably effective in sparking student
interest, increasing motivation, and raising self-esteem, thus positively impacting student
achievement. Research also tells us that a school library media center stocked with up-to-date,
accurate, and attractive resources managed by a professional media coordinator who
collaborates with teachers to augment and enhance classroom instruction also results in
increased test scores, especially in reading. IMPACT reflects both the reality of this research
and the commitment to assuring that every teacher and student has the academic and
personal advantage of access to these high quality programs.

School library media and instructional technology programs and the resources they promote
are central to the success of North Carolina’s ABCs of Public Education—in fact, to all school
reform initiatives throughout the state. IMPACT and the excellence it fosters are a part of the
vision and accountability necessary to produce schools that are First in America.




                                                                 Michael E. Ward
                                                                 State Superintendent of Public Instruction



                 301 N. Wilmington Street, Raleigh, North Carolina 27601-2825            IMPACT for Administrators
                                     Telephone (919) 807-3300                                                Page 1
                           An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
IMPACT for Administrators
Page 2
                                                                                     Overview




Welcome to IMPACT for Administrators: A Resource for Evaluating Media and Technology
Programs. This document is a companion document to IMPACT: Guidelines for School
Library Media and Instructional Technology Programs that each of North Carolina’s school
library media coordinators and instructional technology facilitators reference regularly.
Both versions of IMPACT are part of the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s
overall vision for media and technology. Each recognizes that effective school library media
and instructional technology programs are the infrastructure that supports both teaching
and learning. These programs are the key to making education relevant to a knowledge-
based society and its economy. IMPACT is aligned to Information Power: Building Partner-
ships for Learning, the national standards for media and technology programs. Based on
media and technology research and reflecting the recommendations of the revised School
Technology Plan (2000-2005), IMPACT acknowledges the importance of staffing each school
in North Carolina with both a school library media coordinator and an instructional technol-
ogy facilitator.
The design of IMPACT for Administrators reflects a commitment to provide a roadmap for
understanding and evaluating an integrated media and technology program. Explanations
and checklists of the major program components, as well as assessment rubrics and instru-
ments to assist in the evaluation of media and technology programs and personnel, reflect
everyone’s goal of schools so effective that they are First in America by 2010.
As school administrators, you realize that the public is beginning to understand the link
between media and technology programs and services and a high quality education. Un-
derstanding the elements of these programs and how to evaluate their effectiveness is
essential to your school’s success. IMPACT for Administrators is a tool that will help you and
your media and technology personnel work together to plan and build effective, compre-
hensive teaching and learning environments for the 21st century. We hope you enjoy the
challenge!




                                                    Frances Bryant Bradburn, Director
                                                    Division of Instructional Technologies




                                                                           IMPACT for Administrators
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IMPACT for Administrators
Page 4
                                                                                             Introduction



Through the North Carolina State Board of Education’s Strategic Plan for Excel-
lent Schools, every child has the opportunity to achieve at his or her highest
potential in the fast-paced, ever-changing environment of the 21st Century. The
rapid advance of technology requires that all educators continually upgrade
their skills, knowledge, and perspectives.                                          “The challenge facing
                                                                                    America’s schools is the
                                                                                    empowerment of all
Media and technology programs are the centerpiece of education. Teachers are        children to function
no longer “the sage on the stage” but, rather, teachers and students work           effectively in their
together to answer the questions they encounter on their educational journey.       future, a future marked
They cannot take this journey, however, without understanding how information       increasingly with
is organized and that technology is a portal for learning. The necessity for        change, information
information literacy to be a part of a child’s education demands that library       growth, and evolving
media coordinators and instructional technology facilitators serve as teacher and   technologies.”
student travel guides on this eye-opening journey of learning.                               (National Educational
                                                                                         Technology Standards for
                                                                                             Students: Connecting
                                                                                       Curriculum and Technology
                                                                                                          2000, xi)
IMPACT for Administrators: A Resource for Evaluating Media
and Technology Programs and Personnel is a companion docu-
ment to IMPACT: Guidelines for School Library Media and Instructional
Technology Programs. Both documents provide the set of standards
upon which North Carolina’s library media coordinators and instruc-
tional technology facilitators—and their programs—should be evalu-
ated. National, state, and professional standards are reflected in the
development of this document.The recommendations on programs,
personnel, budgets, resources, and facilities that follow will guide you
as you build a resource-rich learning environment for your school.


IMPACT for Administrators: A Resource for Evaluating Media                          “Information literacy—
and Technology Programs and Personnel will help you meet the                        the ability to find and
educational challenge facing North Carolina schools in the new                      use information- is the
millennium: having a school library media and instructional technology              keystone of lifelong
program that will                                                                   learning.
                                                                                             (AASL & AECT 1998, 1)
                  IMPACT teaching,
                    IMPACT learning,
                      IMPACT motivation, and
                        IMPACT student achievement.




                                                                                    IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                           Page 5
The Role of Media and Technology in Teaching and Learning



                                 The use of technology as a learning tool can make a significant difference in
                                 student achievement as measured by standardized tests.
                                 (Mann et al., 1999)

                                 Research reported by Keith Curry Lance establishes that “higher academic
                                 achievement is associated with:
                                 •       Library Media programs that are staffed to play an integral
                                         role in the school (minimally, at least one library media specialist
                                         with one aide),
                                 •       Principal support of the library media program in collabora-
“Studies demonstrate                     tion with classroom teachers and the library media specialist,
consistently that well-          •       Information technology that extends the reach of the library
equipped, quality                        media program into the school’s classrooms and labs, and
school library media             •       A well-organized, formally requested budget adequate to
centers that have                        support these conditions.”
professional staff                                          (Library Research Service 1999, http://www.lrs.org/docu-
involved in instruction                                     ments/fastfacts/164proof.pdf )
contribute to the
academic success of
their students.”                 Media and Technology programs should incorporate collaboration, information
     (Lance, et al. 2000, 28)    access, staff development, and public relations, all of which contribute to the
                                 success of teaching and learning. These programs should provide resources and
                                 up-to-date technology to support and enrich the curriculum. A learner-centered
                                 approach to instruction incorporates Media and Technology programs as vital
                                 instructional forces that expand, support, and complement classroom learning.
                                 The North Carolina Standard Course of Study outlines both the Information Skills
“Both higher order uses          Curriculum and the Computer Skills Curriculum, which form the core for both
of technology and                school library media and instructional technology programs.
expenditures for library
materials support                Books and computer hardware alone do not create information-literate citizens.
student achievement.”            Print and electronic resources provide the foundation for an information-rich,
      (Lance, et al. 2000, 28)   technology-rich learning environment. Media and Technology programs must
                                 provide not only print and electronic resources, but they must also create an
                                 environment that is readily accessible so that students
                                 and staff can effectively use these materials to
                                 support and enhance the curriculum and contrib-
                                 ute to student achievement. The “explosion of
                                 new information” necessitates that both the
                                 media coordinator and the instructional
                                 technology facilitator play an active role in
                                 the teaching and learning process.




IMPACT for Administrators
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                            The Role of Media and Technology in Teaching and Learning



Although the ultimate responsibility for the integration of information skills and
computer skills into the instructional program rests with media and technology
professionals, an effective instructional program relies on their collaboration
with teachers, administrators, students, support staff, and parents, all working
together to support desired outcomes for students. This collaboration impacts
teaching and learning by supporting the instructional process through planning,
implementation, and evaluation. Instructional units developed through collabo-
ration expand classroom walls to encompass the media center, the computer
lab, and resources beyond the school. In this way, students become self-
directed lifelong learners, complex thinkers, quality producers, collaborative
workers, and community contributors.


Together, Media and Instructional Technology Personnel and Instruc-
tional Staff:
•        plan and deliver collaborative lessons and/or collaborative instruc-
         tional units.
•        evaluate and determine, cooperatively, instructional outcomes on
         product content and relevant information, as well as technology
         literacy skills.
•        ensure that instruction takes place in a student-centered, project-
         based environment.
•        plan projects and activities that are relevant to real-life situations.
•        support the development of critical thinking and problem-solving
         skills.
•        create small group activities to accomplish curriculum goals and
         objectives.
•        focus on reading as the key to life-long learning.
•        involve students in setting their individual learning goals.
•        guide students to create rubrics for project evaluation.
•        create and share a file or database of collaboratively developed
         lesson plans and related resources.
•        identify lesson plans and successful teaching models in other
         schools, at conferences, and in the professional literature.

School library media and instructional technology personnel should be involved
in all aspects of curriculum implementation in order to achieve instructional
goals.

Media and Instructional Technology Personnel:
•      deliver (with instructional staff ) collaborative lessons or instructional
       units.
•      address different learning styles by using and recommending high-
       quality resources in a variety of formats.
•      provide information and resources related to the best available
       models of instruction.


                                                                                     IMPACT for Administrators
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The Role of Media and Technology in Teaching and Learning



                                  •        provide a variety of reading resources and programs (such as
                                           Sustained Silent Reading) to support the state-wide, school-wide
                                           emphasis on reading.
                                  •        participate in the evaluation of product content in collaboration with
                                           classroom teachers by focusing on relevant information and technol-
                                           ogy literacy skills.
                                  •        demonstrate knowledge of the North Carolina Standard Course of
                                           Study for all subject areas and relevant grade levels.
                                  •        collaborate with teachers to infuse media and technology into
                                           instruction across all subject areas and relevant grade levels.
                                  •        serve on the school improvement team and other school-based
                                           committees.
                                  •        reflect the goals of the school improvement plan in instruction and
                                           in the acquisition of resources.
                                  •        collaborate with teachers to help analyze test data to improve
                                           instruction.
                                  •        participate in grade level/departmental meetings.


                                  Flexible Access

                                  Flexible access allows any student, teacher, or staff member to access the school
“In a student-centered            library media center and the computer lab and their resources when needed.
library media program,            The goal is to make the resources of the school library media center and the
learning needs to take            computer lab available when they are needed to support, supplement, and
precedence over class             enhance teaching and learning, thus impacting student achievement. This
schedules, school                 enables the school library media coordinator and the instructional technology
hours, student categori-          facilitator to plan with teachers and staff for instructional purposes.
zations, and other
logistical concerns.”             Flexible access is beneficial to the learner. Lessons taught and learned in the
         (AASL & AECT 1999, 89)   school library media center and computer lab must not be separate from what is
                                  taught and learned in the classroom. Multiple activities can successfully co-exist,
                                  and more than one grade level or class can access resources simultaneously.
                                  Flexible access helps create an environment in which students can become
                                  excited about learning and are able and eager to complete assignments. It also
“Scheduling students              gives full visibility to the creative capabilities of media and technology profes-
in the computer lab is            sionals.
always a challenge...The
challenge is to provide           The implementation of flexible access is a dynamic process that usually evolves
more computers and                through several stages. In the first stage, media and technology professionals
the same kind of access           meet occasionally with classroom teachers to plan cooperatively. There may be
to technology tools as            a combination of fixed classes, as well as times for open access. At the next
to paper and pencils.”            stage, media and technology professionals meet with teachers on a regular basis
            (Reksten 2000, 126)   to plan learning experiences, and there are no fixed times for instruction in the
                                  media center or computer lab. At the highest level of implementation, formal
                                  units of instruction are collaboratively planned, implemented, and evaluated. At
                                  this stage, media and technology professionals may also co-teach with class-
                                  room teachers.

IMPACT for Administrators
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                           The Role of Media and Technology in Teaching and Learning



With flexible access:
•       students access the media center for circulation at any time during
        the day.
•       students move freely to the media center and computer lab for
        research and to use software applications.
•       students from more than one classroom use the media center or
        computer lab simultaneously.
•       media and technology staff cooperatively plan with teachers or          “...when a library media
        instructional teams for the use of media and technology resources.      specialist spends more
•       information and computer skills are integrated into classroom           time in collaboration
        instruction through collaborative lessons or units.                     and leadership activi-
•       media and technology staff deliver instruction to students to meet      ties student academic
        various learning styles.                                                achievement is posi-
•       students are provided opportunities for instruction that is delivered   tively impacted.”
                                                                                (Library Research Service 2001,
        one-to-one, in small groups, or in whole-class settings.                      http://www.lrs.org/docu-
•       students may use the media center and computer lab before and                          ments/fastfacts/
        after school.                                                                          174lmcstaff.pdf )
•       media and technology professionals move in and out of the media
        center or computer lab and into the classroom as needed to support
        teaching and learning.




                                                                                IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                       Page 9
Information Access and Delivery



                            The quality and effectiveness of Media and Technology programs depend on the
                            ability of media and technology professionals to provide equal access to
                            resources and to deliver information in a variety of formats in order to support
                            the diverse needs of students and teachers. For example, the most current
                            information on a topic may be located through dynamically updated and
                            authoritative electronic subscription information sources or on the Internet.
                            Print resources, however, can offer information that has been researched and
                            aggregated into a readily accessible format. Media and technology professionals
                            have a responsibility to assist teachers and students in identifying and using the
                            most appropriate format for a given learning activity.

                            Resources that are available within the school should be catalogued and housed
                            in the school library media center. Curriculum-related information sources
                            available electronically via the Internet may be bookmarked or made available
                            for access in some other way. The technology facilitator should assure that
                            instructional technology resources are organized and easily accessed through
                            the school technology infrastructure.

                            An effective, dynamic school library media and technology collection is:
                            •       assessed to determine the needs of faculty and students.
                            •       updated regularly with new resources (including Internet-based
                                    resources) and equipment, following an established selection policy.
                            •       kept current by discarding older, less appropriate items.
                            •       well organized and easily accessible to users.
                            •       inventoried annually.

                            Adequate and reliable technology:
                            •     meets state standards for infrastructure (See North Carolina School
                                  Technology Plan:Technical Recommendations and Standards, http://
                                  tps.dpi.state.nc.us/techstandard/).
                            •     supports licensed network and desktop software.
                            •     supports online reference resources.
                            •     supports online media automation systems.


                            School facilities should accommodate numerous functions related to the
                            support of teaching and learning. Dynamic Media and Technology programs
                            directly support instruction and require space for diverse learning activities,
                            resources, equipment, technical functions, and program services.

                            The infusion of technology into the instructional program influences the design
                            and renovation of media and technology facilities in order to accommodate
                            school-wide networks and to allow access to information sources within the
                            school library media center, computer labs, classrooms, and administrative areas
                            through networking and telecommunications.




IMPACT for Administrators
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                                                                     Information Access and Delivery



Expanded hours of operation beyond the regular school day and year may be an
outgrowth of programs that endeavor to meet the personal information needs
of students and adults within the school and the local community. To extend this
opportunity, accessibility to the media and technology facilities from outside the
school plant is a primary consideration.

To be effective, media and technology facilities should incorporate principles
of good design within functional areas.

Media and technology facilities are:
•      located near instructional areas.
•      accessible for students with special needs.
•      accessible for use beyond school hours.
•      inviting and aesthetically pleasing.
•      ergonomically furnished to prevent physical strain and injury.
•      designed to provide appropriate lighting.
•      designed to provide adequate acoustics.
•      designed to provide adjustable climate control.
•      designed to provide adequate electrical service to meet the
       needs of the technical infrastructure.
•      designed to provide data, voice, and video infrastructure.
•      designed to provide appropriate furnishings and equipment to
       ensure maximum safety and accessibility for all users.

School-wide Technology Spaces include:
•      classrooms equipped with multimedia computers for student use,
       a designated teacher workstation, a printer, and a projection
       device.
•      a multimedia center equipped with a multimedia computer,
       digital camera, and scanner available for every five classrooms.
•      a multimedia computer lab accessible to classrooms and preferably
       adjacent to the school library media center.
•      a secure and climate-controlled network server area housing the
       building’s computer network services, telephone infrastructure, and
       video/television delivery system.

School Library Media Center Spaces have individual areas for:
•       Large-group instruction
•       Reference
•       Story sharing
•       Independent work
•       Small group activity
•       Informal reading
•       Production
•       Darkroom

                                                                                     IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                      Page 11
Information Access and Delivery



                            •       Periodical storage
                            •       Administration and planning
                            •       Circulation
                            •       Automated catalog
                            •       Professional resources
                            •       Parent resources
                            •       Workroom
                            •       Equipment storage, distribution, and maintenance
                            •       Display and exhibit

                            Multimedia Computer Labs have individual areas for:
                            •      Large-group instruction (sufficient networked multimedia comput-
                                   ers to accommodate the largest class)
                            •      Independent work
                            •      Small-group activity
                            •      Teacher workstation
                            •      Work area
                            •      Storage spaces for software and supplies
                            •      Multimedia data/video projection device
                            •      Screen




IMPACT for Administrators
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                                                                                    Program Administration




The development and implementation of effective Media and Technology
programs depend on the application of good management principles, strong
interpersonal skills, and a vision of the importance of the programs in fostering
life-long learning.

Effective programs are evidenced by administrative principles that
include:
•        Short-term and long-term planning
•        Adequate staffing
•        Effective budgeting
•        Established policies and procedures
•        Building-level and community support


Short-term and Long-term Planning

An effective Media and Technology program relies on planning, both short-term
and long-term. These plans must be based on the mission of the school,
program objectives, and policies adopted by the local school board and school.
Short-term plans should be in place for efforts that need approximately a year or
less to complete. They can also be used for making minor changes, solving
problems, and covering smaller scale expenditures. Long-term plans, on the
other hand, provide vision and direction for a two-to five-year period and for
planning major changes or acquisitions that require large expenditures. Effec-
tive student-centered media and technology programs are based on careful
planning by the Media and Technology Advisory Committee.

Media and Technology Advisory Committee

An active Committee can:
•       strengthen the Media and Technology program and, in turn,
        strengthen the total instructional program.
•       promote positive relationships among media and technology
        personnel, teachers, students, and administrators.
•       serve as a line of communication between the school and the
        community.
•       assist in maintaining a balanced collection of resources and equipment.
•       bring technical expertise and resources into the school (e.g., parent
        and community members).

Media and Technology Advisory Committee Responsibilities:
•      Set goals and priorities (for example: encourage the integration of
       information and computer skills into classroom instruction through
       collaborative planning).
•      Handle challenges to instructional materials according to Board-
       approved policy.

                                                                                         IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                          Page 13
Program Administration



                            •        Identify and recommend resources, based on the Board-approved
                                     selection policy, to meet the curriculum and individual needs of
                                     students and staff.
                            •        Identify and recommend hardware based on recommendations and
                                     standards in the North Carolina Educational Technology Plan.
                            •        Work with system-level technology staff to identify and recommend
                                     infrastructure.
                            •        Advocate for the Media and Technology program by:
                                     •         helping to solve problems (for example: providing security
                                               for after-hours access to the media center and computer
                                               lab).
                                     •         promoting initiatives (for example: implementing a school-
                                               wide Sustained Silent Reading program or using state-wide
                                               resources such as NC WISEOWL).
                                     •         communicating expectations (for example: what teachers
                                               can expect from the media program and what media and
                                               technology professionals expect from teachers).
                                     •         evaluating program effectiveness (for example: devising
                                               student and staff satisfaction surveys).

                            Active involvement of the Media and Technology Committee in any project
                            leads to better awareness, support, and commitment to Media and Technology
                            programs. In large schools, this committee may need to be two separate
                            committees; one that is a Technology Advisory Committee and one that is a
                            Media Advisory Committee. Whether the committees are combined or sepa-
                            rate, they should include both the instructional technology facilitator and the
                            school library media coordinator and be chaired by one or both of these
                            professionals.

                            In addition, committee membership would include the following:
                            •       Principal
                            •       Representative from each grade level or department
                            •       Representative from special areas
                            •       Parent representative
                            •       Student representative (at the middle and high school levels)


See the Personnel Chart     Staffing the Media and Technology Program
on page 36 to identify      A variety of skilled and trained personnel in both media and technology are
the basic level of          necessary to move educational institutions into the twenty-first century and
qualified personnel to      confront the challenges of the electronic information age. Only with skilled and
help ensure exemplary       trained media and technology personnel can schools effectively use resources
Media and Technology        to support and enhance the curriculum and contribute to student achievement.
programs within a           Staffing patterns at the building level depend upon the population of the school,
school.                     facilities, amount and type of equipment, the curriculum, and special programs.
                            The basic level of qualified personnel listed on page 36 can help ensure
                            exemplary Media and Technology programs within a school.

IMPACT for Administrators
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                                                                                            Program Administration



Budgeting for Media and Technology Programs
As the financial component of program planning, budgeting should begin with                      “‘A variety of research
the overall goals of a school’s instructional program, and these goals should be                 studies indicate that
reflected in the budget’s priorities and details. Effective implementation of                    funding for school
learning and instructional management technologies occurs when the funding                       library media center
program is continuous, ensuring the development of high-quality, long-range                      resources has direct
plans.                                                                                           impact upon student
                                                                                                 learning, especially
Budgeting is a collaborative effort. It needs the support of teachers, administra-               upon reading and
tors, students, and the community. Resources purchased for school-wide use                       writing test scores.’
should be housed in the media center to ensure equity of access and the most                              (Lance, 1992/1999)
effective use of limited funds. Acting in their leadership roles, the instructional
technology facilitator and the school library media coordinator seek the support                 The economic value of
of these groups and use school and community public relations strategies to:                     well-equipped, flexibly
•         ensure that budget requests are presented and considered within                        accessed school library
          the appropriate context of program goals and objectives.                               media centers has been
•         heighten awareness of the need for a wide variety of up-to-date                        validated by The Places
          resources and infrastructure to extend and enrich learning opportu-                    Rated Almanac (1998)
          nities.                                                                                and School Match. (NPR,
                                                                                                 1992) .”
                                                                                                    (North Carolina Educational
                                                                                                   Technology Plan 2001-2005,
Budgets Should Reflect:                                                                               http://tps.dpi.state.nc.us/
•      the overall mission of the school.                                                                        techplan2000)

•      long-range and short-range goals and objectives of the school.
•      assessments of specific needs.
•      teaching methodologies and student learning styles.
•      strengths and weaknesses of existing informational and instructional
       resources.
•      regional and state accreditation standards.
•      state and national guidelines and standards.
                                                                                                 “Schools can make
•      priorities set by the Media and Technology Advisory Committee in                          better computer
       conjunction with teacher and student recommendations.                                     purchasing decisions if
•      necessary cycle of replacement and updating of materials and                              they reconcile TCO with
       equipment.                                                                                educational value and
•      average cost of items.                                                                    acknowledge that,
•      total cost of ownership (TCO)                                                             ultimately, educational
                  (see http://tps.dpi.state.nc.us/techplan2000/techplan2000.html#Budget).        value factors will
                                                                                                 outweigh pure cost-
                                                                                                 based considerations.”
                                                                                                   (International Data Corpora-
                                                                                                               tion 1997, http://
                                                                                                   www.apple.com/education/
                                                                                                        k12/leadership/LSWTF/
                                                                                                                      IDC.html)




                                                                                                 IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                                       Page 15
Program Administration



                            Policies and Procedures

                            Policies are powerful tools for shaping the quality of Media and Technology
                            programs. Building-level policies must align with local Board-approved policies.
                            The policies listed below are recommended for every school.

                            •        Materials and Equipment Selection Policy
                                              Policy, procedures, criteria, and strategies that should guide
                                              schools in selecting and maintaining media and technology
                                              resources, including handling challenges to the use of
                                              resources
                            •        Accessibility Policy
                                              Policies, procedures, criteria, and strategies that address the
                                              accessibility of a school’s equipment and resources
                            •        Copyright Policy
                                              Guidelines that help schools understand and comply with
                                              copyright laws for a variety of media and technology
                                              formats
                            •        Acceptable Use (AUP)
                                              Guidelines for the appropriate use of the Internet and e-
                                              mail, incorporating CIPA regulations if appropriate
                            •        Web Site Development
                                              Policies, procedures, criteria, and strategies that guide
                                              schools in the creation of student, teacher, and school Web
                                              sites




IMPACT for Administrators
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                                                                                    Program Administration



The following system-level policies and procedures are recommended in the
North Carolina State Technology Plan.

•        Equipment/Materials Donation Policy
                   Procedures for dealing with equipment and materials that
                   have been donated to the school
•        Replacement of Obsolete Equipment Policy
                   Procedures for the sale and disposal of outdated equipment
                   and guidelines for replacement of such equipment
•        Inventory Control Policy
                   Guidelines for the inventory control of fixed assets
•        Data Privacy Policy
                   Procedures for compliance with the Family Educational
                   Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (The Buckley Amendment,
                   20 U.S.C. S123g and 34 C.F.R. Part 99), governing the rights
                   of individuals to inspect and review, contest the accuracy of,
                   and control access to student educational records
•        Translation Policy
                   Procedures for the translation of policies into the languages
                   of the school system’s diverse student populations
•        Deployment Procedures
                   Guidelines for the distribution of electronic resources, both
                   software and hardware


Building Support for Vision and Programs

It is important that the vision of Media and Technology programs reflect the
instructional mission of the school. Because Media and Technology programs
support the total instructional program of the school, it is especially important
that media and technology staff assume leadership for communicating the
vision for their programs within the school and in the community.

Building Support within the School
In their book, The School Library Media Specialist’s Tool Kit, Richard C. Pearson
and Mary C.Turner indicate that there are two important strategies for building
support of Media and Technology programs within the school.

•        Creating a positive atmosphere wherever programs are located:
         •        Talk to students and listen to their opinions.
         •        Make working with students a priority.
         •        Encourage teachers to assign projects that help students
                  develop research skills.
         •        Leave the media center to promote services.




                                                                                         IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                          Page 17
Program Administration



                            •       Winning the support of faculty:
                                    •       Use faculty as subject area specialists.
                                    •       Offer to assist faculty in the process of curriculum develop-
                                            ment.
                                    •       Assist the faculty in compiling bibliographic lists of available
                                            materials for specific subject areas.
                                    •       Publish a newsletter for faculty and administration.
                                    •       Meet with all first-year teachers for a tour of the library and
                                            discussion.
                                    •       Take student, faculty and administrator opinion [surveys
                                            about] the library and technology programs.
                                    •       Help teachers find applicable grant sources.
                                    •       Participate in school activities and committees.
                                    •       Meet with individual teachers to discuss needs and
                                            interests.
                                                                                          (Pearson, Turner 1999)


                            The patrons of Media and Technology programs must first feel welcome; without
                            a sense of ease and belonging, learning cannot take place. The school facility
                            will dictate how students perceive and interact with media and technology
                            resources and staff.


                            Building Support within the Community
                            Keeping community members apprised of program developments and suc-
                            cesses is one of the best ways to build on-going support for Media and Technol-
                            ogy programs.

                            Communication can be accomplished with:
                                • school Web sites.
                                • newsletters for PTA/PTO.
                                • media articles.
                                • special events such as family reading nights, book and
                                  technology fairs, author visits, and book discussion groups.
                                • presentations for the Board of Education and community
                                  groups.
                                • memberships in professional organizations.
                                • partnerships with other organiations (e.g., parent organizations,
                                  public and other libraries, business and civic groups).
                                • involvement of community in program evaluation.
                                • thank you notes/gifts for volunteers.




IMPACT for Administrators
Page 18
                                                                                                     Bibliography




American Association of School Librarians & the Association of Educational Communications and Technology.
       Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning. Chicago, IL: American Library Association, 1998.

American Association of School Librarians & the Association of Educational Communications and Technology.
       Information Power: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs. Chicago, IL: American Library Associa-
       tion, 1988.

International Data Corporation. Understanding the Total Cost and Value of Integrating Technology in Schools,
         An IDC White Paper. 1997. Apple Computer, Inc. 17 July 2001
         http://www.apple.com/education/k12/leadership/LSWTF/IDC.html

Lance, Keith Curry, Marcia J. Rodney, and Christine Hamilton-Pennell. How School Librarians Help Kids Achieve
         Standards: The Second Colorado Study. San Jose, CA: Hi Willow Research and Publishing, 2000.

Library Research Service, Colorado State Library. “Proof of the Power: A First Look at the Results of the Colorado
         Study…and More!” Fast Facts: Recent Statistics from the Library Research Service. (164), 1999.
         17 July 2001
         http://www.lrs.org/documents/fastfacts/164proof.pdf

Library Research Service, Colorado State Library. “The Status of Library Media Center Staffing and Its Effect on
         Student Achievement.” Fast Facts: Recent Statistics from the Library Research Service. (174), 2001.
         17 July 2001
         http://www.lrs.org/documents/fastfacts/174lmcstaff.pdf

Mann, Dale, et al. West Virginia Story: Achievement Gains from a Statewide Comprehensive Instructional Technology
        Program. 1999. Milken Family Foundation. 17 July 2001
        http://www.mff.org/pubs/ME155.pdf

National Educational Technology Standards for Students: Connecting Curriculum and Technology. Eugene, OR:
         International Society for Technology in Education. 2000.

North Carolina Educational Technology Plan 2001-2005. 2000. North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. 17
        July 2001
        http://tps.dpi.state.nc.us/techplan2000/

Pearson, Richard C. and Mary Y. Turner. The School Library Media Specialist’s Tool Kit. Fort Atkinson, WI: Highsmith
         Press, 1999.

Reksten, Linda. Using Technology to Increase Student Learning. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, 2000.




                                                                                             IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                                Page 19
IMPACT                      for Administrators
         A Resource for Evaluating Media and Technology
                               Programs and Personnel




Media and Technology Program Evaluation
IMPACT for Administrators
Page 20
                                                                              Program Evaluation Rubrics



One of the most effective ways to determine how well Media and Technology
programs are meeting the needs of students, teachers, staff, and the community
is through self-reflection. While teacher and student surveys certainly provide a
realistic assessment of the daily impact of programs and services on the
teaching and learning process, an objective comparison of an individual program
with state and national standards and recommendations offers an opportunity
for self assessment.

The rubrics that follow, based on the chapters found in IMPACT, provide a global
perspective of school library media and instructional technology programs at the
building level. Use these rubrics with your school library media coordinator and
instructional technology facilitator to reflect on your school’s Media and Technol-
ogy programs. Then begin the process of developing a vision of the future-
outstanding school library media and instructional technology programs that
impact teaching and learning for high student achievement and life-long
learning.

Note: The rubric comparison points are Minimum, Developing, and Outstanding;
there is no unsatisfactory. This is intentional. All North Carolina Media and
Technology programs must have the expectation that they will be at least at a
minimum level for successful teaching and learning to occur. If this is not the
case, immediate action should be taken to bring about needed changes.




                                                                                       IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                        Page 21
Program Evaluation Rubrics
Teaching and Learning



                            Program Outcomes

                            Outstanding Teaching and Learning at the building level:

                            •      Focuses on student achievement.
                            •      Involves the entire staff in planning a collaborative instructional
                                   program in a technology and resource rich environment.
                            •      Offers a collaboratively planned, delivered, and evaluated staff
                                   development program that correlates to technology competencies
                                   for educators and meets licensure and renewal requirements.




                            Rubric Topics

                                   1. Instruction
                                   2. Staff Development
                                   3. Collaboration



                            Strategies to Guide Work

                            •      Collaborate with the entire instructional team.
                            •      Lead with Vision
                            •      Utilize media and technology resources




IMPACT for Administrators
Page 22
                                                                       Program Evaluation Rubrics
                                                                                     Teaching and Learning




Teaching and Learning: Instruction

Building-level media and technology programs show evidence that:

Minimum                              Developing                             Outstanding


Instruction focuses on student       Instruction focuses on student         Instruction focuses on student
achievement through teacher          achievement with the learner           achievement with the learner
demonstration of problem             involved in problem solving            involved in self-directed
solving.                             and assessment to promote              problem solving and self-
                                     life-long learning.                    assessment to promote life-
                                                                            long learning.


Instruction is delivered to all      Instruction is delivered to            Instruction is delivered to
students with no variety of          students in various formats.           students in a variety of formats
method.                                                                     based on learning styles.



Occasionally Information Skills      Information skills are taught          Instruction is given in locating,
lessons are planned and taught       primarily within curriculum            gathering, selecting, synthesiz-
in correlation with studies in       content areas.                         ing, and evaluating relevant
content areas.                                                              information in all curricular
                                                                            areas.


The library media coordinator        The library media coordinator          The library media coordinator
adheres to a modified flexible       meets regularly with teachers          collaborates with teachers
schedule and meets occasion-         to cooperatively plan curricu-         through formal planning
ally with classroom teachers to      lum and learning experiences           sessions to develop, imple-
plan cooperatively.                  in a flexibly scheduled                ment, and evaluate learning
                                     environment.                           experiences in a flexibly
                                                                            scheduled environment.


Students have limited access         Students have access to the            Students have access to the
to the Internet and electronic       Internet, electronic databases,        Internet, electronic databases,
databases                            and other resources on high-           and a variety of other re-
                                     speed networks throughout              sources on high-speed
                                     the school.                            networks throughout the
                                                                            school.




                                                                                    IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                       Page 23
 Program Evaluation Rubrics
 Teaching and Learning




 Teaching and Learning: Staff Development

 Building-level media and technology programs show evidence that:

 Minimum                               Developing                       Outstanding


 The staff development                The staff development             The staff development
 program is planned by the            program is planned, delivered,    program is planned, delivered,
 technology facilitator and           and evaluated by the technol-     and evaluated collaboratively
 media coordinator.                   ogy facilitator and media         by a committee with represen-
                                      coordinator.                      tatives from a variety of roles
                                                                        including the technology
                                                                        facilitator, media coordinator,
                                                                        teachers, administrators,
                                                                        students, IHE faculty, and
                                                                        support personnel. Staff
                                                                        development participants are
                                                                        involved in the evaluation
                                                                        process.


 Appropriate staff development        Appropriate staff development     Appropriate staff development
 opportunities are available          opportunities are available for   opportunities for the technol-
 occasionally for the technology      the technology facilitator and    ogy facilitator and media
 facilitator and media                media coordinator, which          coordinator, which include
 coordinator.                         include conference                training in emerging technolo-
                                      attendance.                       gies and conference atten-
                                                                        dance, are a part of the school
                                                                        staff development plan.



 Staff development opportuni-         Staff development opportuni-      Staff development opportuni-
 ties are offered only at             ties are offered at time of       ties are offered at time of
 scheduled times.                     personal need.                    personal need, with opportuni-
                                                                        ties for practice built into the
                                                                        schedule.


 Staff development offerings          Staff development offerings       Staff development offerings
 sometimes correlate with             correlate to technology           correlate to technology
 technology competencies for          competencies for educators.       competencies for educators
 educators.                                                             and meet licensure and
                                                                        renewal requirements.



IMPACT for Administrators
Page 24
                                                                        Program Evaluation Rubrics
                                                                                      Teaching and Learning




Teaching and Learning: Collaboration

Building-level media and technology programs show evidence that:

Minimum                              Developing                              Outstanding


Collaborative planning,              Collaborative planning,                 Collaborative planning,
evaluation, and instruction is a     evaluation, and instruction to          evaluation, and instruction to
team effort between the              show specific links between             show specific links between
technology facilitator, media        information literacy and                information literacy and
coordinator, and teachers.           content is a team effort                content is a team effort
                                     between the technology                  between the technology
                                     facilitator, media coordinator,         facilitator, media coordinator,
                                     teachers, support personnel,            teachers, support personnel,
                                     pre-service interns, administra-        pre-service interns, administra-
                                     tors, and students.                     tors, and students.




Collaborative efforts are based      Collaborative efforts are based         Collaborative efforts are based
on the best available models of      on the best available models of         on the best available models of
instruction to develop instruc-      instruction, collaboration, and         instruction, collaboration, and
tional partnerships.                 cooperative learning to                 cooperative learning to
                                     develop strong instructional            develop strong instructional
                                     partnerships that lead to               partnerships that lead to
                                     student development of                  student development of
                                     critical thinking and problem-          critical thinking and problem-
                                     solving skills.                         solving skills.




                                                                                    IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                       Page 25
Program Evaluation Rubrics
Information Access and Delivery



                                  Program Outcomes

                                  Outstanding Information Access and Delivery at the building
                                  level:

                                  •      Supports the diverse needs of learners and teachers with
                                         access to collections of high-quality resources, equip-
                                         ment, and facilities for classroom activities and personal
                                         or professional interests.



                                  Rubric Topics

                                         1. Needs Assessment
                                         2. Managing Resources
                                         3. Designing Facilities for Teaching and Learning



                                  Strategies to Guide Work

                                  •      Collaborate with the entire instructional team.
                                  •      Lead with vision.
                                  •      Utilize media and technology resources.




IMPACT for Administrators
Page 26
                                                                         Program Evaluation Rubrics
                                                                             Information Access and Delivery




Information Access and Delivery: Needs Assessment: People and Process

Building-level media and technology programs include:

Minimum                              Developing                               Outstanding


A Media and Technology                A Media and Technology                  A Media and Technology
Advisory Committee that               Advisory Committee that                 Advisory Committee that
includes the media coordinator        includes the media coordina-            includes the media coordinator
and the technology facilitator,       tor, the technology facilitator,        and the technology facilitator,
and representative teachers.          and representative teachers.            and representative teachers.




N/A                                   A Media and Technology                  A Media and Technology
                                      Advisory Committee that                 Advisory Committee that
                                      advocates for the technology            advocates for the technology
                                      and media programs within               and media programs within
                                      the school.                             the school.



A Media and Technology                A Media and Technology                  An active Media and Technol-
Advisory Committee that               Advisory Committee that                 ogy Advisory Committee that
meets at least quarterly to           meets at least quarterly to             meets at least monthly to
assess and report needs to            assess needs and make                   assess needs and make
school administration related         recommendations for budget              decisions regarding budget
to media and technology               allocations related to media            allocations based on a resource
resources for teaching and            and technology resources for            development plan supported
learning.                             teaching and learning and               by adequate yearly budget to
                                      justifies budget requests to            maintain, update, and expand
                                      school administrators.                  the school’s resources.


N/A                                   A Media and Technology                  N/A
                                      Advisory Committee that
                                      develops a plan supported by
                                      an adequate yearly budget to
                                      maintain, update, and expand
                                      the school’s resources.




                                                                                     IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                       Page 27
 Program Evaluation Rubrics
 Information Access and Delivery




 Information Access and Delivery: Managing Resources

 Building-level media and technology programs include:

 Minimum                               Developing                        Outstanding
 A diverse collection that             A diverse collection that         A diverse collection that
 supports teaching and learn-          supports teaching and learning    supports teaching and learning
 ing;                                  and students’ personal            and students’ personal
                                       interests.                        interests.

 A diverse collection that meets       A diverse collection that meets   A diverse collection that meets
 the needs of diverse learning         the needs of diverse learning     the needs of diverse learning
 styles, multicultural back-           styles, multicultural back-       styles, multicultural back-
 grounds, physical challenges          grounds, physical challenges      grounds, physical challenges
 (assistive/adaptive devices,          (assistive/adaptive devices,      (assistive/adaptive devices,
 etc.), and building-level             etc.), and building-level         etc.), and building-level
 professionals;                        professionals.                    professionals.

 Resources that are selected           Resources that are selected       Resources that are selected
 and acquired according to local       and acquired by formally          and acquired by formally
 board-approved policy and             assessing needs (e.g., curricu-   assessing needs (e.g., curricu-
 established criteria for various      lum mapping) and following        lum mapping) and following
 media formats.                        the local board-approved          building-level selection policy
                                       policy and established criteria   based on the local board-
                                       for various media formats.        approved model and estab-
                                                                         lished criteria for various media
                                                                         formats.

 An organized collection of            An organized collection of        An organized collection of
 resources, including technol-         resources, including technol-     resources, including technol-
 ogy-based materials and               ogy-based materials and           ogy-based materials and
 equipment, that is cataloged          equipment, that is cataloged      equipment, accessible through
 and circulated using standard         and circulated through an         a district-wide Union catalog
 library conventions.                  automated system.                 and circulated through an
                                                                         automated system.


 Access to technology and              Access to state-of-the-art        Access to state-of-the-art
 resources on local area               technology and resources on       technology and resources on
 networks.                             local area networks.              local and wide area networks.

 An accurate, automated                An accurate, automated            An accurate, automated
 inventory based on annual             inventory based on annual         inventory based on annual
 procedures for adding new             procedures for adding new         procedures for adding new
 materials and equipment and           materials and equipment and       materials and equipment and
 weeding/discarding out-dated          weeding/discarding out-dated      weeding/discarding out-dated
 and worn items.                       and worn items.                   and worn items.

IMPACT for Administrators
Page 28
                                                                         Program Evaluation Rubrics
                                                                             Information Access and Delivery




Information Access and Delivery: Designing Facilities for Teaching and Learning

Building-level media and technology programs include:

Minimum                              Developing                               Outstanding


Opportunities for technology          Opportunities for technology            Opportunities for technology
and media staff to make initial       and media staff to offer advice         and media staff to play an
suggestions during the                on a regular basis for planning,        ongoing and active role
planning of new, renovated, or        renovated, or repurposed                throughout the planning and
repurposed facilities (i.e.,          facilities (i.e., space, design,        construction phases of,
space, design, and furniture          and furniture considerations)           renovated, or repurposed
considerations) that focus on         that focus on accessibility,            facilities (i.e., space, design,
accessibility, flexibility, and       flexibility, and efficiency             and furniture considerations)
efficiency necessary to provide       necessary to provide opportu-           that focus on accessibility,
opportunities for teaching and        nities for teaching and learning        flexibility, and efficiency
learning as well as media and         as well as media and technol-           necessary to provide opportu-
technology administrative             ogy administrative needs.               nities for teaching and learning
needs.                                                                        as well as media and technol-
                                                                              ogy administrative needs.



Infrastructure and connectivity       Infrastructure and connectivity         Infrastructure and connectivity
that meet current State               that meet current State                 that meet current State
Technology Plan and Informa-          Technology Plan and Informa-            Technology Plan and Informa-
tion Resources Management             tion Resources Management               tion Resources Management
standards.                            standards.                              standards.


N/A                                   A plan supported by an                  An implementation plan for
                                      adequate yearly budget to               growth and expansion that is
                                      maintain infrastructure and             supported by an adequate
                                      connectivity.                           yearly budget to support the
                                                                              evolution of developments in
                                                                              state-of-the-art technology.




                                                                                     IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                        Page 29
Program Evaluation Rubrics
Program Administration



                            Program Outcomes

                            Outstanding Program Administration at the building level results in:

                            •      Media and technology programs that are an integral part of the
                                   school curriculum.
                            •      Open access to facilities with stimulating atmospheres, high-quality
                                   resources, and state-of-the-art technology.
                            •      Enhanced student learning through collaborative planning with
                                   teachers.



                            Rubric Topics

                                   1. Policy and Procedures
                                   2. Planning
                                   3. Budget and Resources
                                   4. Communication and Public Relations
                                   5. Evaluation
                                   6. Personnel



                            Strategies to Guide Work

                            •      Collaborate with the entire instructional team.
                            •      Lead with vision.
                            •      Utilize media and technology resources.




IMPACT for Administrators
Page 30
                                                                          Program Evaluation Rubrics
                                                                                       Program Administration




Program Administration: Policy and Procedures

Building-level media and technology programs provide:

Minimum                              Developing                                Outstanding


Policies and procedures that          Policies and procedures that             Policies and procedures that
have been approved by the             have been approved by the                have been established
school board.                         school board.                            specifically for the school,
                                                                               based on school board
                                                                               approved models.



Access to resources and               Equal and open access to                 Flexibly scheduled programs
opportunities for research and        resources throughout the day             that provide equal and open
instruction for each class at         at point of need and opportu-            access to resources and
least once a week.                    nities for research and instruc-         instruction that integrate with
                                      tion for each class at least once        classroom goals and objectives
                                      a week.                                  at point of need.




Barrier-free access to the            Barrier-free access to the               Barrier-free access to the
library media center and its          library media center facility            library media center’s facility
collection as well as access to       and its collection as well as            and its collection as well as
building-level electronic             access to building-level,                access to building-level,
resources during the instruc-         national, state, and district-           national, state, and district-
tional day to support learning.       wide electronic resources                wide electronic resources
                                      during the instructional day to          before, during, and after the
                                      support learning.                        instructional day to support
                                                                               learning.




                                                                                       IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                          Page 31
 Program Evaluation Rubrics
 Program Administration




 Program Administration:Planning

 Building-level media and technology staff:

 Minimum                                 Developing                       Outstanding


 Develop and implement short-           Develop and implement short-      Develop and implement long-
 term plans, with the Media and         term plans, with the Media and    term and short-term plans,
 Technology Advisory Commit-            Technology Advisory Commit-       with the Media and Technology
 tee, for collection develop-           tee, for collection develop-      Advisory Committee, for
 ment and the integration of            ment and the integration of       collection development and
 media and technology                   media and technology              the integration of media and
 programs into the total school         programs into the total school    technology programs into the
 instructional program to               instructional program to          total school instructional
 enhance student learning.              enhance student learning.         program to enhance student
                                                                          learning.


 Participate in at least one            Participate in district and       Act as change agents by
 school-based committee.                school-based planning             continuously building partner-
                                        committees.                       ships and participating in
                                                                          school and district-based
                                                                          planning committees.


 Participate in planning for            Collaboratively plan with         Continuously plan with
 instruction at the request of          teachers at regular intervals     teachers to help students
 teachers.                              throughout the year to help       become independent learners
                                        students become independent       who can solve problems, think
                                        learners who can solve            critically, and evaluate informa-
                                        problems, think critically, and   tion from a wide variety of
                                        evaluate information from a       resources.
                                        wide variety of resources.


 N/A                                    Monitor planning processes        Continuously monitor planning
                                        and results throughout the        processes and results, prioritiz-
                                        year.                             ing, and adapting long and
                                                                          short-term goals and strategies
                                                                          based on feedback and input.




IMPACT for Administrators
Page 32
                                                                         Program Evaluation Rubrics
                                                                                     Program Administration




Program Administration: Budget and Resources

Building-level media and technology staff:

Minimum                                Developing                             Outstanding


Provide a balance of print,            Provide a balance of print,            Provide a balance of print,
multimedia, and electronic             multimedia, and electronic             multimedia, and electronic
resources, based on local              resources, based on local              resources, based on local
board-approved selection               board-approved selection               board-approved selection
policies, that support the North       policies, which support the            policies, that support the North
Carolina Standard Course of            North Carolina Standard                Carolina Standard Course of
Study and the needs of the             Course of Study and the needs          Study and the needs of the
student population.                    of the student population.             student population.

Provide access to technology           Provide access to state-of-the-        Provide access to state-of-the-
and resources on local area            art technology and resources           art technology and resources
networks.                              on local area networks.                on local and wide area
                                                                              networks.


N/A                                    Advocate for adequate funding          Advocate for adequate funding
                                       for media and technology               for media and technology
                                       programs to provide sufficient         programs to provide sufficient
                                       resources that are current and         resources that are current and
                                       relevant to meet the needs of          relevant to meet the needs of
                                       students and staff.                    students and staff.

Encumber allocated funds by            Encumber allocated funds by            Encumber allocated funds by
established deadlines.                 established deadlines.                 established deadlines.


Solicit additional funding from        Secure additional funding by           Secure additional funding by
school-based sources such as           writing grants and soliciting          actively seeking out and
PTA/PTOs.                              funding from school-based              writing grants, and soliciting
                                       sources such as PTA/PTOs.              funding from other sources
                                                                              such as PTA/PTOs, local
                                                                              community organizations, and
                                                                              businesses.

Plan for short-term budget             Plan for short-term budget             Plan for long and short-term
needs, and accurately track and        needs, and accurately track and        budget needs, and accurately
report budget expenditures             report budget expenditures             track and report budget
from all sources.                      from all sources.                      expenditures from all sources.



                                                                                     IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                        Page 33
 Program Evaluation Rubrics
 Program Administration




 Program Administration: Communication and Public Relations

 Building-level media and technology staff:

 Minimum                                 Developing                         Outstanding


 Create and maintain facilities         Create and maintain inviting        Create and maintain inviting
 to allow easy access to                and stimulating facilities that     and stimulating facilities that
 materials and electronic               enhance access to materials         enhance access to materials
 information by students and            and electronic information by       and electronic information by
 teachers.                              students and teachers.              students and teachers.


 Foster interpersonal relations         Foster interpersonal relations      Continuously foster interper-
 with students and staff to             with students and staff to          sonal relations with students
 encourage collaboration,               encourage collaboration,            and staff to encourage
 communication, and the                 communication, and the              collaboration, communication,
 sharing of ideas and strategies        sharing of ideas and strategies     and the sharing of ideas and
 that support the total instruc-        that support the total instruc-     strategies that support the total
 tional program.                        tional program.                     instructional program.



 N/A                                    Advocate for the needs of           Advocate for the needs of
                                        media and technology                media and technology
                                        programs by participating in        programs by participating in
                                        professional organizations.         professional and local commu-
                                                                            nity organizations.


 Publicize the contributions and        Publicize the contributions and     Continuously publicize the
 resources of media and                 resources of media and              contributions and resources of
 technology programs through            technology programs through         media and technology
 at least one vehicle (such as          several vehicles (such as Web       programs through a broad
 Web pages, newsletters, board          pages, newsletters, board           range of vehicles such as Web
 presentations, displays, special       presentations, displays, special    pages, newsletters, board
 events, etc.) at certain times of      events, etc.) at certain times of   presentations, displays, and
 the year.                              the year.                           special events.




IMPACT for Administrators
Page 34
                                                                        Program Evaluation Rubrics
                                                                                    Program Administration




Program Administration: Evaluation

Building-level media and technology staff:

Minimum                                Developing                            Outstanding


Utilize quantitative measures          Utilize quantitative measures         Utilize qualitative and quantita-
to document the provision of           to document the provision of          tive measures to document
media and technology                   media and technology                  and evaluate how media and
resources and program                  resources and program                 technology resources and
initiatives.                           initiatives.                          program initiatives meet the
                                                                             needs of students and teach-
                                                                             ers.



N/A                                    Provide documentation/                Provide documentation/
                                       evidence of major services            evidence of the broad spec-
                                       related to program administra-        trum of services related to
                                       tion and integration of media         program administration and
                                       and technology with the               integration of media and
                                       instructional program for             technology with the instruc-
                                       performance evaluation.               tional program for perfor-
                                                                             mance evaluation.



Prepare end-of-the-year                Prepare monthly and/or end-           Prepare monthly and/or end-
reports that describe program          of-the-year reports that              of-the-year reports that include
initiatives and document               describe program initiatives          information such as program
expenditures.                          and document expenditures.            initiatives, document expendi-
                                                                             tures, and that outline areas of
                                                                             need for the up-coming year.




                                                                                    IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                        Page 35
 Program Evaluation Rubrics
 Program Administration




 Program Administration: Personnel

                                     Recommended minimum staffing for each school based on average
                ADM
                                     daily membership (ADM)
 Minimum                       Developing                               Outstanding


                                     •       1 full-time library media coordinator
                                     •       1 full-time technology facilitator
               1-500
                                     •       1 half-time media assistant
                                     •       1 half-time technology assistant




                                     •       1 full-time library media coordinator
                                     •       1 full-time technology facilitator
             501-1000
                                     •       1 full-time media assistant
                                     •       1 full-time technology assistant.




                                     •       2 full-time library media coordinators

             1001-1500
                                     •       2 full-time technology facilitators
                                     •       1.5 full-time media assistants
                                     •       1.5 full-time technology assistants




                                     •       2 full-time library media coordinators.

             1501-2000
                                     •       2 full-time technology facilitators
                                     •       2 full-time media assistants
                                     •       2 full-time technology assistants




IMPACT for Administrators
Page 36
IMPACT                                          for Administrators
             A Resource for Evaluating Media and Technology
                                                  Programs and Personnel




School Library Media and
  Instructional Technology Personnel Evaluation




    School Library Media Coordinator                 page 38

    Technology Facilitator                           page 63

    Distance Learning Instructional Assistant        page 67
                                                                                    Personnel Evaluation



                Evaluating School Library Media and
                 Instructional Technology Personnel

In 1987 the North Carolina State Board of Education approved the Media
Coordinator Performance Appraisal Instrument. Since that time, principals have
used this instrument and its accompanying guides and interview questions to
evaluate their media personnel. Over the past five years, North Carolina has
developed new performance appraisal instruments for teachers. In the next
stage of the process, the media coordinator instrument will be revised, and an
evaluation instrument will be created for instructional technology facilitators.

The Division of Instructional Technology has revised the job descriptions and the
Standards and Criteria for both positions. In the future, as finances permit, the
actual performance appraisal instruments for each job will be created, piloted,
and validated. Until that time, school library media coordinators should be
evaluated on the 1987 instrument. Instructional technology facilitators should
be evaluated on the teacher instrument, with principals noting the administra-
tive duties such as staff development and management of equipment that are
an inherent part of an instructional technology facilitator’s job.

Here in IMPACT for Administrators, you will find the 1987 Media Coordinator
Performance Appraisal Instrument (MCPAI), the only instrument available for
evaluating school library media coordinators. A revised evaluation guide and
interview questions are also included. Both the guide and questions have been
updated in 2001 to reflect the changing role of the school library media
coordinator since the MCPAI was developed in 1987.

The current, State Board-approved job descriptions and Standards and Criteria for
both the school library media coordinator and the instructional technology
facilitator are also provided in this section. Since no
formal instructional technology facilitator evalua-
tion instrument exists, a sample appraisal
instrument has been included for your
consideration. Until new evaluation tools are
available, please use all the instruments
and documentation incorporated in
IMPACT for Administrators to assist
you in your evaluation process and
as you reflect upon the many
facets of the roles that both
these educators perform daily
within your school.




                                                                                       IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                        Page 37
Personnel Evaluation
School Library Media Coordinator



                           SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA COORDINATOR (076)

In North Carolina, the school’s library media coordinator may be identified by a variety of titles, such as librarian,
library teacher, or media specialist. The official title for certification purposes is school library media coordinator,
and this position is considered a teaching certification.

CERTIFICATION: Approved program requirements that must be met to qualify for K-12 School Library Media
Coordinator certification are at the master’s degree level and were adopted by the State Board of Education in
1987.


SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA JOB DESCRIPTION


REPORTS TO: Principal and Media Supervisor

SUPERVISES: Coordinates and directs the activities of school library media support personnel including library
media assistants, technical assistants, student assistants, and/or volunteers.

PURPOSE: To provide the leadership and instructional resources and services for implementation of a school
library media program that serves as an integral part of a student-centered educational process

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1.   MAJOR FUNCTION: Planning and Implementing for Teaching and Learning

•    Assesses learning and information needs of students and staff
•    Plans and works collaboratively with teachers
•    Instructs students and staff in the effective use of ideas and information
•    Incorporates information literacy into day-to-day instruction
•    Advocates and promotes reading and life-long learning
•    Leads in the school’s use of instructional technology to enhance learning
•    Upgrades professional knowledge and skills on a continual basis

2.   MAJOR FUNCTION: Planning and Implementing for Information Access, Evaluation, and Use

•    Works with the principal and school leadership team to provide flexible access to school library media
     center resources
•    Creates and maintains an environment conducive to learning
•    Encourages the widest possible use of print and electronic resources and services—within the school
     library media center, throughout the school, and through remote access
•    Leads teachers, technology staff, and students in a collaborative process to select and evaluate resources
     that address curricular needs and learning goals of students and teachers in the information age
•    Keeps accurate inventories of print, nonprint, and technology materials and equipment
•    Works cooperatively with other libraries and agencies to share resources that enhance teaching and
     learning


IMPACT for Administrators
Page 38
                                                                                   Personnel Evaluation
                                                                                School Library Media Coordinator



•    Implements an ongoing collection development and evaluation process, in collaboration with the Media
     and Technology Advisory Committee, that focuses on a variety of formats and resources to meet diverse
     learning needs.
•    Adheres to copyright as well as other laws and guidelines pertaining to the distribution and use of re-
     sources
•    Advocates the principles of intellectual freedom and ethical behavior

3.   MAJOR FUNCTION: Planning and Implementing for Program Administration

•    Works with school staff to design and implement short- and long-range plans to ensure balance among
     teaching, instructional technology, collaboration, collection development, and program management.
•    Evaluates the school library media program on a continual basis according to accepted standards of quality
•    Organizes school library media facilities and resources in a manner that supports the mission, goals, and
     objectives of the school and maximizes intellectual and physical access to resources.
•    Leads in the budgetary process of the school through the Media and Technology Advisory Committee to
     ensure equity of access to instructional materials
•    Leads the Media and Technology Advisory Committee in effective decision making to promote the school
     library media program
•    Interacts effectively with students, staff, administration, and the general public to promote and expand the
     school library media program.
•    Demonstrates professional integrity through ethical behavior
•    Prepares and submits accurate reports as required
•    Carries out assigned non-instructional duties and adheres to established laws, policies, rules, and regula-
     tions




                                                                                       IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                          Page 39
Personnel Evaluation
School Library Media Coordinator



            Standards and Criteria for School Library Media Coordinators

1. Vision
    The SLMC is an educational leader who facilitates the development, implementation, and
    communication of a shared vision of learning that reflects excellence and equity for all students.
    1.1 Participates in the development of a broad vision and goals for the school.
    1.2    Develops strategies and priorities for implementing the school’s vision via the School Improvement
           Plan.
    1.3    Communicates the school’s vision, goals, and priorities to appropriate constituencies.
    1.4    Works with school staff, including the Media Advisory Committee, to design and implement a
           comprehensive media program that ensures balance among teaching, instructional technology,
           collaboration, collection development, and program management.
    1.5    Evaluates the school library media program in relation to achieving the school’s improvement goals
           and develops appropriate modifications.


2. High Student Performance
    The SLMC is an educational leader, teacher, information specialist, and instructional partner who
    collaborates with instructional staff in the development of organizational, instructional, and
    assessment strategies to maximize educational achievement.
    2.1 Assesses learning and information needs of students.
    2.2    Plans and works collaboratively with teachers.
    2.3    Instructs students in the effective use of ideas and information.
    2.4    Understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional
           opportunities adapted to diverse learners.
    2.5    Incorporates information literacy into day-to-day instruction.
    2.6    Advocates and promotes reading and life-long learning.
    2.7    Collaborates with the Instructional Technology Facilitator to provide leadership in the school’s use of
           instructional technology resources to enhance learning
    2.8    Cooperates with teachers, technology staff, and students in a collaborative process to select and
           evaluate resources that address curricular needs and learning goals of students and teachers in the
           information age.
    2.9    Collaborates with the school staff to integrate school library media center resources into the
           instructional program.


3. Safe, Orderly, and Caring Schools
    The SLMC is an educational leader who works collaboratively to ensure a working and learning
    climate for all students that is safe, secure, and respectful of diversity.
    3.1 Creates and maintains a safe and orderly environment conducive to learning.
    3.2    Demonstrates high ethical and professional standards.
    3.3    Advocates the principles of intellectual freedom and ethical behavior.
    3.4    Carries out assigned non-instructional duties.


IMPACT for Administrators
Page 40
                                                                                    Personnel Evaluation
                                                                                  School Library Media Coordinator



4. Quality Teachers, Administrators, and Staff
    The SLMC is an educational leader who promotes continuous improvement of teaching and learning
    by participating in professional growth activities and by providing staff development opportunities
    and resources for the instructional community.
    4.1 Upgrades professional knowledge and skills on a continual basis.
    4.2    Instructs staff in the effective use of ideas and information.
    4.3    Supports the induction of new educators and demonstrates pride in education and librarianship as
           professions.
    4.4    Evaluates continually the effects of his or her choices and actions and is a reflective practitioner.

5. Strong Family, Community, and Business Support
    The SLMC is an educational leader who promotes family, business, and community partnerships that
    support the academic success and general well-being of all children.
    5.1 Advocates reading, information, and technology literacy.
    5.2    Works cooperatively with other libraries and agencies to share resources and services that enhance
           teaching and learning.
    5.3    Interacts with the community to promote and enhance the school library media program.

6. Effective and Efficient Operation
      The SLMC is an educational leader who uses organizational and leadership skills to achieve effective and
      efficient management of the school library media program in order to maximize educational
      achievement.
    6.1 Organizes school library media facilities and resources in a manner that supports the mission, goals,
             and objectives of the school and maximizes intellectual and physical access to resources.
    6.2    Maintains, or documents the need for, a flexible schedule for the school library media center.
    6.3    Implements an ongoing collection development and evaluation process, in collaboration with the
           Media and Technology Advisory Committee, that focuses on a variety of formats and resources to
           meet diverse learning needs.
    6.4    Participates in the budgetary process of the school to ensure equity of access to instructional
           resources.
    6.5    Leads, in partnership with Instructional Technology Facilitator, the Media and Technology Advisory
           Committee in effective decision making to promote the school library media program.
    6.6    Uses available technology to enhance communication and media program management.




                                                                                         IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                             Page 41
IMPACT for Administrators
Page 42
IMPACT                         for Administrators
          A Resource for Evaluating Media and Technology
                                  Programs and Personnel




School Library Media and
  Instructional Technology Personnel Evaluation

  Technology Facilitator Performance Appraisal Instrument
                      SAMPLE EVIDENCES FOR
       MEDIA COORDINATOR PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL INSTRUMENT
This document is intended as a guide for persons using the North Carolina Performance Appraisal Instrument
for Media Coordinators. It presents the major functions entailed in the job of media coordinator. The major
functions are responsibilities that apply to all media coordinators.

Below each major function, indicators of the practices subsumed by that function are identified by two digit
numbers

An unnumbered list of sample evidences accompanies each practice.This list is intended to assist observers by
identifying some potential evidences for each practice. The activities on this list comprise a mix of possible tasks
which may or may not be the responsibility of a given media coordinator. They should not be construed to be
mandated.

1. Major Function: Managing Instruction

  *1.1 Management of Instructional Time

   •    manages multiple/concurrent instructional activities within the media center.
   •    has materials, supplies and equipment ready at the start of the a scheduled lesson or instructional
        activity.
   •    gets the class started quickly.
   •    gets students on task quickly at the beginning of each lesson or instructional activity.
   •    maintains a high level of student time-on-task.
   •    demonstrates flexibility and knowledge of resources necessary to facilitate unscheduled instructional
        activities.

  *1.2 Management of Student Behavior

   •    has established a set of rules and procedures aligned with school policy that govern the handling of
        routine administrative matters, student verbal participation, and movement.
   •    frequently monitors the behavior of all students during whole class, small group, and independent
        activities and during transitions between instructional activities.
   •    stops inappropriate behavior promptly and consistently, yet maintains the dignity of the student.

  *1.3 Instructional Presentation

   •    begins lesson or instructional activity with reference to prior knowledge.
   •    introduces the lesson or instructional activity and specifies learning objectives when appropriate.
   •    speaks fluently and precisely.
   •    presents the lesson or instructional activity using concepts and language understandable to the
        students.
   •    provides relevant examples and demonstrations to illustrate concepts and skills.
   •    assigns tasks that encourage higher order thinking skills that students handle with a high rate of success.
   •    asks appropriate levels of questions that students handle with a high rate of success.
   •    conducts lesson or instructional activity at a brisk pace, slowing presentations when necessary for
        student understanding but avoiding unnecessary slowdowns.
   •    makes transitions between lessons and instructional activities within lessons efficiently and smoothly.
   •    makes sure that the task/assignment is clear.
   •    summarizes the main point(s) of the lesson at the end of the lesson or instructional activity.




*Indicators are Practices from TEACHER PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL INSTRUMENT INSTRUMENT
                                                                                              Revised June 7, 2001
Page 48
    MEDIA COORDINATOR PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL INSTRUMENT
                                                                              Rating Scale
                                                                              (Please Check)




                                                                                     Above Standard

                                                                                     Below Standard
                                                                                                      Unsatisfactory
                                                                                     At Standard
                                                                        Well Above
                                                             Superior
Media Coordinator Name _____________________________

School _____________________________________________



1. Major Function: Managing Instruction*



      1.1      Management of Instructional Time

      1.2      Management of Student Behavior

      1.3      Instructional Presentation

      1.4      Monitoring of Student Performance

      1.5      Instructional Feedback

      1.6      Facilitating Instruction

      1.7      Correlating Instruction


 Comments




*    Incorporates Major Functions 1-6 from TEACHER PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL
     INSTRUMENT in evaluation of direct teaching activities.

June, 1987


                                                                                               Page 43
                                                                        Rating Scale
                                                                        (Please Check)




                                                                             Above Standard

                                                                             Below Standard
                                                                             Unsatisfactory
                                                                Well Above


                                                                             At Standard
                                                                Superior
2. MajorFunction: Managing Public Relations

     2.1 Promotes positive staff relationships.

     2.2 Promotes positive student relationships.

     2.3    Maintains a good relationship
            between school and community.

 Comments




3.   Major Function: Planning for the Media Program

     3.1    Develops annual and long-range plans
            for the media program based on periodic
            assessment*

     3.2    Plans with teachers to integrate media
            skills into the curriculum.

     3.3    Designs motivational activities to
            promote reading.

     3.4    Plans a schedule that allows for both instruction
            and collection development within administrative
            guidelines.

 Comments




Page 44
                                                                    Rating Scale
                                                                    (Please Check)




                                                                          Above Standard

                                                                          Below Standard
                                                                                           Unsatisfactory
                                                             Well Above


                                                                          At Standard
                                                             Superior
4. Major Function: Managing Resources

   4.1      Provides leadership for the Media Advisory
            Committee.

   4.2      Analyzes the collection to determine needs.

   4.3      Uses standard selection tools and practices
            to evaluate and select all instructional
            materials.

   4.4      Coordinates the acquisitions process.

   4.5      Insures accessibility to resources.

   4.6      Offers a variety of instructional resources to
            meet curriculum objectives and learning
            styles.

   4.7      Administers the media program budget.

   4.8      Promotes the use of current technologies.

   4.9      Maintains media resources.

 Comments




5. Major Function: Managing the Facility

   5.1       Has organized media center -so that
             areas are identifiable

   5.2       Support areas are organized.


                                                                                    Page 45
    5.3      Provides an environment that reflects the
             multiple goals of the media program.

    5.4      Considers health and safety regulations
             when arranging facility.

    5.5 Facility organized for efficient circulation.


 Comments




6. Major Function: Professional Responsibilities

     6.1    Upgrades professional knowledge and skills.

     6.2    Provides growth opportunities for staff and
            students.

     6.3    Carries out non-instructional duties as
            assigned and/or as need is perceived.

     6.4    Adheres to established laws, policies, rules,
            and regulations.

     6.5    Submits accurate reports promptly.

 Comments




Page 46
 Evaluator’s Summary Comments




 Media Coordinator’s Reactions to Evaluation




Evaluator’s signature and date                 Media Coordinator’s signature and date

                                               Signature indicates that the
                                               written evaluation has been
                                               seen and discussed




                                                                                    Page 47
  *1.4 Instructional Monitoring of Student Performance

   •    maintains clear, firm and reasonable work standards.
   •    circulates throughout media center to check all students’ performance.
   •    routinely uses oral, written, and other work products to check student progress.
   •    poses questions clearly and one at a time.

  *1.5 Instructional Feedback

   •    provides feedback on the correctness or incorrectness of work to encourage student growth.
   •    provides sustaining feedback after an incorrect response or no response by probing, repeating the
        question, giving a clue, or allowing more time.

  *1.6 Facilitating Instruction

   •    collaborates with teachers to develop instructional plans that are compatible with the school and
        system-wide curricular goals.
   •    collaborates with teachers and other staff to use diagnostic information obtained from tests and other
        assessment procedures to develop and revise objectives and/or tasks.
   •    collaborates with teachers to document student performance.
   •    collaborates with teachers to develop instructional plans that match/align objectives, learning strategies,
        assessment and student needs at the appropriate level of difficulty.
   •    collaborates with teachers to identify and a variety of resources to support the instructional program.

  *1.7 Correlating Instruction

   •    integrates instruction with the Standard Course of Study and classroom activities.
   •    integrates Information Skills and Computer Skills curricula into other content areas and student
        experiences.
   •    provides activities that enable students to apply information literacy skills (i.e., locate, analyze, evaluate,
        and synthesize information) to complete classroom assignments.

2. Major Function: Managing Public Relations

  2.1    Promotes positive staff relationships

   •    cooperates with the total operation of the school
   •    is an effective member of teacher teams
   •    advocates for the media and technology program and encourages optimum use of its staff and
        resources
   •    contributes to development of annual objectives of school

  2.2    Promotes positive student relationships

   •    advocates for the media and technology program and encourages optimum use of its staff and
        resources
   •    encourages students to use resources for personal information needs




*Indicators are Practices from TEACHER PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL INSTRUMENT INSTRUMENT
Revised June 7, 2001
                                                                                                               Page 49
  2.3     Maintains a good relationship between school and community

  •     advocates for the media and technology program and encourages optimum use of its staff and
        resources
  •     promotes the media and technology program to the school and community through:
            • Web sites
            • Newsletters
            • special events such as family reading nights, book and technology fairs, and author visits
            • local media outlets (example: newspapers, radio, television) recruits and trains volunteers and
                 requests resources from the school and community
            • partners with other organizations (e.g., parent organizations, public and other libraries, business
                 and civic groups)

3. Major Function: Planning for the Media Program

  3.1     Develops annual and long-range plans for the media program based on periodic assessment

  •     participates on building-level committees such as curriculum planning, school improvement, budget,
        governance
  •     frequently requests input using a variety of sources, such as surveys and suggestion box
  •     aligns program with local, regional, state, and national guidelines
  •     incorporates recommendations of the Media and Technology Advisory Committee

  3.2     Plans with teachers to integrate media skills into the curriculum

  •     attends grade level and departmental meetings
  •     consults textbook and print and Web-based curriculum guides
  •     plans, informally and formally, with teachers
  •     collaborates with teachers to develop integrated units that incorporate information literacy skills and
        the Standard Course of Study

  3.3     Designs motivational activities to promote reading

  •     daily activities
             •     book talking
             •     storytelling
             •     incentives, i.e., bookmarks, buttons, certificates
             •     read-alouds
             •     Battle of the Books
             •     NC Book Awards
             •     Student reviews and art work
  •     special events
             •     book fairs
             •     literature festivals
             •     media fairs, contests
             •     family reading night
             •     author visits

  3.4      Plans a schedule that allows for both instruction and collection development within administra-
          tive guidelines

  •     advocates for flexible schedule to provide optimal student/teacher access to media and technology
        resources and facilities
  •     has a daily /weekly /monthly schedule that shows planning and instructional activities, as well as
        management tasks
  •     schedule is displayed and easily accessible

                                                                                             Revised June 7, 2001
Page 50
4. Major Function: Managing Resources

  4.1 Provides leadership for the Media Advisory Committee

        NOTE: In the 2001-2005 State Educational Technology Plan, this committee’s name was
        changed to Media and Technology Advisory Committee to reflect current practice.

   •    schedules meetings when appropriate (agendas and minutes available)
   •    routes appropriate information to committee members
   •    interprets selection policy for members of the committee
   •    uses the committee to help interpret the selection policy to the faculty
   •    participates in the re-evaluation of challenged materials

  4.2    Analyzes the collection to determine needs

   •    creates and maintains a dynamic collection development plan, using the Standard Course of Study,
        teacher and student input, and statistical data
   •    consults with the Media and Technology Committee and faculty to identify curriculum needs
   •    invites suggestions to determine personal interests of students and teachers

  4.3    Uses standard selection tools and practices to evaluate and select all instructional materials

   •    follows the selection policy approved by the local school board
   •    maintains a consideration file with selection sources indicated
   •    consults a variety of professional reviewing sources such as InfoTech and EvaluTech from Instructional
        Resources Evaluation Services, professional journals and publications
   •    uses first-hand evaluation when possible, i.e., attends book exhibits, orders materials for preview, visits
        other libraries, consults other resources

  4.4    Coordinates the acquisitions process

   •    makes selections
   •    prepares orders
   •    receives and inspects orders
   •    imports MARC records into online catalog
   •    ensures that materials are processed and made available in a timely manner

  4.5    Insures accessibility to resources

   •    organizes the collection for easy, logical access
   •    uses standard Dewey classification
   •    maintains card catalog or online catalog
   •    maintains regular hours including before and after school
   •    remains open throughout the instructional day to allow students and teacher to access materials
   •    provides flexible scheduling to accommodate various groups simultaneously

  4.6    Offers a variety of instructional resources to meet curriculum objectives and learning styles

   •    provides materials in a variety of formats to meet the needs of a diverse population’s:
            •    learning styles
            •    cultures
            •    skill levels
            •    developmental needs and interests




Revised June 7, 2001
                                                                                                             Page 51
   •    provides technology, or a plan to acquire technology, that supports the instructional program including
        access (Internet connectivity) to resources outside the school
   •    maintains a print or online Community Resource File
   •    maintains a print or online Information File

  4.7     Administers the media program budget

   •    develops and continuously evaluates annual and long-range budget goals
   •    works with the Media and Technology Committee to set budget priorities
   •    cultivates partnerships and pursues grant opportunities to supplement funding
   •    maintains records indicating how budget allocation was spent.

  4.8     Promotes use of current technologies

   •    creates awareness of school television, online courses, and other distance learning resources
   •    creates an awareness and facilitates the use of emerging technologies
   •    stays current on emerging technologies through reading professional journals, staff development, etc.
   •    promotes the use of the most appropriate resources to accomplish specific tasks (e.g., using a book
        versus the Internet)

  4.9     Maintains media resources

   •    coordinates equipment repair
   •    updates information file
   •    maintains the collection through weeding
   •    update catalog to reflect additions and deletions
   •    ensures simple repairs to resources, i.e., spine labels, torn pages, lamp replacement
   •    provide organized access to periodicals


5. Major Function: Managing the Facility

  5.1     Has organized media center so that areas are identifiable

   Look for these general areas:
   •   circulation
   •   card or online catalog
   •   large group instruction
   •   independent work area
   •   leisure reading
       • reference
       • listening/viewing/reading/computing
       • story sharing
   •   elementary – storytelling, role playing or acting, puppetry
   •   middle and high school – booktalking, literature discussion groups
   •   professional collection
   •   display/exhibit

  5.2     Support areas are organized

   •    administrative and planning area is evident
   •    production/workroom is organized to meet work needs
   •    equipment is stored in a place that is adequate, secure, and accessible
   •    conference/small group activity area is available




                                                                                                Revised June 7, 2001
Page 52
     5.3     Provides an environment that reflects the multiple goals of the media program

     •      display of student work
     •      bulletin boards
     •      plants, pictures, posters
     •      Orderliness

     5.4     Considers health and safety regulations when arranging facility

     •      free access to exits
     •      extension cords appropriately used
     •      equipment adequately secured
     •      safety problems reported

     5.5     Facility organized for efficient circulation

     •      circulation station near exit and away from stack area
     •      designated area for return of materials
     •      resources are clearly labeled
     •      physical access (handicapped)

6.         Major Function: Professional Responsibilities

     6.1     Upgrades professional knowledge and skills

     •      attends professional meetings, keeps abreast of current literature
     •      attends workshops, seminars and/or enrolls in courses online or held at institutions of higher learning
     •      visits other schools
     •      develops a written professional growth plan

     6.2     Provides growth opportunities for staff and students

     •      trains and supervises student assistants
     •      trains and supervises media assistants
     •      develops orientation process
     •      conducts or coordinates staff development activities
     •      promotes new materials
     •      disseminates information to faculty

     6.3     Carries out non-instructional duties as assigned and/or as need is perceived

     •      club sponsorship
     •      committee involvement
     •      school duties (e.g., sports, social events, PTSA)




Revised June 7, 2001
                                                                                                              Page 53
  6.4     Adheres to established laws, policies, rules, and regulations

  •     school and district policies
            •    materials and equipment selection
                     •      circulation
                     •      inventory
                     •      weeding
                     •      maintenance and repair
                     •      equipment/ materials donation
                     •      replacement of obsolete equipment
            •    copyright
            •    acceptable use (AUP)
            •    Web site development
            •    data privacy
            •    accessibility
            •    translation
            •    school purchase requirements

  6.5     Submits accurate reports promptly

  •     inventories of furniture, equipment, and collection
  •     annual reports (e.g., financial, NCDPI reports)
  •     budget




                                                                          Revised June 7, 2001
Page 54
                                          MCPAI GUIDE - 2001


1. MAJOR FUNCTION: MANAGING INSTRUCTION
Adhering to the Teacher Performance Appraisal Instrument criteria, the School Library Media Coordinator instructs
students and faculty in using and/or producing media to integrate into the curriculum and to facilitate the teaching/
learning process.


METHODS OF EVALUATION: Direct observation, interview, and review of documentation. (At least one
observation of a lesson being taught is required. As soon as it is determined that the School Library Media
Coordinator is a competent teacher, observation time would be well spent examining the other five Major Function
areas.)


INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:

1.   What management system or strategy do you use on a regular basis to allow you to prepare for classes to be
     taught, plan with the teachers, and attend to the other operations of the media center?

         LOOK FOR:
         Evidence of flexible access that allows individuals, small groups, and whole classes to conduct concurrent
         learning/research activities; weekly patterns of scheduled time for collaborative planning and preparation
         for teaching.

2    What rules and procedures have you established to govern student behavior in the media center? Are they
     posted? How are students informed and reminded of the rules? Who established the rules and procedures?
     Are faculty aware of them?

         LOOK FOR:
         Posted rules/procedures and/or student handbook; evidence of input from students and teachers in
         rulemaking; evidence of general understanding of rules/procedures by students and faculty; if
         inappropriate behavior occurs, evidence that it is stopped and rules are enforced; and, when in place,
         evidence of adherence to a schoolwide discipline plan or philosophy.

3.   What methods do you use to evaluate student learning in collaboration with classroom teachers?

         LOOK FOR:
         Questioning techniques and other procedures to monitor learning and check for understanding; rubrics for
         collaboratively evaluating research activities and projects with teachers.

4.   What strategies do you use to encourage teachers to inform and plan with you, so that the lessons you teach
     relate to, correlate with, or are integrated into the classroom curricular units?

         LOOK FOR:
         Informal, as well as formal, contacts with colleagues—in the hall, lunchroom, lounge, before and after
         school, and during planning periods; timelines; charts; memos; grade-level and departmental meeting
         participation.




                                                                                           IMPACT for Administrators
                                                                                                             Page 55
OBSERVATION GUIDE


Although Managing Instruction is only one of six major functions that a School Library Media Coordinator
performs, it is a primary responsibility. Good teaching is good teaching no matter where it takes place--in the
classroom, in the media center, or outside the school setting. Observation and evaluation of School Library Media
Coordinators should reflect the similarities to and the differences from other teaching situations.


DOCUMENTATION:              Do not expect to see all of the evidences listed below. There are many ways to
                            document Managing Instruction. You will want to be confident that students are
                            being taught Information Skills and Computer Skills in an effective manner.

A.   Evidence of Flexible Access to the media center resources, services, and facilities
     1.    Plan book showing flexible access by classes, small groups, and individuals
     2.    Forms available for planning with teachers
     3.    File folder system for tracking instruction and research activities with students in each class.

B.   Instructional plans
     1.     Daily outlines
     2.     Units of study
     3.     Bibliographies
     4.     Organized activity file (by teacher, content, and/or grade)
     5.     Current professional resources (journals, books, audiovisuals)

C.   Correlation/integration strategies and tools
     1.     Notes from collaborative planning sessions with teachers, memos/email
     2.     Working copies of North Carolina Standard Course of Study and LEA scope and sequence

D.   Collaborative assessment instruments
     1.    Rubrics
     2.    Student performance checklists

E.   Displays, skills/interest centers that are current, relevant to curricula, understandable to students, attractive, and
     student-centered.




OBSERVING THE LESSON/ACTIVITY

1.   How is time used for instruction?

2.   How does the School Library Media Coordinator handle multiple concurrent instructional activities? (i.e.,
     student comes from a classroom for help with a research question while small groups of students are already
     working on other projects in the media center)

3.   What methods are used to teach the relevant Information Skills and Computer Skills?

4.   Are students involved and participating in learning activities?

5.   How are students monitored during a lesson/activity?
     - behavior
     - learning/understanding


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6.   What evidence exists that demonstrates planning with teachers for related, correlated, or integrated
     lessons?

7.   What materials were used with the lesson/activity? Were they ready and accessible when needed?

8.   How do students know how they are doing in terms of instructional goals and learning expectations?

9.   What does the School Library Media Coordinator do to facilitate the learning of all students, including those
     who are having difficulty meeting learning expectations?


2. MAJOR FUNCTION: MANAGING PUBLIC RELATIONS
The School Library Media Coordinator initiates interaction with students, staff, administration, and general public for
purposes of integrating, promoting, and expanding the Media Program .


METHODS OF EVALUATION: Interview and review of documentation. Observation of interactions with
students and teachers should be continuous, over a period of time.


INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:

1.   Describe strategies you use to create a positive working relationship with other members of the faculty.

         LOOK FOR:
         Committee assignments; voluntary participation in general programs of the school; cooperation with
         teachers in non-media activities; special notices or events when new resources arrive, special area in the
         media center for teachers and/or services to meet needs of all teachers.

2.   What methods do you use to alert students, faculty, and community to the media center’s available services
     and resources?

         LOOK FOR:
         Web sites, email, memos, bulletin boards, fliers, announcements, news articles, signs, newsletters, programs,
         involvement with other organizations.

3.   How do you promote positive relationships between yourself and the students?

         LOOK FOR:
         Evidence of involvement with students and their activities; incentives for student use of the media center;
         assistance provided in a helpful, professional manner; activities that engage students; student assistants
         being used (where applicable).

4.   Describe methods you use to promote and maintain a good relationship between the school and the
     community?

         LOOK FOR:
         Web sites, newsletters; participation in PTA/PTO activities; use of parent/community volunteers; special
         events such as family reading nights, book and technology fairs, and author visits; information about the
         Media Program contributed to local media outlets and civic organizations; cooperation with the public
         library and community learning centers.




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3. MAJOR FUNCTION: PLANNING FOR THE PROGRAM
The School Library Media Coordinator designs and implements short- and long-range plans that allow a balance
among integrated skills instruction, literature appreciation, planning with teachers, and collection management and
development.


METHODS OF EVALUATION: Interview and review of documentation.


INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:

1.   What are your annual and long-range plans for the Media Program ? How were they formulated? Describe this
     year’s goals and objectives. How do you assess progress toward goals?

          LOOK FOR:
          Written plans, goals, and objectives; evidence that the plans were based on student/teacher needs and the
          school’s mission statement; evidence of input from others (such as the Media and Technology Advisory
          Committee) regarding the Media Program and its assessment - i.e., surveys, suggestion box, questionnaires;
          use of local, regional, state, and national guidelines (e.g., IMPACT: Guidelines for Media and Technology
          Programs, State Technology Plan, and Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning).

2.   How do you plan with teachers for an integrated instructional program?

          LOOK FOR:
          Integrated lesson plans; use of scope and sequence adopted by the school; flexible access for a variety of
          learning activities; explanation of how mutual planning takes place; participation in curriculum planning/
          grade-level/departmental meetings.

3.   What strategies do you use to motivate students to read?

          LOOK FOR:
          Promotion through the instructional program: booktalks, storytelling, visiting authors (on site or online);
          school-wide promotions: book fairs, literature festivals; sustained silent reading times for all, incentive
          programs; special events during Children’s Book Week (November), School Library Media Month (April);
          National Library Week (April); posters; displays; contests.

4.   How is use of the media center planned? What strategies do you use to make sure there is a balance between
     meeting instructional needs and performing the organizational/management tasks?

          LOOK FOR:
          Evidence of flexibility; planning book indicating teaching and non-teaching activities.




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4. MAJOR FUNCTION: MANAGING RESOURCES
The School Library Media Coordinator establishes and carries out procedures for effective and efficient selection,
acquisition, cataloging, processing, accessing, and maintaining materials and equipment.


METHODS OF EVALUATION: Interview and review of documentation.


INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:

1.   How do you provide leadership to the Media and Technology Advisory Committee? (Is there a MTAC? Who is on
     it? How is membership determined? How often does the MTAC meet? Are minutes kept of meetings? How do
     you use data from the MTAC meetings? Does the MTAC know the policy and procedures for responding to
     challenges to materials? Does the MTAC handle challenges to materials when they occur?

         LOOK FOR:
         Agenda and minutes from the MTAC; challenge form in School Library Media Coordinator’s files. (See
         Program Administration chapter of IMPACT: Guidelines for Media and Technology Programs for information
         about the MTAC, Selection Policy, and challenge form). Look for routine communication with the MTAC and
         school faculty about selection policy and other matters; records of how any challenges were handled.

2.   How do you analyze the collection? Has there been an analysis by outside sources, such as a hired consultant or
     SACS team?

         LOOK FOR:
         A collection development plan; a system for gathering input from teachers (i.e., surveys, forms, suggestion
         box, informal and formal input); involvement of the MTAC in analysis; a system for withdrawal of materials.
         The observer is encouraged to browse through the collection for evidence of current curricular and
         recreational reading resources.

3.   What selection tools do you regularly use? Do you have access to them in your media center? If not, where do
     you get them?

         LOOK FOR:
         Standard selection tools (e.g., Elementary School Library Collection, Booklist, School Library Journal,
         Children’s Catalog, Middle and Junior High School Library Catalog, and Senior High School Library Catalog)
         being used--NOT publishers’ catalogs being circulated to teachers. In addition, look for use of InfoTech: The
         Advisory List and the EvaluTech Web site from the NCDPI; wish/want files with selection sources/
         requesting individual indicated; evidence that curriculum/developmental levels are being considered; and
         attendance at book exhibits. (Certain standard selection tools should be available for use somewhere in the
         school system. It is not a fair expectation for the School Library Media Coordinator to have to go to a
         university or public library to borrow/use selection tools).

4.   Have you defined an acquisitions process? What is it?

         LOOK FOR:
         Order times established and deadlines met; orders that are put together from a list of titles specifically
         selected--instead of pre-printed catalog order forms (pre-selected sets of books should be avoided, and
         orders should be placed to a variety of companies or a jobber--not to only one catalog or salesman); use of
         parent volunteers and/or student assistants (when available) to process new materials; adding MARC
         records for new resources on a consistent basis; absence of boxes of new resources filling the back room,
         remaining unprocessed; system for inspecting new materials; evidence that when damaged or
         inappropriate goods are received, they are returned for refund or replacement.


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5.   What strategies do you use to insure accessibility to resources?

          LOOK FOR:
          Materials arranged in a way that promotes use; circulation/operational procedures that are standardized and
          make it easy to retrieve resources; media center open all day-before, during, and after school (School
          Library Media Coordinators need released time to eat lunch); new materials being displayed; teachers
          being notified when new materials arrive; bibliographies, student access to a variety of resources, not just
          books; provisions for overnight checkout of certain resources (such as reference books); print or online
          periodicals; up-to-date online catalog; a variety of activities going on in the media center-large groups,
          small groups, and individuals using resources.

6.   How do you assure that there is a variety of instructional resources to meet curriculum objectives and learning
     styles?

          LOOK FOR:
          Evidence that the School Library Media Coordinator knows what is taught in the various curriculum areas
          and grade levels, and can discuss available resources in light of that information; evidence that the School
          Library Media Coordinator knows why specific media were purchased; representative sample of print and
          nonprint resources (videos, Web sites – free and subscription based, computer software, etc.); current
          Information File and Community Resource File.

7.   How do you administer the Media Program budget? What kinds of records do you keep? Are you able to
     determine: amounts spent for books, audiovisual materials, online resources, equipment, magazines, etc.? Do
     you know balances in various categories or line items?

          LOOK FOR:
          A budget plan and procedure that involves the Media and Technology Advisory Committee(s); records in
          place for several years, up-to-date, and clearly indicating allocations and balances; a plan for future major
          equipment purchases; work with committees to establish priorities for school and special areas, such as
          Federal projects, if appropriate.

8.   How do you promote the use of current and emerging technologies? (How do you keep up with what is new?)

          LOOK FOR:
          Collaboration with the Instructional Technology Facilitator and teachers to promote the integration of a
          variety of technology resources into classroom instruction; promotion of the use of Internet-based
          resources, online courses, and other distance-learning resources; promotion of school television
          programming; evidence of efforts to investigate the value of emerging technologies for education; staff
          development opportunities identified or provided such as Web site design; non-print and Internet
          resources cataloged as part of the collection.

9.   What strategies do you use to maintain the media collection?

          LOOK FOR:
          A plan for weeding the collection on a regular basis (When browsing through the collection, is it obvious
          that the collection is consistently weeded of obsolete, inaccurate and worn, unattractive materials? School
          Library Media Coordinators often combine the weeding process with ongoing inventory.); a procedure for
          deciding whether to mend or discard any damaged or worn materials; materials and supplies for simple
          repair and mending readily available; a plan for replacing worn-out, obsolete equipment; equipment
          awaiting pick-up for repair labeled according to system policy; absence of piles of unshelved books, dusty
          equipment, discarded newspapers and magazines, and boxes of unprocessed materials; systems for
          deleting records from online catalog when resources are removed from collection and evidence that this is
          done; updated Information and Community Resource files.




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5. MAJOR FUNCTION: MANAGING THE FACILITY
The School Library Media Coordinator organizes the facility and resources so that they reflect the philosophy and
goals of the school and its Media Program.


METHOD OF EVALUATION: Observation


QUESTIONS THE OBSERVER SHOULD ASK HIM/HERSELF:

1.   Upon entering the media center, how can I locate various areas—circulation; reference; fiction/nonfiction;
     periodicals; storytelling (elementary); listening/viewing; computing; nonprint materials? [When the facility is too
     small, some areas will be combined with others. When wiring/electrical outlets are inadequate, listening/
     viewing stations are placed where the power is.]

         LOOK FOR:
         Large signs and/or mobiles identifying general areas, student maps, student handbooks, furniture
         arrangement to accommodate large groups and small groups.

2.   How easy is it to find materials?

         LOOK FOR:
         Clearly labeled shelves; alphabetical arrangement of magazines; absence of objects in front of shelving;
         student access to nonprint resources; circulation desk near entrance.

3.   Is the media center well organized? What has the School Library Media Coordinator done to make the media
     center a place where people can work and learn? (Be objective about what factors the School Library Media
     Coordinator can control).

         LOOK FOR:
         Displays of student work and new materials; signs stated in positive terms; plants/pictures/ posters;
         cleanliness.

4.   Are teaching materials, catalogs, etc. filed for easy accessibility? (In some schools, one area may serve as office/
     workroom/production/storage.The main thing to look for is organization of what is there. Can items be found
     easily?)

5.   Is the workroom neat and organized? Where/how are supplies stored?

6.   Are storage areas neat and uncluttered?

         LOOK FOR:
         Absence of obsolete equipment, boxes/piles of out-of-date books, periodicals, newspapers. (Be aware that
         some media centers, having very little storage space, often will be full of materials. The objective should be
         to have a neat, clean, well-organized space, even when full.)

7.   To what extent are health and safety regulations considered in the arrangement of the facility?

         LOOK FOR:
         Uncluttered aisles and spaces between tables wide enough for a wheelchair; flammable materials (e.g.,
         rubber cement, spray paint, equipment cleaners) stored properly; safe production/workroom area (e.g.,
         paper cutters and laminators inaccessible to young students); extension cords used in accordance to fire
         codes.


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6. MAJOR FUNCTION: PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES
The School Library Media Coordinator provides opportunities for personal and professional growth for him/herself as
well as for the school’s staff and students. S/he also carries out assigned non-instructional duties; adheres to
established laws, policies, rules, and regulations; and submits accurate reports promptly.


METHOD OF EVALUATION: Interview and review of documentation. Observation of some activities is
possible.


INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:

1.   How do you keep up-to-date in a rapidly changing profession such as yours? How is this addressed in the
     professional development plan?

            LOOK FOR:
            Membership in professional organizations such as AASL, ALA, NCLA, NCASL, AECT, NCAECT, NCSLMA;
            professional journals regularly scanned for program and collection development information; meetings and
            workshops attended; college credits earned; newly-acquired skills; visits to other media centers.

2.   What, if any, methods do you use for training student assistants and media assistants? (Where applicable)

3.   How do you orient new students, new teachers to the media center? Is there a media center handbook?

4.   How do you inform the faculty about new equipment, production techniques, copyright rules, the school-
     system and building-level selection policies, and the collection development plan?

            LOOK FOR:
            Training sessions conducted with faculty; professional collection for faculty use; media handbook and
            training manuals; observed assistance with equipment and materials; forms used to communicate
            information to teachers; displays or communication promoting new resources; bibliographies; copyright
            notices posted near copiers, VCRs and computers providing copyright information; Selection Policy
            available; familiarity with challenged materials procedures and availability of relevant forms.

5.   What non-instructional duties have you been assigned or volunteered for?

            LOOK FOR:
            Committee assignments; participation in departmental and grade-level meetings; clubs sponsored, other
            school duties-- i.e., sports events, PTA/PTO, social events.

6.   What kinds of reports are you required to submit? How do you know when they are due? Do you get them in
     on time? What systems do you use to assure that reports are accurate?

            LOOK FOR:
            Inventories of furniture, equipment, and collection; budget records, annual reports, including the NCDPI
            Annual Media and Technology Report (AMTR).




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                                                                                     Personnel Evaluation
                                                                                              Technology Facilitator



                          TECHNOLOGY FACILITATOR JOB DESCRIPTION

Title: TECHNOLOGY FACILITATOR
Location: Building-Level
License: NC Teacher Licensure + 18079 Special Endorsement in Computer Education
Reports to: Principal

NATURE OF WORK

The technology facilitator is the key instructional technology specialist for the school. This individual provides
training and support to the staff on technology integration, the North Carolina Computer/ Technology Skills
Curriculum, the North Carolina Technology Competencies for Educators, and administrative applications.The
employee assists with identifying, acquiring, and maintaining hardware, software, and network products. This
individual also assists in the implementation of the system and building-level technology plans.

ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLES OF WORK

1.    Provides onsite assistance to staff in selection of technology resources and solutions.
2.    Conducts staff development in the areas of technology integration, the North Carolina Computer/
      Technology Skills Curriculum, and the North Carolina Technology Competencies for Educators.
3.    Provides leadership and coordination to develop, implement, and update a school instructional technology
      plan focusing on the integration of technology into the instructional program.
4.    Models the integration of technology in all curriculum areas.
5.    Assists with fixed asset and inventory activities of technology products.
6.    Engages in ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of the informational and instructional technology
      planning, program, and staff development.
7.    Serves as source of information on trends, research, applications, and effective practices related to
      technology use in the school program.
8.    Provides technical advice and assistance to building-level users of technology.
9.    Helps teachers develop curriculum materials and specific lesson plans to utilize technology.
10.   Assists in planning and supervising the installation and maintenance of computer networks.
11.   Serves as the school contact for solving hardware and software problems.
12.   Facilitates school participation in special activities; e.g., NC Test of Computer Skills, Computer Learning
      Month, awards, contests, and grants.
13.   Attends meetings and staff development functions as necessary to develop skills.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES

Knowledge of pre K-12 curriculum.
Effective communication and interpersonal skills.
Knowledge of technology resources and systems.

SUGGESTED TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE

Teaching experience in preK-12
18079 Special Endorsement in Computer Education or equivalent




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                                                                                                             Page 63
Personnel Evaluation
Technology Facilitator



                         Standards and Criteria for Technology Facilitators

1. Vision
   The technology facilitator is an educational leader who facilitates the development, implementation,
   and communication of a shared vision of learning that reflects excellence and equity for all students.
   1.1 Participates in the development of a broad vision and goals for the school.
   1.2 Develops strategies and priorities for implementing the school’s vision via the School
        Improvement Plan.
   1.3 Communicates the school’s vision, goals, and priorities to appropriate constituencies.
   1.4 Provides leadership and coordination to develop, implement, and update a school instructional
        technology plan focusing on the infusion of technology into the instructional program.
   1.5 Evaluates the instructional technology program in relation to achieving the school’s improvement goals
        and develops appropriate modifications.

2. High Student Performance
   The technology facilitator is an educational leader, teacher, and instructional partner who collaborates
   with the instructional staff in the development of organizational, instructional, and assessment
   strategies to maximize educational achievement.
    2.1 Coordinates the implementation of a school instructional technology plan, based on the system level
        technology plan, focusing on the integration of technology into the instructional program.
    2.2 Collaborates with teachers to assess learning needs and technology skills of students.
    2.3 Leads teachers in the development of curriculum materials and lesson plans integrating appropriate
        technology competencies with the North Carolina Standard Course of Study.
    2.4 Collaborates with teachers, media staff and students to select and evaluate technology resources that
        address curricular needs and learning goals of students and teachers.
    2.5 Collaborates with the Media Coordinator to provide leadership in the school’s use of instructional
        technology resources to enhance learning.
    2.6 Instructs students in the effective use of technology by modeling and mentoring classroom
        teachers.
    2.7 Advocates and promotes life-long learning.

3. Safe, Orderly, and Caring Schools
   The technology facilitator is an educational leader who works collaboratively to ensure a working and
   learning climate for all students that is safe, secure, and respectful of diversity.
    3.1 Demonstrates high ethical and professional standards.
    3.2 Creates and maintains a safe and orderly environment conducive to learning.
    3.3 Models and advocates safe and responsible use of technology.
    3.4 Facilitates equitable access to technology resources for all students.
    3.5 Identifies and uses technology resources that affirm diversity.
    3.6 Develops, implements and communicates procedures consistent with school, LEA, state, and
        national technology related policies.

4. Quality Teachers, Administrators, and Staff
   The technology facilitator is an educational leader who promotes continuous improvement of
   teaching and learning by participating in professional growth activities and by providing staff develop-
   ment opportunities and resources.
    4.1 Updates professional knowledge and skills on a continuous basis.
    4.2 Plans, develops and conducts staff development in the areas of technology integration correlated with
        the North Carolina Computer/Technology Skills Curriculum, and the North Carolina Technology
        Competencies for Educators.
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                                                                                  Personnel Evaluation
                                                                                           Technology Facilitator



   4.3 Assists with staff development for administrative applications.
   4.4 Serves as a source of information on trends, research, applications, and effective practices related to
       technology use in the school program.
   4.5 Supports the induction of new educators and demonstrates pride in education as a profession.
   4.6 Evaluates continually the effects of his or her choices and actions and is a reflective practitioner.

5. Strong Family, Community, and Business Support
   The technology facilitator is an educational leader who promotes family, business, and community
   partnerships that support the academic success, career readiness and general well-being of all
   children.
    5.1 Advocates information and technology literacy.
    5.2 Encourages the use of technology resources to facilitate communication with family, community and
        business.
    5.3 Interacts with the community to promote and enhance the school technology program.
    5.4 Works cooperatively with other agencies to share resources and services that enhance teaching and
        learning.

6. Effective and Efficient Operation
   The technology facilitator is an educational leader who uses organizational and leadership skills to
   achieve effective and efficient coordination of the school’s instructional technology program in order
   to maximize educational achievement.
    6.1 Manages the available technology resources to achieve school goals.
    6.2 Provides technical advice and assistance to building level users of technology.
    6.3 Assists with identifying, acquiring, and maintaining hardware, software, and network products.
    6.4 Maintains, or documents the need for, a flexible schedule for the school computer lab(s).
    6.5 Leads, in partnership with Media Coordinator, the Media and Technology Advisory Committee in
        effective decision making to promote the school technology program.




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                                                                                                  Personnel Evaluation
                                                                                      Distance Learning Instructional Assistant




                   DISTANCE LEARNING INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT



NATURE OF WORK

An individual in this class supports the delivery of instruction at a distance learning facility. The assistant facili-
tates the interaction between the student and the distant learning instructor.This individual assists in the
monitoring of student behavior and class participation. Assistants are expected to be familiar with the function-
ing of system hardware to ensure satisfactory program transmission during instructional hours.The assistant is
responsible for the distribution and collection of instructional materials.

ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLES OF WORK

1        Monitors work assigned by instructor.
2        Monitors student behavior.
3        Monitors equipment operation.
4        Reports technical difficulties.
5        Records courses for replay.
6        Distributes and collects instructional materials.
7        Monitors and facilitates instruction.
8        Keep records, e.g., registration, attendance, facility scheduling, evaluations.
9        Receives direction from the distance learning instructor.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES

       Ability to operate equipment.
       Ability to record data accurately.
       Ability to effectively manage and monitor students.
       Effective communication and interpersonal skills.

SUGGESTED TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE

         High school diploma or GED. Possession of an equivalent combination of training and experience
         which provides the required knowledge, skills, and abilities for the position.Training on specific
         distance learning equipment.




         This specification has been designed to represent the general nature and level of work found in positions in this class. As
         such, it is not intended to contain all of the duties and qualifications required of an employee in a single position (job).
         Consequently, it is not to be perceived as a position (job) description or as identification of essential functions as required
         by ADA.


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                                                                                                                              Page 67
IMPACT for Administrators
Page 66
IMPACT                       for Administrators
         A Resource for Evaluating Media and Technology
                                 Programs and Personnel




School Library Media and
  Instructional Technology Personnel Evaluation

  Media Coordinator Performance Appraisal Instrument
IMPACT for Administrators
Page 68
                                                    Davidson County Schools

                                  Performance Appraisal Instrument
Instructional Technology Specialist

      Name:                                                               SS#:          /       /

      Date:                                                               School Year

Instructions:

1. Based on the evidence from observation and discussion, the evaluator is to rate the employee’s performance with respect to
    each of the function areas listed below.
2. The evaluator is encouraged to add pertinent comments at the end of each major function.
3. The employee is provided an opportunity to react to the evaluator’s ratings and comments.
4. The evaluator and employee must discuss the results of the appraisal and any recommended action pertinent to it.
5. The employee and the evaluator must sign the instrument in the assigned spaces.
6. The instrument must be filed in the employee’s personnel folder.
7. The rating scale will be as follows:


                                                              Rating Scale
1. Unsatisfactory             2. Below                    3. At Standard                    4. Above Standard


Major Functions:

1. Program Management                                                                       1       2       3        4




1.1      Assists in developing comprehensive school-based and district-level program plans.
2.2      Assists in implementing the planned programs.
2.3      Effectively models/leads the on-going program.
2.4      Assists in evaluating the program.



Comments:


2. Instructional Management                                                                 1       2       3         4




2.1      Provides training to teachers in the use of current technology to meet curriculum goals.
2.2      Provides training to teachers in computer competencies.
2.3      Provides training to teachers to ensure integration of student computer competencies as outlined by the state.
2.4      Assists in the development of activities that help integrate technology into various curriculum areas at local and state levels.
2.5      Maintains current knowledge of technology and instructional practices that relate to the use of technology.
2.6      Provides resource information about new techniques and practices that relate to the use of technology as a learning tool.
2.7      Teaches formal workshops for renewal credit mini-session on single topic for the staff of assigned schools.

Comments:
                                                                                                                            Page 69
3. Information Management                                                             1        2       3      4



3.1   Communicates with school and district personnel, parents and community to share information about the technology
      program.
3.2   Serves as a liaison between the school district and local, state, and federal agencies.
3.3   Assists in the development of in-service programs to develop and improve staff compentences.
3.4   Assists with special projects, i.e. telecommunications, multimedia, desktop publishing.
3.5   Works with school media specialists to maintain accurate records involving computer use, inventories, and maintenance.
3.6   Assesses the needs of assigned schools and communicates such to the appropriate personnel or technology committee.
3.7   Follows ethical guidelines applicable to the position as outlines by professional organizations and/or state, local, and
      federal laws, rules and regulations.



Comments:




4. Technology Management                                                              1        2       3      4




4.1    Provides assistance in selecting, ordering, receiving, and installing new equipment software.
4.2    Assesses the need for miscellaneous items such as cables, power strips power cords,
       adapters, etc.
4.3    Assists school personnel in securing supplies for classroom and lab use.
4.4    Facilitates the use of computer labs.
4.5    Supports the use of computers in classrooms.
4.6    Troubleshoots hardware and software problems and recommends repairs as needed.

Comments:


                                                    Summary Comments


Evaluator’s Summary Comments:



Employees’ Reaction to Evaluation:




Evaluator’s Signature                              Title                              Date



Employee’s Signature                                                                  Date


Mentor’s Signature                                                                    Date

Signature indicates that the written evaluation has been seen and discussed and does not imply agreement or
disagreement with the evaluation.
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