tyrannosaurus rex cal by kpdAfJX

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 7

									                   Tyrannosaurus Rex
                                                              OVERVIEW: Preview book and vocabulary,
DATE:     [Insert Day/Date Here]                              read, discuss, create a prehistoric timeline, do
SESSION 1                                                     a reproducible or an online activity

MATERIALS LIST:
Books, 6 X 18 drawing paper, tape, rulers or yardsticks, colored pencils, markers, crayons, pencils
Alternate Activity: Tyrannosaurus Rex Facts reproducible, pencils
Alternate Online Activity: Computer with internet access

          PREVIEW BOOK
          Pass out Tyrannosaurus Rex to each student. Tell students they will be learning many interesting facts
          about this fearsome beast. Tyrannosaurus Rex (T-Rex) was a huge, meat-eating dinosaur, who walked
          upright on two strong and powerful legs. T. rex's jaws were up to 4 feet long and had 50 to 60 sharp,
          jagged teeth that ranged in size from very small to over 9 inches long. T Rex could eat other large
          dinosaurs like Triceratops. You may know a few facts about this most famous dinosaur, but you are
          sure to learn something new about this king of the tyrant lizards in this book.
         DISCUSSION
10 - 15   Let students flip through pages of the book. Start a group discussion by asking the following questions:
 min.          What kind of dinosaur was Tyrannosaurus rex?
               When did Tyrannosaurus rex live? Where did it live?

         VOCABULARY
5 - 10     atmosphere (AT-muhss-fihr) the blanket of gases that surrounds the Earth. Changes in Earth’s
min.        atmosphere have caused climate changes.
           climate (KLYE-mit) the usual weather in a place. Paleontologists believe dinosaurs could not
            survive in a very cold climate.
           fossils (FOSS-uhls) evidence of plants and animals that lived long ago. Fossils can include bones,
            footprints, teeth, or leaf imprints on rocks. Paleontologists learn about dinosaurs from fossils.
           paleontologist (PAY-lee-uhn-TOL-uh-jist) a scientist who studies prehistoric life. Paleontologists
            figure out what dinosaurs looked like by putting fossils bones together.
           predator (PRED uh tur) an animal that hunts other animals for food. Tyrannosaurus rex was a
            predator.
           prehistoric (pree-hi-STOR-ik) from the time before history was recorded. Tyrannosaurus rex, like all
            dinosaurs, was a prehistoric reptile.
           prey (PRAY) an animal that is hunted by another animal for food. The Tyrannosaurus rex’s excellent
            sense of smell helped it find prey.
           reptiles (REP-tilez) cold-blooded animals that crawl on the ground or creep on short legs. Dinosaurs
            were large, leathery-skinned reptiles.
           serrated (SER-ay-tid) having jagged edges. Its serrated teeth allowed Tyrannosaurus rex to rip
            through flesh easily.
           tyrant (TYE-ruhnt) someone who rules other people in a cruel or unjust way. Tyrannosaurus rex
            means “king of the tyrant lizards.”
        PARTS OF THE BOOK
5 - 10      Include students the cover of the book and read the title aloud. Ask: What kind of animal is this?
min.          (It is a dinosaur. Students might also say that it is a Tyrannosaurus rex, a reptile, extinct, or
              prehistoric.) Explain to students that dinosaurs were reptiles, like lizards and crocodiles.
             Take a picture walk through the book to point out the amazing photographs and illustrations.
              Show students that there are captions on the photographs that point out important information.
             Point out the timeline of prehistoric periods on Earth on pages 38-39. Tell students that
              Tyrannosaurus rex lived during the end of the Cretaceous period. It was one of the last kinds of
              dinosaurs to roam the earth. (Triceratops and Velociraptor also lived during the Cretaceous
              period, but they came on the scene earlier than Tyrannosaurus rex.) Discuss the fact that
              humans did not exist at the same time as the dinosaurs in spite of what we see on TV and in
              the movies. Perhaps students have observed dinosaur skeletons at a museum. Ask: Has
              anyone seen a dinosaur skeleton? Allow time for students to share their experiences.
             Show students how to use the inserted pages, 7 and 26-27. Explain that these pages provide
              additional information for the reader. Show students that as they finish reading page 16, the
              regular text continues on page 18. Explain to students that they may wish to skip over the
              inserted pages and go back to them later.
             Next, turn to the table of contents and read the chapter titles aloud. Ask students to predict what
              the book will be about. Ask: On what page should we look to find out about Tyrannosaurus rex
              fossils? What other things do you predict we will learn about the Tyrannosaurus in this book?
              (The book might tell about T. rex’s size, what it ate, and how it became extinct.)
             Ask students to turn to the index on page 47. Explain that an index lists important topics in the
              book and shows the page numbers where readers can find out about these topics. Ask: Where
              should we look to find out about Sue, the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex
              skeleton ever found? (pages 32, 33, 34, and 35) Turn to those pages. Read the caption on
              page 32 together.
             Turn to “Important Words” on page 46 and introduce key vocabulary. Explain to students that
              they will find vocabulary words in bold print in the text. For example, have them find the word
              “tyrant” on page 6. Talk about why Tyrannosaurus rex was given a name that means tyrant, or
              cruel ruler.
             Look at pages 44 and 45 with students. Tell them that these are library and online resources
              where they can learn more about topics in the book.

       READING
20 – 25 Read pages 5-18
 min.       Include you or students are reading aloud, use think-aloud strategies to help with
              comprehension. Share your thoughts before, during, and after reading. After reading a page or
              two of the book, pause to ask: What did we learn from these pages? What are the most
              important ideas? Have we found answers to any of our questions? If so, jot down the answers.
             Encourage students to use text features, photographs, illustrations, and charts to assist them
              with their reading. Remind students to use the list of Important Words to help them with key
              vocabulary.
             Encourage students to make personal connections between the text and their own experiences
              (text-to-self connections). Guide students to think about connections between the text and other
              books about dinosaurs they have read (text-to-text connections). How does what students have
              learned from the text connect to recent information or news about Tyrannosaurus rex (text-to-
              world connections)?
       ACTIVITY – Create a Prehistoric Timeline
60-90    Have students make a time line of prehistoric Earth to show the Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous,
 min.       and Tertiary periods. Provide each student with two pieces of 6" x 18" drawing paper, taped end-
            to-end to form a wide strip. Have students use rulers or a yardstick to draw a double line about 2
            inches above the bottom edge. Students should then draw three evenly spaced vertical lines to
            divide the time line into four sections. Using pages 38-39 for guidance, students should label the
            four periods and write how many million years ago (m.y.a.) each period occurred. Using crayons
            or colored pencils, students should draw Tyrannosaurus rex and an early human on the timeline.
            They can then add a background. You can point out the kinds of trees that appeared in each
            prehistoric period, and encourage students to use this information as they draw the background.

            Note: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record how well students completed their timelines.


       ALTERNATE ACTIVITY
15-20    Make copies of the Tyrannosaurus Rex Facts reproducible so there is one copy for each
 min.       student. Have students complete the page to fill in the missing words and unscramble the letters
            to form a word.

            Note: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record how well students completed the reproducible.


       ALTERNATE ONLINE ACTIVITY
20-30    If online resources are available, students can learn more about T. rex through each of the
 min.       following activities. Make sure that the computer’s sound is turned on before you begin.

        Go to: http://goafterschool.grolier.com.
        Click on Grolier Online Kids.
        Type in a search for Tyrannosaurus rex.
        Click the first item on the list of articles, Tyrannosaurus. Read the article.
        Click on the Web Links button at the top of the page.
        Scroll down and then click on T-rex Runs, But Slowly. Read the article.
        Use the back button on your browser to return to the list of articles. Scroll down to find and click on
        Tyrannosaurus rex. Watch the animation of a T. rex running.
                   Tyrannosaurus Rex
                                                                  OVERVIEW: Review, read, discuss, create
DATE:     [Insert Day/Date Here]                                  dinosaur bones, do a reproducible or an
SESSION 2                                                         online activity

MATERIALS LIST:
Books, white self-hardening clay, toothpicks
Alternate Activity: Predator or Scavenger reproducible, pencils
Alternate Online Activity: computers with internet access


         DISCUSSION
10 – 15   Review what was already covered in the book. Ask the following, adding additional questions based on
 min.     students’ answers.
               How large was Tyrannosaurus rex? What did it look like? What made it different from other
                 dinosaurs?
               Books, movies, and TV programs often show Tyrannosaurus rex as a frightening, aggressive
                 predator. How are paleontologists trying to find out if this is true or false?

         READING
20 – 25   Read pages 19-27
 min.         If you or students are reading aloud, use think-aloud strategies to help with comprehension.
                Share your thoughts before, during, and after reading. After reading a page or two of the book,
                pause to ask: What did we learn from these pages? What are the most important ideas? Have
                we found answers to any of our questions? If so, jot down the answers.

               Encourage students to use text features, photographs, illustrations, and charts to assist them
                with their reading. Remind students to use the list of Important Words to help them with key
                vocabulary.

               Encourage students to make personal connections between the text and their own experiences
                (text-to-self connections). Guide students to think about connections between the text and other
                books about dinosaurs they have read (text-to-text connections). How does what students have
                learned from the text connect to recent information or news about Tyrannosaurus rex (text-to-
                world connections)?


         ACTIVITY – Create and Excavate Bones
30 – 45    Have students make T-Rex bones or teeth which they can then “excavate”. Provide students with
 min.         white self-hardening clay and have them create several T-Rex teeth or bones. Let them use the
              point of a toothpick to etch their initials in each of their creations. Collect all of the teeth and bones
              and let dry until the next session. At the next session, bury the hardened teeth and bones in a
              large box or container of sand, dirt, or even Styrofoam peanuts. Let each student search through
              the sand to locate their marked clay pieces.

              Note: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record students’ effort and participation.
       ALTERNATE ACTIVITY – Predator or Scavenger?
20-30    Make copies of the Predator or Scavenger reproducible so there is one copy for each student.
 min.       Have students complete the page and write a paragraph to explain which traits support the theory
            that Tyrannosaurus rex was a predator, and which traits support the theory that Tyrannosaurus
            rex was a scavenger.

           Note: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record how well students’ completed the assignment.

       ALTERNATE ONLINE ACTIVITY
20-30    If online resources are available, students can learn more about T. rex through each of the
 min.       following activities. Make sure that the computer’s sound is turned on before you begin.

           Go to: http://goafterschool.grolier.com.
            Click on Grolier Online Kids.
            Type in a search for Tyrannosaurus rex.
            Click on the Web Links button at the top of the page.
            Scroll down to find and click on Sue at the Field Museum. Read all about Sue, take the Sue
            Quiz, and send a Sue E-card to a friend. Click on Just for Kids to download images and play
            games.
                   Tyrannosaurus Rex
                                                             OVERVIEW: Review, read, discuss,
DATE:     [Insert Day/Date Here]                             summarize, write like a paleontologist,
SESSION 3                                                    excavate your dinosaur bones, act like a
                                                             dinosaur, or do an online activity.

MATERIALS LIST:
Books, paper, pencils, (Optional: computer with internet access)
Follow-up Activity: large box of sand, dirt or Styrofoam peanuts, hardened clay bones and teeth from session two
Alternate Activity: (Optional: additional dinosaur books)
Alternate Online Activity: computer with internet access


         DISCUSSION
10 – 15   Review what was already covered in the book. Ask the following, adding additional questions based on
 min.     students’ answers.
               How have paleontologists learned about the eating habits of Tyrannosaurus rex?
               If you were a paleontologist what would you want to find out about a Tyrannosaurus rex?

         READING
20 – 25   Read pages 28-43
 min.         If you or students are reading aloud, use think-aloud strategies to help with comprehension.
                Share your thoughts before, during, and after reading. After reading a page or two of the book,
                pause to ask: What did we learn from these pages? What are the most important ideas? Have
                we found answers to any of our questions? If so, jot down the answers.
               Encourage students to use text features, photographs, illustrations, and charts to assist them
                with their reading. Remind students to use the list of Important Words to help them with key
                vocabulary.
               Encourage students to make personal connections between the text and their own experiences
                (text-to-self connections). Guide students to think about connections between the text and other
                books about dinosaurs they have read (text-to-text connections). How does what students have
                learned from the text connect to recent information or news about Tyrannosaurus rex (text-to-
                world connections)?

         DISCUSS AND SUMMARIZE
20 – 30       Summarize the most important things you have learned about Tyrannosaurus rex.
  min
               In your opinion, was Tyrannosaurus rex the fierce predator that we see in the movies and on
                TV?
               How do paleontologists determine how quickly Tyrannosaurus rex could run and how it caught
                and killed its prey?
               From the size of its head and its keen senses, what can you determine about the
                intelligence of Tyrannosaurus rex?
              NOTE: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record how well students participated in the
               discussion.
       ACTIVITY – Be a Paleontologist for a Day
45-60    Ask students to imagine having a job as a paleontologist. (You may wish to have students go
            online to: www.amnh.org and listen to the stories of the paleontologists who work with the
            Museum of Natural History.) Invite students to write a fictional story telling about their experiences
            as paleontologists both in the field and in the museum laboratory. Tell students to write their
            stories in the first-person (using “I).

            NOTE: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record how well students completed the assignment.

       ALTERNATE ACTIVITY – Act Like a Dinosaur
30-45    Divide students into small groups of 2-3 students. Ask each group to create a short skit showing
            the movements and habits of a type of dinosaur they have read about. Students should
            pantomime the dinosaurs’ actions. Based on their knowledge of dinosaurs, the rest of the class
            should try to guess which dinosaur is being represented in the skit. Note: you may want to share
            other dinosaur books with students before doing this activity.

            NOTE: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record how well students presented their model.

       ALTERNATE ONLINE ACTIVITY
20-30    If online resources are available, students can learn more about T. rex through each of the
 min.       following activities. Make sure that the computer’s sound is turned on before you begin.


            Go to: http://goafterschool.grolier.com.
             Click on Links to Cool Sites
             Scroll down and click on Zoom Dinosaurs
             Click on Dino Info Pages.
             Click on letter “T” to find and click on Tyrannosaurus rex. Read the article, making sure to check
             out the size comparison graph.
             Click on Printouts at the bottom of the page to print a T. rex skeleton and footprint.

								
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