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					                                 Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources
                                         More than cows and plows - today’s agriculture is more than you’ve imagined!
                  Approximately 22 million people now work in agriculture or ag-related fields. But only 3% are directly involved in traditional
                  farming. Agribusiness, communications, science, government, education, processing, distribution, marketing and sales, as well
                   as dozens of other occupations include the jobs that serve the total agricultural industry. Today's agriculture offers more than
                  300 rewarding and challenging careers. These promising jobs offer plenty of opportunity for financial gain, as well as personal
                             growth and satisfaction. PLANTS, PETS, CONSERVATION, WILDLIFE, LEADERSHIP, MARKETING!

Introduction to Agriculture (Credit: 0.5)
Are you interested in the outdoors, plants, or animals? Do you enjoy hands on experiments? If so, this class is for you! Come check out the new era
of agriculture where we will explore the school greenhouse, animals, wildlife, marketing, biotechnology, and much more than you imagined!
Highlights include making ice cream and root beer. This class will learn about FFA and have the chance to participate in Food for America where
high school students teach fourth grade students about agriculture and other service projects.

Veterinary Science (Credit: 0.5)
Do you have a special interest in and/or ability to work with animals? Have you ever had a serious interest in learning more about animal care and
veterinary medicine? In this hands-on class students will explore a wide variety of topics in veterinary science including animal handling, injections,
disease, and medical terminology with a variety of animal species ranging from birds to cattle.

Large Animal Management & Health (Credit: 0.5)
In this course we will be specializing in the food animal industry. We will examine dairy, beef, poultry, and swine and explore breeds, selection,
judging, feeding and management, disease and parasites, housing and equipment, food processing, and marketing.

Specialty Animal Care (Credit: 0.5)
Do you love animals? Do you want to learn more about caring for animals, then, this course is for you! Learn more about different species: horses,
cats, dogs, ferrets, chinchillas, snakes, and more! In this course we will study animal anatomy, behavior, feeding, care, reproduction and genetics. By
incorporating your own animals and pets into the class you will learn just how important animals are to our lives!

Power & Machinery (Credit: 0.5)
This course will study sources and principles of agricultural power including tractors, electricity and hydraulics. A safety unit leads off the course
and following power unit on agricultural machinery. This includes machinery use, management and field adjustment of tillage, planting, harvesting
and specialty machines. Career development events to this course are agriculture mechanics.

Landscape Design (Credit: 0.5)
This hands-on course is designed to teach students about practical home landscape maintenance including lawn establishment, care and repair, tree
planting, pruning and the principles of landscape design. Students will also have the opportunity to operate landscape equipment, create landscapes
for a local home, and devise their very own golf course. A must take for students interested in learning by doing!

Greenhouse Management (Credit: 0.5)
If you want to learn more about plants then this course is for you. Growing and caring for plants in the greenhouse setting is the
major focus of this course. Areas to discover include plant growth and identification, plant propagation, pest problems, the
commercial greenhouse industry and “green” careers. Almost 90% of the class is spent in the greenhouse working with plants and
preparing poinsettias and bedding plants.

Natural Resource Science (Credit: 0.5)
Come learn more about one of Wisconsin’s proudest agricultural areas-wildlife and natural resources! This course allows students to
learn more about the animals and their habitats. The class will focus on management practices ranging from identification to habitat.
If you enjoy fishing, hunting, or just are interested in learning more about wildlife and natural resources then this course if for you!
Project highlights include wildlife identification and fish taxidermy.


                                                                             Art
2D Foundations (Credit: 0.5)
Students will learn the basics of design through explorations of drawing, painting, printmaking, digital art, and commercial art. Art history will be a
component of this course.

3D Foundations (Credit: 0.5)
Students will learn the basics of design as they relate to pottery, sculpture, and fibers. Art history will be a component of this course.

2D Studio (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisite: 2D Foundations & teacher permission. Students will review the basics of design and incorporate them into in-depth studies in
drawing, painting, printmaking, and/or digital art. Written work will be a requirement in this course.

3D Studio (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisite: 3D Foundations & teacher permission. Students will review the basics of design and incorporate them into in-depth studies in pottery,
sculpture, &/or fibers. Written work will be a requirement in this course.
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                                      Business & Information Technology
Keyboarding (Credit: 0.5)
The primary purpose of this course is to help students develop speed and accuracy by learning the touch operation of alphanumeric keyboard
characters. Topics covered include: Basic operation of the computer keyboard, proofreading techniques, and processing documents which include,
letters, memos, tables, and reports. NTC Advanced Standing if “B-” or better is earned.

Computer Applications I (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisites: Keyboarding. Students learn to use Microsoft Office, which includes Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. NTC
Advanced Standing if “B-” or better is earned.

Computer Applications II (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisites: Computer Applications I. Students will learn advanced features of Microsoft Office, which includes Microsoft Word, Excel, Access,
and PowerPoint, and Publisher. NTC Advanced Standing if “B-” or better is earned.

Accounting (Credit: 1)
Open to Grades 10, 11, and 12. This course provides an understanding of the elements and concepts of double entry accounting systems. First
semester topics include: The accounting cycle, equation, entering transactions in journals, posting to ledgers, fiscal period statements and reports,
accounts receivable and payable, depreciation, bad debts, sales taxes, and banking activities. Accounting work is done for both a proprietorship and a
partnership. Computer accounting problems are incorporated into this course. The second semester deals with corporations and basic accounting
procedures. This includes notes, interest, payroll accounting, stockholders' equity, sales returns and allowances and sales discount, purchases returns
and allowances and purchases discount. The semester concludes with an accounting simulation. NTC TRANSCRIPTED CREDIT if “C” or better is
earned.

Introduction to Business & Marketing (Credit: 0.5)
This semester course is offered to students in grades 9-12 to introduce them to the U.S. economic environment and characteristics of various types of
business. Topics will include economics, entrepreneurship and small business management, marketing, law and ethics, and international business.
This course will provide students with practical applications and experiences using real-world examples. This course will meet the needs of both a
student interested in business in his or her personal lives and a student interested in business as a career. It will provide a foundation for college-level
business classes, a career in business, and living in a world influenced by business.

Communication Technology (Credit: 0.5)
Team taught with technology education. This course is designed to introduce and further student’s knowledge of all the different communication
technology in the world. It will allow students to develop their own E-portfolios, web pages, pod casts and videos using various types of equipment.
The students will be allowed to explore the basics of communication through Technologies and develop a better understanding of how they can use it
to better themselves.

Publications (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite: minimum grade of “B” average in English. May be taken junior and senior years. This course teaches the fundamentals of layout,
design, copywriting, and use of graphics in preparing the school newspaper, district newsletter, and yearbook. Grammar, punctuation, and writing
fundaments are reinforced.

NTC Advanced Standing. By earning a “B-” or better will secure technical school credit by NTC Advanced Standing Agreement. Once enrolled in NTC, you can
advance over the introductory courses and begin intermediate courses.


                                                                      English
English 9 (Credit: 1)                                                 Reading, Writing, & Communication skills are required in all cluster areas!
Students will experience a variety of literary forms ranging from classical to contemporary authors. These include Drama, Novel, Poetry, Short
Story, and Non-Fiction. Students will develop the basic skills of oral and written communication. They will write formally and informally using
specific styles such as reflective, expository, and persuasive. Using the Five-Step Writing Process, they will improve their audience awareness,
organization, development, sentence mechanics, and grammar skills.

Short Stories (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisite: English 9. This course focuses on the development of the short story in literature. Particular emphasis is placed on detailed reading,
understanding elements of style, making inferences, and grasping themes. Additionally, students will develop their ability to write detailed story
analyses and to give well-reasoned presentations.

Creative Writing (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisite: English 9. Students will carefully study the elements of creative writing, generate writing using varied techniques, and use the writing
process to continually improve their creative writing. They will experience a variety of poetry, short fiction, and (time-permitting) drama writing.

Novels & Society (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisites: English 9 and a strong interest in extended reading, speaking and writing. This is a semester long class focusing on classic to
contemporary novels, examining how they fit into and shape our society. Along with reading, there will be extensive study in writing and presenting
of key points in all novels.
                                                                              2
English 11 (Credit: 1)
Students will study various forms of American Literature over the time span of its existence. Through studying these time periods, students will
recognize that history and culture is reflected in literature, and how these events have contributed to the development of American Literature.
Students will master skills to effectively communicate and present informative speeches. Students will write a career research paper and further
develop their formal writing skills.

Greek Mythology (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. Students focus on the study of Greek mythology by exploring the origin, history, and legends of Greece
through reading, writing, discussion, and speech.

Advanced Communications (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing. This is a semester long class focusing on English skills and preparing more formal communication.
Primary focus will be on writing and speaking in formal situations. This is an excellent choice for any student, especially those considering post-
secondary education.

AP English Literature & Composition (Credit: 1)
Prerequisites: 3.5 GPA overall and 3.5 GPA in English or special invitation (superior English ability only), seniors only. This advanced English
course is intended only for the serious student. Students are introduced to academic discourse of the university level. The class is intended to mimic
a college-level Literature course with all the reading, projects, assignments that such a designation confers. The course also prepares students to take
the AP English examination in May.

Workforce English (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisites: seniors only. If you feel that technical college or the workforce is in your immediate future after graduation, this course can help you
prepare. You’ll learn reading and writing skills that will help you survive out on your own and on the job. Gain experience with financial and legal
documents, letter writing, communicating and following directions, employee rights, and more. In addition, you’ll update your resume and improve
interviewing skills so you are “job ready”.


                                             Family & Consumer Science
Foods I (Credit: 0.5)
Do you plan to live out on your own someday? This foods class is a good start to being independent in the kitchen. You’ll learn basic cooking terms,
tools, and techniques as you cook recipes for fruits, dairy products, quick breads, and eggs. Creative gingerbread projects are one of the highlights of
this class!

Foods II (Credit: 0.5)
This foods class takes students into more challenging food areas. The units include hearty salads, soups, and yeast breads (i.e. homemade pizza).
Being creative with cookie recipes is another fun unit as well as cooking foods from different regions of the U.S.

Specialty Foods (Credit: 0.5)
If you like to try new foods and change the “usual” into something unique, this class is for you. Try foods from other countries, test microwave
recipes, make pastry and sponsor a pie eating contest, use creative cooking techniques to devise your own recipes which can be bound in a class
cookbook. Who knows-your recipe could end up on the lunch line someday!

Parenting (Credit: 0.5)
If you are considering working with children in any way, this class would give great background knowledge. When does life really begin? How
does pregnancy affect a woman’s body and life? How does your emotional response to a newborn affect brain development? Why do toddlers have
temper tantrums? Learn about children from birth to age 6. And decide how you feel about some controversial topics today.

Child Care (ACCT – Assistant Child Care Teacher) (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisite: Parenting. This course is for juniors and seniors. Childcare teachers are in great demand and this course can get you State Certified to
work in a day care setting. You’ll learn the workings of a center and how you fit in. You’ll plan and prepare activities for young children and get
“on-the-job” training with community kids. You’ll learn how to guide children in a positive way and to keep them and yourself safe and healthy.
There’s never a dull moment when you work with kids and it can be a very rewarding job! Transcripted Credit at NTC with a grade of “C” or
better. May be accepted at other Wisconsin technical colleges.

Life Skills & Employment (Credit: 0.5)
Required for sophomores. Connect with a career direction that matches your interests. Start building a portfolio and gain the skills to land your job
and survive the workplace. Are you ready to move out on your own? Learn about checking accounts, taxes, credit cards, and more. By the end of
this class you’ll have an accurate resume, letters of recommendation on file, and knowledge and tips to be successful in the workplace and in your
personal life situation.




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A variety of mathematics skills are required in all cluster areas!
                                                                     Mathematics
       All mathematics courses require teacher approval – please see “Math Sequence” flow chart for mathematics selections.
        When repeating a math course for a failure either semester, the student is expected to repeat both semesters of the failed course the following year.

Pre-Algebra (Credit: 1)
This course is designed to prepare students for the successful study of algebra. Practical content makes this a very effective class for non-algebra
students in mathematics. Units to be covered: Symbols, properties of math, fractions and mixed numbers, decimals, estimating, graphing, ratios,
proportions, percents, indirect measurement, adding and subtracting rational numbers, multiplying and dividing rational numbers, square roots, and
utilizing algebra in real life.

Algebra I (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in 8th grade math or previously taken Pre-Algebra. Topics covered: Properties of the real number system,
solving equations, graphing equations, polynomials, factoring, algebra fractions, number lines, evaluation of algebra expressions, systems of linear
equations, introduction to functions, inequalities, rational and irrational numbers, and quadratic equations.

Geometry (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite: Algebra I. The main purpose is to provide a sound basis in deductive thought processes using the study of two and three dimensional
space. Units include: Introduction to the use of geometry language, types of reasoning and problem solving, points, lines, planes, angles, polygons,
circles, arcs, solids, ratios, proportion, similarity and introduction to Trigonometry.

Algebra II (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry (or taken concurrently with Geometry). Topics covered: Review of the basic concepts of algebra, inequalities
and proof, slopes, writing equations, laws of exponents, prime factorization, solving polynomials, imaginary numbers, quadratic equations,
discriminate inverse and direct variation, sequences and series, logarithms, linear programming and graphing calculators.

Transitions to College Math (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite: Algebra II. This course is designed for students who have earned credit in Geometry and Algebra II and plan on attending college or
technical college, but are not pursuing a career in the math or science field. Topics previously covered in Algebra II and Geometry will be enhanced
with more emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking. Additional topics will include statistics, probability, consumer mathematics and
financial management, measurement, voting and apportionment, and graph theory.

Advanced Math (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite: Algebra II. Advanced Math is an advanced course in high school mathematics that is designed and recommended for those who seek
careers in mathematics, science, business, engineering or other technical fields. Topics include: review of algebraic concepts; functions and
relations; and circular, trigonometric, polynomial, algebraic, logarithmic and exponential functions. Students must supply their own graphing
calculator (TI‐83+ or TI‐84 preferred).

AP Calculus AB (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite: Advanced Math. AP Calculus is a yearlong course in introductory calculus with elementary functions. This course is intended for
students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, algebra through advanced math. The topics covered are an in-depth
study of functions, differential calculus, and integral calculus. Students will have the opportunity to take the AP Calculus AB examination at the end
of the year, at their own cost, for potential college credit. A TI-84 graphing calculator will be used throughout the course. (NOTE: Many colleges will
grant up to six semester credits for successful completion of the Advanced Placement Calculus AB test administered by the College Board in May each year.)

Applied Math (Credit: 1) (Cannot be taken if in Algebra II or beyond)
Prerequisites: Algebra I (offered to Juniors and Seniors). This class is designed to review and apply those basic skills and concepts of math that are
necessary in the home and work place in today’s society. This course consists of topics such as gross and net income, recordkeeping, checking and
saving accounts, credit cards, loans, housing costs, insurance, investments, personnel, production, purchasing, sales, marketing, warehousing and
distributing. Students must supply their own scientific calculator.


                                                                           Music
                     Any of the classes in the music department may be taken all four years of high school.
Band (Credit: 1/year)
Prerequisite: Previous background in Middle School Band or individual lessons. Band is a performance-oriented class. Performance goals for the
fall semester include marching band, pep band, winter concert, and introduction to concert band, and solo and ensemble music. To attain our highest
performance goal, individual lessons will encourage personal goal setting in the following musical areas of study: Tone, intonation, rhythmic
accuracy, articulation, interpretation, balance technique, overall music effect, and other factors. We will cover music appreciation, theory, and
history related to lesson material and ensemble music. Band is an all-encompassing class, covering areas of Foreign Language, science, history, art
and physical education. A fine arts background is important for developing a well-rounded individual who, upon graduation is ready to attend
college, technical school, or enter the job market. Performance goals will include: Concert Band, Solo/Ensembles, Pep Band, Marching Band,
Graduation Day performance, and Memorial Day.




                                                                                 4
                                            MATH SEQUENCE for Athens High School
                                                           (All math course selections require teacher approval)
            When repeating a math course for a failure either semester, the students is expected to repeat both semesters of the failed course the following year.


   Accelerated Math Sequence “A”                 Accelerated Math Sequence “B”                     Regular Math Sequence                       General Math Sequence
          Begin in 8th Grade                            Begin in 9th Grade                            Begin in 9th Grade                         Begin in 9th Grade

             Algebra I – 8th                               Algebra I – 9th                              Algebra I – 9th                          Pre-Algebra – 9th



             Geometry – 9th                    Geometry – 10th       Algebra II – 10th                  Geometry – 10th                           Algebra I – 10th



            Algebra II – 10th                           Advanced Math – 11th                 Algebra II – 11th    Applied Math –      Geometry – 11th     Applied Math – 11th
                                                                                                                       11th



         Advanced Math – 11th                 AP Calculus – 12th       Transitions to        Advanced Math –        Transitions to    Algebra II – 12th
                                                                      College Math –              12th             College Math –
                                                                           12th                                         12th



AP Calculus – 12th      Transitions to
                      College Math – 12th




                                                                                         5
Choir (Credit: 1/year)
Membership is open to all high school students wishing to perform as part of this group. Voice classification is used to assign the student to the
choral part best suited to his/her developmental stage (vocally). Skills such as diction, ear training, proper tone quality, and performance etiquette are
stressed. Choral literature representing various periods and styles, both sacred and secular, will be used to include the development of concepts such
as: melody, rhythm, texture and form. Units of study include elements from the Wisconsin State Standards in Theatre and Dance as well as Vocal
Music and Musical Theater. Activities range from the co-curricular fall musical, the extra-curricular off shoot – show choir and performances
divided by semester and season. The above mentioned concepts are learned and assessed through such performance activities and opportunities.

Integrated Arts (Credit: 0.5/semester)
Students will develop an understanding of the similarities and differences of the fine arts media and manipulate various technologies including but
not limited to: desktop publishing, digital audio recording, digital video editing, presentation software, the Internet and website design, digital and
analog photography, graphic design, music composition and computer music authoring, CD and DVD authoring. Along with the over arching goal
of new technological advances in the arts and media, such “core” concepts as employability skills and hands-on experiences will speak to future
career goals of the students involved. The students will establish a flexible course structure with a multi-disciplinary approach to the fine arts and
also better understand the place of media in our world and their interaction and perspectives concerning it. The recording studio, the public access
TV station (Channel 10) and the Alpha Technology Center are some of the resources that the students will be able to take advantage of. Units will
include but are not limited to broadcast news, digital editing, film presentation and digital recording.

Musical Theatre Tech (Credit: 0.5/semester)
Membership is open to all senior high students. Units of study include elements from the Wisconsin State Standards in Theatre. Along with the
overall goal of producing the technical aspects of the Senior High Choir fall musical and other first semester productions held in our district, concepts
in design, planning and execution will be emphasized. Students will learn about stage craft, set design, decoration, rigging, lighting and special
effects for the theatre. In addition, employability skills such as meeting deadlines, working within a team, brainstorming, planning and budgeting
come into play.

Students who earn at least a “B-” in Integrated Arts I or II and Musical Theater Tech are eligible to receive two (2) elective credits at Northcentral Technical College
in the Graphic Communications program.


                                                    Physical Education/Health
Fit for Life (Credit: 0.5/Health & 0.5/Technology)
Required for freshmen. It is an applied/integrated approach that includes computer skills, nutritional information, and other health issues. It is an
opportunity for students to use technology, research techniques, and health-related information to determine their overall physical and mental
wellness/abilities, and to set goals for the future. The course focuses on avoiding risks through healthy decision-making, using nutritional
information in food labs, and research study skills for assignments in any class.

Physical Education 10 (Credit: 0.5)
Required for sophomores. The physical education program is based on lifetime sports. These are activities that the student can watch or participate
in throughout their entire lifetime. General Physical Education I class will be “team” oriented sports. These sports include: volleyball, basketball,
football, soccer, ultimate Frisbee, floor hockey, and softball. Grading in this course is based primarily on participation.

Physical Education 11 (Credit: 0.5)
Required for juniors. This course will act as a compliment to the General Physical Education I class. It will consist of individual and dual sports as
well as the more typical life-time sports. These sports include: tennis, pickle ball, ping-pong, bocce ball, badminton, golf, bowling, basic Frisbee
skills, cross-country skiing, and snow shoeing. Grading in this course is based primarily on participation.

Physical Fitness 12 (Credit: 0.5)
Required for seniors. The purpose of this course is to exercise. Students will write and follow a fitness plan that fits their wants and needs. Class
time will be used for warm-up, exercise and cool down. The exercise portion will include aerobics, flexibility, and strength training. The student’s
grade will be determined by the development and execution of their personal fitness plan in addition to proof of their improved fitness level based on
before and after physical fitness tests.

Advanced Physical Education (Credit: 0.5)
This course is highly recommended for those who plan to pursue a health or science related career. The primary focus will be researching and
understanding the benefits of sports and athletics on health and overall fitness. Students are asked to create “documents” which use the knowledge
they’ve gained to teach others. There is no physical exertion required for this class.

                                                                                                                              A variety of physical, life, and environmental
                                                                           Science                                            skills may be needed in specific cluster areas!


Physical Science (Credit: 1)
Required for freshmen. The units that will be covered during the first semester include: introduction to the scientific method, general properties of
matter, physical and chemical changes, mixtures, elements and compounds, atomic structure, classification of elements and chemical reactions.
Second semester will include: forces, energy, work and machines, motion, heat, characteristics of waves and light. This course will enable students
to perceive concepts of chemistry and physics at work in real life situations. It also is a basis for further studies in chemistry and physics.


                                                                                    6
Biology (Credit: 1)
Required for sophomores. The units that will be covered in the first semester include: an introduction to biology, ecology, population biology, life of
a cell, and genetics. Second semester topics include DNA and genes, biological classification, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. The course
includes laboratory work and dissections.

Chemistry (Credit: 1)
Prerequisites: Physical Science and Algebra I, maintaining a “C” or better. This course is intended for those who need to develop a chemistry
background for post-secondary education. The units for this course include: organization of chemistry, periodic law, chemical equations and
reactions, acid-base reactions, and phases of matter and solutions. This course includes laboratory work.

Advanced Biology (Credit: 1)
Biology, maintaining a “C” or better. This course is beneficial for those who need a biology background for post-secondary education. Advanced
biology is an in-depth study of the structure and function of the human body. Units that will be covered in the first semester include: an introduction
to human anatomy and physiology, chemical basis of life, cellular structure, cellular metabolism, tissues, skin and integumentary system, skeletal
system and muscular physiology. Second semester units include: muscular identification, nervous system, endocrine system, digestive system,
respiratory system, blood, circulatory system, urinary system, along with dysfunctions and disorders that accompany each system. This course
includes laboratory work and dissections.

Environmental Science (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite: juniors or seniors only. This course is designed to provide students with a sound foundation in basic principles and concepts of
environmental science. Units to be covered include an introduction to environmental science, water & water testing, land, soils & soil testing, food &
agriculture, renewable & nonrenewable energy, air quality, and waste management & disposal. Students will gain an awareness of the importance of
Earth’s systems and apply critical thought to current environmental issues. This course includes laboratory and field work.

AP Physics B (Credit: 1)
Prerequisites for this course are Physical Science, Algebra I and Geometry, maintaining a “C” or better. This course gives a broad background for
those students planning on a post-secondary education. The units covered include: the science of physics, motion in one and two dimensions, forces
and the laws of motion, work and energy, momentum and collisions, rotational motion, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, waves and optics. This
course includes laboratory work.


                                                                                                                        Having a solid foundation in citizenship
                                                              Social Studies                                            is necessary in all cluster areas!


World History (Credit: 1)
Required for freshmen. The student will learn more about the challenges and achievements of people throughout the world during different periods of
time. The students will learn from the past to apply insight into the present and future world. In addition, it will provide a greater appreciation of
heritage. This course will provide the opportunity to uncover the roots of present day issues and improve the students' abilities to evaluate and deal
effectively with present day concerns.

US History I (Credit: 1)
Required for sophomores. A survey of the major events that shaped a wilderness into a great nation. The course starts with a background look of the
Native Americans and Colonists. Topics include: Settlement, English control of the territories, War of Independence, the Constitution, Civil War, the
Reconstruction Period, and conquering the American West.

US History II (Credit: 1)
Required for juniors. Topics include: A survey course of the events, which caused the United States to become what it is today. Topics include the
Industrial Revolution, Spanish-American War, World War I, II, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression, and the Fifties through the present day.

          The following courses may be taken as juniors or seniors:

Social Issues (Credit: 0.5)
Topics include: Development of Sociology, meaning of culture, social change, status and role, structure of groups, personality, race and ethnic
groups, adolescence, adulthood, age, and gender, class systems, family and political institutions.

Psychological Studies of Society (Credit: 0.5)
This course will deal with the following topics: The history of psychology, personality theory, stress, and adjustment in society, abnormal behavior,
therapy and change, human interaction, and the study of attitude. The broad spectrum of psychology will be viewed through its role as it applies to
culture and society.

Economics (Credit: 0.5)
This course deals with the study of the role of the consumer, Americans and credit, buying the necessities, saving and investing, supply and demand,
business organizations, producing goods, marketing, American labor force, money and banking, unemployment, government spending, foreign trade,
economic growth in personal and national level.

American Government (Credit: 0.5)
This is the study of citizenship, constitution, branches of government, voting, political parties and foreign policy.

                                                                            7
World War II (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite(s): “B” average in social studies courses with a letter of reference submitted by a social studies teacher. This course is designed to
examine World War II in more depth and study than is given in a conventional United States history course. World War II was a pivotal period not
only in American History but World History as well. We will examine not only the origins of the war, but also pivotal battles and events such as the
Holocaust. We will examine the war from the perspective of ordinary citizens, soldiers and leaders. Finally, we will explore the continuing effects
of this war on our society. A student who enrolls in this course must be prepared to do extensive reading, research, various assignments and analysis
of World War II culture through examination of films, music, magazines and other cultural items.

Vietnam (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisite: “B” average in social studies courses with a letter of reference submitted by a social studies teacher. The Vietnam War has had a
tremendous impact on our nation. From our citizens, to our universities, to our military, and to our government, none emerged the same from this
turbulent event. This war was called the “first televised war” because of the breadth of the correspondents who covered it and the depth of our
nation’s involvement in watching the nightly news to get the latest information. This course is intended to help a student who wasn’t even born when
the last American helicopter took off from Saigon understand why people say, “I hope it’s not another Vietnam.” The student will learn how we
became involved in Vietnam, what American policies were, what life was like for the military in Vietnam, what was happening on the home front,
the cultural changes which occurred in the United States and Wisconsin and finally, the consequences and lessons of war. There will be extensive
reading, research, and projects for the course in addition to analysis of films and television clips.

Film & TV in American Society (Credit: 0.5)
This course will examine primary sources rarely considered by students – American television and cinema. These two media, like written primary
sources, reflect the social, political, economic and cultural realities of a given time period. This course will not only examine American television
and cinema as historical images, but it will also provide knowledge of filmmaking techniques, languages, tools and procedures. The students will
also develop critical thinking skills which will allow them to critique images conveyed by American television and cinema in the modern world.

AP Government & Politics: United States (Credit: 0.5)
Prerequisites: senior status (and juniors, with permission of instructor), extremely motivated, and a B average in social studies courses. This course
is equivalent to a semester-long introductory course in American government and politics in college. This course is designed to evaluate and analyze
the government and politics of the United States from its basic framework to its philosophical traditions. The course will examine in depth the three
branches of government as well as the Constitution and pivotal court cases that altered the American political scene. This course demands extensive
work in and out of the classroom. The course also prepares students to take the AP American Government examination in May.

AP World History (Credit: 1)
Prerequisites: senior status (and juniors, with permission of instructor), extremely motivated, and a B average in social studies courses. This
introductory college-level course offered to highly motivated students who wish to explore the relevance and influence of world history on the
modern world and its direct impact on their lives. While encompassing the time period 8000 B.C. to the present, the course will focus not only on
political history, but also explore social structures, economic systems, interaction of cultures, technological change, and migration. This course will
also provide students the opportunity to prepare students for the AP World History Exam in the spring with the possibility of earning college credit
through satisfactory completion of the test.

AP United States History (Credit: 1)
Prerequisites: senior status (and juniors, with permission of instructor), extremely motivated, and a B average in social studies courses. Two years
of US History will provide the basic framework of understanding which this course will then address in greater depth and detail. This course is
equivalent to a freshmen history course in college. The student may earn college credit by taking the AP exam in the spring. The historical content
covers the earliest contacts between European explorers and the Native Americans to the present time period. There will be a greater emphasis of
study on the period from 1763 to the early 2000s. The course will be developed around the following themes which will allow students to consider
the framework of our country’s past and the implications that the past has for the future: American Identity, Culture, Economic Transformations,
Globalization, Politics & Citizenship and War & Diplomacy. The students will learn through the reading of primary sources, other historical
viewpoints (by historians and others), textbook, video, and projects.


                                               Technology & Engineering
Basic Automotive Maintenance (Credit: 0.5)
Class limit of 12 students. This course will cover basic automotive maintenance throughout a semester. The student will learn simple car care, which
includes: checking fluid levels, changing oil, changing tires, spark plugs, window wipers, head lights and muffler. In this is basic car-care course
we will introduce students to the automobile, its systems, preventive maintenance, troubleshooting, buying cars and other fundamental information

Basic Home Maintenance (Credit: 0.5)
Class limit of 12 students. Students will learn basic home maintenance, which includes: outlet replacement, smoke and carbon monoxide
detector placement and installation. Other areas to be covered include fixing leaky faucets, drywall patching and taping. Home tools
such as lawn mowers, tillers, weed trimmers and chain saws will be addressed and maintenance issues covered.

Beginning Craftsmanship (Credit: 1)
Class limit of 12 students. Integrating a number of curricular areas and skills, students will be required to research a woodworking project using the
Internet, draw a detailed set of plans and/or purchase a set of plans. A bill of materials will follow. Math skills are very important as fractions and
area, as well as calculating board feet is required. Students can expect a variety of hands-on experiences designed to apply learning.

                                                                           8
Advanced Craftsmanship (Credit: 1)
Class limit of 12 students. Integrating a number of curricular areas and skills, students will be required to research a woodworking project using the
Internet, draw a detailed set of plans and/or purchase a set of plans. A bill of materials will follow. Math skills are very important as fractions and
area, as well as calculating board feet is required. Students can expect a variety of hands-on experiences designed to apply learning.

Welding (Credit: 0.5)
Class limit of 12 students. In this course the students will be introduced to four different type of welding: Oxy-acetylene, Arc, Mig (wire feed), Tig.
The students will than be assigned a number of welds in each area to complete by the end of the nine weeks. The second nine weeks, students will
use the skills learned, along with research, to form groups and manufacture a large project.

Small Engines (Credit: 0.5)
Class limit of 12 students. In this course the students will become familiar with how small engines operate and the differences between 2- and 4-cycle
operations. Each student will then dismantle a small engine, measure for worn parts, replace parts, reassemble and start their engine. The students
will need an old small engine to work on.

Engineering Technology (Credit: 0.5)
Class limit of 18 students. Basic engineering concepts will be learned through integration of Math, Science and English skills with the designing of
an appropriate project. Various project(s) will be built and tested using concepts learned. A strong emphasis will be placed on problem solving,
experimentation, and-hands on work. Synthesis and application of learned material is the basis of the coursework.

Energy, Power, & Transportation (Credit: 0.5)
Class limit of 18 students. In this class students will study and understand the nature of energy, its discovery, conversion, and harnessing while this
has brought attention to our world’s economic, environmental, political and social ramifications of energy with related choices. We will study the
effects of transportation on society, the comparing of transportation modes on relative costs, speeds, reliability, efficiency and more. Projects will
include but not limited to: mechanical, electrical, fluid and thermal power projects; applications and reinforcements of transportation modes; special
projects and field trips – assessed when possible; and subject areas – water, air, land and space.

Communication Technology (Credit: 0.5)
Team taught with business education. This course is designed to introduce and further student’s knowledge of all the different communication
technology in the world. It will allow students to develop their own E-portfolios, web pages, pod casts and videos using various types of equipment.
The students will be allowed to explore the basics of communication through Technologies and develop a better understanding of how they can use it
to better themselves.

SPARK (Specific Production Academics for Regional Knowledge) (Credit: 3.3 HS & 13.3 Technical College)
Seniors only by recommendation and application. High interest in welding, machine tool, or wood manufacturing. What does your future look like?
Is it a future of possibility? Employability? Is it a future of advancement? Job Security? It can be when you explore an exciting career in
manufacturing. Yes, that’s right – manufacturing. The hours are good. Job prospects are strong. And the pay is one of the highest in the private
sector. Not to mention, manufacturing makes up nearly half of Wisconsin’s economy. Build a future for yourself. Get started today with the Spark
program at Northcentral Technical College, a new opportunity that provides you with a career pathway in manufacturing, welding, machine tool or
wood manufacturing. Classes will meet three days per week. Dual enrollment with AHS & NTC.


                                                         World Languages
Spanish I (Credit: 1)
This beginning foreign language course is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the Spanish language. The
class will cover basic greetings, question and basic grammatical rules and expressions using present tense. An introduction to various cultural
activities will be introduced. Topics and vocabulary will include such themes as weather, time, months, family, and food. Basic commands will be
learned.

Spanish II (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite: “C” or better in Spanish I or permission from Instructor. A direct continuation of Spanish I, Spanish II will review and advance in the
study of more grammatical rules and tenses. Various topics and vocabulary will include (but is not limited to) asking for following directions,
ordering a meal, shopping, professions, various social encounters. More aspects of the Hispanic Culture will be discussed.

Spanish III (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite: “C” or better in Spanish II or permission from Instructor. A direct continuation of Spanish II, Spanish III will continue studying more
advanced grammatical rules and structures. A more detailed look at the language and its uses in "street Spanish" will take place. The student will be
introduced to the subjunctive and present progressive. More oral skits and dialogues will be prepared by the students. A continued look at the
Hispanic culture. Possible topics and vocabulary include relationships, hobbies, past times, personal interests, etc. More reading at an advanced
level.

Spanish IV (Credit: 1)
Prerequisite: “C” or better in Spanish III or permission from Instructor. A direct continuation of Spanish III, Spanish IV will strongly emphasize
advanced participation in the target language in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. More grammatical rules, structures and tenses will be
introduced. Topics and vocabulary will include current events, politics, travel abroad, etc. A continued look at Hispanic culture will take place with
an introductory look at Hispanic literature.
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                                                  Miscellaneous Offerings
Peer Tutor (Credit: 0.5) This course is not included in Cum GPA. Only one peer tutor course per semester. Must have a 2.000 or greater GPA
and no Fs from the previous semester. This course is available to juniors and seniors wishing to help their fellow students and teachers in their
pursuit of a successful educational experience. Students will be assigned to teachers in grades K-12 to help them in different capacities, (i.e.
individual student help, group work with students, homework monitoring, classroom helper, study hall, etc.). Assignments include a daily journal of
experiences, and periodic meetings to discuss problems and accomplishments. The class may be taken for a semester or the whole year. Half credit
per semester can be earned and a student may accumulate two credits during your junior and senior years. An application form must be submitted
prior to scheduling which is subject to approval before final enrollment in this course.

Faculty Assistant (Credit: 0.5) This course is not included in Cum GPA. Grading will be “Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory”. Only one faculty
assistant course per semester. Must have a 2.000 or greater GPA and no Fs from the previous semester. This class is offered to juniors and seniors
only. Students taking this course shall be exposed to the profession of education and teaching through the department of their choice. Students may
be involved with supervised instruction, developing lesson plans, researching educational articles, providing individualized tutoring, developing
instructional strategies, and investigating assessment practices. Individuals interested taking this course must obtain permission from the faculty they
wish to assist. Half credit per semester can be earned and a student may accumulate two credits during your junior and senior years. An
application form must be submitted prior to scheduling which is subject to approval before final enrollment in this course.

Independent Study (Credit: 0.5) Only one independent study course per semester. Must have a 2.000 or greater GPA and no Fs from the previous
semester. Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor/Independent Study Coordinator/Guidance Counselor. This class is offered to juniors and seniors
only. Design your own course of study to meet your own special interests or needs by working one-to-one with faculty members. Half credit per
semester can be earned and a student may accumulate two credits during your junior and senior years. An application form must be submitted prior
to scheduling which is subject to approval before final enrollment in this course.

                                        Applications for all three programs must be completed by February 1.


                                                         Career Academy
The Workplace & You (Credit: 0.5)
This is a prerequisite or co-requisite to the school-to-work or youth apprenticeship program or other work program. Must pass with a “C” to
continue with a career experience below. Are you ready to enter the working world? Do you want to attain professional and personal success? This
course is designed for students who want to get experience out in the workforce. Instruction topics will include work ethics, employer/employee
relations, and skills that employers prefer so that you can find, keep, and excel in a job!

Cooperative Education (Credit: 0.5/semester)
Must enroll in “The Workplace & You” course as a pre- or co-requisite. This course is for junior and senior students. Students are released from the
school day (3 hour maximum) to work for an established place of employment to learn job skills and gain experience for future employment.
Students must assist in securing their own place of employment to be granted this release time from the school building and must complete proper
school permits and forms before participation can start. Students must be passing all core classes in order to participate. Weekly conference with the
Coop coordinator and some written activities are required. For more information contact the coordinator for this program.

Wisconsin Youth Apprenticeship - One and Two Year Programs (Credit: 0.5/semester)
Must enroll in “The Workplace & You” course as a pre- or co-requisite. Students who complete these programs receive a State Issued Skill
Certificate and gain advanced standing credits toward a technical college associate degree. You must apply your sophomore or junior year to be
eligible for a one or two year apprenticeship during your junior and/or senior year. You must help pursue a place of employment for the 1 or 2-year
commitment. This program provides paid, mentored, hands-on learning at the job site combined with classroom instruction. Program areas include:
Auto Collision, Auto Technician, Drafting/Architecture/Mechanical Design, Engineering, Financial Services, Health Services, Hotel/Motel,
Information Technology, Insurance, Logistics, Manufacturing, Production Technician, Machining, Printing/Graphic Arts, Tourism, Welding,
Business, Agriculture (Plant Science) or (Animal Science). For more information contact our youth apprenticeship coordinator.

Youth Options Program
The Youth Options Program allows public high school juniors and seniors who meet certain requirements to take post-secondary courses at a UW
institution, a Wisconsin technical college or one of the states participating private, nonprofit institutions of higher education. To qualify for the
program, a student must:
     Have completed the 10th grade
     Be in good academic standing.
     Have no record of disciplinary problems.
Students meeting the above listed criteria must notify the school & career counselor of their intention of enrolling in a college course no later than
March 1 for a course to be taken in the fall semester and October 1 for a course to be taken in the spring semester. After notification, students and
their families will receive the proper forms to be completed. School Board approval and acceptance at the post-secondary institution must take place
before a student can participate.


                                                                          10
Independent Learning Opportunities
For students interested in taking a course not offered at Athens High School or through the Youth Options Program there are various opportunities
available through long distance, self-paced learning. Students choosing this option can find a variety of courses available. The cost of these
programs can range between $100 - $450 which is covered by the student. Students choosing this option should be in good academic standing and
self-motivated. *Courses taken for college credit should transfer to other post-secondary institutions. Students may also be eligible for Internet-
based courses via CESA #10 Distance Learning On-Line Services. See our school & career counselor for details.

Special Programs
Special Education is provided for any student who may have learning problems or are experiencing physical, mental or emotional problems that
could be handicapping his/her learning. In order for a student to qualify for special education services, law requires a referral process which is called
an IEP meeting. If any parents or guardians have concerns about their child’s academic or social progress, please contact the child’s teacher(s), the
principal, school counselor, or school psychologist. We may schedule students into specially designed courses to enhance the learning needs of
students. Applications for any of these programs must be completed by April 1 for first semester & October 1 for second semester.


                                            Advanced Standing Agreements
                                                 Earn Technical College Credit for High School Courses

Northcentral Technical College and Athens high School have “Advanced Standing” agreements that give students an opportunity to earn dual credit
for both high school and technical college. You can earn the college credit by completing the high school course(s) at Athens High School with a
grade of “B” or better and entering a technical college within 27 months of high school graduation. Advanced standing credit is transferable
between all Wisconsin Technical College is comparable courses. Below is a list of the Athens High School courses that currently offer advanced
standing credit. For additional information, contact Mrs. Albrecht in the Career Center.

Athens: Keyboarding I – ½ HS credit                                  NTC: MS Word I (Course #103-110) Cr. 1 or Computer Keyboarding (Course #106-178), Cr. 1
Athens: Computer Applications I – ½ HS credit                                          NTC: MS Word 1 (#103-110), Cr. 1 or MS Word 2 (Course #106-105), Cr. 1
                                                                                               or MS Word Complete Concepts, Part 2 (Course #103-116), Cr. 1
Athens: Computer Applications II – ½ HS credit                                         NTC: MS Word 1 (#103-110), Cr. 1 or MS Word 2 (Course #106-105), Cr. 1
                                                                                               or MS Word Complete Concepts, Part 2 (Course #103-116), Cr. 1
Athens: Computer Application I -and- Computer Applications II – 1 HS credit     NTC: MS Word 1 (Course #103-110), Cr. 1 or MS Excel (Course #106-120), Cr. 1
                                                                                             or MS Word Complete Concepts, Part 2 (Course #103-116), Cr. 1
Athens: Integrated Arts I or II and Musical Theater Tech – 1 HS credit                                   NTC: two (2) elective credits in Graphic Communications
Athens: Algebra and Geometry and Advanced Math – 3 HS credits                              NTC: Introduction to College Mathematics (Course #804-106). Cr. 3 -or-
                                                                                   College Technical Mathematics 1A and 1B (Courses 804-113, 804-114), Cr. 5 -or-
                                                                                                                  College Technical Mathematics (804-115), Cr. 5
Athens: Physics – 1 HS credit                                                                              NTC: Applied Physics [Machine Tool] (806-303), Cr. 3
                                                                                                                        Applied Physics – Auto (806-304), Cr. 2


                                                          Transcripted Credit
Transcripted Credit is the name given to a technical college course that is delivered at the high school and taught by a high school teacher. A student,
who successfully completes a transcripted credit course, receives an official technical college transcript in addition to high school credit. What are
the benefits? A student can earn college credits at the same time they are earning high school credits, all at no cost to the student or school district.

Accounting I = one high school credit                                                                         Accounting Fundamentals = three NTC credits
Assistant Child Care Teacher (ACCT) – one-half high school credit                            Introduction to Early Childhood Education = three NTC credits


                                    CWETN (Distance Learning) Network
Distance Learning (CWETN) classes are specially designed over our network. Up to four schools can meet at one time for specific courses
scheduled. Understandably, taking a CWETN course is different than a regular AHS course. The teacher may be in another school (not on-site),
students need to be attentive during instruction with TV screens and listening/speaking devices, and receiving additional help is more difficult.

The following criteria have been established to guide students to consider a CWETN course: only juniors and seniors, a minimum GPA of 2.000,
and a desire to be successful (maturity-level). (Students may enroll in French I as sophomores or freshmen with special permission and minimum of
3.000 GPA in middle school courses.) Students who drop or fail a CWETN course will be required to reimburse the district for their share of the
course. Prior to confirming enrollment in a CWETN course, a contract must be signed by the district (school counselor), student, and parent(s). We
reserve the right to determine the final enrollment of a student in any CWETN course.




                                                                              11
                                                   HIGH SCHOOL-TO-HIGH SCHOOL COURSES
Architectural Drafting and Design (New)                                                                                          Technology Elective
Prerequisite: Residential Construction recommended but not required.
Description: Students will begin this course with developing an understanding of residential room layout and floor plan design. Students will then
be introduced to architectural drafting using 3D CAD software. Students will be presented with a variety of residential home design challenges to
learn the software and prepare them for the final project. The final project will allow students to design their “Dream Home”, which will include a
complete set of blue prints including floor plans, foundation plans, elevations, 3D images and video walkthroughs.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                                Length: one semester                                    Host School: Osseo-Fairchild

Astronomy                                                                                                                            Science Elective
Description: This course is designed for juniors and seniors to get an overview of the field of astronomy. Topics will include the solar system, stars,
galaxies, models of the universe, and much more. The historical significance of the developing science will also be discussed. A variety of teaching
styles, methods, and techniques will be utilized, including labs and gatherings for day and night observation.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                                Length: one semester                                            Host School: Loyal

Business Law                                                                                                                          Business Elective
Description: This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic legal principles relevant to their roles as citizens, consumers, and
employees. The law is interpreted through case studies.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                             Length: one semester                                     Host School: TBA or Abbotsford

Business Management (New)                                                                                                             Business Elective
Description: This course will familiarize students with the opportunities available to open their own business enterprises and show how businesses
operate within a community. The course will enable students to develop a positive outlook about the business and/or career opportunities. The goal of
this course is to have students understand the different forms of business ownership, explain the role of small businesses in our economy, and
understand what is meant by business success and failure.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                                 Length: one semester                                              Host School: Thorp

CAD - Architecture Drafting I                                                                                                       Technology Elective
Description: This course meets formally 4 times a week with the 5th day designed as a lab day. Students should have a basic knowledge of
computers (i.e. start up procedure, basic hardware functions, and use of the mouse). Students should be self-directed to work independently during
lab times. This course will provide the student with instruction to draw a partial set of plans for a residential building. All work will be completed
using Computer Aided Design/Drafting (CAD) software. The course will cover CAD drafting technique, plot plans, floor plans, and elevations.
Students must have access to a PC computer for work outside of class as well as during class time with at least a 2001 or newer version of
AutoCAD or AutoCAD-Lite drafting software.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                                Length: one semester                                              Host School: Granton

CAD - Architecture Drafting II                                                                                                      Technology Elective
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of CAD Architecture Drafting I.
Description: Hardware, software, and outside lab requirements are the same as CAD - Architectural Drafting I – Semester 1. This course will
expand upon the first semester’s work to include architectural details, utility plans (plumbing and electrical), schedules, sections, landscape plans and
pictorials. This semester’s course work will emphasize good design and engineering principals as well as career study in the field of Architectural
Drafting.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                               Length: one semester                                               Host School: Granton

CAD/CAM Design to Production (New)                                                                                               Technology Elective
Description: This course will get its start by providing students with skills involving sketching, isometric drawings, orthographic drawings, and
other forms of drafting. After students have learned the basics of drafting and design they will be introduced to 2D and 3D CAD software. Using
CAD students will complete a variety of design challenges. Each of these challenges will require students to take an idea from design to production
using CAM equipment (computer controlled mill and router). Distance students will have to travel OFSD to complete the machine operation portion
of this class.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                               Length: one semester                                     Host School: Osseo-Fairchild

French I                                                                                                                World Language Elective
Prerequisite(s): Students must maintain at least a “B” average in their English class.
Description: This course emphasizes reading, writing, listening, and speaking in French. Classes may also include cultural aspects of France and
other French-speaking countries.
Credits: High School Credit (1.0)                        Length: two semesters (full year)                                  Host School: CESA 10

French II                                                                                                                World Language Elective
Prerequisite(s): Students must maintain at least a B average in their English class and have successfully completed French I.
Description: Students will be challenged to express themselves more accurately and in a more complex manner. Emphasis on verbal
communication is continued along with more intensive vocabulary and verb usage.
Credits: High School Credit (1.0)                        Length: two semesters (full year)                                   Host School: CESA 10




                                                                           12
German I (New)                                                                                                               World Language Elective
Prerequisite(s): Students must maintain at least a B average in their English class.
Description: In this course the students will: engage in conversation in German, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and
exchange opinions. Students will demonstrate understanding of the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the German culture. We
will cover a variety of topics from the German culture and learn how the German celebrate different holidays. Students will also demonstrate
understanding of the nature of language through comparisons between German and English languages. This class will be beneficial to those planning
on traveling to a German-speaking country as well as to those interested in such future careers as international business relations, automobile
industry, chemistry, social studies, etc.
Credits: High School Credit (1.0)                          Length: two semesters (full year)                                      Host School: Arcadia

German II (New)                                                                                                                 World Language Elective
Prerequisite(s): Students must have completed German I.
Description: German II is a natural continuation of German I. German II will continue emphasizing reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills
of the students in German. German II will also incorporate more advanced grammar and present students with culture capsules on Germany, Austria,
and Lichtenstein. The main course text is Auf Deutsch: high school version of Focus Deutsch. The text book is accompanied by a workbook,
transparencies and video and audio materials. Focus of German II is to expand on the vocabulary and the grammatical constructions that students got
to practice in their first year. There will be repeats, on a higher level, of some basic chapters such as "Family" as well as learning of new topics such
as "Jobs and Professions". Students will be practicing useful, real life phrases in dialogues and songs. Due to the nature of the distance class, there
will also be a certain amount of independent work involved that does not include speaking: chapter projects, worksheets, webquests, workbook
activities, video activities. I will be using Arcadia High School grading scale for grading. The classes will be taped one week at a time to allow
students view lessons and catch up with the missed class work. Make up time for class assignments is 3 days after returning to school.
Credits: High School Credit (1.0)                             Length: two semesters (full year)                                      Host School: Arcadia

Survey of Limnology and Oceanography (New)                                                                                            Science Elective
Prerequisite: Biology with a “C” or better.
Description: Survey of Limnology and Oceanography is designed to be an upper level elective for students who wish to study the biology,
chemistry, geology, and physics of aquatic environments. This course offers an opportunity for field and laboratory investigations, including
dissections. Students learn to make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Furthermore, this course provides a
college preparatory delivery, as well as college level textbooks and publications. Required school day and/or weekend field trips may be offered. A
composition-style notebook and scientific calculator are needed.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                                Length: one semester                                              Host School: Thorp

Marketing I (New)                                                                                                                  Marketing Elective
Description: This introductory course is offered to students who are interested in the areas of marketing, advertising, or merchandising. This will be
a student project-based course with hands-on learning activities. Students are introduced to concepts related to the business functions associated with
directing the flow of products and services from the producer to the consumer. The following areas will be covered: human relations,
communication, economics, salesmanship, leadership and career opportunities. This is a class that may be used with a student taking business
apprenticeship.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                               Length: one semester                                          Host School: Abbotsford

Marketing I (New)                                                                                                                 Marketing Elective
Prerequisite: Marketing I.
Description: In this course students use the marketing knowledge they have acquired in Marketing I to look deeper into the world of marketing and
research marketing topics related to the following marketing related areas: sports and entertainment marketing, fashion marketing, sales, e-marketing,
and global marketing. As with Marketing I, this course will be student project-based with hands-on learning activities. This is a class that may be
used with a student taking a business apprenticeship.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                               Length: one semester                                        Host School: Abbotsford

Microbiology (New)                                                                                                                  Science Elective
Prerequisite(s): Completion of Chemistry I, Algebra I and passing grade in Biology.
Description: Topics would include: 1) pro’s and con’s of having microorganisms around, 2) review of chemistry and intro to biochemistry, 3)
history of germs, 4) bacterial anatomy and physiology, 5) anatomy and physiology principles of other microorganisms such as fungi, protozoa,
tapeworms, etc., 6) concept in viruses, growth of microorganisms, metabolism and genetics, 7) principles of control including chemicals and drugs,
infection control concepts and immunology.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                              Length: one semester                                            Host School: Spencer

Nutrition, Exercise, and Healing (New)                                                                                                 Health Elective
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                               Length: one semester                                                Host School: Thorp

Rivit (3-D Architectural) (New)                                                                                                  Technology Elective
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                               Length: one semester                                          Host School: Greenwood




                                                                           13
Sports Management (New)                                                                                                                 Business Elective
Prerequisite: Introduction to Business.
Description: Ever dream of owning your own business or sports franchise? In this class students will use a computer simulation to run a
professional football franchise. While running the simulation students will have to choose the best city to start a franchise in, market the franchise,
obtain sponsorships, set ticket prices, staff all areas of the business, choose the correct promotions week-to-week, and earn a profit. The final week of
the course students will compete against each other to see which owner can earn the most profit and have a winning season. Other management
topics that will be covered in the course include: leadership, finance, product management, people management, information management, and legal
and ethical issues. This would be a great choice for any student considering business as a career.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                                   Length: one semester                                          Host School: Marathon

AP Statistics (New)                                                                                                              Mathematics Elective
Description: The purpose of the AP course in Statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and
drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes:
1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns
2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study
3. Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation
4. Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses
Students who successfully complete the course and exam may receive credit, advanced placement, or both for one-semester introductory college
statistics course. This does not necessarily imply that the high school course should be one semester long. Statistics could be effectively studied in a
one-year course.
Credits: High School Credit (1.0)                           Length: two semesters (full year)                                 Host School: Greenwood

You & the Law (New)                                                                                                               Social Studies Elective
Description: In this course, students will explore a wide variety of legal principles necessary for understanding life in the United States. Students
will research practical issues in the judicial system, understand how civil and criminal course operate, learn about essential elements in creating
binding contracts, and know their legal rights and responsibilities.
Credits: High School Credit (0.5)                                 Length: one semester                     Host School: Galesville-Ettrick-Trempealeau

                                                        TECHNICAL COLLEGE COURSES

These courses are taught by certified instructors at both NTC (Northcentral Technical College) or MSTC (Mid-State Technical College), using
technical college books and materials. Students receive regular technical college credit upon completion of the course(s). Upon successful
completion of the course, students will receive an official transcript with grade and credit(s) recorded at the technical college. Students enrolled in
technical college courses will also receive high school credit (dual credit). These courses are of college level integrity and rigor. Courses will be
taught on the technical college calendar as stated in the course syllabus. Absences due to conflicting high school activities must be pre-arranged
with the instructor, and students will be responsible for any missed work. All high school student registrations must be submitted on the "High
School Registration Form" with appropriate signatures and recommended form where applicable.

Administrative and Organization of Health Care                                                                                        Science Elective
Description: Students will learn about different health care settings such as hospitals, clinics, and nursing homes. You will learn about the laws and
issues that impact how these organizations are administered. This course will help you prepare for a career in the management, business or records
areas with in health care.
Credits: Technical College Credit (3.0)                         Length: one semester                                                Host School: NTC

College Success (New)                                                                                                                   English Elective
Description: This course is designed to help students increase their success in college in order to reach their educational objectives. This course
focuses on developing practical study skills and covers topics such as the college environment, study skills, personal resources, relationships, time
management, memory skills, test taking, reading, note taking, diversity, health, and goal setting. This course will be taught as a hybrid class – two
days per week will be in the video classroom and the rest of the week’s class will be taught online.
Credits: Technical College Credit (3.0)                         Length: one semester                                                Host School: CVTC

Current Events in Criminal Justice (New)                                                                                        Social Studies Elective
Description: Students will explore nine current issues related to law enforcement of today. Students will be given scenarios that speak to those
issues and will be expected to research, reflect and eventually respond to those scenarios in a manner that effectively addresses the issues being
explored.
Credits: Technical College Credit (3.0)                           Length: one semester                                                Host School: NTC

Medical Terminology                                                                                                                 Science Elective
Description: Using the work-building system, this course teaches students to pronounce, define, spell, build, and analyze medical terms. This
course is based on anatomy of the human body systems. There is no physiology included in this course.
Credits: Technical College Credit (3.0)                      Length: one semester                                                Host School: NTC

Oral/Interpersonal Communications (New)                                                                                         English Elective
Prerequisite: Seniors Only.
Description: This course focuses upon developing speaking, non-verbal communication and listening skills through individual speeches, group
activities and other projects.
Credits: Technical College Credit (3.0)                     Length: one semester                                              Host School: NTC

                                                                           14
Psychology, Intro to                                                                                                           Social Studies Elective
Prerequisite(s): Typing or word processing skills recommended.
Description: A survey of the multiple aspects of human behavior and a study of the theories of learning, motivation, emotions, personality,
psychological disorders, physiological factors, and social influences will be covered in this course. Students will examine complexities of human
relationships in personal, social, and vocational settings.
Credits: Technical College Credit (3.0)                          Length: one semester                                              Host School: NTC

Sign Language Elective                                                                                                       World Language Elective
Description: The class will include the basic techniques of communicating with deaf and hard-of-hearing people, the fundamentals of sign language
skill development, knowledge of social aspects of deafness, and the application of hearing aids and assistive listening and signaling devices.
Credits: Technical College Credit (2.0)                        Length: one semester                                                 Host School: NTC

Sociology, Intro to Elective
Description: Introduction to the basic social concepts of the intercultural discipline of sociology with an emphasis on culture, socialization, social
stratification, and the five institutions, including family, politics, economics, religion, and education.
Credits: Technical College Credit (3.0)                              Length: one semester                                           Host School: NTC

Written Communications (New)                                                                                                          English Credit
Prerequisite: Seniors Only.
Description: This course teaches the writing process which includes prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. Through a variety of writing
assignments, the student will analyze audience and purpose, research and organize ideas and format and design documents based on subject matter
and content.
Credits: Technical College Credit (3.0)                        Length: one semester                                    Host School: MSTC or NTC

                                                             UNIVERSITY COURSES

Composition II (New)                                                                                                                  English Credit
Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENG 101 or exemption based on placement test score. Requires completion of online special student
application and submission of transcripts.
Description: A rhetoric course that focuses on writing which presents information, ideas, and arguments, with attention to the essay and techniques
of documentation. Emphasis will be on academic writing which is applicable across the curriculum.
Credits: UW System Credit (3.0)                               Length: one semester                                          Host School: UWMWC

History of Western Civilization 105 (New)                                                                                    Social Studies Credit
Prerequisites: Requires completion of online special student application and submission of transcripts.
Description: Survey of Western Civilization from ancient times through the Renaissance emphasizing the distinctive features of Western culture,
political development, economic development and the contributions made by non-Western People.
Credits: UW System Credit (3.0)                               Length: one semester                                        Host School: UWMWC

History of Western Civilization 106 (New)                                                                                       Social Studies Credit
Prerequisites: Requires completion of online special student application and submission of transcripts.
Description: Survey of Western Civilization from the Renaissance to contemporary times emphasizing the further development of Western culture
political institutions and economic institutions including reference to the interaction among the peoples of the modern world.
Credits: UW System Credit (3.0)                                   Length: one semester                                        Host School: UWMWC

Literature, Introduction to (New)                                                                                                        English Credit
Prerequisites: Exception from 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or consent of instructor. Requires completion of online special
student application and submission of transcripts.
Description: Intensive analysis of literature, including poetry, drama and fiction, using representative types from several periods of literature. Not
open to students with credit in ENG 251, ENG 253 or ENG 255.
Credits: UW System Credit (3.0)                                  Length: one semester                                         Host School: UWMWC

Psychology, General (New)                                                                                                        Social Studies Credit
Description: This introductory psychology course introduces students to the basic concepts of human behavior, learning, thinking, motivation,
perception, emotion, behavior disorders, personality, psychological tests, social behavior and selected applications of psychology.
Credits: UW System Credit (3.0)                                Length: one semester                                             Host School: UW-EC

Introductory Psychology (New)                                                                                               Social Studies Credit
Prerequisite(s): Requires completion of online special student application and submission of transcripts.
Description: Survey of major content areas in psychology. Topics include research methodology, learning, memory, cognition, biological
psychology, sensation, perception, motivation, emotion, development, personality, psychopathology and social psychology. Students may not receive
credit for both PSY 201 and PSY 202.
Credits: UW System Credit (3.0)                                Length: one semester                                      Host School: UWMWC




                                                                          15
                                                  ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES
Advanced Placement courses allow high school students to earn University credit while still in high school in an intellectually stimulating and
rewarding environment. Advanced Placement courses are offered in over 10,000 American high schools and in 64 foreign countries.

Please check with our School & Career Counselor for information on Advanced Placement courses not offered at Athens High School.

                                          INTERNET-BASED, ONLINE COURSES
Please see your School & Career Counselor for additional information for internet-based, on-line classes not offered at Athens High
School.

                                                                   Disclaimer
                      The School District of Athens reserves the right to cancel any course due to lack of student interest.
                         When scheduling, please choose alternate courses that fit your career or educational needs.

                                                        Notice of Nondiscrimination
 The School District of Athens does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, religion, or handicap in the educational
                                                  programs or activities which it operates.




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