Socioeconomic and Environmental Trade-offs of Ethanol Expansion

Document Sample
Socioeconomic and Environmental Trade-offs of Ethanol Expansion Powered By Docstoc
					Onil Banerjee
Janaki Alavalapati

 II Regional Meeting on CGE Modeling: Contributions to 
                Economic Policy in LAC

              November 24 and 25, 2008.
State of the ethanol industry in Brazil
Prospects for the future
Issues surrounding ethanol expansion
Research questions
Framework of analysis
Simulation design
Results
Conclusions
Future research directions
Brazil is the world’s second largest producer of 
ethanol (38% of world output in 2007).
425 million tons of sugar cane were produced (half 
used for sugar); 29 million tons of sugar; 17 billion 
liters of alcohol; 65% and 16% of sugar and ethanol, 
respectively were exported.
The sugar cane sector produces R$41 billion in value 
and 4 million direct and indirect jobs (72,000 farmers).
Brazil has 6.4 million hectares planted with sugarcane.
Approximately 64% of sugar cane production is 
located in the SE.

 Sugar Cane Production
 Region      % output
 North              0.3
 Northeast         12.3
 Southeast         70.3
 South              7.5
 Centerwes          9.6
                          Map source: UNICA, 2007.
Data source: UNICA, 2008
Brazil has a competitive advantage for sugar cane and 
ethanol production due to favorable climate, soils and 
experience.
6,000 liters/ha from sugarcane; 3,000 liters/hectare from 
corn.
Sugar cane has a high energy content and low production 
cost.




                         Chart source: Henniges, O. & Zeddies, J., 2005.
                 2020 PROJECTIONS
Sugar cane production is projected to increase 141% 
while the area cultivated will increase by 121%.
Ethanol production is projected to increase by 265%, 
domestic consumption by 249% and exports by 324%.
Potential expansion in CW, SE, NE.




                                     Map: Ministry of Agriculture, 2006.
Flex fuel vehicles are a domestic driver of demand.
Ethanol supplies 45% of automobile fuel in Brazil.
Flex fuel vehicles accounted for 89% of light duty 
vehicle sales in 2007; by 2020, flex fuel vehicles are 
expected to account for 70% of the total stock of LDV.




                           Chart source: Petrobras, 2007
Between 2003 and 2007, new gasoline and ethanol vehicle sales dropped by ‐79% 
and ‐100%, respectively while new flex‐fuel vehicle sales increased by 4041%.
1. Will sugarcane displace cattle towards the Amazon and indirectly 
      drive deforestation?
‐‐‐Average cattle density in Brazil is 1 cow per hectare.
‐‐‐Increasing density to 1.4 cows per hectare would free up 50‐70 million 
      hectares of unproductive land that could be converted to sugar 
      cane. Underutilized ranchlands border the most productive 
      sugarcane regions in the center and south of Brazil.
‐‐‐Can technological change offset a potential increase in demand for 
      arable land?
2. Will ethanol expansion lead to higher food prices 
and a disproportionate impact on the poor?
 Developing a CGE model based on IFRPI´s Standard 
 CGE Model in GAMs (Lofgren et al., 2002), we ask the 
 following questions:

1. How does improved technology and increased 
   ethanol demand affect regional land use (sugar cane, 
   agriculture, forestry, forest plantations and 
   deforestation)?

2. Does improved technology and increased demand 
  lead to higher food prices affecting poorer 
  households more severely?
Two sources of technological improvements (2007 to 
   2011 projections):
1. Increased yields through more efficient cane 
   production (3.6% increase in yields);
2. Higher yielding varieties: 2.06% percent increase in 
   sucrose content in new varieties of sugarcane.
 Sugar Cane Production Projection 2007‐2011
                                                     2007    2011
 Sugar cane production (millions of tons)            430.0   601.0
 Area cultivated (millions of hectares)               6.3     8.5
 Yield (millions of tons per millions of hectares)   68.3     70.7
 Percent increase in yield                                    3.6
 Source: Jank, 2007.
Conservative projection of 40% increase in domestic 
demand for ethanol from 2007‐2011.



Ethanol Production Projections 2007‐2011
                                                    2007   2011
Ethanol domestic consumption (billions of liters)   14.2   23.2
Percent increase in domestic consumption                   63.4
Source: Jank, 2007.
        Percent change in demand for agricultural land
                               Technology  Demand     All 
                 Sector           shock     shock   shocks
        Agriculture north             0.04     0.00     0.04
        Sugarcane north             ‐15.13     0.00   ‐15.14
        Agriculture northeast         2.88     0.00     2.87
        Sugarcane northeast         ‐11.65     0.01   ‐11.64
        Agriculture southeast         4.65    ‐0.06     4.59
        Sugarcane southeast          ‐8.87    ‐0.01    ‐8.88
        Agriculture south             0.60     0.00     0.60
        Sugarcane south             ‐14.48     0.00   ‐14.48
        Agriculture centerwest        0.19     0.00     0.19
        Sugarcane centerwest        ‐15.05     0.01   ‐15.04

•Agriculture, which includes cattle ranching, expands in all 
regions as the area planted to sugarcane is reduced. 
 Percent change in demand for agricultural land
                                Technology  Demand     All 
 Sector                            shock     shock   shocks
 Forest plantations north             ‐1.60     0.02    ‐1.59
 Forest plantations north east         0.75     0.02     0.77
 Forest plantations south east         7.62     0.04     7.66
 Forest plantations south             ‐2.59     0.04    ‐2.55
 Forest plantations center west       ‐1.82     0.03    ‐1.79

•Forest plantations expand in the 
southeast and northeast while freeing up 
agricultural land in the north, south and 
centerwest.
Deforestation
            Legal        Total           Legal            Technology Demand All shocks Legal       Total
Region      (Ha)         (Ha)            % of total % change % change % change (Ha)                (Ha)
North          125,307
                           
                          1,388,400                      
                                                        9     0.1579 ‐0.0002             
                                                                                0.1579 125,505       
                                                                                                    1,607,637
Northeast      68,263           99,300
                                                      69      0.1835   0.0010   0.1847    68,389        117,641
Centerwest      16,462     
                          1,040,500                      
                                                        2     0.0894 ‐0.0004    0.0890    16,477    1,133,151
                                                                                                     
Total          210,032
                          2,528,200
                                                         
                                                        8     0.1609   0.0002            
                                                                                0.1612 210,371      2,858,429
                                                                                                     

  •Forest-based activities decline
  marginally in the north, northeast and
  centerwest.
  •Total deforestation (legal and illegal)
  increases by an estimated 330,229 ha.
     Percent change in household income
     Indicator    Technology shock Demand shock All shocks
     Low‐income                   0.07      ‐0.37     ‐0.31
     Mid‐income                   0.14      ‐0.21     ‐0.07
     High‐income                  0.18      ‐0.05      0.13


•Low income households were the most vulnerable, experiencing a 
drop in their income.
•Overall, equivalent variation declined marginally only for mid‐
income households.
Percent change in commodity prices
Commodity        Technology shock Demand shock All shocks
Agriculture                   ‐0.32        ‐0.93      ‐1.25
Processed food                 0.09        ‐0.95      ‐0.87
Sugarcane                    ‐20.87        ‐0.89     ‐21.54
Ethanol                        0.16       155.13     155.69
•The price of agricultural and processed 
food products drops.
•Reduced income of low‐income 
households was compensated for by a 
general decrease in the price of 
consumer goods.
Deforestation increases marginally as a result of improved 
technology and increased ethanol demand though there is 
no direct link between ethanol expansion and 
deforestation. 
Increased ethanol production does not necessarily 
increase the sugarcane sector’s demand for arable land.
Ethanol expansion results in very little change in 
household welfare.
The price increase of ethanol suggests that improved 
technology, given increased demand, may not be 
sufficient to maintain current prices.
    Need to examine land use and production in 
    natural forests and plantations differently since 
    environmental responses of natural and plantation 
    forests are distinct.
    Mechanisms for increasing returns to forest land 
    deter deforestation.
‐‐improved monitoring and enforcement of logging 
    may reduce supply of timber on the market, 
    increase prices and thus the returns to forest land.
‐‐policies that increase the value of conserved and 
    managed forests will reduce deforestation.
   Regional disaggregation of cattle and soybean 
   sectors.
   Dynamic analysis: 
‐incorporate sugarcane production and demand 
   projections; flex fuel car production and demand 
   projections; technological advances in sugar cane and 
   ethanol production technology.
‐Update agricultural land supply based on previous 
   period levels of deforestation. 
   Incorporate Illegal deforestation and illegal logging 
   sectors.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:7
posted:3/2/2012
language:
pages:24