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Response of San Joaquin Delta College

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									                             Follow-Up Report
                        of San Joaquin Delta College
     To the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges
                Western Association of Schools and Colleges
                     Recommendations of June 30, 2008




This response presents new
and supplemental
information from San
Joaquin Delta College
regarding the
                                                                                                       ii




October 15, 2008

Dr. Barbara Beno, President
Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges
10 Commercial Blvd., Suite 204
Novato, CA 94949

Dear Dr. Beno:

As directed in your letter dated June 30, 2008, San Joaquin Delta College herein submits new
and supplemental information to the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior
Colleges relative to the four recommendations made by the evaluation team that visited the
College from March 24 – 27, 2008. This Follow-Up Report also focuses on the
recommendations made by the 2002 evaluation team, which were restated in the 2008 Evaluation
Report. This document delineates progress made by the College in responding to the four new
recommendations of the 2008 visiting team and the two recommendations made by the
Commission in June of 2008.

San Joaquin Delta College has consistently achieved excellence in its educational outcomes and
precious few colleges can match this performance on a number of measures of student success.
In spite of that fact, we are cognizant of the need to engage in continual scrutiny of College
practices and performance, and that there are a number of areas that need to be addressed if the
College is to make greater progress as an organization.

The Commission's warning has spurred San Joaquin Delta College to undertake a new round of
self-reflection and self-evaluation. As a result, the College has reviewed its practices, policies,
procedures, and climate in relation to the accreditation standards and the recommendations of the
2008 visiting team. San Joaquin Delta College thanks the Commission for upholding high
standards and for directing the College to implement practices that will enhance its performance
as an institution of higher learning.

The executive leadership team directed the preparation of this report. This team constitutes my
cabinet which consists of the five vice presidents, the Dean of Planning, Research, and
Institutional Effectiveness, and myself. Nonetheless, literally every staff member at San Joaquin
Delta College had an opportunity to provide input and to comment on this report. In essence,
this report is the product of efforts made by the entire campus community. Many thanks are due
to the students, faculty, classified staff, administration, and trustees for their contributions to this
process.
October 15, 2008
Dr. Barbara Beno, President
Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges
Page 2 of 2


The Follow-Up Report has been sent electronically to every employee of the College and posted
on the College web site. It has been sent through the College shared governance review process.
Specifically, it has been presented to the Planning & Budget Committee, the President’s Council,
and the President’s Executive Cabinet. This report was adopted by the Board of Trustees at their
meeting of October 21, 2008.

The College has taken the recommendations of the Commission and made this period of
self-reflection a positive force for institutional change. For example, new institutional studies
have been completed and significant progress has been accomplished on a new strategic plan for
the College. Similarly, from the recent hiring of four new vice presidents to the implementation
of new computerized administrative systems; this process has infused new life and great
expectations into the College community.

It is with great pride in my colleagues at San Joaquin Delta College and on their behalf that I
submit these responses to the recommendations. In these responses, you will find more than just
an attitude of compliance to external standards or a quick fix approach to correct perceived
deficiencies. You will find evidence of a dedicated and concerned college community. A
community that has engaged in an authentic dialogue about how to implement best practices and
how to continually improve its efforts to meet and exceed the learning and service needs of its
students.

Sincerely,



Raúl Rodríguez, Ph.D.
Superintendent/President




                                                                                                iii
Table of Contents
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1 ....................................................................................................... 7
   Comment from 2002 Accreditation Visit.................................................................................................. 7
   Evaluation of 2008 Visiting Team ............................................................................................................ 7
   Description ................................................................................................................................................ 7
      Part I: Comprehensive and Detailed Policies that Speak to Equity and Diversity Issues ..................... 8
      Part II: Student Equity Plan .................................................................................................................. 9
      Part III: Equity for All, 2005-06; Update of Equity for All, Fall 2008 ................................................. 9
      Part IV: The College Faculty and Staff Diversity Plan ...................................................................... 10
      Part V: Improvement of Diversity in Hiring ...................................................................................... 10
      Ethnicity of Delta College Staff and Faculty ...................................................................................... 11
      Part VI: Faculty & Staff Satisfaction Survey and Focus Groups w/African-American Employees .. 12
      Part VII: Activities and Initiatives in Support of Promoting Student & Staff Diversity.................... 13
      Internal Initiatives ............................................................................................................................... 13
      Grant Programs ................................................................................................................................... 15
   Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................... 16
   Planning Agenda ..................................................................................................................................... 18
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1 ..................................................................................................... 19
   Comment from 2002 Accreditation Visit................................................................................................ 19
   Evaluation of 2008 Visiting Team .......................................................................................................... 19
   Description .............................................................................................................................................. 19
   Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................... 28
   Planning Agenda ..................................................................................................................................... 29
Response to 2002 Recommendation 5.1 ..................................................................................................... 30
   Comment from 2002 Accreditation Visit................................................................................................ 30
   Evaluation of 2008 Visiting Team .......................................................................................................... 30
   Description .............................................................................................................................................. 30
      New Administration and Technology ................................................................................................. 30
      Counseling Schedules ......................................................................................................................... 31
      Counseling Performance Data, 2000 - 2008 ....................................................................................... 32
      Service to Special Populations ............................................................................................................ 32
      Expanded Access ................................................................................................................................ 34
   Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................... 35


                                                                                                                                                              iv
   Planning Agenda ..................................................................................................................................... 35
Response to 2002 Recommendation 7.1 ..................................................................................................... 36
   Comment from 2002 Accreditation Visit................................................................................................ 36
   Evaluation of 2008 Visiting Team .......................................................................................................... 36
   Description .............................................................................................................................................. 36
   Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................... 39
   Planning Agenda ..................................................................................................................................... 40
Response to 2002 Recommendation 8.1 ..................................................................................................... 41
   Comment from 2002 Accreditation Visit................................................................................................ 41
   Evaluation of 2008 Visiting Team .......................................................................................................... 41
   Response to the Accrediting Commission Recommendations................................................................ 41
   Description .............................................................................................................................................. 41
       The Strategic Plan for 2008 ................................................................................................................ 41
       Strategic Plan for Serving Regional Sites & Distance Education ....................................................... 43
   Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................... 47
   Planning Agenda ..................................................................................................................................... 48
Response to 2008 Recommendation 1 ........................................................................................................ 49
   Recommendation 1 ................................................................................................................................. 49
   Description: ............................................................................................................................................. 49
   Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................... 50
   Planning Agenda ..................................................................................................................................... 50
Response to 2008 Recommendation 2 ........................................................................................................ 52
   Recommendation 2 ................................................................................................................................. 52
   Description .............................................................................................................................................. 52
   Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................... 53
   Planning Agenda ..................................................................................................................................... 53
Response to 2008 Recommendation 3 ........................................................................................................ 54
   Recommendation 3 ................................................................................................................................. 54
   Description .............................................................................................................................................. 54
   Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................... 56
   Planning Agenda ..................................................................................................................................... 56
Response to 2008 Recommendation 4 ........................................................................................................ 57
Recommendation 4 ..................................................................................................................................... 57



                                                                                                                                                              v
   Description .............................................................................................................................................. 57
   Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................... 59
   Planning Agenda ..................................................................................................................................... 60
Response to 2008 Commission Recommendation 1 ................................................................................... 61
   Commission Recommendation 1 ............................................................................................................ 61
   Description .............................................................................................................................................. 61
   Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................... 63
   Planning Agenda ..................................................................................................................................... 63
Response to 2008 Commission Recommendation 2 ................................................................................... 65
   Commission Recommendation 2 ............................................................................................................ 65
   Description .............................................................................................................................................. 65
   Evaluation ............................................................................................................................................... 67
   Planning Agenda ..................................................................................................................................... 67
Table of Figures .......................................................................................................................................... 70
Index of Tables ........................................................................................................................................... 71
List of Appendices & Resources ................................................................................................................. 73
Integrated Appendices ................................................................................................................................ 78
   Appendix 1: Employee Questionnaire .................................................................................................... 79
   Appendix 2: Results of Focus Groups .................................................................................................... 97
   Appendix 3: Appreciative Inquiry Self Evaluation............................................................................... 116
   Appendix 4: Environmental Scan & Strategic Plan, 2008 .................................................................... 129
   Appendix 5: Equity for All ................................................................................................................... 169
   Appendix 6: District Action Plan .......................................................................................................... 191
       Business Services .............................................................................................................................. 191
       Human Resources ............................................................................................................................. 200
       Information Services ......................................................................................................................... 219
       Instructional Services ........................................................................................................................ 224
       Student Services ................................................................................................................................ 239
   Appendix 7: Personnel Data ................................................................................................................. 245




                                                                                                                                                             vi
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1

Comment from 2002 Accreditation Visit

The College should develop and implement plans to increase College-wide sensitivity to the
needs of its diverse population, evaluate the perception of bias by some employees on the
campus, and review implementation of workplace opportunities to ensure they are equitable for
all employees.

Evaluation of 2008 Visiting Team

The visiting team interviewed faculty and staff and found general satisfaction regarding progress
made addressing this recommendation. Student surveys validate this position. New initiatives
since the 2005 mid-term progress report include the Equity for All projects as well as the
establishment of the Cultural Awareness Program (CAP) that provides speakers, performances,
and other activities promoting diversity.

Although the self-study also reflects that the College has developed comprehensive and detailed
policies and procedures that speak to a wide range of equity and diversity, the team could not
verify the existence of comprehensive and detailed policies, a Student Equity Plan or a Faculty
and Staff Diversity Plan. The College has partially met this recommendation.

Description

San Joaquin Delta College has comprehensive and detailed policies that speak to a wide range of
equity and diversity issues, a Student Equity Plan that was submitted to the California
Community College Chancellor’s Office by the Vice President of Student Services, and an
Equity for All report completed in spring 2006 which has been updated in fall 2008. The
College Diversity Committee is developing a Faculty and Staff Diversity Plan and will monitor
the goals of the Student Equity Plan as prescribed in Policy 2430.

In addition, over the past three years, the College has improved its hiring of diverse faculty and
staff. The College also engaged in a revalidation of its faculty and staff satisfaction survey in fall
2008. College researchers followed up the analysis of the survey results with focus groups that
were conducted with a group of African-American employees in an attempt to understand their
continuing concerns with elements of the College climate. As part of its commitment to the
promotion of equity and diversity, the College has engaged in a variety of external partnerships,
internal initiatives, and grant programs that forward equity and diversity goals.




                                                                                                    7
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1


Part I: Comprehensive and Detailed Policies that Speak to Equity and Diversity Issues

San Joaquin Delta College values the strength of diversity in its students, faculty, management,
and staff. Key documents and policies serve as evidence of this value.

   1. The College Mission Statement, Vision Statement, and Strategic Goals, all revised and
      adopted in 2008, clearly reference the College’s value for equity and diversity. The

   2. Mission Statement indicates that the College serves “the needs of students, the College
      District and the community through” a diversity of programs including: “continuing,
      transfer, career and technical education, and economic development.” Moreover, two of
      the five principles upon which the College acts state that “Commitment to excellence
      requires . . . respect for cultural diversity . . . a vital connection to the arts and cultures of
      the community . . . .” and “Educational resources are available to all students regardless
      of age, disability, gender, or ethnicity.” The Vision Statement indicates that the College
      community “commits themselves passionately to . . . fully appreciate the diverse and
      dynamic world around them.” Strategic Goal 3: “Access, Success & Learning
      Outcomes” states that the College is committed to “Increase access, student equity,
      student success, and positive student learning outcomes.”

   3. Policy 2430 Governance Committee Structure, another policy that has been revised
      several times during the past year, details compositions and responsibilities of all
      governance committees. Nearly every committee is comprised of a diversity of
      employees from all areas of the College, all employee classifications, and at least one
      student representative. This policy also includes several active committees whose
      responsibilities, at least in part, focus on promoting equity and diversity: College
      Diversity Committee, Cultural Awareness Programs (CAP) Committee, and the
      Matriculation and Student Access Committee.

   4. Many other policies throughout the Policies and Procedures Manual, currently being
      updated to the CCLC template, deal with issues of equity and diversity including:

       a. BP 3410 Nondiscrimination and AP 3410 Nondiscrimination
       b. BP 3430 Prohibition of Harassment, AP 3430 Unlawful Discrimination and
          Harassment Complaint Procedure and Investigative Process, and AP 3430.1 Unlawful
          Discrimination/Harassment Complaint Form
       c. Policies 1400, 1402, 1402B, 1402C—Policies concerning unlawful discrimination
       d. Policies 2030, 2032, 2033, 2034, 2035, 2180—Policies governing the hiring,
          evaluation, and rights and responsibilities of College managers
       e. Policies 3000, 3001, 3002, 3020, 3100, 3140, 3300, 3301, 3302, 3303, 3320, 3550,
          3770, 3780, 3782, and AP 7217—Policies governing the hiring, evaluation, and rights
          and responsibilities of College faculty (certificated personnel)
       f. Policies 4000, 4010, 4011, 4020, 4150, 4710, 4900, 4902—Policies governing the
          hiring, evaluation, and rights and responsibilities of College classified personnel
       g. Policies in the 5000 series—Policies governing the admission, matriculation,
          assessment, registration, enrollment, and rights and responsibilities of students



                                                                                                           8
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1


       h. Policies 8080, 8081, 8120, 8121—Policies creating and implementing a minority
          vendors program and policies governing student employees

The Policies and Procedures “Manual” can be found at the following web address:
http://docushare.deltacollege.edu/dsweb/View/Collection-1373

Part II: Student Equity Plan

In spring 2006, Vice President John Williams submitted the San Joaquin Delta College Student
Equity Plan to the California Community College Chancellor’s Office.

Part III: Equity for All, 2005-06; Update of Equity for All, Fall 2008

In October of 2005, San Joaquin Delta College was invited to join the Equity for All:
Institutional Responsibility for Student Success project, a collaboration among a number of
California Community Colleges and the Center for Urban Education at the University of
Southern California. Led by nationally-recognized higher education researcher, Dr. Estela
Bensimon, and supported by the Lumina Foundation and the California Community College
Chancellor’s Office, Equity for All’s purpose was to close the equity gap in postsecondary
educational outcomes among minority and low-income students. The project focused on
defining the problem through an inquiry-based process guided by campus-based teams of
faculty, staff, and administrators. Using a team approach and a model that viewed student
success through four lenses, the team reviewed extensive data on student outcomes by ethnicity
from the perspective of academic pathways, retention, transfer readiness, and excellence.

Through the process, the team produced an equity scorecard which identified those groups that
were not achieving as well as others. After the team reviewed its findings, they presented them
in a variety of venues: to the most affected first—English, Reading, and Math faculty, and then
throughout the organization (President’s Council, Management Senate, Classified Senate, and
Academic Senate) and to the Board of Trustees. Discussions and planning sessions focused
faculty and staff on ways to address the equity issues raised by the report, and faculty and staff
began to work on ways to improve student outcomes for specific ethnic groups of students as
well as all students (See Appendix 5: Equity for All on page). Several initiatives resulted from
conversations about the Equity for All data including the AFFIRM Program for African-
American students, Passport to College, Understanding Poverty workshops, and District
keynotes by Frank Sanchez, a specialist in Hispanic student success and retention and Vincent
Tinto, a nationally-recognized expert in retention and student success.

The Equity for All data have recently been updated by the Planning, Research, and Institutional
Effectiveness analysts, and presentations of the findings are planned for late fall 2008 and spring
2009. After the presentations, conversations and planning will begin again for further addressing
the shortcomings of particular student ethnic group outcomes.




                                                                                                     9
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1


Part IV: The College Faculty and Staff Diversity Plan

San Joaquin Delta College has continued to work on its Faculty and Staff Diversity Plan with
cooperation from all groups on campus including the College Diversity Committee (See AP
2430: College Diversity Committee). The recently hired Vice President of Human Resources
and Employee Relations leads this initiative. Over the past months, the Vice President has
engaged the committee in developing a plan template and creating diversity and equity goals for
the College. The College has reviewed many models and samples of diversity plans and has
identified an exemplary diversity plan model: Cosumnes River College in Sacramento.1 The
Cosumnes River College service area and College demographics match suitably those of San
Joaquin Delta College, and the College Diversity Committee will develop effective
modifications of the Cosumnes model. The committee will finalize the plan in spring 2009, and
the updated diversity plan will serve as one of the cornerstones of the College Strategic Planning
Process.

As a part of its commitment to become a more data driven entity, the College has also begun
more carefully and systematically examining diversity in hiring and promotion as well as
evaluating the relative recruitment activities and the diversity of its candidate pools (See Table
47, Table 48, Table 49 and Table 50). The College Diversity Committee has been charged to
develop surveys to measure the degree of “Delta’s welcoming atmosphere” to traditionally
underrepresented groups. Individual committee members will conduct “mini-audits” of the
campus and community-at-large to determine how internal and external audiences perceive the
District in relation to its diversity performance as outlined in the Mission Statement and Strategic
Goals. The College Diversity Committee is forming action plans that will integrate into the
Strategic Plan and provide a system by which the College can measure its progress towards
quarterly and annual goals. The College Diversity Committee will also monitor the Student
Equity Plan and evaluate the College’s success in achieving the goals set forth in that plan.

Part V: Improvement of Diversity in Hiring

While the student body of San Joaquin Delta College clearly reflects the demographic
composition of the College’s service area, the faculty and staff could be more diverse even
though recent hires reflect more African-Americans, Hispanics, and Asians than the current staff
(See Figure 1).




1
    Reference Appendix rr.


                                                                                                 10
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1


          Ethnic Demography of San Joaquin County Relative to Delta College Staffing2




Figure 1: Ethnic Demography of San Joaquin County & San Joaquin Delta College

Ethnicity of Delta College Staff and Faculty

To that end, over the past several years, the College has improved its recruitment, retention, and
promotion of staff and faculty of diverse backgrounds. The College has also improved its ability
to track its success through the Human Resources Information Systems (HRIS). Since the
accreditation visit, the College has compiled a variety of data and consolidated it into summary
spreadsheets that show its position regarding the hiring of staff and faculty of diverse
backgrounds (See Table 47, Table 48 and Table 49), as well as the ethnic composition of the
College’s current permanent employees (Table 50).

Figure 2 demonstrates that the percent of African-Americans, Asians, and Hispanic or Latino
employees hired over the past three years has increased.




2
    Reference Appendix H.


                                                                                                11
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1



                                       Hiring Trends at Delta College3




Figure 2: Hiring Trends at Delta College

Part VI: Faculty & Staff Satisfaction Survey and Focus Groups w/African-American
Employees

The College’s Office of Planning, Research and Institutional Effectiveness has recently
completed an extensive survey of staff, faculty, and managers on their satisfaction with climate
of the College. This survey was an attempt to revalidate the findings of the spring 2008 survey
used for the 2008 Accreditation Self-Study. The fall 2008 survey concluded that there remain
concerns about equity at the College, particularly among African-American employees. To
illuminate the findings from the survey, researchers and the Vice President of Student Services
met with focus groups of African-American employees who expressed a variety of concerns
including their perceptions that African-Americans are underrepresented in the employee ranks,
particularly in faculty and management; that African-Americans lack mentoring; and that
African-Americans are unable to earn promotions or to learn of promotions, or employment
opportunities with the same ease as other ethnicities. Overall, the African-American employees
involved in the focus groups did not feel they were consistently treated fairly in comparison to
employees from other racial or ethnic backgrounds. The report suggests the need for a planning
agenda that addresses staff concerns regarding discrimination and diversity, and it is clear that
significant efforts at staff training on diversity and non-discrimination are necesssary.

The survey and report are printed in Appendix 1 (Employee Questionnaire) and Appendix 2
(Results of the Focus Groups).
Recommendation 2.1
3
    Reference Appendix J.


                                                                                                12
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1


Part VII: Activities and Initiatives in Support of Promoting Student & Staff Diversity

Since the 2002 Accreditation, San Joaquin Delta College has engaged in a variety of initiatives
and activities intended to improve the sensitivity of the College community to the diversity—in
all its manifestations—of its students, faculty, staff, and larger community. Though some of
these activities may have been targeted to appeal to certain groups, they nevertheless
demonstrate a variety of initiatives designed to increase sensitivity to diversity, improve success
among particular groups, or promote greater understanding where differences exist.

External Partnerships

   1.     Beginning in summer 2003, at the suggestion of Superintendent/President Raúl
        Rodríguez, the College partnered with Stockton Unified School District to host the José
        Valdés Math Institute on the College campus. A six-week intensive program designed to
        improve sixth graders’ math skills, the Valdés Math Institute demonstrated the College’s
        commitment to improving the educational opportunities of a highly diverse population of
        students in Stockton Unified School District. The program which also involves the
        students’ parents in a commitment to improving student achievement has continued to
        serve approximately 280 students annually.

   2.     In October 2005, San Joaquin Delta College was invited to join the Equity for All:
        Institutional Responsibility for Student Success project, a collaboration among a number
        of California Community Colleges and the Center for Urban Education at the University
        of Southern California. Led by nationally-recognized higher education researcher, Dr.
        Estela Bensimon, and supported by the Lumina Foundation and the California
        Community College Chancellor’s Office, Equity for All’s purpose was to close the equity
        gap in postsecondary educational outcomes among minority and low-income students.
        The project focused on defining the problem through an inquiry-based process guided by
        campus-based teams of faculty, staff, and administrators. Using a team approach and a
        model that viewed student success through four lenses, the team reviewed extensive data
        on student outcomes by ethnicity from the perspective of academic pathways, retention,
        transfer readiness, and excellence. Through the process, the team produced an equity
        scorecard which identified those groups that were not achieving as well as others. After
        the team reviewed its findings, they presented them in a variety of venues including to
        English, Reading, and Math faculty, to various shared governance groups, and to the
        Board of Trustees. Discussions and planning sessions led to the development of a
        number of student success initiatives.

Internal Initiatives

   1.     An extremely active subcommittee of the College Diversity Committee is the Cultural
        Awareness Program Committee (CAP). Established by faculty and staff in 2000 with the
        support of past President Ed Gould, the CAP Committee has an annual budget that
        supports cultural events for students, faculty, staff, and the community alike. (See
        Appendix B, CAPs Events.)




                                                                                                  13
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1


    2.     Long-standing DSPS, EOPS, and CARE programs at the College have served students
         with disabilities and under-represented, socio-economically and educationally
         disadvantaged students. These programs provide a variety of support for students with
         special needs and address academic, social, and financial issues that often prevent these
         students from succeeding in College.

    3.     An initiative that resulted from Equity for All was Passport to College. Funded through
         the Appreciative Inquiry (AI) Process in 2006-07, Passport to College is a partnership
         between San Joaquin Delta College and all of the school districts in the College service
         area. The program initially focused on all fifth grade students in the District and
         promised them two tuition-free years at the College in exchange for their participation in
         select College activities on an annual basis until they reached high school graduation.

    4.     The AI Process also funded Hispanic Serving Institution Outreach to local high
         schools, Puente Field Trips to colleges and universities, Discipline Collaboration: Search
         for Student Success Methods, and AFFIRM,4 a program not unlike Delta Golddd5 that is
         intended to promote the academic and personal success of African-American students at
         the College. Funds from AI were also used to promote student success through the New
         Faculty Orientation and the New Faculty Academy which has supported the attendance of
         new instructors to the Great Teachers’ Academy and the Student Success Conference
         among others.6

    5.     Promoted by staff who had attended them elsewhere, in fall 2006 and fall 2007, the
         College sponsored Understanding Poverty workshops for the entire faculty and staff.
         These workshops focused on the diversity of socio-economic disadvantage and its effects
         on educational attainment and student success. An outcome of this workshop was a
         video produced by the Public Information and Marketing Office entitled “Accepting the
         Challenge” which highlighted College programs designed to assist students with their
         financial need.7

    6.     San Joaquin Delta College serves the college-going population of all of San Joaquin
         County as well as parts of four surrounding counties: Calaveras, Solano, Alameda, and
         Sacramento. While well-known for its agricultural richness, this region is also widely
         known as having high poverty and low educational attainment rates. The video,
         “Accepting the Challenge,” was made to address the variety of ways in which San
         Joaquin Delta College provides programs and services designed to assist students in
         moving out of poverty through educational attainment and gainful employment.8




4
  Reference Appendix C.
5
  Reference Appendix ss, Appendix X
6
  Reference Appendix C and D
7
  Reference Appendix E.
8
  Reference Appendix E.


                                                                                                  14
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1


In 2006, the District In-Service Keynote address was delivered by Frank Sanchez, Ph.D., an
expert in promoting student success for Hispanic students. The fall 2008, In-Service revolved
around the keynote from Vincent Tinto, Ph.D., the highly-respected retention and student success
researcher who met with individuals at all levels of the organization to promote a culture of
student success for Delta College students.

       7.     In spring 2006, San Joaquin Delta College participated in a comprehensive examination
            of its basic skills programs as a precursor to the state-wide Basic Skills Initiative.
            Supported by Superintendent/President Rodríguez, the administration and faculty formed
            a College-wide Developmental Education Review Task Force of approximately 50
            faculty and staff from basic skills as well as career technical, general education, and
            transfer programs. The Task Force met several times throughout the spring of 2006,
            studied the literature of basic skills “best practices,” and developed action plans for
            improving basic skills for all students at Delta College. The Task Force met again in
            2007-08 to complete additional action plans for the duration of the state-wide Basic Skills
            Initiative, and will continue the work on improving basic skills outcomes in 08-09.

       8.     Basic Skills dollars from the California Community College Chancellor’s Office have
            supported the hiring of a student success coordinator, faculty and staff attendance at a
            variety of conferences and institutes, and the funding of a variety of pilot projects
            intended to improve student success.

       9.     The New Faculty Academy for 2008-09 has a renewed focus on matters of diversity.
            Nearly 30 new full-time faculty are participating in training on appreciation of diversity,
            cultural competence, and diversity of learning styles among other topics.

Grant Programs

       1.     In 2001-02, the College reinstated its membership in the Puente program and revived
            the program on campus. Focusing on counseling support and academic support in
            English classes, this program has remained intact, and successfully graduates and
            transfers many students each year.

In 2005-06, after qualifying as a Hispanic-Serving Institution, the College successfully pursued
and won a federal Title V, HSI grant.9 Focusing on improving student success primarily for its
Hispanic student population, this 5-year, 2.5 million dollar infusion of resources has allowed the
College to improve its tutoring support for students through the expansion of the Reading
Writing Learning Center and the Math Science Learning Center, to improve student outcomes in
a set of key “gateway” courses in English, math, and science, and to provide extensive
professional development for instructors and staff.10 Just recently the College learned that it has
also been selected for a CCRAA.




9
    Reference Appendix vv.
10
    Reference Appendix vv.


                                                                                                      15
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1


   2.    Hispanic Serving Institution Federal Grant of nearly $2 million to support Science,
        Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs.

   3.     In 2005, the College also earned a TRIO Student Services Grant. Designed to address
        the needs of underrepresented students and specifically including students with
        disabilities, the TRIO Grant supports the Delta Golddd program which provides
        academic, social, and financial support to this special population of students.

All of the above initiatives indicate a solid commitment on the part of San Joaquin Delta College
to improve the climate its for underrepresented students. While most of them focus primarily
upon improving student success, these initiatives send the message that the College cares about
its subgroups’ needs and provides specially-developed programming to address them.

Evaluation

The College has undertaken a comprehensive evaluation of its sensitivity to the needs of staff
and faculty of diverse backgrounds. The College clearly has comprehensive and detailed
policies that speak to a wide range of diversity issues. As it moves from the current board policy
format to the CCLC templates, the College will continue to update existing policies related to
diversity. The College Diversity Committee will continue to recommend policy updates as may
any other entity on campus.

The College has a complete Student Equity Plan which is monitored by the College Diversity
Committee. Moreover, the Equity for All Report from 2005-06 has prompted a variety of
initiatives to promote student success for all groups of students particularly African-Americans
and Hispanics. The Equity for All Report has been updated, and discussions of the results will
prompt new initiatives to promote student success.

Among the most needed steps is to complete the Faculty and Staff Diversity Plan. While the
hiring figures show a continued progression toward meeting the goals of the College, the
instability in senior management of 2007-08 had caused completion of a formal Faculty and Staff
Diversity Plan to become “lost in the shuffle.” Under the leadership of the Vice President of
Human Resources and Employee Relations work on a formal Faculty and Staff Diversity Plan is
underway and will be completed early in 2009.

As is evidenced by the tables and figures depicting the hiring results for the past three years, the
College has improved its hiring of diverse faculty and staff.

The updated employee survey and the focus group discussions among the African-American
employees have suggested a variety of reforms that should be included in the Faculty and Staff
Diversity Plan.




                                                                                                   16
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1


Finally, the College will continue to add external partnerships, internal initiatives, and seek grant
funds to promote success among diverse groups of employees and students as it seeks to fulfill
the terms of its Mission Statement, Vision Statement, and Strategic Goals. The College remains
vigilant to continue evaluation and planning that not only promotes staff diversity in hiring, but
also improve the feelings and perceptions of those employees already employed by at Delta
College.




                                                                                                   17
Response to 2002 Recommendation 2.1


Planning Agenda

   1. The College Diversity Committee will revise into the CCLC template and update all
      College policies dealing with equal opportunity and fairness in recruitment, hiring,
      evaluation, reclassification, promotion, and grievance settlement by December 2009.

   2. The College Diversity Committee will review and evaluate progress on the goals of the
      Student Equity Plan of spring 2006 by May 2009.

   3. The Dean of Planning, Research, and Institutional Effectiveness and his staff will present
      the findings of the updated Equity for All Report to faculty, staff, appropriate governance
      committees, and the Board of Trustees by December 2008. Faculty and staff will develop
      student success initiatives and proposals for submission to the AI Process by February
      2009.

   4. The College Diversity Committee will continue meeting bi-weekly to prepare a draft of
      the Faculty and Staff Diversity Plan by November 28, 2008. The Faculty and Staff
      Diversity Plan will address the concerns of the African-American employees. The final
      draft will be presented to the Board of Trustees by January 6, 2009.

   5. The College Diversity Committee will continue to monitor the diversity of hiring among
      College faculty and staff on an annual basis and suggest ways to improve the diversity of
      pools of applicants and of employment and promotion opportunities for current
      employees.

   6. The College will continue to engage in external partnerships, internal initiatives, and seek
      grant support for promoting faculty, staff, and student success and appreciation of
      diversity.




                                                                                                18
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1

Comment from 2002 Accreditation Visit

The College needs to proceed under the guidance of the Mission Statement and with the
leadership of its new President, to focus on College-wide strategic goals supported by
department, division, and administrative plans. These College-wide goals with measurable
objectives and action plans need to be clearly articulated as the basis for priorities in budgeting
and other decisions. The process for planning and budgeting needs explicit communication and
coordination, clearer charges for the related committees, and expected timelines to meet both
long-range objectives and annual implementation processes. Furthermore, the College should
implement the assessment of Institutional Outcome Measures as benchmarks for progress in
achieving College-wide goals. (Currently Standard I)

Evaluation of 2008 Visiting Team

An in-depth review of documentation did not verify the self-study assertions that a current viable
College-wide strategic plan forms the basis for decision-making. There is no across-the-board
institutional plan that would include individual unit goals, measurable objectives, action plans for
programs/services, needed resources, priorities for resource allocations, timelines for
implementation, and evaluation processes. Although the College has conducted periodic program
review and has gathered some appropriate research data, it is clear that these are isolated general
procedures with little or no relationship to overall planning and appraisal. Commendable
projects, such as those funded by the Appreciative Inquiry (AI) Process, are limited by the
availability of funds. The AI Process encompasses only a relatively small portion of
comprehensive planning and allocation. The College has not met this recommendation.

Description

In 2005, the College provided a mid-term report to the ACCJC that reflected a number of
significant initiatives to improve its planning and budgeting processes. In the years since, the
College has attempted to maintain its efforts to tie decision-making to the Mission Statement of
the College and to established strategic goals. It is clear that the 2008 visiting team did not find
adequate evidence to suggest that systematic planning was in place to meet ACCJC standards.
The College has taken quick action in the last 10 months to establish a new strategic planning
framework and believes it has begun a new chapter in the institution’s history. In the pages that
follow, a history is provided of planning and budgeting at the College since the 2002
Accreditation visit and outline the new strategic planning model that is in place at the College in
response to the 2008 accreditation visit.
In the year following the 2002 accreditation visit, the College struggled with a significant
downturn in the state economy that resulted in large mid-year budget cuts in community college
funding in early 2003. Many departments, including instruction, were asked to make 8% to 12%
cuts in their operations. This downturn resulted in the loss of staffing positions throughout the
College through attrition and retirements, with maintenance and operations suffering the deepest
staffing losses.



                                                                                                      19
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1


The lean budget year also led to the consolidation of two dean positions – the Dean of Planning,
Research and Grants Development and Dean of Regional Education – into one single position:
Dean of Planning, Research and Regional Education. The position has since been reclassified
and job responsibilities clarified to focus the position on institutional effectiveness. The position
is now identified as the Dean of Planning, Research and Institutional Effectiveness, with direct
reporting responsibilities to the Superintendent/President.

Strategic Planning and Revision of Mission Statement
As the budget began to rebound, Superintendent/President Rodríguez initiated a new model of
strategic planning using the AI framework for discussion of the College’s strengths and its
institutional focus for strategic goals. Beginning in fall 2003, an ad hoc Strategic Planning team
was assembled and AI training was implemented for 15 key campus leaders from various
constituency groups. Those members engaged in campus interviews to collect information from
more than 150 campus representatives. In March 2004, the College held a day-long retreat that
resulted in a new draft vision and mission statement for the College. Those statements were
reviewed by campus governance groups (Planning and Budget Committee, Policies and
Procedures Review Committee, governance committees, President’s Council, and ultimately the
Board of Trustees). The resulting Mission Statement from that process was:
     The mission of San Joaquin Delta College is providing excellent post-secondary education
     that serves the needs of students, the College District and the community through continuing,
     transfer, and career education. To achieve this objective, the faculty and staff commit
     themselves to providing comprehensive instructional programs, students’ services and public
     services that are high quality.11

     In fulfilling its mission, San Joaquin Delta College acts upon the following principles:
             Commitment to excellence requires effective collaboration, respect for cultural diversity,
           appreciation of historical perspective, open communication, high academic standards, and
           competitive athletics.
             Educational resources are available to all students regardless of age, disability, gender,
           or ethnicity.
             Institutional renewal must include continuous improvements through new and revised
           curricula; the use of student learning outcomes to enhance student performance; new and
           effective technology, and a vital connection to the arts and cultures of the community the
           College serves.
             All aspects of the College encourage good citizenship, responsible leadership, ethical
           behavior, and the appreciation of lifelong learning.12

The Mission Statement has been modified twice since that 2005 revision. For example, in May
of 2007, the campus constituencies reviewed and slightly changed the statement to reflect an
emphasis on coordinated planning for student success and equity. The new statement added the
following principle:


11
   This Mission Statement was not in effect for the 2002 Accreditation Self-Study. It has since changed twice and the current
statement can be found on the following page.
12
   Reference Appendix ww, Item VIII 4.


                                                                                                                                20
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1


         Student success and equity are founded on a well-coordinated and institutionally-
         integrated developmental education program.13

Another slight modification to the Mission Statement was introduced in early 2008. Coupled
with some re-wording, the College governance groups included specific language in the
statement that addresses its mission to foster economic development in the region. This addition
to the Mission Statement reflects the College’s commitment to continuous review and
improvement. The Board formally adopted this revised Mission Statement on February 19,
2008.14 The current Mission Statement now reads as follows:

         The mission of San Joaquin Delta College is to provide excellent post-secondary
         education that serves the needs of students, the College District and the community
         through continuing, transfer, career and technical education, and economic
         development. To achieve this objective, the faculty and staff are committed to
         providing comprehensive instructional programs, student services and public
         services that are high quality.
         In fulfilling its mission, San Joaquin Delta College acts upon the following principles:
               Commitment to excellence requires effective collaboration, respect for cultural
                diversity, appreciation of historical perspective, open communication, high
                academic standards, a vital connection to the arts and cultures of the community,
                and competitive athletics.
               Student success and equity are founded on a well-coordinated and
                 institutionally-integrated developmental education program.
               Educational resources are available to all students regardless of age, disability,
                gender, or ethnicity.
               Institutional renewal must include continuous improvement through new and
                revised curricula; the use of student learning outcomes to enhance student
                performance; new and effective technologies; and ongoing faculty and staff
                professional development.
               All aspects of the College encourage good citizenship, responsible leadership,
                ethical behavior, and the appreciation of lifelong learning.

Strategic Goal Setting and Department Action Plans

While the College can be faulted for failing to develop a cohesive, institution-wide strategic
planning document in the past, the College and Board has engaged in strategic planning efforts in
the past. In 2004, the Superintendent/President initiated a goal-setting process with campus
governance groups that emanated from the AI training and workshops the prior year.
Participants in these goal setting discussions ultimately established four broad strategic goals for
the institution that were affirmed by the Planning and Budget Committee and President’s
Council in early 2005.15 Those goals were tied to the College’s Mission Statement and
accreditation standards, formulated and shared with campus governance groups, and became the

13
   Reference Appendix xx.
14
   Reference Appendix iii, Item VIII A.3.
15
   Planning and Budget Committee Minutes, January 27, 2005; President’s Council Minutes, February 5, 2005.


                                                                                                             21
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1


foundation for action plans at the Vice Presidential and departmental level. The 2005 goals
included the following:

       Strategic Goal 1: Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy
       access to information to and from all internal and external groups to promote access,
       student success, and positive student learning outcomes.

       Strategic Goal 2: Develop a College-wide staff development program to improve faculty,
       administrator, and classified staff skills to promote access, student success and positive
       student learning outcomes.

       Strategic Goal 3: Increase access, student success and positive student learning
       outcomes.

       Strategic Goal 4: Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets,
       and adjust College budget priorities to support and insure access, and successful student
       outcomes.

The development of strategic goals and action plans has become the model for the College’s
current approach to strategic planning. Action plans are designed to identify specific objectives
geared toward a specific strategic goal, the parties responsible for bringing the objective to life,
and a timeline for expected completion. The current model of planning envisions an annual
environmental scan and strategic planning process, leading to the development of specific action
plans at the departmental level that address strategic goals identified by the College through its
environmental scanning process. The action plans “roll up” under a specific administrator but
these initiatives are developed and accomplished by the students, faculty, staff, administration
and Board of the College. Thus, all campus constituents have an opportunity to participate in
this process through their own development of objectives and action plans, and their attendance
and participation in shared governance committees that review the strategic plan. A graphic
illustration of the relationships among the Mission Statement, strategic plans and action plans is
noted on the following page:




                                                                                                  22
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1




                                       Mission Statement of San
                                        Joaquin Delta College




                      Strategic                      Strategic                 Strategic
                       Plan A                         Plan B                    Plan C




             Action           Action        Action               Action   Action           Action
              Plan             Plan          Plan                 Plan     Plan             Plan




Figure 3: Diagram of Strategic Plan

Since the accrediting team’s visit in March 2008, the College has developed an Environmental
Scan and Strategic Plan that is rooted in the framework discussed above (a copy of the 2008
Strategic Plan is included in the Appendix to this report). This broad-based document was
generated by in-depth study of the environmental surroundings of the College District and the
2,300 square miles it serves. The study was modeled after other community College strategic
planning documents. The report was produced by the College’s Office of Planning, Research,
and Institutional Effectiveness and was reviewed and edited by key campus governance groups,
including the Planning and Budget Council, President’s Council, and the Board of Trustees.

Once the environmental scan was completed, providing the external data needed to form the
foundation of the institutional plan, it was further refined within the context of the shared
governance process. Specific goals and objectives were added to the document during the
review process in the late spring and summer of 2008. Each iteration of strategic plan
refinement focused the needs of the campus in more and more detail. The resulting plan yielded
six areas of institutional initiatives, with many of the goals tied back to the earlier strategic goals
identified by the College in 2005. The six strategic goals identified in the 2008 Strategic Plan
are reproduced below:

         Strategic Goal 1: Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy
         access to information to and from all internal and external groups.

         Strategic Goal 2: Develop a College-wide staff development program to improve faculty,
         administrator, and classified staff skills to promote access, student success and positive
         student learning outcomes.




                                                                                                     23
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1


       Strategic Goal 3: Increase access, student equity, student success and positive student
       learning outcomes.

       Strategic Goal 4: Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets,
       and adjust College budget priorities to support and insure access, and successful student
       outcomes.

       Strategic Goal 5: Facilitate the completion of Measure L Bond Projects and the
       revitalization of the Stockton campus.

       Strategic Goal 6: In light of regional and global trends, examine operational procedures
       and launch new vocational and educational programs that meet the challenges of wise
       resource management, new energy technology, transportation logistics, health care,
       viticulture, and information technology.

In tandem with the development of the Strategic Plan of 2008, College units have engaged in the
process of action plan development and will be asked to analyze previous action plans. In
addition, new strategic initiatives will be introduced through the AI budget augmentation process
in late 2008. The next layer of strategic planning will be for the administrators in the different
areas to lead discussions among their staffs and analyze the new goals. With these crucial
conversations, the administrators, faculty, staff, students, and the Board will develop specific
action plans to achieve the goals and objectives outlined in the Strategic Plan. The development
of all of these action plans involves widespread consultation with each member of the
departments. As indicated earlier, samples of these action plans have been included in the
appendix of this document.
Some notable initiatives have been produced by the College in response to the 2008 strategic
planning process. The Office of Public Information and Marketing has completed a draft
Communications Plan that will improve the College’s external marketing efforts and make better
connections to potential students in the community through new internet efforts and outreach to
prominent alumni. The College’s Office of Planning, Research and Institutional Effectiveness
has produced a Report on Institutional Effectiveness that provides benchmark data on measures
of institutional outcomes that has been widely distributed (see Appendix zz). The Academic
Senate has taken the lead on an aggressive schedule of course and program SLOAs (as outlined
in this report). The Human Resources and Employee Relations Office has taken steps to
accelerate the completion of overdue personnel evaluations, and has significant plans to upgrade
its information systems and thereby improve the efficiency of its operations. Emerging trends in
the “greening” of College operations have resulted in the attendance of a team of staff and
faculty at the Green California Community College Summit in October 2008. As a result of that
conference and the Strategic Plan, discussions are under way for new approaches to curriculum,
maintenance and operations at the College that address environmental sustainability.
The development of a Strategic Plan, and the creation of action plans that flow from that plan
provide strong evidence that the College has entered a new phase of planning and budgeting that
is marked by an understanding of strategic initiatives and the mission and vision of the College.
There are still areas for improvement, but the College believes that it now meets



                                                                                                 24
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1


recommendations of the ACCJC and the Commission’s expectations as described in
Recommendation 3.1.

AI & the Budgeting Process

San Joaquin Delta College views its budget and budgeting process as tangible mechanisms by
which the Strategic Plan of the College is demonstrated in the action plans. It not only provides
the financial resources necessary to accomplish the many varied actions of the College but it also
chronicles the history of the budget priorities for past periods. Using this integrated and evolving
budget development process, the budget document remains flexible and responsive to the needs
of the College.

The College maintains a budget calendar that is ongoing and linked to a series of input data
sources and internal strategic and action planning. Strategic Plan data rises to the top as the most
important internal source of input data to the budget development cycle. While external sources
of information help determine the resources of the College, the Strategic Plan, through the AI
Process, develops the internal plan for allocation of those resources. The two sides of the
budget, internal priorities and external resources, proceed in parallel cycles. At the same time
the College receives its external data regarding state and local sources of funds, the Strategic
Planning process is, through AI budget request, producing the expenditure priorities of the
institution.16

As shown in the San Joaquin Delta College Budget Development & Strategic Planning
Schedule,17 the external sources of data begin to emerge just after the new calendar year. At the
same time, the AI process is providing training and refreshing of the process of strategic plan
integration.18 While the College finance staff is gathering data from the State of California,
Governor and Legislative Analyst Office, and advocacy groups, the Instruction Office leads the
AI training process. The goal is to educate staff on the use of the AI process and the integration
of the Strategic Plan before the initial budget is produced. The College has experienced that
budgeting before planning leads to a financial document that does not always reflect the actual
Strategic Planning initiatives of the College.

As shown by the San Joaquin Delta College Budget Development & Strategic Planning
Schedule, the month of January each year is consumed with budget development activities of the
College finance department in parallel with the AI planning process. Early January is the time
that the College receives the first official budget proposal from the Governor of the State of
California. While this document bears little factual resemblance to the final budget adopted by
the State of California many months later, the initial Governor’s budget does portend the climate
of the state’s economy.

Having received the calendar of AI activities in December, the campus community is prepared to
begin the strategic action-planning in January. The training workshops are conducted


16
   Reference the Appreciative Inquiry Requests for the 2008 – 2009 Budget Year, June 23, 2008, Appendix D.
17
   Reference San Joaquin Delta College Budget Development & Strategic Planning Schedule, July 25, 2008.
18
   Reference AI Planning Calendar for 2008-2009, Appendix oo


                                                                                                             25
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1


simultaneous with the reception of the Governor’s initial budget. Training is conducted each
year to refresh staff and orient them to the new planning cycle. But there are two other
budget-related goals. The first is that returning staff need to be reminded of the process to ensure
they do not rely solely upon memory of the past year’s planning cycle. The second reason is that
planning activities can change from one year to the next. While San Joaquin Delta College has
not experienced changes in the cycle, it is anticipated that, in some future year, the planning
cycle could be disrupted. In that case, even returning staff would need training on the new
process.

The first draft AI proposals are due at the end of January.19 The first College Tentative Budget is
due for Board action on June 18. During the period between the first draft AI proposals and the
Tentative Budget, the AI initiatives are evaluated by relevant campus constituencies to ensure
there is significant exposure of the new plans to the campus community. Each constituency
makes comments and offers ranking of the AI proposals based upon how they facilitate the
Strategic Plan of the College. Vice Presidents and Executive Cabinet members will be using a
standard scoring rubric to evaluate AI budget proposals using a standard framework. The rubric
will ensure that requests for staff and resources are tied to the Mission Statement of the College
and the Strategic Goals that have been identified as top priorities. It is the intention of the
College to have all AI proposals reviewed and prioritized by the time the Publication Budget is
produced and offered to the Board for adoption.

As the budget activities continue, there are many tasks related to the AI process that occur
simultaneously.20 The period between the Tentative Budget approval and the Adopted Budget,
the AI Process conducts the following review activities:

                 AI Proposals Published on Campus-wide Web Site
                 Departments Prioritize Proposals for VPs
                 VPs Prioritize Top 25 AI Proposals using a scoring rubric
                 Proposals Presented to Cabinet
                 Proposals Reviewed for Feasibility
                 Proposals Combined where Necessary
                 President's Cabinet Prepares Ranking using a scoring rubric
                 PBC Reviews Ranking and Recommends Final Ranking
                 Final AI Ranking Published on Campus-wide Web Site
                 President's Cabinet Reviews Final PBC Ranking
                 AI Proposals Integrated into Adopted Budget

After the Adopted Budget is approved, the College finance department begins a process of
budget review. These activities include evaluating the expected revenue and expenditures and
reporting to the Chancellor’s Office. During this same period, the College, represented by the
Assistant Superintendent/Vice President of Instruction, evaluates the effectiveness of the AI
proposals funded in the budget.21 This verification evaluates a stated goal of an AI initiative
against the strategic plan to which it has been associated. Adjustments are then made to the
19
   Reference AI Proposal Form, Appendix D.
20
   Reference San Joaquin Delta College Budget Development & Strategic Planning Schedule, July 25, 2008.
21
   Reference Appendix U2.


                                                                                                          26
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1


proposal and budget to ensure the positive impact of the AI proposal on the Strategic Plan. In
parallel with the perpetual budget cycle, this evaluation and feedback continues through the end
of the academic year.

At the start of a new academic year, an evaluation cycle begins for prior AI initiatives. An
example of the AI evaluation process has been provided in the appendix of this document.22
These evaluations can set the stage for new modifications and new AI requests in the current
year budget cycle. 23

The College’s use of the AI process has helped integrate budgeting requests with the College’s
Mission Statement and Strategic Goals. As the 2005 mid-term report pointed out, AI became the
mode for submitting budget requests using a standard format via a FileMaker template that could
be used to consolidate all requests into one database. The College has now gone through three
iterations of budget requests using the AI/FileMaker Process, and has just engaged in one cycle
of evaluation of AI funded projects. The AI process ensures that faculty, staff, and managers
make the necessary linkage between budgeting requests and the College’s mission and strategic
goals.

The electronic handling of these documents is the subject of new campus technology initiatives.
While the current method of preparing the AI proposals on an electronic template has greatly
increased the productivity of the system, the College looks forward to new technological
solutions to speed the process of review and include everyone on campus. Currently, the AI
proposals are printed and distributed to leaders of each constituent group on campus. The
College DocuShare system, allowing the capability of making each proposal available
electronically through the web. In addition, the new Kuali / KFS system, which is planned for
implementation by July 1, 2009, will provide a paperless environment in which the approved AI
proposals will be electronically transmitted to the College finance department. The College
views the electronic formats as methods of creating even more efficiencies in an already-efficient
system, and will make the proposals available in an electronic format that is faster than currently
produced.

Program Review and Planning for Faculty Entitlements

The College uses an annual entitlement request process for the establishment of new faculty
positions and for filling vacancies from prior years. While these requests are processed outside
of the AI budget process, the success of faculty staffing requests is driven by demonstrated need
and decisions that are based on data from the College’s Data Warehouse. The process begins in
September or October when the Vice President of Instruction and the Academic Senate
leadership invites faculty and division deans to submit faculty entitlement requests. The requests
utilize a standard template that calls for narrative justification and linkages to a program review
document that establishes a prior need and evidence for a new faculty position. As a result, there
is a strong incentive for programs to complete program reviews if they have any intention of
making a pitch for a new faculty entitlement, and the use of evidence from program reviews
provides some basis for objective comparison across multiple department requests. Division

22
     Reference Appendix 3
23
     Reference Appendix oo.


                                                                                                 27
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1


deans and faculty who have been attuned to new strategic planning initiatives can also tie their
request to an established institutional goal. As an example, once a strategic planning goal has
been established that emphasizes exploring new programs in energy technology, the faculty in
that division might conduct labor market research to justify the establishment of an entitlement.
While FTES and FTEF would not be available for such a new program, the use of evidence tied
to a strategic goal might elevate the proposal up the listing of ranked priorities.

The entitlement requests feature data elements that measure FTES, FTEF, and trends in data over
a five year period. These figures are derived from the College’s data warehouse and are
validated by staff in the Office of Planning, Research and Institutional Effectiveness. The use of
these figures allow the College to use data-driven decision-making that balances the hiring of
staff in high enrollment programs with ones that might require more limited student to faculty
ratios because of lab-based learning.

Once the requests for new entitlements have been formulated, two different rankings are
developed – one by the Academic Senate after a formal meeting to discuss the proposals and ask
questions about them, and another by the Vice Presidents of Instruction and Student Services.
When the two rankings are completed, representatives from the Academic Senate meet with the
Vice President of Instruction to compare the rankings and attempt to reach a consensus on the
institutional priorities for faculty hires. Once that consensus list is formalized, it is presented to
the Superintendent/President for discussion and a recommendation is formalized for Board of
Trustee approval. The Board action usually occurs in December in order to facilitate recruitment
and screening throughout the spring semester.

The Superintendent/President has established an informal policy of hiring replacement faculty
when there is a separation by resignation or retirement. In most cases, programs seeking to
replace a faculty member who left in the prior year still must fill out entitlement requests to make
the case for the replacement.

Evaluation

The College’s capability to engage in planning and budgeting based on an institution-wide
strategic plan has been greatly enhanced since the commission team’s visit. The College has
benefited from the establishment of a new team of vice presidential executives and a Dean of
Planning, Research and Institutional Effectiveness who have worked collaboratively to
implement a new planning approach that asks units of the College to develop annual planning
agendas. These plans feature timelines for completion, responsible stakeholders, and are
benchmarked around strategic goals that have been adopted by College governance groups.

The College will need to sustain the momentum that has been established for a new approach to
planning and budgeting. Specifically, new budget initiatives proposed through the AI framework
will be analyzed using a standard scoring rubric that cabinet level executives can use to prioritize
new budget requests. The rubric will ensure that higher scores will be awarded to projects that
address the mission of the College and its adopted strategic goals. Planning has begun to take
shape in the form of annual action plans that are featured in the appendix of this document.




                                                                                                    28
Response to 2002 Recommendation 3.1


Much progress has been made on this standard, but there is still room for improvement. For
example, the current strategic plan, while commendable, does not devote enough attention to the
various environmental impact statements and planning documents that have been created for
Measure L Bond projects. Additionally, the document needs to make a stronger connection to
existing program reviews and the recommendations that flow from those documents. This will
be addressed in the 2009 revision of the strategic plan. The College will also need to make
significant progress on updating its educational master plan and linking that document to its
strategic planning efforts.

The College believes that it has addressed the concerns that were raised by the 2002 and 2008
accreditation commission reports and has met the standards established by the ACCJC for
effective planning and budgeting processes.

Planning Agenda

   1. Continue with implementation of new strategic planning and budgeting initiatives:
      Ongoing.

   2. Utilize new AI budget review rubric to guide cabinet level prioritization of budget
      requests from faculty, staff, and managers: Formal Review December 2008.

   3. Update the Educational Master Plan within the next 18 months to provide a solid
      foundation for long-range decisions on program expansion and use of regional sites.

   4. Revise the strategic plan in spring 2009 and incorporate greater discussion of program
      review documents and recommendations in that plan. Use the opportunity of revising the
      strategic plan to expand discussion of regional centers and environmental plans for those
      sites.




                                                                                                29
Response to 2002 Recommendation 5.1

Comment from 2002 Accreditation Visit

It is recommended that the College enact a plan to resolve the issue of the counseling department
schedules to ensure that the counseling needs of students are being met. (Currently Standard II)

Evaluation of 2008 Visiting Team

No evidence could be found to substantiate that this recommendation has been addressed. The
College has not met this recommendation.

Description

     New Administration and Technology

     As noted in previous sections, San Joaquin Delta College has undergone a transformation;
     hiring four out of five vice presidents within the past year. One of the new administrators is
     Trudy Walton, the Vice President of Student Services. Using new and refreshing
     approaches to student services the Vice President has already helped to transform Delta
     College into the student serving institution the Accreditation Report is requiring.

     The Counseling Department has made great improvements to ensure that there are
     counselors available to meet the needs of all students. These initiatives include staggering
     counselor start dates to ensure full-time counselors are available all year round, using new
     technology and devoting counselors to areas of specialized needs. The staggered start dates
     have ensured that there is sufficient coverage of counselors before and after each semester
     so that students do not all seek services at the same peak period. The new technology has
     made the counselors’ time more efficient by limiting vacant time periods. And the
     designation of counselors to serve specific student needs ensures that the assigned
     counselors have the appropriate expertise and resources to serve the students’ needs.

     Student Services is not just hiring new staff. They are retraining and using technology to
     leverage their capacities to serve students. For instance, the implementation of SARS is
     currently underway. This new software-based system has increased the productivity of
     counseling staff as it attempts to eliminate schedule “holes” caused by cancellations and
     “no-shows.” SARS can quickly identify potential appointment slots and reallocate that
     counselor to serve another student. In addition, SARS will establish a system of
     accountability to ensure that counselors are available to meet student needs.

     The combination of new leadership, new technology, specialized counseling and a new
     spirit has propelled the Counseling Department well beyond the criteria that the
     Accreditation Commission requires. As shown in the data below, counseling appointments
     have increased 48%, new directed counseling efforts have started and Delta College has
     conferred the fifth most Associates degrees in the nation. These are all indications that the
     counseling schedule concerns have been resolved.



                                                                                                  30
Response to 2002 Recommendation 5.1


       Counseling Schedules
       The District concurs with the sentiment expressed by the Commission in reference to the
       importance of counselor scheduling processes and the degree to which these support
       student needs throughout the school year. Indeed, a similar sentiment was expressed by a
       visiting team during a matriculation site visit in 1995.24 It was partly in response to their
       recommendation that the current scheduling process was installed in 1996. Since that time,
       full time regular counselors have been on duty throughout the year (July – June) to meet
       student counseling needs.25
       It is the position of the District that the current counselor work calendar now provides a
       stable, timely and appropriate response to student need during peak demand periods.
       Attached data track numbers of students seen by month over several years.26 The
       Commission will note that the combined months of June, July, and August, those months
       when counselors typically do not work in traditional systems, reflect service to 30% of the
       students seen all year.
       The current scheduling system calls for counseling faculty to be assigned to rolling start
       dates (July, August, and September). This guarantees that full time, regular counseling
       faculty are on duty throughout the year. These schedules are supplemented by counselors
       on overload, as well as adjunct faculty, in response to student demand. Counselors
       have voiced concerns about the lack of planning and coordination that can take place when
       counselors for designated programs are "off track" at the start and end of the academic
       year. The counselors are willing to continue discussions about schedule start dates to
       ensure high quality service to Delta' students.
       The 2002 Accreditation Report stated:
       “The team did validate a concern raised in the Self-Study that there is a problem with the
       scheduling of full-time counselors resulting in students not having access to counseling
       services during the latter part of the academic year.”27
       In Appendix cc, the College summarizes the number of full and part time counselors
       assigned to provide one-to-one counseling services during the last full school year, 2007-
       08. Several years ago, concerns were expressed regarding the potential service coverage
       issues created in April and May by having a portion of the full time staff assigned to start
       in July. Such assignments require that these counselors go off contract in April, producing
       a shortage of full time counselors at the end of each academic year. The data in Appendix
       cc indicates that Delta College’s current assignment of a combination of full and part time
       counselors provides much higher level of coverage throughout the year. During April
       2008, 17.06 counselors were on duty. During the month of May, 17.5 counselors were on
       duty. The Appendix also reflects that during the month of July, “registration counseling”




24
   Reference Appendix Z.
25
   Reference Appendix aa.
26
   Reference Appendix bb.
27
   Reference 2002 Accreditation Report.


                                                                                                    31
Response to 2002 Recommendation 5.1


         limits appointments to no more than thirty minutes each unless special circumstances
         warrant additional time (probation, veterans, international students, etc.).

         The District is committed to a program in the Guidance and Counseling Division that
         creates student access to full time counselors throughout the year. Delta College’s planned
         approach to this involves the use of staggered start dates. Starting a counselor later in the
         year ensures that the faculty is still under contract at the end of the academic year. This has
         greatly increased the availability and consistency of full time counselor coverage and
         service to the students. The College believes that the schedule is flexible and responsive
         with respect to student needs. The District will always maintain, as its priority, the highest
         level of student access to counseling services throughout the year.

         Counseling Performance Data, 2000 - 2008

         Appendix bb provides data summarizing the number of students served in one-to-one
         counseling sessions (appointment and drop-in) over the last eight years. The Commission
         will note that these numbers have increased dramatically over this period. During the 2000
         - 2001 school year general counselors saw 14,040 students. During the 2007-08 school
         year a total of 20,840 students were counseled.28 This represents a 48% increase in number
         of students served.

         The District also expanded the number of full-time regular counselors during this time.
         During the 2000 - 2001 school year, Delta College employed 10.5 full-time counselors.
         During the 2008 - 2009 school year Delta College will employ 18 full-time counselors, an
         increase of 71%. It should be noted that several of these counselors are assigned to special
         programs (listed below).

         The Appendix (bb) also reflects overall enrollment changes at the institution over the last
         eight years. The “Total Students Enrolled” line indicates the number of unduplicated
         students enrolled during fall semester. The “Service Ratio” is a reflection of numbers
         served in counseling over the number enrolled during fall semester. Though the numbers
         served in counseling is a duplicated count, the increase in this percentage reflects a
         benchmark of steady growth in service, compared to the total student population growth.

         Service to Special Populations

         Delta College is proud of its expansion of services to special population groups. The
         District maintains a long standing commitment to disadvantaged students through its well
         established programs in the areas of Extended Opportunities Programs and Services as well
         as Disability Support Programs and Services.

         During the last several years, the Guidance and Counseling Division has expanded
         assignment of counselors to a number of special, targeted service programs. These include:



28
     These are duplicated head count numbers.


                                                                                                      32
Response to 2002 Recommendation 5.1


          Puente - This program, offered in concert with the University of California system, uses
           a combination of counseling, English instruction, and mentoring to promote transfer to
           the University of California for disadvantaged students. The District has supported its
           operation since the 2001 - 2002 academic year.

          Transfer Services - All District counselors provide transfer counseling services.
           However, Delta College has committed one full-time regular counselor to providing
           leadership in transfer programs and services. Transfer rates (at an institution with
           challenging demographics) are consistently among the highest in the California
           Community College's Region 5.

          Veterans - The District has made a significant commitment to veterans. One of Delta
           College’s counselors works closely with the veteran’s representative in Financial Aid and
           Veterans Services to coordinate educational planning and support for veterans. The
           assigned counselor also serves on the new Troops to College Advisory Committee.

          Academic Probation - One counselor serves as lead staff in the development of services
           to students on academic probation. This program has featured aggressive outreach to
           students informing them of probation workshops, special counseling, and college success
           classes.
          Academic Alert - The District has developed an electronic academic alert system. The
           lead staff on this project is a counselor. This counselor promotes utilization of this
           system by full time regular faculty and is currently working on a special project to
           provide follow-up to students who have been contacted by teaching faculty.

          International Students - A counselor works in conjunction with the Outreach and
           Community RelationsOffice to assure that international students have a single point of
           contact regarding their educational planning issues.

          TRIO - Delta College is in the fourth year of a Federal TRIO grant, providing a variety
           of special services to disadvantaged students. One counselor is assigned full time to this
           program, called Delta Golddd (drive, determination, and dedication).
          Title 5 - San Joaquin Delta College is also a Hispanic serving institution. The District is
           grant funded under Title V to provide a number of services to improve the graduation and
           transfer rates of its students. One counselor is assigned full time to assist in this enriched
           transfer counseling effort. 29
          Student Athletes / Athletic Express - The District recognizes the special challenges
           faced by student athletes in managing work, school, athletic and educational planning
           issues. One of Delta College’s guidance counselors has developed a program to meet the
           special needs of athletes entitled Athletic Express. This program provides focused
           attention on small study groups, educational planning workshops, and counseling
           sessions which take into account the special needs of student athletes.


29
     Reference Appendix vv.


                                                                                                      33
Response to 2002 Recommendation 5.1


           Middle College High School - San Joaquin Delta College has hosted a very successful
            Middle College High School for several years. One of the College’s guidance counselors
            is designated as the special contact for these students to assist with the planning of Delta
            College classes. This counselor provides orientation and one-to-one counseling services.

           Non Credit Matriculation - The District offers services to GED and disabled students
            under the auspices of a Non Credit Matriculation Grant. One full time counselor and
            several adjunct faculty members provide orientation and one-to-one counseling designed
            to promote the transition of non-credit students to employment or credit instruction.

            The measurement of a counseling faculty is a difficult task. As pointed out in previous
            Accreditation Reports, access to counselors is a key to student success. Because the
            positive effects of counseling are ubiquitous but elusive, easy measurement is not
            possible. However, the statistics showing a 48% increase in counseling appointments by
            students over a period in which student enrollment remained relatively flat shows greater
            attention to the counseling needs of the College. In addition, through counseling efforts
            and the efforts of other departments on campus, the conference of Associates Degrees
            grew dramatically.30 In a recent newspaper article, the reporter wrote:

            “Delta (College) ranked fifth out of more than 5,000 colleges…The College ranked 58th in
            2006.”

            Such a monumental task of graduating so many students can never be attributed to one
            College department. But certainly the counselors played a major role in this nationally
            recognized feat.

           Expanded Access

           The District has made significant strides in creating multiple access points for counseling
           services. In addition to instituting the new staggered counseling calendar that is the subject
           of this response, the District has expanded services in a number of other ways including:

                Tracy Service Center - Several years ago Delta College initiated a part time
                 counseling assignment at the expanding Tracy Center. This position has now been
                 installed as a full time permanent position and expected to greatly enhance services to
                 students in the Tracy area.

                Saturday Services - For the last two years, the Guidance and Counseling Division
                 has expanded counseling services to include morning sessions on Saturdays during
                 busy registration periods in June and in January. This provides another opportunity
                 for students to access help in educational planning.

                eAdvising Program - Since the 2000 - 2001 school year the Guidance and
                 Counseling Division has employed eAdvising through its “Ask a Counselor” web

30
     Breitler, Alex. July 9, 2008. Stockton Record. Delta College’s Graduation Rate Skyrockets.


                                                                                                       34
Response to 2002 Recommendation 5.1


           site. This allows students to ask quick questions that would otherwise involve a
           significant commitment of time for an office visit. This system serves from 2,000-
           2,500 students per year.

          Expanded Orientation - The District has undertaken a major expansion of services
           to first time students through its Guidance 11 course, New Student Orientation
           Program. Over 1,500 students participate in this one day class which provides rich
           information on financial aid and other campus resources along with a first semester
           course list recommendation.
          SARS, (Student Appointment Reporting System) - The District recently purchased
           a new student appointment system, SARS. This system will go into effect during fall
           2008. It allows students to make appointments more conveniently. It also provides
           the District with the opportunity to report services and provide more closely
           monitored student follow-up.
           SARS is a software program that is designed to provide efficiency in scheduling
           student appointments, tracking student data, planning and reporting information.
           SARS is set up on a grid and displays counselors’ appointments with students, and
           can display No Shows, Drop-In Appointments, and appointment rescheduling etc.

           SARS has the capability to track multiple services including student contacts or
           visits. It allows the user to make changes and edits to appointments and sends
           reminders to students who have scheduled appointments. Some of the grid features
           include:
                          Group Appointments
                          Appointment Searches
                          Drop-In Appointments
                          Viewing Notes About Students
                          Alerts To Counselors
                          Generation of Reports

Evaluation
The College provides dozens of specific counseling services to its students directed at specific
needs: veterans, EOPS, academic warning etc. These services have been restructured to provide
full time counselors to be available during all periods of the year. Specific attention has been
placed on the periods of high student activity.
Recommendation 5.1

While this recommendation has been met, it is the intention of the College to continue to
evaluate the counseling schedules and the changing needs of the students to ensure that there is a
maximum coverage by full time counselors when needed by the students.
Planning Agenda

None. This accreditation recommendation and standard are met.



                                                                                                35
Response to 2002 Recommendation 7.1

Comment from 2002 Accreditation Visit

As called for in the 1996 Accreditation Evaluation Report recommendation 4.1, the College
should ensure that evaluations of staff are conducted at agreed-upon intervals and provide
training on evaluation procedures to managers, faculty, and classified staff. (Standards 7.B1 and
7.B2)

Evaluation of 2008 Visiting Team

The College has established a systematic evaluation process for all employees. While processes
exist, the team could not find evidence that evaluations are being met in a timely manner or, in
some cases, completed at all. The College has partially met this recommendation.

Description

The responsibility for tracking the evaluations of all employees is one of the duties of the Vice
President of Human Resources and Employee Relations. Mr. Vince Brown, who previously
served as the Director of Employee Services and Loss Control in the Human Resources
Department at Delta College, assumed his new role as vice president in May 2008. Mr. Brown
has extensive experience in private industry in human resources. He understands the importance
of employee evaluations and has made the implementation and maintenance of an employee
tracking and evaluation system one of his highest priorities.

At the time of the accreditation visit, March 2008, the College had a system to evaluate all
employees. But it was out of compliance in the sense that the evaluations were not tracked to
ensure compliance as required by Board Policy and the accreditation standards. In this regard,
Delta College recognizes that the accreditation visit comment 7.1 was accurate and drew
attention to a very important, yet neglected part of the College administrative responsibilities,
ensuring the timeliness of employee evaluations.

Delta College spends 78% of its general fund expenditures on employees’ salaries, wages and
benefits. This large financial commitment to employees reflects the priority and importance that
Delta College places on its largest asset, human resources. Unfortunately, the College’s lack of
timely performance evaluation sends the contrary message that employees are not valued. This is
a statement that is not shared by the College community, students, faculty, staff, administration
and the Board of Trustees. In fact, these groups each value our employees greatly. So why have
the evaluations been so neglected? The answer is fairly simple: information. The Human
Resources and Employee Relations Department has lacked the tracking mechanisms by which
compliance with our evaluation policies can be tracked, monitored and enforced. In fact, some
managers do not perform evaluations because they do not know when they are due and the
Human Resources Department has not had a Human Resources Information System (HRIS) that
can accurately track all employees and the due dates of their evaluations.




                                                                                                    36
Response to 2002 Recommendation 7.1


In the 1996 Accreditation Report SJDC’s challenges surrounding the consistency and timeliness
of staff evaluations were brought to the attention of the College administration. At that point in
time all of the transactions involving HR were performed manually, with the exception of payroll
which had some computer support. During 1996 the College was actively developing “System
2000” which would provide for student, faculty and business services functions. Unfortunately,
the leadership of the HR function did not recognize the value that could be realized through
systemization of HR transactions. The administration decided to continue to track evaluations
manually.

In 2004, after a change in leadership in the HR function, an attempt was made to create an
Evaluation Tracking/Reporting Module within System 2000. Unfortunately, the system was
never fully completed and the College continued to attempt to manage evaluations manually.
In 2006, the College purchased MUNIS, a payroll and HRIS, from Tyler Software. From the
hiring process to retirement, MUNIS will track every aspect of employee information relevant to
the administration of a large staff of employees, including staff evaluations. In building the
requisite tables to populate the new system, the College will now have an accurate baseline from
which to report and direct evaluation recovery efforts.

The implementation of MUNIS is ongoing and the College expects to have it fully implemented
by January 1, 2009. In the meantime, the HR department, under its new leadership, has embarked
upon an aggressive data-gathering process. This includes consolidating information from
existing systems, such as System 2000 and Oracle Financial. It includes a manual tracking of
those employees who fall outside of the technological systems, those tracked in paper file
folders. The HR department has summarized evaluation progress data for all employees and
reconciled that to the employees currently on the payroll system. Using this method, the Human
Resource Department is confident that all employees are accounted for and listed in the
employee evaluation schedule.

The tabulation of this data has verified Recommendation 7.1 in that the College was not
following its own policy regarding completing employee evaluations in a timely manner. At the
point at which the data was tabulated for the self study, there were many outstanding evaluations
that were late and/or over-due. As will be discussed below, this error has been corrected.

                                                         Number of Evaluations Past
                          Calendar Year
                                                             Due in that Year
                                     2001                                          1
                                     2002                                          2
                                     2003                                          3
                                     2004                                          7
                                     2005                                        29
                                     2006                                        47
                                     2007                                       124
                                     2008                                       113
        Table 1: Staff Evaluations Past Due by Year




                                                                                               37
Response to 2002 Recommendation 7.1


In addition, data collected by the HR department indicate there are many employee evaluations
that are imminent:

                                                                Number of Evaluations
                                Period
                                                                   Coming Due
                        June 30, 2008                                                         11
                        July 31, 2008                                                          4
                        August 30, 2008                                                       41
                        September 28, 2008                                                    18
                        October 31, 2008                                                      39
                        November 30, 2008                                                     48
                        December 30, 2008                                                     43
                               2009                                                          176
                               2010                                                          113
                               2011                                                           49
       Table 2: Evaluations Due in Future

The complete report of evaluations shows that there were 869 total evaluations due or upcoming
between 2001 and 2011. Great efforts were taken to reduce that number and to create a system
by which future delinquencies will be avoided.

With new leadership, new technology and a new spirit to show value to the employees, the HR
department constructed a survey31 to determine the sentiments of the campus community with
respect to the HR department. This new information has guided the department in its Strategic
Plan initiatives and its new action plans, listed in the Appendix to this report. While the results of
the survey were sobering, they do provide a benchmark from which the department can embark
on new initiatives to improve services.

While no survey questions specifically asked about employee evaluations, it is reasonably
inferable that the questions regarding “Employee Issues” and “Labor Relations” can provide
some insight into the broader question of how the HR department is interfacing with the campus
community. A component of these interfaces is the employee evaluation.

Relative to Labor Relations, 51% of respondents were either “dissatisfied” or “very dissatisfied.”
This is partly due to the ongoing collective bargaining agreement negotiations. The question
regarding Employment Issues yielded similar results: 40% of respondents were either
“dissatisfied” or “very dissatisfied” with the College’s employee relations. Also this could have
resulted from the ongoing collective bargaining contract. But taken together and recognizing the
generally negative comments about HR in the survey, the College concludes that HR must make
significant changes to improve campus satisfaction with ITS administration. This is partly caused
by the lack of consistent employee evaluations. These conclusions are further validated by a
comment written by a survey respondent:

           “Provide more accurate lists of evaluations that are due.”

31
     Reference Human Resource Survey, 2008.


                                                                                                   38
Response to 2002 Recommendation 7.1


In an attempt to ensure compliance with Human Resources’ requirements for timely, accurate
and relevant employee evaluations, the new Vice President of Human Resources and Employee
Relations has started an education campaign to train supervisors in the proper use and
development of employee evaluations. The first step in this process has been to educate the
managers formally.

On July 22, 2008, the Vice President Of Human Resources And Employee Relations conducted a
training seminar with the Management Senate. The largest body of supervisors and managers on
campus, the Management Senate represents the people directly responsible for conducting and
writing employee evaluations. The 19 slide PowerPoint presentation was prepared by Business &
Legal Reports (BLR).32 It shows the importance of and proper procedures for developing an
employee performance appraisal system. The seminar was well attended and the group was
engaged. It is hoped that this, along with one-on-one training for managers, will greatly increase
the reliability of employee performance appraisal writing.

After this training seminar and after the Human Resources and Employee Relations Department
consolidated data from all of the human resource systems, a notice was sent to each manager
directing each to write and submit performance evaluations. Along with this brief cover email, a
more detailed memo explained the need to provide employee evaluations. Also attached was a
spreadsheet showing the due dates for each evaluation in the email recipient’s department or
area.

As of July 31, 2008, the District had a total of 341 past due evaluations for the period of 2001 to
July 2008. Since the notification of staff management in early August, training on proper
evaluation procedures has been conducted by HR leadership. As of the end of August 2008
completed evaluations are up 13% over the same period in 2007. While Delta College has
considerable additional work to be done to become fully compliant in this area, it is felt the
College has turned the corner. With MUNIS fully operational the College will have the needed
tools to notify management of upcoming evaluations as well as provide fully functional forms on
line for their use. The College will be able to provide accurate real time reports on past due
evaluations on a daily, weekly and monthly basis and provide access to these reports by
individual manager. Managers will be able to view their evaluation responsibilities online both at
the College and from home on the HR portal.

In the final quarter of 2008, the 13% increase in completed evaluations is expected to double to
26% due to the continued timely notification of managers of the evaluation due dates.

Evaluation

The College has had a problem in identifying and overcoming delinquent employee evaluations.
In the past there was no coordinated human resource information system to adequately track the
schedule of evaluations. The College is currently installing MUNIS software and it will be fully
functional by January 2009.



32
     Reference Business & Legal Reports, Inc. PowerPoint Presentation delivered July 22, 2008.


                                                                                                 39
Response to 2002 Recommendation 7.1


The number of employee evaluations outstanding at the time of the accreditation visit last March
was significant. In August of 2008, the Superintendent/President sent a memo to all managers
directing them to complete all delinquent evaluations by October 2008. Two months ago the
number of evaluations to be completed remained high at 326. As of the writing of this report, the
number of evaluations to be completed is now at a total of 85. However, this number is still
somewhat inflated due to the large number of evaluations of part-time faculty that will be
completed during the course of the fall semester. Those evaluations could not be done sooner
because the faculty were not here during the summer and the division deans had to wait until the
faculty returned. All of those evaluations are now underway.

Due to the many changes that have been implemented, the momentum has shifted in the proper
direction. Managers have submitted 26% more evaluations compared to this time last year. This
positive increase can be largely attributed to the evaluation training that has occurred, to the
communications that are being sent to all managers reminding them of their scheduled
evaluations and those that are overdue, and to the directive that was sent to all managers to
complete their delinquent evaluations.

Considerable efforts and resources have been invested to create a system that will assist HR and
all managers in completing their evaluation responsibilities in a timely manner. Every manager
who had delinquent evaluations has completed them or is now in the process of completing them,
and their progress will be tracked by HR. Because of these many efforts, Delta College is now in
compliance with the standard concerning employee evaluations (Standard 7 of the previous
accreditation standards and Standard III of the current standards).

Planning Agenda

   1. Continue the implementation of the MUNIS HRIS software to track all evaluations and
      begin roll-out of MUNIS to users in January 2009.

   2. Continue the practice of electronic reminders for supervisors to complete evaluations,
      with another reminder scheduled for October 2008.

   3. Remind academic managers of the need to begin faculty evaluation processes in October
      2008.

   4. Advise supervisors with delinquent evaluations of sanctions at the end of October 2008.

   5. Contact chief administrator of areas with delinquent evaluations by November 2008.




                                                                                               40
Response to 2002 Recommendation 8.1

Comment from 2002 Accreditation Visit

A comprehensive Strategic Plan should be developed with input from all key constituencies,
which integrates educational programs and facilities needs for the entire San Joaquin Delta
College District including the main campus in Stockton, the Tracy Learning Center, the proposed
Mountain House Center, and other centers and sites. The plan should build in contingencies for
short and long-term demographic trends and shifts, anticipate and balance needs at the main
campus with needs at regional centers and outlying sites, maximize the use of distance education
strategies, project expansion and investment in centers and sites as needed, and consider
development of collaborative agreements with neighboring college districts to help address
educational needs in outlying areas.

Evaluation of 2008 Visiting Team

The visiting team did not find evidence of a Strategic Plan integrating educational programs and
facilities for the entire district. An in-depth review of documentation did not verify the self-study
assertions that a current viable College-wide Strategic Plan forms the basis for decision-making.
There is no across-the-board institutional plan that would include individual unit goals,
measurable objectives, action plans for programs/services, needed resources, priorities for
resource allocations, timelines for implementation, and evaluation processes. Although the
College has conducted periodic program reviews and has gathered some appropriate research
data, it is clear that these are isolated general procedures with little or no relationship to overall
planning and appraisal. Commendable projects, such as those funded by the Appreciative Inquiry
(AI) process, are limited by the availability of funds. The AI process does not address traditional
institutional activities and decisions and only encompass a relatively small portion of
comprehensive planning and allocation. The College has not met this recommendation.

Response to the Accrediting Commission Recommendations

The Commission Report in 2002 clearly gave notice to the College for not having developed an
advanced strategic planning process, and the visiting team in 2008 raised the same concerns
about the need for coordinated planning. The College recognizes its need to improve planning
processes and has implemented dramatic changes in this area with a new leadership team in
place. In a short time span, the College has been able to refine disconnected elements of prior
planning into a more consolidated process that is guided by a strategic planning document.
There is still room for improvement, but the College is clearly advancing in the right direction
recommended by the Accrediting Commission.

Description

   The Strategic Plan for 2008

   The College has adopted a Strategic Plan and Environmental Scan for 2008. The document
   flowed from an extensive environmental scan that was undertaken by the Office of Planning,
   Research and Institutional Effectiveness, starting in February of 2008. The Interim Dean


                                                                                                   41
Response to 2002 Recommendation 8.1


     made this one of his top priorities for the year. The draft document was discussed in several
     governance forums to allow for input from all constituencies at the College. This input was
     garnered in meetings with the Management Senate, the Student Services Council, the
     Associated Student Body Government, the Planning and Budget Committee, the President’s
     Council, and the Board of Trustees. The Strategic Goals outlined in the document were
     ratified by the President’s Council in July 2008, and by the Board of Trustees on August 26,
     2008.33 The six strategic goals have been discussed earlier in this document, but include:

     1. Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information
        to and from all internal and external groups.

     2. Develop a College-wide staff development program to improve faculty, administrator,
        and classified staff skills to promote access, student success, and positive student
        learning outcomes.

     3. Increase access, student equity, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.

     4. Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust
        College budget priorities to support and ensure access and successful student outcomes.

     5. Facilitate the completion of Measure L Bond Projects and the revitalization of the
        Stockton campus.

     6. In light of regional and global trends, examine operational procedures and launch new
        vocational and educational programs that meet the challenges of wise resource
        management, new energy technology, transportation logistics, health care, viticulture,
        and information technology.

     The goals are drafted in such a way as to facilitate department and unit-level goals that can be
     “rolled up” to the institutional level to reflect a comprehensive, consolidated and continuous
     cycle of planning. The Strategic Goals also reflect a commitment to both educational
     planning and facilities planning, with an emphasis on completing the Measure L Bond
     projects that will revitalize the Stockton campus and provide new regional education sites.

     Strategic planning has been a focus of discussion at a number of shared governance meetings
     since the College received the Accrediting Commission’s Report in June 2008. Beyond the
     establishment of strategic goals by the Board of Trustees, the Planning & Budget Committee
     has adopted an annual schedule for Strategic Planning,34 and reviewed a conceptual model of
     the Planning and Budgeting Process which will be explained and distributed to shared
     governance committees and the campus community. 35 Work has begun on an evaluative
     rubric that can be used by campus constituencies when they review annual budget
     submissions in the AI Process. The scoring rubric will ensure that strategic goals and the
     College’s mission statement frame the decisions that are made when weighing budget

33
   Board of Trustees Agenda, August 26, 2008.
34
   Calendar for Strategic Planning, Planning & Budget Committee, August 18, 2008
35
   The Planning & Budgeting Process, Planning & Budget Committee, August 18, 2008


                                                                                                  42
Response to 2002 Recommendation 8.1


     priorities. These documents provide an organizing structure that links budgeting and
     planning decisions into a coherent and understandable framework.

     There are still areas for improvement in the area of strategic planning. The College’s
     leadership team will need to ensure that budgeting decisions are guided by the goals outlined
     in the Strategic Plan. The development of a standard rubric for evaluating budget requests
     will go a long way to achieving this goal. Additionally, the College’s Strategic Plan in its
     future iterations will need to do a better job of coordinating facilities, human resources, and
     information technology plans into the environmental scan process. Additionally, the current
     Strategic Plan does not adequately address the Educational Master Plan, regional center plans
     and environmental impact reports. These documents will need to be analyzed as a part of any
     future strategic planning process and reports. However, the goals outlined in the existing
     document have widespread support and they are informed by both long-term and short-term
     trends that will impact the College.

     The Executive Summary of the Strategic Plan serves as evidence of the College’s efforts to
     engage in a new and invigorated model of long-range strategic planning and short range
     action planning. An Executive Summary of the plan is included in the Appendix to this
     report, along with a copy of the entire document.

     Strategic Plan for Serving Regional Sites & Distance Education

     While strategic planning has improved and de further developed, the College has made
     strides in addressing some of the planning priorities identified by the visiting team in 2002.
     For instance, the College has maximized its internet course offerings to help alleviate
     enrollment pressures at the Stockton campus. Over the last six years, internet enrollments
     have grown by 164 percent, reaching a point of 2,687 FTES in the 2007-08 academic year.36
     Indeed, internet enrollments at the College now comprise 14 percent of all student
     enrollments. The College’s long-running contracts with internet service providers, ETUDES
     and e-College, have allowed the College to increase internet enrollments with reliable and
     extensive help-desk services for faculty, staff and students. At the same time, the College
     instructional leadership has increased the course offerings at the Tracy Center to take
     advantage of educational partnerships with Tracy Unified School District while waiting for
     construction of the Mountain House Educational Center.

     In 2003, San Joaquin Delta College District embarked upon a planning process in preparation
     for proposing a General Obligation Bond Measure, known as Measure L. This planning
     process identified the need to provide educational centers to serve population centers outside
     of Stockton. Four centers, each of which had a history of being served through provision of
     classes in rented space from local unified school districts, were the sites of proposed
     construction projects: Tracy/Mountain House, where the District had purchased 125 acres;
     Manteca, where the District has owned 160 acres for many years and has operated an active
     farm laboratory including two classrooms; Lodi, Galt; and the Foothills (See Delta Bond
     Demographics, 2003).

36
  Office of Planning, Research, and Institutional Effectiveness, Enrollment and Distance Education Report, Fall 2008, Board of
Trustees, November 4, 2008.


                                                                                                                            43
Response to 2002 Recommendation 8.1


   In March 2004, Measure L passed, thereby providing the District with access to $250 million
   which, together with potential state and other funds, would allow the District to update the
   Stockton campus as well as expanding and building educational centers throughout the
   District.

   Since the approval of the Bond, educational master plans have been developed for the
   Stockton Campus, and regional centers at Mountain House and Lodi. The hallmark elements
   of those plans include the following:

      Mountain House – A planned 55,000 square foot facility that will feature a transfer-centered
       curriculum with math and science emphases and a full suite of student services.
      Stockton – The campus will soon feature renovated physical education and athletics facilities,
       a renovated library, a new data center, a new Math and Science Center and a “Gateway”
       Student Services Center that will serve as a “one-stop shop” for student needs.
      Lodi – Plans call for a center that will capitalize on the viticulture and hospitality needs of
       that region, while also offering general education and vocational offerings in fields like
       administration of justice and culinary arts.
      Manteca – The initial plans for the Manteca Center called for relocation of the College’s
       Caterpillar Technician program to that site (from the Stockton campus), but funding shortages
       in the Bond campaign have scuttled that plan and the Caterpillar program will now benefit
       from a program expansion at the Stockton campus.

   From 2004 to the present, the District has engaged in extensive planning on Bond projects.
   But, many individuals throughout the College and the community became critical of the Bond
   program management consultants whom, they believed, had made significant errors and
   oversights leading to unnecessary delays in important projects. Some “quick-start” projects
   such as the electronic College signs on Pershing and Pacific Avenues, ADA (American with
   Disabilities Acts) projects, and permanent benches for outdoor seating throughout the campus
   had been completed. In addition, a number of projects involving new and/or improved
   athletic fields and improved road and infrastructure for new or updated facilities were either
   completed or well underway. However, by the beginning of 2008, Rodríguez decided to
   engage a new Bond team comprised of “Delta people.” Under the leadership of the Vice
   President of Information Technology, Lee Belarmino, the new Bond team was constituted
   and presented to the Board of Trustees in April 2008 and an experienced and trusted
   consultant, Kathy Roach with MurphyTate LLC, was engaged to advise the team on how to
   proceed.

   The new Bond team immediately set out to assess the situation including the state of the
   Measure L budget and other funds garnered from the state for major projects. The team
   comprehensively reviewed each Bond project, identified how close it was to completion and
   its remaining budget. On June 26, 2008, the team presented its findings to the Board of
   Trustees in a workshop designed to provide the Board with as much information as was
   possible so that the Board could prioritize the in-progress projects and decide what remaining
   projects were possible (see 2008-06-26 Bond Program Update).




                                                                                               44
Response to 2002 Recommendation 8.1


   The Bond team presented the projects in several groups. The first group, “Completed
   Projects,” included a variety of “quick start” projects, master plans for Manteca and Lodi,
   Stockton infrastructure improvements, debt reduction, costs related to bond issuance, the
   baseball stadium, soccer field, security cameras, an ADA transition plan, and other project-
   related studies. The second group, “Too Far Along,” represented projects for which planning
   had reached a “no turning back” stage, either because significant expenditures had already
   been made or state money had been committed and would be lost if the project did not go
   forward. The North Road and Stockton Infrastructure Projects, the Gateway Student Services
   Center, the Goleman Library Renovation, the Mountain House Portable Village, and the
   Physical Education Recreation and Athletics Outdoor Facilities comprised this group. The
   third group, “Critical,” consisted of projects the Bond team deemed as absolutely necessary
   for legal, safety, or facilities dependency reasons. These projects included the Budd
   Remediation project to address Title IX compliance, the Cunningham Planetarium remodel,
   the Atherton Safety project, and campus-wide infrastructure projects including Northeast
   Infrastructure, Central Plant Expansion, and the Energy Management System.

   The final group of projects, “On the Table,” represented significant, highly desirable projects
   for which there were not sufficient remaining Bond dollars. This set of projects included the
   Cunningham Math and Science Center, the Data Information Technology Center and
   Infrastructure (aka; District Data Center), the three regional center projects (Mountain House
   Permanent Building, Lodi Land and Infrastructure, and Manteca Annexation and
   Improvements), the District Support Services Center, and the Shima Center Heavy
   Equipment Technology Program Expansion. The Board was asked to evaluate each of these
   projects and agree on their priorities which the Bond team would then undertake.

   In July, 2008, the Board moved the Cunningham Math and Science Center and the Data
   Information Technology Center and Infrastructure (aka: District Data Center) into the
   “Critical Group” and eliminated the District Support Services Center. This action identified a
   remaining budget of approximately $64 million and left the regional centers and Shima
   projects to compete for the remaining funds. At this meeting, the Board directed the Bond
   team to develop several scenarios from which the Board could choose. At present, the Bond
   team continues to work on the development of these scenarios. Below are some possibilities:

       1. Consider the Mountain House permanent building to be the highest priority
          (which it has been and was in the Measure L language); downsize the current
          Mountain House building plans to meet a $64 million budget. Do nothing in
          Lodi or Manteca.

       2. Consider a more modest permanent structure at Mountain House, e.g., a
          prefabricated building, which could be used in conjunction with the portable
          village; purchase land and place a portable village in Lodi; annex the Manteca
          property and make other minimal improvements.

       3. Consider additional portables for Mountain House (e.g., library, eating
          facilities, more laboratories and classrooms); purchase a building and
          warehouse facility in Lodi; annex the Manteca property, place additional



                                                                                                45
Response to 2002 Recommendation 8.1


           portables including laboratories on the Manteca property, and provide
           necessary fencing and barn structure.

   On September 9, 2008, the Board heard proposals similar to those outlined above so that they
   can set the priorities for the remaining Bond dollars and projects can move ahead. Overall,
   the process used by the Bond team has encouraged the Board to see the entire Bond program
   in a comprehensive way and has allowed them to make well-reasoned decisions in stages that
   clear the way for most projects to move forward quickly and efficiently. Once the final
   prioritization of the “On the Table” projects occurs, those projects too will be able to move
   forward, or be abandoned, for the foreseeable future.

   As of writing this report, the Board had recently held two critical meetings scheduled to
   finalize the project priorities. On October 6, 2008, the Board participated in a Bond
   Workshop to hear alternatives for regional sites. On October 7, 2008, the Board received
   recommendations from the Bond Planning Team and took action to move forward with a plan
   that establishes two projects as the top priorities for funding:

          The Mountain House center, featuring a 55,000 gross square foot building at an
           estimated cost of $49.3 million.
          The Caterpillar expansion and Shima remodeling project at the Stockton campus at
           an estimated cost of $13.3 million.

   Seven other projects were also approved by the Board assuming that budget estimates were
   correct for the top two projects. Those projects include:

          Danner safety issues at the Stockton campus, $600,000;
          Mountain House landscaping, $1 million;
          A fence for the Manteca property, $70,000;
          A new barn/shade structure for Manteca, $650,000;
          Funding to purchase land in Lodi, $2.8 million; and,
          Stockton refurbishments, $1.03 million.

  The plans for the various sites suggest a balancing of general education and vocational
  offerings that takes into consideration the labor market strengths of each region, and the
  growing population of the region. While the housing market has slowed down some of the
  expected population growth in the region, the College remains increasingly popular with
  residents of the area, and FTES have increased dramatically over the past six years even in a
  period of only modest growth in student head counts. This implies that students are taking
  more classes and that the College is meeting the needs of its district. The College believes that
  the implementation of Bond projects will provide even better services to its student population.

  Regional Collaboration & Other Initiatives

  The College has explored collaborative arrangements with neighboring districts on a few key
  programs. One of the most prominent examples is the Stanislaus County POST Academy that
  the College took over from Modesto Junior College in the summer of 2007. This arrangement


                                                                                                46
Response to 2002 Recommendation 8.1


  has utilized the strong full time and adjunct faculty at the College in the field of criminal
  justice, and resulted in significant gains in FTES for Delta College. The College has
  collaborated for years with neighboring districts through the Central Valley Higher Education
  Consortium (CVHEC). The CVHEC consortium has allowed the College to establish transfer
  agreements with CSU Sacramento and CSU Stanislaus, along with articulation course
  agreements with neighboring community colleges like Modesto Junior College and Cosumnes
  River College.

  The College's Office of Planning, Research and Institutional Effectiveness is exploring ways
  to improve long-range demographic and economic forecasting using data available from
  Economic Modeling Specialists Incorporated (EMSI) and through enhanced capabilities to use
  geographic information software (GIS). EMSI specializes in web-based database management
  for labor market analysis and economic impact studies, and the firm has established strong ties
  with a number of California Community Colleges to enhance their capacity to engage in
  strategic planning and economic forecasting. If the College establishes a contract with EMSI,
  the ITS ability to plan for long-range curriculum expansion and job training throughout the
  region will be greatly enhanced. In terms of GIS expansion, the College is committing
  resources to train research analysts in the use of GIS software to enhance its abilities to map
  demographic changes and to provide better analysis to the Board and public on key trends in
  the District’s population base. As an example, once the analysts have acquired appropriate
  skill levels, the College could analyze the transportation patterns of its student population and
  provide an estimate and mapping demonstration of carbon dioxide emissions produced by
  student and staff traffic patterns. Likewise, GIS software can be put to use to provide mapped
  images of anticipated population growth over the next three decades. The College has already
  played a leading role in the application of GIS systems to help develop mapped images of all
  community college districts in the California system. An enhanced GIS profile will strengthen
  the College’s planning capacity.

  The aggregation of these initiatives, coupled with the 2008 Strategic Plan and the Bond
  planning decisions that have been made recently, suggest that the College has taken great steps
  toward improving its planning processes to meet the ACCJC standards.

Evaluation

As indicated earlier, the College has taken significant steps to improve its capacity to use
strategic planning to guide its decision-making. The College has implemented a process of
annual action plans for operational and instructional units that are tied to institutional strategic
goals adopted in a formal Strategic Plan. Educational facilities planning has been engaged by the
Measure L Bond team, with long-range and short-range demographic patterns and regional needs
taken into consideration in those plans.

While substantial progress has been made on this element, the College recognizes that there are
steps that must be taken to improve the strategic planning process. The College’s leadership
team will need to ensure that budgeting decisions are guided by the goals outlined in the
Strategic Plan. The development of a standard rubric for evaluating budget requests will go a
long way to achieving this goal. Additionally, the College’s Strategic Plan in its future iterations



                                                                                                  47
Response to 2002 Recommendation 8.1


will need to do a better job of coordinating facilities, human resources, and information
technology plans into the environmental scan process. Additionally, the current Strategic Plan
does not adequately address the educational master plan, regional center plans and environmental
impact reports. These documents will need to be analyzed as a part of any future strategic
planning process and reports. However, the goals outlined in the existing document have
widespread support and they are informed by both long-term and short-term trends that will
impact the College.

Effective and transparent Bond planning will be a continuing issue of concern for the College.
The College has had its reputation in the community harmed by inefficient planning by the
original Bond consultant and delays in project startups at Mountain House. The new Bond
Planning Team has helped to stem the tide of public criticism, and there is widespread hope that
the team will build on its momentum of effective planning and transparency with the Board and
public. The College will need to use the strength and unity of this team to advance plans for the
various construction projects and to help usher in a new Educational Master Plan.

Planning Agenda

   1. Complete a new draft Educational Master Plan within 18 months that analyzes programs
      and needs for the district population and the various regional educational sites operated
      by the District.

   2. Update the Strategic Plan in 2009 to incorporate more linkages to program review
      documents and plans outlined in the information technology, human resources and
      facilities plans completed by operational units: March 31, 2009.

   3. Implement the use of a standard scoring rubric by the President’s Cabinet to prioritize
      budget requests through the AI Process: December 2008.




                                                                                                48
Response to 2008 Recommendation 1
Recommendation 1

The team recommends that the Board of Trustees develops a systematic process to review and
revise existing Board policies, establishes and adheres to an acceptable code of ethics (Standard
IVB.1; IVB.1.a; IVB. 1.b-h, ER 3).

Description:

Five members of the San Joaquin Delta College Board of Trustees met in a special board
meeting on Thursday, July 17, 2008 , to consider a revised code of ethics..37 The Board has had
two documents in place that are relevant to Recommendation 1 of the accreditation evaluation
team. The first document is Board Policy 1040 Duties and Responsibilities of the Board of
Trustees. This Board Policy is essentially a job description of the various tasks and obligations
that correspond to the operations of the Board of Trustees. The second document is Board
Policy 1041 Board of Trustees Standards of Good Practice, which was first approved in 1993.
This document is essentially a code of ethics as it outlines the legal and ethical parameters of
behavior expected from the Board of Trustees.

The new document that the Board discussed on July 17 made a number of revisions to Board
Policy 1041. The title was changed to include the phrase “code of ethics.” The new title of this
policy is proposed to be BP 1041 Board of Trustees Code of Ethics and Standards of Good
Practice. In addition to revising the main text of this policy, two new sections were added to it.
Section B describes the procedure for responding to complaints of misconduct or unethical
behavior by Board members. Such a procedure was never included in the previous version of
this document. The San Joaquin Delta College Board of Trustees recognizes that it is necessary
to have a procedure in place to deal with complaints and discipline issues, and a process where a
Board member can be sanctioned if they have violated this policy.

The final addition to this policy is a short statement indicating that the Board of Trustees will
undertake an annual self-evaluation. This statement is linked to a newly proposed policy, Board
Policy 1042 Board of Trustees Self-Evaluation. This policy describes the process and the timing
for the Board to undertake an annual self-evaluation. This policy is in draft form and must pass
through the College policy and procedure process before it is officially adopted by the Board of
Trustees.

A companion policy that is also newly proposed is Board Policy 104338 Evaluation of the
Superintendent/President. While the process to evaluate the Superintendent/President has been
described in the employment contract of the Superintendent/President, this procedure has never
been codified in Board Policy. This new policy describes the timing of the annual evaluation,
the sequence of events, and the scope of the evaluation.



37
     Reference Appendix bbb. Note, two Trustees were absent
38
     Reference Appendix ddd.


                                                                                                49
Response to 2008 Recommendation 1


The Board of Trustees is committed to an ongoing revision of College policies. Delta College is
a subscriber to the CCLC Policy and Procedures Template project, which is an attempt to aid
community college districts in standardizing the numbering and format of policies. Aside from
Delta College’s involvement in this project, the Board President and the
Superintendent/President will be working in tandem to review and revise all of the Board
Policies in the 1000 series, which are the policies and procedures that specifically have to do
with the behavior, functions, and activities of the Board of Trustees.

Evaluation

The Board of Trustees have responded to this recommendation by initiating a process to review
all of the Board Policies in the 1000 series, which are the policies that directly concern the
actions and behavior of the Board of Trustees. The remainder of the policies and procedures are
regularly and systematically undergoing a review in conjunction with the adoption of the CCLC
policy templates and the conversion and standardization process that entails.

The Superintendent/President and the President of the Board of Trustees determined that two
new policies needed to be added to the 1000 series. These two new polices39,40 (BP 1042 and BP
1043) are in draft format and have been submitted to the shared governance process for policy
review. The Superintendent/President and the President of the Board of Trustees are reviewing
the remaining policies in the 1000 series and will make recommendations as appropriate.

The Board of Trustees completed a review of Board Policy 1041 Board of Trustees Standards of
Good Practice. The revision of that policy has been renamed as Board Policy 1041 Board of
Trustees Code of Ethics and Standards of Good Practice. The policy has been submitted to the
shared governance policy review process. The Board of Trustees has publicly stated that they
will adhere to the code of ethics.

Planning Agenda

       1. Complete the governance process leading to the adoption of Board Policy 1041 Code of
          Ethics and Standards of Good Practice.

           Status: The draft of the amended policy was reviewed by the Board of Trustees on July
           17, 2008. The draft of the amended policy was sent to the College Policies and
           Procedures Review Committee on October 9, 2008, for review, and released for a 30 day
           comment period by the constituent groups as part of the shared governance process. The
           Policies and Procedures Review Committee will send the policy forward to President’s
           Council following the comment period. Once the President’s Council has reviewed this
           policy, it will go to the Board of Trustees meeting for a first reading on November 18,
           2008. The proposed policy will then go to the Board of Trustees for a second reading
           and adoption at the their meeting on December 2, 2008.



39
     Reference Appendix ccc.
40
     Reference Appendix ddd.


                                                                                                50
Response to 2008 Recommendation 1


   2. Complete the review and adoption of proposed new board policies (Board Policy 1042
      Board of Trustees Self Evaluation and Board Policy 1043 Evaluation of the
      Superintendent/President).

      Status: The draft of Board Policy 1042 Board of Trustees Self Evaluation and the draft of
      Board Policy 1043 Evaluation of the Superintendent/President were submitted to the
      Policies and Procedures Review Committee on September 25, 2008. The Policies and
      Procedures Review Committee released the Board Policies to the shared governance
      constituency groups for a comment period (ending November 3, 2008). The President’s
      Council review will occur on November 11, 2008. The first reading of these policies will
      be at the Board of Trustees meeting on November 18, 2008. The second reading and
      adoption will occur at the meeting of the Board of Trustees on December 2, 2008.




                                                                                             51
Response to 2008 Recommendation 2

Recommendation 2

The visiting team recommends that the Board of Trustees establishes and monitors itself as a
policy-making body, reaffirms delegation of operational authority to the
Superintendent/President, and actively supports the authority of management for the
administration of the College (Standard IVB; IVB.1.e).

Description

The revised version of Board Policy 1041 Board of Trustees Code of Ethics and Standards of
Good Practice41 does contain language identifying the purpose of the Board. Specifically, sub-
section A.1 of Board Policy 1041 states: “Board members shall bear in mind under all
circumstances that the Board is legally responsible for the effective operation of the San Joaquin
Delta Community College District. Its primary function is to establish the policies by which the
District is to be administered.” Sub-section A.2 states: “The Board shall maintain consistent
oversight of the College as a policy-setting board with emphasis on instructional quality,
operational efficiency, and fiscal stability.”

In sub-section A.3 of BP 1041, the concept of delegation of authority is described. It states:
“The Board shall delegate authority to the Superintendent/President as the Board’s executive
officer and confine Board action to policy determination, planning, performance evaluation, and
maintaining the fiscal stability of the District. Problems and issues that arise shall be referred to
the Superintendent/President to be dealt with through administrative channels or be placed on the
Board agenda for discussion. In this regard, rather than dealing directly with staff, it is
appropriate for Board members to take their concerns directly to the Superintendent/President.”

On the issue of actively supporting the authority of management for the administration of the
College, sub-section A.11 states: “The Board will promote a healthy working relationship with
the Superintendent/President through supportive, open, honest communication and regular
evaluation. The Board will employ a competent, productive administration and staff, giving
them confidence and support.”

Additionally, the Board of Trustees has proposed two new board policies: Board Policy 1042
Board of Trustees Self-Evaluation and Board Policy 1043 Evaluation of the
Superintendent/President. The first of these two policies requires the Board to conduct an annual
evaluation, which will allow them to monitor their performance in relation to Board Policy 1040
Duties and Responsibilities of the Board of Trustees and Board Policy 1041 Board of Trustees
Code of Ethics and Standards of Good Practice. The second new policy will allow the Board the
opportunity to assess their relationship with the Superintendent/President and to ensure that they
are appropriately delegating operational authority.




41
     Reference Appendix bbb.


                                                                                                  52
Response to 2008 Recommendation 2


Evaluation

By unanimously endorsing the revised Board Policy 1041 at the Board Retreat on July 17, 2008,
the San Joaquin Delta College Board of Trustees reaffirmed their commitment to their role as a
policy-making body, they reaffirmed the delegation of operational authority to the
Superintendent/President, and they expressed their support for the authority of management for
the administration of the College.

On July 17, 2008, the Board voted 5 to 0 to endorse the revised Policy 1041, and in doing so the
Trustees reaffirmed their commitment to their role as a policy-making body. They also
reaffirmed the delegation of operational authority to the Superintendent/President, and they
expressed their support for the authority of management for the administration of the College..

With the proposal of Board Policy 1042 and Board Policy 1043, the Board has for the first time
put into writing a process for their self-evaluation and for the evaluation of the
Superintendent/President. These two policies will provide a feedback mechanism for the Board
to monitor their function as a policy-making body and to what extent their actions are consistent
with the delegation of operational authority to the Superintendent/President and the management.

Planning Agenda

1.     Complete the review and adoption of proposed new board policies (Board Policy 1042
       Board of Trustees Self-Evaluation and Board Policy 1043 Evaluation of the
       Superintendent/President).

       Status: The draft of Board Policy 1042 Board of Trustees Self-Evaluation and the draft of
       Board Policy 1043 Evaluation of the Superintendent/President have both been submitted
       to the Policy and Procedures Review Committee. The Policy and Procedures Review
       Committee will review these documents at the meeting of September 25, 2008. The
       President’s Council review will occur on November 11, 2008. The first reading of these
       policies will be at the Board of Trustees meeting on November 18, 2008. The second
       reading and adoption will occur at the meeting of the Board of Trustees on December 2,
       2008.

2.    The Board plans to engage in an annual review of Board Policies 1041, 1042, and 1043 in
      order to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of these policies on a regular basis.




                                                                                               53
Response to 2008 Recommendation 3
Recommendation 3

The visiting team recommends that the College decisively address the development and
implementation of a comprehensive Strategic Plan closely focused on assessing institutional
effectiveness. A systematic, continuous cycle of feedback and evaluative improvement must be
critically and deliberately developed and put into effect. This Strategic Plan must incorporate
student learning outcomes within all institutional efforts, resource allocations, and be supported
by program and service reviews and research data. Educational, fiscal, technological, physical,
and human resources should be considered and integrated. As a whole, the planning document
should also identify short- and long-term directions for the College, timelines for
implementation, the individuals responsible for each area, monitoring and follow-up strategies,
and expected outcomes (Standard IA; IB). This was noted in the 2002 recommendation item 3.1
and which has yet to be resolved to meet Commission Standards.

Description

As has been pointed out in the College’s response to Recommendations 3.1 and 8.1 of the 2002
accreditation report, the College has made significant strides since the March 2008 accreditation
visit in developing and implementing a comprehensive strategic plan that is closely focused on
assessing institutional effectiveness.

To date, the College has completed the following:

   1. Collaboratively revised and officially adopted its current Mission Statement (President’s
      Council minutes, January 2008; Board minutes, February 2008). The College intends to
      engage in an annual review of its Mission Statement.

   2. With the guidance of the 2008 Mission and Vision Statements, the College conducted an
      environmental scan and reevaluation of its 2004 strategic goals to produce a 2008
      Environmental Scan and Strategic Plan that includes six strategic goals. The 2008
      Environmental Scan and Strategic Plan speaks directly to the 2008 Mission and Vision
      statements and provides an evaluation of the external and internal College environments.
      The plan examines long-term and short term demographic changes in the region, labor
      market demands, and regional and global trends that will influence the College and its
      operations (See the Environmental Scan & Strategic Plan, 2008, Appendix 4 of this report).

   3. Communicated the 2008 Strategic Plan to the College community including the
      President’s Council and the Board of Trustees. The President’s Council ratified the
      Strategic Goals contained in the plan in July 2008, and the Board followed suit on August
      26, 2008. (See President’s Council and Board minutes).

   4. Guided by the 2008 Mission, Vision, Strategic Plan, and its six Strategic Goals, the
       College has developed institutional, vice-presidential, and divisional goals and objectives
       and action plans specifically designed to achieve the strategic goals. Goals and
       objectives specify timelines and are measurable. These goals and objectives are provided


                                                                                                 54
Response to 2008 Recommendation 3


      in this document for ACCJC staff and teams members to review (See Strategic and
      Action Planning: Budgeting, Business Services, Human Resources, Information
      Services, Instructional Services, and Student Services).

   5. Tied goals and objectives to the AI Strategic Planning and Budgeting Process in that
      annual goals and objectives, developed in the spring of each year are reaffirmed and
      revised the following fall, and serve as the basis for AI Proposals due annually in
      January. AI Proposals integrate educational, human, technological, physical, and fiscal
      resources needed to fulfill the proposal outcomes. (The template for submitting AI
      Proposals and training materials are currently in revision to reflect these changes.)

   6. Tied program reviews to the AI Strategic Planning and Budgeting Process in that
      program review recommendations developed in the fall of each year serve as the basis for
      AI Proposals due annually in January. (The template for submitting AI Proposals and
      training materials are currently in revision to reflect these changes.)

   7. Developed an institution-wide program review framework based on the one currently in
      place in Instructional Services. This framework specifies that mini program reviews are
      completed and reviewed annually by internal committees of constituencies within each
      vice presidential area and that more substantial ones are completed and reviewed every
      two years in vocational areas and every six in non-vocational ones. (See the Instructional
      Program Review template.)

   8. Reorganized and refocused the position of Dean of Planning, Research, and Regional
      Education. This position has been renamed Dean of Planning, Research, and Institutional
      Effectiveness and has been moved organizationally from Instructional Services to report
      directly to the College Superintendent/President. An interim currently occupies this
      position and is assisted by two full-time research analysts. The permanent position has
      been advertised, and a permanent dean is expected to be approved by the Board by early
      spring of 2009. (See Board of Trustees minutes September 9, 2008.) The regional
      education function including distance education; the Professional Development Center;
      Middle College High School; and Valdés Math Institute now report directly to the
      Assistant Superintendent/Vice President of Instruction.

   9. Developed institutional effectiveness measures based on the Mission Statement, Vision
      Statement, consultations with and between shared governance groups, and the 2008
      Environmental Scan and Strategic Plan. The measures of institutional effectiveness have
      resulted in a detailed report produced by the Office of Planning, Research, and
      Institutional Effectiveness. That report has been shared with campus governance leaders
      in the President’s Council (September 16, 2008), and with the campus community. (See
      the Report on Institutional Effectiveness Measures.)

   10. Developed a framework for a cycle of assessment and continuous improvement of
       institutional student learning outcomes and assessments; operational, instructional, and
       student services student learning outcomes and assessments; programmatic student
       learning outcomes and assessments; and course student learning outcomes and



                                                                                                  55
Response to 2008 Recommendation 3


       assessments. The master plan for SLO assessment has been spearheaded by the faculty
       leadership in the Academic Senate (See SLOAC Master Plan).

   11. Developed a two-year timeline for completing course, program, operational,
       instructional, student services, and institutional student learning outcomes and assessment
       cycles (See Timeline SLOAC).

The College recognizes that strategic planning initiatives and assessment of student learning
outcomes and institutional effectiveness are paramount for reinforcing the College’s long-
standing positive reputation in the community and for its continuing status as an accredited
institution of higher education. The initiatives that have been put in place over the last year
provide evidence that the College has turned the corner toward a new era of comprehensive self-
reflection, strategic dialogue, and focused improvement.

Evaluation

Recommendations 3.1, 8.1 and visiting team Recommendation 3 are substantially similar.
Consequently, the evaluation remains the same. The College has made great strides to improve
its system of strategic planning. The biggest single improvement is the AI evaluation process.
The outcomes of that process form the initial planning data for the next round of AI planning.
As described above, the College has begun to establish action plans from the strategic planning
process. The College’s Strategic Plan draws its goals from the Mission Statement and an
extensive study of its internal and external environment, and there are plans to engage in an
annual review and planning process. This cyclical process will ensure that evaluations will
create a feedback loop from year to year.

Planning Agenda

   1. Continue with implementation of new strategic planning and budgeting initiatives:
      Ongoing.

   2. Utilize new AI budget review rubric to guide cabinet level prioritization of budget
      requests from faculty, staff, and managers: Formal review by January 2009.

   3. Update the Educational Master Plan within the next 18 months to provide a solid
       foundation for long-range decisions on program expansion and use of regional sites.

   4. Revise the Strategic Plan in spring 2009 and incorporate greater discussion of program
       review documents and recommendations in that plan. Use the opportunity of revising the
       Strategic Plan to expand discussion of regional centers and environmental plans for those
       sites.




                                                                                                  56
Response to 2008 Recommendation 4

Recommendation 4

The visiting team recommends that the College meet the urgent need to establish a stable
management team. Longevity of the team, particularly at the vice-presidential level, will help
resolve the perceived deficiencies in effective communication, comprehensive planning, and
collaborative dialogue (Standard IIIA.1; IIIA.2). This was noted in the 2002 recommendations
7.1, 8.1 and 2.1 and which has yet to be resolved to meet Commission Standards.

Description

The College has taken a number of steps to date and will shortly be taking more to establish and
ensure the continuity of a stable management team. The first order of business was to stabilize
the senior management team. Due to the retirement of two vice presidents and the professional
advancement of two other vice presidents who moved on to accept vice chancellor positions with
larger community college districts, the College found itself in the position of having to replace
four of the five vice president positions at San Joaquin Delta College. Specifically, these four
positions were the Assistant Superintendent/Vice President of Instruction, the Vice President of
Business Services, The Vice President of Human Resources and Employee Relations, and the
Vice President of Student Services.

In spite of the fact that four of the five vice president positions were vacated in a short
timeframe, all of these positions were quickly filled with capable interim appointments to enable
the College to undertake national searches to fill these positions. All of the searches resulted in
strong candidate pools. The finalists who were interviewed for these positions were all more
than qualified to fill these positions. In two of the vice president searches, the individuals who
had filled the positions in an interim capacity were appointed to the permanent positions. In the
other two vice president searches, the individuals selected had no prior experience at Delta
College although they both had significant experience in the community college system. All of
the individuals selected for these positions have been appointed by the Board of Trustees.

In addition to the four vice president positions, there were several other management positions
that needed to be filled on a permanent basis. For example, the Division Dean of Physical
Education, Recreation and Athletics position had to be filled due to the request of the incumbent
to leave management and return to faculty status. The College conducted a national search and
hired a longtime Delta College faculty member and coach for this position. Out of the 65
management positions at Delta College, there are three management positions that are being
staffed by interim appointments. The College will conduct national searches to seek candidates
to fill these positions. It is expected that these positions will be filled no later than the start of the
2009-2010 academic year.

An integral aspect of stable management is ongoing professional development. The College
Mission Statement cites staff professional development as a basic principle of the College. A
comprehensive approach to developing and retaining administrators and managers is outlined in
the following diagram:



                                                                                                       57
Response to 2008 Recommendation 4




As outlined above the central objectives of the Management Stability Program (MSP) are to:

      Provide an improved environment and tools for managers and administrators;
      Review the management salary structure to ensure competitiveness;
      Explore retention driven programs for securing the senior management team;
      Build and introduce the “Management Academy;”
      Provide career ladders for all employees interested in management development; and,
      Improve the likelihood of retention through improved recruiting and selection.

The Executive Management Team has already begun the process of implementing this program.
It is expected that the following activities will be underway by the late fall of 2008.

      Official kickoff of the “Management Academy,” which is an orientation and training
       program for new and current management employees that will cover both basic and
       timely topics in management practice and theory.
      Use currently scheduled Manager’s Meetings to deliver certain training activities,
       especially those related to policies, contracts, and procedures.
      Initiation of a study comparing the Delta College management pay structure with that of
       comparable colleges.
      Agreement on “Management TRAC,” which is a sequence of management-related
       courses that all potential managers should take or have taken as preparation for a
       management position along with career counseling support for aspiring managers.




                                                                                             58
Response to 2008 Recommendation 4


The MSP activities listed below are scheduled to begin in spring semester 2009:

      The Professional Development Center will assess and potentially re-allocate a greater
       portion of their time and resources to management development.
      The three collective bargaining agents, CTA, CSEA and POA, will be invited to partner
       with the administration to develop career ladder opportunities for their membership.
      A review of recruitment procedures to enhance the breadth and depth of candidates for
       management positions will be implemented.
      Successful participation in the “Management TRAC” program will be used as a bonus
       point in the hiring process for internal candidates.

Evaluation

At the time of the accreditation evaluation conducted by the visiting team, the College found
itself in the unusual position of having four senior leadership positions that were staffed by
interim appointments and that needed to be filled with permanent appointments. These
vacancies came about through a combination of retirements and career advancements. All four
of these positions have been filled after conducting extensive national searches. The
qualifications of the candidates selected are outstanding and the College now possesses possibly
the strongest senior management team in the history of the institution.

To retain these talented leaders and the other well qualified managers who have been hired or
who will be hired to fill other management vacancies, the College is implementing a broad
retention and development strategy, which has been dubbed the San Joaquin Delta College
Management Stability Program (MSP). There are several key components to the MSP including
a Management Academy for current employees and a Management TRAC for Delta College
faculty and staff who are interested in being trained so as to be competitive candidates for future
management vacancies. The MSP is essentially a “grow your own” approach by developing the
skills of existing managers so that they will be better prepared for upward mobility opportunities
and by developing college employees who are not managers but who may aspire to management
positions as a career objective. It is also believed that these activities will create a positive
learning environment for the management team.

In reviewing the long-term stability of the senior management at the College, the recent turnover
in the senior management of the College was an aberration. That is, there has never been a point
in the history of the College where a majority of the senior management positions were vacant at
the same time. There has been turnover in other management positions, but it is certainly within
the normal expectations of a community College with a large management staff. While the
recent turnover in the vice president positions was disturbing to the visiting team, it was not the
crisis situation that the visiting team portrayed for the following reasons. First, the
Superintendent/President, who is the leader of the senior management team, has enjoyed a
lengthy tenure at Delta College that is well beyond the average tenure of community college
CEOs (i.e., the average tenure of a community college CEO is approximately four years and Dr.
Rodríguez is in his seventh years as Superintendent/President of Delta College). Further, in
February 2008, the Board of Trustees extended his employment contract through 2012. This
extension, along with the hiring of the four vice presidents, has eased almost all of the tensions


                                                                                                 59
Response to 2008 Recommendation 4


and concerns that existed at the time of the evaluation visit surrounding the stability of the senior
leadership of the College.

Planning Agenda

   1. Complete a study of administrators’ salaries and make appropriate recommendations to
      the Board of Trustees by January 1, 2009.

   2. The College will make it best efforts to compensate the administrators at a level that will
      retain them in their current positions.




                                                                                                   60
Response to 2008 Commission Recommendation 1

Commission Recommendation 1

The College should demonstrate that it has completed the identification of SLOs and begun the
implementation of assessments that would bring the College to the Development level on the
Rubric for Evaluating Institutions Part III.

Description

Prior to fall 2005, San Joaquin Delta College faculty had been trained in the principles of the
Student Learning Outcomes and Assessment Cycle of Course, Program and Institutional
Improvement (SLOAC) through a variety of in-services and workshops. In fall 2005 the
Academic Senate and the Curriculum Committee sponsored a full-day mandatory flex activity
devoted to writing student learning outcomes and assessments for current courses in the
curriculum. Professor Harry Mersmann, a faculty member in Sociology department and the SLO
Coordinator, conducted the workshop and continued to work with faculty to assist them in
writing SLOs and assessments during 2005 and 2006.

Since fall 2005 the Curriculum Committee has required that all new courses and those submitted
for revision include explicit student learning outcomes and describe the methods that would be
used to assess those outcomes. In spring 2007, Professor Diane Oren, a faculty member in
English, became the SLO Coordinator. Among other activities, she developed a PowerPoint
presentation on the SLOA cycle, which was accepted by the College Academic Senate. This
PowerPoint presentation was used in various faculty SLOAC trainings including a second half-
day training in fall 200742.

Based on the current College mission, this presentation reiterated the College Academic Senate’s
determination to improve student learning by using the SLOA cycle of student learning
outcomes and assessment. The presentation contains definitions of student learning outcomes
and assessments, their relationships to courses, programs, and the institution as a whole, and the
cycle of improvement that should occur when SLO’s are assessed, reviewed, and
curriculum/methodologies are revised based on the resulting data. The document also provides
additional clarification by defining “objectives” as distinct from outcomes, “measurability”
which may be qualitative as well as quantitative, and outlines the importance of the faculty role
in this process. The document then focuses on the “assessment” part of the cycle, defining and
exemplifying “authentic assessments,” and providing additional guidance on principles of good
practice for assessing student learning outcomes.

Despite regular annual cycles of curriculum revision, by fall 2008, just 57% of courses in the San
Joaquin Delta College curriculum contained SLOs and assessments; few, if any, faculty had
completed the cycle by reviewing their assessment results and revising their curricula or SLOs in
light of the assessment results. 43


42
     Reference Appendix dd.
43
     Reference Appendix ee.


                                                                                                61
Response to 2008 Commission Recommendation 1


The General Education Committee, led by Articulation Officer Jack Saunders, met and began to
discuss general education student learning outcomes during the 2007-08 academic year; they will
continue their work in 2008-09 with a report to the College Curriculum Committee by year’s end.

The Accreditation Commission’s recommendation made clear to College constituency groups the
urgency of moving the College along in the SLOAC process from the course-level to the
program-level and ultimately to the institutional level. Since June 30, 2008 considerable
progress has been made due in large part to the leadership of the Academic Senate President/
Student Success Coordinator Janice Takahashi. She has attended several national and regional
conferences focusing on student learning and outcomes assessment, and has developed a model
that was presented to the Division Deans and the President’s Council in July, 2008.44

The first iteration of the SLOA model presented a conceptual institutional framework for the
SLOA cycle at the courses, program, and institutional levels. At each level, the recursive cycle
of SLO development, assessment, review, and curriculum/methodology revision provides
continuous improvement of courses and also provides feedback to the program level which in
turn provides feedback to the institutional level. This model provided the impetus for interactive
workshops with the Division Deans and the President’s Council where participants attempted to
develop institutional student learning outcomes based on the College mission statement.45 46 47 48
Additional workshops are scheduled for fall 2008 with the Academic Senate, the Student
Services Council, the Curriculum Committee, and other constituency groups to get their input.
These workshops should lead to general agreement on a set of institutional SLOs and may lead to
a revision of the College mission statement if it no longer aligns with the institutional SLOs.

The second iteration of the SLOA model operationalized the conceptual framework for the
SLOA cycle. Using a series of assessment committees at the discipline, program, and
institutional levels, this model uses the recursive cycle of SLO development, assessment, review,
and curriculum revision described above and develops specific goals, objectives for meeting
those goals, and timelines within which the goals and objectives must be developed.49 By the
end of 2008-09, 100% of courses will have complete student learning outcomes and assessments;
discipline-specific and interdisciplinary programs will have been defined; the necessary
CurricUNET modules will have been developed, tested, and used; and the tri-level assessment
committees will be in place. By the end of December 2009, the College will have completed the
first recursive cycle from the course, to the program, to the institutional level, and by February
2010, the Institutional Assessment Committee Chair will have reported the results of all of this
work to the Board of Trustees, the College constituency groups, and others.

In parallel with the instructional SLOA cycle development, Student Services will establish a
Student Services Assessment Committee to oversee the SLOA Cycle in Student Services and
Instructional Services, Business Services, Human Resources and Employee Relations,
Information Services will establish an Operational Assessment Committee will establish an

44
   Reference Appendix ff.
45
   Reference Appendix hh.
46
   Reference Appendix jj.
47
   Reference Appendix kk.
48
   Reference Appendix ll.
49
   Reference Appendices gg and mm


                                                                                               62
Response to 2008 Commission Recommendation 1


Operational Assessment Committee to oversee the SLOA Cycle in the those areas. Student
Services managers have already been working on student learning outcomes and assessments for
their functions, and a planning group comprised of several members of the President’s Council
has been named to develop the SLOA Cycle for the other operational areas. Both the Student
Services Assessment Committee and the Operational Assessment Committee are expected to
develop processes that dovetail with the plans and timelines for completing the SLOA cycle as
prescribed in Ms. Takahashi’s model.

Evaluation

Through the leadership of Academic Senate President/Student Success Coordinator, the College
has made significant strides toward achieving the Development level on the Commission’s
Rubric for Evaluating Institutions Part III.

The College now has a workable model for College-wide development of the SLOA Cycle of
continuous improvement of curriculum from the course to the program to the institutional level.
Roles and expectations for faculty and administration have been defined, discussed, and accepted
by the appropriate constituencies such as the Curriculum Committee, the Executive Cabinet, the
President’s Council and the Deans’ Council. A timeline for completion of the SLOA Cycle has
been defined and published so that by the end of December 2009, the College will have
completed the first cycle of assessment and improvement revision at the course, program, and
institutional levels. By February 2010, the Institutional Assessment Committee Chair will have
reported the results of the work to the Board of Trustees, the College constituency groups, and
other groups throughout the College community.

In parallel to the course and program outcomes and assessment cycle, Student Services
Operational Programs have been developing their own SLOA Cycle which will adhere to the
same timelines as the curricular one. Moreover, they will establish a Student Services
Assessment Committee to oversee this process. Other operational programs such as those in
Instructional Services, Business Services, Human Resources and Employee Relations,
Information Services have begun meeting to develop student learning outcomes, assessments,
and timelines for review and continuous improvement as well. They, too, will establish an
Operational Assessment Committee to oversee their SLOA Cycle. Student Services and Other
Operational Programs SLOA will feed into the process so that their results will also appear in the
February 2010 report to the Board of Trustees and College constituency groups and governance
committees.

The Superintendent/President, the Vice Presidents, the Academic Senate President and Student
Success Coordinator, the President’s Council, and the Curriculum Committee are committed to
achieving these goals and adhering to the established timeline.

Planning Agenda

The College continues to develop student learning outcomes for each class, program and the
institution.




                                                                                               63
Response to 2008 Commission Recommendation 1


   1. The College will reach the goal of 100% of courses having SLO’s specifically defined
      and integrated into course outlines and teaching objectives by June 30, 2009.

   2. The first complete cycle of course and program SLO’s will be completed by December
      31, 2009.

   3. All institutional SLO’s will be completed and reported through shared governance
      committees and the Board of Trustees by February 28, 2010.




                                                                                             64
Response to 2008 Commission Recommendation 2

Commission Recommendation 2

The College should provide evidence that faculty and others directly responsible for student
progress toward achieving stated student learning outcomes have, as a component of their
evaluation, effectiveness in producing those learning outcomes (III.A.1.c).

Description

At San Joaquin Delta College to date, faculty—teachers, counselors, librarians—have been the
primary authors of student learning outcomes and assessments for College courses. Prior to fall,
2005, faculty had been trained in the principles of the Student Learning Outcomes and
Assessment Cycle at conferences and workshops. In fall 2005, the Academic Senate and the
Curriculum Committee sponsored a full-day mandatory flex activity conducted by the SLO
coordinator. Following some training, faculty worked alone or in small discipline-based groups
devoting the day to discussion and writing student learning outcomes and assessments for current
courses in the curriculum.

Subsequently, the Curriculum Committee required that SLOs and assessments be included in all
new and revised courses. In spring 2007, a new SLO Coordinator developed a PowerPoint
presentation on the Student Learning Outcomes and Assessment Cycle which was accepted by
the College Academic Senate and used for continuing training of faculty.50 Based on the current
College mission, this presentation reiterated the College Academic Senate’s determination to
improve student learning by using the SLOA cycle of student learning outcomes and assessment.
The SLO Coordinator contacted faculty who had not written SLOAs and urged them to begin the
process.

Periodically, the Curriculum Committee has requested a report of the number of courses without
SLOs or Assessments. To date, 57% of all courses contain SLOs and Assessments. Recently,
the Curriculum Committee has requested that Division Deans reinforce the importance of the
SLOA cycle, provide as much support as possible to faculty in developing SLOA, encourage
faculty whose courses are missing SLOA to attend workshops, remind faculty that flex credit
will be awarded for workshop attendance, suggest that faculty who have completed SLOA for
their courses mentor those who have not, and use the updated list of courses without SLOA to
keep current on SLOA progress. The Academic Senate President/Student Success Coordinator
and the Curriculum Committee have developed a timeline from fall, 2008 through February 2010
that calls for the development of the SLOA process at all levels of the College.51

At the institutional level, Division Deans and President’s Council have been working with
Academic Senate President and Student Success Coordinator Takahashi to begin developing
institutional student learning outcomes based on the current mission statement. The results of
these workshops will be reviewed and revisited by the Academic Senate, the Curriculum
Committee, the Student Services Council and other shared governance groups to gain agreement

50
     Reference Appendix dd.
51
     Reference Appendix ii.


                                                                                               65
Response to 2008 Commission Recommendation 2


on the institutional SLOs.52 Also, prior to graduation in 2007 and 2008, the College Institutional
Researcher developed a survey for graduating students based on the student learning outcomes
suggested by the College mission statement. In both years, students responded very positively to
the survey indicating that they had indeed achieved the outcomes suggested by the College
mission.53

Meanwhile, some student services managers have been working on SLOs for their functions.
Others are scheduled to develop in fall 2008. Beginning in fall 2008, the timeline for SLOAC
calls for the establishment of a Student Services Assessment Committee and an Operational
Assessment Committee which will train managers and staff and solicit Student Services SLOAs
from the Student Services functions and Operational SLOs from Business Services, Human
Resources, and Information Services areas of the College. These Assessment Committees will
report their work to the Institutional Assessment Committee (President’s Council).

Through the College’s participation in the Equity for All research project, the Developmental
Education Review Task Force (Basic Skills Initiative), Title V Hispanic-Serving Institution
grant,54 and a variety of professional development opportunities such as the Student Success
Conference, Understanding Poverty workshops, and Professor Vincent Tinto’s presentations at
the District In Service Day in 2008, College faculty and staff have become immersed in a variety
of experiences that point out the importance of effective teaching and a renewed focus on student
learning.

Moreover, the Assistant Superintendent/Vice President of Instruction through the Professional
Development Center has established a New Faculty Academy designed to induct nearly 70 new
faculty members into the institution and promote the institution’s value for excellence in
teaching and learning.

To date, expectations for faculty and College staff at all levels regarding the SLOA Cycle are
high, and all are urged to comply, but development and assessment of SLO’s has not been
included as a component of the faculty, management, or classified evaluation process. Several
reasons for this are well-articulated in a paper written by Marcy Alancraig and Janet Fulks,
statewide Academic Senate Leaders in the SLOA.55

Faculty Association leadership, Academic Senate, and the Curriculum Committee are reluctant
to approve the use of formal evaluation mechanisms related to the development and
implementation of the SLOA Cycle in the faculty evaluation process in order to avoid a punitive
approach to the process. The faculty prefer positive reinforcement for these activities, and the
faculty leadership is united in its commitment to fulfilling their responsibilities to adhere to the
establish timelines for SLOA Cycle development.




52
   Reference Appendix nn
53
   Reference Appendix qq.
54
   Reference Appendix vv.
55
   Reference Appendix pp.


                                                                                                  66
Response to 2008 Commission Recommendation 2


Professor Vincent Tinto, this year’s District In-Service keynote speaker and a nationally-known
educator on retention and student success, specifically warned against the use of SLOA data in
faculty evaluations.

Evaluation

Over the past few years the College management, faculty, and staff have immersed themselves in
developing a culture that values the improvement of teaching and learning through research and
professional development. Many faculty throughout the College have participated in workshops
and in-service programs on campus through the Professional Development Center or sponsored
by grant programs such as Title V or Equity for All. Others have attended conferences and
professional meetings such as the Student Success Conference, Umoja, and others.

A New Faculty Academy has been developed through the Assistant Superintendent/Vice
President of Instruction and the Professional Development Center to inculcate this value for
teaching and learning among the nearly 70 new faculty who have been hired over the past three
years.

The leadership of the Academic Senate and the Curriculum Committee with support from the
College administration and division-level management has taken full responsibility for
completing the SLOA Cycle at the course, program, and institutional level and, through the
Institutional Assessment Committee, reporting to the Board and others by February 2010. To
date, SLOA Cycle development is on target to meet this goal.

The College has been advised by Statewide Academic Senate leaders that tying the development,
assessment, and review of student learning outcomes and assessments to faculty evaluations
constitutes a punitive approach to the SLOA process which could have a chilling effect on the
very culture of teaching and learning that the College has endeavored to develop. Likewise,
Professor Vincent Tinto, the 2008 District In-Service keynote speaker and nationally-known
expert on retention and student success, specifically warned against the use of SLOA data in
faculty evaluations.

Consequently, the Superintendent/President and Assistant Superintendent/Vice President of
Instruction have committed to the faculty that as long as the development of the SLOA Cycle
remains on target, SLOA development or data from the process will not be used in faculty
evaluations. Nevertheless, continued conversations on the ways in which SLOA might be used
positively in evaluation will continue to take place in fall 2008, and recommendations will be
made to the Institutional Assessment Committee early in 2009 to address the faculty evaluation
process in a positive manner.

Planning Agenda

   1. Beginning in January 2009, the Superintendent/President and Assistant
      Superintendent/Vice President of Instruction will monitor the progress on developing and
      completing the SLOA Cycle and request quarterly reports from the Curriculum
      Committee on progress toward reaching the establish goals and timelines.



                                                                                              67
Response to 2008 Commission Recommendation 2



   2. Conversations will be encouraged at all levels regarding how SLOA Cycle development
      and process could become positive elements of the faculty evaluation process. The
      Faculty Association, Academic Senate, and Curriculum Committee will make
      recommendations to the President’s Council.

   3. SLOA development and assessment will be incorporated as an important component of
      the New Faculty Academy by December 2008.




                                                                                          68
Table of Figures
Figure 1: Ethnic Demography of San Joaquin County & San Joaquin Delta College ................................ 11
Figure 2: Hiring Trends at Delta College.................................................................................................... 12
Figure 3: Diagram of Strategic Plan ........................................................................................................... 23
Figure 4: Percentage of Educational Administrators, Tenured Faculty and Academic Temp. Positions by
Ethnicity ...................................................................................................................................................... 80
Figure 5: Percentage of Classified Administration, Classified Professional and Classified Support
Positions at SJDC by Ethnicity ................................................................................................................... 81
Figure 6: Proportion of Ethnic Groups in San Joaquin Co. vs. Average Proportion of Ethnic Groups
Employed at SJDC ...................................................................................................................................... 82
Figure 7: Percentage of Agreement between Genders ................................................................................ 86
Figure 8: Percentage of Agreement between Ethnic Group........................................................................ 87
Figure 9: Percentage of Agreement by Employment Classification ........................................................... 88
Figure 10: Employees’ Perceptions of Racism at SJDC ............................................................................. 90
Figure 11: Employees’ Perceptions of Sexism at SJDC ............................................................................. 90
Figure 12: Employees’ Perceptions of Sexism at SJDC ............................................................................. 91
Figure 13: Percent of Funded AI Projects Supporting Each Institutional Outcome ................................. 118
Figure 14: Percent of Funded AI Projects Supporting Each Institutional Efficiency Theme ................... 119
Figure 15: Percent of Funded AI Projects Supporting Each Institutional Outcome Theme by FY .......... 120
Figure 16: Recommendations for AI Budget Process Change.................................................................. 121
Figure 17: Ethnic Background of Students ............................................................................................... 148
Figure 18: Students by Age Group ........................................................................................................... 149
Figure 19: Head Count and FTES 2002 - 2007 ........................................................................................ 149
Figure 20: Student Body Composition by Region .................................................................................... 150
Figure 21: Gender Composition of Student Body 2002 - 2007 ................................................................ 150
Figure 22: Vocational & Basic Skills Course Completion ....................................................................... 153
Figure 23: Measure of Achievement ......................................................................................................... 153
Figure 24: Improvement Rate in Basic Skills & ESL ............................................................................... 154
Figure 25: Equity Scorecard Framework .................................................................................................. 172




                                                                                                                                                               70
Index of Tables
Table 1: Staff Evaluations Past Due by Year .............................................................................................. 37
Table 2: Evaluations Due in Future ............................................................................................................ 38
Table 3: 2008 Campus Survey: Respondents’ Demographics vs. 2007 Employee Demographics ............ 83
Table 4: 2008 Campus Survey: Respondents’ Perceptions by Employee Gender and Ethnic Group ....... 84
Table 5: General Perception Scores by Employee Classification Type ...................................................... 85
Table 6: Comparison of 2001 and 2008 Respondents: Percent Responding that the “College Welcomes
and Supports Minorities” in Key Leadership Positions .............................................................................. 89
Table 7: Percentage Agreeing Each Issue NOT Being a Problem by Group .............................................. 92
Table 8: Recommended College Activities .............................................................................................. 111
Table 9: Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Instructional
Improvement ............................................................................................................................................. 123
Table 10: Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Instructional
Improvement ............................................................................................................................................. 123
Table 11: Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Instructional
Improvement ............................................................................................................................................. 124
Table 12: Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Program Efficiency
 .................................................................................................................................................................. 125
Table 13: AI Recommendations ............................................................................................................... 126
Table 14: Geography of San Joaquin Delta College District .................................................................... 134
Table 15: San Joaquin County Population Projections ............................................................................. 135
Table 16: Educational Attainment Levels ................................................................................................. 137
Table 17: Job Growth................................................................................................................................ 139
Table 18: Reading, Writing and Math Assessment ................................................................................... 151
Table 19: Student Success by Major Feeder High Schools ...................................................................... 152
Table 20: 2008 Strategic Goal One ........................................................................................................... 157
Table 21: 2008 Strategic Goal Two .......................................................................................................... 158
Table 22: 2008 Strategic Goal Three ........................................................................................................ 160
Table 23: 2008 Strategic Goal Four .......................................................................................................... 161
Table 24: 2008 Strategic Goal Five .......................................................................................................... 162
Table 25: 2008 Strategic Goal Six ............................................................................................................ 164
Table 26: Business Services Goal One ..................................................................................................... 195
Table 27: Business Services Goal Two..................................................................................................... 196
Table 28 Business Services Goal Three .................................................................................................... 197
Table 29: Business Services Goal Four .................................................................................................... 199
Table 30: Human Resources Goal One ..................................................................................................... 207
Table 31: Human Resources Goal Two .................................................................................................... 209
Table 32: Human Resources Goal Three .................................................................................................. 212
Table 33: Human Resources Goal Four .................................................................................................... 218
Table 34: Information Technology Strategic Plans .................................................................................. 223
Table 35: Instructional Services Strategic Goals ...................................................................................... 227
Table 36: Instructional Services Strategic Goal One ................................................................................ 229
Table 37: Instructional Services Strategic Goal Two ............................................................................... 230



                                                                                                                                                                   71
Table 38: Instructional Services Strategic Goal Three ............................................................................. 232
Table 39: Instructional Services Strategic Goal Four ............................................................................... 235
Table 40: Instructional Services Strategic Goal – Facilitate Site Visit ..................................................... 236
Table 41: Instructional Services Strategic Goal – Measure L................................................................... 237
Table 42: Instructional Services Strategic Goal – Emerging Trends ........................................................ 238
Table 43: Student Services Strategic Goal One ........................................................................................ 240
Table 44: Student Services Strategic Goal Two ....................................................................................... 241
Table 45: Student Services Strategic Goal Three ..................................................................................... 243
Table 46: Student Services Strategic Goal Four ....................................................................................... 244
Table 47: 2005 – 2006 San Joaquin Delta College Hiring by Ethnicity ................................................... 245
Table 48: 2006 – 2007 San Joaquin Delta College Hiring by Ethnicity ................................................... 246
Table 49: 2007 – 2008 San Joaquin Delta College Hiring by Ethnicity ................................................... 247
Table 50: Ethnicity of Permanent College Employees ............................................................................. 248




                                                                                                                                      72
    List of Appendices & Resources
  Appendix             Title                          Description                   Number of Pages
Appendix A    Equity for All         Report of Institutional Accountability                       -22-
                                     Promoting Equity for Underrepresented
                                     Students
Appendix B    Cultural Awareness     A listing of events sponsored by the San                      -10-
              Program (CAPS)         Joaquin Delta College Cultural Awareness
                                     Program.
Appendix C    AFFIRM Report          A report on the success and needed                             -6-
                                     initiatives to adequately represent African-
                                     American students at San Joaquin Delta
                                     College
Appendix D    List of AI Proposals   This list of budget augmentation proposals                     -6-
                                     shows diversity in funding of many
                                     outreach efforts and other projects in
                                     pursuit of the Strategic Plan of San Joaquin
                                     Delta College.
Appendix E    Accepting the          This document represents a video produced                      -1-
              Challenge              by San Joaquin Delta College to provide
                                     information about underrepresented
                                     students.
Appendix F    Schedule for           Written in Microsoft Project, this Gantt                       -4-
              Accreditation          Chart shows the timelines and
              Responses              responsibilities for preparing the responses
                                     to the ACCJC comments and
                                     recommendations. It also shows the
                                     collegial, shared governance method by
                                     which the responses were developed.
Appendix F1   ACCJC Response         This memo, written by the vice president                       -1-
              Comments Memo          of business services invited the entire
                                     campus community to comment on the
                                     Accreditation Follow-Up Report.
Appendix F2   ACCJC Response         This memo, written by the vice president                       -1-
              Comments Memo          of business services invited the entire
              (Reminder)             campus community to comment on the
                                     Accreditation Progress Report. This was
                                     sent as a reminder to the first notice.
Appendix G    Welcome to Fall        Two page memo from the Director of                             -2-
              Semester, 2008         Guidance & Counseling to the students,
                                     fall, 2008.
Appendix H    US Census Data         Synopsis of population by ethnicity for San                    -1-
                                     Joaquin County prepared by the US
                                     Census Bureau.
Appendix I    San Joaquin Delta      One page diagram of the committee                              -1-
              College Committee      reporting structure shows the diversity and
              Structure              inclusion of the campus community in
                                     decision-making.
Appendix J    Current Employees      Tabulation of employees from 2005 to                           -4-
              August 2008            2008 by ethnicity.


                                                                                              73
  Appendix              Title                             Description                    Number of Pages
Appendix K   Campus Climate Survey       This email was sent from our Interim Dean                         -1-
             for Staff, Faculty &        of Planning, Research & Regional
             Managers                    Education to the campus community
                                         inviting participation in a survey regarding
                                         campus climate, diversity and other issues.
Appendix L   SJDC Employee               This is the web-based survey administered                         -5-
             Questionnaire               by the Office of Research & Institutional
                                         Effectiveness to assess campus climate,
                                         diversity and other issues.
Appendix M   Board Policy 1400           Board Policy 1400 prohibits discrimination                        -3-
                                         and states the College’s policy on
                                         diversity.
Appendix N   Invitation to Participate   Sent to African-American staff, faculty and                       -3-
             in Focus Group              managers, this invitation was sent July 28,
                                         2008 to invite participants to join a focused
                                         discussion on diversity at the College and
                                         related issues.
Appendix O   Executive Summary of        This is the executive summary to the                              -5-
             Environmental Scan          complete Environmental Scan and
             [2008]                      Strategic Plan developed, reviewed and
                                         adopted in 2008.
Appendix P   Environmental Scan &        Adopted in 2008, this is the most recent                       -38-
             Strategic Plan              evaluation of external, economic and
                                         demographic conditions of the College. In
                                         this document the college responds to these
                                         factors by adopting a Strategic Plan that
                                         focuses activities on the future challenges
                                         of the College.
Appendix Q   Staff Evaluation Memo       This is the reminder memo sent by the                             -3-
             / Reminder                  Human Resources Department to
                                         supervisors to instruct them as to which
                                         employees need evaluations. The cover
                                         memo was attached to a customized list of
                                         employees in the recipient’s department
                                         who need current evaluations. (Sample
                                         only.)
Appendix R   Summary of                  This memo indicates the number of                                 -1-
             Evaluations Due             employee evaluations that were due as of
                                         July 30, 2008 and projects out to 2011.
Appendix S   Delta College               This PowerPoint presentation was made by                       -19-
             Performance                 the vice president of human resources to
             Evaluations                 the management of the college in
                                         preparation for fall 2008.
Appendix T   Human Resources             These are the comprehensive survey results                     -16-
             Survey Results              from “How May We Help You…Better.”
                                         This survey was conducted as part of a
                                         program evaluation conducted by the
                                         Human Resources and Employee Relations
                                         department.



                                                                                                   74
  Appendix             Title                            Description                      Number of Pages
Appendix U    Application for            This is a sample form used to request                             -1-
              Appreciative Inquiry       funding from the AI Proposal Process.
              Funding
Appendix U1   Appreciative Inquiry       This document is used to track the                                -1-
              Self-Evaluation Form       effectiveness and results of the AI funding.
                                         The results of these evaluations are used as
                                         feedback into the action planning cycle for
                                         future planning and AI funding.
Appendix U2   Appreciative Inquiry       This lengthy document chronicles the                           -171
              Requests and Rankings      requests made of the Appreciative Inquiry
                                         (AI) process for the 2008 – 2009 academic
                                         year.
Appendix V    Strategic Planning         This Gantt Chart shows the strategic                              -1-
              Schedule                   planning and budget calendars for San
                                         Joaquin Delta College.
Appendix W    Evaluation Report          Evaluation Report of the visiting                              -39-
                                         accreditation team.
Appendix X    Golddd Web Page            This print of the Golddd web page                                 -4-
                                         describes the activities of this outreach to
                                         underrepresented student groups.
Appendix Y    Stockton Record            Current newspaper article showing San                             -1-
              Newspaper Article          Joaquin Delta College’s dramatic 2008
                                         award of Associate’s Degrees.
Appendix Z    Matriculation Report       This Matriculation Report from 1995                               -2-
                                         shows information about counseling.
Appendix aa   Back Up Worksheet          This 2007 – 2008 Back Up worksheet                                -1-
                                         shows the number of counselors working
                                         by month.
Appendix bb   Distribution of Students   Document shows the number of students                             -1-
              Served                     served during each month of the year.
Appendix cc   Number of Full & Part      This document shows the number of full                            -1-
              Time Counselors on         and part time counselors on duty by month.
              Duty
Appendix dd   Student Learning           PowerPoint presentation of student                             -40-
              Outcomes &                 learning outcome cycle.
              Assessment Cycle
Appendix ee   Report on Active           This list presents the current status of                       -26-
              Course SLOs                courses in relation to their status providing
                                         SLO’s.
Appendix ff   Institutional Learning     This PowerPoint presentation shows a map                       -25-
              Outcomes                   for current and future institutional student
                                         learning outcome measurements.
Appendix gg   Student Learning           This PowerPoint presentation shows the                         -18-
              Assessment Cycle           cycle of assessment of student learning
                                         outcomes.
Appendix hh   Division Deans             Minutes from Division Deans council.                              -1-
              Council: August 6, 2008




                                                                                                   75
  Appendix               Title                         Description                       Number of Pages
Appendix ii   Student Learning and      Spreadsheet of Student Learning and                                -4-
              Assessment Cycles         Assessment Cycles
Appendix jj   Division Deans Council    Minutes from Division Deans Council.                               -1-
              Follow Up: August 6,
              2008
Appendix kk   Division Deans Council    Minutes from Division Deans Council.                               -2-
              Follow Up: August 6,
              2008
Appendix ll   Institutional Learning    Minutes from Division Deans Council.                               -2-
              Outcomes - minutes
Appendix mm   Timeline for              Timeline showing progress of the College                           -4-
              Institutional Outcomes    in meeting Institutional Student Outcomes.
Appendix nn   Student Learning          Exercises for the Division Deans to study                          -4-
              Exercises                 Student Learning Outcomes
Appendix oo   Appreciative Inquiry      This 2007 – 2008 calendar, written in                              -1-
              Timeline                  Microsoft Project, shows the timelines for
                                        the AI process.
Appendix pp   Accreditation & Faculty   Accreditation and Student Learning                                 -6-
              Evaluations               Outcomes
Appendix qq   Results from the 2008     Results from the 2008 Survey of Delta                           -28-
              Survey of Delta College   College Graduates
              Graduates
Appendix rr   Cultural Competence       This Cultural Competence Strategic Plan                         -10-
                                        from Cosumnes River College is the model
                                        for the current draft of the Diversity Plan at
                                        Delta College.
Appendix ss   Golddd Brochure           Brochure describing Golddd program to                              -1-
                                        students.
Appendix tt   Guidance and              These brochures and publications present                        -36-
              Counseling Brochures      information regarding the Guidance and
                                        Counseling program services to students.
Appendix uu   Accepting the             This DVD was produced to demonstrate                            DVD
              Challenge                 the Accepting the Challenge program.
Appendix vv   Title V Report            This is a performance report for the Title V                    -25-
                                        activities of San Joaquin Delta College.
Appendix ww   Board Minutes             The Board of Trustees met on December 3,                        -10-
                                        2002 to adopt the District Mission
                                        Statement.
Appendix xx   Board Policy / Mission    Adopted May 17, 2005, this is a revised                            -1-
              Statement                 Mission Statement for the College.
Appendix yy   Board Minutes             The Board of Trustees met on                                    -10-
                                        May 17, 2005 to adopt the revised District
                                        Mission Statement.
Appendix zz   Report on Institutional   Report of key indicators of institutional                       -21-
              Effectiveness             success.



                                                                                                   76
  Appendix               Title                           Description                    Number of Pages
Appendix aaa   DataMart Employee         This printout is the newest (2007) data that                     -1-
               Ethnicity                 is posted on the Chancellor’s web site
                                         regarding San Joaquin Delta College
                                         employee ethnicity.
Appendix bbb   Board Policy 1041         Board of Trustees Code of Ethics and                             -4-
                                         Standards of Good Practice
Appendix ccc   Board Policy 1042         Board of Trustees Self-Evaluation                              -1-
Appendix ddd   Board Policy 1043         Evaluation of Superintendent/President                         -1-
Appendix eee   Student Services          During the process of writing the Follow-                     -16-
               Updated Strategic Goals   Up, new strategic plans were updated. This
                                         is one such plan.
Appendix fff   EOPS Visions              Delta College EOPS newsletter.                                   -4-
Appendix ggg   President’s Council       Minutes - President’s Council meeting for                        -2-
               Minutes                   January 8, 2008.
Appendix hhh   Board Meeting Minutes     Minutes - Regular Board Meeting on                            -11-
                                         January 15, 2008
Appendix iii   Board Meeting Minutes     Minutes - Regular Board Meeting February                         -1-
                                         19, 2008




                                                                                                  77
Integrated Appendices




                        78
Appendix 1: Employee Questionnaire

           Assessing the Campus Climate: SJDC Employee Questionnaire
                                              Fall 2008

                                    Alyssa Nguyen, Research Analyst
              Matthew Wetstein, Interim Dean of Planning, Research, and Regional Education
                                     Brianna Hays, Research Analyst

Background


In the past two accreditation cycles, concerns have been voiced about employment equity and
patterns of promotion and hiring. Particular work place concerns were brought forward by
African-American employees, and the 2002 accrediting commission report recommended that
the College “should develop and implement plans to increase College-wide sensitivity to the
needs of its diverse population, evaluate the perception of bias by some employees on the
campus, and review implementation of workplace opportunities to ensure they are equitable for
all employees.” In 2004, focus group discussions were conducted with African-American
employees, and the College took some steps to increase the number of Cultural Awareness
Program (CAPs) programs that addressed diversity themes. The College also took part in the
Equity for All Research Project to document contemporary patterns of student inequity in terms
of access and course success. Data from the 2007 Accreditation Survey of staff continued to
demonstrate some gaps in perceptions between White and Non-White staff members about
employment equity issues.

The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, the new survey provides up-to-date data on staff,
faculty and management perceptions about San Joaquin Delta College relative to a host of
concerns, including the campus climate toward employment diversity, student preparedness, and
campus resources. Second, the survey helps frame some of the College’s efforts to respond to
accrediting commission concerns about the College’s employment patterns. A comparison of
survey results with demographic hiring patterns can help identify the realities of employment
equity versus the perceptions of employment bias that may or may not exist. Moreover, the
survey results provide a fresh benchmark on campus sentiments about the overall climate of the
institution. Findings from the survey can help inform planning agendas for future change at the
College.




                                                                                             79
Demographic Make-Up of Staff


In fall 2007, the College reported to the Chancellor’s Office that 1,234 employees worked in one
of six identifiable job categories: educational administration, tenured or tenure track faculty,
academic temporary faculty, classified management, classified professional and classified
support positions (see Figures 1-2). Even though the distributions of employees by ethnic groups
appear to be reflective of the population, this is not the case when a closer examination of the
data is made. Overall, White employees are underrepresented in the classified support staff ranks
(39.2%). Moreover, many of the ethnic groups (e.g. African-American, Asians, etc) are grossly
underrepresented in more prestigious positions such as tenured faculty and management. Given
the ethnic disparity in positions held at SJDC, this may be one of the reasons why negative
campus climate perceptions exist at SJDC as indicated from the results of the 2001 campus
climate survey.

          Percentage of Educational Administrators, Tenured Faculty and Academic Temporary
                                    Positions at SJDC by Ethnicity
                               70


                               60


                               50
     Percentage




                               40


                               30


                               20


                               10


                                  0
                                                                                                                  Other
                                                                             Native     Pacific
                                      Asian   Black   Filipino   Hispanic                         White   Unk     Non-
                                                                            American   Islander
                                                                                                                  White
                  Educational Admin   5.26    5.26                10.53       5.26                47.37   26.32
                  Tenured             5.99    3.23      2.3       12.44       1.38                60.83   11.98   1.84
                  Academic Temp       6.83    3.19     1.37        8.2        1.59      0.23      64.46   12.98   1.14

     Source. CA Chancellor’s Office Data Mart
Figure 4: Percentage of Educational Administrators, Tenured Faculty and Academic Temporary Positions at SJDC by Ethnicity




                                                                                                                          80
                  Percentage of Classified Administration, Classified Professional and Classified Support
                                             Positions at SJDC by Ethnicity

                                    60



                                    50



                                    40
         Percentage




                                    30



                                    20



                                    10



                                        0
                                                                                                                        Other
                                                                                   Native     Pacific
                                            Asian   Black   Filipino   Hispanic                         White   Unk     Non-
                                                                                  American   Islander
                                                                                                                        White
                      Classified Admin                                  14.29                            50     35.71
                      Classified Prof       4.44    8.89     6.67       17.78       2.22                51.11   8.89
                      Classified Support    10.4     7.8      3.6       25.2        1.4        0.6      39.2    10.8     1

Figure 5: Percentage of Classified Administration, Classified Professional and Classified Support Positions at SJDC by Ethnicity
                                        Source. CA Chancellor’s Office Data Mart
As Figure 3 reveals, on average, over 50 percent of all employees at SJDC are White, a
proportion substantially higher than the population in the San Joaquin County area (40%). In
general, White employees at SJDC are overrepresented in comparison to their proportion in the
population and all other ethnic groups are underrepresented in comparison to their proportion in
the population.

In short, the concentration of minorities in lower-paid staffing categories and their employment
at SJDC may be fostering lingering perceptions of employment bias.




                                                                                                                                81
Proportion of Ethnic Groups in San Joaquin County vs. Average Proportion of Ethnic Groups Employed
at SJDC
                            60.0


                            50.0


                            40.0


                            30.0


                            20.0


                            10.0


                             0.0
                                                                                              Native
                                                                      American
                                                                                            Hawaiian/
                                                                       Indian
                                   Hispanic     White       Black                   Asian     Other     Other
                                                                      /Alaskan
                                                                                              Pacific
                                                                       Native
                                                                                             Islander
                 County %            35.7        39.6        6.9         0.6        13.8       0.4       2.9
                 Average SJDC %      14.7        52.2        5.7         2.4         6.6       3.9      19.1

                      Source. American Community Survey (2006) and CCCCO Data Mart (Fall 2007)
Figure 6: Proportion of Ethnic Groups in San Joaquin County vs. Average Proportion of Ethnic Groups Employed at SJDC

In the spring of 2001 a campus climate survey was administered to staff and faculty at SJDC,
with 243 responding to the survey. This survey contained items on diversity related issues and
asked respondents questions about the college’s hiring procedures, racism, sexism and sexual
harassment. Results of this survey were reported in 2002 Accreditation Self-Study and it was
found that only about half of all respondents felt the college ensured fair employment procedures
and approximately half of all respondents felt that the college had a problem with racism,
sexism, and sexual harassment. Moreover, it was found that of all ethnic groups, African-
American employees felt the least welcomed by the college in terms of pursuing management
and faculty positions.56 Although plans to address the negative perceptions of campus climate
were made, these plans were not implemented thoroughly.

As a result, in 2008, the Accreditation Team recommended that SJDC begin developing and
implementing a plan of action that would address the negative campus climate perceptions. As a
preliminary step, a modified version of the campus climate survey administered in 2001 and in
spring 2007 was re-administered to obtain current campus climate perceptions from employees.

Method & Sample


In fall 2008, the modified campus climate survey was administered via campus-wide e-mail to
all employees at SJDC. This survey was pared down from the original version (33 vs. 54 survey
items) to capture only the most pertinent items addressing perceptions of campus climate.

56
     San Joaquin Delta College. 2002. Accreditation Institutional Self Study, 207-208.


                                                                                                                82
Approximately 21 percent of all employees returned their surveys (n = 256). As Table 1 reveals,
respondents were predominately female (63%), White (63%), Classified staff (43%), and worked
at SJDC between 0-5 years (33%).

The breakdown of respondents into various categories demonstrates that the survey is not truly
representative of the SJDC workforce. The survey responses over-represent white employees
and under-represent non-white employee groups. Given that over half of respondents were
White, analyses involving this variable (Ethnicity) were re-coded to a dichotomous variable to
compare White vs. Non-White respondents. This was done because all other ethnic groups were
too small in sample size to conduct any meaningful analyses. Along the same lines, full-time
faculty filled out responses to the survey in larger numbers than their status in the entire SJDC
population: 34% of the surveys came from full-time faculty, but they make up only 18% of all
employees at the College. As a result, some of the evidence drawn from the survey may be
skewed by the over sampling of white staff members and full-time faculty.

          2008 Campus Survey: Respondents’ Demographics vs. 2007 Employee Demographics

                                                                  Survey          Employee     Gap Between
                                                                   Group            Group        Staff &
DEMOGRAPHIC                                                      Percentage       Percentage     Survey
SEX (n = 245)
        Female                                                      63.3                58.6      +4.7
        Male                                                        36.7                41.4      -4.7
ETHNICITY (n = 242)
        African-American                                             3.3                 5.3       -2.0
        Native American                                              1.2                 1.5       -0.3
        Asian                                                        5.0                 7.9       -2.9
        White                                                       62.8                52.7      +10.1
        Filipino                                                     2.1                 2.6       -0.5
        Hispanic                                                    16.9                16.3      +0.6
        Other                                                        8.7                13.3       -4.6
EMPLOYEE TYPE (n = 254)
        Classified Staff                                            42.5                40.5      +2.0
        Full-Time Faculty                                           34.3                17.6      +16.7
        Part-Time Faculty                                            9.1                35.6      -26.5
        Manager                                                     14.2                 6.3      +7.9
YEARS EMPLOYED (n = 252)
        0-5                                                         33.3                54.4      -21.1
        6-10                                                        21.8                17.6      +4.2
        11-15                                                       17.9                11.0      +6.9
        16-20                                                        9.9                 6.7      +3.2
        20 +                                                        17.1                10.3      +6.8
Table 3: 2008 Campus Survey: Respondents’ Demographics vs. 2007 Employee Demographics




                                                                                                          83
Results


General Perceptions

 The campus climate survey was broken down into four distinct sections: general perceptions of
the campus climate (10 items), perceptions of the quality of education students receive at SJDC
(7 items), perceptions of the campus resources (4 items), and perceptions of resources available
to employees (5 items). On most questions, respondents answered each of the items based on a
4-point scale ranging from 1 = Strongly Agree to 4 = Strongly Disagree. Readers should note
that higher scores in each section represented negative perceptions, whereas lower scores in each
section represented positive perceptions. The scale also contained a “Not Sure” option that was
not included in the analyses (see Appendix A for questionnaire copy).
Items from the four sections were totaled to get a total scale score for each section. Below in
Table 2 are the mean differences for these sections based on respondents’ gender and ethnic
group.
     2008 Campus Survey: Respondents’ Perceptions by Employee Gender and Ethnic Group

             Perception                                               Mean Difference                 t-value
             Campus Climate
                     Gender (Female vs. Male)                                  -1.18                   -1.38
                     Ethnicity (White vs. Non-White)                           -0.52                   -0.64
             Student Preparedness
                     Gender (Female vs. Male)                                  -1.52                   -2.45*
                     Ethnicity (White vs. Non-White)                           -1.83                  -3.01**
             Campus Resources
                     Gender (Female vs. Male)                                  -1.35                  -3.46**
                     Ethnicity (White vs. Non-White)                           -0.48                   -1.26
             Employee Resources
                     Gender (Female vs. Male)                                   -.92                   -1.80
                     Ethnicity (White vs. Non-White)                           -0.53                   -1.08
           *significant difference at the 95% confidence level, ** significant at the 99% confidence level
Table 4: 2008 Campus Survey: Respondents’ Perceptions by Employee Gender and Ethnic Group

In terms of general campus climate and employee perceptions, there were no significant
differences between the ethnic groups or sexes. Non-White (M = 12.83) and female (M = 13.32)
employees had more positive perceptions of the quality of education students were getting at
SJDC than White.
(M = 14.66) and male employees (M = 14.84). Regarding campus resources, there were no
attitudinal differences reported between the ethnic groups but there was a significant difference
between the sexes. Female employees (M = 8.46) had more positive perceptions of the campus
resources than male employees (M = 9.81). In addition to employee sex and ethnic group
comparisons, comparisons were made between the different employment classification types.
Results revealed significant differences between the types for all four sections. Full-time faculty
reported significantly less positive perceptions than all employee types concerning the campus
climate, employee resources, campus resources and student preparedness (see Table 5: General
Perception Scores by Employee Classification Type).



                                                                                                                84
                         General Perception Scores by Employee Classification Type




Table 5: General Perception Scores by Employee Classification Type

Specific Perceptions between Groups

Ten specific statements were analyzed to isolate differences between ethnic, sex and employee
classification types. We employed Chi-square Tests of Independence to determine if any of the
differences were large enough to reject the hypothesized random effect. Presented in Figures 5-7
are the proportions of each group agreeing to each of the statements. The responses of these
statements were collapsed in order to get three specific categories instead of the original five
response choices. Results revealed that more female employees than male employees felt the
college sought to meet the diverse educational needs of its students. Full-time faculty and White
employees disagreed more than their peers to the statement that cheating was not a problem at
the college. These respondents were far more likely to indicate that they perceive student
cheating as a problem at Delta.

Of all the employee classifications, full-time faculty expressed the most disagreement with the
college’s support for women and ethnic minorities in faculty and management positions and
effective transfer services for students. Managers on the other hand, reported the highest
proportions of agreement on almost every single item.




                                                                                                  85
                                                                    Percentage of Agreement between Genders


                             The college adheres to written policies ensuring
                                   fairness in all employment practices
                         The college provides effective transfer services to 4
                                 year institutions of higher education
                             The college provides adequate opportunities for
                                   students to upgrade their basic skills
                         * The college seeks to meet the diverse educational
                                         needs of its students

                                            Cheating is not a problem at Delta

                                    Students receive a high quality education

                             The college atmosphere welcomes and supports
                                   ethnic minorities in faculty positions
                             The college atmosphere welcomes and supports
                               ethnic minorities in management positions
                             The college atmosphere welcomes and supports
                                        women in faculty positions
                             The college atmosphere welcomes and supports
                                     women in management positions

                                                                                 0       20         40                60   80   100
                                                   Male
                                                                                                         Percentage
                                                   Female


Figure 7: Percentage of Agreement between Genders
*Items with asterisks indicate statistically significant different proportions




                                                                                                                                      86
                                                                 Percentage of Agreement between Ethnic Group



                         The college adheres to written policies ensuring
                               fairness in all employment practices
                     The college provides effective transfer services to 4
                             year institutions of higher education
                         The college provides adequate opportunities for
                               students to upgrade their basic skills
                       The college seeks to meet the diverse educational
                                      needs of its students

                                       * Cheating is not a problem at Delta

                                 Students receive a high quality education

                         The college atmosphere welcomes and supports
                               ethnic minorities in faculty positions
                         The college atmosphere welcomes and supports
                           ethnic minorities in management positions
                         The college atmosphere welcomes and supports
                                    women in faculty positions
                         The college atmosphere welcomes and supports
                                 women in management positions

                                                                                 0       20          40                60   80   100
                                              White
                                                                                                          Percentage
                                              Non-White


Figure 8: Percentage of Agreement between Ethnic Group
*Items with asterisks indicate statistically significant different proportions




                                                                                                                                       87
                                                                      Percentage of Agreement by Employment Classification

               The college adheres to written policies ensuring fairness in all
                                  employment practices
                   * The college provides effective transfer services to 4 year
                                 institutions of higher education
     The college provides adequate opportunities for students to upgrade
                               their basic skills
              The college seeks to meet the diverse educational needs of its
                                         students

                                              * Cheating is not a problem at Delta

                                        Students receive a high quality education

       * The college atmosphere welcomes and supports ethnic minorities
                              in faculty positions
       * The college atmosphere welcomes and supports ethnic minorities
                           in management positions
       * The college atmosphere welcomes and supports women in faculty
                                  positions
                * The college atmosphere welcomes and supports women in
                                   management positions
                                                Manager                              0     10      20     30      40      50        60   70   80   90   100
                                                Part-Time Faculty
                                                Full-Time Faculty                                                      Percentage
                                                Classified Staff
     Figure 9: Percentage of Agreement by Employment Classification
*Items with asterisks indicate statistically significant different proportions




                                                                                                                                                              88
Perception of Problems


        Perceptions of Equal Employment: 2001 vs. 2008. One of the most important findings
from the 2002 Accreditation Self-Study was the awareness of bias and perceptions of “unequal
opportunity” among the African-American employees at SJDC. As mentioned, although plans to
address this bias were put forth in a variety of venues, it remains to be seen whether these plans
paid off in reducing perceptions of bias. As Table 3 reveals, from 2001 to 2008 these negative
perceptions held by African-American employees have appeared to decrease substantially.
Whereas in 2001 only 8% of African-Americans agreed that the “college welcomed and
supported ethnic minorities in management positions,” 58% of these employees now support this
statement. Likewise, the percentage of African-American employees who agreed that the
“college welcomed and supported ethnic minorities into faculty positions” have more than
doubled since 2001. Although the perceptions of equal employment opportunities have increased
substantially within the African-American employee group, their overall percentage is still much
lower than all the other ethnic employee groups.
    Comparison of 2001 and 2008 Respondents: Percent Responding that the “College Welcomes and
                         Supports Minorities” in Key Leadership Positions

                                            2001*                                              2008
                                Faculty                Management                    Faculty          Management
White                             77                       76                          74                 77
Hispanic                          75                       66                          64                 63
Black                             17                       8                           44                 58
Asian and Others                  65                       43                          66                 76
Table 6: Comparison of 2001 and 2008 Respondents: Percent Responding that the “College Welcomes and Supports
Minorities” in Key Leadership Positions
                                   * SJDC. 2002. Accreditation Institutional Self Study

        Negative Beliefs. On one key set of questions centering on perceptions of racism, sexism
and sexual harassment, response categories were altered in the 2008 survey that make direct
comparisons with earlier data less straightforward. In 2001 and in 2007, respondents were asked
to “agree or disagree” with statements that said, for example, “racism is not a problem at Delta
College.” In the 2008 survey, the response categories were altered, asking respondents to mark
“yes,” “no” or “not sure” to such statements. When the responses were initially examined, we
decided to recode all of the data on to the same scale. In Figures 8-10, we see that when
employees were asked: “Racism is not a problem at Delta College,” “Sexism is not a problem at
Delta College,” and “Sexual harassment is not a problem at Delta College,” the percentage of
employees who agreed that these three issues were not a problem decreased from 2001 to 2008.
Whereas in 2001, almost half indicated there was not a problem, this percentage has decreased in
2008 with a larger percentage of employees indicating they either felt it was a problem or was
not sure whether there was a problem. In the same vein, while 54% of employees in 2001
indicated they felt the college adhered to fair hiring procedures, only 37% of the employees
sampled in 2008 felt that way. The reduction in fairness perceptions amongst employees may be
due in part to the negative beliefs held by employees. Therefore, Chi-square Goodness of Fit
tests were used to investigate whether these changes were significant.



                                                                                                                   89
                                      Employees’ Perceptions of Racism at SJDC
                           60


                           50


                           40
         Percentage




                           30


                           20


                           10


                            0
                                    Yes                        No                       Don't Know
                                             Racism is Not a Problem at Delta College
                      2001          49                         21                           30
                      2007          53                         34                           14
                      2008          37                         39                           24

Figure 10: Employees’ Perceptions of Racism at SJDC
                                      Employees’ Perceptions of Sexism at SJDC
                            70

                            60

                            50
              Percentage




                            40

                            30

                            20

                            10

                                0
                                    Yes                        No                       Don't Know
                                             Sexism is Not a Problem at Delta College
                           2001     51                         21                          28
                           2007     60                         26                          15
                           2008     41                         32                          27

Figure 11: Employees’ Perceptions of Sexism at SJDC




                                                                                                     90
                            Employees’ Perceptions of Sexual Harassment at SJDC
                     60


                     50


                     40
        Percentage




                     30


                     20


                     10


                      0
                              Yes                           No                       Don't Know
                                    Sexual Harassment is Not a Problem at Delta College
                     2001      49                           17                            44
                     2007      55                           21                            24
                     2008      34                           32                            34

Figure 12: Employees’ Perceptions of Sexism at SJDC



Results revealed significant differences in proportions between 2001 and 2008 and between 2007
and 2008. The proportion of employees who agreed that racism, sexism and sexual harassment
were not problems at SJDC decreased substantially between 2001 and 2008 and even between
2007 and 2008. These results suggest that SJDC employees have even more negative perceptions
of the campus climate now than they did seven years ago and even just one year ago. We should
caution, however, that we cannot be certain that the changes are not due to question response
wording changes in the 2008 survey. It may be useful to re-implement the “agree-disagree”
format of the question in 2009 to explore whether the results are due to the change in the
response set.

One other avenue to explore in the questions concerning racism, sexism, and sexual harassment
is whether differences emerge across sex, ethnicity, and employee group lines. As the data in
Table 4 indicate, ethnic and employee classification groups did not differ in their perceptions
about the prevalence of racism, sexism or sexual harassment. Members within each group
showed similar views. Women (35%) however, were less likely to agree with the statement
“sexism is not a problem” than men (53%). Women (35%) were also less likely than men (42%)
to agree with the statement “racism is not a problem.” These data suggest that the College has
significant problems to address in the way of staff training in order to allay concerns about both
overt and subtle acts of racism and sexism/sexual harassment on campus.




                                                                                                  91
                  Percentage Agreeing Each Issue NOT Being a Problem by Group

                                             Racism             Sexism   Sexual Harassment
        Sex
           Female                             35.1*              35.1*         30.7
           Male                               41.6*              52.8*         38.2
        Ethnic Group
           Non-White                           34.6               43.3         32.0
           White                               39.3               40.0         34.7
        Employee Classification
           Classified Staff                    40.7               44.9         37.0
           Full-Time Faculty                   33.3               34.5         30.2
           Part-Time Faculty                   22.7               31.8         18.2
           Manager                             45.7               52.8         40.0
Table 7: Percentage Agreeing Each Issue NOT Being a Problem by Group
        *significant difference at the 95% confidence level



Board of Trustees
Two statements were used to measure employees’ perceptions of the Board’s ability to run the
College effectively. Of all the tested groups, full-time faculty, male, and White employees
reported the least agreement with each of the statements about the Board in 2008. Between
spring 2007 and fall 2008, the percentage of employees who felt “The Board of Trustees
effectively balances the requests and proposals of competing interest groups” decreased
significantly from 15% to 6%. In addition, employees sampled in 2008 (6%) were also less
optimistic than employees sampled in 2007 (22%) when asked whether the “Board of Trustees is
effective in setting the overall policy direction for the College.” This significant decrease in
employee confidence in the Trustees’ ability to run the College coincides with a spate of news
stories surrounding the Board during the past year over Measure L Bond spending, Brown Act
violations, and a critical grand jury report on Board decision making.

Employee Satisfaction
Despite all the negative publicity the College has experienced in the past year, 76% of all
employees sampled in 2008 still felt the College was a “great place to work.” Moreover, 75% of
these respondents also reported that they were satisfied with their jobs at SJDC suggesting that
although problems may exist within the College (e.g., negative perceptions, etc) these problems
do not contaminate the overall employee satisfaction here at SJDC. Having said this, full-time
faculty reported the lowest levels of satisfaction, with only 63% agreeing that Delta is a “great
place work.” This lower level of satisfaction may stem from the drawn-out bargaining talks
between the College and the faculty union.




                                                                                               92
Conclusions / Recommendations


Results from the 2008 Employee Questionnaire still point to the same conclusions found from
the 2001 survey, negative perceptions of bias still exist within SJDC and African-American
employees still perceive equal opportunity at the College at a lower rate than all other employee
ethnic groups. Although attempts to understand and mitigate these negative perceptions took
place shortly after the 2002 Accreditation, the followup work for action was not completed. In an
attempt to follow through and address these problems directly, two focus groups were planned
and conducted in tandem with the readministration of the Employee Questionnaire in hopes that
this will provide the College with more information about how best to address the negative
perceptions within the institution. The focus groups are the subject of a separate report, but it is
clear that the College will need to develop plans to address lingering perceptions of racism,
sexism, sexual harassment, and employment bias.

The presence of such negative perceptions is counterbalanced by the overall satisfaction that
employees have for the College and the work that they do to advance the students’ goals and
interests. Nevertheless, lingering resentment about problems at the College have the capacity to
undermine the learning environment, and if allowed to fester, can undermine the morale of its
employees. It can also expose the College to serious legal liability if the perceived conditions of
discrimination are not addressed head-on. It is clear from the survey results that significant
efforts at staff training on diversity and non-discrimination are necesssary. While Delta
employees are reasonably satisfied with their jobs, no employer can ignore data suggesting that
30 to 40% of its employees see racism, sexism, and sexual harassment as problems at their
workplace.




                                                                                                 93
                                                APPENDIX A
                                     SJDC Employee Questionnaire – Fall 2008

        Thank you for participating in the Fall 2008 online employee survey. The results of this survey
        will be used as evidence for the College’s response to the recommendations provided by the
        Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) and the Western
        Association of Schools and Colleges, and for planning purposes. The survey will allow us to chart
        the opinions of staff, faculty and administrators and to compare responses to prior year results.
        The survey takes about 10 minutes to complete and will provide valuable feedback on the state of
        the campus and employee perceptions about the College. The survey is completely anonymous so
        there will be no direct link between you and the opinions that you provide. If you come across
        questions where you are unfamiliar with the topic, feel free to select “Not Sure”.

        Please submit your completed survey no later than August 22, 2008.

     1. What is your opinion on the following statements related to campus climate at San Joaquin Delta
        College?

                                                           Strongly    Agree   Not    Disagree   Strongly    Don't
                                                            Agree              Sure              Disagree    Know
1.   The atmosphere of the College is one that
    welcomes and supports women in management
    positions
2. The atmosphere at the College is one that
    welcomes and supports women in faculty positions
3. The atmosphere at the College is one that
   welcomes and supports ethnic minorities in
   management positions
4. The atmosphere at the College is one that
    welcomes and supports ethnic minorities in faculty
    positions
5. Delta College supports and protects academic
    freedom
6. The campus is safe and secure.
7. The College is committed to high standards of
    teaching.
8. The administration promotes an effective teaching
    and learning environment.
9. The College community is provided with
    opportunities to understand and experience the
    value of diversity.
10. The institution is administratively organized and
    staffed to reflect its mission, size and complexity.

     2. What is your opinion on the following statements?

             A. Racism is not a problem at Delta College.
                Ο Yes                 Ο No             Ο Don’t Know

             B. Sexism is not a problem at Delta College.
                Ο Yes                 Ο No              Ο Don’t Know

             C. Sexual harassment is not a problem at Delta College.
                Ο Yes                 Ο No             Ο Don’t Know


                                                                                                            94
             3. What is your opinion on the following statements related to students at San Joaquin Delta College?

                                                                  Strongly      Agree             Not        Disagree       Strongly     Don't
                                                                   Agree                          Sure                      Disagree     Know
       1.    Students must meet high standards of
             achievement to be awarded a degree
             and/or certificate.
       2.    Most students at Delta are academically
             well prepared for College work.
       3.    Students receive a high quality of
            education.
       4.    Cheating is not a problem at Delta.
       5.    The College seeks to meet the diverse
             educational needs of its students.
       6.    The College provides adequate
             opportunities for students to upgrade their
             basic skills.
       7.    The College provides effective transfer
             services to four-year institutions of higher
             education.


            4. What is your opinion on the following statements related to San Joaquin Delta College’s Board of
               Trustees?

                      A. The Board of Trustees effectively balances the requests and proposals of competing interest groups.
                         Ο Yes                Ο No               Ο Don’t Know

                      B. The Board of Trustees is effective in setting the overall policy direction for the College.
                         Ο Yes                Ο No                 Ο Don’t Know

     5. What is your opinion on the following statements related to San Joaquin Delta College’s equipment and
        facilities?

                                                            Strongly         Agree         Not           Disagree       Strongly Don't
                                                            Agree                          Sure                         Disagree Know
1.  Office equipment and furniture are
    suitable for their designated purposes.
2. Delta College grounds are attractive and
    well-maintained.
3. Delta College buildings are clean and
   well maintained.
4. Maintenance equipment and vehicles are
    suitable for their designated purposes.

     6. What is your opinion on the following statements related to employee resources at San Joaquin Delta
        College?

                                                            Strongly         Agree         Not           Disagree       Strongly Don't
                                                            Agree                          Sure                         Disagree Know
1.     The faculty and staff evaluation process
       assesses effectiveness and encourages
       improvement.



                                                                                                                                95
                                                  Strongly          Agree          Not    Disagree     Strongly Don't
                                                  Agree                            Sure                Disagree Know
2.  All faculty and staff are provided with
    opportunities for continued professional
    development.
3. The Professional Development Center
   provides high quality training and
   services.
4. The College provides adequate computer
    facilities and computer support staff to
    faculty, staff and students.
5. The College adheres to written policies
    ensuring fairness in all employment
    practices.

             7. What is your opinion about the following statements related to your overall satisfaction at San
                Joaquin Delta College?

                 A. All things considered, Delta College is a great place to work.
             Ο Strongly Agree    Ο Agree           Ο Don’t Know              Ο Disagree    Ο Strongly Disagree

                B. All things considered, I am satisfied with my job at Delta College.
            Ο Strongly Agree    Ο Agree            Ο Don’t Know             Ο Disagree     Ο Strongly Disagree




             DEMOGRAPHIC INFORMATION

             Gender
                      Male                 Female

             Classification
                     Classified Staff
                     Full-Time Faculty
                     Part-Time Faculty
                     Manager

             Ethnicity
                     African-American
                     Native American
                     Asian
                     White
                     Filipino
                     Hispanic
                     Pacific Islander
                     Other

             Years Worked at Delta College
                    0–5
                    6 - 10
                    11 –1 5
                    16 – 20
                    More than 20


                                                                                                                  96
Appendix 2: Results of Focus Groups
 Results from the San Joaquin Delta College
       Employee Focus Group Study
                August 2008

                                 Brianna Hays, Research Analyst
        Matt Wetstein, Ph.D., Interim Dean of Planning, Research and Regional Education
                                Alyssa Nguyen, Research Analyst
              Trudy Walton, Vice President of Student Services, Group Facilitator




                                                                                          97
Acknowledgements


The authors extend thanks to several individuals who helped contribute to the success of the focus groups
described in this report. First, the 20 individuals who participated in the sessions made an important
contribution to the College through their willingness to share their thoughts and experiences. We also
acknowledge the work of Trudy Walton, Vice President of Student Services for her extraordinary efforts
as focus group facilitator. President/Superintendent Raul Rodriguez and his staff gave instrumental
support to this project by providing funding for the dinners and refreshments. Confidential Staff Analyst
Paula Bennett and Secretary Sue Anderson in the Office of Planning, Research and Regional Education
contributed to the meticulous event planning. We also owe a debt of gratitude to Dean of Library
Services, Dr. Evia Moore, for her willingness to allow her office to be used for the focus group sessions,
especially on the night of Senator Barack Obama’s speech to accept the Democratic presidential
nomination.




                                                                                                        98
Executive Summary


San Joaquin Delta College is committed to providing high-quality educational experiences for
students and the community and to providing a fair and equitable workplace for its employees.
Previous accreditation reports cited employee perceptions of bias based on racial or ethnic
background as an issue of concern at the College. In order to further investigate these
perceptions of bias and to assess the College’s climate in relation to African-Americans, the San
Joaquin Delta College Office of Planning, Research and Regional Education and the Vice
President of Student Services conducted a focus group study with African-American employees.
Fifty African-American managers, faculty and classified staff members were invited to
participate in the study. Two focus group sessions were held with a total of 20 African-
American employees, including managers, faculty members and staff members.

Participants were asked a series of questions pertaining to perceptions of the College in general,
perceptions of the College as a workplace, the College’s supportiveness of ethnic diversity in the
workplace, opportunities for advancement, and personal experiences with discrimination. A
number of themes emerged in participants’ responses. A summary of the most common themes
and patterns of responses are provided below.

      Participants had generally positive perceptions of the College as an institution of higher
       education. However, when asked more specifically about the College as a place of work,
       participants identified a number of areas of concern. Many participants enjoyed working
       with students and appreciated the diversity of the College’s student population, but a
       number of participants felt that there was under representation of African-Americans in
       the employee ranks, and particularly in faculty and management.
      When it comes to diversity in the workplace, the consensus among participants was that
       the College’s actions do not support its mission. Participants emphasized the difference
       between the College outwardly endorsing diversity as a concept and actually
       implementing diversity-promoting policies, procedures and activities with its employees.
       Participants offered a number of suggestions for improving the College’s climate for
       diversity, including the implementation of diversity awareness training as part of the
       faculty development process, and more activities and events related to African-American
       culture.
      Overall, participants did not feel that they were consistently treated fairly in comparison
       to employees from other racial or ethnic backgrounds. The major concerns among
       participants were the College’s hiring practices and opportunities for career development
       and advancement.
      A number of participants felt that it was particularly difficult for African-American
       employees to get hired on the College’s staff, and many participants felt that it was
       important for the College to recruit and hire more African-American faculty members.
       To provide for a more transparent hiring process, participants suggested a review of the
       College’s hiring policies to ensure they are conducive to fairness in hiring and are being
       implemented properly.
      In addition, many employees were concerned about their opportunity to develop a career
       trajectory that led to a promotion. To address this advancement issue, participants


                                                                                                99
       recommended a training and mentoring program that would allow current employees to
       expand and enhance their skills and abilities. Participants also expressed interest in more
       structured procedures to encourage employee growth and development, and policies that
       would persuade supervisors to be more involved and invested in their employees’
       professional development and growth.
      Many participants felt that they were qualified for higher positions and some had even
       applied for them but felt they were turned down because of their ethnic background. A
       number of participants mentioned the political nature of the College, and some were
       concerned that social networks and campus politics prevented qualified applicants from
       being hired for positions. To combat this issue, participants suggested contracting an
       external organization to monitor and provide formative feedback to the College regarding
       its hiring and promotion practices.
      A number of participants said they had experienced some form of discrimination,
       whether implicit or explicit. Many participants had worked at the College for a number
       of years and said they had seen prejudice and discrimination worsen and improve over
       the years but that there was much room for improvement in the current campus climate.
       In participants’ more recent accounts, implicit prejudice was the predominant form of
       prejudice experienced on the campus. Experiences with prejudice ranged from subtle
       differences in treatment compared to employees from other ethnic or racial backgrounds
       to de facto segregation of employees by ethnic background in one particular College
       department. To address this issue, participants expressed a desire to be more involved in
       the College’s decision-making processes. Participants wanted to be more fairly
       represented in campus committees and campus leadership.
      Participants brought up a number of concerns with the College’s climate for diversity and
       treatment of African-American employees and the majority of participants also expressed
       a concern for the College’s students. Many participants felt the lack of representation of
       African-Americans at the College was detrimental to students, both in terms of
       recruitment and outreach and in terms of retention and success. Participants were
       generally concerned about the treatment of African-American students at the College,
       both in and out of the classroom. Several participants said the high demand for and
       participation in existing programs (such as Project AFFIRM) and the inequity of student
       outcomes was proof of the need for additional support for African-American students. A
       number of participants expressed an interest in developing these programs but said they
       needed more institutional support from the College, such as grant-writing assistance and
       staff support, to make them a reality.
      Participants were willing to share their opinions of and personal experiences at the
       College, and most participants seemed genuinely hopeful that their comments and
       suggestions would lead to positive changes at the College. In general, participants
       appeared to be committed to the College and indicated they were willing to contribute to
       the discussion and participate in the study to make the College a better place for both
       African-American employees and students.

In both discussion sessions, participants cited a number of areas for improvement at the College.
Participants had generally positive perceptions of the College as an institution of higher
education but less positive perceptions of the College as a place of employment. Participants
generally felt underrepresented at the College, particularly at the faculty level, and many felt that


                                                                                                  100
diversity was not appreciated or promoted in practice at the College. Participants felt that it was
particularly difficult for African-Americans to get hired at the College, and many participants
believed that, once hired at the College, opportunities for advancement were rare or nonexistent.

Many participants had experienced some form of prejudice or discrimination, implicit or explicit,
at the College, and a number of participants were concerned that these experiences were
negatively impacting not only employees but African-American students. For each of these
problem areas, participants offered a number of solutions, including a more action-oriented
diversity plan, review and revision of hiring and promotion practices, training and mentoring for
employees and more outreach and support programs for African-American students. Many of
these suggestions are actionable areas for improvement of the campus climate.

The results of the focus group sessions support the proposition that African-American employees
perceive bias and experience prejudice and discrimination at the College but these findings also
provide employee-proposed recommendations for improving the campus climate in relation to
African-Americans. Based on these findings, it is recommended that the College evaluate the
feasibility of each of these suggestions and formulate an action plan to address the issues
discussed in this report. Follow-up studies should also be conducted at regular intervals to
measure changes in employee perceptions of these issues and to gather formative feedback
regarding the College’s effort to address these issues.




                                                                                                101
Background


San Joaquin Delta College is a publicly-funded community college located in California’s
Central Valley. The College has over 28,000 enrolled students and employs over 1,000 faculty,
staff and management employees. As part of the College’s ongoing effort to provide quality
post-secondary educational opportunities to the students and the community, the College is
committed to providing a fair and equitable workplace for its employees. College administrators
expressed an interest in assessing employees’ perceptions of the campus’s climate for diversity
and perceptions of employment and advancement opportunities. In particular, the College was
interested in assessing African-American employees’ perceptions of bias and opinions of the
campus as a place of employment. In three previous accreditation self-studies, the College asked
faculty, staff and managers to complete a survey that addressed the campus climate and culture.
To further investigate perceptions of bias among African-American employees and to gather
more detailed information, a focus group study was proposed.

The goals of the study were to:

           Assess African-American employees’ general perceptions of Delta College as a place of
            employment
           Assess African-American employees’ perceptions of the College’s hiring and recruitment
            processes
           Identify ways in which the College can improve its recruitment and retention of African-
            American employees
           Measure African-American employees’ perceptions of the opportunities for professional
            development and career advancement at the College

To that end, the Office of Planning, Research and Regional Education and the Vice President of
Student Services began planning a focus group study. A discussion guide was drafted and
African-American employees of the College were recruited to participate in the study.

Methodology


Discussion Guide Development
The focus group discussion guide was derived from the specific areas of concern listed in the
College’s previous two accreditation reports. The 2002 accreditation report Recommendation
2.1 noted “The College should develop and implement plans to increase College-wide sensitivity
to the needs of its diverse population, evaluate the perception of bias by some employees on the
campus, and review implementation of workplace opportunities to ensure they are equitable for
all employees.”57 In order to appropriately address these issues of concern, the focus group
discussion guide included questions about the College’s sensitivity to employee needs,
perceptions of treatment at the workplace, opportunities for advancement at the College, and
personally-experienced acts of discrimination. The discussion guide also included some general

57
     San Joaquin Delta College Office of the President. (2008, July 7). Campus-wide Memorandum: Accreditation Action Letter.


                                                                                                                          102
questions about perceptions of the College. A copy of the full discussion guide is provided in
Appendix A.

Participant Selection and Recruitment
An electronic list of all full-time employees who self-identified as African-American was
compiled. All faculty members, classified employees, and managers on this list (N=50) were
sent letters via U.S. Mail requesting their participation in one of two focus group sessions. The
letter included some background information about the study, the purpose of the focus groups
and dates, times and locations of the focus group meetings. Participants were asked to respond
to the invitation and indicate a focus group date preference. Participants were offered a
complementary dinner during the focus group session for their participation in the study.

Participants
Of the 50 employees recruited to participate in the focus group study, a total of 20 (40%)
employees attended a focus group session. Participants were representative of the African-
American employees at the College, and included managers, faculty members, and classified
employees from various departments and employees varying in tenure from recent hires to long-
term employees.

Focus Group Session Procedures
The focus group sessions were conducted at the San Joaquin Delta College library’s temporary
facility. The library facility was selected due to its off-campus, relatively neutral location. Each
focus group began with an introduction to the facilitator (the Vice President of Student Services)
and two assistants (Research Analysts from the Office of Planning, Research and Regional
Education) and an overview of the study’s purpose. Participants were assured their individual
responses would be kept confidential and that no names would be included in the summary
report to be provided to College leadership. The facilitator mentioned some standard ground
rules for the discussion and asked participants to contributed ideas for discussion group norms.
Participants then introduced themselves and described how long they had worked for the College
and the type of work they did at the College. The facilitator asked participants in each session to
respond to each major question in the discussion guide. Each focus group session lasted about
two hours.

Organization of Findings

Results

The discussion guide included questions pertaining to participants’ perceptions of the College,
their opinions of the College as a workplace, and their perceptions of College’s approach to
cultural diversity. Questions progressed to more specific topics, including unmet needs of
employees, perceptions of the College’s fairness, employee opportunities for advancement, and
personal experiences with discrimination at the College. A summary of participant responses is
provided below:

General Perceptions of the College
In general, many participants had very positive views of Delta College as an institution of higher
education. Participants cited the College’s high-quality educational programs and affordability


                                                                                                 103
as major attributes and described the College as a much-needed institution in San Joaquin
County. Many participants acknowledged the College’s potential to reach even higher numbers
of students in the County. A few participants noted that the College very much reflected the
culture of the surrounding community, both in its positive features and in its areas for
improvement.

Perceptions of the College as a Workplace
Participants’ perceptions of the College as a place of work were not quite as positive as their
perceptions of Delta College in general. Although participants mentioned some positive features
of and experiences at the College, they cited a number of problems encountered while working at
the College. Positive comments about Delta College pertained to the enjoyment of working with
Delta’s diverse student population, the camaraderie among African-American employees at the
College and the adequacy of the College’s benefit and salary packages. Even though participants
acknowledged some very positive Delta College characteristics, the general sense in both
sessions was that the College could improve in a variety of areas.

There was considerable consensus that the College may be representative of the larger
community in terms of its student body but that it is not representative in terms of its employees.
One participant noted that, although peripheral employment figures show that College employee
totals represent the population of the surrounding community, the figures were less
representative when employee type (manager, faculty and classified) was taken into account. A
few participants said that African-Americans were represented only in the classified employee
ranks, but not in management or faculty positions. These impressions track with actual data
indicating that African-Americans are underrepresented in the management and faculty ranks.

Campus Climate for Diversity
There were a number of factors that participants listed as contributing to this unequal
representation in faculty and leadership positions. First and foremost, there was substantial
agreement among participants that the College may endorse diversity as a general, abstract
concept but that it does not embrace diversity in practice. Participants noted:
     “What offends me most is how the College talks about diversity”
     “What we say we’re about is not what we do. That’s frustrating.”

The vast majority of participants agreed that the College does not value or foster diversity in the
workplace. Participants said that the College greatly needs a more sensitive approach to cultural
diversity. A few employees who had been employed with the College for multiple decades said
they saw fluctuations in the way the College dealt with diversity. There seemed to be a common
feeling that the College did not truly value diversity by providing the tools, resources, training
and leadership to create a culture of valuing diversity. A few participants suggested that this
cultural shift should start with the College’s administration and be integrated into regular College
training and professional development, such as the New Faculty Academy. It should be noted
that extensive diversity and non-discrimination training is already built into the curriculum of the
New Faculty Academy in 2008-2009. There was a general sense that diversity implies more than
just having a diverse population of students, that it should include interactive and engaging
training on the importance of respecting all cultures and people from all backgrounds. A few
participants expressed that in order to address some of these issues, the College must actually


                                                                                                104
want to change and take the appropriate action to prevent discrimination based on race or ethnic
background.

Recruitment and Hiring Processes
Although there was considerable consensus about the lack of representation of African-American
employees at the College, perceptions of the College’s hiring practices were more mixed. Some
employees had not personally experienced problems with the College’s recruitment and hiring
process, but most participants agreed that it was difficult for African-Americans to obtain initial
employment at the College.

      “I like working at Delta. The students, the faculty, the staff…the key is getting hired.”
      “It’s a fine college to work at, but it’s hard to get on as an African-American.”

There were a number of participants who felt that the College was an extremely political
environment, in which hiring decisions are made based on the opinions of an internal social
network. A number of participants felt that the hiring process was unfair because decisions as to
whom to hire were made even before the interview process. Several participants said the College
showed preference for employees who were related to or had personal ties to members of the
hiring committee or to leaders of the position’s work unit, which made it difficult for non-
networked applicants to obtain employment or be promoted.

      “It’s very political. It’s a very political place.”
      “Internally there is too much politics. They don’t know how to separate business from
       personal relationships to make a fair decision.”
      “If they don’t like you, you’re not going anywhere. Those who have been here for many
       years…they don’t like outsiders.”

Participants felt that there needed to be more representation of African-Americans at all levels of
employment at the College, but particularly at the management and faculty levels. Some
participants agreed that a review of the College’s hiring policies and procedures was required to
ensure equity in the hiring process and, upon the suggestion from one participant, there appeared
to be some interest in having an external party monitor hiring and promotion practices at the
College. In general, participants wanted to see more opportunities for internal applicants to train
for, apply and be hired for higher-level positions.

Opportunities for Professional Development and Advancement
In addition to concerns about the College’s hiring process, many participants voiced frustration
with the College’s lack of opportunity for training and career advancement. Some participants
said their managers were not concerned with their professional development and did not provide
the leadership and direction to help employees advance.

      “I thought I would stay here and promote, but…it feels kind of stagnating.”
      “People stay in positions for 40 years: no advancement.”
      “You don’t seem to have an opportunity to grow.”
      “The ceiling is so small, you can’t really go anywhere.”



                                                                                                105
The tenure of participants in the focus group sessions varied, but there was a common concern
about the College’s investment in its African-American employees and their career development.
Some participants felt that, considering their experiences and qualifications, they were viable
candidates for a higher-level position but were often overlooked because they were African-
American. The vast majority of participants said they had no hope for advancement and believed
they would either remain in their current position or have to seek out other employment in order
to advance their careers. There was a shared perception among some participants that the
College hired external applicants and trained them for a position instead of training existing
employees and offering them an opportunity to further their careers. Participants noted:

      “No one looks at our qualifications.”
      “Upward mobility is bad for African-Americans. It’s an issue.”
      “People here in this room are qualified. They have the abilities, and any one of us could
       run a department.”

Even though they expressed their disappointment with their opportunities for advancement, few
of the participants said they were considering seeking employment elsewhere. A number of
participants appeared passionate about their jobs and their service to the College, and participants
generally appeared committed to improving the College for students and employees alike. Most
participants appeared hopeful that their sharing of experiences would lead to positive changes for
the College.

Toward that end, participants said they would like to become more involved in the campus
decision-making process. Participants said there was an inequality of power and that some
College leaders had hidden agendas that prevented the process from working as intended. A few
participants expressed a need for clarification and communication of the College’s mission, goals
and priorities to increase awareness and collaboration among employees. Participants expressed
a desire to play a role and be fairly represented in the decision-making process at the College.
To facilitate this, a few employees said they would like to see more information for employees
on how to join campus committees, participate in shared governance, and navigate the College’s
system.

Experiences with Prejudice and Discrimination

Several participants shared their personal experiences with prejudice and discrimination at the
College. Accounts of racial prejudice-related experiences ranged from perceptions and feelings
of implicit prejudice to experiences with explicit acts of discrimination. Many of these personal
accounts focused on perceived negative stereotypes and prejudices held by other Delta College
employees. A number of participants said they felt that other Delta College employees looked
down on African-Americans in general and assumed they were not intelligent. Some participants
said they did not feel welcome and that other employee’s subtle behaviors reflected their
prejudice. A few participants said they felt like they were prejudged by their colleagues before
they were able to “prove themselves” and get past their colleagues’ stereotypes.

Participants stated:
     “They assume that we did not go to good schools, that we’re not intelligent.”


                                                                                                106
Another employee noted that discrimination at the College has changed over the years, but that
problems still exist. A few participants said they felt that some College employees, including
administrators, were uncomfortable speaking to them. Some participants said they felt their
managers discriminated against them, and a few participants said there was some segregation,
intentional or unintentional, of employees by race in certain departments. Other participants said
they felt as though they were expected to “take care of their own,” meaning that issues brought
up by African-American employees were to be resolved by other African-American employees
rather than going through the appropriate channels. There was a consensus that prejudice and
discrimination at the College was everyone’s problem and that any solution aimed at resolving
these problems should include all ethnic groups.

Implications for Delta College Students

Some of the biggest concerns for participants pertained to the negative impact of prejudice and
discrimination on Delta College’s students. Several participants believed the prejudice they
experienced at the College was negatively affecting the College’s African-American students.
Participants mentioned faculty and staff members’ differential treatment and stereotyping of
African-American students as examples of prejudice at the College. One participant shared a
personal account of a classroom observation, in which African-American students were treated
differently than students from other ethnic backgrounds. A number of participants expressed
concern that faculty and staff members were prejudging the academic abilities of African-
Americans, particularly males, based on their attire and color. Several participants felt that there
was a perpetual sense among African-American students of not being wanted. Participants
noted:

      “Many of our students are thought to be less-than.”
      “Students say, ‘They don’t want us here’.”
      “If students don’t feel wanted, they don’t stay.”

Many participants were concerned that these prejudices were negatively impacting African-
American student recruitment, retention and success. Several participants agreed that these
problems prevented African-American students from feeling comfortable at the College, leading
them to withdraw, both figuratively and literally, from the College.

Reaching Out to Potential Students
In order to combat these problems and promote African-American student success at the College,
many participants said that additional outreach efforts, support services and mentoring for
students were essential. There was considerable agreement among participants that a gap exists
between student needs and College program and service offerings. Participants were particularly
concerned about the visibility of the College in the community and the lack of outreach efforts
targeting African-American students. Participants described the general population of potential
Delta students as needing additional preparation, tools, resources and assistance to succeed.

      “Institutionally, we do not look realistically at the population we serve … [we don’t]
       understand the needs or have programs to meet their needs.”


                                                                                                 107
Participants said that increased visibility and early outreach to potential or future students would
provide the tools students need to set their educational goals and map out a plan to achieve them.
Participants said these were important to potential students from every ethnic background, but
particularly to African-American students, who many participants saw as lacking the tools and
resources to make it through the system. There was a shared perception that African-American
students enter the College with fewer opportunities for support and assistance than students from
other ethnic groups.

Promoting African-American Student Success

Participants referenced recently-implemented College programs targeting students from other
ethnic groups and indicated that few such programs and services exist for African-American
students. Many participants felt that students from other ethnic groups were mentored and
coached on how to make it through the College’s system but that there was no such coaching for
African-American students. Moreover, several participants said there were virtually no grant
programs specifically aimed at African-American students, and that, as a result, there are fewer
African-American students enrolling at the College and fewer still that stay and complete their
degrees or certificates. To increase student engagement, retention and success, participants
requested programs with mentoring, counseling and other support services for African-American
students. As an example of the need for such services, participants mentioned the high demand
for the AFFIRM (Academic Force for Inspiration, Retention and Matriculation) program, a
program intended to increase African-American student retention and success in core academic
courses.

Many participants expressed an interest in offering additional programs for African-American
students (such as targeted mentoring and counseling) and in providing additional resources and
opportunities for students to be engaged in student-led activities, campus employment and
campus life. A number of participants expressed a willingness to develop these programs
targeting African-American students but said that, in order to be successful, this effort would
require institutional support and collaboration.

      “We need the tools to make this happen. We cannot go as far as we need to go. We
       know there is money, resources. We need them.”

Participants identified a number of problems at the College that would adversely affect African-
American students, but few said the College has made a concentrated effort to resolve them. A
number of possible strategies to address these problems were suggested. Participants believed
that a greater or more equal representation of African-Americans in the Delta College workforce
would improve African-American student outreach, retention and success. Several participants
said that students may feel encouraged when they see African-Americans, with whom they could
easily identify, represented in the College’s faculty and staff.

      “African-Americans should feel represented at the College. Representation has a lot to
       do with student success. We need to be represented fairly.”
      “[Students] are looking for someone who looks like ‘me’.”


                                                                                                 108
      “If we’re not represented enough, [students] pick up on that.”
      “It makes me feel bad…sad that there are so few of us.”

Many participants emphasized the importance of increasing the representation of African-
American employees at the College, particularly in positions that are highly visible to students.
Throughout participants’ comments, a theme of equality and fairness emerged. Overall,
participants wanted to be fairly represented, to provide African-American students with an equal
opportunity to attend the College, to be engaged at the College, to succeed and attain their
academic goals.

Context of Focus Group Sessions

In general, participants were willing to share their ideas, opinions, and personal experiences at
the College.

In both sessions, participants were asked to contribute to the group norms to be followed during
the discussion session. Although a few norms differed between to the two sessions, the overall
tone of the norms suggested were respect, understanding and appreciation for differing opinions.
As they identified each problem, participants offered a number of possible solutions to help
resolve the problem. Participants appeared hopeful that their openness and willingness to
participate in the study would result in positive changes for both students and employees of the
College. Each individual in attendance at the focus group sessions provided feedback and shared
their opinions and experiences. Both sessions began with participant identification of problems
at the College and ended with actionable recommendations for change.




                                                                                                109
Conclusions and Recommendations

The findings of the present study support the proposition that African-American employees
experience forms of bias (prejudice and discrimination) based on their race or ethnic background.
Although participating employees generally had positive perceptions of the College as an
educational institution, they had less favorable opinions of the College as a place of employment.
Participating employees believed that the College’s policies and practices did not represent its
explicit endorsement of diversity. Participants believed there were a number of things the
College could do to promote diversity in the workplace, such as providing training and cultural
awareness activities to employees at all levels.

There was a strong consensus that African-Americans were underrepresented at the College in
general, and particularly in faculty and management positions. Participants generally felt that it
was particularly difficult for African-Americans to get hired at the College, perhaps due to racial
prejudice or lack of in-group membership. A number of participants favored a review and
revision of hiring policies and practices to ensure equality in employment opportunities. One
obvious way to address this issue is to make an institutional commitment to greater African-
American presence on faculty and management screening committees. This may tax the time
and energy of African-American employees who may feel the burden of extra committee service,
but the payoff in greater staff diversity may well be worth the effort.
Participants expressed great concern for the lack of career advancement opportunities at the
College. Many participants said they had no hope for advancement at the College. There was a
shared opinion that the College needed to invest more in its existing employees by offering
training and mentoring as well as structured professional development plans.
The majority of participants said they had experienced some form of prejudice and
discrimination at the College. Implicit prejudice appeared to be the most common form of
prejudice experienced by participants; personal experiences with discrimination ranged from
subtle mannerisms and differences in treatment to de facto segregation of employees by racial or
ethnic background into job assignments. Participants generally agreed that prejudice was a
problem at the College and that steps need to be taken to address this problem.
Recommendations for change included an employee code of conduct and greater representation
for African-Americans in the institutional decision-making process. It is clear that staff training
sessions on racism and cultural understanding are also needed.
Regardless of whether their job duties specifically involved students, participants appeared to be
quite concerned with the impact of the campus climate on the retention and success of African-
American students. A number of participants said they observed African-American students
being treated differently than other students both in and out of the classroom. Other participants
pointed to the inequity in student outcomes for African-American students as evidence of the
need for change. Participants requested more programs to reach out to and recruit African-
American students to come to Delta College and to provide the support necessary for African-
American students to succeed. In order to do this, participants said they needed more
institutional support, including staffing for programs and grant-writing assistance to help fund
programs and services.




                                                                                                110
Overall, participants were willing to participate and share their opinions and personal
experiences, and most were optimistic that their contributions would lead to positive changes at
the College. In order to address some of the issues identified in this report, it is recommended
that the College respond to each area and provide a list of possible actions to resolve these issues.
A list of recommended activities is provided in Table 1. Follow-up studies should be conducted
at regular intervals to measure changes in perceptions of bias and experiences with prejudice and
to provide formative feedback regarding the College’s efforts to resolve these issues.
                                     Recommended College Activities
Item                                                                                  Follow-Up Report
                  Recommendation                          Responsible Parties
 No.                                                                                        Due
1.   Investigate allegations of de facto              Vice President of Human         November 1, 2008
     segregation of African-American                  Resources
     employees into job assignments
2.   Increase the institution’s commitment to         Vice President of Instruction   January 31, 2009
     fund training on racism and prejudice
3.   Establish on-going funding for                   Vice President of Human         January 31, 2009
     comprehensive diversity and cultural             Resources
     competency training and programs                 Vice President of Instruction
4.   Explore external and internal funding            Vice President of Instruction   January 31, 2009
     opportunities for initiatives that foster        Vice President of Student
     greater access and success for African-          Services
     American males
5.   Consider implementing a mentoring                Vice President of Human         March 31, 2009
     program for African-American employees           Resources
     interested in advancement into
     management
6.   Revise policies on hiring for diversity          Vice President of Human         July 1, 2009
                                                      Resources
7.      Explore the feasibility of online training    Vice President of Human         July 1, 2009
        modules dealing with diversity and            Resources
        discrimination
8.      Explore the use of New Faculty Academy        Academic Senate President       July 1, 2009
        modules on diversity and discrimination       Vice President of Instruction
        for campus-wide training sessions
9.      Increase participation of African-            Academic Senate President       August 31, 2009
        Americans in screening committees for         Vice President of Human
        faculty and management positions              Resources
10.     Increase institutional support for African-   Vice President of Student       August 31, 2009
        American student groups and support           Services
        services                                      Vice President of Instruction
11.     Revise classified job classification to       Vice President of Human         August 31, 2009
        establish deep classes that guarantee         Resources
        promotion and advancement through
        education, training, certification and
        demonstrated skill attainment
Table 8: Recommended College Activities




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Appendix A: Focus Group Discussion Guide
                Delta College Campus Climate Focus Group Script (August 2008)

A: Introduction

Thank you for joining us for our discussion this evening to talk about Delta College. We are very
interested in your opinions of the College and your experiences as an employee of the College, and
we would like to get your thoughts on how we can make the working environment better here at
Delta. My name is Trudy Walton, and I am the new Vice President for Student Services. I will be
the discussion facilitator this evening, and two research analysts, Bri Hays and Alyssa Nguyen, from
the Office of Planning, Research and Regional Education will be here to assist me and take notes. I
understand that a series of focus groups was conducted in 2004 in response to the 2002 accreditation
report; the goal of this study is to follow-up on the findings of that study and to move forward in
addressing some of the issues cited in the accreditation report. We would like the results of our
discussion sessions to produce positive changes at the College.

We are going to treat this as a group discussion tonight, and I will be asking you a few questions
about your experiences, opinions and feelings. I’d like you to talk about each question while we take
notes on what you are saying. Please feel free to say whatever you think. There are no right or
wrong answers, and it is important for you to provide your honest opinion, even if it is different from
someone else’s point of view.

We want to hear everything you have to say, but we want to make sure that everyone who has
something to say gets a chance to talk. We also need to cover all the questions I have, so please do
not be offended if I have to end one discussion a bit abruptly. We will try to catch up with you later
in the discussion if you have a point that you would like to discuss more fully. Once we’ve heard
what you have to say, we will be able to tell the College how to make the campus a better place to
work for employees like you. We will be preparing a report based on this and next week’s discussion
sessions for the College leadership and accreditation committee, and we will ensure that each of you
has access to the report once it is completed. Please be assured that no comments will be linked to
any one individual, and no names will be included in the summary report that we prepare for the
College.

Before we begin, let me mention a few of the expectations for our discussion session. Please speak
up, and please speak just one at a time. We’ll be taking notes so that we don’t miss any of your
comments, and it is difficult to hear what you say if everyone talks at once. We ask that you please
turn off your cell phones so that they do not interrupt our discussion. Our discussion group will last
about two hours, and we will take a short break after about one hour. We’ve placed name cards in
front of each of you so that we can remember each other’s names. Let’s go around the room and
introduce ourselves. Could each of you please tell us your name, your job on campus, and how long
you have worked for Delta College?

Thank you. I’m going to start by asking you a few general questions about Delta College.




                                                                                                   112
A: Discussion Guide

PERIPHERAL QUESTIONS (GENERAL PERCEPTIONS OF THE COLLEGE)
   1. How would you describe Delta College as a place of employment to other people in the
      community?
   2. What do you like best about working at Delta College? What do you like least about
      working at Delta College?
   3. What about the College is most important to you as an employee?
   4. What do you believe you need to be successful as a Delta College employee? (Probe: what
      types of support, resources, materials, training, etc.)
          a. Is there anything you need that the College does not provide?
          b. What could the College do to address this/these need(s)?
   5. Do you feel Delta College is supportive of ethnic diversity in the workplace? Why or why
      not?

Now we’re going to talk a little bit about your experiences at the College.
CORE QUESTIONS (FAIR TREATMENT AND OPPORTUNITIES AT THE COLLEGE)
  6. As an African-American employee, how do you feel about Delta College as a place of work?
          a. Do you feel you are treated fairly in relation to other Delta College employees?
          b. Do you feel you are treated fairly in relation to employees from other ethnic or
              cultural backgrounds? Why or why not?
  7. Considering your current qualifications and experience, do you feel that you have adequate
     opportunities for advancement at Delta College?
          a. Do you feel that your opportunities for advancement at Delta College are fair in
              relation to College employees from other ethnic or cultural backgrounds?
          b. What else could the College do to ensure workplace opportunities are more equitable
              for African-American employees?
  8. Have you personally experienced any acts of discrimination as a Delta College employee?
          a. Could you please describe your experiences?
          b. What could the College do to prevent future acts of discrimination against
              employees?
  9. Is there anything the College could do to improve your experience as an employee?

Those are all the questions I have. Is there anything else that we should have covered tonight but
didn’t?
[IF TIME ALLOWS:] Thank you for taking the time to share your opinions about your experiences
as an employee at Delta College. Just to recap what was expressed during our discussion...

[INSERT MAIN POINTS FROM DISCUSSION NOTES]...

Thank you again for your input and feedback. Once this study is completed, we will follow up with
you and make sure that a copy of the summary report is made available to each of you once it is
completed. The experiences shared and opinions you expressed here today will help make Delta
College a better place to work for employees from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds.




                                                                                               113
Appendix B: Focus Group Recruitment Letter
July 28, 2008

Dear [FIRST NAME LAST NAME]:

We are writing to invite you to attend a focus group discussion on the climate and culture of the
institution relative to African-Americans at San Joaquin Delta College. It is our hope that you
will be able to join us for one of two discussion forums on either Thursday, August 21 or
Thursday August 28, from 5 to 7 pm in the Library Building at 41 W. Yokuts Avenue.

Background
In the prior three accreditation self-studies, the College asked faculty, staff and managers to
complete a survey that addressed the campus climate and culture. We are conducting these focus
group sessions to go beyond the prior surveys in order to understand more clearly as a college
what African-American employees think about Delta College and more importantly, to learn
how we can improve the institution.

Focus Group Discussions
The focus group discussions are designed to examine the perceptions that are held by African-
Americans about workplace opportunities and the campus climate in terms of jobs and
opportunities. What we are proposing is a two-hour long dinner and conversation about some of
these critical issues. We cannot do this without your support and your willingness to provide
open and honest feedback.

The focus group discussions will be led by T. J. Walton, Vice President of Student Services, and
research analysts from the Office of Planning, Research, and Regional Education (Brianna Hays
and Alyssa Nguyen). Each participant will be assured that individual responses and comments
will be held in the strictest confidence and anonymity. The sessions will not be recorded in order
to facilitate open dialogue and commentary. Brianna and Alyssa will serve as facilitators and
note takers in the session so that notes from the meetings can be recorded anonymously in a
detailed report for the College.

If you agree to attend one of these sessions, we ask you to think about your experiences at Delta
College and come prepared the night of the session to talk about your past experiences. Your
comments and suggestions regarding recruitment of African-American job applicants and
retention of African-American employees is encouraged. We also want you to contemplate how
you would recommend making changes to improve Delta College.

These discussion groups will be critical for identifying action plans that flow from the
accrediting team’s report. We will be asking managers at the College to recognize the
significance of these discussions and will encourage them to honor flexible work schedules that
will accommodate your participation in these discussions.

On the attached sheet, please indicate whether you are able to attend either one of the focus
group discussions. If your schedule permits attendance on both dates, please make a note of this



                                                                                               114
and we will make an effort to evenly divide the groups so that we can have a balanced attendance
at each session.

We want to thank you in advance for your willingness to assist the College in this effort.

Sincerely,



T. J. Walton                                         Matthew E. Wetstein
Vice President of Student Services                   Interim Dean of Planning, Research,
                                                        and Regional Education




                                                                                             115
Appendix 3: Appreciative Inquiry Self Evaluation
                                  Budget Years 2005-06 and 2006-07

                                Matthew Wetstein & Alyssa Nguyen

Background / Purpose



In 2008, the Accreditation Team recommended that San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC) develop
and implement a comprehensive strategic plan that focused on assessing institutional
effectiveness. In response to this recommendation, one of the plans to create a cycle of feedback
and evaluative improvement was to create a self-evaluation form for Appreciative Inquiry (AI)
projects that were funded by the College and an assessment rubric for future AI project
proposals.



Previously, projects proposed through the AI process only required proposers to submit an
application. Reviewers then prioritized projects based on their impacts on the College’s mission,
vision, strategic goals and program review evaluation process. After the funding of these
projects, no follow-up work was done to inquire on the status of the project and to evaluate the
effectiveness of those projects in meeting the listed goals and objectives.



In order to create a systematic action plan for the AI budgeting process at SJDC, a self-
evaluation form was created for AI project managers to complete as an evaluation of their
progress and to assess the success of the projects the College provided funding. In addition, an
assessment rubric was created for future AI project reviewers to use when prioritizing funding
for new projects. The data presented below are the results of the self-evaluation process for AI
projects funded for the fiscal years 2005-06 and 2006-07.



Method



Between 2005-06 and 2006-07, a total of 38 projects were funded by the College. Each
organizational unit that received funding was asked to complete a self-evaluation form that was
designed by staff in the Office of Instruction and Office of Planning, Research, and Regional
Education and the Assistant Superintendent/Vice President of Instruction (see Appendix A). The
self evaluation instrument required individuals to describe the purpose of their project, the goals



                                                                                                116
and objectives of the program, the status of the project and whether goals had been met, the types
of measures used to track progress or successful completion, and recommendations for change in
the program and the Appreciative Inquiry budget process. The form also asked individuals to
describe how their program addressed the strategic goals of the College or the mission statement.



Division deans and program managers were given roughly a month to complete their evaluations.
By the deadline date of August 22, 2008, 27 self evaluations had been returned (see Appendix B
for list of projects without self-evaluations). Staff in the Office of Planning, Research, and
Regional Education reviewed the reports and created data figures and tables to summarize the
findings from the evaluations.




Results



Self-Evaluation Summary

Based on the information from the self-evaluations returned, most of the AI projects were funded
to increase student access and success (96%) [See Figure 13].

Percent of Funded AI Projects Supporting Each Institutional Outcome




                                                                                              117
Figure 13: Percent of Funded AI Projects Supporting Each Institutional Outcome

Note: AI Project proposals could address more than one funding criteria




Projects that were funded addressed several significant themes of institutional improvement. We
categorized the programs as fostering instructional improvement, improvements in efficiency,
improvements in student or staff equity and expanded community outreach (see Figure 2). For
example, 41 percent of the projects could be classified as addressing themes of instructional
improvement. These projects included such projects as funding for field trips in geology and
geography classes, the hiring of an on-line instructional support coordinator, and training for
instructors on the creation and assessment of student learning outcomes (SLOs). Another 33
percent of the projects were geared toward improving services for students and establishing more
efficient operations at the College. These projects included ideas such as upgrading the software
and hardware used to track receipt and delivery of instructional materials, the implementation of
computerized assessment testing and counseling to improve student services at the admissions
stage, and financing for the KUALI financial system development. Equity projects were less
common in the AI process, representing 7 percent of those funded in the 2005-07 budget years.
AI funds also supported several significant outreach efforts, including the use of student
ambassadors for high school visits and a staff member to increase K-8 contacts with Delta
College.




                                                                                             118
Percent of Funded AI Projects Supporting Each Institutional Efficiency Theme


   Expanded Community Outreach                       14.8

          Student and Staff Equity             7.4

        Instructional Improvement                                           40.7

               Program Efficiency                                   33.3

                     No Response         3.7

                                     0         10     20      30       40          50

                                                       Percentage



Figure 14: Percent of Funded AI Projects Supporting Each Institutional Efficiency Theme



Funded projects were examined by fiscal year to determine whether priorities differed depending
on the fiscal year. As seen in Figure 3, projects funded for instructional improvements appeared
to be of high priority in both 2005-06 and 2006-07 fiscal years; while projects funded for
program efficiency increased more than 100 percent between 2005-06 and 2006-07. What this
suggests is that many AI reviewers perceived the need for program efficiency to be of high
priority in 2006-07 and that projects designed to improve instruction were always of top priority.



Percent of Funded AI Projects Supporting Each Institutional Outcome Theme by Fiscal Year




                                                                                              119
                                                                                                          2005-06
         Expanded Community                          14.3
                                                                                                          2006-07
              Outreach                                15.4


                                                     14.3
           Staff/Student Equity
                                        0.0


                                                                                     42.9
     Instructional Improvement
                                                                              38.5


                                                              21.4
            Program Efficiency
                                                                                        46.2


                                              7.1
                  No Response
                                        0.0


                                  0.0         10.0     20.0          30.0    40.0           50.0   60.0
                                                                Percentage



Figure 15: Percent of Funded AI Projects Supporting Each Institutional Outcome Theme by Fiscal Year




Recommendations for Change



In addition to items about the funded projects, one item was included asking respondents what
they would change about the AI Budget Process in order to gauge how proposers felt about the
process. This was also done to provide AI Budget Committee Members with a few ideas on how
to improve the process. The item was asked in an open-ended fashion so that respondents could
freely write what they thought. The responses were then coded into eight distinct
recommendations. Figure 4 reveals that many respondents did not know what they change about
the AI process and many suggested for the AI process to be less competitive.




                                                                                                               120
Recommendations for AI Budget Process Change


                            To clarify the AI process       3.7

      To provide explanations for denied proposals          3.7

                             To fund more projects          3.7

   To speeden the process between submission and …          3.7

    For annual reports to be written on the projects        3.7

          To increase funding for existing programs               7.4

                  Process to be used for everything         3.7

                             To be less competitive                               22.2

                               No recommendation            3.7

                                         Don't know                                                      44.4

                                                        0   5     10    15   20   25     30   35   40   45     50

                                                                              Percentage



Figure 16: Recommendations for AI Budget Process Change



Summary of Funded Projects.

Listed below in Tables 1-4 are summaries of the AI funded projects for which a self-evaluation
form was received, categorized by the institutional efficiency theme they support.




                                                                                                         121
Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Instructional Improvement

Program                    Goals/Purpose                          Measured Objectives                             Status        Recommendations

                                                                                                                                For Program Changes

Molecular Biology          Provide student access to molecular    Students’ abilities to perform DNA              Complete      None
                           biology techniques                     separation tests

Chem 3A Supplies and       Provide chemistry classes to Tracy     Number of chemistry courses offered every       Complete      None
Equipment                  Center students                        semester

Student Learning           To use Flex-Day to introduce           Number of course-level SLOs                     Complete      For training to be continuous
Outcomes (SLOs) 2005       Student Learning Outcomes and
                           assessment cycle to faculty

Adjunct Academy            To provide quality online and face-    Number of workshops offered                     In progress   More human resources and
                           to-face training for adjunct faculty                                                                 time needed for project

Faculty Academy            To provide all faculty with a          Workshop Evaluations to get feedback and        In progress   Better course scheduling to
                           comprehensive orientation and          suggestions                                                   make it possible for all first-
                           introduction to SJDC                                                                                 year faculty to attend

eCollege Units             Support additional eCollege units      eCollege units being offered to faculty as an   Complete      All faculty to use the same
                           for Distance Learning                  incentive to switch to ETUDES                                 platform

Online instructional       To provide full-time online support    Hired position                                  Complete      None
support coordinator        for distance education

Horton Gallery Annual      To support and secure the              Continuous programming and general              In progress   Offer more programs and
Funding                    programming and general                operations at gallery                                         workshops at gallery
                           operations of gallery

Geology Field Trips        Develop field trips for                Grades of students who participated in field    In progress   Offer full-term field-based
                           geology/oceanography classes to        trips compared to grade of students who did                   classes
                           actively involve students              not participate

Discipline Colloboration   Provide funds for inservice and        Curriculum revisions                            In progress   More faculty support
                           professional development travel to


                                                                                                                                                              122
                       improve student success

US Constitution        Fulfill federal mandate, increase      FTES figures                       In progress   More faculty support
Symposium              FTES and improve public relations

Table 9: Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Instructional Improvement


Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Student/Staff Equity

Program                Goals/Purpose                          Measured Objectives                Status        Recommendations

                                                                                                               For Program Changes

Internship Project     Recruit 10 potential faculty interns   Number of interns recruited        In progress   Need a full-time recruiter
                       from diverse academic and ethnic
                       backgrounds

Annual Classified      To increase the ability to pay for     Event evaluations                  In progress   Continuous funding
Retreat                high quality speakers to increase
                       attendance

Table 10: Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Instructional Improvement




                                                                                                                                            123
Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Expanded Community Outreach



Program                   Goals/Purpose                           Measured Objectives                       Status        Recommendations

                                                                                                                          For Program Changes

Student Ambassador        Help potential students relate better   Evaluations                               In progress   Increase funding for project
Program                   to College

Athletic Express          Increase retention rate of student      Retention rate of student athletes that   In progress   More support from students
                          athletes                                participated                                            and staff

K-8 Outreach Program      Hire K-8 specialist and establish       Hired position and number of school       In progress   None
                          more contact and relations with K-8     presentations and attendance at events
                          schools and expand outreach to
                          parents

Quality Radio Marketing   Use quality radio marketing to          Increased media presence increasing       In progress   Department collaborations to
                          increase enrollment                     enrollment                                              streamline process

Table 11: Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Instructional Improvement




                                                                                                                                                    124
Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Program Efficiency

Program                   Goals/Purpose                        Measured Objectives                           Status        Recommendations

                                                                                                                           For Program Changes

Vehicle for First         Purchase an emergency response       Response rates to emergency situations with   Complete      None
Responder                 vehicle for better protection of     the addition of the vehicle
                          campus

Mobile Radios             Purchase new radios for better       Time Savings                                  Complete      None
                          communication

Kuali Financial System    Develop and implement an             Completion of phases needed to complete       In progress   Have a more accurate
Development               advanced financial system            project                                                     estimation of time and
                                                                                                                           resources

Transfer Opportunity      Reinstate UC Davis’s presence of     Number of student contacts/appointments       In progress   None
Program UCD               TOP on our campus                    with UCD representative

Articulation Initiative   Fund articulation process and        Attendance to relevant events and updated     In progress   Increase direct student contact
                          activities to improve transfer       information provided to students on website
                          process

Web services              To develop and enhance the College   Improvements on website                       In progress   None
coordinator               website

Upgrade Receiving         Upgrade receiving and tracking       Productivity of delivery person               Complete      None
Tracking System           system to increase response times
                          for deliveries

Digital Imaging           Replace microfilming to save space   Room space                                    In progress   Hire additional staff member

Computers/COMPASS         To provide computer-based            Number of computers and students who take     Complete      None
                          assessment                           COMPASS

Table 12: Summary of Funded AI Projects between 2005-06 and 2006-07 Supporting Program Efficiency




                                                                                                                                                      125
Conclusions / Recommendations



Based on the submitted self-evaluations, it appears that projects promoting instructional
improvement were prioritized in 2005-06 and 2006-07 and projects promoting program efficiency
gained importance in 2006-07. Information regarding the status of these projects revealed that
most of these projects were still in progress (67%) and that most self-recommendations included
requests for continuous funding and increased time and human resources (33%).

When asked how the AI Budget Process could be improved, many evaluators alluded to a need for
more information and clarification such as providing explanations for denied proposals, providing
annual written reports about the projects, and clarification of the AI funding process. Discussion
within the Planning and Budget Committee has led to the recommendation that perhaps two or
more cycles of proposal and evaluation could be implemented, with funds set aside to
accommodate project proposals at two different time periods (or three).

Based on the information provided by the submitted self-evaluations, a few immediate
recommendations are suggested for implementation:

Recommendations                                                                     Responsible Party

The AI website should be updated to make it more user-friendly                      Dean of PR & RE

The updated website should include clear and concise directions for proposers.      Dean of PR & RE
This material should include a copy of the AI evaluation rubric that will be used
for prioritizing project proposals.

An AI denial form should be created to provide proposers’ with a general            Dean of PR & RE
explanation of why their projects were not accepted.


All funded AI project managers should complete a self-evaluation                    Dean of PR & RE
approximately one year after being funded to provide constituents with a “status
report” on the progress of the projects

These self-evaluations should be used to write-up as annual summary reports so      Dean of PR & RE
that recommendations can be used to improve the next fiscal year

6. The Planning and Budget Committee should review the proposed                     Planning and Budget Committee
recommendations from the program directors to determine whether any
recommended changes should be endorsed and funding options explored.

7. The Planning and Budget Committee should consider more than one cycle of         Planning and Budget Committee
annual proposal submissions, allowing for more regular development and
review of funding proposals.

Table 13: AI Recommendations



                                                                                                                126
                                                      APPENDIX A

Proposer’s Name:                                                                     Date:



Project Title:                                                                       AI Project Number:

Project Year:

       Note: For those who have multiple projects, please complete one (1) self-evaluation for each project.

Please briefly describe the purpose of the project:




Please list the objectives/goals of the project:




       What is the current status of the project?       In progress       Complete

       Were the objectives/goals met?           Yes      No        Unsure

How was this measured?



       This project supports which of the following:

   Mission Statement          Strategic Goals         Employee Development & Training        Open Communication

   Vision Statement           Program Review          Increased Student Access/Success       Increased Financial Resources



Please provide a brief statement supporting how the project supports the item(s) checked:




       RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CHANGE


       If there was anything you could change about your program, what would it be?

       If there was anything you could change about the AI Budget Process, what would it be?




                                                                                                                127
                                    APPENDIX B



LIST OF FUNDED AI PROJECTS WITHOUT SELF-EVALUATIONS



BUDGET    PROJECT NAMES
YEAR

2005-06   Counseling Scanning Project

          Management Development Program

          Survey Feedback Action Program

          Send Senators to Classified Leadership

          Delta Dollars

2006-07   Passport to College

          Research Analyst for Special Programs

          Very Basic Physics Equipment

          Risk Manager Position

          Rapid Service Operation

          Modified Duty Program




                                                      128
Appendix 4: Environmental Scan & Strategic Plan, 2008
                                San Joaquin Delta College
                        Environmental Scan & Strategic Plan (2008)
                                  Executive Summary
This report provides a summary of the 2008 San Joaquin Delta College Environmental Scan and
Strategic Plan. The College’s own strategic plans and strategies parallel many of the themes
identified at the California Community College system level, and data gathered from this
assessment will be used to inform future decision making at the College.

Vision

The faculty, staff, and students of San Joaquin Delta College envision a community of learners
who pursue and achieve ever higher educational goals, commit themselves passionately to life-
long learning, and fully appreciate the diverse and dynamic world around them.

Mission

The mission of San Joaquin Delta College is to provide excellent post-secondary education that
serves the needs of students, the College District and the community through continuing,
transfer, career and technical education, and economic development. To achieve this objective,
the College’s faculty and staff are committed to providing comprehensive instructional
programs, student services and public services that are of the highest quality.

External Environmental Context

San Joaquin Delta College is located in San Joaquin County, a region that has experienced
substantial population growth but is challenged by low rates of educational attainment, high
levels of unemployment and poverty, and a decline in revenues due to the mortgage and housing
crisis. These factors provide both opportunities and challenges for the College.

        Current enrollment patterns indicate that
         just over 5% of the county population is          Global climate trends will place increasing
         enrolled at the College in any given year.        pressure on the community to adopt green
         Even so, College-going rates for                  living practices. The College will need to
         graduating seniors in the county lag behind respond with environmentally-conscious
         the statewide average. San Joaquin                policies and planning for educational
         County is one of the most critical regions
                                                           program and promote sustainability and
         in the state and country in terms of the
                                                           conservation.
         need for improvement of educational
         attainment.
        The College’s future is intricately tied to the local economy, population and employment
         growth in the region. Recent projections suggest the local economy will be significantly
         harmed by job losses in the housing construction sector and in the banking and mortgage
         sector, and unemployment rates in the region are already higher than the state average.
         Even with the economic downturn, there is substantial projected growth in technology-,


                                                                                               129
                health- and education-related fields. The College has certificate and degree programs in
                many of these fields and is prepared to provide employees for the labor market demand.
               The Delta College service area is situated in the agricultural region of the Great Central
                Valley, and global climate trends will place increasing pressure on local residents to
                adopt green living practices and sustainable energy approaches. The College will need to
                respond by minimizing its contribution to the climate change problem and simultaneously
                planning for vocational and educational programs that promote sustainability and
                conservation.

     State and Federal Budget

  To bridge the gap           The 2008 state budget projection suggests that the College will face
      between state           enrollment growth pressures, caps in state revenue, and decreased funding for
        funding and           student support programs.
          increasing
                              Three principal sources of funds for California Community Colleges are state
                              general apportionment dollars (awarded on a per student basis or FTES basis),
     enrollment, the
                              local property taxes and student enrollment fees. State revenue shortfalls
        College has
                              driven by the mortgage crisis and downturn in property sales and tax revenues
increasingly sought
                              have led to the possibility of suspending the guarantee of 40 percent funding
out external funding          to K-14 schools in the 2008-09 academic year.
      opportunities.

               To bridge the gap between state funding and increasing enrollment, the College has
                increasingly sought out external funding opportunities. The College has successfully
                applied for and received major federal support for student instructional programs and
                support services, including a Title V58 Hispanic Serving Institution Grant and a TRIO
                Grant. In recent years, federal funding accounted for approximately 4% of the College’s
                total income.

     Educational Partnerships

     As a longstanding and well-known educational institution in         The College has articulation
     the region, the College has established strong partnerships         agreements that provide a
     with local school districts and both public and private             smooth transfer process for
     universities. The College works with these other agencies to        student transferring to local
     ensure that students make a smooth transition from local high       four-year institutions.
     schools to Delta College, and from the College to a four-year
     university.
          The College’s nearest four-year university is the University of the Pacific, and there are
             many historical ties and articulation agreements between the two institutions. The
             College also has articulation agreements that provide a smooth transfer process for
             students transferring to local, publicly-funded four-year institutions, such as California
             State University, Stanislaus; California State University, Sacramento; and the University
             of California, Davis.


     58
          Reference Appendix vv.


                                                                                                       130
        The College frequently partners with local school districts on grant-funded projects and
         to provide transition programs for high school students to enroll in Early-College courses.
         These projects include the Valdes Math Institute partnership with Stockton Unified
         School District, the Middle College High School partnership with Lodi Unified School
         District, and Passport to College.

 Physical Resources
 The College continues to meet its major objectives of certificate and degree attainment, transfer
 preparation, and vocational education and skill building. However, the institution faces
 challenges in advancing English as a Second Language students and those entering the College
 with low-level math, reading and writing skills.

        The College possesses a number of high-quality learning resources that are well equipped
         to serve the students and community, such as the Math and Science Learning Center and
         the Reading and Writing Learning Center, which feature computer labs, resources and
         tutoring for students. The College’s Assessment Center provides for computerized
         testing to assist in course placement, and the E-Services lab provides computers for
         students to use for campus business. The College also offers applied agricultural
         programs at its Manteca farm property, a 160-acre site that allows for the cultivation of
         crops, rearing of livestock, and classroom instruction.
                                  Many of the College’s facilities were constructed in the early
The planned Mountain                 1970s. In an effort to meet the needs of the region’s growing
House Educational                    population, the College has planned an expansion in the Tracy
Center will hold                     area, which will be funded by a portion of the College’s $250
50,000 sq. ft. of                    million bond measure passed in 2004. The planned Mountain
instructional space                  House Educational Center will hold 55,000 square feet of
when completed.                      instructional space when completed in 2010. Future
                                     educational centers are also planned for the Lodi, Galt, and
                                     Foothills regions of the district.

 Program Review

 The College has implemented a systematic framework for review          As of fall 2007, 60% of active
 of its instructional programs. Staff members in each instructional     or pending courses had
 unit are required to review program trends in terms of student         Student Learning Outcomes
 participation, demographics, retention, success, and patterns of
                                                                        (SLOs).
 FTEF in the unit.

        The program review process allows faculty to identify staffing and resource needs for the
         future, and budget requests for new entitlements and staffing positions must refer to
         program review document for justification.
        A relatively new element of review and evaluation for the College is the implementation
         of course and program level student learning outcomes (SLOs). As of fall 2007, 80% of
         active or pending courses in the College’s curriculum system have SLOs; the next cycle
         of evaluation will emphasize reviewing student performance on these SLOs.



                                                                                                131
 The Students of Delta College

 San Joaquin Delta College students are generally representative of the community served by the
 College. The College has seen a declining share of white student enrollments since 2002, while
 Hispanic and Asian student enrollments have grown.

                                    The College’s 28% Hispanic population has allowed the
                                     institution to qualify as a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI)
                                     under the U.S. Department of Education since 2004. The
     Roughly half of the
                                     composition of the student population in terms of age groups
students who enter the
                                     has remained stable over the five year period. Sixty percent of
        college achieve
                                     the current students are age 24 or under, and 6 of every 10
   transfer status or an             students are female. The majority (62%) of the student
AA degree within a six-              population is drawn from the City of Stockton.
       year time frame.           A significant percentage of students enter the College without
                                     adequate preparation for college-level work. Less than 20%
                                     of entering students in the fall of 2007 demonstrated reading
                                     proficiency levels at or above the 10th grade level.
       Despite these initial setbacks, overall SJDC students do reasonably well when completing
         vocational and basic skills courses, and roughly half of the students who enter the
         College achieve transfer status or an AA degree within a six-year time frame.
       Rates of improvement in basic skills and ESL instruction have not been as strong, and
         this is where the College needs to improve. The need for basic skills improvement has
         been identified as a key focus for college leaders, and strategic efforts are being directed
         at this challenge.

 Challenges and Opportunities
                                                                   Faculty at the College will
 Delta College currently faces significant challenges and          need to be responsive to
 opportunities for growth and change. Economic and global          emerging community
 forces can work to energize the College’s curricular              needs and green trends by
 offerings and importance to the region while environmental        designing new curricular
 and labor market trends prompt changes in the College’s           offierings.
 operations.
      Technological developments and the environmental consciousness of the state and region
         will influence the College and its operations.
      Faculty at the College will need to be responsive to emerging community needs and
         green trends by designing new curricular offerings to address these themes.
      The College will also face challenges as it renovates its aging buildings on the Stockton
         campus and simultaneously builds new educational facilities in the Tracy, Lodi and
         Manteca regions.




                                                                                                 132
    Planning
    Planning has been identified in two successive accreditation reports as a concern, and the
    College must face this challenge head-on. Strategic planning is rigorous, cyclical assessment of
    where we are, where we want to be, how we get there, and how we measure progress. This
    process begins with assessing the external and internal environment in which the College
    operates, and this allows the planning team to see the organization as a whole in relation to its
    environment. The results of the analysis should point out the most significant indicators of need,
    aid decision makers by placing the institution’s priority issues in context, and help define or
    describe the significance of a strategic issue. At this time, College-level planning is largely
                                 achieved through the leadership of the Planning and Budget
Strategic planning is a          Committee and the Office of Planning, Research, and Regional
rigorous cyclical                Education. The Office of Planning, Research and Regional
assessment of where we           Education has taken the lead in developing the environmental scan
are, where we want to be,        and strategic planning document for the College, meeting with
how we get there and how         governance groups to discuss recent trends, the environmental
we measure progress.             context it faces, and formulating draft strategic goals for discussion.
                                 As a result of those discussions, the College has identified six
                                 strategic goals for the immediate future (2008-09).
    Strategic Goals
        Develop and implement a communication plan that
           provides easy access to information to and from all          The College has identified 6
           internal and external groups.                                strategic goals for the
        Develop a College-wide staff development program to            immediate future.
           improve faculty, administrator, and classified staff skills
           to promote access, student success, and positive student
           learning outcomes.
        Increase access, student equity, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.
        Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust
           College budget priorities to support and ensure access and successful student outcomes.
        Facilitate the completion of Measure L Bond Projects and the revitalization of the
           Stockton campus.
        In light of regional and global trends, examine operational procedures and launch new
           vocational and educational programs that meet the challenges of wise resource
           management, new energy technology, transportation logistics, health care, viticulture, and
           information technology.
                               Program units at the College have been asked to develop their own
   The College                 objectives and strategic initiatives that mesh with the overarching goals
   developed a                 established by the College. In an effort to move the strategic planning
   comprehensive list          process forward, the College has embarked on the development of a
   of key performance          comprehensive list of key performance indicators that can be tracked
   indicators.                 over time to measure the College’s progress toward meeting specific
                               goals. As of spring 2008, campus governance groups were asked to
                               review a list of 60 performance indicators, and the list was endorsed by
                               the President’s Council in spring of 2008. The specific indicators are


                                                                                                    133
aligned with the College’s mission and vision statement, and parallel many of the goals outlined
in the Strategic Plan. The Office of Planning, Research, and Regional Education was assigned
the task of developing an institutional report that tracked the indicators on an annual basis. Data
gathered from this continuous assessment will be used to inform future decision making and to
ensure the College is prepared to respond to the changing needs of the College and the region.

Copies of the complete 2008 Strategic Plan are available at the following website:
http://www.deltacollege.edu/div/planning




                                                                                                134
                              San Joaquin Delta College
                          Environmental Scan & Strategic Plan, 2008




                                         Spring 2008


                      Office of Planning, Research & Regional Education
                                Dr. Matt Wetstein, Interim Dean
                               Alyssa Nguyen, Research Analyst




Our Vision: The faculty, staff, and students of San Joaquin Delta College envision a
community of learners who pursue and achieve ever higher educational goals, commit
themselves passionately to life-long learning, and fully appreciate the diverse and dynamic
world around them.




                                                                                              132
Section One – Vision & Mission


Vision Statement

The faculty, staff, and students of San Joaquin Delta College envision a community of learners
who pursue and achieve ever higher educational goals, commit themselves passionately to life-
long learning, and fully appreciate the diverse and dynamic world around them.

Mission Statement

The mission of San Joaquin Delta College is to provide excellent post-secondary education that
serves the needs of students, the College District and the community through continuing,
transfer, career and technical education, and economic development. To achieve this objective,
the faculty and staff are committed to providing comprehensive instructional programs, student
services and public services that are high quality.

In fulfilling its mission, San Joaquin Delta College acts upon the following principles:

      Commitment to excellence requires effective collaboration, respect for cultural diversity,
       appreciation of historical perspective, open communication, high academic standards, a
       vital connection to the arts and cultures of the community, and competitive athletics.
      Student success and equity are founded on a well-coordinated and institutionally-
       integrated developmental education program.
      Educational resources are available to all students regardless of age, disability, gender, or
       ethnicity.
      Institutional renewal must include continuous improvement through new and revised
       curricula; the use of student learning outcomes to enhance student performance; new and
       effective technologies: and ongoing faculty and staff professional development.
      All aspects of the College encourage good citizenship, responsible leadership, ethical
       behavior, and the appreciation of lifelong learning.

The College has engaged in a continuous cycle of evaluation of its mission and vision
statements. Both statements were recently reviewed by campus governance groups and
modifications were endorsed by the Board of Trustees in early 2008.




                                                                                                 133
Section Two – The External Environmental Context


The College is situated in a region that has experienced exploding population growth but is
challenged by low rates of educational attainment, high levels of unemployment and poverty, and
a decline in revenues due to the mortgage and housing crisis. These factors provide both
opportunities and challenges for the College.

Population Growth of the District and Region

San Joaquin Delta College draws its student population from a designated service area that is
roughly 2,400 square miles, making it larger in geographic scope than the states of Delaware or
Rhode Island (SJDC Accreditation Report 2008, 2, 4). The main campus is situated on a 165
acre site in the heart of Stockton. Regional education centers are situated in Tracy, Manteca, and
the College maintains a natural resources area in Mountain Ranch in the Sierra Nevada foothills.




Table 14: Geography of San Joaquin Delta College District
College District service area with Trustee districts

Although population growth has been a constant force for the local region over the last decade
(rising from 568,932 in 2000 to 662,000 in 2005), the recent collapse of the sub-prime mortgage
market has stalled new housing construction in the county and slowed population growth


                                                                                              134
(California Statistical Abstract 2007, 60 Minutes 2008). A recent estimate places new housing
starts for 2008 at one-third the rate of 2005 (Business Forecasting Center 2007, 64). Population
forecasts for the county, however, suggest that the housing downturn should have only a short-
lived effect on the College’s service population. Estimates from the State Department of
Finance indicate that San Joaquin County will have more than 740,000 residents by the
year 2010, and will surpass the 1 million mark somewhere around 2020 (California
Department of Finance, 2007b). Given these estimates, the College is likely to experience stable
rates of growth in student enrollment for the next two decades.

Current enrollment patterns indicate that just over 5% of the county population is enrolled at
the College in any given year. Projections based on these rates of utilization could drive
enrollments as high as 50,000 students by the year 2030, and close to 100,000 by 2050.




Table 15: San Joaquin County Population Projections

Economic and Demographic Profile of the Region
According to Census Bureau data from the 2005 American Community Survey, San Joaquin
County is considerably below the median household income for California at $49,391 as
compared to $53,629. Fourteen percent of persons in San Joaquin County are below the
poverty level as compared to 13.2% in California. Census data also reveal that San Joaquin
County is lower in educational attainment in the population 25 years of age and over with
75% of San Joaquin County persons having achieved a high school diploma and 17.3% a


                                                                                             135
bachelor’s degree as compared to 80.1% and 29.5% respectively in California (see the figure
below).

College-going rates for graduating seniors in the county lag behind the statewide average.
According to data from the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC 2008), only
42% of graduating seniors from public high schools in San Joaquin County enrolled in public
colleges and universities after graduating in 2006. County high school graduates were
disproportionately represented in the community colleges of the state (especially SJDC) and
were far less likely to enroll in CSU or UC campuses (CPEC 2008). Because so many students
rely on Delta College for the start of their college career, it is important for the college to stress
positive educational outcomes that lead students to gainful employment and transfer to four-year
institutions.

One national ranking of educational needs suggests that San Joaquin County is one of the most
critical regions in the state and country in terms of improvement of educational attainment
(Lumina Foundation 2006). Using data on educational attainment, economic factors, and market
demand for jobs and job training, like other counties in California’s great Central Valley, San
Joaquin County scored in the bottom ten percent of all counties in the United States on a
global measure described as the Educational Needs Index (ENI 2006). This index uses
indicators based on educational attainment, economic factors, market demand for jobs and job
training. The data on educational need and attainment present on-going challenges and
opportunities for higher education institutions situated in the Central Valley.




                                                                                                   136
Table 16: Educational Attainment Levels

The population of the surrounding region is diverse, with whites making up only 30 percent
of the total population. Thirty-five percent of the population is Hispanic, and the College has
an increasing percentage of students that are drawn from this population base (28 percent in
2007-08). The county also has a population base of 7 percent African-Americans, 15 percent
Asian/Pacific Islanders, and 1 percent Native Americans.

The College’s service region also features a disproportionately large number of children
growing up in single-parent families (27 percent) compared to the state average (25 percent,
Great Valley Center 2004, 8). Nearly a quarter of the region’s children live in poverty
(GVC, 13). The College features a disproportionate share of students who qualify for Extended
Opportunity Programs & Services (EOPS), a state funded program that is designed to assist
economically disadvantaged students. Foster children are also over-represented in the Central
Valley and San Joaquin County region when compared against the state and nation. The authors
of a recent report suggested that several focused strategies were necessary to help the region’s
youth “overcome the challenges of poverty, maltreatment, and poor educational and health
outcomes,” including better educational partnerships and higher expectations for our children
(GVC, 3). The continuing patterns of inequality show up in the College’s success rates for ESL
students and those taking basic skills courses. According to data compiled for the Accountability
Report for Community Colleges (ARCC 2008), only 20% of ESL students taking the next
highest course succeed at the next level within three years, and only 40% of Basic Skills students


                                                                                              137
pass a follow-up course within three years. As a provider of education and training for many of
the region’s economically disadvantaged students, the College will need to continue to address
these patterns of inequality and provide focused instruction and services that cater to the most
deserving students in its population base.

The Local Economy & Labor Market
The College’s future is intricately tied to the local economy, rates of population and employment
growth in the region. In the near term, economic forecasters expect that the local economy will
be significantly harmed by job losses in the housing construction sector and in the banking
and mortgage sector (Business Forecasting Center 2007, 61). Stockton’s local economy slowed
at a faster rate than the California average as it became one of the country’s leading areas for
home mortgage foreclosures in 2007. The year ended with only 0.4% job growth in the
Stockton/Lodi metropolitan service area, well below the prior year level of 1.3%, and 1.2% for
the entire state (Business Forecasting Center 2007, 10, 61). Unemployment rates (8.2 percent)
in the region are higher than the state average (5.3 percent) and national average (4.6 percent
for 2007). Estimates for Stockton and California’s economy in 2008 were even gloomier as the
country headed into a recession in the first quarter of the year.

Even with the economic downturn, the local region did feature some positive economic signs in
terms of expected job growth in the 2008-2010 period. The fastest growing segment of the
Stockton/Lodi economy is expected to be in the realm of professional and business services,
growing at an annual rate of over 3% in that time frame. Other areas expected to see higher
than average rates of annual growth are in leisure and hospitality services (2.3%) and
education and health services (2.1%). Two of the largest employment sectors in the region –
trade, transportation and utilities and state and local government – were also expected to see job
growth of 2.0 and 1.3% respectively (Business Forecasting Center 2007, 61).

Transportation logistics, warehouse management and regional and international trade are
increasingly important sectors of the regional economy. The county’s geographic proximity
to the San Francisco Bay area and Sacramento, coupled with the transportation corridors of
Interstates 5, 99, and 580 have made it a prime location for warehousing and distribution centers.
Large warehousing operations are evident along all three highways, and the Stockton Port’s
growing significance for international shipping also highlight the region’s importance for the
flow of trade. The county also stands to benefit from airport expansion plans and increased air
travel out of the Stockton Airport. In areas of the economy where employment is expected to be
strong, the College must be ready to offer vocational training that meets the workforce needs of
the region.

State Employment Development Department Data provide a more refined snapshot of the job
prospects for the region (EDD 2008). According to EDD data, the fastest growing job categories
for San Joaquin County through 2014 are in the area of computer network systems and data
analysts, and in the realm of home health care aides and personal medical assistance (see Table
1). In many of the leading job growth categories, the College has certificate and degree
programs that are well-positioned to provide employees for the labor market demand. The
College’s growing nursing and health programs are certain to play a key role in employment
growth over the next decade. In other areas, the College has not developed certificate programs



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to meet the growing needs of local businesses, and these areas include aircraft maintenance,
home care aides, education, the life science, and physician’s assistant. The faculty in key
disciplines will need to respond with flexible certificate offerings in areas such as physician’s
assistant and respiratory therapy.


Job Growth in the Fastest Growing Employment Categories for San Joaquin County, 2004-
                                          201459
                                     Estimated Estimated Percent Growth College
Occupation                             2004       2014    Change     Rate Program
1. Network Systems/Data Analysts        150        240      60.0       4.8        yes
2. Home Health Aides                  1,010      1,600      58.4       4.7        yes
3. Aircraft Mechanics/Service Techs     100        150      50.0       4.1         no
4. Personal and Home Care Aides         980      1,430      45.9       3.9         no
5. Sales Reps, Wholesale/Manufacturing 290         420      44.8       3.8        yes
6. Respiratory Therapists               250        360      44.0       3.7         no
7. Computer Software Engineers          180        260      44.4       3.7        yes
8. Special Ed Teachers/Middle School     90        130      44.4       3.7         no
9. Postsecondary Teachers               450        640      42.2       3.6         no
10. Life Scientists                     760      1,080      42.1       3.6         no
11. Network/Computer Systems Admin 120             170      41.7       3.5        yes
12. Surgical Technologists              120        170      41.7       3.5        yes
13. Instructional Coordinators          170        240      41.2       3.5         no
14. Radiologic Techs                    200        280      40.0       3.4        yes
15. Physician Assistants                 50         70      40.0       3.4         no
16. Registered Nurses                 3,770      5,270      39.8       3.4        yes
17. Postsecondary Teachers/all other     50         70      40.0       3.4         no
18. Drafters                             50         70      40.0       3.4        yes
19. Personal Financial Advisers         100        140      40.0       3.4         no
20. Sales Managers                      480        670      39.6       3.4        yes
Table 17: Job Growth




59
     Reference Source: California Economic Development Department


                                                                                                    139
Long-Term Regional & Global Trends

Climate Change & Energy

San Joaquin County is situated in the center of the great Central Valley, and its location in one of
the largest agricultural production belts of the world presents some unique opportunities and
challenges. Global climate trends will place increasing pressure on valley residents to adopt
green living practices and sustainable energy approaches. Market forces are already at work
to promote solar and wind-powered energy projects and Congress has responded with an
omnibus energy bill. That legislation included the Green Jobs Act of 2007, allocating $125
million for workforce training grants to create jobs installing and maintaining solar panel
installations (U.S. Congress 2007). Capital investment in clean energy technologies has been
disproportionately located in California, with over $900 million invested in California firms in
2006 alone (Next 10 2008, 43). Local business leaders are also noting the benefits of “going
green.” The Stockton Chamber of Commerce has recognized this need with its “REACON –
Recycling, Energy and Air Conservation” private-public partnership that promotes
environmentally conscious recycling and energy reduction efforts (Greater Stockton Chamber
2008). The City of Stockton has also received national notice as being one of the top 50 “green
cities” in the country in terms of environmental stewardship, energy use, and public
transportation (Popular Science 2008). The city is also in the process of revamping its
operational procedures to ensure green principles are incorporated into building renovation
designs, purchasing processes, irrigation systems, and vehicle management (Tien 2008).

Continued legislative and regulatory pressures will produce greater investment and interest in
bringing to market products that emanate from low-energy processes. The College’s position in
a climate zone that is stressed by 100 degree days and energy costs necessary to live in such an
environment will only foster greater popular pressure for energy conservation and awareness.
The College will need to respond in kind with policies that limit its “carbon footprint” and
minimize its contribution to the climate change problem, while simultaneously planning for
vocational and educational programs that promote sustainability and conservation as core
values for the community. Moreover, current instructional programs can work to “green up”
their curriculum to address these changing environmental patterns. As suggested earlier, greater
reliance on solar and wind-powered technology for the delivery of energy will foster a
burgeoning field of employment in specialized energy technicians. The community College’s
mission as a provider of technical training should capitalize on this trend.

Water Resources
In tandem with the environmental pressures already cited, there is the critical need for wise use
of water resources in the region. Aquifers and water basins across the globe face increasing
population pressures and agricultural demands. The region is heavily dependent on three major
sources of water: snow melt runoff from the Sierra Nevada mountain range, underground
aquifers fed partially by that runoff, and the San Joaquin Delta. The College’s proximity to the
San Joaquin Delta and the Sierra Nevada range places it in a prime position to partner
with other universities to provide science training to students interested in careers in
aquatics, marine biology, and environmental science.



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Information Technology Trends

Another significant trend is the increasing emergence of web-based delivery of information for
students and residents of the region. This trend has been documented in a number of ways,
including declining rates of newspaper readership, increasing household penetration of
computers and web-based information consumption, increasing reliance on web-based
instructional delivery. Many of the College’s instructors and librarians have been willing
pioneers in the implementation of web-based instruction and information services, and the
College’s information services department has played a leading role in programming
development for shared software solutions in the higher education sector. These trends will no
doubt continue. It is likely that software and technology companies will increasingly turn to
the Central Valley as a base for their newest development projects here rather than in the
more expensive Bay Area.

State and Federal Mandates

The College operates in a legislative and bureaucratic environment that places a number of
mandated reporting and legal requirements on its operations. Some of these statutory mandates
are relevant for funding mechanisms. For example, federal and state government civil rights
laws require that the College not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin,
ancestry, disability, medical condition, marital status, age, gender, or sexual orientation. Failure
to comply with federal civil rights laws such as Title IX could put the College’s federal grant
funding and financial aid packages in jeopardy. State mandates require that restricted
portions of the College’s annual budget be dedicated to serving specific student
populations. Examples include the use of DSPS funds to provide educational services to
disabled students, and the provision of EOPS funds to first-time, first generation college students
from disadvantaged backgrounds. Curricular mandates also exist for general education
requirements and the number of units that can be completed in the area of basic skills
development and in certificate programs.

The College also operates under strict accounting and audit requirements for the expenditure of
funds and the receipt of apportionment revenues. College staff in the budget office must be
constantly trained and aware of the guidelines for the proper handling of specific public funds
and on generally accepted practices in the field of accounting. The implementation of
Government Accounting Standards Bureau (GASB) directives requiring the actuarial accounting
of post-employment retirement benefits represent just one example of external mandates that
drive College planning.

State mandated testing of students in lower educational levels has significant ramifications for
the College. The implementation of the California High School Skills Exit Exam (CAHSSEE)
could have both positive and negative effects on the College in terms of its student population.
To the extent that CHASSEE testing might generate better-prepared students for college entry,
the net effect may be positive. However, it is likely that the College’s open enrollment policy –
mandated by state law – will result in larger numbers of underprepared students enrolling at the




                                                                                                  141
College who have not completed high school and have not successfully passed the CAHSSEE
exam.

Both the state and federal governments require periodic reporting of college data and
information to ensure that mandates are being met. An example of state mandated reporting
can be seen in the Accountability Reporting for the Community Colleges (ARCC) data that is
collected by the Chancellor’s Office from every community college in the system (Chancellor’s
Office 2007a). Additionally, the federal Department of Education requires annual reporting of
college data through the Integrated Post-Secondary Education Data System survey (IPEDS).

College Financial Resources

The College draws its main sources of revenues from the State of California’s annual budget
allocation to the Community College system. The budget levels are subject to annual allocation
by the California Legislature and Governor. Three principal sources of funds for California
Community Colleges are state general apportionment dollars (awarded on a per student basis or
FTES basis), local property taxes and student enrollment fees. Since 1988, the community
college system and the K-12 school districts have had their state funding tied together in
what is called the Proposition 98 guarantee. The Proposition ensures that 40 percent of state
general funds dollars are allocated to K-14 public education, except in emergency years
(LAO 2007, 35). Under the law, Community Colleges have typically expected a 10.9% percent
share of that funding, but the Prop. 98 split has often been distributed by the Governor and
Legislature to the disadvantage of community colleges relative to primary and secondary school
funding. In 2004, community college funding per
FTES stood at $4,637, well below the amounts
provided to other educational systems in the                    The 2008 state budget
California budget (Chancellor’s Office 2005).                   picture suggests that the
Indeed, equivalent FTES funding for a University of             College will be faced with
California student stood at $10,812 that same year,             enrollment growth
more than double the rate of funding for the                    pressures at the same time
community college system (Chancellor’s Office                   that state revenue flows
2005, 13).
                                                                will be capped and specific
State revenue shortfalls driven by the mortgage                 student support programs
crisis and downturn in property sales and tax                   will face cuts in funding.
revenues have led the discussions of suspending
the Prop. 98 guarantee of 40 percent funding in
the 2008-09 academic year (LAO 2007; CCLC
2008, 1). The impact of this reduction in funding was not resolved at the time of this report, but
early budget estimates suggested that community colleges could expect to receive no cost of
living adjustments and growth funding of only 1.67 percent while categorical programs would
face major cuts averaging 7 percent (CCLC 2008, 4). State funded categorical programs make
up approximately 14 percent of the revenues and support state targeted initiatives (Budget 2007-
08). Late in the 2007-08 year, the community college system ordered budget cuts that amounted
to $1.2 million for Delta College. The 2008 state budget picture suggests that the College will be




                                                                                              142
faced with enrollment growth pressures at the same time that state revenue flows will be capped
and specific student support programs will face cuts in funding.

Federal resources to the College are dwarfed by the State’s commitments, and largely come in
the form of grants for special programs and through the pass-through of federal financial aid and
work study dollars to students. In recent years, the College has successfully applied for and
received major federal support for student instructional programs and support services,
including a Title V Hispanic Serving Institution Grant (available to colleges with 25
percent or more Hispanic students); and a TRIO Grant (designed to foster student
achievement for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds). These grant programs are not
without costs since they frequently require the College to commit to staffing levels well beyond
the life of the grant funding in order to sustain successful programs. Other important sources of
federal funding include the College’s annual allocation of federal Vocational Technical
Education Act (VTEA) funds, grant funds to support the College’s growing nursing degree
program, Small Business Administration funds, and AmeriCorps funds to finance teacher
preparation and service learning activities. Frequently grants and categorical funding requires
the College to match the dollars provided as is the case with most Federal grants. In total,
federal funds accounted for approximately 4 percent of the College’s income in recent
years (Budget 2007-08).

Local funding, excluding property taxes and student enrollment fees, make up another 4 percent
of the College’s revenue. Much of this revenue comes from local business support such as that
from the Caterpillar Dealers and the local hospitals that provide additional funding for key
programs to meet the economic needs of the community (Budget 2007-08).

The budget for the District is allocated and spent within sound fiscal management benchmarks
established by the California Community College Chancellor’s Office and the legislature. The
majority of the budget is designated for employee compensation, 81 percent in 2006-07, with
operating supplies, services, equipment and transfers out making up the remaining budget. More
than 50 percent of expenditures are spent in support of instruction as stipulated in state
regulations. The College measures favorably to other benchmarks as well. New expenditures
are budgeted using contract commitments, operational mandates, accounting requirements and
Strategic Planning Appreciative Inquiry (AI) proposals.

Major Educational Partnerships
The College has established strong partnerships with local school districts, and both public and
private universities. The College’s nearest post-secondary college is the University of the
Pacific, and there are long-standing ties between the two institutions, particularly in terms of
articulation of transfer courses, and through Pacific’s Community Involvement Program (CIP), a
scholarship program for local students with a demonstrated history of community involvement.
Many CIP students are former San Joaquin Delta College students. The College is also part of
the Higher Education Consortium for Central California (HECCC). The College also has long-
standing articulation agreements that provide a smooth transfer process for students
seeking to attend California State University, Stanislaus; California State University,
Sacramento; and the University of California, Davis.




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Local school districts frequently partner with the College for grant-funded projects and to
provide linkage mechanisms for high school students to enroll in early-college course work or
seamless transfers to the College. Some examples of prominent partnerships include the
following:

Stockton Unified School District – Valdes Math Institute (summer math skills program);
California High School Exit Exam grant (to promote greater passage rates on the California exit
exam); and a Teacher Preparation Pipeline Grant (to boost the number of young students to
consider a career in teaching); and the Tech Prep Grant (to align technical education curriculum
across levels of education).

Lodi Unified School District – The Middle College High School Program (a self-contained high
school on Delta’s campus offering high school students early entry into college level
coursework); the California Partnership for Achieving Student Success (CalPASS, a data sharing
consortium to help faculty align curriculum across the secondary and post-secondary levels); and
regional education partnerships that allow the College to offer college coursework at Lodi USD
facilities.

Passport to College – The College Foundation has played an integral role in fostering college
aspirations among young children by developing a Passport to College program that
promises free tuition to participating 5th grade students when they enter the College in 2014. The
Passport program has signed up more than 7,000 young students, each of whom has pledged to
earn good grades throughout middle and high school in order to qualify for the free tuition
guarantee. Students from local schools have visited the campus for tours and special educational
presentations, cementing their bond with the College at an early age. This program promises to
pay unique dividends in fostering interest in the College not only among young children but their
parents and relatives as well.

2+2 Articulation Agreements – The College maintains an active list of articulation agreements
with regional high schools, granting student’s credit for Advanced Placement and equivalent
courses taken at their sites. Agreements exist with Amador High School, Bret Harte, Bear
Creek, Calaveras, East Union Escalon, Franklin, Galt, Merrill West High School, Linden, Lodi,
Manteca, McNair, Modesto, Sierra, St. Mary’s, Stagg, Tokay, Tracy, and the Weber Institute of
Technology.

Section Three – The Internal Environmental Context


The College has done well addressing some of its key objectives in terms of certificate/degree
attainment, transfer preparation, vocational education and skill building, but progress can still
be made and the institution faces challenges in addressing ESL students and those entering the
College with low level math, reading and writing skills.




                                                                                               144
Human Resources
The College draws its strength from a qualified staff and faculty that are hired through formal
personnel processes. Staffing patterns suggest that the College must do a better job of
hiring faculty and staff from underrepresented minority groups. Currently, only 12% of the
full time faculty and 20% of the full time staff are drawn from the ranks of the Hispanic
community, a rate that falls short of the 35% that Hispanics represent in the county population.
Similarly, African-Americans and Asians are underrepresented in the faculty ranks vis-à-vis their
standing in the local community.

In terms of academic preparation, instructors, librarians and counselors at the College are well
qualified in their fields of expertise. More than 26% possess the equivalent of doctoral degrees
or the highest degree awarded in the field of education or law. All of the faculty meets the
minimum qualifications established for their discipline by the Chancellor’s Office and local
Academic Senate.

Learning Resources
The College possesses a mixture of first-rate learning resources that are well situated to
provide services to the students and community. The Goleman Library is scheduled for major
renovations in 2008, and currently holds over 111,000 books, periodicals, DVDs or other
recordings. The library subscribes to 29 different electronic databases for student use and
research purposes (Accreditation Self Study 2008, 160). Roughly 300,000 visits were made to
the library in the 2006-07 academic year. The renovated library will feature expanded square
footage for collections, new study rooms, expanded computer access for students, a coffee and
snack bar, and enhanced learning resource rooms for classroom training on library utilization and
research techniques.

The College also has two several popular Learning Centers, including newly remodeled centers
for Math and Science and Reading and Writing. The Math and Science Learning Center
occupies space on the second floor of the Shima Building and is equipped with computers and
resources funded through a Title V grant from the federal government. The center serves as
a tutoring center for students seeking help with math and science classes, and some faculty in the
division have begun to hold office hours there in order to assist a larger number of students. The
Reading and Writing Learning Center is located on the second floor of the Holt building. It
features a Center for Academic Preparation, the Writing Lab, and a shared computer lab that
allows students the opportunity to obtain tutoring assistance on written assignments. This center
serves as a clearinghouse for all tutoring that is outside of the field of math and science. A Basic
Skills Math Lab is located on the third floor of the Shima Building in order to provide
supplemental assistance to students most in need of skills development in arithmetic. Athletes
have a dedicated study hall in Budd Center that is proximate to locker rooms and team facilities
(Accreditation Self Study 2008, 160).

A computer lab on the second floor of the Cunningham building serves as the main open
computer lab for student work outside of the other learning centers. The lab operates on a drop-
in basis for any SJDC student seeking to use a computer for coursework. There are other
dedicated labs across the campus that are geared toward particular academic or vocational
programs. Examples of these labs include dedicated classroom and lab environments for



                                                                                                145
computer science, broadcasting, electron microscopy, graphic arts, business education,
engineering, and the GED program (Accreditation Self Study 2008, 161). The Assessment
Center allows for computerized testing to assist in course placement. The College also operates
an E-Services lab for students to use for campus business (such as course registration and email).
With the renovation of Goleman Library, both of these labs have been relocated to Cunningham
while new facilities are built with bond money at the Gateway building.

The agriculture programs offered by the College are strengthened by the College’s
Manteca farm property, a 160 acre site that allows for the cultivation of crops, rearing of
livestock, and classroom instruction. Students enrolled in the College’s animal husbandry
program have consistently won awards in state and regional competitions. The College also
operates viticulture classes and has a vital landscaping program with a well stocked garden and
greenhouse on the Stockton campus.

Assets & Property

As indicated above, the College maintains property in several different locations. The main
campus is located on a 165 acre site in the center of Stockton, with seven major buildings:
Shima, Cunningham, Locke, Holt, Budd, Goleman, and Danner Hall. The construction of these
facilities in the early 1970s has allowed the campus to maintain a coherent architectural
theme that is said to be modeled along a mining environment or the pitched roofs of barns with
roof gables (AMEC, 2006, B 17-18). Buildings that have been constructed on the campus since
its creation have generally followed the roof lines, color scheme and building forms of prior
construction. Example of this are found in the Central Plant facility that was built in the mid
1990s, and the Center for Microscopy and Allied Sciences building completed in 2002.

The Locke Center features Atherton Auditorium, a large scale theater space that can
accommodate over 1,400 visitors and is the home of the Stockton Symphony. The theater,
along with Tillie Lewis Theater in the Locke complex, can be rented out by community groups
for events and concerts. The Budd complex features two gymnasia for athletic team use, an
Olympic size swimming pool for aquatics programs, weight rooms, training facilities and locker
rooms for student and team use. Nearby athletic fields provide competition and training space
for programs in soccer, baseball, softball, track and field, and football. Renovations are under
way or planned for the near future to address Title IX concerns about the equality of services and
opportunities offered to female athletes.

The Measure L Bond Program

The College’s expansion in the Tracy region will be completed using a portion of the College’s
$250 million bond measure passed in 2004. The Mountain House Educational Center will
hold 55,000 square feet of instructional space when completed in 2010. Until then, the
College is relying on existing space arrangements with the Tracy Unified School District and in
fall of 2008 will begin offering courses at the Mountain House site in portable facilities that will
be placed on the parking lots.




                                                                                                 146
Future educational centers are planned for the Lodi, Galt, and Foothills regions of the
district. Property has been identified for these sites, including a large parcel of land east of Lodi
on bordering Highway 12 on the south and the Mokulmne River on the north, and an already
purchased site off of Liberty Road in the northern reaches of the district near the city of Galt.
The Manteca Center is also slated for expansion in the College’s Educational Master Plan (SJDC
2005). Long-term, the College envisions a movement toward a multi-campus College District
that address the population growth expected in the region.

Renovations and construction projects are also under way on the Stockton campus. So far, new
athletic facilities have been constructed for baseball, track and field and soccer, and facilities are
under construction for softball and football. Major building projects for the next two years
include the renovation of Goleman Library and the construction of a one-stop shop for Student
Services. Future projects include a Data Center and a new Math and Science Learning Center.

Program Review & Evaluation

The College has implemented a systematic framework for engaging in program review for its
instructional programs. Staff members in each instructional unit are required to review program
trends in terms of student participation, demographics, retention, success, and patterns of FTEF
in the unit. Instructional programs in the vocational arena have an added requirement of
completing a “mini” program review every two years that provides up-to-date labor market
analysis. The program review process allows faculty to identify staffing and resource needs
for the future, and budget requests for new entitlements and staffing positions must refer
to the program review document for justification. College documents indicate that all of the
instructional programs have completed their reviews in a timely manner (SJDC Program
Reviews, Docushare).

A relatively new element of review and evaluation for the College is the implementation of
course and program level student learning outcomes (SLO’s). The incorporation of SLO’s has
been achieved through the periodic review and resubmission of curriculum through the
Academic Senate’s Curriculum Committee. As of the fall of 2007, 80 percent of active or
pending courses in the College’s curriculum system have SLO’s identified by the faculty,
and the next cycle of evaluation will push faculty to review student performance on these SLO’s.

Student and Business Services conduct periodic departmental reviews to evaluate the efficiency
and effectiveness of the procedures and processes that support the College.

Demographics of the Student Body

San Joaquin Delta College students are generally representative of the community served by the
College. Data in the figures below indicate that the College has seen a declining share of
white student enrollments since 2002 (dropping from 38 to 31 percent in a five year period).
During the same time frame, Hispanic and Asian student enrollments have grown, and the
College’s 28% Hispanic population has allowed the institution to qualify as a Hispanic
Serving Institution (HSI) under the U.S. Department of Education since 2004. The composition
of the student population in terms of age groups has remained stable over the five year period.



                                                                                                   147
Sixty percent of the current students are age 24 or less, up slightly from 57 percent in 2002.
The students who compose that segment are more likely to be traditional college students who
take larger loads of courses. As a result, despite a slight drop in student headcounts, the level of
full time equivalent students (FTES) has continued to grow slightly.

Women continue to represent a larger proportion of the student population: 6 of every 10
students are female. In a similar vein, 62 percent of the student population is drawn from the
City of Stockton. The College’s popularity with local residents is striking. Data analysis of
course taking patterns by the Office of Planning, Research and Regional Education suggests that
one of every six adults in Stockton have attended the College in the past two years (2006-2007).



                                          Ethnic Background of SJDC Students, 2002-2007

                                    50%




                                    40%




                                    30%




                                    20%




                                    10%




                                    0%
                                               2002-03        2003-04        2004-05      2005-06   2006-07
           African-American                     10%            10%            10%          10%       10%
           Asian/Pacific Islander               18%            19%            20%          20%       20%
           Hispanic                             26%            26%            26%          27%       28%
           Other/Unknown                         8%             8%            10%          11%       11%
           White Non-Hispanic                   38%            37%            34%          32%       31%


Figure 17: Ethnic Background of Students




                                                                                                              148
                                         SJDC Students by Age, 2002-2007

            40%




            30%




            20%




            10%




            0%
                      2002-03            2003-04            2004-05            2005-06   2006-07
     19 or Less        31%                34%                31%                31%       31%
     20 to 24          26%                27%                30%                30%       29%
     25 to 29          11%                11%                11%                11%       12%
     30 to 34           8%                 8%                 8%                 7%        7%
     35 to 39           7%                 6%                 6%                 6%        6%
     40 to 49          10%                 9%                 9%                 9%        8%
     50 +               6%                 5%                 5%                 6%        6%


Figure 18: Students by Age Group




                                 Head Count and FTES Enrollments at SJDC, 2002-07

            35000




            30000



            25000




            20000




            15000




            10000



             5000




                  0
                       2002-03            2003-04            2004-05           2005-06   2006-07
  Total Headcount       30658              28332             26881              26911     27732
  Total FTES            14826              14608             14852              15114     15661


Figure 19: Head Count and FTES 2002 - 2007




                                                                                                   149
                    Student Body Composition by Region, 2006-07




                                                  Foothills, 2%
                                    Tracy, 8%                     Lodi-Galt, 13%



                                                                          Manteca-Lathrop,
                                                                                9%


                                                                              Other in State, 5%
                                                                              Other out of State,
                                                                                     0%


                         Stockton, 62%




Figure 20: Student Body Composition by Region

                                Gender Composition of Student Body, 2006-07




                                                Unknown, 1%




                    Male, 40%




                                                                                Female, 58%




Figure 21: Gender Composition of Student Body 2002 - 2007




                                                                                                    150
Patterns of Student Success & Retention

The College’s Accreditation Self Study (2008) reports that a significant percentage of students
enter the College lacking adequate academic preparation for college-level work. For instance,
less than 20% of entering students in the fall of 2007 demonstrated reading proficiency
levels at or above the 10th grade level. More than 40% tested at Reading Level 1, a level at the
6th grade or lower. Similar patterns existed for writing/composition and math levels as well (see
the table below). If reading and writing assessment test performance serves as a suitable
benchmark for skill levels, the College faces significant challenges in addressing the
development of basic skills in its student population.

Reading, Writing, and Math Assessment Levels for SJDC Students, Summer and Fall 200760
                               Level 1             Level 2            Level 3
                               Grade 6            Grade 6 to         Grade 10
Assessment Category           or Lower             Grade 9           or Higher
Reading                        37.7%                46.4%              15.8%
Writing                        46.1%                38.1%              15.7%
Math                           41.2%                23.6%              35.1%
Table 18: Reading, Writing and Math Assessment

The College tracks student performance across a number of different categories. For example
graduates from San Joaquin County High Schools tend to comprise a major bloc of SJDC
students, but success rates vary from school to school. The table below suggests that Middle
College High School (MCHS) students, who take high school and college classes on the
Stockton campus of the College, perform best among county high school students when
taking classes at the College. Nearly three quarters of the courses taken by MCHS students
result in a grade of C or better. The average success rate for San Joaquin County high school
graduates is 61.1 percent. These patterns of success track well with standardized test results for
the various high schools around the county.

Stockton Unified School District high school graduates represent a significant pool of entering
students at SJDC in any given year. In recent years, standardized test scores for SUSD
students have been on the rise (SUSD 2007). The District’s overall Academic Performance
Index (API) has risen from a score of 616 in 2003-04 to 645 in 2006-07. To the extent that the
API measures student reading and writing abilities, this pattern of rising scores bodes well for
higher rates of increasing rates of success at Delta College.




60
     Reference SJDC Data Warehouse


                                                                                                151
                Student Success at SJDC by Major Feeder High Schools, 2006 - 200761
                      High School                 Total Enrollments % Success
                      Middle College High School             1,716       74.8
                      Escalon HS                               773       71.7
                      St Mary`s HS                           3,207       69.3
                      Linden HS                              1,927       68.7
                      Tracy HS                               3,075       67.8
                      West (Merrill F.) High                 3,448       67.4
                      Sierra High (Manteca)                  2,389       66.7
                      Lodi HS                                5,625       66.6
                      East Union HS                          3,428       66.2
                      Tokay HS                               8,023       65.2
                      Lincoln HS                             7,536       62.7
                      Manteca HS                             2,502       62.3
                      Bear Creek HS                          6,539       61.7
                      Stagg HS                               8,191       60.8
                      Edison HS                              6,839       60.5
                      Franklin HS                            6,882       59.0
                      Liberty HS (Lodi)                        951       56.8
                      Weber Institute (SUSD)                   708       55.6
                      SUSD Continuation/ILC                    765       47.1
                      Plaza Robles                           1,022       46.5
Table 19: Student Success by Major Feeder High Schools

When it comes to patterns of successful course completion, data from the Chancellor’s Office
ARCC report (2008) suggest that SJDC students do reasonably well when completing
vocational and basic skills courses. The College’s rates of successful course completion for
new cohorts of students have hovered above 70 and 63 percent in each of these respective
categories. Additionally, the College has performed reasonably well in achieving benchmarks
for AA degrees, certificates awarded, and preparing students to be “transfer ready” for their next
level of study within six years. Roughly half of the students who have entered the College
achieve transfer status or an AA degree within a six year time frame.




61
     Reference SJDC Data Warehouse


                                                                                               152
                              Vocational & Basic Skills Course Completion
                              Rates at Delta College, 2006-2008 ARCC Data
                      100.0


                                              Successful course completion rates in vocational courses
                       80.0
                                             73.5                             72.9                           71.6
Percent of Students




                       60.0                  63.7                             64.4                           63.1
                                                    Successful completion rates in basic skills courses


                       40.0



                       20.0



                        0.0
                                      2006 Data                        2007 Data                        2008 Data

          Figure 22: Vocational & Basic Skills Course Completion




                               Three Measures of Achievement for Delta
                               College Students, 2006-2008 ARCC Data
                      100.0



                       80.0                              Term-to-term persistence, fall semesters
                                                                             74.6                            73.1
                                             70.9
Percent of Students




                                                                             69.9                            70.5
                                             66.7        Percent of students earning 30 units or more
                       60.0

                                             50.0                            50.5                            49.4
                       40.0     Percent of students earning a degree, certificate, or achieving transfer prepared status



                       20.0



                        0.0
                                      2006 Data                        2007 Data                        2008 Data

          Figure 23: Measure of Achievement




                                                                                                                           153
Rates of improvement in basic skills and ESL instruction have not been as strong, and this
is where the College needs to make major strides of improvement. According to the most recent
ARCC data, the College’s rate of improvement in ESL – a measure based on students completing
a higher level course within three years of their first ESL course – is only 20%, suggesting that
four out of every five ESL students never completed a follow-up course within a three year span.
For basic skills students, the rate was better, reaching 40% for a cohort of new students enrolling
in 2004-05 (ARCC 2008, 505).


                                     Improvement Rates in Basic Skills & ESL
                                         Courses, 2006-2008 ARCC Data
                             100.0




                              80.0
       Percent of Students




                              60.0


                                            Percent passing a higher level basic skills course within 3 years
                                                                             39.2                               40.1
                              40.0          38.7


                                                                                                                19.8
                              20.0          16.7                             14.9

                                              Percent passing a higher level ESL course within 3 years
                               0.0

                                       2006 Data                      2007 Data                        2008 Data

         Figure 24: Improvement Rate in Basic Skills & ESL

Overall, the College has done well in addressing some of its key objectives in terms of
certificate/degree attainment, transfer preparation, vocational education and skill building, but
progress can still be made and the institution faces challenges in addressing ESL students and
those entering the College with low level math, reading and writing skills. The need for basic
skills improvement has been identified as a key focus of energy and resources by College
leaders, and the Developmental Education Task Force and Basic Skills Initiatives provide clear
evidence that strategic efforts are being directed at this challenge.




                                                                                                                       154
Section Four – Challenges & Opportunities


Delta finds itself at a crossroads, facing significant challenges and opportunities for growth and
change. Economic and global forces can work to energize the College’s curricular offerings and
importance to the region at the same time that environmental trends and labor market conditions
impinge on the traditional ways the College has operated.

Technological innovations are reshaping many fields of the local and regional economy. In
fields ranging from farming to automobile parts distribution to aerospace to nanotechnology,
faster computing speeds and the shrinking size of technology are altering the way
information is processed and the way products are manufactured and moved. The
environmental consciousness of the state and region suggest that “green” trends in
transportation, housing, and consumption will influence the College and its operations.
This places Delta College at a crossroads, facing significant challenges and opportunities for
growth and change. Economic and global forces can work to energize the College’s curricular
offerings and importance to the region at the same time that environmental trends and labor
market conditions impinge on the traditional ways the College has operated. Faculty at the
College will need to be responsive to emerging community needs and green trends, designing
new curricular offerings to address these themes.

One of the major challenges facing the College is the low educational attainment rate of the
region, low literacy levels, and school systems that produce underperforming students. This
places demands on the College to offer expansive and high quality programs in basic skills
instruction. When addressing this challenge, College staff and instructors have tremendous
opportunities to reverse years of educational neglect, but it requires them to be adaptive to new
teaching strategies and to be attuned to best practices in developmental education.

The College also faces remarkable challenges as it revamps its aging buildings on the Stockton
campus while simultaneously building new educational facilities in the Tracy, Lodi and Manteca
regions. Voter support within the greater community has opened the door to $250 million in
bond funding, but College officials will be hard pressed to manage construction schedules and
costs during an aggressive building program.

The College also needs to address its planning processes to ensure that varied planning processes
are tied together to address strategic themes in a single-minded manner. Planning is an area of
concern that has been identified in two successive accreditation reports and the College
must face this challenge head-on. Indeed, a coordinated planning process that sets objectives
and goals on an annual basis is one of the hallmarks of a successful College, and it is hoped that
the development of this environmental scan document will kick off a serious planning and goal
setting process.




                                                                                                155
Section Five – Strategic Planning & Objectives


Simply put, strategic planning is rigorous, cyclical assessment of where we are, where we want
to be, how do we get there, and how do we measure progress. This process begins with
assessing the external and internal environment in which the College operates. It is an analysis
of internal and external factors that allows the planning team to see the organization as a whole
in relation to its environment. This is one of the key accomplishments of effective planning.
The results of the analysis should 1) point out the most significant indicators of need; 2) aid
decision makers by placing the institution’s priority issues in context; and 3) help define or
describe the significance of a strategic issue.

At this time, College-level planning is largely achieved through the leadership of the Planning
and Budget Committee and the Office of Planning, Research, and Regional Education. The
Planning and Budget Committee has implemented a planning and budget cycle that uses
Appreciative Inquiry (AI) as its guiding focus. AI budget requests are submitted on an annual
basis by programs asking them to address mission, vision, and strategic goals of the College, and
those requests are collated and reviewed by Vice Presidents and the President’s Cabinet. Once
AI proposals have been identified for funding in the coming year, the College’s budget office
takes the necessary steps to create budget accounts for the new programs. This Office of
Planning, Research, and Regional Education plays a support role for the institution by
conducting research and analysis on student enrollment trends, student success, providing data to
campus decision makers and by writing ad hoc reports for campus groups engaged in program
evaluations. The office has spearheaded the development of an on-campus Data Warehouse and
provides frequent training to campus representatives on the use of data for decision making and
program evaluation. The office has taken the lead in developing the environmental scan and
strategic planning document for the College, meeting with governance groups to discuss recent
trends, the environmental context it faces, and formulating draft strategic goals for discussion.
As a result of those discussions, the College has identified six strategic goals for the
immediate future (2008-09). The goals are focused on the following themes:

Strategic Goals of the Institution


1) improving communication of the College’s programs and outcomes
2) improving staff development
3) increasing student access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes
4) reviewing and adjusting of budget priorities to enhance access and student success
5) facilitating the revitalization of College facilities and the Measure L Bond campaign
6) launching new programs that respond to the emerging trends in the region and world

Program units at the College have been asked to develop their own objectives and strategic
initiatives that mesh with the overarching goals established by the College. In the paragraphs
that follow, a summary of major goals and planning objectives are provided for stakeholders and
the community at large.




                                                                                               156
Goal 1 Communications – Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy
access to information.

Communication is essential to addressing the College’s commitment to serving the community
and its planning objectives. Several internal and external planning objectives are highlighted
below to address this strategic planning theme.

Objective                Activity                   Timeline                Key Individuals
Increase communication   Print & disseminate        Summer 2008             Director of Public
of College priorities to strategic plan document                            Information &
external community       to community leaders                               Marketing
Increase campus use of   3 campus workshops for     Fall 2008/Spring 2009   Dean of Planning,
information resources    faculty and staff on the                           Research & Regional
documenting student      use of the College data                            Ed
success & learning       warehouse &
outcomes                 Chancellor’s Office
                         Data Mart
Increase by 5% student   Increase student use of    Ongoing                 Vice President of
use of the College’s web the web portal by                                  Information Services
portal for access to     enhancing web services
campus services          through the Kuali
                         project
Implement a consistent   Maintain a bi-weekly       2008-2009               Vice President of
schedule of campus       schedule of distribution                           Information Services
notices on bond projects of the Campus E-                                   and Director of Public
and upcoming activities Bulletin and Delta                                  Information &
                         Express                                            Marketing
Increase the publication Mandate a consistent       2008-2009               Committee chairs
of committee agendas & format and uploading of
minutes on the campus    committee agendas and
Docushare network        minutes to the campus
                         Docushare network
At least 75% of
committees submit        Annual submission of
annual report to         committee reports to
President’s Council      President’s Council
Establish and publicize  Complete at least 80       September 2008          Dean of Planning,
a list of institutional  percent of the                                     Research & Regional
performance indicators   performance indicators                             Education
for the College          project by September
                         2008, post on the
                         College web site
More fully develop and Review current Delta         2008-09                 Vice Presidents and
utilize the College web  web content, identify                              Director of Public
site to provide          information gaps and                               Information and
meaningful information inconsistencies and                                  Marketing
                         work to enhance the
                         web page
Table 20: 2008 Strategic Goal One


                                                                                                  157
Goal 2 Staff Development – Develop a College-wide staff development program to improve
faculty, administrator, and classified staff skills to promote access, student success, and
positive student learning outcomes.

A college that is focused on continuous improvement cannot lose sight of the importance of
continuous staff development. Listed below are some of the key strategies and objectives that
have been identified by campus programs in this field.
Objective                     Activity                     Timeline                 Key Individuals
Increase faculty training     Faculty workshops on         Ongoing                  Academic Senate, Vice
initiatives in basic skills   campus by national and                                President of
courses to improve rates      regional experts in                                   Instruction/Assistant
of retention and student      developmental                                         Superintendent, Student
success by 2% within          education                                             Success Coordinator,
two years                     Opening day Flex                                      Dean of Planning,
                              activity on                                           Research and Regional
                              developmental                                         Education
                              education and learning
                              communities (Vince
                              Tinto)
                              Continue funding of
                              faculty generated Basic
                              Skills Mini Grants and
                              establish research
                              evaluation studies to
                              track progress and
                              implementation
Increase staff                Classified Staff Retreat     Spring 2009              Vice President of
development                   workshop on improving                                 Student Services
opportunities to provide      services to students
improved services to
students in the areas of
registration, on-line
services, assessment,
counseling, and
matriculation
Increase by 3 the             Provide training and         Fall 2008/ Spring 2009   Vice President of
number of learning            $1,000 stipends to                                    Instruction/Assistant
communities courses           faculty to encourage the                              Superintendent, Title
offered at the College        creation of learning                                  V/TRIO Coordinator
                              communities courses
Provide increased             Provide 3 workshops in       Spring 2009              Office of Planning,
faculty and staff training    the Professional                                      Research, and Regional
on use of the data            Development Center on                                 Education
warehouse and                 use of the data
Chancellor’s Office data      warehouse and data
mart                          mart for studies of
                              access, equity, retention,
                              and student success
Table 21: 2008 Strategic Goal Two



                                                                                                        158
Goal 3 Access, Success & Learning Outcomes – Increase access, student success, and positive
student learning outcomes, particularly for special populations like first-generation college
students, students from low-income families, and single-parent homes.

Objective                   Activity                   Timeline         Key Individuals
Achieve a successful        Review success rates by    2008-2009        Dean of Planning,
course completion rate      course, instructor,                         Research and Regional
of 65% for all courses at   method of instruction                       Education
San Joaquin Delta           and type of student;
College (up 2%)             provide reports to
                            relevant campus
                            stakeholders
Achieve a 55% rate of       Re-examine best            2008-2009        Student Success
successful course           practices for success in                    Coordinator, Vice
completion in pre-          Basic Skills courses and                    President of
collegiate Basic Skills     work to implement best                      Instruction/Assistant
courses (up 2%)             practices                                   Superintendent

                            Conduct faculty
                            workshops to
                            disseminate best
                            practices for student
                            success in basic skills
                            courses
Examine barriers to         Conduct surveys and        Fall 2008        Office of Planning,
success for first-          focus group studies of                      Research and Regional
generation and low-         student groups to                           Education, Student
income students             determine local and                         Success Coordinator
                            psycho-social factors
                            that impact rates of
                            successful course
                            completion
Increase by 5% the          Increase by 5% the         2009-2010        Dean of Math &
services offered in the     number of tutors                            Science and Dean of
Math/Science Learning       available for one-to-one                    English Language Arts
Center and the              tutoring within two                         divisions
Reading/Writing             years
Learning Center
Increase the number of      Initiate review and        2008-09          Academic Senate,
courses with student        adoption of new                             Curriculum Committee,
learning outcomes           curriculum for courses                      Faculty in various
(SLOs) by 15%               lacking SLOs                                disciplines

Establish assessment        Examine research           Fall 2008        Math and English
and placement               studies of assessment                       Faculty, Office of
guidelines in Math and      cut scores for                              Planning, Research &
English to promote          correlations with rates                     Regional Education,
greater rates of student    of student success                          Assessment Center
success in key gateway                                                  Coordinator
courses                     Faculty review of


                                                                                                159
Objective                     Activity                  Timeline    Key Individuals
                              studies and
                              establishment of
                              assessment regimes to
                              foster greater rates of
                              successful course
                              completion
Increase rates of             Continue funding,         Ongoing     President/Superin-
persistence and transfer      operation and explore                 tendent, Vice President
for all students, and         new sources of funding                of Instruction/Assistant
particularly for Hispanic     to support programs                   Superintendent, Vice
and African-American          such as AFFIRM,                       President of Student
students                      MESA, Puente, TRIO                    Services, Vice President
                              and Title V programs                  of Business Services
                                                                    Office of Planning,
                              Conduct on-going                      Research and Regional
                              evaluation studies of                 Education
                              special population
                              programs to evaluate
                              their success
Continue accessibility        Explore accessibility     2008-2009   Director of DSPS, Vice
modernization to ensure       barriers and devise                   President of Business
ADA access to all             timelines and funding                 Services
campus structures that        models for their
provide student and           removal
community services
Table 22: 2008 Strategic Goal Three




                                                                                        160
Goal 4 Budget Priorities – Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending
targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and ensure access and successful
student outcomes.

Objective                    Activity                 Timeline         Key Individuals
Streamline planning and      Strengthen review of     Ongoing          Superintendent/President,
budget process to            budget proposals by                       Vice Presidents, Dean of
ensure budget requests       Vice Presidents to                        Planning, Research, and
are tied to strategic        ensure AI strategic                       Regional Education,
priorities and to            goals, mission, and                       Director of Finance
program review               program review “check-
recommendations              offs” are valid

                             Establish annual goal
                             setting process at the
                             level of academic
                             divisions and programs
Evaluate the success of      Interview AI proposers   2008-09          Planning & Budget
funded AI projects           on success of AI                          Committee, Vice
                             projects, identify                        Presidents, Dean of
                             measurements needed                       Planning, Research, and
                             to gauge success                          Regional Education
Continue with the Kuali      Continue programming     Ongoing          Vice President of
Finance modernization        development of the                        Information Services,
process to upgrade the       Kuali finance module                      Director of Finance
College’s financial
accounting system
Table 23: 2008 Strategic Goal Four




                                                                                            161
Goal 5 Rebuilding & Growth – Facilitate the completion of Measure L Bond Projects and the
revitalization of the Stockton campus.

Objective                     Activity                   Timeline    Key Individuals
Complete construction         Supervise construction     2008-2010   Vice President of
of the Gateway Student        and change order                       Information Services,
Services Building with a      processes to reduce                    Vice President of
goal of opening by            construction delays and                Business Services, Vice
Summer 2010                   foster completion of the               President of
                              project under budget                   Instruction/Assistant
                                                                     Superintendent, Bond
                                                                     Team
Complete renovation of        Supervise construction     2008-2010   Vice President of
the Goleman Library           and change order                       Information Services,
Building with the goal        processes to reduce                    Vice President of
of returning to the           construction delays and                Business Services, Dean
expanded center in 2010       foster completion of the               of Library Services,
                              project under budget                   Bond Team
Complete design and           Track approvals with       2008-2009   Vice President of
architectural approval        the State Architect’s                  Business Services,
processes for the new         Office                                 Director of Facilities,
Math and Science                                                     Bond Team
Building and begin
construction
Complete renovation           Supervise construction     2008-2009   Vice President of
and construction of the       and change order                       Information Services,
athletic complex              processes to reduce                    Vice President of
                              construction delays and                Business Services, Vice
                              foster completion of the               President of
                              project under budget                   Instruction/Assistant
                                                                     Superintendent, Bond
                                                                     Team, Dean of PERA
Table 24: 2008 Strategic Goal Five




                                                                                         162
Goal 6 Innovation – In light of regional and global trends, examine operational procedures
and launch new vocational and educational programs that meet the challenges of wise
resource management, new energy technology, transportation logistics, health care,
viticulture, and information technology.

Objective                 Activity                     Timeline        Key Individuals
Explore innovative        Research emerging            2008-2009       Faculty, Division
academic and vocational   trends in the labor                          Deans, Vice President
programs and introduce    market                                       of Instruction/Assistant
at least 3 new programs                                                Superintendent, Dean of
that address changing     Explore the feasibility                      Workforce
needs of the              of new certificate                           Development,
surrounding community     programs in:                                 Curriculum Committee
                          Viticulture,
                          Outdoor recreation,
                          Naturalist/parks worker,
                          Alternative energy
                          technician,
                          Solar energy technician,
                          Water resource
                          management,
                          Transportation
                          management,
                          Information technology,
                          Stem cell lab technician,
                          Home health care aide,
                          Geographic information
                          systems
Explore green             Research the feasibility     Ongoing         President/Superinten-
innovations that could    of sustainability projects                   dent, Vice President of
reduce the College’s      that would reduce                            Business Services, Vice
carbon “footprint” by     energy consumption,                          President of
15%                       increase recycling, and                      Instruction/Assistant
                          employ the creative re-                      Superintendent
                          use of resources:

                           Shortened summer
                            schedules
                           Compressed calendars
                            for fall and spring
                            terms
                           Composting of food
                            waste
                           Improved irrigation
                            practices
                           Re-use of office
                            products on a larger
                            scale


                                                                                           163
Objective                     Activity                   Timeline         Key Individuals
                               Purchase of office
                                furniture using
                                recycled materials
                               Use of biodiesel fuels
                                in diesel fleet
                               Low flow toilet
                                installations
Table 25: 2008 Strategic Goal Six

Institutional Performance Indicators
In line with the planning processes mentioned above, the College has embarked on the
development of a comprehensive list of key performance indicators that can be tracked over time
to measure the College’s progress toward meeting specific goals. As of the spring of 2008,
campus governance groups had been asked to review a list of some 60 performance indicators,
and the list was endorsed by the President’s Council in spring of 2008. The Office of Planning,
Research, and Regional Education was assigned the task of developing an institutional report that
tracked the indicators on an annual basis. The specific indicators are aligned with the College’s
mission and vision statement, and parallel many of the goals outlined in the Strategic Plan. The
first formal report is scheduled for release in fall of 2008.




                                                                                             164
Appendix 1 – Chancellor’s Office Strategic Plan for California Community Colleges


The California Community College System has identified several key components in a strategic
planning process that was established in 2005. In 2007, the system office released a report on
progress toward implementing some of those goals (Chancellor’s Office 2007a). Among the
goals and the priority strategies that have been identified for implementation are:

   A. College Awareness & Access
         1. Encouraging early awareness of the community colleges as an option and the need
             for K-12 students and parents to prepare for student success.
         2. Ensuring that community colleges remain affordable and fulfill their primary
             mission or providing open access to all Californians
         3. Increasing college access among growing population groups that will emerge
             from current demographic trends.
   B. Student Success & Retention
         1. Ensure that basic skills development is a major focus and an adequately funded
             activity of the community colleges.
         2. Develop methods to more effectively assess student preparedness levels and to
             place students in appropriate courses.
   C. Partnerships for Economic & Workforce Development
         1. Ensure that community college programs are aligned and coordinated with state
             and local economic and workforce development needs.
         2. Create links between academic and career fields to provide clearly defined career
             pathways that encourage and support a lifetime of educational career
             opportunities.
         3. Ensure high standards and academic rigor in the community college programs
             while delivering timely, relevant and high quality offerings that meet the needs of
             business and industry.
         4. Encourage and support community college initiatives to collaborate with other
             economic and workforce development agencies and industry sectors to develop
             regional partnerships and networks.
   D. System Effectiveness
         1. Ensure the implementation of accountability reporting for the community colleges
             (ARCC) and annual evaluation of college-level performance indicators in meeting
             statewide educational needs.
         2. Develop additional measures of success based on student outcomes and the
             unique role of the community colleges in providing open access, lifelong learning,
             and career exploration opportunities.
         3. Enhance the research and analytical capability at the System Office to support the
             colleges and Board of Governors in tracking performance, planning and
             budgeting, and setting policy.
         4. Support the System Office in its role as an advocate and facilitative leader of the
             community colleges (especially for providing assistance with recovery from
             potential campus crises and emergencies).




                                                                                            165
   E. Resource Development
         1. Ensure that system resources are leveraged to implement the initiatives identified
            in the Strategic Plan.
         2. Develop alternative sources of revenue to reduce overall reliance on state funding.
         3. Ensure that colleges receive sufficient state resources to fulfill their primary
            mission of providing open access and ensuring student success.
         4. Address inequities and inadequacies in District funding mechanisms.

The College’s own strategic plans and strategies parallel many of the themes identified at
the system level. For example, basic skills development and student success are central
elements of the College’s own strategic plan and current planning documents, and mini-grants
have been awarded to faculty and staff to pursue specialized projects to improve student success
rates in developmental education courses. The College has taken part in several key initiatives at
the system level, including spearheading the development of geographic information system
(GIS) mapping files for each of the community college districts in the state. Annual ARCC data
submissions have resulted in discussions of strategies and objectives to improve rates of learning
in basic skills and ESL courses.




                                                                                              166
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Tien, Christine. 2008. Green Building: Examples from the City of Stockton. Presentation at the
       Green Momentum Conference sponsored by the Great Valley Center, Sacramento, May
       7, 2008.

U.S. Census Bureau. 2005. American Community Survey. Washington, DC: U.S. Census
       Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/home/saff/main.html?_lang=en

U.S. Congress. 2007. Energy Independence Act of 2007 – Title X: Green Jobs Act.
       Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/




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Appendix 5: Equity for All


             Equity for All: Institutional Responsibility for Student Success




Section I. Introduction


Large-scale demographic changes and social movements within the last 40 years have radically
changed the postsecondary institutional environment, particularly that of the community college.
This country’s emphasis on access to greater postsecondary educational opportunities has paved
the way for minority students to enroll in large numbers in institutions of higher education. As a
result, the face of higher education has changed and now sports a more diverse hue. San Joaquin
Delta College is no exception to the changes and it is an institution characterized by its diversity.
Students who enroll at Delta College are a reflection of the large, urban metropolis in which the
College is located.

The purpose of this report is to describe the activities and findings of Delta College’s Equity for
All team. This report begins by outlining the goals and background of the Equity for All Project
and describes the formation of Delta’s Equity for All team. The institutional context of San
Joaquin Delta College is subsequently summarized. Thereafter, “Academic pathways,” the
Equity for All perspective on which this interim report focuses, is defined. Student outcomes in
academic pathways are measured through “vital signs.” The vital signs are organized sets of data
utilized as a starting point from which to measure the status of equity for a given perspective.
After discussing vital signs used to measure equity in academic pathways, we highlight
significant gaps in performance that the vital signs revealed. The narrative of gaps is
accompanied by charts and graphs, illustrating areas in which the team identified as needing
further investigation. The penultimate section of this report lists three fine-grained measures
selected to monitor the gaps indicated in the previous section. The report concludes with the
team members’ initial recommendations for future action.

Goals and Background of the Equity for All Project

Higher education decision makers have traditionally favored interventions that look to change
the student so that they are better able to adapt to the processes and structures that govern
postsecondary institutions. The Equity for All project seeks to reframe the discussion from
student responsibility to institutional accountability and place the processes of higher education
center-stage to bring about change at the institutional level. This is accomplished through the in-
depth examination of existing institutional data, disaggregated by race and ethnicity. The
purpose of such an examination is to investigate the effectiveness of individual institutions to

                                                                                                 169
promote equity and excellence in the educational outcomes of historically underrepresented
students.

The key principle of Equity for All is that individuals at all levels of leadership, responsibility,
and power are the ones who can make change happen and bring about equitable educational
outcomes. The capacity of individuals to become agents of change can be facilitated by
engagement in a collaborative productive activity. In Equity for All this principle is implemented
by the formation of teams of practitioner-researchers who convene on a regular basis to examine
data on student outcomes and develop a scorecard that represents the “state of equity” for their
campus. These teams are called “evidence teams” and are comprised of faculty, administrators
and other university personnel who come together to critically examine and discuss routinely
collected data in order to reach a measure of understanding as to why inequities persist on their
campuses. Members of the evidence teams assume the role of researcher, whose job it is to
“hold up a mirror to their respective institutions and reflect the status of underrepresented
students on basic educational outcomes.” Participation in the evidence teams enable various
members of the university community to transform raw data (usually seen only by institutional
researchers and stored in obscure reports) into simplified, yet compelling “stories” that are
accessible to a wider audience. Organizational learning occurs when new knowledge is
constructed by evidence team members and is used to induce institutional change for the
improvement of educational outcomes for minority student groups.

Evidence team members begin by analyzing available data, disaggregated by race and ethnicity
across four perspectives: access, retention, institutional receptivity, and excellence. The initial
analysis of the data leads evidence team members to question and focus on specific educational
outcomes by student groups for further analysis. These questions in turn become the goals and
measures by which institutional effectiveness will be evaluated by the evidence team. The result
is the creation of an “Equity Scorecard,” a self-assessment framework that evaluates the current
status of equity within the institutions. The scorecard highlights areas in need of further attention
and establishes performance goals in the four perspectives as a means to attain equity.

The Equity Scorecard Framework

The Equity Scorecard is a “living” assessment framework that needs to be monitored to assess to
what extent inequities are being eliminated for four perspectives. The Equity Scorecard contains
a set of measures that provides an institution’s leadership with a comprehensive view of how
well historically underrepresented students are performing. As such, an institution’s Equity
Scorecard should be modified and updated on a routine basis. Four perspectives make up the
structure of the Scorecard (see Figure 1):


Transfer Readiness:

This perspective consists of measures that indicate students’ completion of required academic
requirements for transfer and measures that indicate institutional structures and practices that are
conducive to a transfer-oriented culture.




                                                                                                 170
Academic Pathways:

This perspective includes indicators that represent access to majors, programs, and tracks (e.g.,
transfer vs. vocational track).


Retention and Persistence Perspective:

Retention refers to continued attendance from one year to the next year and/or to completion of
degrees.


Excellence Perspective:

While measures of retention may represent the fulfillment of minimal requirements for
“academic survival,” excellence measures represent higher level academic accomplishments that
can lead to majors in STEM fields, transfer to selective institutions, winning academic
scholarships, etc. The excellence perspective calls attention to the importance of institutions
focusing on producing “leaders” and not just “survivors” (Gandara, 1999).
In addition, there are four sections included within each of the four perspectives in the Scorecard:
Measure, Baseline, Improvement Target, and Equity.

   1. A measure is an indicator that illustrates possible areas of equity or inequity of
      educational outcomes among ethnic/racial groups of students. A possible measure for
      Academic Pathways could be successful completion of courses for the Associate Degree,
      for example.

   2. The baseline constitutes the current status of the measure. For example, one can
      determine the percentage of students in a given ethnic group who successfully complete
      courses for the degree.

   3. The improvement target is a benchmark that expresses the criteria that indicate a goal has
      been accomplished. For example, the improvement target for completion of courses
      required for the degree could be a designated percent, such as 5% for a given ethnic
      group.

   4. Equity represents a numerical goal that the team aims to achieve for a given measure.
      For example, the team may decide that equity is achieved when at least 50% of all ethnic
      groups who attempt an Associate Degree successfully earn the degree.




                                                                                                171
Figure 25: Equity Scorecard Framework

Invitation to Participate in the Equity for All Project

San Joaquin Delta College was invited to participate in the Equity for All project based on the
racial/ethnic composition of its student body and at the request of Academic Senate President,
Janice Takahashi. All invited institutions met at least one of the following criteria for inclusion
in the project62:

                The percentage of enrolled Latino/a students was 25% or greater
                The enrollment of African-American students exceeded the California Community
                 College system-wide average of 7%;
                The enrollment of Native American students exceeded the system wide average of
                 1%;
                The total enrollment of non-Caucasian students was 50% or greater.

In addition to the fact that Delta College met the qualifications for participating in the Equity for
All project, the institution was also a good match for the project in other important ways.

62
     2003 Enrollment data from California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC) was used to establish qualification.

                                                                                                                           172
Specifically, Equity for All is commensurate with San Joaquin Delta College’s mission and
strategic goals and with a long tradition of honoring the diversity of the College’s student body
and service area. Delta’s mission statement follows below (the pertinent aspects are in bold):

   The mission of San Joaquin Delta College is providing excellent post-secondary
   education that serves the needs of students, the College District and the community
   through continuing, transfer, and career education. To achieve this objective, the
   faculty and staff commit themselves to providing comprehensive instructional
   programs, student services and public services that are high quality.

   In fulfilling its mission, San Joaquin Delta College acts upon the following principles:

       Commitment to excellence requires effective collaboration, respect for cultural
       diversity, and appreciation of historical perspective, open communication, high
       academic standards, and competitive athletics.

       Educational resources are available to all students regardless of age,
       disability, gender, or ethnicity.

       Institutional renewal must include continuous improvements through new
       and revised curricula; the use of student learning outcomes to enhance
       student performance; new and effective technology, and a vital connection to
       the arts and cultures of the community the College serves.

All aspects of the College encourage good citizenship, responsible leadership, ethical
behavior, and the appreciation of lifelong learning.

The strategic goals seek to achieve positive student outcomes, which connect to the goals and
objectives of the Equity for All project (in bold).

      Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information
       to and from all internal and external groups to promote access, student success, and
       positive student learning outcomes.
      Develop an annual College-wide Professional Development Program to improve faculty,
       administrator, and classified staff skills to promote access, student success, and
       positive student learning outcomes.
      Increase access, student success and positive student learning outcomes.
      Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust
       College budget priorities to support and insure access, student success, and successful
       student learning outcomes.

Moreover, the measures proposed by the California Community College System Office in
collaboration with the RP Group to satisfy AB1417, also mirror the goals of the Equity for All
project in the sense that they require systematic data collection, review of the data, and concern
improvement of such outcomes as transfer, degree and certificate attainment, and improvement
of success rates in basic skills courses.



                                                                                                173
                                           Section II. Institutional Context

The San Joaquin Delta College Equity Scorecard Team
The San Joaquin Delta College Equity for All team is comprised of five faculty members, three
administrators, and one classified employee from the Delta campus and two researchers from the
Center for Urban Education at the University of Southern California. These individuals are as
follows:

           John Williams, Team Leader
            Vice President, Student Services
           Dr. Kathy Hart, Institutional Researcher Dean of Planning, Research, and Regional
            Education - Vice President, Instructional Services
           Janice Takahashi, Academic Senate President
           Nick Bykov, Mathematics faculty member
           Candace Andrews, English faculty member
           Amir Asahdi-Rad, Biology faculty member
           Evelyn Chapman, Counselor
           Francisco Mora, Research Analyst
           Frank Harris III
            Research Associate, Center for Urban Education, University of Southern California
           Daniel K. Park
            Research Assistant, Center for Urban Education, University of Southern California

Prior to the first meeting, all team members attended an orientation to the project at the
University of Southern California with the nine other participating institutions. San Joaquin
Delta College’s Equity for All team, which is led by John Williams, met a total of six times from
June to December 2005. On January 19, the team presented its report to
President/Superintendent Raúl Rodríguez. Since that time, the team has met several additional
times (February 16, March 30, April 18, May 2, May 12, May 16, and June 2) and has presented
data to the English faculty on February 24 and mathematics faculty on March 3.

Demographic Composition

San Joaquin Delta College serves San Joaquin County and Calaveras County as well as small
portions of Sacramento, Alameda, and Solano counties. Stockton is the largest city in this fast-
growing, highly diverse, and generally below-average income service area. San Joaquin Delta
College enrolls approximately 20,000 students each year averaging about 26% Hispanic, 21%
Asian, 33% White Non-Hispanic, 10% African-American, and 10% other or undeclared
ethnicities (see Figure 1)63. San Joaquin Delta College is a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI), as
it enrolls a Hispanic student population that exceeds 25%, of which at least half are low-income.
Nearly 62% of the student population is female.




63
     This information was gathered from a report given to the MSAC and President’s Council.

                                                                                                174
Figure 2. Racial/ethnic composition (2005-2006 academic year)




    Racial/Ethnic Composition
                                                  African
                                                 American
                                                   10%


             White
             33%
                                                                Asian/Pacific
                                                                  Islander
                                                                    21%




                  Other
                  10%
                                                   Hispanic
                                                     26%

         African American       Asian/Pacific Islander     Hispanic    Other    White




                                                                                        175
                     Section III. Choosing a Perspective and Approach

Team Meetings 1 and 2

Prior to the first two team meetings, Kathy Hart and Francisco Mora completed as much of the
data for all four perspectives as possible. The purpose of the first two meetings, then, was to
review the data and begin to decide which of the four perspectives the team would focus on to
identify the racial/ethnic groups of particular interest. The team reviewed the following data:

       Perspective 1: Academic Pathways
       1. Access to Institution: Headcount 2004-2005 by race/ethnicity
       2. Access to Institution by Entering Cohort Group: Headcount for Summer, Fall, Spring
          2000-2001 through 2004-2005 by race/ethnicity (African-American, Asian/Pacific
          Islander, Hispanic, Other, and White) and gender
       3. Pathways to Educational Tracks: 2000-2001 Cohort Potential Transfer ‘Critical 4’
          by race/ethnicity and gender
       4. Pathways to Transfer: 2000-2001 Cohort Transfer Potential by race/ethnicity and
          gender

       Perspective 2: Retention and Persistence
       1. Persistence to Graduation or Transfer: 2000-2001 Cohort persistence to AA/AS
          degree, 2000-2001 Cohort persistence to transfer to four-year institution; and
          persistence to certificate completion
       2. Retention by Discipline: Achievement of A.A./A.S. degree by discipline and fields;
          achievement of certificate by fields
       3. Term to Term Persistence Rates: Spring 2003 to Fall 2003; Fall 2004 to Spring 2005
       4. Term to Term Persistence Rates by Discipline: Spring 2003 to Fall 2003; Fall 2004
          to Spring 2005

       Perspective 3: Transfer Readiness
       1. Course completion with grade of ‘C’ or better: English by race/ethnicity, gender;
          Math by race/ethnicity, gender; both Math and English by race/ethnicity, gender.
       2. UC Transfer-eligible disaggregated by race/ethnicity and gender
       3. CSU Upper-division transfer-eligible disaggregated by race/ethnicity and gender
       4. CSU Lower-division transfer-eligible disaggregated by age/ethnicity and gender
       5. Students with grade of ‘C’ in transfer-level courses disaggregated by race/ethnicity
          and gender
       6. Students who have chosen a major disaggregated by race/ethnicity
       7. Transfer-eligible students who took basic skills math and when disaggregated by
          race/ethnicity and gender

       Perspective 4: Excellence
       1. Excellence in academic performance: GPA distribution by race/ethnicity in basic
          skills, transferable, and vocational/occupational courses
       2. Excellence in degree completion: Transfer in three years or less; AA degree in three
          years or less
       3. Time to transfer: Transfer in two years from those who were transfer potential
       4. Transfer to highly selective institutions
                                                                                              176
Academic Pathways Defined

At the next several meetings, the team began to focus on the perspectives/measures of particular
interest. The Academic Pathways perspective focused on measures that indicate students’
progress toward the attainment of educational and career goals of transfer, A.A./A.S. degree, and
certificate attainment. The measures selected for the Academic Pathways perspective indicate
how well first time students of different racial and ethnic backgrounds are progressing to meet
the goals of transfer, completion of the A.A. or A.S., or completion of certificates. Although the
entering cohorts for 1999-2004 were looked at, the team focused primarily on the 2000-2001
cohort of first-time students (N=13,009) to give these students time to make progress toward the
goals of transfer, degree, or certificate.

Figure 2 indicates the racial/ethnic composition of the 2000-2001 first-time students. Rather
than using the five categories used in Figure 1, at the suggestion of the Academic Senate
president, the following was used: African-American, American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian
(not Vietnamese, Cambodian, or Laotian), Hispanic, Other non-white, Pacific Islander including
Filipino, Southeast Asian (Vietnamese, Cambodian, or Laotian), Unknown, and White. It was
felt these categories would give greater insight into the progress of more finely-grained racial
and ethnic subgroups.




                                                                                               177
Figure 3. Racial/ethnic composition (2000-2001 academic year)

 Racial/Ethnic Composition 2000-01

                                                           10%
                                                                      1%
                                                                           6%

                   38%




                                                                              24%




                                                                     1%
                                10%
                                                 5%             5%

           African American                                     American Indian/Alaskan Native
           Asian (not Viet, Camb, Laos)                         Hispanic
           Other non-White                                      Pacific Islander incl Filipino
           Southeast Asian (Viet, Camb, Laos)                   Unknown
           White

Academic Pathways Vital Signs
In reviewing the data related to Academic Pathways, the team focused on the following
questions:

          What is the racial/ethnic and gender composition of the entering fall cohorts of
           students from 2000-2004?
          What is the racial/ethnic and gender composition of students who attained ‘transfer
           potential’ status?
          What is the racial/ethnic and gender composition of students who attained “Critical 4”
           status?

The answers to these questions are organized into the following sections of this report:
Enrollment, Transfer Potential, and the ‘Critical 4’ requirements.


                                                                                                 178
   Enrollment
   As Table 1 below indicates, San Joaquin Delta College is becoming increasingly female over
   time—from 59.77% in fall 2000 to over 61% in fall 2004. The percentage of African-Americans
   has increased over time from just over 8% in fall 2000 to nearly 9.5% in fall 2004. Likewise,
   Asian/Pacific Islanders have increased from about 17.5% in fall 2000 to nearly 20.5% in fall
   2004. The Hispanic student population has also increased from nearly 24% to almost 25.5% in
   fall 2004. Only the White population has decreased from 41.65% in fall 2000 to 35.25% in fall
   2004. Overall, traditionally underrepresented ethnic groups seem to be gaining greater access to
   college through attending Delta College.
   Table 1 - Fall Enrollment 2000-2004 by Race/Ethnicity And Gender


Academic                                African- Asian/Pacific                                    %
Year     Gender                         American Islander        Hispanic Other White    Total    Gender
Fall     Female                                 970       1,845       2,818    958 4,817 11,408 59.77%
2000     Male                                   572       1,459       1,723    750 3,134    7,638 40.01%
         unknown                                                          2     14             16   0.08%
         Unknown/Non-Respondent                   2                             24             26   0.14%
Total                                         1,542       3,304       4,543  1,722 7,951 19,088
                                             8.08%      17.31% 23.80% 9.02% 41.65%
Fall       Female                             1,061       1,942       3,002  1,038 4,901 11,944 59.50%
2001       Male                                 616       1,575       1,862    792 3,240    8,085 40.28%
           unknown                                                        1     18             19   0.09%
           Unknown/Non-Respondent                 1            1          1     23             26   0.13%
Total                                         1,677       3,517       4,865  1,848 8,141 20,074
                                             8.35%      17.52% 24.24% 9.21% 40.55%
Fall       Female                             1,138       2,115       3,148  1,070 4,934 12,405 60.34%
2002       Male                                 632       1,603       1,900    817 3,149    8,101 39.40%
           unknown                                                        3     19             22   0.11%
           Unknown/Non-Respondent                 1            1          2     26     1       31   0.15%
Total                                         1,770       3,718       5,051  1,906 8,083 20,559
                                             8.61%      18.08% 24.57% 9.27% 39.32%
Fall       Female                             1,228       2,196       3,186  1,006 4,673 12,289 60.66%
2003       Male                                 663       1,730       1,881    707 2,955    7,936 39.17%
           unknown                                                        1     11             12   0.06%
           Unknown/Non-Respondent                 1                       1     18     1       21   0.10%
Total                                         1,891       3,926       5,068  1,724 7,628 20,258
                                             9.33%      19.38% 25.02% 8.51% 37.65%
Fall       Female                             1,264       2,362       3,200  1,048 4,348 12,222 61.04%
2004       Male                                 635       1,717       1,878    745 2,711    7,686 38.38%
           unknown                                2                       1     39             42   0.21%
           Unknown/Non-Respondent                 2            1          1     68     2       74   0.37%
Total                                         1,901       4,079       5,079  1,832 7,059 20,024
                                             9.49%      20.37% 25.36% 9.15% 35.25%
Source: Delta College Data Warehouse--Demographics Cube




                                                                                                 179
Transfer Potential and AA/AS Degree or Certificate Attainment

Rather than use self-declared educational goals to measure progress toward transfer, A.A./A.S.
degrees, and certificate completion, the team used a measure called transfer potential and
A.A./A.S. degree or certificate attainment. Transfer potential was defined as “attained 12 units
and attempted transfer English or transfer mathematics course.” The team had also completed
some studies of general progress in basic and intermediate skills English and math courses that
could inform their findings, which found that overall very few students irrespective of ethnicity
were making progress from the lowest level basic skills reading, writing, and mathematics
classes to transfer-level classes.

Of the 13,009 first-time students in 2000-01, 2,674 (20.5%) had reached transfer potential status
by spring 2005. Table 2 shows the percent of each racial/ethnic group in the original cohort, the
percent in the transfer potential group, and the Equity Index for each group (See Appendix A).
As the data indicate, African-Americans and Hispanics are underrepresented in the transfer
potential group while Asian, Southeast Asians, Pacific Islander/Filipinos, and Whites are
overrepresented. These data were even more dramatic when the team looked at them by gender
as both African-American males and females, and Hispanic males were the most
underrepresented groups.

Table 2
First-time students by race/ethnicity compared to transfer potential

                                  Asian
                       Amer       (not               Other
             African   Ind/Alas   V, C,              non-    Pac Is      SE
             Amer      Native     L)      Hispanic   white   /Filipino   Asian   Unkn    White
 2000-01
 First-        1,226       180      773      3,151     165        628      703   1,363     4,820
 time            9%        1%       6%        24%      1%         5%       5%     10%       37%

 Transfer       181          27     212       596       37        148      207     179     1,087
 Potential      7%          1%     22%        8%       1%         6%       8%      6%       41%
 Equity
 Index          0.78       1.00    3.67       0.33    1.00       1.20     1.60    0.60      1.11


 2000-01
 First-
 time
 Students     13,009
 Transfer
 Potential
 Students      2,674    20.56%




                                                                                                   180
When the team looked at A.A./A.S. degree attainment (see Table 3), the data again revealed that
African-Americans and Hispanics were underrepresented in the 6.47 % of the 2000-2001 cohort
who attained A.A./A.S. degrees.

Table 3
First-time students by race/ethnicity compared to A.A./A.S. degree attainment

                                 Asian
                      Amer       (not               Other
            African   Ind/Alas   V, C,              non-    Pac Is      SE
            Amer      Native     L)      Hispanic   white   /Filipino   Asian   Unkn    White
2000-
2001
First-        1,226       180      773      3,151     165        628      703   1,363     4,820
time            9%        1%       6%        24%      1%         5%       5%     10%       37%
AA/A.S.          36        13       93        182      14         49       72      32       351
degrees         4%        2%      11%        22%      2%         6%       9%      4%       42%
Equity
Index          0.44       2.00    1.83       0.92    2.00       1.20     1.80    0.40      1.14

2000-
2001
First-
time
Students     13,009
A.A./A.S.
Degree
Students       842      6.47%




                                                                                                  181
Table 4 continues the comparison of the ethnicity of students from the 2000-2001 cohort who
completed certificates. In this case, 2.8% of the 2000-2001 first-time students completed a
certificate. Again, African-Americans and Hispanics lag behind their Asian, Southeast Asian,
Pacific Islander/Filipino, and White counterparts in AA/AS degree attainment.

Table 4
First-time students by race/ethnicity compared to certificate attainment

                                       Asian
                            Amer       (not               Other
                  African   Ind/Alas   V, C,              non-    Pac Is      SE
                  Amer      Native     L)      Hispanic   white   /Filipino   Asian   Unkn    White

    2000-2001       1,226       180      773      3,151     165        628      703   1,363     4,820
    First-time        9%        1%       6%        24%      1%         5%       5%     10%       37%

    Certificate        29         3       20         74      7          29       16      9        179
    Students          8%         1%      5%        20%      2%         8%       4%      2%       49%
    Equity
    Index            0.89       1.00    0.83       0.83    2.00       1.60     0.80    0.20      1.32

    2000-01
    First-time
    Students      13,009
    Transfer
    Potential
    Students         366      2.81%



Further analysis of the Transfer Potential data indicated that while 2,609 (97.6%) of the 2,674
students had completed 12 units and attempted a transfer English, only 25% had completed 12
units and attempted a transfer-level math class. Both African-Americans and Hispanics were
somewhat underrepresented in the population of students who attempted transfer English;
however, they were significantly underrepresented in the population who attempted transfer-
level math.

Critical 4’ Attainment

The “Critical 4” or “Golden 4” are a set of courses that, when completed with a ‘C’ or better,
highly predict successful transfer to a four-year institution. The “Critical 4” at Delta College are
English 1A, English 1B (1D or Philosophy 30), Com St 1A (speech), and transfer-level math.
Of the 13,009 students who began in the 2000-2001 cohort, just over 6% had completed the
“Critical 4” with a ‘C’ or better by the Spring 2005. Table 5 indicates the comparison of the
percentage of each racial/ethnic group in the “Critical 4” population with the percentage in the
First Time Student population and provides the Equity Index for each group. In this comparison,
African-Americans again fall significantly lower while Hispanics are slightly lower than the
comparison group in the population.




                                                                                                        182
Table 5 - First-time students by race/ethnicity compared to ‘Critical 4’ attainment
                                Asian
                     Amer       (not               Other
           African   Ind/Alas   V, C,              non-    Pac Is      SE
           Amer      Native     L)      Hispanic   white   /Filipino   Asian   Unkn    White
2000-
2001
First        1,226       180      773      3,151     165        628      703   1,363     4,820
Time           9%        1%       6%        24%      1%         5%       5%     10%       37%
Critical        27         7       86        183       7         54       84      29       328
4              3%        1%      12%        23%      1%         7%      10%      4%       41%
Equity
Index         0.33       1.00    2.00       0.96    1.00       1.40     2.00    0.40      1.11

2000-
2001
First
Time
Students    13,009
Critical
4              805     6.19%

Fine-Grained Measures for the Academic Pathways Perspective
Consistent with the Equity Scorecard approach, upon examining the vital signs data, the team
identified the attainment of Transfer Potential (first time students who have attained 12 units and
attempted a transfer English or mathematics course) and A.A./A.S. degree attainment as the key
retention and success variables they believed they should focus on for the following reasons:
   1. Attainment of Transfer Potential status and A.A./A.S. degree attainment are strong
      predictors of retention, persistence and course completion.
   2. Attainment of Transfer Potential and/or A.A./A.S. degree attainment require a focus on
      improving retention and success in basic skills English (and Reading) leading to transfer
      English where it is noted the need to improve course retention, successful completion,
      and successful continuation in courses in the sequence leading to transfer English
      Courses: English 1A and English 1B/1D and Philosophy 30.
   3. Attainment of Transfer Potential and AA/AS degree attainment require a focus on
      retention and success in basic skills mathematics leading to transfer mathematics where it
      is noted the need to improve course retention, successful completion and successful
      continuation in courses in the sequence leading to transfer math courses.
   The ethnic/gender specific groups we wish to focus on are as follows:
   1. African-American Men and Women
      African-Americans make up approximately 10 % of the first-time student population at Delta
      College and this percentage is inching up slowly. However, African-American men and
      women are underrepresented in the Transfer Potential, AA/AS degree, and Certificate groups.

       Hispanic Men are significantly underrepresented in the Transfer Potential, AA/AS
       degree, and Certificate groups.

                                                                                                 183
Figure 4. Equity scorecard framework with academic pathways measures




      Measure #1: Achievement of transfer potential status (Completion of 12 units and
       attempted transfer English or transfer-level math)

      Measure #2: Achievement of A.A./A.S. degree

      Measure #3: Achievement of a certificate

      Measure #4: Completion of the ‘Critical 4’ (English 1A, English 1B (1D or Philosophy
       30), Com St 1A (speech), and transfer-level math)




                                                                                          184
                     Section IV. Perspective 2: Retention and Persistence

For Perspective 2, Retention and Persistence, the team chose to focus on term to term persistence
rates. They chose to look at two cohorts of first time students and their persistence to the next
semester. The semesters we chose were spring 2003 to fall 2003 and fall 2004 to spring 2005.
For this perspective the team chose two more recent cohorts to give them an idea of how groups
of students were persisting from one term to another. As Table 5 shows below, overall
persistence of students who began at Delta College in the spring 2003 was relatively low at
nearly 30% returning the following Fall 03 semester. Among the spring 2003 first time students,
African-Americans were the only ethnic group that persisted at a lower rate than their
representation in the population of spring 2003 first time students.

Table 5
Spring 2003 first-time students by race/ethnicity compared to those who persisted to Fall 2003

                                         Asian
                              Amer       (not               Other
                    African   Ind/Alas   V, C,              non-    Pac Is      SE
                    Amer      Native     L)      Hispanic   white   /Filipino   Asian   Unkn   White
                     337         42        186     951       43        151       96      402    1,151
Spring 2003 First
      Time           10%        1%        6%       28%       1%       4%         3%     12%     34%
   Persistence        91        15        69       297       22       46         33      73     344
Spring 03 to Fall
        03           9%         2%        7%       30%      2%        5%        3%      7%      35%
Equity Index         0.92       1.21      1.26     1.06     1.73      1.03      1.17    0.62    1.01

Spring 2003 First
Time Students       3,360
Persistence Sprig
03 to Fall 03        990      29.46%

Table 6 shows the persistence of students by ethnic group of first time fall 2004 students to
spring, 2005. Persistence overall for the first time fall 2004 cohort was considerably higher than
the spring 2003 to fall 2004 at 52.25%, and all ethnic groups were represented in nearly the same
proportion as they were in the initial cohort. These two variables, unlike those that were looked
at in Perspective 1 are not showing extreme differences among ethnic groups in simple
persistence from one semester to another. Nevertheless, the persistence rates for all students,
especially from spring to fall, could certainly be improved to improve overall student success.




                                                                                                        185
Table 6
Fall 2004 first-time students by race/ethnicity compared to those who persisted to Spring 2005

                                           Asian
                               Amer        (not                Other
                     African   Ind/Alas    V, C,               non-    Pac Is      SE
                     Amer      Native      L)       Hispanic   white   /Filipino   Asian    Unkn    White
  Fall 2004 First        322          45      199        873      57         186     122      564       983
       Time             10%         1%        6%        26%      2%          6%       4%     17%       29%
  Persistence Fall       168          25      112        485      35         114       86     155       571
  04 to Spring 05      10%          1%        6%        28%      2%         7%       5%       9%       33%
 Equity Index          1.00        1.06      1.08       1.06    1.18       1.17     1.35     0.53      1.11

 Fall 2004 First
 Time Students        3,355
 Persistence Fall
 04 to Spring 05      1,753      52.25%

Fine-Grained Measures for Retention and Persistence Perspective

Upon examining the vital signs data for Retention and Persistence, the team identified
persistence from spring to fall and fall to spring as two variables to monitor with a key focus on
retention of African-American students who enter the College in the spring. Overall, persistence
from spring to fall shows Asians and Pacific Islander/Filipinos in slightly increased proportions
among those who persisted, while African-Americans lost ground. However, it should be noted
that persistence from spring to fall is low at 29% of the first-time students. On the other hand,
persistence from fall to spring is considerably higher—over 52% returned, and they returned in
the same proportions ethnically as they appeared in the initial cohort. Overall, measures in this
perspective were not particularly helpful in providing answers to the concerns that were raised in
the Academic Pathways perspective. The team did not set targets in this perspective, feeling that
the measures they chose in the Academic Pathways perspective were more telling and
demonstrated the most dramatic differences for certain groups.

                               Section V. Perspective 3: Transfer Readiness

For Perspective 3, Transfer Readiness, the team focused on three variables and again used the
2000-01 cohort used for Perspective 1, Academic Pathways. The team believed that UC
Transfer Eligible, CSU Upper-Division Transfer Eligible, and Grade of “C” or better in Transfer
Level Courses, would give them insight into how students were doing in preparing themselves
for transfer.

Table 7 shows that overall approximately 20% of the 2000-01 first time students had achieved a
grade of C or better in transfer level courses by 2004-05. Looked at by ethnicity, two groups of
concern emerged: African-Americans and Hispanics. Unlike their Southeast Asian and Asian
counterparts who are found in the target group in greater proportions that they were in the 2000-
01 first time student cohort, just 7% of African-Americans and 22% of Hispanics achieved this
milestone as opposed to 9% and 24% in the initial cohort.



                                                                                                          186
Table 7
2000-01 First Time Students who achieved a grade of C or better in transfer level courses.
                                           Asian
                               Amer        (not                 Other
                     African   Ind/Alas    V, C,                non-    Pac Is      SE
                     Amer      Native      L)        Hispanic   white   /Filipino   Asian    Unkn     White
  2000-01 First       1,226         180       773       3,151     165         628     703     1,363     4,820
      Time               9%         1%        6%         24%      1%          5%       5%      10%       37%
  Grade of 'C' in        180          26      213         596      37         148     207       176     1,088
  Transfer Level
     Courses             7%         1%        8%         22%      1%         6%       8%        7%       41%

 Equity Index           0.75       0.97      1.33        0.93    1.39       1.11     1.55      0.66      1.10

 2000-01 First
 Time Students       13,009
  Grade of 'C' in
  Transfer Level
     Courses          2,671     20.53%

Following the 2000-01 cohort of first-time students, the team then looked to see how many had
achieved CSU Upper-Division Transfer Eligibility. While nearly more than 20% had achieved C
or better in transfer level classes, only 4.83% (628 of 13,009) had achieved CSU Upper-Division
Transfer Eligibility by 2004-05. Furthermore, as Table 8 shows, African-Americans and
Hispanics were losing ground to their Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander/Filipino
counterparts in this level of transfer preparation.

Table 8
2000-01 First time Students who achieved CSU Upper-Division Transfer Eligibility

                                           Asian
                               Amer        (not                 Other
                     African   Ind/Alas    V, C,                non-    Pac Is      SE
                     Amer      Native      L)        Hispanic   white   /Filipino   Asian    Unkn     White
   2000-01 First      1,226         180       773       3,151     165         628     703     1,363     4,820
       Time              9%         1%        6%         24%      1%          5%       5%      10%       37%
   CSU Upper-             29          6         84        139       8          43       68       33       218
 Division Transfer
        Elig             5%         1%       13%         22%      1%         7%      11%        5%       35%
 Equity Index           0.51       0.96      2.23        0.92    1.27       1.37     2.17      0.53      0.94

 2000-01 First
 Time Students       13,009
   CSU Upper-
 Division Transfer
        Elig            628      4.83%




                                                                                                            187
Finally, the team looked at the 2000-01 First time Student cohort to see how many had achieved
UC Transfer Eligibility by 2004-05. Of the 13,009 students who began at Delta in 2000-01, only
352, 2.71%, had achieved UC Transfer Eligibility by the end of the 2004-05 academic year.
When looked at by ethnicity, African-Americans and Hispanics had again lost ground, and again
their Asian and Southeast Asian counterparts had more than doubled their representation in the
UC Transfer Eligible group.

Table 9
2000-01 First time Students who achieved UC Transfer Eligibility

                                         Asian
                             Amer        (not                 Other
                   African   Ind/Alas    V, C,                non-    Pac Is      SE
                   Amer      Native      L)        Hispanic   white   /Filipino   Asian    Unkn     White
   2000-01 First    1,226          180       773      3,151     165         628      703    1,363     4,820
      Time             9%          1%        6%        24%      1%          5%       5%      10%       37%
  UC Transfer           10           0        54         73       5          23       46       21       120
     Eligible          3%          0%      15%         21%      1%          7%     13%        6%       34%
Equity Index          0.32        0.00      2.56       0.86    1.42        1.31     2.61     0.60      0.92

2000-01 First
Time Students      13,009
UC Transfer
Eligible              352      2.71%

Fine-Grained Measures for Transfer Readiness Perspective

Upon examining the vital signs data for Transfer Readiness, the team identified three variables
and again used the 2000-01 cohort of first time students used in Perspective 1, Academic
Pathways. UC Transfer Eligible, CSU Upper-Division Transfer Eligible, and Grade of “C” or
better in Transfer Level Courses were the variables that were chosen. African-Americans lost
considerable ground to all other groups when compared on all three variables, and only 39 of the
initial 1,226 African-Americans achieved either CSU or UC Transfer Eligibility. Hispanics, too,
experienced disappointing outcomes with only 212 of 3,151 achieving CSU or UC transfer
eligible status. Clearly, the College needs to work with these groups and their parents to improve
these outcomes.

As all of these outcomes were reviewed, it became clear that the initial placements in reading,
writing, and mathematics needed to be looked at to see if the lower achieving groups were
coming into the College with lower skills, and if so, if they were also being unsuccessful in the
basic skills courses. If, on the other hand, they were entering the College well-prepared in
reading, writing, and mathematics, why were they being unsuccessful?

These data and discussions about them will be the subject of coming meetings with
English/Reading and Mathematics faculty.




                                                                                                          188
                                      Section VI. Conclusion

The findings and recommendations presented in this report were arrived at through careful
examination and discussion of institutional data, disaggregated by race/ethnicity and also by
gender. Delta’s Equity for All team gained a new understanding of the state of equity in
educational outcomes at San Joaquin Delta College as we engaged in a collaborative analysis of
the data. However, the work of the team does not stop at findings and recommendations.
Sharing these findings about the state of equity at San Joaquin Delta College with the wider
campus community is equally important. As such, the team developed a multi-pronged
dissemination strategy to spread the word about what they have found and to engage faculty,
administrators, staff and students in a discussion about how to bring out equity in educational
outcomes:

          Presentation to the San Joaquin Delta College President--completed
          Presentation to a select group of English/Reading faculty--completed
          Presentation to a select group of Mathematics faculty—completed
          Submission of AI Strategic Planning proposal for funds to explore equity solutions,
           present to adjunct faculty, etc.--completed
          Presentations to all English/Reading faculty including adjunct faculty—Fall 2005
          Presentation to all Mathematics faculty including adjunct faculty—Fall 2005
          Presentation to the Academic Senate, Matriculation and Student Access Committee,
           President’s Council, Division Deans Council, Student Services Council.

The team hopes that this dissemination strategy will help to bring the entire campus community
into a dialogue about equitable educational outcomes. While proud of what they have
accomplished thus far, the San Joaquin Delta College Equity for All team realizes they must
continually infuse the state of equity into the larger discussion about institutional performance.




                                                                                                189
                                        Environmental Scan

The Equity Index is a measure of proportionality based on the population for each racial and
ethnic group under analysis. The Equity Index is a ratio of two shares or percentages as
expressed by the formula below.




                                          Target group with the educational outcome / Total
        Target Group’s                         students with the educational outcome
      Equity Index for the
      educational outcome        =          Target group in the reference population / Total
           of interest
                                                 students in the reference population




The numerator of the ratio is the share or percentage of the students from the target group (e.g.,
Latino students) among all students with a given academic feature and the denominator is the
corresponding reference measure. At its simplest level, it means that students who obtain post-
secondary degrees should be representative of the College student body; students who
successfully transfer from two-year community colleges to four-year colleges should be
representative of the students in the community colleges.
To illustrate how the Equity Index is used to calculate equity, we will use a fictional college’s
transfer numbers. The graduating class of this college consists of 1,000 students and 400, or 40
percent, are Latino students. From this graduation cohort a total of 450 students transfer to a
four-year institution, of whom 45, or 10 percent, are Latinos. These data, once placed in the
formula for the Equity Index, yield the following result:

                                 45 Latino students transfer to 4-year /
    Latino students’ Equity      450 total transfer cohort
                                                                                   10%
  Index for attending the UC
            and CSU
                             =                                               =           = 0.25
                                                                                   40%
                                    400 Latino
Interpreting the Academic Equity Index Score graduates /
                                            1000 total graduates
The Equity Index scores are easy to interpret. A score of 1.0 represents equity, a score less than

1.0 indicates below equity, and a score higher than 1.0 signifies above equity. Scores that are
below or above 1.0 represent an equity gap that is reflective of an under representation or
overrepresentation in the specific indicator. In the fictional example provided above, the Equity
Index for Latino students transferring to four-year institutions is 0.25. Since the achievement of
equity requires that each group’s Equity Index results in 1.0, these results reveal a major gap in
equity in the transfer rates for Latinos.


                                                                                                  190
Appendix 6: District Action Plan


The following goals and action plans are organized by vice presidential area of responsibility.
Goals and plans support the Strategic Plans and identify the accreditation standard to which they
refer.


Business Services

A new vice president assumed the administrative responsibilities for the Business Services
Division in June 2008. As part of the overall district initiative to fill important administrative
vacancies, the new vice president of business services has already begun many of the Action
Plans and new initiatives that were contemplated under the previous leadership.

Leveraging technology, the new vice president of business services has an aggressive agenda for
replacing critical administrative computing systems with state-of-the-art programs that will add
functionality to the College and provide key accountability measures. For example, the new
Kuali / KFS financial control system will provide a way to report total general fund expenditures
based upon the Strategic Plan pursued by the expenditures. Recognizing that funding is a
significant way an institution shows its commitment to strategic initiatives, the new vice
president has made accountability to the Strategic Plan his number one priority for computerized
financial control systems.




                                                                                                     191
         Recommendation 3.1


GOAL 1
Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and external groups to
promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.
      Objective            Strategic/Tools           Responsible Party           Time Frame           Outcomes                Resources      Accreditation    Program
                                                  w/Stakeholders Involved        Completion                                                   Standards        Review
Enhance engagement                              Vice President/Business         FY 2006-07    Better communication and
of Planning & Budget                            Services, Finance Department                  understanding of Budget.
Committee                                       management team                               Reasonably framed
                                                                                              expectations.
Work closely with         Meet with VP of IS    Director of Finance with team   Ongoing       Implementation of             See Bond         9 and 3
Vice President of         throughout process    members – Director of                         General Ledger to go live     Quick Start
Information Services      to ensure internal    Purchasing, Accounting                        7/1/10                        #27.S.7 and AI
on development            and external          Manager, and Budget                                                         #1
communication/open        coordination.         Manager.
source system(s)
Install web based job     Implement Digital     Greg Greenwood, Patrick         Sept. 2006    The goal is to allow          Existing         3C              No
submission software.      Storefront software   Stapleberg, with assistance                   remote submission of          funding. No
                          by Electronics For    from IS.                                      print jobs in a               additional
                          Imaging Inc.                                                        standardized PDF format.      staff.
                          Provide training                                                    It is part of a larger goal
                          sessions in PDC.                                                    to move volume from
                                                                                              convenience copiers to
                                                                                              the Publication Center’s
                                                                                              more cost effective
                                                                                              production equipment.
Install scan to PDF/E-    Implement             Greg Greenwood, Patrick         Sept. 2006    This will allow staff and     Existing         3C              No
Mail devices in high      DocSend scanning      Stapleberg, with assistance                   faculty to submit jobs        funding. No
usage areas.              devices These will    from IS.                                      electronically to             additional
                          be added to                                                         Publication Center if they    staff.
                          existing scanners.                                                  only have a paper
                                                                                              document. It will assist in
                                                                                              moving volume from
                                                                                              convenience copiers to
                                                                                              the Publication Center’s
                                                                                              production equipment.
Begin delivery services   Delivery service      Publication Center staff        Sept. 2006    Re-establishing delivery      Will require     3C              No
for completed work.       would be to any                                                     services will add further     hiring
                          permanently                                                         motivation for staff to       additional
                          staffed office.                                                     submit work                   work study



         Action Planning: Business Services                                                                                                                  192
          Recommendation 3.1


GOAL 1
Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and external groups to
promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.
      Objective            Strategic/Tools            Responsible Party        Time Frame           Outcomes                Resources       Accreditation    Program
                                                   w/Stakeholders Involved     Completion                                                    Standards        Review
                          Electronically                                                     electronically to the        and short term
                          submitted jobs                                                     Publication Center, thus     employees
                          would get priority                                                 reducing the cost for each   from existing
                          for delivery                                                       document.                    funding.
Continue to update the    As the Public          Purchasing                   Ongoing        The goal is to improve the   Existing                          No
Purchasing Web Page       Works projects are     Bond Team                    process        communication with both      funding. No
and Electronic            announced, the         Finance & Budget Depts.                     internal and external        additional
Construction Bid          information needs                                                  groups. The electronic       staff.
Board.                    to be immediately                                                  advertising of projects is
                          posted in the                                                      an effective and efficient
                          electronic systems                                                 way of soliciting vendor
                          to notify potential                                                participation. It allows
                          bidders.                                                           the vendors the
                                                                                             opportunity to access the
                                                                                             project information on a
                                                                                             timely manner to
                                                                                             determine if they want to
                                                                                             submit a bid.
Continue to oversee       This is a              Purchasing and the Bond      Ongoing        The goal is to make sure     Existing                          No
the bid process for the   communication and      Team                         process        the rules and regulations    funding. No
Bond related projects.    coordination effort.                                               governing Public             additional
                                                                                             Purchasing are applied       staff.
                                                                                             correctly to avoid issues
                                                                                             that may delay the
                                                                                             progress of a project.
Provide training          Provide yearly         Maria Bernardino and the     Yearly event   This workshop will be a      No additional                     No
opportunities for local   workshop for local     Small Business Development   (Spring        yearly event after having    staff. May
vendors to understand     vendors on how to      Center                       semester)      a successful response to     require some
the community college     do business with                                                   the first workshop that      additional
bidding process.          California                                                         took place early Spring      funding to pay
                          Community                                                          2006. The goal is to         for advertising
                          Colleges.                                                          provide the vendors with     the event.
                                                                                             information regarding the
                                                                                             various rules and



          Action Planning: Business Services                                                                                                                 193
         Recommendation 3.1


GOAL 1
Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and external groups to
promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.
      Objective           Strategic/Tools          Responsible Party          Time Frame            Outcomes                Resources      Accreditation    Program
                                                w/Stakeholders Involved       Completion                                                    Standards        Review
                                                                                             regulations well as
                                                                                             individual District
                                                                                             processes they would
                                                                                             have to comply with if
                                                                                             they want to do business
                                                                                             with the community
                                                                                             college system.
Enhance bond program     Complete overhaul    Andy Dunn, Maria Baker, BR     Ongoing         Enhanced understanding       Bond Team,       N/A             N/A
outreach to both         of bond website;     Brown, Bob Bush, Jeff Scogin                   of how Measure L funds       Facilities
internal and external    implement campus                                                    are being expended.          Planning
stakeholders.            wide email                                                                                       Committee
                         program; create
                         uniform campus
                         wide project
                         signage; increase
                         participation in
                         shared governance
                         committees;
                         increase frequency
                         of community
                         Outreach meetings.
Continue to serve as a   Serve on the         Purchasing & Accounts          Ongoing         The goal is to provide       One additional                   No
functional committee     various working      Payable                        process until   technical feedback, based    staff member
member for the Kuali     committees to                                       the system is   on the respective areas of   was approved
Financial System.        provide feedback                                    finalized and   expertise to ensure that     and is in the
                         regarding the                                       implemented.    the final outcome is an      process of
                         various system                                                      effective and efficient      being hired.
                         enhancements.                                                       Financial system.
Implement the            The electronic       Maria Bernardino, Receiving    July 2006       This is an enhancement to    No additional                    No
electronic Tracking      tracking device      staff, and Dave Sartain                        the current tracking         funding
System to track the      will be available                                                   system. Currently, only
status of incoming       for campus use via                                                  the Receiving Department
packages.                the Purchasing                                                      is able to provide
                         Web Site.                                                           information on the status



         Action Planning: Business Services                                                                                                                 194
       Recommendation 3.1


GOAL 1
Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and external groups to
promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.
     Objective           Strategic/Tools         Responsible Party      Time Frame          Outcomes              Resources   Accreditation   Program
                                              w/Stakeholders Involved   Completion                                             Standards       Review
                                                                                     of packages received.
                                                                                     The electronic tracking
                                                                                     device will allow
                                                                                     individuals to track a
                                                                                     package, as long as it has
                                                                                     been logged in the
                                                                                     Receiving system. They
                                                                                     will not have to call
                                                                                     Receiving to obtain
                                                                                     delivery information such
                                                                                     as the date when the
                                                                                     package was delivered to
                                                                                     the department and who
                                                                                     signed for it. The user
                                                                                     will also be able to print
                                                                                     the electronic signature.


       Table 26: Business Services Goal One




       Action Planning: Business Services                                                                                                     195
      Recommendation 3.1



GOAL 2
Develop an annual College-wide staff development program to improve faculty, administrator, and classified staff skills to promote
access, student success and positive student learning outcomes.

       Objective            Strategic/Tools           Responsible Party        Time Frame            Outcomes               Resources         Accreditation    Program
                                                   w/Stakeholders Involved     Completion                                                      Standards        Review
Update and continue       Make evaluations a     Vice President of Business   Claire – ASAP      Enhanced
employee evaluations      Strategic Learning     Services & Directors         MB – ASAP          capabilities
                          tool                                                Maria – ASAP
                                                                              Yvonne –
                                                                              ASAP
                                                                              Von – ASAP
                                                                              Per HR
                                                                              schedule
Support and encourage     Encourage staff to     Vice President of Business   Opportunities to   Better training will   Existing funding      Accreditation    No
continuing education      participate in         Services & Directors         be made            provide for more       will be utilized as   Standard 3.5
activities among staff    training sessions                                   available on an    efficiency in all      well as some
                          offered by the                                      ongoing basis.     parts of the           possible funding
                          PDC, SkillPath,                                                        operation.             available through
                          and other                                                                                     Classified
                          accredited agencies                                                                           Professional
                          as well as                                                                                    Growth.
                          interaction with
                          other professional
                          associations related
                          to the respective
                          field of expertise.
      Table 27: Business Services Goal Two




      Action Planning: Business Services                                                                                                                      196
     Recommendation 3.1


GOAL 3
Increase access, student success and positive student learning outcomes.

      Objective            Strategic/Tools           Responsible Party       Time Frame        Outcomes              Resources         Accreditation    Program
                                                  w/Stakeholders Involved    Completion                                                 Standards        Review

Analyze and develop a                           Andy Dunn                   FY 2006-07    Improved service        To be defined
comprehensive                                   Maria Baker                               and appropriate
reorganization plan for                         Stacy Pinola                              staffing needs
the Facilities
Management
Department.
Continue to support       Continue to use       Publication Center staff    Ongoing       Continual               Current pay for      Accreditation   No
and improve printing      revenue from pay                                                improvement of          print system         Standard B 1
services in student       for print system to                                             student printing        revenue is           A
labs.                     improve services                                                aids in the efficient   sufficient to
                          and availability of                                             operation of            allow continuing
                          student printers.                                               student labs.           renewal of
                                                                                                                  printing devices.
Enhance unimpeded         Complete ADA          Andy Dunn                   Ongoing       Improved physical       Interim              N/A             N/A
physical access to        transition plan;      Maria Baker                               access to program       Maintenance
spaces where              enhance campus        Stacy Pinola                              spaces by persons       Manager Stacy
instruction and student   way finding           Bob Bush                                  with disabilities.      Pinola; Facilities
life are centered.        through improved      Ed Heffernan
                          signage; require
                          universal design
                          principles in all
                          Measure L funded
                          design work;
                          improve elevator
                          access.

     Table 28 Business Services Goal Three




     Action Planning: Business Services                                                                                                                197
       Recommendation 3.1


GOAL 4
Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and insure access,
student success, and successful student outcomes.
       Objective             Strategic/Tools           Responsible Party        Time Frame        Outcomes             Resources        Accreditation     Program
                                                    w/Stakeholders Involved     Completion                                               Standards         Review
Develop a plan to           Continue to work      Claire Tyson                Plans to be     Better                N/A                 1 and 3          Business
relocate the Finance        with Bond Team        Maria Bernardino            complete by     coordination of                                            Services
Office and co-locate        and architects on     Maria Baker                 3/1/07          processes to                                               7/1/00
Facilities, Accounting,     the floor plan and    Stacy Pinola                                achieve best
Purchasing on the main      footprint of future   Bob Bush                                    practices and more
campus (District Support    facility.             Ed Heffernan                                efficient use of
Services Center)                                                                              staff resources at
                                                                                              fewer costs.
Continue to provide the     Provide catalog       Purchasing staff and        Ongoing         The                                       Accreditation    No
departments the             information on        departmental users                          communication                             Standard D 1
necessary information,      item selections;                                                  interaction that                          B
using “vendor sourcing”     continue to engage                                                takes place
and other research tools.   in vendor sourcing                                                between the
                            using the internet                                                Buyers, end-users
                            and other                                                         and vendors is
                            resources, to find                                                critical to the
                            the best source to                                                success of
                            obtain the                                                        obtaining a
                            requested item at                                                 positive outcome
                            the lowest possible                                               when placing
                            price.                                                            orders.
Improve the delivery        Currently the         Maria Bernardino with the   Fall 2006 (to   The student           Hire a permanent                     Yes
service of incoming         internal delivery     support of Andy Dunn        complete the    workers are not       Shipping &
packages.                   service is provided                               process to      dependable to         Receiving person.
                            mainly by student                                 request a new   provide this
                            workers. In the                                   classified      service. A
                            absence of student                                entitlement)    permanent
                            workers, deliveries                                               delivery person
                            get backlogged due                                                will provide an
                            to limited                                                        efficient delivery
                            permanent staff                                                   service to all end-
                            resources.                                                        users.



       Action Planning: Business Services                                                                                                               198
      Recommendation 3.1


GOAL 4
Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and insure access,
student success, and successful student outcomes.
       Objective            Strategic/Tools          Responsible Party       Time Frame          Outcomes              Resources         Accreditation     Program
                                                  w/Stakeholders Involved    Completion                                                   Standards         Review
Establish a preventative   Coordination with    Maria Baker                 Second Quarter   Ensured
maintenance plan for all   Information          Stacy Pinola                2006-07          maintenance on
physical plant assets      Services on                                                       campus equipment
under the Facilities       possible                                                          for the safety of
Department.                preventative                                                      the students and
                           maintenance                                                       staff.
                           program.
Revamp the current         Coordination with    Maria Baker                 Second           The work order
Maintenance Work           Information          Stacy Pinola                Quarter          system would be
Order System.              Services on          Debi Kinimonth              2006-07          more user friendly,
                           changes to current   Maintenance Crew                             create the
                           system.                                                           necessary reports,
                                                                                             and track work
                                                                                             completed.
Reconcile the FY 06-07     Projection of        Andy Dunn                   Ongoing          Eliminate,            Claire Tyson,         N/A              N/A
Measure “L” Bond           individual project   Maria Baker                                  reaffirm, revised,    Budget Manager,
project budgets to the     costs to midpoint    Bob Bush                                     and prioritize        Bond Team Asst.
available remaining        of construction      Ed Heffernan                                 projects.             Controller,
bond dollars.              using Engineering                                                                       Facilities Planning
                           News Record’s                                                                           Committee
                           Construction Cost
                           Index. Establish
                           past and project
                           future inflation
                           additive costs for
                           each project.
      Table 29: Business Services Goal Four




      Action Planning: Business Services                                                                                                                 199
Recommendation 3.1



Human Resources

The Human Resources Department has new leadership through an internal promotion of San
Joaquin Delta staff who took the place of the former vice president of human resources and
employee relations. Taking his new position in May 2008, Mr. Vince Brown has acted quickly to
expedite progress on the Strategic Plan and to leverage new technologies to increase the
administrative capabilities of the Human Resources Division.

Previous comments and recommendations of the accrediting commission have included accurate
appraisals that employee evaluations have not been completed in a timely manner and have not
been completed for some employees during the entire tenure of that employee. Part of the lack of
administrative discipline has been caused by a lack of training of managers. The second, more
important component, however, has been the inability of the Human Resources Division to
accurately and timely research and report the areas that need employee evaluations. Without this
critical accountability of manager to write evaluations, the College has not had the ability to
enforce policies.

The new vice president has selected and partially implemented new software that will, among
other functions, be able to quickly identify and report the employees who need evaluations. The
complete implementation of MUNIS software is expected January 1, 2009.

Many of the following goals and objectives will be made possible by the implementation and use
of this new Human Resource Information System, MUNIS.




Action Planning: Human Resources                                                             200
 Recommendation 3.1

                                                 SAN JOAQUIN DELTA COMMUNITY COLLEGE
                                              STRATEGIC GOALS and ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2007-2008

 *The majority of goals impacted by the absence of MUNIS. Several goals will be unattainable without MUNIS. The implementation of this
 new software is scheduled for January 1, 2009.

Strategic Goal 1:      Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and
                       external groups to promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                    Responsible Party
                                                                         Time Frame     Planned Outcomes                         Accreditatio   Program
    Objectives            Strategies/Tools           w/ Stakeholders                                               Resources
                                                                         Completion     (Accomplishments)                        n Standard      Review
                                                         Involved
1.1 Deliver a          a. Develop new benefit     Vince Brown lead       6/30/08        Ongoing for all other
comprehensive          packages and               CTA, CSEA, Benefits                   unions
benefit package for    approaches which will      department, M&C        Formula for
employees which        mirror existing benefits                          defined
provide for their      closely at minimal cost    Norma Hunt             contribution   Facilitated and
needs at a cost that   in 07-08.                                         requires re-   completed the
is affordable and                                                        negotiations   contract process with
good value.                                                              in 2009.       the District and
                                                                                        CalPERS, changing
                                                                                        the retirement benefit
                                                                                        formula for our safety
                                                                                        employees from 2%
                                                                                        to 3% at age 55.

                                                                                        Successfully
                                                                                        completed transition
                                                                                        of all employees from
                                                                                        Defined Benefit
                                                                                        package to Defined
                                                                                        Contribution.


Deliver a              b. Implement Flexible      Vince Brown, Suzanne   08/15/09       Provide employee         Not possible
comprehensive          Spending Account or        Franco, Norma Hunt                    opportunity to defer     without MUNIS
benefit package for    Health Savings                                                   monies pre-tax.
employees who          Account for 2009 Open

 Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                   201
 Recommendation 3.1

Strategic Goal 1:      Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and
                       external groups to promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                  Responsible Party
                                                                        Time Frame    Planned Outcomes                     Accreditatio   Program
    Objectives            Strategies/Tools         w/ Stakeholders                                             Resources
                                                                        Completion    (Accomplishments)                    n Standard      Review
                                                       Involved
provide for their      Enrollment                                                    Negotiated a contract
needs at a cost that                                                                 with Tax Deferred
is affordable and a                                                                  Services to administer
good value.                                                                          our 403(b) program.

                       c. Conduct retirement     Ongoing in 2007-08     Ongoing      Better informed
                       workshops on-campus.      quarterly Norma Hunt                employees and greater
                                                                                     satisfaction with Delta
                                                                                     retirement programs.
                       d. Create a Retiree       Vince Brown, Suzanne   01/01/09     Assist/inform retiree
                       Information Package       Franco                              of continuing
                       for new District                                              benefits during
                       Retirees.                                                     retirement.

                       e. Management             Vince Brown, Suzanne   03/31/09     Educate on legal
                       Training for Family       Franco                              Federal and State
                       Medical Leave.                                                obligation.
                       f. Create Desk            Vince Brown, Suzanne   Ongoing      To provide accurate
                       Procedures Manual.        Franco, Staci Swift                 up to date guidance
                                                                                     on procedures &
                                                                                     services.
1.1 Deliver a          g. Streamline FML,        Vince Brown, Suzanne   06/30/09     Provide employees
comprehensive          Worker’s                  Franco, Lupe Payan,                 with an appropriate
benefit package for    Compensation, LTD         Norma Hunt                          and reference able
employees which        and Disability                                                guide to self
provide for their      Retirement                                                    answering on
needs at a cost that   accountability and                                            questions concurring
is affordable and      processing of available                                       Delta’s umbrella of
good value.            leaves/benefits                                               benefits.


1.2 Continue           a. Phase I – Human        Vince Brown, Lee       Q3 2009FY    Completed initial

 Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                             202
 Recommendation 3.1

Strategic Goal 1:     Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and
                      external groups to promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.

                                               Responsible Party
                                                                   Time Frame       Planned Outcomes                    Accreditatio   Program
    Objectives           Strategies/Tools       w/ Stakeholders                                             Resources
                                                                   Completion       (Accomplishments)                   n Standard      Review
                                                    Involved
integration of        Resources, Continual   Belarmino, Germie     (until payroll   Time Keeping project
Human Resources       troubleshooting and    Pascua                is live)         scope out with
Management            parallel system                                               rSmart.
Information System    maintenance until
(HRMIS) to            MUNIS Payroll goes                                            Completed initial
eventually replace    live.                                                         MUNIS HR data
the HR functions                                                                    entry documentation.
within System 2000.
                                                                                    Completed initial
                                                                                    MUNIS System
                                                                                    Administrator
                                                                                    documentation.

                                                                                    Completed S2K &
                                                                                    MUNIS Interfaces.

                                                                                    Completed MUNIS
                                                                                    software upgrade
                                                                                    v6.2.

1.2 Continue          b. Phase II – MUNIS    Vince Brown, Germie   09/08            MUNIS Self Service
integration of        Self Service,          Pascua                                 (MSS) initial install
Human Resources       Implementation of                                             of software.
Management            Online Application,
Information System    Benefits Open                                                 April 2008 MSS
(HRMIS) to            Enrollment.                                                   upgrade.
eventually replace
the HR functions                                                                    Completed employee
within System 2000.                                                                 application modules.




 Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                          203
 Recommendation 3.1

Strategic Goal 1:        Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and
                         external groups to promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                     Responsible Party
                                                                            Time Frame    Planned Outcomes                    Accreditatio   Program
     Objectives             Strategies/Tools          w/ Stakeholders                                             Resources
                                                                            Completion    (Accomplishments)                   n Standard      Review
                                                          Involved
                         c. Phase III – Payroll,   Vince Brown, Lee         Q3 2008-09
                         Begin payroll             Belarmino, Germie        Fiscal Year
                         implementation ahead      Pascua
                         of schedule with a
                         tentative go-live date.

                         d. HR Survey, “How        Vince Brown, Germie      Spring/       Completed survey
                         May We Help               Pascua                   Summer        setup.
                         You…….Better                                       2008          Compiled Spring
                                                                                          2008 results.
                                                                                          Provide service
                                                                                          metrics for baseline.
1.3 Install a Human                                Staci Swift              Moved to      Improved resource for
Resources Hotline                                                           07/08, no     suggestions and
for concerns,                                                               funding       customer service.
compliments and                                                             approved
complaints.                                                                               Failed, move to
                                                                                          survey.
 1.4 Educate the staff   a. Revision of Human      Staci Swift, managers,   08/19/09      Recruit/Hiring
and public on            Resources Policies and    HR Team                                Revision
Human Resources          Procedures for                                                   Not progressing as
procedures.              Recruitment and                                                  hoped
                         Hiring.
Educate the staff and    b. Continue to maintain   Staci Swift              Ongoing       Improve
public on Human          a good rapport with                                              Communication
Resources                VPs, Division Deans,
procedures               Directors, Managers                                              Survey indicates
                         and employees of the                                             opportunities for
                         District                                                         improvements.




 Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                204
 Recommendation 3.1

Strategic Goal 1:       Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and
                        external groups to promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                    Responsible Party
                                                                        Time Frame     Planned Outcomes                     Accreditatio   Program
     Objectives            Strategies/Tools          w/ Stakeholders                                            Resources
                                                                        Completion     (Accomplishments)                    n Standard      Review
                                                         Involved
                        c. Complete work with     Staci Swift           09/05/09      Improve
                        management senate to                                          communication and
                        create manager’s                                              provide a resource for
                        handbook                                                      managers.

                                                                                      Ineffective progress to
                                                                                      date.
1.5 Continue with       a. Provide training on    Vince Brown, CTA,     Ongoing       Completed CSEA
the interest-based      new union contract        CSEA, POA, Mgt        training in   Salary Survey.
approach to joint       (CTA, CSEA, and           Senate, Classified    management
areas of labor          POA).                     Senate, Academic      meetings      Improved Labor
relations and                                     Senate                              relations through a
effective operations.                                                                 Learned approached
                                                                                      “Interest Based
                                                                                      Resolution”.
                        b. Continue an            Vince Brown, Jon                    Improved Labor
                        infrastructure to         Stephens                            relations through a
                        contract negotiations                                         Learned approached
                        process in an interest-                                       “Interest Based
                        based model.                                                  Resolution”.
                        c. Develop training on    Vince Brown           11/1/09       Productive contract
                        Labor Management.                                             negotiations.

Develop a               d. Identify               Vince Brown           Ongoing       More structure and
collaborative Labor     opportunities to                                              accountable process
Management              increase collaborations                                       identified and
partnership model       with CTA, CSEA, and                                           implemented for
which takes an          POA on an Ongoing                                             Classified and
interest-based          basis, with overall                                           Administrative
approach to joint       interaction increasing                                        Reclassification and
areas of labor          in non-bargaining                                             Entitlement
relations and           years.                                                        Processes; more
effective operations.                                                                 improvement still
 Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                              205
 Recommendation 3.1

Strategic Goal 1:       Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and
                        external groups to promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                  Responsible Party
                                                                       Time Frame      Planned Outcomes                     Accreditatio   Program
     Objectives            Strategies/Tools        w/ Stakeholders                                              Resources
                                                                       Completion      (Accomplishments)                    n Standard      Review
                                                       Involved
                                                                                      needed.

                                                                                      Comprehensive
                                                                                      outside survey needs
                                                                                      to be conducted to
                                                                                      validate all positions,
                                                                                      their placement and
                                                                                      equity relationships
                                                                                      both internally &
                                                                                      externally.
                        e. Reduce grievances;    Vince Brown, Staci    Ongoing        2007-08: Decrease in
                        eliminate nuisance       Swift                                classified and faculty
                        grievances.                                                   grievances; no
                                                                                      arbitration.

1.6 Institute an        a. Develop a prototype   Vince Brown, Germie   Publish        Employees will
annual Employee         assessment instrument.   Pascua                completed      receive feedback as to
Satisfaction Survey,                                                   results fall   their desired
and deliver the                                                        2008.          improvements and
results in an open                                                                    how and when they
forum with input for                                                                  may expect to see
implementing                                                                          results.
identified solutions.

1.6 Institute an        b. Administer survey     Employee Services/    3/1/07,
annual Employee         annually in March of     Vince Brown           Ongoing
Satisfaction Survey,    each year; establish
and deliver the         first year baseline.                           Date changed
results in an open                                                     to 12/07 and
forum with input for                                                   every
implementing                                                           December
identified solutions.                                                  thereafter.

 Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                              206
 Recommendation 3.1

Strategic Goal 1:       Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and
                        external groups to promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                  Responsible Party
                                                                      Time Frame      Planned Outcomes                   Accreditatio   Program
    Objectives             Strategies/Tools        w/ Stakeholders                                           Resources
                                                                      Completion      (Accomplishments)                  n Standard      Review
                                                       Involved




                       c. Report survey result   Vince Brown          Fall semester   No activity in 2006-
                       to all employees in                            each year       07 due to benefits
                       each department.                                               issues and climate.

                       d. Provide manager        Vince Brown          May each
                       training to develop                            year
                       survey action plans to
                       identify actions to
                       address actionable
                       items.
                       e. Managers               Vince Brown          May each
                       communicate action                             year
                       plans to employees,
                       copy to HR and VPs.
 Table 30: Human Resources Goal One




 Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                           207
Recommendation 3.1


 Strategic Goal 2:       Develop a College-wide staff development program to improve faculty, administrator, and classified staff skills to promote access,
                         student success and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                   Responsible Party
                                                                         Time Frame     Planned Outcomes                        Accreditatio     Program
     Objectives            Strategies/Tools         w/ Stakeholders                                               Resources
                                                                         Completion     (Accomplishments)                       n Standard        Review
                                                        Involved
 2.1 Develop a          a. Complete an           Vince Brown             1/1/07         New training            1 FTE &
 training and           organizational needs                                            function in HR.         support
 Development            assessment for                                                  Request for training
 function within HR.    employee and                                     2006           position rejected by
                        management training                                             President’s Cabinet.
                        needs.
                        b. Complete processes    Vince Brown             3/1/07         Original due date
                        to entitle and recruit                                          Organizational
                        Training Coordinator                             02/01/07       Development
                        position in HR.                                                 Specialist position
                                                                                        approved by PEC.
                        Take position back to                            01/09          Job description and
                        Planning & Budget for                                           justification &
                        approval.                                                       analysis developed
                                                                                        4/07. To CC&E and
                                                                                        Planning & Budget
                                                                                        Committees in July
                                                                                        2007; Rejected.
 2.2 Continue to        a. Computerize all       Vince Brown, IT Dept    Initially      Complete:               MUNIS
 improve the            Performance                                      completed      Performance
 Performance            Evaluation processes,                            7/1/2005       evaluation forms
 Evaluation Process     place review                                                    revised with 2004-07
 to ensure all          completion on-line.                                             contracts, are all on
 employees are                                                                          line for completion;
 provided with                                                                          monthly reporting to
 timely, constructive                                                                   each manager of
 feedback by their                                                                      outstanding
 supervisor who is                                                                      performance
 trained and                                                                            evaluations
 knowledgeable on
 completing

Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                      208
Recommendation 3.1

 Strategic Goal 2:        Develop a College-wide staff development program to improve faculty, administrator, and classified staff skills to promote access,
                          student success and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                    Responsible Party
                                                                          Time Frame     Planned Outcomes                        Accreditatio     Program
      Objectives            Strategies/Tools         w/ Stakeholders                                              Resources
                                                                          Completion     (Accomplishments)                       n Standard        Review
                                                         Involved
 performance
 appraisals.
 2.2 cont’d -            b. Report back monthly   Vince Brown , Staci     Ongoing        Individual managers   MUNIS
 Continue to improve     to all managers and      Swift                                  receive reports; no
 the Performance         employees with past                                             roll-up to VP or
 Evaluation Process      due performance                                                 President yet.
 to ensure all           appraisals, with cc to
 employees are           VP and roll up to
 provided with           President.
 timely, constructive
 feedback by their
 supervisor who is
 trained and
 knowledgeable on
 completing
 performance
 appraisals.
Table 31: Human Resources Goal Two




Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                       209
Recommendation 3.1


 Strategic Goal 3: Increase access, student success and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                        Responsible Party
                                                                            Time Frame    Planned Outcomes                     Accreditation   Program
     Objectives             Strategies/Tools             w/ Stakeholders                                           Resources
                                                                            Completion    (Accomplishments)                     Standard        Review
                                                             Involved
 3.1 Improve the         a. Develop policies         Staci Swift            Ongoing      Reduced length of         MUNIS
 selection and           and practices to reduce                                         time to hire:
 recruitment process     length of time to hire                                          Improved in 2006-07.
 to be more flexible,    non-faculty positions to
 inclusive, faster and   90 days maximum                                                 Revised entitlement
 responsive to the                                                                       process: discretionary
 needs of managers                                                                       replacement by
 and employees                                                                           President of
 without                                                                                 retiring/vacant faculty
 compromising                                                                            implemented.
 compliance with
 laws, rules and                                                                         Update hiring
 codes.                                                                                  policies.

                                                                                         Sexual Harassment
                                                                                         Training offered to
                                                                                         all managers in
                                                                                         collaboration with
                                                                                         Professional
                                                                                         Development Center.

                                                                                         4,452 applications
                                                                                         processed and 795
                                                                                         employees
                                                                                         recruited/hired and
                                                                                         entered in both
                                                                                         MUNIS & S2000.
 Improve the             b. Increase faculty         Staci Swift            Ongoing      Faculty on board for
 selection and           recruitment to ensure                                           Fall semester.
 recruitment process     all positions are offered
 to be more flexible,    and filled by 5/15 of
 inclusive, faster and   each year.
 responsive to the
Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                  210
Recommendation 3.1

 Strategic Goal 3: Increase access, student success and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                      Responsible Party
                                                                          Time Frame    Planned Outcomes                     Accreditation   Program
     Objectives             Strategies/Tools           w/ Stakeholders                                           Resources
                                                                          Completion    (Accomplishments)                     Standard        Review
                                                           Involved
 needs of managers
 and employees
 without
 compromising
 compliance with
 laws, rules and
 codes.

                         c. Increase the number     Staci Swift           Ongoing
                         of adjunct instructors
                         available for
                         assignment.
                         d. Benchmark Delta         Staci Swift           Ongoing       Ongoing through
                         recruitment and                                                CCC Registry,
                         selection processes                                            ACHRO/EEO, and
                         against other CCC                                              CCLC.
                         schools.
                         e. Integrate temporary     Staci Swift           12/30/08      Provide better service
                         employment pools and                                           to departments that
                         student employment.                                            need temporary
                                                                                        student help.
 Improve the             f. Train/retrain old/new   Staci Swift           12/30/08      Involve more
 selection and           EEO representative for                                         employees in
 recruitment process     hiring committees.                                             recruitment process;
 to be more flexible,                                                                   provide adequate
 inclusive, faster and                                                                  training for EEO
 responsive to the                                                                      representatives.
 needs of managers
 and employees
 without
 compromising
 compliance with

Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                211
Recommendation 3.1

 Strategic Goal 3: Increase access, student success and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                      Responsible Party
                                                                          Time Frame    Planned Outcomes                Accreditation   Program
      Objectives            Strategies/Tools           w/ Stakeholders                                      Resources
                                                                          Completion    (Accomplishments)                Standard        Review
                                                           Involved
 laws, rules and
 codes.



                         g. Establish a dedicated   Staci Swift
                         testing area.



 3.2 Incorporate HRIS a. Integrate temporary        Staci Swift, Germie
                      employment pools and          Pascua
                      student employment.


                         b. Keep Human              Staci Swift, Germie   Ongoing       Provide better
                         Resources Web page         Pascua                              communication.
                         current.

Table 32: Human Resources Goal Three




Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                           212
Recommendation 3.1


 Strategic Goal 4:      Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and insure
                        access, and successful student outcomes.

                                                          Responsible Party
                                                                                Time Frame    Planned Outcomes                     Accreditation   Program
      Objectives              Strategies/Tools             w/ Stakeholders                                             Resources
                                                                                Completion    (Accomplishments)                     Standard        Review
                                                               Involved
 4.1 Migrate the         a. Train and empower           Vince Brown, Germie     Q1 2009FY    We failed to              MUNIS
 Payroll to MUNIS or     manager.                       Pascua, Lee Belarmino                implement this
 return to Tyler                                                                             software with more
 Software for refund.                                                                        than 3 years of
                                                                                             preparation. It is time
                                                                                             to either move
                                                                                             forward or cut our
                                                                                             losses and explore a
                                                                                             different approach.
                         b. Continue to keep abreast    Vince Brown, Norma                                             MUNIS
                         with the federal, state and    Hunt
                         local laws as it relates to
                         payroll and retirement and
                         maintaining compliance.
                         c. Implementing the time       Vince Brown, Norma                   In a cooperative effort
                         and attendance system          Hunt                                 with Information
                         “My Time at Delta”.                                                 Technology we
                                                                                             developed a “beta”
                                                                                             time and attendance
                                                                                             system called “My
                                                                                             Time at Delta” using
                                                                                             Kuali workflow on a
                                                                                             test database.




 4.2 Work with Tax        a. Implement the “common      Vince Brown, Norma
 Deferred Services        remitter” services with Tax   Hunt
 group to install the tax Deferred Services.
 shelter annuity
 compliance program
Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                       213
Recommendation 3.1

 Strategic Goal 4:          Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and insure
                            access, and successful student outcomes.

                                                           Responsible Party
                                                                                  Time Frame      Planned Outcomes                    Accreditation    Program
      Objectives                  Strategies/Tools          w/ Stakeholders                                               Resources
                                                                                  Completion      (Accomplishments)                    Standard         Review
                                                                Involved
 to monitor for 403(b)
 plan compliance.


 Work with Tax               b. Tax Deferred Services     Vince Brown, Norma
 Deferred Services           will be responsible for      Hunt
 group to install the tax    transmitting employee tax
 shelter annuity             shelter contributions to
 compliance program          their respective accounts.
 to monitor for 403(b)
 plan compliance.

 4.3 Enter information a. Enter Benefit                   Germie Pascua,         10/08           Successfully updated     MUNIS
 for Active and Retired information.                      Suzanne Franco                         all beneficiary
 Employees into                                                                                  information into
 MUNIS.                                                                                          MUNIS system.

                             b. Enter Workers’            Germie Pascua, Lupe    12/08           Within the last two
                             Compensation Claims.         Payan                                  years we have
                                                                                                 successfully closed
                                                                                                 and settled more than
                                                                                                 30 Workers’
                                                                                                 Compensation cases.
                                                                                                 Successfully
                                                                                                 transferred Worker’s
                                                                                                 Compensation injury
                                                                                                 claims from US
                                                                                                 Health Works to
                                                                                                 Kaiser Permanente
                                                                                                 for a centralized
                                                                                                 medical facility to
                                                                                                 better treat employees

Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                           214
Recommendation 3.1

 Strategic Goal 4:       Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and insure
                         access, and successful student outcomes.

                                                          Responsible Party
                                                                               Time Frame      Planned Outcomes                       Accreditation   Program
     Objectives                Strategies/Tools            w/ Stakeholders                                                Resources
                                                                               Completion      (Accomplishments)                       Standard        Review
                                                               Involved
                                                                                              in a timely manner.




 4.3 cont’d - Enter       c. Enter Liability Claims      Germie Pascua, Lupe   12/08          Successfully closed
 information for                                         Payan                                and settled more than
 Active and Retired                                                                           25 liability cases.
 Employees into
 MUNIS.

                          d. Place the Supervisor’s      Germie Pascua
                          Accident Report on
                          Human Resources
                          Website.
 4.4 Develop an           a. Improve working                                   Ongoing        Ongoing and                 Outsource
 Environmental            relationship with facilities                                        productive. See item
 Health and Safety        management.                                                         above.
 function within HR.
 4.5 Reduce the cost      a. Provide staff training in   HR Management         Ongoing        Outstanding results in
 of employment            existing contracts, policies                                        this area. Over 25%
 related litigation by    and procedures, Title V,                                            reduction in workers’
 40% over the next 3      and Ed Code.                                                        comp costs and
 years                                                                                        liability in 2006-07.
                          b. Develop formal HR           Vince Brown           Ongoing        Major reductions in
                          Team communication and                                              liability and litigation.
                          discussion regarding
                          litigated cases with intent                                         Excellent case
                          of reducing reliance on                                             management resulting
                          outside legal counsel.                                              in closure of high
                                                                                              liability cases
                                                                                              favorably for the
Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                         215
Recommendation 3.1

 Strategic Goal 4:        Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and insure
                          access, and successful student outcomes.

                                                           Responsible Party
                                                                                Time Frame      Planned Outcomes                    Accreditation    Program
     Objectives                 Strategies/Tools            w/ Stakeholders                                            Resources
                                                                                Completion      (Accomplishments)                    Standard         Review
                                                                Involved
                                                                                               district.




 Reduce the cost of        c. Identify opportunities to   Vince Brown                          Ongoing
 employment related        eliminate “attitude”
 litigation by 40% over    litigation; report out
 the next 3 years.         suggestions to President’s
                           Cabinet and possibly
                           Trustees quarterly.
                           d. Develop formal HR           Vince Brown          Ongoing         Vince Brown; very
                           Team communication and                                              productive results
                           discussion regarding                                                since partnering with
                           litigated cases with intent                                         JT@, Dan Lamb, and
                           of reducing reliance on                                             others.
                           outside legal counsel.
 4.6 Reduce the cost       a. Review and evaluate         Vince Brown          Ongoing
 of workers'               current processes and
 compensation              systems to identify
 insurance coverage        opportunities for improved
 overall by 15%            service, more efficient
 annually over the         processes, and more cost
 next 3 years.             productive results.
                           b. Implement quarterly         Vince Brown          Ongoing
                           case reviews and projected
                           outcome sessions.




Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                         216
Recommendation 3.1

 Strategic Goal 4:        Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and insure
                          access, and successful student outcomes.

                                                            Responsible Party
                                                                                Time Frame      Planned Outcomes                     Accreditation   Program
      Objectives                Strategies/Tools             w/ Stakeholders                                           Resources
                                                                                Completion      (Accomplishments)                     Standard        Review
                                                                 Involved
 Reduce the cost of        c. Develop an expanded        Vince Brown                                                  Submitted
 workers'                  Return to Work Program                                                                     to AI
 compensation              where employees with                                                                       Process and
 insurance coverage        work limitations due to                                                                    funded for
 overall by 15%            accident or injury are                                                                     2006-07.
 annually over the next    accommodated for a
 3 years.                  minimum of 90 days or                                                                      Program
                           less as needed ( industrial                                                                introduced
                           and non-industrial).                                                                       to CSEA
                                                                                                                      with
                                                                                                                      acceptance
                                                                                                                      in May
                                                                                                                      2007.

                           d. Provide training to        Vince Brown            Ongoing
                           managers and supervisors                                                                   Training
                           on managing employees                                                                      delivered as
                           with restrictions and WC                                                                   part of Mgt
                           claims and/or limitations                                                                  Training
                                                                                                                      meetings.
                           e. Aggressively               Vince Brown                           Ongoing
                           implement a Fitness for
                           Duty Program.
 4.7 Incorporate roll                                    Vince Brown            Begun                                 Ongoing to
 out with Sexual                                                                9/1/2005 and                          all
 Harassment                                                                     initially                             managers;
 prevention training                                                            completed                             optionally
 required under                                                                 6/30/07                               provided
 AB1825.                                                                                                              and
                                                                                                                      recommend
                                                                                                                      ed to all
                                                                                                                      classified

Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                         217
Recommendation 3.1

 Strategic Goal 4:      Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and insure
                        access, and successful student outcomes.

                                                       Responsible Party
                                                                              Time Frame      Planned Outcomes                    Accreditation    Program
      Objectives              Strategies/Tools          w/ Stakeholders                                              Resources
                                                                              Completion      (Accomplishments)                    Standard         Review
                                                            Involved
                                                                                                                    and faculty
                                                                                                                    since 6/05.



Table 33: Human Resources Goal Four




Action Planning: Human Resources                                                                                                                       218
Recommendation 3.1

Information Services

The Information Services division is the organizational unit that assists all areas of San Joaquin
Delta College in its technology needs. Its vice president and staff support academic as well as
administrative computing services. With a lean budget and growing, unfunded enrollment, the
College relies more and more on the leveraging of its human resources by developing and
installing state-of-the-art computerized systems.

At this point in the history of Delta College, more than any other time, the campus is very reliant
on the expertise, skill and knowledge of these technology experts. The mission is to support the
other departments of the College as they pursue the overall Mission and Strategic Plan of the
College. The Action Plans of the Information Services division focus on the facilitation of
successful plans in other departments.




Action Planning: Information Services                                                           219
Recommendation 3.1

                                                       Responsible Party w/
                                                                              Timeframe                                      Accreditation   Program
Objectives                   Strategies/Tools          Stakeholders                        Planned Outcomes    Resources
                                                                              Completion                                     Standard        Review
                                                       Involved

1.1 Development of the       a. Engage vendor to       Coombs                  12/31/08    1. Students use     a. Delta      1, 2, 3
    SARS scheduling             develop interfaces.                                           SARS for         College
    module for the           b. Purchase and utilize                                          scheduling       Programmer/
    Counseling                  the SARS toolkit for                                          Counseling       Analyst I
    Department.                 making any                                                    appointments.
                                necessary
   This requires that new       modifications.
   interfaces are built to   c. Test and implement
   the Web Extender             software in the
   document imaging             Counseling
   software.                    Department.

1.2 Implement the Kuali      a. Develop              Belarmino                 11/31/08    1. Finished KFS     Coombs,       1, 3
    Financial System for        implementation plan Coombs                                    release 3        Kirschenman
    Delta College.              with the rSmart      Kirschenman               12/31/08       development      Programmer/
                                Group.                                                     2. Implemented      Analyst
                             b. Identify necessary                             01/31/09       Kuali Rice       resources
                                development                                                   standalone
                                resources.                                                    server
                             c. Develop all data                               05/01/09    3. Hired and
                                conversions                                                   trained
                                necessary to go from                                          additional
                                existing Oracle                                               developer for
                                system.                                        07/01/09       Delta KFS
                             d. Modify software to                                         4. Finished
                                meet Delta                                                    programming
                                College’s unique                                              Delta specific
                                needs.                                                        customizations
                             e. Develop necessary                                             to core KFS
                                technical                                                  5. Delta College
                                architecture.                                                 uses Kuali
                             f. Develop reports.                                              Financial
                                                                                              System for all
                                                                                              business
                                                                                              functions.
Action Planning: Information Services                                                                                                          220
Recommendation 3.1

                                                    Responsible Party w/
                                                                           Timeframe                                     Accreditation   Program
Objectives                  Strategies/Tools        Stakeholders                        Planned Outcomes   Resources
                                                                           Completion                                    Standard        Review
                                                    Involved

1.3 Complete a productive a. Develop and            Coombs                  07/01/09    6. Published       Kirschenman   1, 2,3,4
    development year on the    enhance technical    Kirschenman                            technical       Coombs
    Kuali Student System.      architecture.                                               architecture.   MacDannald
                            b. Develop and                                              7. Published Use   Other
                               validate Use Case                                           Case            Programmer
                               requirements.                                               documents.      resources
                            c. Acquire necessary                                        8. Programmer
                               Delta College                                               hired and
                               programmer                                                  trained for
                               resources.                                                  Kuali
                                                                                           development.

                                                                                                           Kirschenman
1.4 Development, testing,   a. Finish development   Kirschenman             12/31/08    1. Automated       Potts,        1, 3
    and implementation of      of Kuali Workflow                                           Time and        The rSmart
    an automated Kuali         application.                                                Attendance      Group
    Time and Attendance     b. Test Time and                                               system.
    application.               Attendance system.
                            c. Implement Time
                               and Attendance
                               system.

1.5 Fully implement the     a. Develop plan.        Hitt                    03/31/09    1. More automated Hitt           1, 3
    MUNIS Human             b. Develop resource                                            Human
    Resources and Payroll      plan.                                                       Resources and
    applications.           c. Acquire necessary                                           Payroll
                               resources.                                                  functions.
                            d. Develop interfaces
                               and conversion
                               programs.
                            e. Test/implement.




Action Planning: Information Resources                                                                                                     221
Recommendation 3.1

                                                         Responsible Party w/
                                                                                Timeframe                                           Accreditation   Program
Objectives                     Strategies/Tools          Stakeholders                        Planned Outcomes       Resources
                                                                                Completion                                          Standard        Review
                                                         Involved

1.6 Define/Install server      a. Meet with              Sartain                 08/24/08    1. Partnership with    Sartain         1, 3
    hardware for Kuali            Sun/rSmart and         Coombs                                 Sun w/detailed      Coombs
    projects                      develop outline of                                            discounts for       Lewman
                                  discounts applicable                                          equipment/soft      Other
                                  to Kuali project                               09/1/08        ware etc.             IT Staff
                               b. Acquire Kuali                                              2. Professional            resources
                                  system                                         12/1/08        services for
                                  requirements.                                                 configuration
                               c. Acquire necessary                                             and installation
                                  server hardware for                            01/30/09       of Sun
                                  the Kuali project.                                            Hardware
                               d. Install Hardware                                              identified and
                               e. Test Sun Glashfish                                            procured.
                                  architecture against                                       3. Equipment
                                  Kuali Student                                                 purchased and
                                  available release.                                            installed
                                                                                                available for
                                                                                                software install.

1.7 Evaluation, acquire        a. Evaluate industry      Coombs                  12/31/08    1. Increased           Azzaro          1,3
    implement a Business          solutions                                                     visibility into
    Intelligence solution on   b. Evaluate data                                                 business needs
    compass to pull               model offered                                                 and trends by a
    information from           c. Determine scope of                                            larger
    multiple data sources         reporting needs                                               appropriate set
    including but not             from multiple                                                 of College
    limited to System 2000        departments                                                   managers
    Student System, Munis,     d. Acquire resources                                          2. More accurate
    Kuali Finance system,      e. Develop interfaces,                                           assessment of
    MIS, archived data.           packages, cubes,                                              course and
                                  etc.                                                          program
                               f. Test/Implement                                                success
                                                                                                resource
                                                                                                allocation and
                                                                                                constituent
Action Planning: Information Resources                                                                                                                222
Recommendation 3.1

                                                      Responsible Party w/
                                                                             Timeframe                                   Accreditation   Program
Objectives                      Strategies/Tools      Stakeholders                        Planned Outcomes   Resources
                                                                             Completion                                  Standard        Review
                                                      Involved
                                                                                              demographics




1.8 Implement Document       a. Define file           Cuneo                   12/31/08    1   HR documents   Cuneo       1,3
     Imaging Solution in the    structures needed     Swift
     HR Office                  to support.
The benefits of this:           Retrieval of imaged
Documents available on-line     forms.
for retrieval Paper          b. Define security for
documents need not be           access and for
stored for auditors, etc.       securing images
                             c. Test and implement
Table 34: Information Technology Strategic Plans




Action Planning: Information Resources                                                                                                     223
Recommendation 3.1

Instructional Services

With a new vice president of instruction at the helm, the Instructional Services division is boldly
taking steps to pursue the institutions Strategic Plan while leveraging technology to increase
institutional effectiveness. The reader will see in the program initiatives and action plans,
attempts to establish effective relationships related to governance constituencies. In addition,
using new and enhanced technological resources, the new vice president of instruction is greatly
expanding the communication of campus plans so that all constituencies are knowledgeable and
can provide input to the planning agenda of the Instructional Division.




Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                         224
   Recommendation 3.1



                                                       SAN JOAQUIN DELTA COMMUNITY COLLEGE
                                                         MISSION AND STRATEGIC GOALS 2008-09

   Areas of Responsibility: Instructional Services--VP, Instruction Office Deans

                                                                                                                                                             Objective
          Objectives                                       Responsible Party      Time                                                                        Borne
                                    Strategies/Tools        w/Stakeholders       Frame         Planned Outcomes           Accreditation Standard               from
                                                               Involved        Completion                                                                    Program
                                                                                                                                                              Review
Develop a relationship with the                            VP Instruction,     June 2009    AA degrees defined and     Institutional Mission                   Yes
Curriculum Committee and                                   Deans, Division                  approved by CCCCO.         Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
faculty leadership to                                      Deans, Curriculum                                           Resources
collaboratively define AA                                  Committee,                                                  Leadership and Governance
degrees and have them approved                             Faculty
by the CCCCO.
Develop a relationship with the                            VP Instruction,     June 2009    Program definition         Institutional Mission                   Yes
Curriculum Committee and                                   Deans, Division                  complete and included      Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
faculty leadership to                                      Deans, Curriculum                in program review          Resources
collaboratively define the                                 Committee,                       documents                  Leadership and Governance
relationship between courses and                           Faculty
programs.
Develop a relationship with the                            VP Instruction,     June 2009    Updated general            Institutional Mission                   Yes
Curriculum Committee and                                   Deans, Division                  education policy;          Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
faculty leadership to                                      Deans, Curriculum                validated/revised          Resources
collaboratively define general                             Committee,                       current general            Leadership and Governance
education, relate courses to the                           Faculty                          education pattern
general education definition and
the articulation standards set by
4-year colleges.
With Curriculum Committee and                              VP Instruction,     June 2009    List of courses that       Institutional Mission                   Yes
program faculty, evaluate                                  Deans, Division                  provide evidence of        Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
courses for currency, employer                             Deans, Curriculum                currency, etc.,; list of   Resources
needs, "green" and other trends.                           Committee,                       courses that need to be    Leadership and Governance
                                                           Faculty                          developed to
                                                                                            accommodate current
                                                                                            trends.




   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                     225
   Recommendation 3.1


                                                                                                                                                           Objective
           Objectives                                    Responsible Party        Time                                                                      Borne
                                      Strategies/Tools    w/Stakeholders         Frame         Planned Outcomes         Accreditation Standard               from
                                                             Involved          Completion                                                                  Program
                                                                                                                                                            Review
Work collaboratively with the                            VP Instruction,       June 2009    100% SLO's for active    Institutional Mission                   Yes
Curriculum Committee and                                 Deans, Division                    courses; 50% for         Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
faculty to write SLO's for 100%                          Deans, Curriculum                  programs; 50%            Resources
of active courses, 50% of                                Committee,                         assessments in courses   Leadership and Governance
programs; develop assessments                            Faculty                            and programs; pilot
for 50% of courses and progrms;                                                             SLOA process with 5-
pilot the SLOA process with a                                                               10 programs begun.
small group of willing programs.
Develop CurricuNET to                                    VP Instruction,       June 2009    SLOA Process in          Institutional Mission                   Yes
accommodate the SLOA                                     Deans, Division                    CurricuNET completed     Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
process.                                                 Deans, Curriculum                  to accommodate pilot     Resources
                                                         Committee,                         courses.                 Leadership and Governance
                                                         Information
                                                         Services,
                                                         CurricuNET staff
Create/develop programs to                               VP Instruction,       June 2010    New and enhanced         Institutional Mission                   Yes
attract and promote transfer, e.g.,                      Deans, Division                    programs                 Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
articulation, honors, Early                              Deans, Curriculum                                           Resources
College                                                  Committee,                                                  Leadership and Governance
                                                         Faculty, Career and
                                                         Transfer Center,
                                                         local public
                                                         schools and
                                                         colleges.
Develop programs suited to                               VP Instruction,       June 2010    New programs             Institutional Mission                   Yes
Distance Educaiton and for                               Deans, Division                                             Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
Regional Sites.                                          Deans, Curriculum                                           Resources
                                                         Committee,                                                  Leadership and Governance
                                                         Faculty, Distance
                                                         Education
                                                         Committee,
                                                         Regional Education
                                                         Advisory
                                                         Committees




   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                   226
  Recommendation 3.1


                                                                                                                                                               Objective
          Objectives                                          Responsible Party      Time                                                                       Borne
                                           Strategies/Tools    w/Stakeholders       Frame         Planned Outcomes          Accreditation Standard               from
                                                                  Involved        Completion                                                                   Program
                                                                                                                                                                Review
Develop a model and process for                               Student Success     June 2009    Model for SLO's           Institutional Mission                   Yes
developing institution-wide                                   Coordinator, VP                  approved by President's   Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
SLO's, SLO's for General                                      Instruction,                     Council; Board; begin     Resources
Education, Basic Skills, etc.;                                President's                      development of SLO's      Leadership and Governance
begin developing actual SLO's                                 Council, Deans,
                                                              Faculty
  Table 35: Instructional Services Strategic Goals




   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                       227
   Recommendation 3.1




Strategic Goal 1:          Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and
                           external groups to promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.
                                                                                                                                                               Objective
          Objectives                                      Responsible Party        Time                                                                         Borne
                                      Strategies/Tools     w/Stakeholders         Frame         Planned Outcomes            Accreditation Standard               from
                                                              Involved          Completion                                                                     Program
                                                                                                                                                                Review
Develop a relationship between                            VP Instruction,       June         Problems/concerns           Institutional Mission                   Yes
the instructional services                                Deans, Division       2009         solved collaboratively.     Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
administrators and managers and                           Deans, faculty                                                 Resources
the faculty leadership,                                   leadership                                                     Leadership and Governance
Curriculum Committee, and
Academic Senate to improve
problem-solving, curriculum
processes, etc.
Develop/restore close                                     VP Instruction,       June 2009    Relationships re-           Institutional Mission                   Yes
communication with College                                Deans, Division                    established/reaffirmed;     Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
partners, e.g, hospital council,                          Deans, faculty                     develop method to           Resources
school districts, HECCC, UOP,                             leadership                         monitor relationships       Leadership and Governance
BEA, other business partners.
Develop and communicate                                   VP Instruction, VP    June 2009    Promotional materials       Institutional Mission                   Yes
collaborative programs with                               Student Services,                                              Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
Student Services to promote                               Deans, Division                                                Resources
Delta College as the College of                           Deans, Student                                                 Leadership and Governance
choice for all students, e.g.,                            Services
honors programs, programs for                             manaagers, PIO,
special populations                                       faculty leadership
Develop collaboration,                                    VP Instruction,       June 2009    Additional learning         Institutional Mission                   Yes
cooperation, communication                                Deans, Division                    communities; more           Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
across divisions and programs to                          Deans, faculty                     integration of basic        Resources
provide greater integration and                           leadership,                        skills (reading, writing,   Leadership and Governance
coherence within the curriculum                           Curriculum                         math) in content area
and more effective delivery of                            Committee, Basic                   courses.
services, e.g., baisc skills &                            Skills Faculty, CTE
CTE; GE & CTE, etc. Pilot                                 and General Ed
programs that inegrate these                              Faculty
areas.



   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                       228
   Recommendation 3.1


Strategic Goal 1:           Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and
                            external groups to promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.
                                                                                                                                                                 Objective
           Objectives                                          Responsible Party       Time                                                                       Borne
                                            Strategies/Tools    w/Stakeholders        Frame         Planned Outcomes          Accreditation Standard               from
                                                                   Involved         Completion                                                                   Program
                                                                                                                                                                  Review
Communicate the importance of                                  VP Instruction,      June 2009    Meeting with              Institutional Mission                   Yes
the campus environment to the                                  Deans, Division                   Sup/President             Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
Superintendent/President.                                      Deans, Faculty                                              Resources
                                                               Leadership                                                  Leadership and Governance
Institute regular (bi-monthly)                                 VP Instruction,      June 2009    Board/President's         Institutional Mission                   Yes
reports on instructional programs                              Deans, Division                   Council reports           Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
and services to the Board and the                              Deans, Faculty                                              Resources
President's Council.                                           Leadership                                                  Leadership and Governance
Bring faculty leadership into the                              VP Instruction,      June 2009    Better relationships;     Institutional Mission                   Yes
Deans' meeting at least                                        Deans, Division                   more effective problem-   Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
once/month to discuss issues                                   Deans, Faculty                    solving.                  Resources
regarding curriculum, enrollment                               Leadership                                                  Leadership and Governance
planning, etc and to build
collaborative problem-solving.
Work effectively with the                                      VP Instruction       June 2009    Better relationships;     Institutional Mission                   Yes
Executive Cabinet to address                                                                     more effective problem-   Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
issues and solve problems                                                                        solving                   Resources
collaboratively.                                                                                                           Leadership and Governance
Develop and institute ways to                                  VP Instruction, VP   June 2009    Honors and awards         Institutional Mission                   Yes
honor employees for outstanding                                HR, Deans,                                                  Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
service.                                                       Division Deans,                                             Resources
                                                               Faculty Leadership                                          Leadership and Governance
Communicate information from                                   VP of Instruction    ongoing      Faculty, staff            Institutional Mission                   Yes
the Measure L Bond team to                                                                       awareness; possible       Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
Instructional Services and                                                                       survey                    Resources
faculty; serve as representative                                                                                           Leadership and Governance
of the instructional program on
the Measure L Bond team
   Table 36: Instructional Services Strategic Goal One




   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                         229
   Recommendation 3.1



Strategic Goal 2:          Develop a College-wide staff development program to improve faculty, administrator, and classified staff skills to promote
                           access, student success and positive student learning outcomes.

                                                                                                                                                                   Objective
           Objectives                                         Responsible Party         Time                                                                        Borne
                                           Strategies/Tools    w/Stakeholders          Frame         Planned Outcomes           Accreditation Standard               from
                                                                  Involved           Completion                                                                    Program
                                                                                                                                                                    Review
Develop a Division Dean                                       VI Instruction,        June 2010    Better informed            Institutional Mission                   Yes
training calendar for 2007-08;                                Deans, Division                     Division Deans; more       Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
prepare modules on enrollment                                 Deans, other VPs                    effective performance,     Resources
management, apportionment,                                                                        use of all types of        Leadership and Governance
curriculum management,                                                                            resources.
CurricuNET, SLOA process
monitoring, program review,
planning, budget development,
monitoring, effective facilities
use, performance assessment and
discipline, data-driven
management.
Emphasize the importance of                                   VP Instruction,        June 2009    Better attendance at       Institutional Mission                   Yes
professional development for                                  Deans, Division                     Professional               Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
managers, faculty, and staff;                                 Deans, College                      Development                Resources
consider instituting professional                             Leadership:                         Activities; including of   Leadership and Governance
development plans as part of the                              Faculty, Classified,                professional
performance evaluation process                                and Management                      development as part
for managers, faculty, and staff.                                                                 evaluation process for
                                                                                                  faculty, staff, and
                                                                                                  managers (non-
                                                                                                  punitive).
Consider requiring reports from                               VP Instruction,        June 2009    Reports at Deans           Institutional Mission                   Yes
managers, faculty, and staff who                              Deans, Division                     meetings; other            Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
have attended training or                                     Deans,Faculty                       committees.                Resources
conferences.                                                  Leadership                                                     Leadership and Governance
Develop a "grow your own"                                     VP Instruction, VP     June 2009    Report on program to       Institutional Mission                   Yes
approach to developing                                        HR, Deans,                          be instituted in fall,     Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
administrators for Delta                                      Division Deans,                     2009                       Resources
                                                              Faculty Leadership                                             Leadership and Governance
   Table 37: Instructional Services Strategic Goal Two


   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                           230
   Recommendation 3.1




Strategic Goal 3:         Increase access, student success and positive student learning outcomes.
                                                                                                                                                              Objective
           Objectives                                      Responsible Party       Time                                                                        Borne
                                      Strategies/Tools      w/Stakeholders        Frame         Planned Outcomes           Accreditation Standard               from
                                                               Involved         Completion                                                                    Program
                                                                                                                                                               Review
In collaboration with Student                              VP Instruction,      June 2009    Assessments decided        Institutional Mission                   Yes
Success Coordinator and Basic                              Deans, Division                   and ready for validation   Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
Skills Faculty and Assessment                              Deans, Student                    studies                    Resources
instructor refine assessment                               Success                                                      Leadership and Governance
processes.                                                 Coordinator,
                                                           Student Services
                                                           personnel, Faculty
                                                           Leadership
                                                           Assessment
                                                           Instructor, Basic
                                                           Skills Faculty
In collaboration with Student                              VP Instruction,      June 2010    Course revisions and       Institutional Mission                   Yes
Success Coordinator and Basic                              Deans, Division                   alignments complete        Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
Skills Faculty revise the basic                            Deans, Student                    and to the Curriculum      Resources
skills curriculum to improve                               Success                           Committee                  Leadership and Governance
student outcomes and progress                              Coordinator,
to college-level work.                                     Developmental
                                                           Education Task
                                                           Force Steering and
                                                           Task Force,
                                                           Faculty
                                                           Leadership, Basic
                                                           Skills Faculty in
                                                           reading, writing,
                                                           math; Non-Basic
                                                           Skills Faculty
Through restored/developed                                 VP Instruction,      June 2010    Increased opportunities    Institutional Mission                   Yes
relationships with partners,                               Deans, Division                   for internships, work      Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
improve/provide greater                                    Deans, Faculty                    experience,                Resources
internship, work experieence,                              Leadership,                       apprenticeships,           Leadership and Governance
employment, educational                                    Program Faculty                   employment for
possibilities for students.                                                                  students.


   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                      231
   Recommendation 3.1


Strategic Goal 3:          Increase access, student success and positive student learning outcomes.
                                                                                                                                                                Objective
           Objectives                                          Responsible Party       Time                                                                      Borne
                                            Strategies/Tools    w/Stakeholders        Frame         Planned Outcomes         Accreditation Standard               from
                                                                   Involved         Completion                                                                  Program
                                                                                                                                                                 Review
Develop programmatic                                           VP Instruction,      June 2009    More efficient,          Institutional Mission                   Yes
scheduling plans that speak to                                 Deans, Division                   effective                Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
student and community needs.                                   Deans, Faculty                    programmatically-        Resources
                                                               Leadership,                       sound course offerings   Leadership and Governance
                                                               Program Faculty
Hire new faculty and support                                   VP Instruction, VP   June 2010    New faculty, division    Institutional Mission                   Yes
staff; develop and promote new                                 HR, Deans,                        dean hires               Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
staff academies; hire and induct                               Division Deans,                                            Resources
new division deans/directors                                   Faculty Leadership                                         Leadership and Governance
   Table 38: Instructional Services Strategic Goal Three




   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                        232
   Recommendation 3.1




Strategic Goal 4:         Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and
                          insure access, and successful student outcomes.
                                                                                                                                                             Objective
          Objectives                                       Responsible Party       Time                                                                       Borne
                                      Strategies/Tools      w/Stakeholders        Frame         Planned Outcomes          Accreditation Standard               from
                                                               Involved         Completion                                                                   Program
                                                                                                                                                              Review
Develop an enrollment                                      VP Instruction,      June 2009    Enrollment                Institutional Mission                   Yes
management plan that includes                              Deans, Division                   management plan           Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
enollment history and                                      Deans, Faculty                    posted on Instructional   Resources
forecasting, considers labor                               Leadership,                       Services website          Leadership and Governance
market and other external                                  Program
demands, uses both qualitative                             Leadership
and quantitative data for
decision-making, and provides
division deans and the
instructional program with clear,
reasonable enrollment targets
(discipline/department/division/
regional/basic skills/distance
education) for which they will be
held accountable; tie the plan to
budget.
Get control of the hourly budget;                          VP Instruction,      June 2009    Development of a          Institutional Mission                   Yes
assess the efficacy of the use of                          Deans, Division                   realistic hourly budget   Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
reassigned time; develop                                   Deans, VP                         that reflects actual      Resources
accountability measures for                                Business Services,                spending and uses         Leadership and Governance
those on released assignments.                             Director of                       reassigned time
                                                           Finance, Faculty                  responsibly (outcomes)
                                                           Leadership,
                                                           Program
                                                           Leadership
Develop a human resources plan                             VP Instruction,      June 2009    Human resources plan      Institutional Mission                   Yes
for instructional services with                            Deans, Division                   for 08-09 through 13-14   Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
HR that assesses annual hiring                             Deans,Faculty                     posted on Instructional   Resources
needs; proposes new and adjunct                            Leadership,                       Services website          Leadership and Governance
faculty hiring, includes                                   Program
comprehensive testing for key                              Leadership
positions and career ladders

   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                     233
   Recommendation 3.1


Strategic Goal 4:          Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and
                           insure access, and successful student outcomes.
                                                                                                                                                                Objective
           Objectives                                       Responsible Party        Time                                                                        Borne
                                       Strategies/Tools      w/Stakeholders         Frame         Planned Outcomes           Accreditation Standard               from
                                                                Involved          Completion                                                                    Program
                                                                                                                                                                 Review
based on skills patterned on civil
service; tie human resources
plan to budget.

Develop an instructional                                    VP Instruction,       June 2009    Instructional facilities   Institutional Mission                   Yes
facilities use plan including                               Deans, Division                    use plan for 08-09         Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
instituting the R25 software,                               Deans, faculty                     through 13-14 posted       Resources
developing and communicating a                              leadership,                        on Instructional           Leadership and Governance
space allocation plan, managing                             program faculty                    Services website
current space more efficiently;
tie faclities use plan to budget.
Work actively with maintenance                              VP Instruction,       June 2009    Survey of deans            Institutional Mission                   Yes
and custodial services to clean                             Deans, Division                    regarding quality of       Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
and fix up the campus; actively                             Deans, Faculty                     instructional              Resources
monitor instructional space to                              Leadership,                        maintenance.               Leadership and Governance
preserve facilities.                                        Program Faculty,
                                                            Maintenance and
                                                            Operation
Validate that PERA space and                                VP Instruction,       June 2009    Analysis of pros &         Institutional Mission                   Yes
Fine Arts space should be                                   Deans, Division                    cons.                      Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
managed by a division rather                                Deans                                                         Resources
than the Instruction Office.                                                                                              Leadership and Governance
Institute budget monitoring on a                            VP Instruction,       June 2009    Quarterly budget           Institutional Mission                   Yes
quarterly basis for instruction;                            Deans, Division                    reports                    Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
include quarterly budget reports                            Deans, Division                                               Resources
from deans/directors.                                       Secretaries                                                   Leadership and Governance
Evaluate past AI projects; decide                           VP Instruction,       June, 2009   Reports, rubric for        Institutional Mission                   Yes
which to continue and which to                              Deans, Dean of                     evaluation, evaluations    Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
jettison.                                                   Planning,                          and recommendations        Resources
                                                            Research, and                      for continuation or        Leadership and Governance
                                                            Regional                           elimination.
                                                            Education,
                                                            President's Council


   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                        234
   Recommendation 3.1


Strategic Goal 4:          Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and
                           insure access, and successful student outcomes.
                                                                                                                                                               Objective
           Objectives                                          Responsible Party      Time                                                                      Borne
                                            Strategies/Tools    w/Stakeholders       Frame        Planned Outcomes          Accreditation Standard               from
                                                                   Involved        Completion                                                                  Program
                                                                                                                                                                Review
Develop a grant development                                    VP Instruction,     June 2009    Grant development and    Institutional Mission                   Yes
and monitoring plan; make                                      Deans, Division                  monitoring plan on       Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
recommendations for resources                                  Deans, Faculty                   Instructional Services   Resources
based on the plan; develop                                     Leadership,                      website.                 Leadership and Governance
strategic resource development                                 Program Faculty
that focus on high profile
programs.
   Table 39: Instructional Services Strategic Goal Four




   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                       235
   Recommendation 3.1




Strategic Goal 5:           Complete the Accreditation Report and Facilitate the Accreditation Site Visit.

                                                                                                                                                                             Objective
           Objectives                                                        Responsible Party       Time                                                                     Borne
                                              Strategies/Tools                w/Stakeholders        Frame         Planned Outcomes        Accreditation Standard               from
                                                                                 Involved         Completion                                                                 Program
                                                                                                                                                                              Review
Address accreditation                                                        VP Instruction,      June 2009-   Report                  Institutional Mission                   Yes
recommendations and prepare                                                  Deans, Division      2010                                 Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
for response.                                                                Deans, Faculty                                            Resources
                                                                             Leadership,                                               Leadership and Governance
                                                                             Program Faculty
Consolidate plans from 2008                                                  President, VP        August,      Report to President's   Institutional Mission                   Yes
Accreditation Self-Study Report,                                             Instruction, Dean    2008         Council                 Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
make assignments, begin                                                      of Planning,                                              Resources
working on plans; develop                                                    Research, and                                             Leadership and Governance
reporting calendar.                                                          Regional Education
   Table 40: Instructional Services Strategic Goal – Facilitate Site Visit




   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                                     236
   Recommendation 3.1




Strategic Goal 6:          Facilitate the Revitalization of College facilities and the Measure L Bond campaign.

                                                                                                                                                               Objective
           Objectives                                            Responsible Party      Time                                                                    Borne
                                           Strategies/Tools       w/Stakeholders       Frame        Planned Outcomes        Accreditation Standard               from
                                                                     Involved        Completion                                                                Program
                                                                                                                                                                Review
Serve on the Measure L Bond                                      VP Instruction      June 2009    Communication to       Institutional Mission                   Yes
team; monitor input from user                                                                     constituents           Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
groups.                                                                                                                  Resources
                                                                                                                         Leadership and Governance
Serve on various project steering                                VP Instruction      June 2009    Committee membership   Institutional Mission                   Yes
committees and represent the                                                                      and attendance.        Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
interests of the instructional                                                                                           Resources
program.                                                                                                                 Leadership and Governance
   Table 41: Instructional Services Strategic Goal – Measure L




   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                       237
   Recommendation 3.1




Strategic Goal 7:           Launch new programs that respond to the emerging trends in the region and the world.

                                                                                                                                                                      Objective
           Objectives                                                  Responsible Party      Time                                                                     Borne
                                           Strategies/Tools             w/Stakeholders       Frame         Planned Outcomes        Accreditation Standard               from
                                                                           Involved        Completion                                                                 Program
                                                                                                                                                                       Review
Consider infusing current                                              VP Instruction,     June 2010    Curriculum proposals;   Institutional Mission                   Yes
courses/programs with principles                                       Deans, Division                  presentations           Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
of sustainability/"green"                                              Deans, Faculty                                           Resources
technology.                                                            Leadership,                                              Leadership and Governance
                                                                       Program Faculty
Develop an optics program for                                          VP Instruction,     June 2010    Curriculum proposals;   Institutional Mission                   Yes
Mountain House site.                                                   Deans, Division                  approved curriculum     Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
                                                                       Deans, Faculty                                           Resources
                                                                       Leadership,                                              Leadership and Governance
                                                                       Program Facultyy
Develop viticulture, hospitality,                                      VP Instruction,     June 2010    Curriculum proposals;   Institutional Mission                   Yes
other programs for Lodi site.                                          Deans, Division                  approved curriculum     Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
                                                                       Deans, Faculty                                           Resources
                                                                       Leadership,                                              Leadership and Governance
                                                                       Program Faculty
Identify programs that speak to                                        VP Instruction,     June 2010    List of programs;       Institutional Mission                   Yes
local employer needs and current                                       Deans, Division                  curriculum proposals;   Student Learning Programs/Resources     No
trends.                                                                Deans, Faculty                   approved curriculum     Resources
                                                                       Leadership,                                              Leadership and Governance
                                                                       Program Faculty
   Table 42: Instructional Services Strategic Goal – Emerging Trends




   Action Planning: Instructional Services                                                                                                                              238
Recommendation 3.1

Student Services

The Division of Students Services has been the beneficiary of a new vice president. Coming
from American River College, this new administrator has experienced many of the same
opportunities and challenges as has San Joaquin Delta College.
With a new vision and new energy, the vice president of student services has many new
directions and initiatives to deploy for the students of San Joaquin Delta College. And similar to
the other new vice presidents, the chief student services officer plans to leverage technology to
achieve strategic goals quicker and add functionality to the division without adding an inordinate
number of new staff.

From DocuShare, a system to collaborate in a paperless office to the implementation of SARS,
an online counseling schedule software, the Student Services division has made great strides in
implementing action plans in pursuit of the Strategic Plans.




Action Plan: Student Services                                                                  239
Recommendation 3.1



    GOAL 1
    Develop and implement a communication plan that provides easy access to information to and from all internal and external groups
    to promote access, student success, and positive student learning outcomes.
           Objectives               Strategies/Tools     Party Responsible Timeframe/      Planned        Resources Accreditation Program
                                                          w/Stakeholders     Completion   Outcomes        Required       Standard    Review
                                                               Involved
     1.1 Promote the expansion       a) Faculty use of student   1. Division chairs    Spring 2007   1. More           1. Re-             II.B.4      Yes
        and enhancement of an           E-mail.                  2. S.S. Directors     March/April      informed          allocation of
        effective student            b) Department use of        3. V.P. Info                           students          staff
        communication model             post cards.                 Technology                       2. Increased      2. Minimal
        within at least three        c) Faculty use of early     4. V.P. Instruction                    retention         funding
        departments/divisions           alert system             5. Faculty                          3. Improved
                                                                                                        student
                                                                                                        success

     1.2 Institute student success a) Departmental               1. Division chairs    Spring 2007   1. Increased      1. None            I.A.1.      Yes
        discussion forums             meetings.                  2. Selected S.S.      March/April      retention         anticipated     I.B.1.
        between Student Services b) Division meetings.              Directors                        2. Improved                          II.B.4.
        and at least three                                       3. V.P. Instruction                    student
        Instructional divisions.                                 4. Faculty                             success.
                                                                                                     3. Improved
                                                                                                        service to
                                                                                                        students.

     1.3 Promote faculty             a) Department meetings.     1. Faculty            Spring 2007   1. Improved       1. Unknown         I.A.1.      Yes
        dialogue and encourage       b) Division meetings.       2. Administrators                      Student                           II.A.1.a.
        the implementation of        c) Staff development        3. Director of                         success                           II.A.1.c.
        Equity for All Project to       meetings.                   Institutional                    2. Increased                         II.A.2.a.
        reduce the achievement                                      Research                            retention                         II.A.2.b.
        gap for minority students                                4. Directors                        3. Increased                         II.A.2.e.
        on campus.                                               5. Staff                               graduation                        II.A.2.f.
                                                                                                        and transfer                      II.A.2.h.
                                                                                                        rates.                            II.A.2.i.
                                                                                                                                          II.A.2.j.

Table 43: Student Services Strategic Goal One




Action Planning: Student Services                                                                                                                           240
Recommendation 3.1



    GOAL 2
       Develop a College-wide staff development program to improve faculty, administrator, and classified staff skills to promote access,
       student success and positive student learning outcomes.
          Objectives              Strategies/Tools    Party Responsible Timeframe/       Planned        Resources Accreditation Program
                                                        w/Stakeholders  Completion      Outcomes         Required          Standard    Review
                                                           Involved
     2.1 Conduct a Student          a) College Mission         1. V.P. Student       Spring 2007   1. Establish      1. Minimal   I.A.4.      Yes
        Services administrative        Statement.                 Services                            specific          funding   I.B.1.
        retreat to review           b) Student Services        2. Student Services                    timeline for                I.B.3
        progress of the                Mission                    Managers                            submission     2. Reports   I.B.5.
        development of a            c) Review departmental     3. Faculty Leaders                     of
        student services model         accomplishments                                                accomplish-
        that would assist           d) Review departmental                                            ments
        departments in                 goals and objectives.
        assessing, developing                                                                      2. Establish
        and tracking student                                                                          specific
        learning outcomes                                                                             timeline for
        utilizing the new                                                                             submission
        Accreditation                                                                                 of
        Standards.                                                                                    departments’
                                                                                                      goals and
                                                                                                      objectives
     2.2 Provide continued          a)   Memos                 1. V.P. Student        Fall 2006    1. Knowledge- 1. Minimal       II.A.1.c.   Yes
        support and                 b)   Department meetings      Services           Spring 2007      able faculty/ funding       II.A.2.a.
        encouragement of            c)   Personal contact      2. S.S. Managers                       staff in the                I.A.3.
        faculty and staff           d)   Staff development     3. Faculty Leaders                     development                 I.B.1.
        participation at local,                                                                       and
        regional, and state-wide                                                                      implementati
        student learning                                                                              on of
        outcomes conferences                                                                          Student
        and workshops.                                                                                Learning
                                                                                                      Outcomes
                                                                                                   2. Student
                                                                                                      support
                                                                                                      services
                                                                                                      that support
                                                                                                      learning
Table 44: Student Services Strategic Goal Two

Action Planning: Student Services                                                                                                                   241
Recommendation 3.1



   GOAL 3
   Increase access, student success and positive student learning outcomes.
           Objectives              Strategies/Tools     Party Responsible Timeframe/                 Planned           Resources        Accreditation Program
                                                          w/Stakeholders    Completion               Outcomes          Required          Standard      Review
                                                             Involved
    3.1 Provide Ongoing           a)   Joint Meetings        1. V. P. Instruction   Summer 2006    1. Increased       1. Joint          II.B.3.a.
       collaboration, support &   b)   Use of Research       2. V. P. Business       Spring 2007      enrollment         meetings       II.B.3.e.
       assistance to the          c)   Marketing             3. V. P. Human                        2. Equitable       2. Use of
       Assistant Supt/Vice        d)   Outreach                 Resources                             access to all      research
       President of Instruction   e)   Recruitment           4. V. P. Info Svcs                       segments /         data
       to ensure the              f)   Focus Recruitment     5. Director                              district        3. Marketing
       enhancement and the        g)   Economic trend data      Admissions &                          service area    4. Recruitment
       implementation of an                                     Records                            3. Increased          Outreach
       effective Enrollment                                  6. Director                              district        5. Economic
       Management Plan.                                         Recruitment/                          funding            trend / data
                                                                Outreach
                                                             7. Dir. Counseling
                                                             8. Division Chairs
    3.2 Promote the               a)   Intro to College      1. V.P.                 Fall 2006     1. More            1. Minimal        II.B.1.
       development, expansion     b)   Assessment               Information         Spring 2007       convenient         funding        II.B.3.
       and implementation of      c)   Orientation              Services                              access to       2. Training       II.B.3.c.
       web based e-services       d)   Advisement            2. Director                              services
       and technology in an       e)   Outreach                 Counseling                         2. More
       effort to deliver an                                  3. Web-Master                            efficient use
       adequate level of                                     4. Counseling Staff                      of resources
       services throughout the                               5. Outreach Staff                     3. Greater
       district service area                                 6. F.A. Outreach                         access and
                                                                Staff                                 use of
                                                                                                      services




Action Planning: Student Services                                                                                                                               242
Recommendation 3.1


    GOAL 3
    Increase access, student success and positive student learning outcomes.
            Objectives              Strategies/Tools     Party Responsible Timeframe/                   Planned           Resources   Accreditation Program
                                                           w/Stakeholders    Completion                 Outcomes          Required     Standard      Review
                                                              Involved
     3.3 Work collaboratively        a) Staff development         1. V.P. Instruction   Fall 2007     1. Clearer       1. Funding     I.A.1.         Yes
        with the Assistant              activities                2. Directors          October /        Understand- 2. Staffing      II.A.1.a.
        Superintendent/Vice          b) Campus-wide               3. Division Chairs    November         ing of                       II.A.1.c.
        President of Instruction        Meetings                  4. Academic                            student                      II.A.2.a.
        in the development and       c) Workshops                    Senate President                    learning                     II.A.2.b.
        implementation of            d) Staff training sessions   5. Faculty                             outcomes                     II.A.2.e.
        student learning                                          6. Staff                            2. Better                       II.A.2.f.
        outcomes                                                                                         response to                  II.A.2.h.
                                                                                                         accreditation                II.A.2.i.
                                                                                                         standards                    II.A.2
     3.4 Work collaboratively        a) Staff development         1. V.P. Instruction    Fall 2006    1. Improved
        with “Equity for All”           activities                2. Division Deans     Spring 2007      student
        committee and faculty        b) New curriculum            3. Directors                           success
        in implementing                 models                    4. Academic                         2. Improved
        strategies to improve        c) New teaching methods         Senate President                    graduation
        student success in Math                                   4. Faculty                             rates
        and English                                                                                   3. Improved
                                                                                                         transfer rates
                                                                                                      4. Improved
                                                                                                         retention
Table 45: Student Services Strategic Goal Three




Action Planning: Student Services                                                                                                                             243
Recommendation 3.1



    GOAL 4
     Assess resources to accomplish goals, set income and spending targets, and adjust College budget priorities to support and insure access,
     student success, and successful student outcomes
             Objectives                  Strategies/Tools       Party Responsible Timeframe/          Planned               Resources    Accreditation Program
                                                                 w/Stakeholders   Completion          Outcomes              Required      Standard      Review
                                                                    Involved
     4.1 Continue working            a) Internal / external     1. V.P. Business       Fall 2006    1. Consolation     1. Reports        1 .A.4.        Yes
        collaboratively with the        meetings                   Services           Spring 2007      of essential    2. Funding        1. B.3.
        Vice President of            b) Use of research data.   2. V.P. Instruction                    services.                         1. B. 4.
        Business Services and                                   3. Dean Planning                    2. More                              1. B. 6.
        Bond team in finalizing                                    Research                            convenient
        the Gateway building                                    4. S.S Directors                       access to
        and planning other                                      5. Faculty/Staff                       services.
        district-wide Bond                                                                          3. More
        projects.                                                                                      efficient use
                                                                                                       of space

     4.2 Coordinate with the         a) Expand on-line          1. V.P. Instruction   Spring 2007   1. Increase        1.   Technology   II.B.1.        Yes
        Asst. Superintendent &          services                2. V.P. Business       Mar/April       enrollment      2.   Training     II.B.3.a.
        Vice President of            b) Re-allocate staff       3. Dean, Tracy                      2. More            3.   Staff
        Business in the              c) Develop one-stop           Center                              efficient use   4.   Funding
        enhancement and                 services                4. Dean, Planning &                    of staff        5.   Reports
        expansion of student         d) Increase recruitment       Research                         3. More
        support services at the         /outreach efforts       5. Student Services                    convenient
        Mountain House               e) Assess student needs       Directors                           access to
        educational center in                                                                          services
        Tracy.


Table 46: Student Services Strategic Goal Four




Action Planning: Student Services                                                                                                                                244
Appendix 7: Personnel Data
                      2005 – 2006 San Joaquin Delta College Hiring by Ethnicity
                   Ethnicity                   Short-Term Hires          Permanent Hires         Overall Hires
          African-American Non Hisp.            11             4.3%      10        5.4%     21           4.8%
             American Indian Alaskan
                                Native            2            0.8%       2        1.1%      4           0.9%
                                 Asian          57            22.4%      19       10.3%     76          17.3%
                   Hispanic or Latino           44            17.3%      20       10.9%     64          14.6%
                      Pacific Islander            2            0.8%       2        1.1%      4           0.9%
                     South American               3            1.2%       2        1.1%      5           1.1%
                  White Non-Hispanic            91            35.7%      95       51.6%    186          42.4%
                    Other Non-White               8            3.1%       2        1.1%     10           2.3%
                      Decline to State            8            3.1%       4        2.2%     12           2.7%
            Unknown, Non Respondent             29            11.4%      28       15.2%     57          13.0%
                                     Totals    255          100.0%      184      100.0%    439         100.0%

             Asian Subcategories               Short-Term Hires          Permanent Hires         Overall Hires
                           Asian Indian           6           10.5%       0        0.0%      6           7.9%
                            Cambodian             5            8.8%       2       10.5%      7           9.2%
                               Chinese            6           10.5%       5       26.3%     11          14.5%
                               Filipino         14            24.6%       5       26.3%     19          25.0%
                              Japanese            1            1.8%       2       10.5%      3           3.9%
                                Korean            2            3.5%       0        0.0%      2           2.6%
                                Laotian           1            1.8%       0        0.0%      1           1.3%
                            Vietnamese            9           15.8%       2       10.5%     11          14.5%
                     Asian Non-Specific           6           10.5%       1        5.3%      7           9.2%
                               Other Asian        7           12.3%       2       10.5%      9          11.8%
                                Total Asian     57          100.0%       19      100.0%     76         100.0%

              Hispanic or Latino
                Subcategories                  Short-Term Hires          Permanent Hires         Overall Hires
                              Hispanic            6           13.6%       5       25.0%     11          17.2%
                     Mexican, Mexican-
                     American, Chicano          36            81.8%      13       65.0%     49          76.6%
                             Other Hispanic       2            4.5%       2       10.0%      4           6.3%
                Total Hispanic or Latino        44          100.0%       20      100.0%     64         100.0%

       Pacific Islander Subcategories          Short-Term Hires          Permanent Hires         Overall Hires
                               Hawaiian           0           0.0%        0        0.0%      0           0.0%
                   Other Pacific Islander         2         100.0%        2      100.0%      4         100.0%
                   Total Pacific Islander         2         100.0%        2      100.0%      4         100.0%
Table 47: 2005 – 2006 San Joaquin Delta College Hiring by Ethnicity64

64
     Reference Appendix J.
                                                                                                                 245
                              2006 – 2007 San Joaquin Delta College Hiring by Ethnicity
Table 48: 2006 – 2007 San Joaquin Delta College Hiring by Ethnicity




                                                                                          246
                              2007 – 2008 San Joaquin Delta College Hiring by Ethnicity
                 Ethnicity                         Short-Term Hires           Permanent Hires         Overall Hires
       African-American Non Hispanic                16            6.7%        14        9.9%     30           7.9%
       American Indian Alaskan Native               10            4.2%         2        1.4%     12           3.2%
                                  Asian             58           24.4%        21       14.9%     79          20.8%
                    Hispanic or Latino              54           22.7%        27       19.1%     81          21.4%
                       Pacific Islander              1            0.4%         0        0.0%      1           0.3%
                      South American                 1            0.4%         0        0.0%      1           0.3%
                  White Non-Hispanic                60           25.2%        71       50.4%    131          34.6%
                     Other Non-White                 9            3.8%         1        0.7%     10           2.6%
                      Decline to State               0            0.0%         1        0.7%      1           0.3%
             Unknown, Non Respondent                29           12.2%         4        2.8%     33           8.7%
                                     Totals        238          100.0%       141      100.0%    379         100.0%


          Asian Subcategories                      Short-Term Hires           Permanent Hires         Overall Hires
                            Asian Indian             3            5.2%         1        4.8%      4           5.1%
                             Cambodian               9           15.5%         2        9.5%     11          13.9%
                                Chinese              5            8.6%         3       14.3%      8          10.1%
                                Filipino            18           31.0%         5       23.8%     23          29.1%
                               Japanese              3            5.2%         1        4.8%      4           5.1%
                                 Korean              2            3.4%         0        0.0%      2           2.5%
                                 Laotian             0            0.0%         1        4.8%      1           1.3%
                             Vietnamese              9           15.5%         3       14.3%     12          15.2%
                      Asian Non-Specific             1            1.7%         2        9.5%      3           3.8%
                               Other Asian           8           13.8%         3       14.3%     11          13.9%
                               Total Asian          58          100.0%        21      100.0%     79         100.0%


  Hispanic or Latino Subcategories                 Short-Term Hires           Permanent Hires         Overall Hires
                             Hispanic                2                3.7%     2        7.4%      4           4.9%
           Mexican, Mexican-American,
                             Chicano                46           85.2%        21       77.8%     67          82.7%
                           Other Hispanic            6           11.1%         4       14.8%     10          12.3%
                 Total Hispanic or Latino           54          100.0%        27      100.0%     81         100.0%


    Pacific Islander Subcategories                 Short-Term Hires           Permanent Hires         Overall Hires
                                  Hawaiian           0                0.0%     0        0.0%      0           0.0%
                    Other Pacific Islander           2          100.0%         1      100.0%      3         100.0%
                    Total Pacific Islander           2          100.0%         1      100.0%      3         100.0%
Table 49: 2007 – 2008 San Joaquin Delta College Hiring by Ethnicity




                                                                                                                247
                                            Ethnicity65                     Staff & Faculty
                                   African-American Non Hispanic           83         5.5%
                                  American Indian Alaskan Native           23         1.5%
                                                               Asian      161        10.7%
                                                 Hispanic or Latino       231        15.3%
                                                    Pacific Islander        4         0.3%
                                                   South American           3         0.2%
                                               White Non-Hispanic         822        54.5%
                                                  Other Non-White           6         0.4%
                                                   Decline to State         9         0.6%
                                          Unknown, Non Respondent         165        10.9%
                                                                 Totals   1507     100.0%
                                       Asian Subcategories                  Staff & Faculty
                                                           Asian Indian    11         6.8%
                                                            Cambodian      10         6.2%
                                                               Chinese     31        19.3%
                                                               Filipino    42        26.1%
                                                              Japanese     18        11.2%
                                                                Korean      2         1.2%
                                                                Laotian     6         3.7%
                                                            Vietnamese     15         9.3%
                                                     Asian Non-Specific    14         8.7%
                                                           Other Asian     12         7.5%
                                                            Total Asian   161      100.0%
                               Hispanic or Latino Subcategories             Staff & Faculty
                                                          Hispanic         73        32.6%
                                        Mexican, Mexican-American,
                                                          Chicano         131        58.5%
                                                         Other Hispanic    20         8.9%
                                             Total Hispanic or Latino     224      100.0%
                                 Pacific Islander Subcategories             Staff & Faculty
                                                              Hawaiian      1        20.0%
                                                Other Pacific Islander      4        80.0%
                                                 Total Pacific Islander     5      100.0%
Table 50: Ethnicity of Permanent College Employees




65
     Reference Appendix J.
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