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COUNTY OF IMPERIAL

VIEWS: 12 PAGES: 39

									C OMPREHENSIVE E CONOMIC
 D EVELOPMENT S TRATEGY
( FORMERLY O VERALL E CONOMIC D EVELOPMENT P LAN )




     C OUNTY OF I MPERIAL
                      2002 - 2003



                             P R E PA R E D B Y :

                       COUNTY OF IMPERIAL
 C O M M U N I T Y & E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T D E PA RT M E N T
                          836 M A I N S T R E E T
                     E L C E N T RO , C A L I F O R N I A
                           760-337-7814
                          WWW. ICCED . COM
                          TABLE OF C ONTENTS


SECTION 1:   B ACKGROUND
    1-1   INTRODUCTION ……………………………………………………….……                       1
    1-2   LOCATION ………………………………………………………….………                         2

SECTION 2:   O VERALL E CONOMIC D EVELOPMENT C OMMISSION
    2-1   OVERALL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION …………………….           3
    2-2   ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT ……………………...……………..              4
    2-3   MINORITY REPRESENTATION OF THE OEDC COMMISSION …...……….     5
    2-4   OVERALL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION MEMBERSHIP ….…      5
    2-5   METHOD BY WHICH MINORITY REPRESENTATION SELECTED ………...…   10

SECTION 3:   P OPULATION D EMOGRAPHICS
    3-1   POPULATION DEMOGRAPHICS …………………..…...…...…….………..          11
    3-2   EMPLOYMENT ….………………………………………………….….…….                     12
    3-3   INCOME AND POVERTY …………………………….…………………..….                 15
    3-4   HEALTH AND SAFETY ………………………………………………....…...               16
    3-5   EDUCATION ……………………...…….…………………………….……..                   16
    3-6   HOUSING ……………………...…………………………………...……….                    17
    3-7   OVERVIEW …………………...………..……………………...…...….…….               19

SECTION 4:   A NALY SIS
    4-1   ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEMS AND OPPORTUNITIES …………....…………      21
    4-2   RESOURCE ANALYSIS ….………………………………………….….…….                 23
    4-3   INDUSTRY TRENDS AND OUTLOOK ……………………….………………               23

SECTION 5:   V ISION
    5-1   GOALS AND OBJECTIVES ………………….…………….…..………….….              25

SECTION 6:   A CTION P LAN
    6-1   DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY AND IMPLEMENTATION PLAN …….…...……     28
    6-2   PROGRAM AND PROJECT SELECTION ….…………………...……….…….          28
    6-3   ASSUMPTIONS ABOUT ECONOMIC TRENDS IN IMPERIAL COUNTY …….   29
    6-4   DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY AND IMPLEMENTATION ACTION PLAN ……..   29
    6-5   CRITERIA FOR SELECTING PROJECTS TO EDA ………..….………………       36
    6-6   PRIORITY PROJECTS CRITERIA …….……………………..…...…….….…         36
    6-7   PUBLIC WORKS IMPACT PROGRAM …….………………………..….…….            37
          TABLE: OEDC PROJECTS FOR EDA FUNDING ………………...…            39
S ECTION 1. B ACKGROUND
1-1 I NTRODUCTION

The U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration (EDA) annually makes grant
awards to eligible recipients to help support economic development initiatives of an area. To compete for
these funds, an approved Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS), formerly known as the
County’s Overall Economic Development Plan (OEDP), must be prepared and maintained. The purpose of
this document is to satisfy this requirement and, therefore, maintain the eligibility of the County of Imperial,
the incorporated and unincorporated cities, special districts, and nonprofit organizations to apply for and
receive EDA grant assistance.

A Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) is the result of a local planning process designed
to guide the economic growth of an area. The terms '‘area”, “region” and “community are often used
interchangeably to refer to an appropriate political, economic, geographic, or environmental entity for
addressing economic development. A CEDS process will help create jobs, foster more stable and diversified
economies, and improve living conditions.               It provides a mechanism for coordinating the efforts of
individuals, organizations, local governments, and private industry concerned with economic development.

A CEDS is required to qualify for Economic Development Administration (EDA) assistance under its public
works, economic adjustment, and most planning programs, and is a prerequisite for designation by EDA as
an economic development district (EDD).

The CEDS must be the result of a continuing economic development planning process, developed with broad
based and diverse community participation, and contain the following:

        An analysis of economic and community development problems and opportunities including
       incorporation of any relevant materials or suggestions from other government sponsored or supported
       plans;

        Background and history of the economic development situation of the area covered, with a discussion
       of the economy, including as appropriate, geography, population, labor force, resources, and the
       environment;

        A discussion of community participation in the planning efforts;

        A section setting forth goals and objectives for taking advantage of the opportunities of and solving
       the economic development problems of the area serviced;A plan of action, including suggested projects
       to implement objectives and goals set forth in the strategy; and




  I M P E R I A L C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G Y 2002 - 2003…………….…….…… 1
        Performance measures that will be used to evaluate whether and to what extent goals and objectives
       have been or are being met.

1-2        L OCATION

Imperial County, located in the southeast corner of California, is bordered on the north by Riverside County,
on the west by San Diego County, on the south by Mexico, and on the east by the Colorado River, which
forms the boundary between California and Arizona. Imperial is the ninth largest county in California and
covers an area of 4,597 square miles. The small community of Calipatria is the lowest community in the
United States at 180 feet below sea level.

Seventy-five percent of the county area is desert sand and rugged mountains with an average annual rainfall of
less than 3 inches. Imperial County is one of California’s major agricultural producers. The main farming area
is in the Imperial Valley, an 830-square-mile area that extends from the Mexican border north to the Salton
Sea. An extensive irrigation system has been developed, and adequate water is supplied from the Colorado
River through the All-American Canal.

Imperial County is the only designated Enterprise Community rural area in southern California and covers
2.94 million acres in the southeast corner of California. With a countywide population of approximately
142,361, the largest cities in Imperial County are El Centro (37,835 population), Brawley (22,052 population),
and Calexico (27,109population). The City of Mexicali (764,902 population) is located across the international
border from Calexico.
From January 1992 to January 1998, the three largest cities in the county (El Centro, Calexico, and Brawley)
increased their populations between 4.3 percent and 9.9 percent.



                 Table 1     Imperial County Population
                                                                  #                        % of Total
                 Brawley                                       22,052                        15%
                 Calexico                                      27,109                        19%
                 Calipatria                                     7,289                         5%
                 El Centro                                     37,835                        27%
                 Holtville                                      5,612                         4%
                 Imperial                                       7,560                         5%
                 Westmorland                                    2,131                         1%
                 Unincorporated                                32,773                        23%
                       Total                                  142,361                       100%
                 Source: Census Bureau 2000 data




  I M P E R I A L C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G Y 2002 - 2003…………….…….…… 2
                                                LOCATION MAP




S ECTION 2.                  O VERALL E CONOMIC D EVELOPMENT C OMMISSION

2-1        O VERALL E CONOMIC D EVELOPMENT C OMMISSION

Originally, the regional promotion that was done in Imperial County, was conducted by the Regional
Economic Development Incorporated (REDI), a private non-profit agency.                             With operations largely
dependent upon Federal Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) funding, in 1994 when amendments to the
JTPA were passed prohibiting employment generating activities, Imperial County lost its only economic
development entity.

With the loss of REDI, the community was in need of an economic development agency that would promote the
county.    The Imperial County Board of Supervisors hoped that Imperial County Community Economic
Development (CED) Department, the acting agency for economic and community development, would be able to
continue the operations REDI which included, initiate new activities and build economic development within the
area.

Since attitudes toward economic development were changing within the community and government, CED was
not properly structured to handle new economic development efforts in Imperial County. In an effort to facilitate
and maintain economic development efforts in Imperial County, the Imperial County Board of Supervisors




  I M P E R I A L C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G Y 2002 - 2003…………….…….…… 3
appointed an Economic Development (ED) Steering Committee to restructure the CED into an agency that the
public and private sector could work with to improve economic development within Imperial County.

The Committees’ responsibility was to develop strategies for regional economic development and identify an entity
to represent Imperial County in such endeavors. The outcome of the ED Steering Committee work resulted in
the restructuring of the CED Department. CED is changed its name to the Valley of Imperial Development
Alliance (VIDA). VIDA, which means life in Spanish, continued the work of CED, especially its work with the
Overall Economic Development Commission (OEDC) in fulfilling established goals and objectives.

VIDA served as staff to the OEDC. The commission is appointed by the respective cities, supervisorial districts
and the Board of Supervisors. Membership is comprised of a minimum of 41 primary members and 25 alternates.
The Commission meets at least once every other month and is open to the public.

In 2001, VIDA changed its name to Imperial County Community and Economic Development, ICCED. The
focus has remained the same, to promote economic development throughout Imperial County. ICCED staffs the
OEDC meetings.

The OEDC is the principal coordinator of the economic development planning process. The commission is
responsible for developing and implementing strategies, programs and projects that encourage new industry
development, business expansion and recruitment in Imperial County.

2-2        O RGANIZATION AND M ANAGEMENT

In accordance with the requirements of the Public Works and Economic Development Act of 1965, as
amended, the County of Imperial established the Overall Economic Development Commission to formulate
an Economic Development program consistent with the County’s agrarian economy. In accordance with
Imperial County’s Overall Economic Development Commission by-laws, the OEDC consists of seventeen
(17) members appointed in the following manner:

    1. One (1) member appointed by each of the five (5) members of the Imperial County Board of
         Supervisors.

    2. One (1) member appointed by each of the seven (7) incorporated cities in Imperial County.

    3. Five (5) members appointed by members of the leading minority groups or organizations of the area.

The Commission is well represented from a geographical standpoint and includes the major economic
segments of Imperial County. The OEDC Executive Committee includes the Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson
and Secretary and they serve for a period of one year. The Chairperson has the authority to appoint other
committees and subcommittees, which are deemed necessary to accomplish the purposes, tasks and
responsibilities of the OEDC.




  I M P E R I A L C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G Y 2002 - 2003…………….…….…… 4
2-3       M INORITY R EPRESENTATION OF THE OEDC C OMMISSION

The following information is to provide data to determine compliance with EDA Directive 7.06 on minority
representation on OEDC Committees. The aspects of compliance are as follows:

   1. Every effort shall be made to have minority representation, on the OEDC Commission, in
      proportion to the population of the County.

   2. Minority representation should be selected by representatives of the leading minority groups or
      organization of the area. In addition, consideration must be given to female representation.

2-4       O VERALL E CONOMIC D EVELOPMENT C OMMISSION M EMBERSHIP

Currently, the commission is comprised of 41 primary members and 25 alternates.                            Following is the
membership of the current 2001 – 2002 Imperial County Overall Economic Development Commission:

ENTITY REPRESENTED                  PRIMARY MEMBER                                ALTERNATE MEMBER

CITY GOVERNMENT
CITY OF BRAWLEY                     Ann Garcia                                    Jerry Santillan
                                    Assistant to the City Manager                 City Manager
                                    205 S. Imperial Ave                           205 S Imperial Ave
                                    Brawley, CA 92227                             Brawley, CA 92227
                                    Tel. (760) 351-2655                           Tel. (760) 344-9111
                                    Fax (760) 351-2656                            Fax (760) 344-0907

CITY OF CALEXICO                    Julia Osuna                                   Rosalind Guerrero
                                    Economic Development Specialist               Assistant to City Manager
                                    608 Heber Avenue                              608 Heber Avenue
                                    Calexico, CA 92231                            Calexico, CA 92231
                                    Tel. (760) 768-2177                           Tel. (760) 768-7469
                                    Fax (760) 357-3831                            Fax (760) 768-2103

CITY OF CALIPATRIA                  Romualdo Medina
                                    City Manager
                                    125 N. Park Avenue
                                    Calipatria, CA 92233
                                    Tel. (760) 348-4141
                                    Fax (760) 348-7035


ENTITY REPRESENTED                  PRIMARY MEMBER                                ALTERNATE MEMBER
CITY OF EL CENTRO                   Oscar Rodriguez                               Marcela Piedra
                                    Director of Economic Development              Community Development Specialist
                                    1275 Main Street                              1275 Main Street
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel. (760) 352-4543                           Tel. (760) 337-3176
                                    Fax (760) 352-4867                            Fax (760) 352-4867

CITY OF HOLTVILLE                   Colleen Ludwig                                Virginia Samaha
                                    Council member                                Council member

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                                    121 East Fifth Street                         121 East Fifth Street
                                    Holtville, CA 92250                           Holtville, CA 92250
                                    Tel. (760) 356-1352                           Tel. (760) 356-1352
                                    Fax (760) 356-2894                            Fax (760) 356-2894

CITY OF IMPERIAL                    Vincent Long
                                    Interim City Manager
                                    420 S. Imperial Avenue
                                    Imperial, CA 92251
                                    Tel. (760) 355-3340
                                    Fax (760) 355-4718

CITY OF WESTMORLAND                 Jorge Galvan
                                    The Holt Group
                                    1561 S. Fourth Street
                                    El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel. (760) 337-3883

COUNTY GOVERNMENT
AIR QUALITY                         Jeannette Monroy                              Brad Poiriez
                                    Air Pollution Control District                Air Pollution Control District
                                    150 S. 9th Street                             150 S. 9th Street
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel. (760) 482-4606                           Tel. (760) 482-4606
                                    Fax (760) 353-9904                            Fax (760) 353-9904

COUNTY OF IMPERIAL                  Robertta Burns                                Ron Grassi
                                    County Executive’s Office                     County Executive’s Office
                                    940 Main Street, Suite 208                    940 Main Street, Suite 208
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel. (760) 482-4290                           Tel. (760) 482-4290
                                    Fax (760) 352-7876                            Fax (760) 352-7876

COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC Ken Hollis                                                 Trish Ferrand
DEVELOPMENT            Director                                                   Economic Development Coordinator
                                                                                  II
                                    836 Main Street                               836 Main Street
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel (760) 337-7814                            Tel (760) 337-7814
                                    Fax (760) 337-8907                            Fax (760) 337-8907

ENTITY REPRESENTED                  PRIMARY MEMBER                                ALTERNATE MEMBER
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL                                                              James Semmes
SERVICES                                                                          Director
                                                                                  2995 S Fourth Street
                                                                                  El Centro, CA 92243
                                                                                  Tel (760) 337-6800
                                                                                  Fax (760) 370-0492

PLANNING DEPT.                      Jurg Heuberger                                Darrell Gardner
                                    Director                                      Planning Department
                                    939 Main Street                               939 Main Street
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243


 I M P E R I A L C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G Y 2002 - 2003…………….…….…… 6
                                    Tel. (760) 482-4236                           Tel. (760) 482-4236
                                    Fax (760) 353-8338                            Fax (760) 353-8338

PUBLIC HEALTH                       Robin Raecker                                 Jose Carrillo
                                    Assistant Director                            Disease Prevention Specialist
                                    935 Broadway                                  935 Broadway
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243

TRANSPORTATION                      Rosa Lopez
                                    I.V. Association of Governments
                                    940 Main Street, Suite 208
                                    El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel. (760) 339-4290

EDUCATION
IMPERIAL VALLEY                     Leonard Fabian                                Gonzalo Huerta
COLLEGE                             Workforce Development Specialist              Dean of Instruction for Applied
                                                                                  Science
                                    P.O. Box 158                                  P.O. Box 158
                                    Imperial, CA 92251                            Imperial, CA 92251
                                    Tel. (760) 355-6480                           Tel. (760) 355-6419
                                    Fax (760) 355-6172                            Fax (760) 355-2663

IMPERIAL VALLEY                     Mary Camacho                                  Deborah Harrold
REGIONAL OCCUPATIONAL               Director                                      School-to-Career Coordinator
PROGRAM (IVROP)                     1398 Sperber Road                             1052 Heber Avenue
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           Heber, CA 92249
                                    Tel. (760) 312-6434                           Tel. (760) 336-2418
                                    Fax (760) 337-1364                            Fax (760) 336-2780

IMPERIAL COUNTY                     John Anderson                                 Teri D. Sanders
OFFICE OF EDUCATION                 County Superintendent                         Resource Development Coordinator
K-12                                1398 Sperber Road                             1398 Sperber Road
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel. (760) 312-6460                           Tel. (760) 312-6473
                                    Fax (760) 312-6568                            Fax (760) 312-6565

ENTITY REPRESENTED                  PRIMARY MEMBER                                ALTERNATE MEMBER
SAN DIEGO STATE                     Kimberly Collins                              Khosrow Fatemi
UNIVERSITY – IMPERIAL               Director                                      Dean of Campus
VALLEY CAMPUS                       720 Heber Avenue                              720 Heber Avenue
                                    Calexico, CA 92231                            Calexico, CA 92231
                                    Tel. (760) 768-5510                           Tel. (760) 768-5520
                                    Fax (760) 768-5583                            Fax (760) 768-5568

EMPLOYMENT
CALIFORNIA EMPLOYMENT               Norma Kastner-Jauregui                        Sandra Diaz
DEVELOPMENT                         Manager                                       Employment Program Manager
DEPARTMENT                          P.O. Box 3187                                 P.O. Box 3187
                                    El Centro, CA 92244                           El Centro, CA 92244
                                    Tel. (760) 339-2712                           Tel. (760) 339-2158
                                    Fax (760) 312-5783                            Fax (760) 352-2374



 I M P E R I A L C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G Y 2002 - 2003…………….…….…… 7
IMPERIAL COUNTY OFFICE OF Sam Couchman
EMPLOYMENT TRAINING       Director
                          2695 S. Fourth Street Bldg D
                          El Centro, CA 92243
                          Tel (760) 337-5007
                          Fax (760) 5005

WORKFORCE INVESTMENT                Efrain Silva                                  Alicia Castillo-Swaim
BOARD                               Director                                      Workforce Investment Board
                                    2995 Fourth Street                            2995 Fourth Street
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel. (760) 336-2240                           Tel. (760) 353-5050
                                    Fax (760) 336-0065                            Fax (760) 353-6594

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
UNITED STATES DEPT. OF              Alicia P. Salgado                             Rafael Lopez-Barragan
AGRICULTURE – RURAL                 Rural Development Specialist                  Rural Development Specialist
DEVELOPMENT                         177 N. Imperial Avenue                        177 N. Imperial Avenue
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel. (760) 352-4418                           Tel. (760) 352-4418
                                    Fax (760) 352-0219                            Fax (760) 352-0219

HOUSING
IMPERIAL VALLEY HOUSING Bill McNees
AUTHORITY               Deputy Executive Director
                        1401 D Street
                        Brawley, CA 92227
                        Tel (760) 351-7000
                        Fax (760) 344-9712

NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE OF Ricardo Ortega
CALEXICO              Executive Director
                      506 E Fourth Street
                      Calexico, CA 92231
                      Tel (760) 357-6875
                      Fax (760) 357-2248

ENTITY REPRESENTED                  PRIMARY MEMBER                                ALTERNATE MEMBER
UTILITIES
IMPERIAL IRRIGATION                 Brad Luckey
DISTRICT                            Executive Officer
                                    P.O. Box 937
                                    Imperial, CA 92251
                                    Tel. (760) 339-9785
                                    Fax (760) 339-9787

HEBER PUBLIC UTILITY                George Aguilar
DISTRICT                            General Manager
                                    1085 Ingram Ave
                                    Heber, CA 92249
                                    Tel (760) 353-0323
                                    Fax (760) 353-9951



 I M P E R I A L C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G Y 2002 - 2003…………….…….…… 8
WATER QUALITY
IMPERIAL IRRIGATION                 Ron Hull                                      Sue Giller
DISTRICT                            Public Affairs                                Supervisor of Media Communication
                                    P.O. Box 937                                  P.O. Box 937
                                    Imperial, CA 92251                            Imperial, CA 92251
                                    Tel. (760) 482-9600                           Tel. (760) 339-9350
                                    Fax (760) 482-9611                            Fax (760) 339-9191

BUSINESS
IMPERIAL VALLEY                     Louis Fuentes                                 Larry Bratton
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT                President/CEO                                 I.V. Economic Dev. Commission
COMMISSION                          P.O. Box 937                                  N. 6th & Main Street
                                    Imperial, CA 92251                            El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel. (760) 353-8332                           Tel. (760) 353-4155
                                    Fax (760) 353-9149                            Fax (760) 353-4841

BRAWLEY ECONOMIC       Mercedes Wheeler
DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION Member
                       195 S Second Street
                       Brawley, CA 922227
                       Tel (760) 344-2360
                       Fax (760) 344-9778

THOMAS TOPUZES AND                  Thomas Topuzes
ASSOCIATES                          Consultant
                                    1866 Haskell Drive
                                    El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel (760) 353-9321

AGRICULTURE
IMPERIAL COUNTY FARM                Steven Pastor                                 George Ray
BUREAU                              Executive Director                            I.C. Farm Bureau
                                    1000 Broadway                                 1000 Broadway
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243



ENTITY REPRESENTED                  PRIMARY MEMBER                                ALTERNATE MEMBER
NUDAIRYONE                          Ed McGrew                                     Patty McGrew
                                    Owner                                         Owner
                                    1583 River Drive                              1583 River Drive
                                    Brawley, CA 92227                             Brawley, CA 92227
                                    Tel (760) 344-4152                            Tel (760) 344-4152

FINANCE
SUN COMMUNITY                       Nancy Thornburg
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION                Chief Operating Officer
                                    P.O. Box 4210
                                    El Centro, CA 92244
                                    Tel. (760) 337-4200
                                    Fax (760) 336-8775

VALLEY INDEPENDENT                  Justina G. Arce                               Kay Fischer


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BANK                                Community Development Officer                 AVP/SBA Loan Officer
                                    1498 Main Street                              1498 Main Street

                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel. (760) 337-7065                           Tel. (760) 337-7083
                                    Fax (760) 337-4797                            Fax (760) 337-4797

WELLS FARGO BANK                    Becky Fleming                                 John Levada
                                    1200 W Main Street                            1200 W Main Street
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel (760) 344-7506                            Tel (760) 344-7504
                                    Fax (760) 344-2805                            Fax (760) 344-2849

CDC SMALL BUSINESS                  Kit Marks
FINANCE                             Loan Officer
                                    1224 State Street
                                    El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel (760) 353-3095
                                    Fax (760) 353-0305

MINORITY
CALIPATRIA STATE PRISON             Octavio Peraza                                Thelma Swetich
                                    Community Resource Manager                     Public Information/Admin. Assistant
                                    718 Blair Road                                718 Blair Road
                                    Calipatria, CA 92233                          Calipatria, CA 92233
                                    Tel (760) 348-7000                            Tel (760) 348-7000
                                    Fax (760) 348-7188                            Fax (760) 348-7188


ENTITY REPRESENTED                  PRIMARY MEMBER                                ALTERNATE MEMBER
FARM WORKERS                        Jose Lopez                                    Toni Carrillo
                                    Campesinos Unidos                             Campesinos Unidos
                                    P.O. Box 203                                  400 Main Street
                                    Brawley, CA 92227                             Brawley, CA 92227
                                    Tel. (760) 344-6300                           Tel. (760) 344-9222
                                    Fax (760) 344-0322                            Fax (760) 344-0907

SMALL BUSINESS                      Ben Solomon
DEVELOPMENT CENTER                  Director
                                    301 N Imperial Ave
                                    El Centro, CA 92243
                                    Tel. (760) 312-9800
                                    Fax (760) 312-9838

TOURISM                             Larry Bratton                                 Daniel Romero
                                    I.V. Join t Chambers                          A.F. Romero & Company
                                    N. 6th & Main Street                          477 Cesar Chavez Blvd.
                                    El Centro, CA 92243                           Calexico, CA 92231
                                    Tel. (760) 353-4155                           Tel. (760) 357-9779
                                    Fax (760) 353-4841                            Fax (760) 357-0524

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION                Dilda McFadden
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT                 Vice-President
OF COLORED PEOPLE                   Tel. (760) 337-7777

 I M P E R I A L C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G Y 2002 - 2003…………….…….…… 10
                                    Fax (760) 353-4850




2-5        M ETHOD BY WHICH MINORITY REPRESENTATION SELECTED

Pursuant to the Imperial County Overall Economic Development Commission (OEDC) by-laws and
Economic Development Administration (EDA regulations) minority groups in Imperial County are provided
the opportunity to select their own representative on the Commission. The following minority organizations
are periodically notified for appointments to the Overall Economic Development Commission (OEDC):
          Calexico Neighborhood House
          Campesinos Unidos, Inc.
          Clinicas de Salud del Pueblo
          Mexican American Political Association
          SER-Job for Progress
          United Farmworkers Union
      Should the minority organizations not choose to appoint a representative to the Commission, the by-
      laws provide for the Board of Supervisors to appoint a minority representative to fill a vacancy, if such
      exists.

S ECTION 3.                 P OPULATION D EMOGRAPHICS
3-1        D EMOGRAPHICS

The 2000 population of California was estimated to be 33,145,121. The county population increased to
145,285 in January 2000, according to the California Department of Finance estimates---an increase of 7,539
over the January 1995 estimate.

There was a 31 percent population increase between 1990 and 1999 in Imperial County. The rate of
population growth has been consistent across all areas of the county. Natural increase (births minus deaths)
added 12,153 individuals (40 percent of the increase), and net migration added an estimated 18,247 individuals
(60 percent of the increase). Imperial County is expected to continue its rapid growth. Interim county
projections estimate that the population in Imperial will have grown to 185,200 by the year 2010 and up to
222,600 by the year 2020.




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              Table 2     Population Trends 1990 - 2020
                                     Imperial County                           California
                                   Total     Annual Average            Total         Annual Average
                                                % Change                                % Change
                1990           110,445               ---            29,944,000              ---
                1995           137,746            3.96%             32,223,000            1.41%
                1996           141,200            2.45%             32,383,000            0.49%
                1997           141,000            -0.14%            32,670,000            0.88%
                1998           142,100            0.77%             33,252,000            1.75%
                1999           144,500            1.66%             33,765,000            1.51%
                2000           145,285            0.55%             34,336,000            1.66%
                2010           185,200            1.78%             40,939,000            1.52%
                2020           222,600            1.68%             47,507,000            1.38%
              Source: US Census Bureau; California Dept of Finance, 2000



Families in Imperial Valley face considerable hardship, and family composition is part of that hardship.
Families are somewhat larger than the state average (3.25 family members versus 2.79 statewide). Almost
65 percent of Imperial County households included children (1990) compared with only about 54 percent of
households throughout California. Also, families in Imperial County are more likely to be headed by a female
(19.0 percent versus 16.7 percent for California as a whole), and single females headed 17 percent of families
identified in the 1990 Census with no spouse present in the home. A full 15 percent of all Imperial County
children live in single parent families, compared with 21 percent for the state.



3-2        E MPLOYMENT

With the exception of agriculture, the number of jobs in Imperial County has increased over the past four
years as industries expand and new people enter the labor market. The number of jobs in all industries is
expected to continue to grow by as much as 20 percent.

About one fifth of Imperial County is irrigated for agricultural purposes, most notably the central area known
as the Imperial Valley, and agriculture is the dominant industry in the county. In 1999, it accounted for over
30 percent of all employment. Government, also a significant industry, accounts for a little over 28 percent
with a majority of the employment in local government. Retail trade makes up almost 15 percent of the total.

Industry employment projections indicate that most of the future non-farm wage and salary jobs will be in
retail trade, services and government. Retail trade is projected to grow by 12 percent and services will grow
by over 9 percent, with most of the growth in the business services sector. Government is projected to grow
by almost 8 percent.

In 1999, agriculture, government and retail trade dominated Imperial County’s employment. Projections in
non-farm employment indicate that by 2004, almost 70 percent of the job growth will be in the retail trade,
services and government industry divisions.


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The number of jobs in the construction industry has fluctuated in recent years but is steadily increasing.

Manufacturing employment has steadily increased every year since 1983 and has recovered almost all the
ground lost in the early 1980s. The nondurable goods sector accounts for two-thirds of the employment.

Transportation and public utilities have maintained their current level of jobs over the last two years.

Wholesale trade has been the third largest segment of wage and salary employment in Imperial County for a
number of years, and with new stores opening, has provided an increasing number of jobs. However, many
of these jobs are part-time or seasonal in nature.

Finance, insurance, and real estate jobs have slowly increased, and employment in this sector is approaching
1,100 jobs.

Services have been the fourth largest contributor to employment in Imperial County for the past few years.

Government, the largest industry group in the county, has registered fairly significant growth. The education
sector has shown a slight increase in jobs as school enrollments rise.

The California Employment Development Department estimates that Imperial County had a civilian work
force of approximately 65,900 in September 2000.                 From this work force, approximately 43,600 were
employed and 22,300 were unemployed. This equates to an annual seasonally unadjusted unemployment rate
of 33.9 percent. During the same time, California had an annual seasonally unadjusted unemployment rate of
5.0 percent. Historically, Imperial County has had a substantially higher rate of unemployment than the rest
of California.

Given the importance of agricultural production to the local economy, the correlation between seasonal
agricultural employment and monthly unemployment rates must be considered. According to the California
Employment Development Department, during 1996 the annual average number of agricultural production
workers numbered just over 33,000 for the region, which included Imperial, Riverside, and San Bernardino
Counties. One-third of these were employed in Imperial County. This sector of the local economy appears
to be growing with total farm employment increasing in the region from 1996 to 1997 by 5.8 percent. As the
number of agricultural workers drops in late June, the unemployment rate rises in the following month. This
suggests that a substantial number of agricultural workers remain in Imperial County throughout the year
rather than migrating to other areas for production work.




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             Table 3      Unemployment
                                            Imperial County                                   California
                               Labor Force   Unemployed     Unemployment                  Unemployment Rate
                                                                Rate
             Jan 1990            50,300        10,400          20.7%                               5.6%
             Jan 1995            56,200        12,900          22.9%                               8.7%
             Jan 1996            57,300        16,300          28.4%                               8.2%
             Jan 1997            56,400        14,000          24.8%                               7.4%
             Jan 1998            56,200        13,900          24.7%                               6.7%
             June 1998           55,200        12,900          23.4%                               5.7%
             Sept. 2000          65,900        22,300          33.9%                               5.0%
             Source: California Employment Development Department



               Table 4    Wage & Salary Employees in Agriculture
                                           Imperial County                   California
                                        Total          % Change       Total             % Change
                      1990             15,000               ---      363,600                ---
                      1991             13,800            -8.00%      342,000             -5.94%
                      1992             12,000          -13.04%       351,600             2.81%
                      1993             12,700             5.83%      362,300             3.04%
                      1994             13,800            8.66%       379,700             4.80%
                      1995             14,500            5.07%       373,500             -1.63%
                      1996            14,400            -0.69%      380,500             1.87%
               Source: California Employment Development Department



Unemployment has remained at least twice that of the state average. Since 1995, county unemployment has
ranged from a low of 22.9 percent to a high of 33.9 percent (2000).

Statewide unemployment rates over the same time period have ranged from a low of 5.7 percent to a high of
only 8.7 percent. A recent study of employers conducted by the Imperial County Workforce Investment
Board (WIB) identified several factors contributing to reductions in employment.

       Cyclical—poor farm economy

       Episodic—impact of the recent whitefly infestation

       Structural changes—increased mechanization and computerization and consolidations due to new
        economies of scale

Changes in the employment levels of the various occupations reflect changes in the area's overall level of
economic activity, differences in the rate of growth or decline among the various industries, and changes in
the occupational needs within individual industries in demand for widely used occupations. Only the growth
of employment in specific industries will bring an increase in the demand for other, less widely used
occupations.




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This situation will not likely improve because the region is unprepared to effectively compete in a fast-
changing U.S. economy. Imperial County lacks the sufficient capital base necessary for new investment in
business and infrastructure.

A high rate of unemployment and the growth of an under-trained and untrained labor force is expected to
remain the county's primary economic problem.



3-3        I NCOME AND P OVERTY

Other economic indicators show that the county lags behind the state. In 1998 the Imperial County per-
capita income was $17,353, compared to $28,163 for the state. This puts Imperial County at 53 in per-capita
income among all 58 California counties.


                  Table 5     Personal Per-Capita Income
                                        Imperial County                           California
                                    Total          % Change                Total           % Change
                     1990          $15,161              ---               $21,289              ---
                     1991          $14,571           -4.05%               $21,425            0.63%
                     1992          $14,077           -3.51%               $22,128            3.18%
                     1993          $15,149            7.08%               $22,389            1.17%
                     1994          $14,121           -7.28%               $22,828            1.92%
                     1995          $14,790            4.52%               $24,090            5.24%
                     1998          $17,353             7.5%               $28,163             6.7%
                  Source: California Dept of Finance, California Statistical Abstract


Imperial County’s population is significantly poorer than the averages for California as a whole. Nineteen
percent of the population has incomes that fall below the federal poverty level and another 54.2 percent of the
population in Imperial County has income below 200 percent of the federal poverty level (Table 6). In all,
this represents 30.1 percent of the total population in California. Twenty-eight percent of the population is
on the Medi-Cal program, compared to 16.8 percent of all Californians. Per-capita income was just $17,353
(Table 5), compared to $28,163 for the state.



        Table 6     Poverty, 1999
                                                                           Imperial County              California
         Median Household Income                                              $31,870                     $47,067
         Median Family Income                                                 $35,226                     $53,438
         Persons living in poverty                                            111,568                   29,003,219
         Persons with incomes below poverty level                              29,681                    3,627,585
         Percent of persons with incomes below poverty level                   22.6%                       12.5%
        Source: Census Bureau 2000 data




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Family income is another aspect of the hardship. In 1990, the average household income in Imperial County
was $22,442, which is 33 percent lower than the statewide average. The median family income was only
$25,142, a full 36 percent lower than the statewide median. Despite the higher-than-average rates of single
female-headed households, Imperial County ranks near the bottom of all California counties in child support
payments. In 1990, more than 31 percent of the county’s children lived below the poverty level; for Latinos,
this figure increased to 36 percent.

Imperial County also suffers from a shortage of service providers. For example, in 1992 the county ranked in
the bottom quarter percentile of all California counties in terms of licensed hospital beds per 1,000 population
(2.0 versus a statewide average of 2.8), skilled nursing care beds per 1,000 (2.1 versus 4.0 for California), and
persons per physician (966 versus 412 for the state as a whole). As a result of these shortages, the U. S.
Health Resources and Services Administration has designated most of Imperial County as being medically
under-served.

3-4        H EALTH AND S AFETY

There are two hospitals in Imperial County: El Centro Regional Medical Center (ECRMC) and Pioneers
Memorial Hospital (PMH). Both ECRMC and PMH offer up-to-date medical care with some limitations,
specifically in the areas of neonatal intensive care treatment and trauma services. These facilities serve the
larger cities and are quite a distance from some towns and cities in outlying areas. Those areas rely on small
clinics and ambulance services to receive medical care.

The County Public Health Office is involved in extensive outreach and case-management activities. Staffs are
often the first, and in some cases, the only contacts that hard-to-reach populations have with the formal
healthcare system. They provide targeted outreach to families in remote areas and to traditionally under-
served populations. Imperial County covers an area of 4,597 square miles and has a current population of
approximately 145,285. Much of the area is wilderness with isolated pockets of low-income seniors and
residents, and some areas are 50 miles from the closest health facility. The public health program is the only
service that many of these individuals can access.

Tuberculosis is a critical public health problem in Imperial County. s include tuberculosis and teen pregnancy.
The county's tuberculosis rate in 1992 was more than double the statewide average (35.4 cases per 100,000
population versus only 14.4 for the state as a whole). Also, in 1992, the death rate from this cause was 17.9
per 100,000 population, compared with a statewide rate of 13.9.



3-5        E DUCATION

Education is part of family hardship in Imperial County. Many adults in the county have relatively little
education. For example, in 1992, 45.5 percent of mothers giving birth in Imperial County had less than 12

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years of education (versus 34.0 percent for California). In fact, the county has the highest percentage of
adults over age 25 who have not completed high school (49 percent for the county as a whole and 62 percent
among Latinos, partly reflecting the large farm labor population).

Almost two-thirds of the children grow up in households where English is not the primary language,
compared with approximately half of that elsewhere in the state. Forty-seven percent of school children are
classified as "Limited English Proficient " (LEP), compared with only 21 percent for the state as a whole.
Roughly 95 percent of Imperial County's LEP students come from homes where Spanish is spoken;
Cantonese, Korean, and other Asian languages account for most of the remainder.

For the first time this decade, in 1997 there was a decrease in the number of students with Limited English
Proficiency. After increases as high as 4 percent, when the state was experiencing a decline of 24 percent, the
slight decrease of LEP students is encouraging, especially since the state’s rate of increase has been somewhat
consistent at around 4 percent each year.

Taking these obstacles into consideration, it should not be surprising that during 1987 through 1990, Imperial
County ranked last among all California counties in eighth-grade achievement test scores.
              Table 7      Students with Limited English Proficiency*
                                        Imperial County                                 California
                                      #             % Change                         #             % Change
                  1993             14,589               ---                      1,515,819            ---
                  1994             15,231             4.22%                      1,215,218         -24.74%
                  1995             15,269             0.25%                      1,262,982          3.78%
                  1996             15,492             1.44%                      1,323,767          4.59%
                  1997             15,383            -0.71%                      1,381,393          4.17%
              Source: California Department of Education
              * Those students whose primary language is other than English and who have been assessed by state-
                 approved procedures to lack the English language skills.

The level of education attainment is another important measure of economic strength. Imperial County
ranked the lowest of California’s 58 counties for the percentage of residents 25 years and older who had not
finished high school. In Imperial County 46.8 percent of residents 25 years and older did not finish high
school, compared to 23.8 percent statewide.



3-6        H OUSING

Imperial County has serious basic housing needs. The major challenge facing the area is to provide for

the development and maintenance of an adequate supply of affordable housing for all segments of the

population.

Sufficient development of affordable housing units is not occurring at a rate to adequately meet the housing
needs of this growing population. This is due, in part, to a significant reduction in both federal and state


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funding for such development. The median single-family home prices in the unincorporated areas ranged
from a low of $88,500 in Imperial to a high of $156,500 in El Centro area (Data Quick Services and
Cotton/Beland/Associates, Inc., May 2000). In addition, most new development is taking place in the
incorporated cities.

The most serious housing need for Imperial County is the rehabilitation and continued maintenance of the
existing housing stock, especially the units occupied by low- or moderate-income households. According to a
recent Imperial County Housing Element, 15 percent of the housing units in the county area are in
substandard or dilapidated condition. However, the substandard conditions are worse in particular areas of
the county. A major cause responsible for the deteriorating conditions of the housing stock is age, since 48
percent of the county's housing stock is over 40 years old (1990 census). Moreover, if not adequately
addressed, the deterioration of this aging housing stock will further decrease the affordable housing supply as
well as increase the total cost of rehabilitation.

Typically, low-income households, both owner/occupants and renters, occupy most of these substandard
units. Low-income households lack the resources necessary to afford decent, safe, and sanitary housing. This
lack of resources will lead to increased overcrowding and overpayment by the county.

A survey by Lauren Associates, Inc., May 1998 identified 4,396 housing units as either being sound, needing
minor repair, needing a moderate level of repair, requiring substantial repair, or being dilapidated (Housing
Condition Survey and Household Income Survey, May 1998). Using the State Department of Housing and
Community Development (HCD) criteria, the foundations, roofing, siding, windows, and doors of the units
were analyzed. A numeric score, ranging from "0" to "56 and over," was assigned, depending on the level of
rehabilitation required. The score represented the aggregate condition of the structure.

The results were as follows:
        150 housing structures in the unincorporated area of Imperial County had "minor" deficiencies.
        313 structures in the target area need substantial rehabilitation if they are to remain in residential use.
        282 structures in the target area are considered dilapidated and need to be replaced.

Population is increasing in both the county and each city. In some areas, there are increases of as much as
9.9 percent. There are a number of potential factors that may support an accelerated population growth in
the near future. These factors include: growth of the geothermal industry in the County; additional prisons;
and additional USA/Mexico border crossing; and the possible expansion of the U.S. Naval Air Facility.




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3-7        O VERVIEW

Overall, the economic and social areas that were measured for Imperial County are improving, or at least
keeping consistent with historical trends.             With the proper programs in place, the economic and
socioeconomic factors in Imperial County could continue to improve.

The opening of the new Port of Entry in December 1996 in Imperial County has intensified economic
development activity in the area and has been the catalyst to increase the County’s participation in the
international and regional trade area. According to the results of a survey conducted at the two ports of entry
between Imperial County and Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico by San Diego Dialogue, and Centro de
Estudios Económicos del Sector Empresarial de Mexicali in March 1998, there were 2.9 million legal
admissions in the existing port of entry and the new port of entry. Nearly 80 percent of these legal
admissions were at the existing port of entry and 20 percent were at the new port of entry. Approximately 75
percent of these legal admissions were passengers in vehicles and 25 percent were pedestrians. According to
the results of the study, most border crossings are for shopping purposes. Shopping trips across the border
from Mexicali generate approximately $70 million monthly in retail sales in Imperial County. These retail
sales were estimated to generate $1.5 million in sales tax revenues. The results of the survey are very
significant for local governmental decision makers, local economic development agencies, and other
individuals interested in knowing the impact that border crossers have in the local economy.

The new Port of Entry is an area with tremendous potential for commercial and industrial development.
However, Imperial County is working to remedy the lack of a major road connection to the interstate highway
system. According to County officials, there has been a major increase in the flow of trucking traffic into the
County since the opening of the Calexico East Port of Entry. Most of the traffic goes through the new port
and travels on county roads and Calexico city streets. It has been the County’s goal to pursue state and
federal resources for construction of Highway SR-7, which begins at the Calexico East Port of Entry and ends
at Highway 98. The proposed construction is to extend Highway SR-7 to Interstate 8. The project to extend
Highway SR-7 will cost approximately $43 million. The County has already committed $9.6 million to the
project and the Imperial Valley Association of Governments (IVAG) will fund the project with $36 million
from the State Transportation Authority. The money is the County’s share of the state gas tax revenue. In
March 1998, the United States House of Representatives committee approved $217 billion in transportation
funds, and out of those funds, $10 million were approved for the Highway SR-7 project.

Business and industry attraction will be centered in the new commercial port of entry and those industries
complimentary to the thriving Maquiladora industry in Mexicali. Some of these industries include supply of
raw material and components, warehousing and distribution, transportation services, and brokerage services.
The County, through VIDA, is also in the process of applying for a Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ) Designation




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for the new port of entry area. Currently, VIDA is working with a consultant in obtaining and compiling data
for the FTZ designation application.

Despite often-heard rhetoric to the contrary, the passage of NAFTA has brought dramatic increases in foreign
investment to the California/Mexico border region. NAFTA, combined with the region's business friendly local
governments, superior labor force, competitive wage rates, strategic location as the gateway to the Pacific Rim and
Latin America, and proximity to a growing network of suppliers and service providers, makes the California border
region the optimum location for an international manufacturer. At the same time, NAFTA has strengthened
America's trading relationship with Mexico. All 50 states can now export to Mexico through the California
gateway and there is every reason to believe that the Southern California border region is becoming a key
worldwide manufacturing center and a prime export market for many U.S. and foreign companies.

The California/Mexico border region is positioned to capitalize on NAFTA and industrial development in
Mexico. However, understanding the growth of industrial development in Mexico and the benefits that accrue to
the U.S., begins with an understanding of the maquilladora industry. Traditionally, maquilas are foreign owned
assembly plants in Mexico that import raw materials duty-free and export final products to the U.S. and around the
world. Industries most likely to take advantage of the maquila program are those which require high investments
in labor cost such as electronics, electronic components, industrial equipment and machinery, plastics, textiles, and
furniture. Recently, more and more maquila operations are becoming Mexican domestic companies to take
advantage of Mexico's Free Trade agreements with countries in Central and South America.

Border wide, maquila employment has risen by 20 percent since the passage of NAFTA. More than 700 maquilas
operate in Baja California, making Baja Mexico the maquila capital. In 1995, fifty companies committed nearly a
billion dollars to projects in the state of Baja. Samsung Electronics alone decided to invest one half of a billion
dollars into a Tijuana production facility. Nine companies have invested over 1.419 billion in Mexicali: SONY,
THOMPSON, RHEEM, DAEWOO, NEC, MITSUBISHI, NEG, AMTEK, AND MITSUBISHI CRT.



S ECTION 4.                 A NALYSIS
4-1        A SSESSMENT OF P ROBLEMS AND O PPORTUNITIES
It is important to determine the key issues presently affecting Imperial County. As part of our strategic
planning, the Overall Economic Development Commission is making consensus-building workshops at its
monthly meetings a priority. OEDC members are extending an invitation to City Council officials to be
involved in the visioning process for Imperial County. These meetings identified dozens of issues that were
viewed as barriers or that showed promising opportunity.                   These issues are organized in four areas:
Community Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT).                          The better the community's




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understanding of the environment in which it operates, the better its ability to formulate its mission and to set
realistic goals, objectives, and action plans.

The “SWOT Analysis” is a process by which Imperial County can track what is occurring or is about to
occur. It provides critical information related to Imperial County’s community and economic well being.

The information from each of the workshops, along with information provided through existing

strategic plans, was then organized and consolidated in two categories: problems and opportunities. The
following are the results of the community assessment process. They are the problems and opportunities to
be addressed by the OEDC.



S TRENGTHS
    Close knit community                                                 Access/communication with local officials
    Positive rural environment                                           Good weather – most of the year
    Growing community based partnerships                                 Border economic opportunity
    Large amount of vacant, affordable land                              Pro-growth attitude
    Fertile available inexpensive land                                   Less expensive cost of living
    NAFTA                                                                Clean environment
    Border community                                                     Open space
    New Port Of Entry - Calexico                                         Environmental resources
    Commerce between two countries                                       Affordable housing
    Proximity to Mexico maquiladoras                                     Low crime rate
    Small town culture                                                   Stable property values
    Abundance of water                                                   United community
    Availability of affordable power/water                               Citizen involvement
    Inexpensive availability of workforce                                Good work ethics
    Capable human capital with need of training                          Opportunity regarding military base
    Thermal energy                                                       Transportation routes/freeway access
    Multicultural community                                              Development of local industrial park
    Bicultural environment                                               Low property taxes
    Imperial Valley College                                              Growth potential
    San Diego State University – I.V. Campus                             Youth employment
    Availability of state and federal resources                          Recreation
    Business incentives                                                  Development of commercial business district
    Tax incentives                                                       Collaboration among agencies
    Enterprise Zone, Enterprise Community,                               Peaceful living
    Manufacturing Enhancement Area, Southwest                            Good schools
    Border Pilot Community                                               Youth/community involvement
    Friendly planning process                                            Rich agricultural economy




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W EAKNESSES
    Underfunding of special education                                    Lack of community vision
    Lack of DSL lines to workplaces, homes                               Divisive attitudes
    Need for additional high quality childcare                           North/South line
    Training for higher paying social service                            Territorial attitudes of towns
     jobs                                                                Lack of coordinated outreach for regional
    Diversified economy                                                   development
    Growth delays                                                        Not enough recreational activities for
    Lack of infrastructure to support present/                            kids/adults
     future development                                                  Distance from the action - metropolitan
    Limited retail store options                                         Lack of financial resources
    Border crossing traffic                                              Need to diversified economy
    Lack of regional airport                                             Difficult summer weather
    Few upscale apartments for attracting and                            Lack of variety of job sectors
     keeping professionals                                               Inadequate technical assistance available to
    No accessibility of high tech communication                           employers
    Transportation inadequate                                            Lack of state/federal political support
    High unemployment                                                    Lack of recognition
    Lack of job opportunities                                            Lack of quality medical facility
    Lack of high paying jobs                                             Drug crossing area
    Low skilled workforce                                                Language barriers
    Lack of higher education facilities                                  Regional partnerships – Lack of interborder
    Low educational levels                                                cooperation
    Need for another junior college                                      Seasonal employment
    Need more distance learning options                                  Salton Sea environmental problems
    Young people going away to college and not                           Need for proactive planning
     returning                                                           Need for technical jobs
    Need to improve quality of education in K-12                         Poor economic growth
     schools
    Local government coordination



4-2        R ESOURCE A NALY SIS
As part of the Imperial County’s Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy, an in-depth Resource
Analysis was conducted. The purpose of our resource analysis was to determine what Imperial County and
the respective social associations and governmental and faith-based organizations can offer in the way of
resources and competencies.

The process revealed many different skills and programs presently operating in various cities, service clubs,
nonprofit organizations, and churches. Many different implementation resources are available for our plan.
These resources include:

       personnel and people resources (volunteer work force);
       fiscal and wealth resources (cash and in-kind match);
       information and planning resources;


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       technology and technical assistance resources;
       operating resources (programs and services);
       systems resources (project management and governance systems); and
       cultural resources.
Setting our goals involved a lot of careful thought and consideration.                 The OEDC has increased its
membership and together we are working on a 2010 Visioning and Strategic Plan for Imperial County. The
OEDC is working with representatives of all sectors to assure that the goals are realistic, specific, and focused.
Our goals mutually reinforce one another and take into consideration our vision and values. The following
goals represent numerous meeting focus workshops and consensus-building exercises.

4-3         I NDUSTRY T REND AND O UTLOOK
Changes in the employment levels of the various occupations reflect changes in the area's overall level of
economic activity, differences in the rate of growth or decline among the various industries, and changes in the
occupational needs within individual industries. While economic growth tends to ensure an increase in demand
for widely used occupations, only the growth of employment in specific industries will bring an increase in the
demand for other, less widely used occupations.

In addition to the 5,900 job opportunities created through industry growth, another 6,100 jobs will become
available to replace workers who leave the labor force. The separations data represent an estimate of the number
of job openings expected to occur when workers retire, pass away, or otherwise leave the labor force for an
extended amount of time. The data does not include the sizable number of openings that result from turnover as
people change occupations or change jobs but remain in the same occupation.

Industry employment projections indicate that most of the future non-farm wage and salary jobs will be in
retail trade, services and government. Between 1997-2004 retail trade is projected to grow by 12 percent and
services will grow by over 9 percent, with most of the growth in the business services sector. Government is
projected to grow by almost 8 percent.


    4-3-1       AGRICULTURE

Employment share averaged 30.4 percent of total industry employment in 1999. Agriculture is a dominant
industry in Imperial County and follows seasonal patterns of high employment during the winter months
followed by lower employment during the hot summer months, exactly opposite from the seasonal pattern
elsewhere in the State. A leading producer of row crops and livestock, Imperial County is experiencing a
trend toward reliance on labor contractors to provide workers to meet seasonal demand.

Nonagricultural wage and salary employment in Imperial County is projected to grow by 10.6 percent, during
the 1997-2004 projection period. County payrolls increased an average of 4.5 percent between 1985-1992



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with the lowest growth rate in 1991. Nonfarm employment was estimated at an all-time high of 34,900 in
1994. Growth is expected to be uneven across specific industries, however.



    4-3-2       MANUFACTURING

Employment is projected to increase by 200 jobs, or 11.1 percent through the 1997-2004 projection period.
Manufacturing payrolls demonstrated constant, steady growth beginning in 1990 at 1,600 jobs and peaked in
1994 at 1,900 jobs primarily due to growth in the durable goods manufacturing sector, which increased from
500 jobs in 1990 to 800 jobs in 1994. Employment at light manufacturing companies, moving into the county
in response to active economic development efforts, has made up the bulk of the growth in the
manufacturing industry.

Employment in transportation and public utilities is expected to increase by 100 jobs, or 4.8 percent, between
1997-2004. This major industry division was exceptionally stable during 1991-1993, however, employment
began to increase in 1992 and peaked in 1994 at 1,600 jobs.                   Geothermal research has contributed
significantly to providing low-cost electrical energy in the County.



    4-3-3       TRADE

Trade is the second largest nonagricultural industry.            In 1999, trade occupied 14.9 percent share of
nonagricultural wage and salary employment in Imperial County. Trade is expected to increase by 10.9
percent between 1197-2004. Payrolls in the retail trade sector were estimated at 7,900 in 1993. Retail trade
has grown steadily from 7,175 jobs in 1985 through peak employment of 8,100 jobs in 1994. The wholesale
sector remained even throughout the same period at 1,800 jobs.

    4-3-4       FINANCE, INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE

Employment is projected to increase by 100 jobs, or 9.1 percent through the 1997-2004 projection period.
This industry is not expected to grow measurably during the projection period 1993-2000 due to uncertainty
in the real estate market and bank automation limiting demand for customer service workers.

    4-3-5       SERVICES

The services industries are forecasted to add 500 workers to payrolls, or a 9.3 percent increase, between 1997-
2004. Growth is expected to be concentrated in health services and business services with each sector adding
100 and 200 jobs, respectively, for a total of 5,900 jobs for this industry by the year 2004.

    4-3-6       GOVERNMENT

Employment is forecasted to increase by 1,100 jobs, or 8 percent, from an estimated employment level of
14,000 jobs in 1997 to 15,100 by the forecast year of 2004.. Government employment closely parallels
population growth and enrollment at state and local educational institutions.

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S ECTION 5.                V ISION
5-1       G OALS AND O BJECTIVES
The following goals were developed for use by Imperial County economic development planning agencies as
general guidelines to maintain a healthy and diversified economy.

                         GOALS                                                      OBJECTIVES
1. Construction of necessary public works projects to           Attraction of business and industrial firms into
   commercial and industrial areas with potential for           Imperial County and expansion of existing
   development and for improved or expanded                     businesses and industries.
   services.

2. Continue support of a County-wide regional agency The coordination of regional marketing and
   which would be dedicated and responsible for the  promotional activities. Promote location and
   promotion of economic development in Imperial     proximity to metropolitan areas and other markets.
   County.

3. Develop labor force data, especially with respect to         Develop working relationship with the Workforce
   occupational skills.                                         Investment Board, local university and community
                                                                college.

4. Assist in the promotion of tourism related facilities        Development of cultural and resort activities
   and activities.                                              including second homes, recreational facilities,
                                                                hotels, mobile homes and recreational vehicle
                                                                parks. Participate in tourism related activities
                                                                throughout the state and region, ie. California State
                                                                Fair, Imperial County Mid Winter Fair and Fiesta,
                                                                Fiestas Del Sol, and Location 96’ Film Industry
                                                                Conference.

5. Continue the restoration and protection of the               Develop waste management facilities for locally
   environment for the community.                               generated hazardous waste.

6. Improvement of transportation corridors in                   Continue to pursue state and federal resources for
   Imperial County.                                             the expansion and improvement of our highway
                                                                infrastructure.

7. Increase scope of capital available to firms for the         Develop finance mechanisms geared to assist small
   financing of business expansion, product                     and/or new businesses in acquiring capital for
   development.                                                 expansion or new building construction. Continue
                                                                to expand small business revolving loan fund and
                                                                microenterprise programs.

8. Increase international awareness of United                   Develop bi-national marketing strategies and
   States/Mexico border opportunities related to                opportunities through economic trade relationships
   NAFTA and maquiladora industry.                              between Mexico and Imperial Valley

9. Continue to promote industrial development in                Promotion of available low cost resources such as
   areas suitable for this activity.                            labor, land, electrical power and water as
                                                                compared to other areas.

10. Continue support of job search and training                 Assess the needs of local employers and targeted
    programs for the unemployed and underemployed.              industries and development programs to address
                                                                those needs.
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11. Capitalize on development opportunities related to          Ascertain impacts of NAFTA and the changing
    second border crossing.                                     maquiladora program.

12. Promotion of agriculture and other related                  Development of related agricultural industries and
    industries.                                                 economic activities.

13. Promote development of energy resources                     Develop geothermal direct heat use, solar, and
    for maximization of industrial and commercial               wind energy.
    development.

14. Research and development of recycling and waste             Increase public awareness of the need for efficient
    management facilities.                                      and effective long term solutions for solid waste
                                                                management, recycling, and increasing scarcity of
                                                                raw materials.

15. Reduce unemployment by 5%.                                  Increase employment opportunities using strategies
                                                                developed in Imperial County’s Job Creation
                                                                Investment Fund Strategic Plan. Improve and
                                                                expand job training activities to mirror needs of
                                                                industries targeted for attraction.

16. Increase the technological infrastructure available         Develop fiber optic network linking schools and
    to schools, businesses and community                        community agencies. Encourage private enterprise
    organizations.                                              to develop DSL or fiber optic capacity to homes
                                                                and businesses.
17. Increase the technological infrastructure available         Develop fiber optic network linking schools and
    to schools, businesses and community                        community agencies. Encourage private enterprise
    organizations.                                              to develop DSL or fiber optic capacity to homes
                                                                and businesses.

18. Create high tech, higher paying jobs to entice local        Support four-year university with a diversified
    youth to remain in Imperial County and upgrade              faculty and academic majors.
    13-16 education to meet needs for health careers,
    education fields, social service positions and higher
    paying positions in a diversified economy.


19. Increase overall academic achievement of K-12               Support efforts to assist local K-12 educators to
    students.                                                   enable all students to meet or exceed 50th percentile
                                                                on standardized test, including limited English
                                                                proficient students.




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S ECTION 6.                A CTION P LAN
6-1        D EVELOPMENT S TRATEGY AND I MPLEMENTATION P LAN
The development strategy for the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) forms the base
upon which the total area wide action plan will be programmed during the next five years. The Commission
has received and discussed various recommendations from its subcommittees concerning both positive and
negative features of the area's overall economy. General assumptions about economic trends in Imperial
County were identified and goals were developed to carry forward what is considered an aggressive program
designed to enhance, enrich and generally improve the overall economic conditions of the area .

In establishing these goals, the Overall Economic Development Commission (OEDC) carefully considered
the economic, political and social make-up of the communities in the County. The Commission concluded
that there is a need to strengthen communication and coordinate regional economic and community
development activities throughout the County. It was felt that a more integrated approach was necessary in
order to find and disseminate information necessary for an effective economic development program. The
OEDC considers itself a mechanism, which brings together the ideas, philosophies, attitudes and efforts of all
concerned in order to formulate a multi-year development plan which is realistic and acceptable to the citizens
and decision makers of the County.

6-2        P ROGRAM AND P ROJECT S ELECTION
This development strategy is designed to pull together the identified potential programs, projects and
activities which are planned to enhance the area's economy. This will be accomplished by conducting an
overall assessment of these activities based on the following elements:

      1. Assumptions:      Regarding economic trends in Imperial County.

      2. Goals:                  Based on reasonable expectation of changes in economic factors affecting
                                 Imperial County.

      3. Criteria:               To guide the area's utilization of resources in achieving the economic
                                 development goal.




6-3        A SSUMPTIONS A BOUT E CONOMIC T RENDS I N I MPERIAL C OUNTY
A high rate of unemployment and the growth of an under and/or untrained labor force is expected to remain
the County's primary economic problem.

The County's population is expected to continue its moderate growth. The larger communities are expected to
experience the largest numerical population increases; but, smaller communities and unincorporated areas may
show large gains due to their potential for future economic development..

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The development of energy resources specifically geothermal, (electrical and non-electrical application) solar
and wind, are technically and economically feasible and offer economic benefits and afford development
potentials.

The number of tourists who pass through Imperial County in route to Arizona, Mexico and the California
coast offer a major opportunity for new development.

Urban Southern California will be looking to and relying on Imperial County’s resources to satisfy certain
economic needs.

6-4        D EVELOPMENT S TRATEGY AND I MPLEMENTATION A CTION P LAN
The following reflects the goal of the Overall Economic Development Plan, the strategy that will be followed,
and the plan for implementation that outlines the agencies that will be involved:

    1) CONSTRUCTION    OF NECESSARY PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS WITHIN COMMERCIAL AND
         INDUSTRIAL AREAS WITH POTENTIAL FOR DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVED OR
         EXPANDED SERVICE.

           STRATEGY:

                Solicit projects from cities and unincorporated areas that will assist in the development of
                 the commercial and industrial base.
                Assist cities and unincorporated areas in the preparation of grants and applications for
                 project development.
                Apply for funding of projects through state and federal agencies.

           IMPLEMENTATION:

                Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
                Overall Economic Development Commission
                City Economic Development personnel
                Regional Economic Development agencies

    2) CONTINUE   SUPPORT OF A COUNTYWIDE REGIONAL AGENCY WHICH WOULD BE
         DEDICATED AND BE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE PROMOTION AND ECONOMIC
         DEVELOPMENT IN IMPERIAL COUNTY.

           STRATEGY:

                Attend monthly meeting for the county-wide regional agency dedicated to the
                 promotion of economic development.
                Assist in the development, coordination, and implementation of marketing activities for
                 Imperial County.
                Encourage the participation of smaller communities in activities of the regional economic
                 development organization.
                Participate in joint meeting of the regional economic development organization and the
                 Mexicali Industrial Development Commission in joint promotional effort of Imperial
                 Valley/Mexicali Valley and Tri-Valley Alliance.
                Participate in joint meeting of the regional economic development organization and the
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               Coachella Valley Economic Partnership in joint promotional effort of Imperial
               Valley/Coachella Valley and Tri-Valley Alliance.

         IMPLEMENTATION:

              Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
              Overall Economic Development Commission
              City Economic Development personnel
              Regional Economic Development agencies
              Mexicali Industrial Development Commission
              Coachella Valley Economic Partnership
              Imperial Valley Economic Development Corporation
              Joint Chambers
              Imperial County Office of Education
              San Diego State University - Imperial Valley Campus


  3) DEVELOP LABOR FORCE DATA, ESPECIALLY WITH RESPECT TO OCCUPATIONAL SKILLS.

         STRATEGY:

              Establish closer working relationships with the State and local Employment
               Development Department
              Support the Workforce Investment Board
              Work with the Imperial County Office of Employment Training
              Community Based Organizations to improve and share local economic, employment,
               and planning data.
              Assist in the coordination of job creation and job training.


         IMPLEMENTATION:

              Community Based Organizations
              Workforce Investment Board
              Employment Development Department
              Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
              Overall Economic Development Commission

  4) ASSIST IN THE PROMOTION OF TOURISM RELATED FACILITES AND ACTIVITIES.

         STRATEGY:

              Identify recreational facilities needed in the County.
              Coordinate with private enterprise for the development of new businesses in the field of
               recreation.
              Assist and encourage the clean up of the New River and Salton Sea.
              Participate in amending the Desert Protection Act which limits recreational areas
               available to Imperial County and hinders tourist activity.
              Participate in the development and promotion of cultural activities.
              Participate in California State Fair, Imperial County Mid Winter Fair and Fiesta, Fiestas
               Del Sol.
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         IMPLEMENTATION:

              Imperial County Film Commission
              Chambers of Commerce
              Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
              Overall Economic Development Commission
              Regional Economic Development agencies
              Imperial Valley Association of Governments
              Imperial County Arts Council

  5) DEVELOP   WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES FOR LOCALLY GENERATED SOLID AND
       HAZARDOUS WASTE.

         STRATEGY:

              Assist in the research and development of waste management facilities.
              Assist in increasing public awareness of the need for efficient and effective long term
               solution for solid waste management.
              Research and seek funding from State and Federal agencies to address the need for long
               term solutions.

         IMPLEMENTATION:

              Imperial Valley Association of Governments
              Overall Economic Development Commission
              Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
              Imperial County Public Works Department
              Imperial County Planning Department


  6) IMPROVEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CORRIDORS IN IMPERIAL COUNTY.

         STRATEGY:

             Pursue State and Federal funding to improve the highways necessary to take advantage of
              the development of trade corridors and their connectivity to the interstate system.
              Specifically, State Route 7, Highway S86, 98 and 111.
             Assist in the development and implementation of improving Imperial County's rail access to
             California coastal markets, commercial and industrial access, and development
              opportunities related to the new border crossing.

         IMPLEMENTATION:

              Imperial Valley Association of Governments
              Overall Economic Development Commission
              Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
              Imperial County Public Works Department
              State of California Dept. of Transportation
              San Diego Association of Governments
              Federal Highway Administration

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              Southern California Association of Government
  7) INCREASING SCOPE OF CAPITAL AVAILABLE TO FIRMS FOR THE FINANCING OF BUSINESS
     EXPANSION AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT.

         STRATEGY:
              Assist in the development of financing mechanism for business start-up, expansion and
               working capital.
              Apply for State and Federal funding for the implementation of revolving loan funds for
               small businesses.
              Work closely with micro businesses in the development of programs and financing for
               local cottage businesses.
              Research the development of a one-stop capital shop.

         IMPLEMENTATION:

              Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
              Cities in Imperial County
              Valley Independent Bank
              United States Department of Agriculture
              State of California Department of Housing and Community Development
              Other financial institutions


  8) INCREASE INTERNATIONAL      AWARENESS OF UNITED                                  STATES/MEXICO BORDER
       OPPORTUNITIES AS RELATED TO THE NORTH AMERICAN                                 FREE TRADE AGREEMENT
       (NAFTA).

         STRATEGY:

              Determine the impacts of NAFTA and its implementation plan.
              Assist and support studies regarding special and/or unique economic problems or
               constraints and attempt to identify alternative solutions.
              Continue support of the existing Imperial/Mexicali Valley Economic Development
               forum.
              Encourage and support cross border promotional and economic development
               activities.
              Continue participation with international and regional organizations.


         IMPLEMENTATION:

              Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
              Overall Economic Development Commission
              City Economic Development personnel
              Mexicali Industrial Development Commission
              Border Trade Alliance
              Border Counties Coalition
              Southwest Border Regional Partnership
              Local government
              International Boundary and Water Commission



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  9) PROMOTE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT IN AREAS SUITABLE FOR THIS ACTIVITY.

         STRATEGY:

              Development of an EcoPark for location of renewable energy and “green technology”
             industrial projects within the Mesquite Lake Specific Plan Area.
              Development of Mesquite Lake as an industrial site through the implementation of a site
               and marketing plan.
              Identify areas in Imperial County suitable for industrial use.
              Identify funding sources appropriate for the development of industrial and commercial
               activity.
              Develop Specific Planning Area (SPA) adjacent to new commercial port of entry.


         IMPLEMENTATION:

              Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
              Overall Economic Development Commission
              City Economic Development personnel
              Southwest Border Pilot Community
              Imperial Irrigation District


  10) CONTINUE  SUPPORT OF JOB TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR THE UNEMPLOYED AND
       UNDEREMPLOYED.

         STRATEGY:

              Assist in the coordination of job creation and job training in conjunction with the
               Workforce Investment Board, Community Based Organizations, and Imperial County
               Office of Employment Training.
              Diversify predominantly agrarian economy by increasing retail and industrial base.
              Implement strategies defined in Job Creation Investment Fund (JCIF) Strategic Plan.
              Upgrade academic achievement and workforce level for potential of higher paying jobs.


         IMPLEMENTATION:

              Workforce Investment Board
              Employment Development Department
              Overall Economic Development Commission
              Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
              JCIF Task Force
              Imperial County Office of Employment Training
              Imperial Valley Employer Services Team
              K-12 Schools
              Imperial County Office of Education
              Imperial Valley Regional Occupational Program
              San Diego State University – Imperial Valley Campus
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  11) CAPITALIZE         ON DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES RELATED TO SECOND BORDER
      CROSSING.

         STRATEGY:

              Participate in the progression of infrastructure development and land use planning
               through the County's general plan update and specific planning areas.
              Seek financing mechanisms and assist in the promotion of industrial and commercial
               development of the new border area.


         IMPLEMENTATION:

              Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
              Overall Economic Development Commission
              City Economic Development Personnel
              Mexicali Industrial Development Commission
              County Planning Commission
              County Planning Department


  12) PROMOTION OF AGRICULTURE AND OTHER SUITABLE INDUSTRIES.

         STRATEGY:

              Encourage the continued development of agriculture related industry, i.e, dairies, food
               processing.
              Participation in eradication of the silver leaf whitefly through the Imperial County
               Agricultural Extension and Farm Bureau and White Fly Committee.
              Monitor legislative activity as it relates to agriculture.


         IMPLEMENTATION:

              Imperial County Farm Bureau
              Overall Economic Development Commission
              Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
              Imperial County Agricultural Commissioners Office
              Cities
              Dairy Attraction


  13) PROMOTE DEVELOPMENT OF ENERGY RESOURCES FOR MAXIMIZATION OF INDUSTRIAL
      AND COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT.



         STRATEGY:

              Promote Imperial County's geothermal resources, solar, and wind energy resources.
              Assist in the research and development of new energy resources.
              Assist in the research and development of waste to energy resources.
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          IMPLEMENTATION:

               Overall Economic Development Commission
               Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
               Imperial County Planning and Public Works Departments
               Imperial Irrigation District
               Southern California Gas Company
               Imperial Valley Geothermal Association

    14) RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF RECYCLING FACILITIES.

          STRATEGY:

               Participate in increasing public awareness of the importance of recycling and increasing
                scarcity of raw materials.
               Identify and seek State and Federal programs for the designation of recycling zones in
                Imperial County.


          IMPLEMENTATION:

               Imperial Valley Association of Governments
               Overall Economic Development Commission
               Valley of Imperial Development Alliance
               Imperial County Planning and Public Works
               Imperial County’s Incorporated Cities


6-5       C RITERIA FOR SELECTING PROJECTS THAT WILL BE SUBMITTED TO
          THE U.S. D EPARTMENT OF C OMMERCE , E CONOMIC
          D EVELOPMENT A DMINISTRATION
The purpose of the Public Works grant program is to assist communities with the funding of public works
and development facilities that contribute to the creation or retention of private sector jobs and to alleviate
unemployment. Such assistance is designed to help communities achieve lasting improvement by establishing
stable and diversified local economies and by improving local conditions.

Projects developed for consideration should be consistent with EDA policies. Priority consideration will be
given to projects which best meet the relative needs of eligible areas, and are in areas of high unemployment
and/or low per capita income.

The following criteria will be utilized to evaluate projects which are required to have the OEDC review as a
prerequisite for funding by the U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration and
other funding agencies.




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6-6       P RIORITY PROJECT CRITERIA

PRIORITY      W I L L B E G I V E N TO P RO J E C T S W H I C H :

       Improve the opportunities in the area where such project is or will be located, for the successful
          establishment or expansion of industrial or commercial plants or facilities.
       Assist in creating or retaining private sector jobs in the near-term and assist in the creation of
          additional long-term employment opportunities for such area.
       Benefit the long-term unemployed and members of low-income families who are residents of
          the area to be served by the project.
       Fill a pressing need of the area, or part thereof, in which it is, or will be located.
       Are consistent with the EDA, approved by the OEDC for the area in which it is, or will be
          located, and have been recommended by the OEDC.
       Have broad community support and significant private sector investment.
       Have adequate local matching funds with evidence of firm commitment.
       Have a favorable cost per job ratio.
       Complement Department of Commerce goals such as reducing the Federal trade deficit by
          increasing export development and assisting minority business development.

L OW   P R I O R I T Y W I L L B E G I V E N TO P RO J E C T S W H I C H :

       Do not benefit the long-term unemployed.
       Cannot be implemented within a reasonable period of time.
       Support downtown commercial activities such as parking garages, pedestrian walkways and non-
       residential street repairs unless, it can be demonstrated that EDA's assistance is critical to and an
       integral part of the local economic development strategy for the area and required to support other
       ongoing development investments.
       Involve substantial land purchase or public buildings. Do not have the applicant's share of
          project funding readily available.
       Support tourism or recreational activities, unless it can be demonstrated that tourism is the
        major industry in the area or will assist in creating a significant number of jobs and substantially
        diversify the area's economy.          In which case the project must directly assist in providing job
        opportunities for the unemployed and the underemployed residents of the area and otherwise
        support the long-term growth of the area.



6-7       P UBLIC W ORKS IMPACT PROGRAM
Priority will be given to Public Works Impact Program projects which:



 I M P E R I A L C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G Y ……………………………..….…… 35
    1. Will directly or indirectly assist in creating employment opportunities by providing immediate useful
         work (i.e. construction jobs) or other economic or educational benefits for the unemployed and
         underemployed residents in the project area.

    2. Will primarily benefit low income families by providing essential services.

    3. Have on-site labor costs as a substantial portion of the total estimated project costs.

    4. Can be substantially completed within twelve months from the start of construction.

    5. Improve the community or economic environment in areas of severe economic distress.

The following page lists projects that have been submitted by Imperial Valley governmental agencies. The
projects as listed have been rated and ranked by the Overall Economic Development Commission, according
to the established criteria as outlined previously.

Inclusion of projects throughout the fiscal year is encouraged from those entities that have not identified a
project at the time of the CEDS update.




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                               OEDC PROJECTS FOR EDA FUNDING
                                         July, 20, 2003
CATEGORY          AGENCY                    JOBS          EDA               DESCRIPTION                                 PROJECT
                                                          FUNDING                                                       STATUS
COMMERCIAL        Brawley                                 $880,000          Transportation Plan
                  Brawley                                 $6 million        Downtown revitalization
                  Brawley                   1200          $480,000          Upgrade Waterline NE Brawley
                  Calipatria                              $6,000,000        Airport Industrial Park Improvement         Prelim Stages
                  El Centro                  500-800      $3.6 million      Imperial Ave. extension                     Prelim Stages
                  El Centro                  300-500      $2.4 million      La Brucherie and I - 8 overpass             A
                  Holtville                  30-50        $750,000          Water Main upgrade                          A
INDUSTRIAL        County of Imperial         6,350        $3 million        Gateway Infrastructure                      A
                  El Centro                  141          $1,300,000        High Tech Business Incubator                A
                  Brawley                   1,200         $480,000          Upgrade Waterline NE Brawley                A
                  Imperial County            2,500        TBD               Mesquite Lake EcoPark
COMMUNITY         Brawley                                 $1,500,000        Upgrade Waterline NE Brawley                A
FACILITIES
                  Brawley                                 $1,100,000        Satellite Fire Station
                  Imperial County           30            $5,000,000        Fiber Optic-Job Training/
                  Office of Education                                       Community Access to Technology
                  San Diego State                         $150,000          Arizona and CA Border                       A
                  University – IVC
                                                                            Communities




    A – ACTIVE




     I M P E R I A L C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G Y ……………………………..….…… 37

								
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