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					Graduate Diploma

Implementing and Managing the
       Code of Practice
           Day 5
 Thursday 17th February 2011
Special Educational Needs Code of Practice
for Wales 2002




                CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
                                            EDUCATION DIRECTORATE


What do we mean by SEN?

  Children have special educational needs if they
  have a learning difficulty which calls for special
  educational provision to be made for them

Children have a learning difficulty if they:

a. have a significantly greater difficulty in
   learning than the majority of children of the
   same age



                CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
What do we mean by SEN?

Or:

b. have a disability which prevents or
   hinders them from making use of
   educational facilities of a kind generally
   provided for children of the same age in
   schools within the area of the local
   educational authority

               CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
What do we mean by SEN?

Or:

c. are under compulsory school age
   and fall within the definition at a)
   or b) above or would do so if
   special educational provision was
   not made for them

             CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
Key principles

 Schools must have due regard to the Code

 Provision for SEN is a whole school issue

 All teachers are teachers of SEN

 Children should be offered access to an
  appropriate curriculum



                CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
Key principles

 A child with SEN should have their needs met

 These needs will normally be met in a
  mainstream setting

 A child’s view should be sought

 Parents have a vital role to play



                CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
SEN Code of Practice
 Early Identification is seen as critical

 The Graduated response: -
                     Early Years or
                     School Action

                  -          Early Years or
                             School Action Plus

                  -          Statement

                CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
Categories of Need

   There are no hard and fast categories but most
   pupils will fall into one of these main areas:

 communication and interaction

 cognition and learning

 behaviour, emotional and social development

 sensory and/or physical


                 CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
   Complete sheet
‘Categories of need’
Categories of Need

Communication and Interaction may include:

 speech and language delay, impairments or disorders

 specific learning difficulties (e.g dyslexia, dyspraxia)

 hearing impairment

 autistic spectrum disorder




                     CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
Categories of Need

Some pupils may also have:

 moderate, severe or profound
  learning difficulties

 language and communication
  difficulties as a result of permanent
  sensory or physical impairment

              CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
                                      EDUCATION DIRECTORATE


  Categories of Need

Cognition and Learning may include:

 Moderate
 Severe
 Profound learning difficulties

Some pupils may also have:

 specific learning difficulties
 physical and sensory impairments
 autistic spectrum disorder
Categories of Need

  Some of these children may also have:

 Sensory

 Physical

 Behavioural difficulties

              CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
Categories of Need

Behaviour, emotional and social
development may include those who are:

 disruptive and disturbing

 hyperactive and lacking concentration

 withdrawn or isolated
Categories of Need

  Some of these pupils may also
  have:

 immature social skills

 challenging behaviours arising
  from other complex special
  needs
Categories of Need
   There is a wide spectrum of sensory, multi-
   sensory and physical difficulties. The sensory
   range includes:

 profound and permanent deafness

 visual impairment

 lesser levels of loss, which may only be
  temporary
Categories of Need

 Physical impairments may arise from physical,
  neurological or metabolic causes

 Others may lead to more complex learning and
  social needs

 A few children will have multi-sensory
  difficulties, some with associated physical
  difficulties
Defining SEN
        Additional Learning Needs (ALN)

                       Or

      Additional Educational Needs (AEN)

is becoming more widely used to encompass those
    with SEN and with other disabilities that may
   impact on their ability to access the curriculum
The Impact of SEN

 Some issues pupils may have in common:

 Low self-esteem

 Difficulty co-operating with peers

 Difficulty working independently
The Impact of SEN
Some issues pupils may have in common:
(continued)

 Difficulty staying on task

 Difficulty completing tasks

 Poor communication skills

 Poor motivation
Individual Education Plans
Individual Education Plans

a useful way of focusing
on a child’s needs and how
to meet them, or just
another bureaucratic
chore?
Why do we have IEP’s?

Task
Purpose of IEP
IEPs
 The idea behind individual plans for children
  with special needs, is a good one: when a pupil is
  experiencing difficulties, identify what they
  are; decide on some appropriate action; do it,
  then review it

 BUT a whole industry has grown up around
  designing templates, creating targets,
  measuring progress – and stressing over the
  whole business. SENCOs have literally made
  themselves ill in the process
IEPs
 The test of how well IEPs are used is
  whether a teacher knows about a pupil’s
  difficulties, plans accordingly and
  differentiates effectively in the
  classroom, science lab, studio, gym, etc,
  rather than the IEP being used only by
  the TA running a small group
  intervention.
Questions to consider
 What should they include?

 Should they all be the same

  Primary, Secondary?
IEPs
 Individual plans still play an important role
  however, especially for children with significant
  difficulties. For these pupils, a ‘bespoke’ approach
  may be needed and the important thing is that
  thought is given to the individual.

 Part of the reason for IEPs gaining such a bad
  reputation was that many tended to be generic,
  with a tendency to only ‘change the name’
  sometimes; another reason is that they often didn’t
  see the light of day – kept neatly in the teacher’s
  desk drawer, or a filing cabinet, ready for when an
  inspector called!
IEPs
 An individual plan should be a working
  document, useful to all staff working with the
  pupil and constantly at hand: its design should
  allow for regular updates and comments
  (scribbled notes) by TAs, teachers and
  parents. In some schools, an extra sheet is
  attached to the IEP for daily/weekly updates,
  rather than waiting for the scheduled review –
  this makes much more sense in many ways.
Make sure that:
 targets are achievable, short-term and specific, so that
  everyone can see when each one has been met
 the pupil is involved in the setting of targets whenever
  possible
 targets are described in jargon-free language and clear to all
  concerned – not least the pupil himself/herself, who should
  be able to say ‘Today I hit one of my targets… I sat on the
  carpet for the whole story/spelled three new target words
  correctly/asked a question in class…’
 teaching/behaviour management strategies are described
  with details of who will deliver them, when and where
 necessary resources are listed
 there is a date for review, and the names of people involved
  in reviewing.
IEPs
 Involving pupils in decisions about their IEPs
  and types of support provided is something
  that everyone acknowledges as a ‘good thing’,
  but in practice, is not always well done. It may
  not always be appropriate for a child to attend
  review meetings, but a one-to-one with the
  SENCO or TA/mentor beforehand can provide
  useful information and insight into how a child
  is responding to the support on offer.
                                           EDUCATION DIRECTORATE

Individual Education Plans


     Should only contain what is additional to
      and different from the school’s
      differentiated curriculum planning for all
      pupils

     3 or 4 SMART short term targets set
      through discussion with the pupil and
      parents.

     A description of the child’s strengths
      and areas for development

               CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
                                           EDUCATION DIRECTORATE

Individual Education Plans


    Targets should be:

                 SPECIFIC
                 MEASURABLE
                 ATTAINABLE
                 RELEVANT
                 TIME CONSTRAINED
               CITY AND COUNTY OF SWANSEA • DINAS A SIR ABERTAWE
Individual Education Plans

Look at some IEP’s

Are the targets SMART?
IEPs
 there have been moves to minimise the
  number of IEPs and many schools have
  used ‘provision mapping’ as a way of
  allocating different types of support to
  individuals. Pupils identified for ‘school
  action’ can certainly fit well into this
  type of planning and management of
  interventions.
     Can provision maps replace IEPs?

 Provision maps can support schools in reducing
  bureaucracy

 In England they are being used as an alternative to
  writing large numbers of individual education plans for
  students with low level needs that can be met through
  wave 3 literacy and numeracy interventions

 Some schools believe they will replace IEPs, however
  this could only happen if certain provision is in place
          Can provision maps replace IEPs?
    Some schools believe they will replace IEPs, however this could
     only happen if certain provision is in place

These include:

    Whole school target setting systems that incorporate individual
     targets for all vulnerable groups/ students which are reviewed
     at least twice a year

    Rigorous self evaluation of SEN provision which ensures all
     students are making good progress

    Systems for working in full partnership with parents

    Systems which take account of the views of students
Look at some provision maps

				
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