The Shocking History of Wine by feil4msol

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									Ever wondered how did somebody figure out
they could crush a grape, ferment the juice, and
come up with wine?
 Find out what we know about the major progressions of wine
 drinking and wine making throughout the years.
          Ancient Beginnings
The harvesting of grapes and winemaking was
first recorded in Ancient Egypt beginning around
4,000 BC.
Ancient Egyptians used stone tablets or wrote on walls to record
information about their grape harvests.
    Ancient Greece and Roman Empire

Winemaking spread throughout the Mediterranean.
        France and England
It is thought that the Romans introduced the grapevine to France,
which, at the time, was known as Gaul.
                             An important factor in the history of wine
                             and it spreading to England was the
                             marriage in 1152 of Eléonore of Aquitaine
                             (Bordeaux region) with Henry Plantagenet ,
                             who was to become Henry II, the future
                             king of England.
      17th and 18th Centuries
The wine industry is challenged in the 17th and
18th centuries.
                       People found other sources for their
                       excessive indulgences, like hard liquor,
                       beer and ale, tobacco, chocolate, and
                       coffee and tea.
      19th Century
French wine had become a great source of national pride
for the people of France as it had become known as the
benchmark of wine making standards in the international
wine world.
    New World
The New World wine makers began to challenge Old
World wine makers round about the 19th century.
        Modern Times
As technological procedures advanced, the winemaking
industry developed better methods for production, which
created better and more varied types of wines.
       Keep trying the new ones.
And keep enjoying your favorites.
                         Cheers!
        Visit our site for info on types of wine,
winemaking, wine and food pairing, and more…

								
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