Melanie Daneluk - Alberta Environment - Government of Alberta

Document Sample
Melanie Daneluk - Alberta Environment - Government of Alberta Powered By Docstoc
					Melanie Daneluk
From:                        Mary Richardson [maryr@athabascau.ca]
Sent:                        Friday, January 27, 2012 2:30 PM
To:                          AENV Environmental Assessment
Subject:                     Keepers of the Athabasca Response to Blackrod Commercial SAGD Project Proposed ToR
                             for EIA

Attachments:                 Blackrod_Keepers_of_the_Athabasca.doc




Blackrod_Keepers_
 of_the_Athaba...
                    Dear Sir or Madam,

Please find attached the Keepers of the Athabasca Watershed Council's review of the Proposed Terms of
Reference for BlackPearl Resources Inc.'s Blackrod Commercial SAGD Project.

I would appreciate acknowledge of your receipt of this message.

Thank you.

best regards,

Mary Richardson
Research Director
Keepers of the Athabasca Watershed Council
4804-47 Ave.
Athabasca, AB
T9S 1R1
780-675-3144

--
      This communication is intended for the use of the recipient to whom it
      is addressed, and may contain confidential, personal, and or privileged
      information. Please contact us immediately if you are not the intended
      recipient of this communication, and do not copy, distribute, or take
      action relying on it. Any communications received in error, or
      subsequent reply, should be deleted or destroyed.
---




                                                          1
                                                                     

January 27, 2012 
 
Director, Environmental Assessment, Regional Integration  
Alberta Environment and Water 
111 Twin Atria Bldg. 
4999‐98 Ave 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T6B 2X3 
environmental.assessment@gov.ab.ca 
 
Re:  Keepers of the Athabasca Watershed Council Review of BlackPearl Resources Inc., Blackrod 
Commercial SAGD Project, Proposed Terms of Reference for Environmental Impact Assessment (File 
#001‐00301778) 
 
Dear Sir or Madam, 
 
The Keepers of the Athabasca Watershed Council has several concerns with BlackPearl Resources Inc’s 
proposed terms of reference (ToR) for the environmental impact assessment (EIA) of its Blackrod 
Commercial SAGD Project (the Project).  In this letter, we provide our critique of the ToR and our 
request that it be revised and expanded in the ways we describe.  We believe that several important 
points are missing, and others are not stated with enough specificity to ensure that they are dealt with 
in sufficient detail.  In keeping with the "Guide to Providing Comments on Proposed Terms of 
Reference," we key our suggestions to the sections of the ToR and provide justifications and wording for 
each point.  New wording is italicized. 
 
One of our main concerns with the ToR is that little attention is paid to cumulative environmental
impacts of the Project together with other activities in the region.  Cumulative effects refer to the overall 
impact of accumulated changes to a particular place over time (i.e. past, present, and future). 
Cumulative effects can be considered in terms of impacts to the environment, the economy, and 
society. The Province of Alberta is committed to applying a cumulative effects approach in the 
management of its land and resources. 1    
 
Another concern is that the ToR does not address in detail the kinds of impacts that could continue 
underground long after the closure of the Project, such as groundwater movement of toxins that 
eventually reach the Athabasca River through channels that were created in the process of bitumen 
extraction or slow drying of wetlands due to changes in flow rate and direction of aquifers.     
 
The Keepers of the Athabasca are First Nations, Metis, Inuit, environmental groups, and Watershed 
citizens working together for the protection of water, land and air, and thus for all living things today 
and tomorrow in the Athabasca River Watershed.  Our mission is to unite the peoples of the Athabasca 


                                                            
1
 Government of Alberta - Environment. 1995-2011. Cumulative Effects. Accessed 25 May 2011 from
http://environment.alberta.ca/0890.html

                                                               1 
 
River and Lake Watershed to secure and protect water and watershed lands for ecological, social, 
cultural and community health and well being. 
 
We request the following changes to the ToR: 
 
Section 1 [A] ‐ Public Engagement and Aboriginal Consultation 
 
         Rationale:  In order to express concerns and issues with a project, the public must be informed 
         of the project and be invited to express its concerns.  The EIA should contain information about 
         how the Proponent informed the public of its project and solicited input. 
          
         Wording:  Describe how the public was informed of the Project and how public input, concerns 
         and issues were solicited.  Describe the concerns and issues expressed by the public and the 
         actions taken to address these concerns and issues, including how public input was incorporated 
         into the Project development, impact mitigation and monitoring. 
          
Section 2.1 [E] ‐ Overview 
 
         Rationale:  The adaptive management approach to a Project should be related to the cumulative 
         impacts of all industrial projects in the region.   
          
         Wording:  Provide the adaptive management approach that will be implemented throughout 
         the life of the Project.  Include how cumulative impacts of all projects in the region, monitoring 
         and evaluation were incorporated. 
 
Section 2.2 [A] f) and [C] ‐ Constraints 
 
         Rationale:  Due to lack of adequate monitoring and gathering of baseline information over the 
         decades of oil sands development, the existing cumulative effects are not known.  This has been 
         pointed out by the Federal Oilsands Advisory Panel, the Royal Society of Canada Experts Panel 
         and the Water Monitoring Data Review Committee. 2    As a result the province, has committed 
         to a new monitoring system which has not yet been established, and it will take time to gather 
         sufficient data to understand the existing cumulative effects.  Thus, while Blackrod is expected 
         to discuss the process and criteria used to identify constraints to development, including 
         cumulative environmental impacts in the region and how the Project has been designed to 
         accommodate those constraints, that is not currently possible.   
          
         Also, from a public interest perspective, it is important to know why decisions concerning the 
         location of some facilities have not yet been made, such that they cannot be reviewed as part of 


                                                            
2 Oilsands Advisory Panel. 2010. A Foundation for the Future: Building an Environmental Monitoring System for
the Oil Sands http://www.ec.gc.ca/pollution/default.asp?lang=En&n=E9ABC93B-1; The Royal Society of Canada
Expert Panel. 2010. Environmental and Health Impacts of Canada’s Oil Sands Industry.
http://www.rsc.ca/documents/RSCreportcompletesecured9Mb_Mar28_11.pdf; The Water Monitoring Data Review
Committee. 2011. Evaluation of Four Reports on Contamination of the Athabasca River System by Oil Sands
Operations http://environment.alberta.ca/documents/WMDRC_-_Final_Report_March_7_2011.pdf.
 

                                                               2 
 
        the EIA process.  It is likewise important to know what types of review processes or licensing are 
        required for the construction of facilities whose locations have not yet been determined.   
 
        Wording:   
         
        [A] f) cumulative environmental impacts in the region, including gaps in information required to 
        determine those impacts. 
 
        [C] Provide a list of facilities for which locations will be determined later, a rationale for the 
        current lack of determination and a description of the review processes or licensing requirements 
        for the construction and operation of those facilities. 
 
Section 2.5 [A] f) ‐ Air Emissions Management 
 
        Rationale:  There are other substances of concern besides Criteria Air Contaminants that may be 
        emitted to air in plant operations under normal, upset or emergency conditions.  These 
        substances, including, but not limited to, heavy metals and arsenic, are known to be harmful to 
        both the environment and human health.  
         
        Wording:  amount and nature of Criteria Air Contaminants, heavy metals (speciated), arsenic 
        (speciated) and other substances of concern emissions 
 
Section 2.6.1 [A] a), b), c), e), f) and g) ‐ Water Supply 
 
        Rationale:  The Blackrod Project Summary Table 3  indicates that the only water that will be used 
        in the SAGD process is saline water from the Grosmont Formation. Despite the fact that use of
        this water does not require a Water Act license or Water Act approval, this water should be
        accounted for in water balances and listed in process water requirements. All water treatment
        systems and chemicals, and their amounts, should be listed and described.

        Also, the exact location of sources/intakes should be specified so that their impacts can be
        assessed.
         
        Finally, there has been a case in which saline water was proposed to be used in a SAGD 
        operation, but later an application to use surface water was made, and the company stated, 
        “desalinization of local groundwater as a source of process water … is now not preferred due to 
        technical problems, elevated costs associated with saline groundwater use, and the need for 
        greater waste management. 4   It is crucial that Blackpearl Resources Inc. present a back‐up plan 
        in its EIA in case it decides that the use of saline water is no longer preferred, and an application 
        for the use of other water sources is to be made. 
         

                                                            
3
  BlackPearl Resources Inc, “Blackrod Commercial SAGD Project, Project Summary Table.”  Undated.   
 http://www.blackpearlresources.ca/i/pdf/Blackrod_Project_Summary_Table.pdf.  
 
4
   Julia Ko and William Donahue.  Drilling Down:  Groundwater Risks Imposed by In Situ Oil Sands Development, 
Water Matters Society of Alberta, July, 2010, citing Nexen Inc, “Long Lake Source Water Project:  Application to 
Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Transport Canada, and Alberta Environment” (Calgary, AB: Nexen, 2010), Application 
Numbers 001‐00267465 and 001‐00267466466.   

                                                       3 
 
        Wording:   
         
        a) the expected water balance, including saline groundwater, during all stages of the Project. … 
        b) … Identify the volume of water to be withdrawn from each source, including saline 
        groundwater, considering plans for wastewater reuse.  Provide a back‐up plan in case saline 
        groundwater is determined not to be the preferred source of process water 
        c) the exact location of sources/intakes and associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines for water 
        supply) 
        e) the expected cumulative effects of water losses/gains, including of saline groundwater, 
        resulting from the Project’s operations.  Include calculations. 
        f) potable water and process water treatment systems for all stages of the project 
        g) type and quantity of potable water and process water treatment chemicals used 
 
Section 3.1.2 [A] c), d) and e) – Air Quality, Climate and Noise – Impact Assessment 

        Rationale:  The cumulative effects of air emissions of all regional industrial projects should be 
        taken into account when determining components of the Project that will affect air quality.  
        Deposition of all substances of concern should be listed. 

        Wording: 

        [A] c) taking into consideration cumulative impacts of the Project and all other regional industrial 
        projects, discuss any expected changes to patterns of particulate deposition, nitrogen 
        deposition, acidic deposition or deposition of any other substances of concern 

        [A] d) taking into consideration cumulative impacts of the Project and all other regional 
        industrial projects, identify areas that are predicted to exceed Potential Acid Input (PAI) critical 
        loading criteria 

        [A] e) taking into consideration the cumulative impacts of the Project and all other regional 
        industrial projects, discuss interactive effects that may occur resulting from co‐exposure of a 
        receptor to all emissions 

Section 3.2.1 [A], [A] a), [A] b) i), [A] b) ii) and [A] b) iv) ‐ Hydrogeology ‐ Baseline Information  

        Rationale:  The overview should be broad enough to determine whether there is a potential for 
        steam‐heated bitumen and/or other mobilized materials to flow between aquifers or to the 
        surface.   Also, the foundations of oil producing zones should be studied in order to determine 
        whether steam‐heated bitumen and/or other mobilized materials have the potential to flow to 
        deeper levels below the surface.    

        Also, there should be studies of regional and Project area geology that determine whether the 
        formations through which drilling will occur contain substances of concern such as arsenic.   

        The baseline information on aquifers should be based on available information and new 
        information collected through the installation of monitoring and test wells on the Project site.  


                                                       4 
 
        Raw data from these wells should be provided in the EIA.  The description of the aquifer should 
        include historical trends.  

        The description of groundwater chemistry should include other substances of concern beyond 
        major ions, metals and hydrocarbon indicators 

         Wording:   

        [A] Provide an overview of the existing geologic and hydrogeologic setting from the ground 
        surface down to, and including, the oil producing zones and their foundations, and disposal 
        zones, and: 

       [A] a) present regional and Project Area geology to illustrate depth, thickness and spatial extent 
       of lithology, stratigraphic units and structural features.  Indicate whether formations through 
       which drilling will occur contain substances of concern such as arsenic. 

        [A] b) i) … Supply raw data from monitoring and test wells on the Project site.  The description of 
        the aquifer should include historical trends.   

         [A] b) ii) the chemistry of groundwater aquifers including baseline concentrations of major ions, 
        metals, hydrocarbon indicators and other substances of concern 

        [A] b) iv) water well development and groundwater use, including saline water, and including an 
        inventory of groundwater users 

Section 3.2.2 [A] [B] and [B] c) ‐ Hydrogeology – Impact Assessment   

        Rationale:  

       Discussions of impacts should include impacts of upset, emergency and worst‐case conditions.  
       Also, since impacts on hydrogeology may continue long past the lifetime of the Project, the EIA 
       should address impacts in a time scale that reaches several decades beyond the closure of the 
       Project.    

       Impacts on hydrogeology should include both those of the project itself and cumulative effects 
       of all industrial projects in the region.  The study of the cumulative impacts should describe both 
       short term and long term effects. 

       Also, impacts on water quality should include modifications to groundwater geochemistry in the 
       impacted aquifers due to the proposed operations, including a discussion of potential changes in 
       metal species and species of other substances of concern.  

        Wording: 

        [A]Describe project components and activities, including under upset, emergency and worst‐case 
        conditions, that have the potential to affect groundwater resource quantity and quality at all 
        stages of the Project and for several decades post‐closure. 

                                                     5 
 
        [B] Describe the nature and significance of the potential Project impacts and cumulative impacts 
        of all industrial projects in the region on groundwater with respect to: 

        [B] c) changes in groundwater quality, including modifications to groundwater chemistry, i.e. 
        concentrations of major ions, metals, hydrocarbon indicators and other substances of concern 
        and changes in species of metals and other substances of concern  and quantity 

Section 3.4 [A] ‐ Surface Water Quality 

        Rationale:  The EIA should examine not only the effects of the Project on surface water, but
        also the cumulative effects of all industrial projects in the region on surface water.

        Also, because groundwater may interact with surface water, and because there could be
        upset, emergency or worst-case events or conditions associated with the Project, the
        impacts of groundwater extraction and upset, emergency or worst-case events on surface
        water quality should be discussed.

        Wording: Describe the potential impacts of the Project and the cumulative impacts of all
        industrial projects in the region on surface water quality, including changes caused by
        groundwater withdrawals and/or upset, emergency or worst-case events, and proposed
        mitigation measures to maintain surface water quality at all stages of the Project.  

Section 3.5.1 [A] ‐ Aquatic Ecology ‐ Baseline Information 
 
        Rationale:  As stated above, a main concern with the Project is its addition to the cumulative
        environmental impacts in the region. Baseline information about fish habitat and aquatic
        resources in the region as well as in the Project site should be part of the EIA.

        Wording: Describe and map the fish, fish habitat and aquatic resources (e.g., aquatic and
        benthic invertebrates) of the lakes, rivers, ephemeral water bodies and other waters in the
        Project site and in the region. … 
 
Section 3.5.2 [A] ‐ Aquatic Ecology ‐ Impact Assessment 
 
        (same Rationale as for Section 3.5.1 [A], above) 
          
        Wording:  Describe and assess the potential impacts of the Project and the cumulative
        impacts of all industrial projects in the region to fish, fish habitat, and other aquatic
        resources.
 
Section 3.7.1 [A], [B] ‐ Wildlife ‐  Baseline Information 
 
        [A] Rationale:  Habitat fragmentation is already an important issue for wildlife in the oil sands 
        area. The Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute (ABMI) reported that 7% of the landscape in 




                                                    6 
 
        the Lower Athabasca region has already been altered as a result of human development. 5  This 
        number is anticipated to grow as the vast in situ reserves are developed. In total, Alberta’s oil 
        sands resources covers 140,200‐km². 6 

        While mining projects cause more localized damage, when taken together in situ techniques will 
        lead to greater habitat fragmentation over time due to the extensive area they cover (80% of 
        the total resource) 7 .  

        There are serious and ongoing declines in woodland caribou herds in the oil sands area.  
        Woodland caribou are a species at risk listed nationally and in Alberta. 8    They are threatened 
        and likely to become in danger of extinction if limiting factors are not reversed.  Research 
        indicates that without management intervention these herds will be locally extinct within 20‐40 
        years. 9  

        Tasked with developing an Athabasca Landscape Management Options Report [Management 
        Options Report] for boreal caribou ranges in northeast Alberta [the Athabasca Landscape area] 
        the Athabasca Landscape Team [ALT], established in June 2008 by the Alberta Caribou 
        Committee Governance Board [ACCGB], presented management options to recover and sustain 
        boreal caribou in all populations in the Athabasca Landscape area, consistent with the provincial 
        woodland caribou Recovery Plan (2004/05‐2013‐14). 10   

        The Management Planning Report developed planning areas that add a 20 km buffer to caribou 
        ranges that reflect the influence of adjacent habitats and populations of predators and other 
        prey on caribou population dynamics.  According to the landscape planning map for the East 
        Side Athabasca Range, the Blackrod project area lies between the ranges of two caribou herds, 
        and may lie within the buffer zones of one or both ranges. 11    
         
        Also, with respect to cumulative effects, the Management Options Report expands on the 
        severity of the situation and its link to broader land use planning.  The ALT determined that 
        there is insufficient functional habitat to maintain and increase current caribou distribution and 
        population growth rates within the Athabasca Landscape area.  Boreal caribou will not persist 

                                                            
5
  Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute. 2009. The Status of Birds and Vascular Plan in Alberta’s Lower
Athabasca Planning Region 2009 – Preliminary Assessment. 2009.
http://www.abmi.ca/abmi/reports/reports.jsp?categoryId=163 
7
   Government of Alberta. 2011. Investing in our Future: Responding to the Rapid Growth of Oil Sands
Development – Final Report.
http://alberta.ca/home/documents/Investing_in_our_Future_Section4.pdf.  
7
   Schneider, R., S. Dyer. 2006. Death by a Thousand Cuts Impacts of In Situ Oil Sands Development on Alberta’s
Boreal Forest. CPAWS NAB and Pembina Institute.
http://cpawsnab.org/resources/files/tarsands/DeathBook.pdf/view?searchterm=death%20by%20a%20thousand 
8
   Athabasca Landscape Team. 2009. Athabasca Caribou Landscape Management Options Report.
www.albertacariboucommittee.ca/PDF/Athabasca-Caribou.pdf.
9
   Athabasca Landscape Team. 2009. Athabasca Caribou Landscape Management Options Report.
www.albertacariboucommittee.ca/PDF/Athabasca-Caribou.pdf.
10
    Ibid. 
11
    Ibid. 

                                                        7 
 
               for more than two to four decades without immediate and aggressive management 
               intervention. 12   They state:  
                
                       Tough choices need to be made between caribou conservation and industrial 
                       development of oil reserves. It is clear that the history of planning and mitigation of 
                       activities at local project scales has not worked to protect caribou. The cumulative 
                       effects of many individual projects have led to total industrial activity exceeding the 
                       levels that can support viable caribou herds in the TT [Traditional Territory] and 
                       surrounding area. Restoration, protection, and caribou mortality management need to 
                       be part of a broad land use planning framework that recognizes the trade‐off between 
                       caribou conservation and industrial development. 13 

               Wording:   
                
               [A] Describe and map the wildlife resources (amphibians, reptiles, birds and terrestrial and 
               aquatic mammals), including those caribou herds with ranges for which the project will occupy 
               20 km buffer zones around  habitat areas, and their use and potential use of habitats. … 
 
               [B] Describe and map existing wildlife habitat, including a 20 km buffer around caribou ranges,
               and habitat disturbance (including exploration activities) on the Project site as well as cumulative
               habitat disturbance by industrial projects in the region. …

Section 3.7.2 [A], [B] Wildlife ‐ Impact Assessment 
 
        (same Rationale as for 3.7.1 [A] and [B], above) 
         
        Wording:   
         
        [A] Describe and assess the potential impacts of the Project and the potential cumulative effects 
        of regional industrial projects to wildlife and wildlife habitats, including a 20 km buffer around 
        caribou ranges, considering: 
         
        [B] Discuss mitigation measures to minimize the potential impact of the Project, taking into 
        consideration cumulative effects of all industrial projects in the region, to wildlife and wildlife 
        habitats. …  
         
Section 5 [A] a), [A] c) i) and [B] ‐ Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Land Use 
 
        Rationale:  An important aspect of Traditional Ecological Knowledge is knowledge of patterns 
        and shifts over time in location and abundance of vegetation, fish and wildlife species for food, 
        traditional, medicinal and cultural purposes as well as location, quantity and quality of water 
        sources.  This knowledge is important for predicting cumulative effects of all projects in the 
        traditional land use area on fish, wildlife, vegetation and water.   
         
                                                            
12
      Ibid. 
13
      Ibid. 

                                                               8 
 
        Also, the EIA should consider cumulative impacts on aboriginal land use. 
         
        Wording:   
         
        [A] a) Provide a map and description of traditional land use areas including fishing, hunting, 
        trapping; nutritional, medicinal or cultural plant harvesting; and water sources (if the aboriginal 
        community or group is willing to have these locations disclosed); include a description of 
        reported changes over time in the location and abundance of vegetation, fish and wildlife species 
        for food, traditional, medicinal and cultural purposes and changes over time in the quantity, 
        quality and location of water sources in the identified traditional land use areas. 
         
        [A] c) i)  Wording: the availability of vegetation, fish and wildlife species for food, traditional, 
        medicinal and cultural purposes in the identified traditional land use areas considering all 
        Project related impacts and cumulative impacts of all industrial projects in the traditional lands.   
 
        [B] Wording:  Determine the impact of the Project and cumulative impacts of all industrial 
        developments on traditional, medicinal and cultural purposes, including water use. 
 
Section 6.2 [A] a) Public Safety  
 
        Rationale:   Spill containment is not the only type of public safety concern for which there 
        should be emergency reporting and response procedures.  The Proponent should list potential 
        emergency situations, including spills, blow‐outs, etc., and key them to its emergency response 
        plans. 
         
        Wording:  List emergency situations that could arise during the operation of the Project, and 
        describe the Proponent’s emergency response plan, keyed to each type of potential emergency, 
        including public notification protocol and safety procedures to minimize environmental effects, 
        including emergency reporting procedures for the containment and management of spills and 
        other emergency situations.   
 
Section 7.2 [B] g) (new item) 
 
        Rationale:  Project hiring may reduce the number of local workers available for other 
        occupations, and the level of project wages may make it difficult for other local businesses and 
        organizations to compete for workers.  The effect could be a lowering of the quality of life in the 
        local region, if few workers are available to provide services. 
         
        Wording:  g) Describe the effect of project hiring on the local labour pool and the effect of project 
        wages on the ability of local businesses and organizations to compete for workers.   
 
Please contact Dr. Richardson (contact information below) if you require further information. 
 
Thank you. 
 
Sincerely, 
 
Mr. Roland Woodward, Fort McMurray First Nation 

                                                      9 
 
Chair, Keepers of the Athabasca Watershed Council 
Box 5041, Ft. McMurray, AB  
T9H 3G2     
 
Dr. Mary Richardson 
Research Director, Keepers of the Athabasca Watershed Council 
4804‐47 Ave. 
Athabasca, AB 
T9S 1R1 
780‐675‐3144 
maryr@athabascau.ca 




                                                 10 
 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:13
posted:2/27/2012
language:
pages:11