alckqk55jf4cag551uowxsfw.doc - The Measurement Standard Blog by yangxichun

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									ARTIC LEID: 1652
Date: 9/10/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times Online (nyti mes.c om)
Head lin e: CERN Launc hes Parti cle C ollider
OTS: 14559077
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: T he buzz was worl dwide. Gordon Kane, of the U ni versity of Mic higan call ed the new c ollider 'a why mac hi ne,' in a posting on t he bl og 'Cos mic Variance.' Others, worried about s pecul ati on that a bl ac k hole coul d emerge from the proton c ollisions, have c alled it a dooms day machi ne, to the dis may of C ERN physicists who c an poi nt to a vari ety of studi es and reports that s ay that this fear is sci enc e ficti on.
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CERN Launches Particle Collider




BAT AVIA, ILL. - Scienc e r ode a beam of subatomic particl es and a ri ver of c hampagne into the future on Wednes day. After 14 years and $8 billion, scientis ts at the Eur opean Center for N uclear R esearc h, or C ERN, outsi de Geneva, s ucc eeded in turni ng on the most powerful mi crosc ope ever built for i nvestigating the el em ental particles and forces of natur e. At 4:27 a.m., Eas ter n ti me, the protons made their firs t circui t around a 17- mile-l ong r ac etrac k known as the Large H adr on Collider, 300 feet under neath the Swiss Fr ench border, and then made a r eturn j our ne y. 'Its a fantastic moment,' sai d Lyn Evans, who has been the project direc tor of the collider si nc e its inc eption. We can now look for ward to a new era of unders tanding about the origins and evoluti on of the uni vers e. An ocean and half a conti nent away from Geneva, several dozen physicists , journalists , s tudents and j ust pl ain citizens g ather ed here at the F ermi N ati onal Acc eler ator Labor ator y, or F ermil ab, outside C hic ago, to watch the dawn of a new gener ati on i n high-energy physics ,
applauding each mil estone of the night as the sci entists at CER N slowl y wres tled the beam i nto s hape. Dr. Pi er Oddone, F er milabs director, l auded the new mac hine as the r esul t of 'two and a hal f dec ades of dreams to open up this hug e new territor y i n the expl orati on of the natural world.' R oger Aymar, C ERNs direc tor, call ed the new c ollider a 'disc over y machi ne.' The buzz was worldwi de. Gor don Kane, of the U ni versity of Michigan c alled the new c ollider 'a why mac hine,' i n a pos ting on the bl og 'Cos mic Vari anc e.' Others , worried about s pec ulation that a bl ac k hole coul d emerge from the proton collisions, have c alled it a doomsday mac hine, to the dis may of CERN physi cis ts who c an point to a variety of s tudies and r eports that say that this fear is scienc e fic tion. But Boaz Kli ma, a F ermil ab particl e physicis t, sai d that the s pecul ati on had neverthel ess helped create buzz and exci tement about par ticle physics.
ARTIC LEID: 3697
Date: 9/16/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times Online (nyti mes.c om)
Head lin e: J our nal Di sputes McC ain's Health C are Cl ai ms
OTS: 14559077
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: T he anal ysis was written by T homas Buc hmueller of the Uni versity of Michigan, Sherr y A. Gli ed of Col umbi a, Anne R oyalty of Indi ana U ni versity-Purdue U ni versity of Indianapolis, and Katherine Swartz of H ar vard. Eli minati ng the tax excl usion, they wrote, would greatly reduc e the number of people who obtai n health i nsur ance through their employers.
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Jour nal Disputes Mc Cai n's Health C are Clai ms




Senator John McC ainâ €Â℠¢s top domestic polic y advis er, for mer C ongressional Budget Office dir ector Douglas J. Holtz- Eaki n, rec entl y s ai d in a conferenc e c all with r eporters that Mr. McC ai nâ€Â â„¢s health car e proposal would â€Â Å“put 25 to 30 million indi vidual s out of the ranks of the uni nsur ed, into the ranks of the i ns ured.⠀ • In an articl e r eleas ed Tues day, a panel of promi nent health ec onomists c oncl udes that Mr. H oltz- Eaki n†Â℠¢s proj ection is off by, well, 25 to 30 million. The article, published i n the journal H eal th Affairs , arg ues that †œiniti all y there would be no real c hange in the number of people covered as a r es ult of the McC ai n pl an.†• After a short-term reduction of 1 million in the number of people wi thout c overage, the number of uni nsur ed would incr ease by 5 million after fi ve years, the authors pr edic t. There ar e c urrentl y 45 million peopl e wit hout ins uranc e, or 15 perc ent of the populati on, acc ordi ng to the Cens us Bureau. Mr. McC ain⠀ ™s pl an is
desig ned to create greater eq uity between the group and indi vidual ins ur anc e mar kets. He would end the exclusi on of empl oyer-provi ded health benefits fr om feder al inc ome taxes, an advantage not enj oyed by those who buy ins ur anc e on their own, and replac e it with health c are tax credits of $2,500 per indi vidual and $5,000 per famil y. That, the McCai n c ampaign asserts, would dri ve mor e people i nt o the indi vi dual mar ket, fomenting c ompeti tion, r educi ng pr emiums and dis couraging c ons umers from buying more cover age than t hey need or c an afford. The ec onomists wrote that many ⠀œ people ar e li kel y to have far less gener ous policies than thos e they have today.⠀• T he anal ysis was written by T homas Buc hmueller of the U ni versity of Michigan, Sherr y A. Glied of Col umbi a, Anne R oyalty of Indi ana U ni versity- Purdue Uni versity of Indi anapolis, and Katherine Swartz of H ar var d. Eli minating the tax exclusi on, they wr ote, ⠀œ w oul d greatl y r educ e the number of people who obtai n health i nsur ance thr oug h their
empl oyers.â€Â • They put that figure at 20 million, and c alcul ated that it would be offset at first by the 21 million who woul d be able to afford indi vidual cover age usi ng Mr. McC ainâ €Â℠¢s tax credits. Withi n a few years, however, the trend woul d revers e, the s tudy asserts. T hat is bec aus e, accor ding to Mr. Hol tz-Eakin, the McC ain heal th car e tax credits would be indexed to â€Â Å“regul ar inflation,†• pr es umabl y the C ons umer Pric e Index, which is typic all y lower than annual i ncre as es i n health c are cos ts. U nl ess costs c an be s ubstantiall y r eined in, the credits would ther efore enable fewer people to afford cover age each year, leadi ng to an eventual ris e i n the number of uninsur ed. Mr. H oltz- Eaki n did not res pond to a r equest for c omment. T he esti mates in Health Affairs are compar abl e to those made in Jul y by the Urban Institute and Brooki ngs Instituti on, which pr ojected that 1 million peopl e woul d gai n c overage after one year under Mr. McC ai nâ€Â â„¢s pl an, that al most 5 million people would g ain
coverage after four years, and that the number of unins ured would then cr eep upward. By c omparis on, Senator Barac k Obama†Â℠¢s plan, whic h woul d provi de heavy g over nment subsi dies for ins uranc e for l ow-inc ome wor kers, would reduc e the number of uni ns ured by 18 million in 2009 and by 34 million i n 2018, acc ordi ng to the Urban Institute/Brooki ngs Instituti on report. T hat woul d s till leave Mr. Obama well shy of his goal of ac hievi ng uni versal coverag e.
ARTIC LEID: 16274
Date: 9/10/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: PR News wire Broadcas t Minute for Wednes day, September 10, 2008
OTS: 13764305
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: Lic ks D oes it Take to Reduce T ooth D ec ay? T he affiliated c ompanies of D elta Dental of Mic higan, Ohi o, Illinois, T enness ee and Indiana ar e fundi ng two cli nical studi es to determi ne if s ugarl ess l ollipops contai ning licoric e extr act can r educ e the bac teri a that c auses tooth dec ay i n nursing home residents and H ead Start chi l dren. T he i nvestigati ons are a c ollaborati ve effort of the Uni versity of Mic higan, the Uni versity of C alifor nia -- Los Ang eles (UCLA) and the Beaumont H os pital Di vision of Geri atric M edici ne.
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usic World M usic/C olumbia Recor ds will rel ease the third full-length studi o album fr om the i nter national s uperstar and c ultural ic on Beyonce on T uesday, November 18. One of 2008's most hotl y antici pated new album rel eases , Beyonce's as- yet- untitled upcomi ng al bum mar ks the artis t's first new s tudio coll ecti on sinc e the Grammy- wi nni ng multi- plati num-selling B'Day debuted at #1 on charts around the world s hortl y after its i nternati onal rel ease on September 4, 2006 (i n c elebration of Beyonc e's 25th birthday). Beyonc e's fans will get their first glimps e of the artist's n ew album with the si multaneous r eleas e of two of the al bum's key tr ac ks -- 'If I Were A Boy' and 'Si ngle Ladies' -- schedul ed to i mpact radio on October 7. Full s tor y at: http://medi a.prnews wire.com/en/js p/l atest.js p?res ourc ei d=3813193 H ow M any Lic ks D oes it T ake to R educ e T ooth D ecay? The affili ated compani es of D elta D ental of Michig an, Ohio, Illi nois , T ennessee and Indi ana ar e funding two clinic al studies to deter mine if s ugarless lollipops c ontaining lic orice extrac t c an reduce the
bac teri a that c auses tooth dec ay i n nursi ng home resi dents and H ead Start chil dren. T he inves tigati ons ar e a c ollabor ati ve effort of the Uni versit y of Michig an, the Uni versity of Cali for nia -- Los Angel es (UC LA) and the Beaumont H ospi tal Di visi on of Geriatric Medici ne. D elta Dental's Res earch and Data Institute is pr ovidi ng the grants as par t of its mission to remain on the c utti ng edge of fi ndi ng s oluti ons to oral health probl ems. F ull s tor y at: http://medi a.prnews wire.com/en/js p/myPRNJ.js p?r es ourc eid= 3813926 Americ an Airlines N amed N orth Americ a's Leading Airline at 2008 World Travel Awar ds Americ an Airlines has been named 'North Americ a's Leadi ng Airline' at the 2008 Worl d Travel Awards, a travel i ndus tr y awar d program that has been described by the Wall Street Journal as the 'Oscars of the Travel Industr y.
ARTIC LEID: 16275
Date: 9/11/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Bull ying T op C onc er n of Par ents With Over weight Chil d
OTS: 13764305
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: Par ents of thes e c hildr en, aged 6 to 13, also ar e much mor e li kel y than par ents of chil dren at a healthy weight to c all bull yi ng a top health is sue for ki ds, ac cor ding to a r eport r eleas ed Monday by the Uni versity of Michig an C.S. M ott Chil dren's Hospital N ati onal Poll on C hildren's H eal th. 'We found that parents with over weight or obes e c hildr en ac tuall y vi ew bullyi ng as a greater pr obl em than chil dhood obesity,' Dr. Matthew M . D avis, director of the National Poll on C hildr en's Health, s ai d in a uni versity news rel ease.
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Par ents of thes e c hildr en, ag ed 6 to 13, als o are much more li kel y than par ents of chil dren at a healthy weight to c all bull yi ng a top health is sue for ki ds, ac cor ding to a r eport r eleas ed Monday by the Uni versity of Michig an C .S. M ott Chil dren's Hos pital N ati onal Poll on Chil dren's Health. 'We found that parents with over weight or obes e c hildr en ac tuall y vi ew bull yi ng as a greater pr obl em than chil dhood obesity,' Dr. Matthew M . D avis, direc tor of the National Poll on C hildr en's Healt h, s ai d in a uni versi ty news rel ease. 'Since bull ying is known to be a pr obl em for c hildr en with increased weight, bull yi ng pr eventi on programs will need to be mindful of obesity as a potenti al trigger for bull yi ng behavi or and of parents conc erns surr ounding this iss ue.' Over all, par ents don't take c hildhood obesi ty lightl y, ranki ng it N o. 1 is among heal th concer n for ki ds i n the N ational Poll on Chil dren's Health. Still, onl y two-thirds of par ents actuall y enforce s uch limits with their chil dren on junk food and ti me s pent in front of a TV or computer screen, the poll found. Still, many
par ents are tal ki ng with their chil dren about having healthier diets and incr easi ng their physic al acti vity, which Davis sai d is an i mportant first step i n s etti ng the stage for a healthier lifes tyle. N earl y two in fi ve of the families polled i ncluded one or more over weight or obes e c hild betwee n the ages of 6 and 13.
ARTIC LEID: 16278
Date: 9/11/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Seigo Iz umo, MD J oins Gil ead as Seni or Vic e Presi dent, C ardi ovascul ar T her apeutics
OTS: 13764305
Subject: F ac ulty
Summ ar y: Previ ousl y, he was C hief of the Car diol og y Di visi on and Pr ofess or of Internal M edici ne and Bi ologic al C hemistr y, U ni versity of Mic higan Medic al School in Ann Ar bor. Dr. Izumo r ecei ved his undergraduate and medic al degrees fr om the U ni versity of T okyo.
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Gilead Sci enc es , Inc. (Nas daq:GILD) today announced that Seigo Izumo, MD has j oined the c ompany as Senior Vic e Presi dent, C ardiovas cul ar T her apeutics. Dr. Izumo will report to N orbert Bisc hofberger, PhD, Gilead's Exec uti ve Vic e President, R es earc h and D evelopment and C hief Sci entific Offi cer. Dr. Iz umo will overs ee Gil ead's growi ng car diovasc ular business unit and will ser ve as a member of Gilead's exec uti ve c ommittee. 'Seigo's depth of knowl edg e in car diovas cul ar sci enc e and medicine will be of great val ue to our team an d ulti matel y to the patients we ser ve,' s aid Dr. Bischofberger. 'His experienc e i n both l abor ator y sci enc e and clinic al research, together with his l eaders hip c apabiliti es, will ens ure conti nued advancement of progr ams to addr ess unmet needs in car diovasc ular medicine.' Dr. Iz umo mos t rec entl y s er ved as Vice Pr esident & Global Head of C ardi ovascul ar R esearc h at N ovartis Ins titu tes for Bi oMedic al R esearc h. Prior to j oini ng Novartis in Jul y 2003, he ser ved as Pr ofess or of M edici ne at H ar var d M edic al School in Boston
and at Har vard-MIT Di vision of H ealth Sci ences and T ec hnolog y. In additi on to his academic positi on at H ar var d, Dr. Iz umo was Direc tor of Car diovasc ul ar Res earch and Physici an, D epartment of M edici ne, Beth Isr ael D eaconess M edical C enter, Bos ton a nd Director of the C ardioGenomics Program, a N ational, H eart Lung and Bl ood Institute-sponsor ed initi ati ve. Previ ousl y, he was C hief of the C ardi olog y Di visi on and Profess or of Inter nal M edicine and Biol ogical C hemis tr y, U ni versity of Michigan M edic al Sc ho ol i n Ann Arbor. Dr. Iz umo r ec ei ved his undergraduate and medical degrees fr om the Uni versity of T okyo. About Gilead Sciences Gil ead Sci enc es i s a bi ophar mac eutic al c ompany that disc overs , develops and c ommerci alizes innovati ve therapeutics i n areas of unmet medic al need.
ARTIC LEID: 16280
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: European s toc ks extend gains as banks ris e
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan s enti ment index jumped to 73.1 i n September fr om 63.0, and was far above the c onsens us for ec ast of 64.0. Mi ning shares wer e the top gai ners , with Rio Tinto up 6.8 perc ent,
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PARIS, Sept 12 (Reuters) - European s toc ks added to their gains in late trading on Friday, as banks gai ned gr ound on hopes for a bid for tr oubled Wall S treet firm Lehman Brothers, while strong c ons umer s entiment data als o helped. At 1431 GMT, the FT SEurofirst 300 i ndex of top Eur opean shares was up 1 percent at 1,151.61 points. T he Fi nanci al ti mes s aid on Friday, citi ng peopl e familiar with the matter, that Bank of Americ a C orp, JC Fl owers & Co, and the C hines e s overeign wealth fund C hi na Inves tment Co wer e c onsdi ering a possi ble joi nt bid for Lehman. The R euters /Uni versit y of Michig an senti ment index j umped to 73.1 in September from 63.0, and was far above the cons ensus forec ast of 64.0. Mini ng s har es were the top g ainers, with Ri o Ti nto up 6.8 percent, while banks gai ned ground after being mi xed mos t of the session. Cr edit Suiss e was up 2.5 perc ent and Societe General e up 0.8 percent. tf.TFN-Europe_newsdes k@thomsonreuters.c om c mr T homson Financi al N ews Li mited 2008. All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 16282
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: U.S. r etail s ales fall, raisi ng rec essi on fears
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: H owever, a sharp retr eat i n energy c osts pulled whol es ale prices down i n August by the l argest amount in al most two years and cons umer senti ment hit an eight-month high this month as Americans br eathed a sigh of relief as gasoli ne pric es fell. T he R euters/ Uni ver sity of Mic higan s urvey of c ons umer c onfidenc e j umped to 73.1 in September, its str ong est si nc e J anuar y, from 63 in Aug us t.
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WASHIN GTON (Reuters) - U.S. r etail s ales fell for a sec ond month i n a row in August, the government s ai d Friday, raisi ng fears that falteri ng cons umer spendi ng was heightening the c hanc es of a rec essi on. H owever, a sharp retr eat in energy costs pulled whol esal e prices down in Augus t by the l argest amount i n al most two years and cons umer s enti ment hit an eight- month high t his month as Americans breathed a sigh of r elief as gas oline prices fell. T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey of c onsum er c onfidence jumped to 73.1 i n September, i ts strongest sinc e Januar y, from 63 i n August. That was well above anal ysts' expectati ons and li kel y reflec ted cheaper gas oline prices . 'Higher g as prices dir ectl y i mpact c ons umers' wallets , es peci all y in a toug h economic envir onment, so when gas pric es eas ed over the past month, that boosted cons umer confi denc e,' s aid Ian Shepher dson, chi ef ec onomis t for High Fr equenc y Economics i n Val hall a, N ew Yor k. T he mi xed data helped pus h up prices for U.S. gover nment debt as tr aders began to i nch
further toward the view that a F ederal R es er ve rate cut was pos sibl e by year end. T hat did little to lift spirits among stoc k i nvestors, however, who remained fi xated on the possibility that inves tment bank Lehman Brothers ( nys e: LEH - news - peopl e ) c ould collaps e. The blue c hi p D ow J ones i ndus trial average was off about 70 poi nts in mi d- mor ning. T he retail sal es r eport from the C ommerc e D epartment highlighted a weakeni ng economic outl ook as c onsumers, who fuel two-thirds of nati onal ec onomic acti vity, pull bac k after being battered by s oaring energ y c osts, plunging home prices and an ane mic jobs mar ket. 'It looks li ke cons umer spendi ng is retrenc hing, not onl y retrenchi ng but digging a new hole,' sai d C hris Rupkey, s eni or fi nancial ec onomis t for the Bank of Tokyo-Mits ubis hi ( other-otc: MSBHY.PK - news - peopl e ) U FJ in N ew York. 'I would be ver y s urpris ed to s ee cons umer spendi ng in positi ve territor y in the thir d quarter.' Retail s ales dropped 0.
ARTIC LEID: 16283
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: US c ons umer mood hi ts 8-month high i n Sept-s urvey
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan Sur veys of Cons umers sai d its preli minar y index of confi denc e j umped to 73.1 in September, the highes t si nce Januar y, fr om 63.0 i n Aug ust, for the bigges t monthl y j ump since Januar y 2004. September's readi ng was well above economists' median expec tation of 64.0,
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NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. cons umer c onfidenc e s oar ed unexpec tedl y to an eight- month high i n September as l ower fuel prices s oothed inflati on fears and made Americ ans mor e ho peful about the economy, a s ur vey s howed Friday. T he Reuters/U ni versi ty of Mic higan Sur veys of Cons umers sai d its preli minar y index of confi denc e j umped to 73.1 in September, the highes t si nce Januar y, fr om 63.0 i n Aug ust, for the bigges t monthl y j ump since Januar y 2004. September's readi ng was well above ec onomis ts' median expec tation of 64.0, acc ordi ng to a Reuters poll. T he s unnier mood can be tr aced mostl y to l ower prices at the gas pump and c onsumers' one- year i nflation expec tations plunged to 3.6 percent, matchi ng F ebr uar y's l ow, from 4.8 percent l ast month, acc or ding to the s ur vey. Acc ordi ng to the s ur vey, onl y two extraor dinar y events in the past quarter centur y have prompted s uc h a steep one- month decline i n i nflation expec tations: Hurric ane Katrina in 2005 and the Sept. 11, 2001 attac ks on the U nited States . 'We were antici pating that l ower
energy pric es would boost c onsumer s enti ment but that the deteriorating j ob mar ket would hold it down, but i t appears that mor e c onsumers benefit from l ower energ y prices,' s aid Gary Thayer, senior ec onomist at Wachovi a (nyse: WB - news - peopl e ) Sec urities in St. Louis. On Wall Str eet, stoc ks were steady at lower l evels as inves tors focus ed on the fate of inves tment bank Lehman Brothers ( nys e: LEH - news - peopl e ) as fears mount about its ability to s ur vi ve. U .S. government bonds par ed gains after the str ong er-than- expec ted senti ment readi ng while the doll ar tri mmed l oss es agai nst the euro. However, c onsumers s till see i nfl ation risi ng at a faster clip than they did a year ago, when the one- year i nflation outlook stood at 3.1 percent. The r eport's fi ve- year i nfl ati on expectati on fell more modestl y to 2.9 percent, fr om 3.2 percent i n Aug ust. Als o encouragi ng, the repor t's inde x of c urrent condi tions r ose to 76.5, fr om 71.
ARTIC LEID: 16284
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: US ST OCKS- Wall St dr ops on Lehman unc ertai nty
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: U.S. cons umer confi denc e s oared unexpec tedl y to an eight- month high in September as lower fuel pric es s oothed i nflation fears and made Americans more hopeful about the ec onomy, the R euters/U ni versity of Mic higan Sur veys of C ons umers showed.
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es - * Financials dr op as investors fret about Lehman * Paulson ' adamant' no govt money on any Lehman deal * Aug retail s ales fall, but Sept cons umer mood rises * D ow off 1 pc t, S&P 500 off 0.8 pct, Nasdaq off 1.04 pct (U pdates to earl y morni ng) By Ellis M nyandu NEW YOR K (Reuters) - U.S. stoc ks fell Friday as i nves tors sol d off fi nanci al s har es due to unc ertai nty about what form any deal to res cue Lehman Br others will take as fears about the i nvestment bank's s ur vi val grow. Sourc es with direct knowl edg e of the tal ks sai d U .S. authorities wer e in i ntensi ve disc ussi ons with Lehman on opti ons i ncluding an outright s ale. But a sourc e familiar with U .S. Treas ur y Secr etar y H enr y Pauls on's thinki ng s aid he is ' adamant' no government money be us ed i n any deal to r es ol ve that crisis. Shar es of Lehman Br others dropped 10 perc ent to $3.79 on the New Yor k Stoc k Exc hange after dr oppi ng nearl y 42 perc ent T hursday. Other s har es taki ng a bl ow on the financial front i ncl uded ins ur er American Internati onal Group (nyse: AIG - news - people ), down more
than 19 perc ent, and Merrill Lync h ( nys e: M ER - news - people ) , down 9 perc ent. The S&P fi nanci al i ndex was off 1 perc ent. ' Lehman is a pr oxy for the U .S. mar kets to s ome extent,' sai d Ji m Fehrenbac h, head of Nasdaq tr adi ng at Pi per Jaffr ay (nyse: PJC - news - people ) i n M inneapolis. ' Where Lehman goes so will the mar ket i n the s hort term.' The D ow J ones industrial averag e dropped 117.57 points, or 1.03 perc ent, to 11,316.14. T he Standar d & Poor's 500 Index declined 9.46 points, or 0.76 percent, to 1,239.59. T he N asdaq C omposite Index dr opped 23.49 poi nts , or 1.04 perc ent, to 2,234.73. Bank of America C orp (nyse: BAC - news - people ), the No. 2 U.S. bank, will li kel y wi n any aucti on for Lehman, sai d anal ys t Ric har d Bove of Ladenburg Thal mann. Shar es of Bank of America edged up 0.4 perc ent t o $33.17. T he U.S. Treasur y and F ederal Res er ve were engaged in the tal ks, whic h c ould wr ap up this weekend, one s ourc e s aid. Lehman's woes underscor e the s everity of the cr edit crisis which began more than a year ago as the U.S.
housi ng slump s welled l oss es s temmi ng from soured mortgag e inves tments . C onc erns about Lehman's s ur vi val were acc entuated after the bank's failur e to a nnounc e deals to rais e desperatel y needed capital when it posted quarterl y res ults Wednes day. On the ec onomic front, a govern ment r eport showed r etail s ales unexpectedl y fell in Augus t, addi ng to c oncer ns about the i mpac t of the housi ng slump and a fal tering l abor mar ket on household spendi ng. U.S. cons umer c onfidenc e s oar ed unexpectedl y to an eight- month high i n September as l ower fuel pric es soothed i nfl ation fears and made Americans more hopeful about the ec onomy, the Reuters/U ni versi ty of Mic higan Sur ve ys of Cons umers showed. (Additional reporti ng by Ric har d Leong, Editi ng by J ames Dalgleis h) C opyright 2008 Reuters, Clic k for R estricti on Companies : AIG | MER | PJC | BAC Articl e C ontr ols E-Mail| E-Mail N ewsl etters del .icio.us| Digg It! | | Shar e | RSS '); //--> N ews H eadli nes | More From F orbes.com | Special Reports R elated Business T opics Starting A Small
Busi nessSmall Busi ness Loans Tr adi ng Center Brought to you by the sponsors below CEO Book Cl ub Book R evi ew Book R evi ew Kr ystle M. D avis Yes, waiters will s ometimes spi t in your food.
ARTIC LEID: 16286
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: European s toc ks end higher, power ed by miners, energ y
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: Strong c onsumer s entiment data als o fuelled the mar ket's rall y. The R euters/Uni versity of Mic higan senti ment i ndex j umped to 73.1 in September from 63.0, and was far above the c ons ens us forecas t of 64.0. 'Stoc ks are still movi ng in a tight range, they have been bounci ng between the same l evels for a few weeks now,'
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PARIS, Sept 12 (Reuters) - European s toc ks ended higher on Friday, snappi ng a three-ses sion losing s treak as buoyant metal prices spar ked a strong rall y i n mi ning s hares, whil e energ y stoc ks gai ned ground as oil prices rise. The FTSEur ofirst 300 index of top Eur opean shares unoffici ally closed 1.8 perc ent higher at 1,161.06 points. The i ndex g ained 3.2 perc ent during the r oller-coaster week that s tarted with a s har p j ump on M onday followi ng the announcement of the r esc ue by the U.S. gover nment of embattl ed mortg age firms Fannie M ae (nyse: F NM - news - people ) and Freddie M ac (nys e: FRE - news - people ). London M etal Exc hange copper, tin, nic kel , lead and zi nc j umped between 3 and 6 perc ent on Friday as traders cited short-coveri ng. A soft dollar agai nst euro als o hel ped to pus h prices higher. Ri o Ti nto, Xstr ata (other-otc: XSR AF.PK - news - peopl e ), BH P Billiton (nys e: BBL - news - peopl e ) and Anglo Americ an (nasdaq: AAU K - news - people ) s oar ed between 7.3 percent and 8.4 percent. Strong c ons umer senti ment data als o
fuelled the mar ket's r all y. T he R euters/U ni versity of Michigan s enti ment index jumped to 73.1 i n September from 63.0, and was far above the cons ens us forec ast of 64.0. 'Stoc ks ar e still movi ng in a tight r ang e, they have been bounci ng between the same l evels for a few weeks now,' sai d Yann Lepape, chi ef global macro s tr ategist at Oddo Securiti es, in Paris. 'But the adjus tment to the macr oeconomic outl ook has still to be done. In the U .S., the real c onsumer reces sion has n't r eall y started yet and i n the euro z one, we j ust rec entl y ti pped our toes into r ecession. Thes e factors make me think that s toc ks will revisi t their lows.' tf.T FN-Eur ope_news des k@ thoms on.com tc Thoms on Financial N ews Li mited 2008. All rights reser ved.
ARTIC LEID: 16287
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: U.S. r etail s ales off but optimis m rises
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: the Labor Department sai d a s har p r etreat in energ y c osts pull ed wholes al e prices down in August by the larges t amount i n alm os t two years. And a R euters /Uni versity of Mic higan sur vey of c ons umer confi denc e j umped to 73.1 in September , its strongest si nc e J anuar y, from 63 in Augus t. T hat was well above anal ysts' expectations and li kel y refl ected c heaper g asoli ne pric es. 'Higher gas pric es direc tl y i mpac t c ons umers' wall ets, es peciall y in a tough ec onomic environment, s o when g as prices eas ed over the past month, that boos ted c ons umer c onfi denc e
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United States - *U.S. r etail sal es fall for sec ond month i n Augus t * Whol es ale pric es drop s harpl y as energ y c osts fall *C heaper g as brightens c ons umer s pirits in September *U nsol d s toc ks at wholes alers cli mb sharpl y (Rec asts lead, adds details, updates mar ket r eac tion) WASH INGTON (Reuters) - Sal es at U .S. retail s tor es fell for a s ec ond straight month i n Aug ust as cons umers facing a tough j ob mar ket cut s pending, b ut declini ng gas oline prices seemed to lift their s pirits i n September. A s eries of reports fr om the gover nment and res earc h groups underlined the s ens e of uneasi ness among c onsumers as U.S. home forecl os ures rise and jobs keep dis appeari ng, raisi ng c hanc es that vi tal cons umer spendi ng will shrink in the third quarter. U .S. retail s ales fell 0.3 perc ent in Augus t, acc ordi ng to the Commerc e D epartment, whi ch also s har pl y revis ed J ul y s al es to s how a 0.5 perc ent decli ne rather than the 0.1 perc ent drop first reported. The number is cl os el y watc hed b ecaus e c onsumer purc hases of goods and ser vic es fuel two thir ds of U .S. nati onal
economic acti vity and a s ustained pull bac k rais es chances of reces sion. But s epar atel y, the Labor Department sai d a s harp r etreat in energ y c os ts pull ed wholesal e prices down in Augus t by the largest amount i n al mos t two years. And a R euters/U ni versity of Mic higan s urvey of consumer c onfidence jumped to 7 3.1 in September, its str ong est sinc e J anuar y, from 63 i n Augus t. That was well above anal ys ts' expectati ons and li kel y reflec ted c heaper gas oline prices . 'Higher g as prices directl y i mpact c onsumers' wall ets , especi all y in a tough economic envi ronment, s o when gas prices eas ed over the past month, that boos ted cons umer c onfi denc e,' s aid Ian Shepherdson, chi ef ec onomist for High Fr equenc y Economi cs in Valhalla, N ew Yor k. T he mi xed data initi all y pus hed up prices for U.S. g over nment debt as traders began to i nch further towar d the view that a F ederal R es er ve rate cut was possibl e by year end. But bonds turned negati ve by midday as s toc ks r egained s ome of the ground they had l ost earlier on fears about the possi bility that
inves tment bank Lehman Brothers ( nys e: LEH - news - peopl e ) c ould coll aps e. The blue chi p D ow J ones indus trial average was off about 15 poi nts in earl y afternoon but h ad been down mor e than 100 points i n earl y trading. Anal ys ts s ai d c ons umers were tur ning c autious, hardl y sur prising in view of c ostli er energy, pl unging home pric es and an anemic j obs market. 'It looks li ke c onsumer s pending is retr enc hi ng, not onl y r etr enc hing but digging a new hol e,' s aid Chris R upkey, s enior financial ec onomist for the Bank of T okyo-Mitsubis hi (other-otc : M SBH Y.PK - news - people ) UFJ i n N ew Yor k. 'I woul d be very s urprised to see cons umer s pendi ng in positi ve territor y i n the third qu arter.' T he August fall i n s ales was s har pl y c ontrar y to forec asts by Wall Str eet anal ysts who had expected a 0.2 perc ent s ales incr ease. Separ atel y, the Labor Department sai d Aug ust wholes ale pric es dipped by 0.9 percent, the s har pest r etreat in al most two years, pri maril y becaus e of a decline i n energy c osts. T hat c oul d be a relief to F eder al Reser ve polic y- makers who
meet T ues day to consider i nteres t-rate str ateg y and have expressed c onc ern about i nfl ati on. T he Fed is wi del y s een keepi ng offici al inter est r ates on hol d and may s uggest it is growing a bit more ner vous about the ec onomy's weakness . Sal es at motor vehicle deal ers rose 1.9 percent i n Aug ust -- the first i ncreas e si nce Januar y -- after a 4.3 percent Jul y dr op. But Augus t s ales still were down 13.5 percent from a year earlier. Excl uding motor vehicl es, r etail s ales in August wer e down 0.7 perc ent after g aining 0.3 percent i n J ul y. Gas oline s ales fell 2.5 percent las t month -- the biggest monthl y decli ne since mi d-2007 -- after a 0.2 percent ris e i n J ul y. Gasoli ne pric es eased i n August from r ecor d J ul y l evels. Sal es of buildi ng materi als, cl othing and el ectronics all were weaker in Augus t than they wer e in Jul y. Busi ness es have slas hed jobs i n ever y month s o far this year, and many anal ys ts expec t har d-pr ess ed cons umers will cut their spendi ng during the third quar ter for the firs t ti me in 17 years. Another report fr om the C ommerc e D epartment s howed
busi ness i nventories ros e during J ul y at the s harpest r ate i n four years, another sign that c onsumers are r eluc tant to s pend. Inventories j umped 1.1 perc ent to $1.51 trillion after growing by a r evised 0.8 perc ent i n J une, with stoc ks of unsol d goods rising i n c ategories ranging fr om new c ars to cl othing, food and fur nitur e. (Additi onal r eporting by Mar k F els enthal; Editing by Andr ea Ricci) Copyright 2008 Reuters, Clic k for Restriction '); //--> News H eadlines | Mor e Fr om F orbes.c om | Special R eports Rel ated Busi ness T opic s Starti ng A Small Busi nessSmall Busi ness Loa ns Tr adi ng Center Brought to you by the sponsors bel ow CEO Book Club Book R evi ew Book R evi ew Kr ystle M. D avis Yes, waiters will s ometimes spi t in your food.
ARTIC LEID: 16288
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Buoyant miners hel p Eur opean stoc ks snap losing str eak
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan s enti ment index jumped to 73.1 i n September fr om 63.0, and was far above the c onsens us for ec ast of 64.0. ' Stoc ks are still moving i n a tight r ange, they have been bounci ng between the s ame levels for a few weeks now,' s ai d Yann Lepape, c hief global macr o str ategist at Oddo Sec ur ities, i n Paris. 'But the adj ustment to the macroec onomic outlook has still to be done. In the U.S., the real c ons umer rec essi on has n't reall y s tarted yet and in the euro zone, we j ust r ec entl y ti pped our toes i nto reces sion.
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Switz erland - * FT SEurofirst 300 ris es 1.9 perc ent, up 3.3 perc ent on the week * Mini ng s har es j ump as metal prices rall y * Banki ng stoc ks ris e as r eport of Lehman bid reass ures PARIS, Sept 12 (R euters) - Eur opean stoc ks ended higher on Fri day, s napping a three-s ession l osi ng streak as buoyant metal prices s par ked a str ong r all y in mini ng shares, while energ y s toc ks g ained ground as oil pric es r ose. T he FTSEurofirst 300 i ndex of top European s har es cl os ed 1.9 percent higher at 1,162.15 poi nts . T he index gai ned 3.3 perc ent during the roller-c oaster week that started with a sharp jump on Monday following the announc ement of the rescue by the U .S. government of embattled mortgag e fir ms F anni e M ae (nys e: FNM - news - peopl e ) and Freddi e M ac ( nys e: FR E - news - people ) . London M etal Exchang e c opper, ti n, nic kel, l ead and zinc jumped between 3 and 6 perc ent on Friday as traders cited short covering. A soft doll ar agains t the eur o also helped to push pric es higher. Rio Tinto, Xstrata (other-otc : XSR AF.PK - news - people ), BHP
Billiton (nyse: BBL - news - peopl e ) and Anglo Americ an (nas daq: AAUK - news - people ) s oar ed between 7.3 percent and 8.4 percent. Energy s har es were als o among the bigges t gai ners as oil prices ros e, on worries over the potenti al i mpact of H urricane Ike. T otal r ose 2.2 percent and BP ( nys e: BP - news - peopl e ) added 1.6 percent. Strong cons umer senti ment data als o fuelled the mar ket's r all y. T he R euters /Uni versity of Michigan senti ment index j umped to 73.1 in September from 63.0, and was far above the cons ensus forec ast of 64.0. 'Stoc ks are still moving i n a tight range, they have been bouncing between the s ame levels for a few weeks now,' s aid Yann Lepape, c hief global macr o str ategist at Oddo Sec urities, i n Paris. 'But the adj ustment to the macroec onomic outloo k has still to be done. In the U.S., the real c onsumer r ec essi on has n't reall y started yet and i n the eur o z one, we jus t rece ntl y tipped our toes i nto rec essi on. T hese factors make me thi nk that stoc ks will revisit their l ows.' Investors' enthusias m on Fr i day was limi ted by data
that s howed weaker-than- expected U.S. monthl y s ales that reki ndled c oncer ns over c ons umer s pendi ng. U .S. retail s ales dropped 0.3 perc ent in Augus t after a s har pl y revi sed 0.5 perc ent drop i n J ul y that previ ousl y was r eported as onl y a 0.1 perc ent decline. '(The figure) bac ks expectations for a stagnation or even a c ontraction i n r eal cons umpti on in the third quarter,' J ean-Marc Luc as, ec onomist at BN P Paribas (other-otc: BNPQY.PK - news - people ) in Paris, wrote in a note. 'T he dissi pation of the fisc al pac kage i mpact and the clear upward trend in unemployment are now affec ting hous ehol d c ons umption. Thes e neg ati ve factors shoul d be onl y partl y offset by the expected moderation in inflati on and the pos sibility for househol ds to us e savi ngs.' LEHM AN HOPES Banki ng stoc ks gai ned ground on rising hopes for a bid for troubled Wall Street firm Lehman Brothers ( nyse: LEH - news - people ). T he Financial Times sai d on Friday, citing people familiar with the matter, that Bank of America Cor p ( nys e: BAC - news - peopl e ), JC Flowers & C o, and
the C hinese s over eign wealth fund C hina Inves tment C o were c onsi deri ng a possi ble j oint bid for Lehman. Barclays (nys e: BC S - news - people ) g ained 3.6 perc ent, Cr edit Suiss e rose 3.2 percent and Soci ete Gener ale added 1.8 perc ent. Around Europe, Ger many's D AX index gained 0.9 percent, U K's FTSE 100 i ndex ros e 1.9 perc ent and France's CAC 40 added 2 percent. D eutsche Postbank tumbled 6.3 percent after D eutsc he Pos t s old a big stake i n the bank to Deutsc he Bank ( nys e: D B - news - people ), amid what traders sai d was c onfusion about the str ucture of the deal. Fr enc h steel tube maker Vall our ec s urged 7.9 perc ent, pr opelled by the rall y in commodi ty-related stoc ks as well as by an upgrade by Soci ete Gener ale to 'buy' fr om 'sell'. (Editi ng by Sue T homas) C opyright 2008 R euters, Clic k for R estricti on C ompanies : FNM | FRE | XSR AF.PK | BBL | AAUK Rel ated Sec tions H ome> Br eaki ng News '); //--> News H eadli nes | More From F orbes .com | Speci al Reports R elated Business Topics Starting A Small Business Small Business
Loans Tr adi ng Center Br ought to you by the sponsors below CEO Book Cl ub Book R eview Book R eview Kr ys tle M. D avis Yes, waiters will s ometimes spit in your food.
ARTIC LEID: 16289
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: TREASURIES-Bonds fall as stoc ks par e los ses , s ap s afety bid
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T hings tur ned more bearish for bonds after T he R euters /Uni versity of Michigan Surveys of C onsumers s aid U.S. c onsumer c onfide nce soared unexpectedl y to an eight- month high i n September, with l ower fuel prices s oothi ng inflati on fears and maki ng Americ ans more hopeful about the ec onomy
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United States - * Safety bid for bonds stifl ed as stoc ks pare earl y losses * Weaker r etail s ales contri buted to earl y bond str ength * Friday' s data overall does littl e to c hange outl ook (Adds anal ysts' quotes, updates prices) N EW YOR K (R euters) - U .S. Treas ur y debt pric es were mostl y l ower Friday as s toc ks par ed steep earl y losses and s apped s afe- haven biddi ng for lower ris k gover nment debt. Bonds had begun the day stronger after data s howi ng unexpec tedl y weak c onsumer s pending i n J ul y and Aug ust, whic h added to expec tations that the ec onomy i s ti ppi ng into r ec ession. As stoc ks str uggled bac k from s teep earl y l oss es, bonds turned and went south. 'The market is reall y j ust following equiti es,' s ai d May Ann H urley, vic e presi dent of fi xed inc ome tr adi ng at D.A. Davi ds on & C o i n Seattle. Benchmar k 10- year Treas ur y notes were tr adi ng 14/32 lower in pric e for a yi eld of 3.70 percent from 3.65 perc ent l ate T hurs day, while 2- year notes were unc hanged i n price for a yi el d of 2.23 percent. Investors are focusi ng on the state of U.S. financial
companies and s pec ul ation on the future of investment bank Lehman Brothers (nyse: LEH - news - people ) . Lehman stoc k has pl unged on disappoi ntment over the c ompa ny's i nability to wor k out a deal to bolster its capital needs, and fostered s pecul ati on that s ome ki nd of bailout plan will be needed in order for the c ompany to sur vi ve. 'Ever ybody is j ust keyi ng off Lehman and the musings there and what may occur or not occ ur over the weekend,' s ays M arty Mi tchell, head of g overnment bond trading at Stifel Nicol aus & Co. in Balti more. Ec onomic data r eleas ed Friday morning painted a mi xed pic tur e for the economy. T he government s ai d total s ales at U.S. retailers in August fell 0.3 percent after a sharpl y revis ed 0.5 perc ent drop in Jul y that previ ousl y was reported as onl y a 0.1 perc ent decli ne. Wall Str eet anal ys ts s ur vey ed by Reuters had expected a 0.2 percent sal es i ncreas e i n August. The data was s een by anal ys ts as further evi denc e the U .S. may be falli ng into r ec ession, and gave bonds an earl y boos t. T he government als o s aid U .S.
August wholes ale pric es dropped by a bigger-than- expec ted 0.9 perc ent, the sharpest retr eat i n almost two years. C ore pric es, whic h stri p ou t food and energy cos ts, ros e 0.2 perc ent as expec ted after a 0.7 perc ent s urge i n J ul y that had fanned infl ati on fears . T hings tur ned more bearish for bonds after The R euters/Uni versity of Mic higan Sur veys of C onsumers s ai d U.S. cons umer c onfi denc e s oar ed unexpec tedl y to an eight- month high i n September, with lower fuel pric es s oothing i nflation fears and making Americans more hopeful about the ec onomy. 'We s aw another roc ky road of U .S. economic rel eas es today with a variety of l arge but offsetting sur pri ses that di d littl e to alter the over all outl ook for output growth,' s aid Mic hael Englund, chi ef ec onomis t at Acti on Ec onomics in Boul der , Col orado. Fi ve- year Tr easur y notes were tradi ng 3/32 l ower i n price for a yi el d of 2.95 perc ent fr om 2.93 percent l at e T hursday, whil e 30- year bonds wer e 31/32 l ower for a yi eld of 4.28 percent from 4.23 perc ent. (Additi onal r eporti ng by John Parr y; Editing by To m
Hals) Copyright 2008 Reuters, Clic k for Restricti on '); //--> N ews H eadlines | Mor e Fr om F orbes.c om | Special R eports R elated Busi ness T opic s Star ting A Small Busi nessSmall Busi ness Loans Tr adi ng Center Brought to you by the sponsors below CEO Book Cl ub Book R evi ew Book R evi ew Krystle M. D avis Yes, waiters will s ometi mes spi t in your food.
ARTIC LEID: 16292
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: US ST OCKS- Wall St ends fl at amid Lehman vigil; oil a boost
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T hat weighed on s har es of iPod maker Apple (nas daq: AAPL - news - people ) Inc, whic h fell 2.4 perc ent to $148.94 and was a top dr ag on the N as daq. But U .S. c onsumer c onfidenc e soared unexpectedl y to an eight-month hig h in September as lower fuel prices soothed infl ati on fears and made Americans more hopeful about the ec onom y, the R euters/U ni versity of Michigan Sur veys of C ons umers s howed
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United States - * Fi nancial s dr op as inves tors fret about Lehman * Pauls on 'adamant' no govt money i n any Lehman deal * Higher oil pric es dri ve up energ y s har es * Aug retail s al es fall, but Sept c ons umer mood rises * D ow off 0.1 pct, S&P up 0.2 pct, Nasdaq up 0.1 pct (Updates to close, adds byline) By Steven C . J ohns on NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. s toc ks cl os ed little changed Friday i n day of whipsaw moves as unc ertai nty over the fate of troubled inves tment bank Lehman Brothers ( nys e: LEH - news - peopl e ) kept i nvestors anxi ous about the health of the U .S. fi nanci al s ys tem. But shares of natur al resource compani es and utiliti es g ained as c ommodity prices ros e, offs etti ng losses among fin ancial and bank s hares. All thr ee maj or indexes managed to finis h the week higher. C onc erns about American Internati onal Group (nys e: AIG - news - peopl e )'s l arge expos ure to mor tgages pus hed the i nsur ance company's shares down more than 30 percent on Fri day, making it the top drag on the D ow and S&P. Lehman s har es tumbled to a 14- year low
amid uncer tai nty about what form a possi ble deal to resc ue the fir m woul d take, es peciall y after a source s aid the Tr easur y was rel uctant to provi de fi nanci al bac ki ng in any deal. 'Lehman is a proxy for the U.S. mar kets to some extent,' s aid Ji m F ehr enbach, head of N as daq tr ading at Pi per Jaffr ay (nyse: PJC - news - people ) i n Mi nneapolis. ' Where Lehman goes so will the mar ket i n the s hor t term.' A 5 percent slide i n Gener al El ectric (nys e: GE - news - peopl e ) s hares added to the negati ve tone as investors feared the i mpac t of ongoing financial s ec tor turmoil on the conglomerate, whic h has a fi nanc e ar m and c ommerci al real estate i nteres ts. GE shar es were a top drag on t he Dow, falling to $26.75. The D ow J ones industrial averag e was down 11.72 points, or 0.10 percent, at 11,421.99. T he Standar d & Poor's 500 Index was up 2.67 points , or 0.21 percent, at 1,251.72. T he Nasdaq C omposite Index was up 3.05 poi nts , or 0.14 perc ent, at 2,261.27. F or the week, the Dow finis hed 1.8 percent higher while the S&P added 0.8 perc ent and the N asdaq
edg ed up 0.2 perc ent. T he S&P i ndex of financial shares fell 1.1 perc ent, while shares of AIG shed 30.8 percent to $12.14 on fears of more mortg age-rel ated loss es. Lehman s hares fell 13.5 perc ent to $3.65 after falling as low as $3.17 earlier. Sources with dir ect knowledge of the tal ks s aid U.S. authorities were i n i ntensi ve disc ussi ons with Lehman on opti ons i ncluding an outright s ale. But a so urc e familiar with U .S. Treas ur y Secr etar y H enr y Pauls on's thinki ng s aid he is ' adamant' no government money be used i n any deal to r es ol ve that crisis. Any deal to s ave Lehman woul d c ome les s than a week after a gover nment bailout of Fannie M aeand F reddie M ac (nys e: FRE - news - people ) , the biggest pr oviders of U .S. home fi nanci ng. Bank of America (nys e: BAC - news - people ), the No. 2 U.S. bank, has been menti oned as a possi ble s uitor. 'T his is as ris ky and as dic ey a ti me as I' ve ever se en,' s aid Hugh J ohns on, c hief inves tment officer of J ohns on Illington Advis ors in Al bany, New Yor k. Inves tors war ned that a res olution for Lehman would not
eas e the cr edit crisis. 'We're not even cl os e to being out of the woods yet,' s aid Peter Kenny, managing director at Knig ht Equity Mar kets in Jers ey City, N ew J ers ey. ' But these ar e c onstruc ti ve, nec ess ar y s teps . R esol vi ng these is sues, is part of the proc ess.' Was hington Mutual (nyse: WM - news - people ) , under pr essur e of l ate on c apital c oncer ns, fell 3.5 percent to $2.73, r eversing a s hort-li ved gain after the American Banker reported that JPM organ Chas e ( nys e: J PM - news - people ) was in advanc ed tal ks to buy the s avi ngs and l oan. The energ y sector was a bright s pot for an other wis e str ained mar ket. U.S. crude oil fluc tuated, briefl y di ppi ng bel ow $100 a barrel before s ettling 31 cents hig her at $101.18 . Fears about H urricane Ike and the damag e it could do to U .S. oil facilities in the Gul f of M exic o remained a factor. An index on energy stoc ks was up 2.8 perc ent, and s har es of Exxon Mobilros e 2.6 perc ent at $77.50. Shares of utilities als o gai ned, with an i ndex up 1.4 perc ent. On th e economic fr ont, the l atest data on cons umers was mi xed.
A government r eport s howed r etail s ales unexpectedl y fell in Augus t, addi ng to c onc er ns about the i mpac t of the housi ng slump and a faltering l abor mar ket on househol d s pending. That weig hed on shar es of i Pod maker Apple ( nasdaq: AAPL - news - peopl e ) Inc , which fell 2.4 perc ent to $148.94 and was a top drag on the Nas daq. But U.S. c onsumer c onfidence s oar ed unexpectedl y to an eig ht- month high i n September as l ower fuel prices s oothed inflati on fears and made Americ ans mor e hopeful about the economy, the R euters /Uni versity of Michigan Sur veys of Cons umers showed. About 1.31 billion s hares changed hands on the N ew Yor k Stoc k Exchange on T hurs day, below l ast year's esti mated daily aver age of roughl y 1. 90 billion. On N as daq, about 1.99 billion s har es tr aded, below l ast year's dail y averag e of 2.17 billion. Advanci ng stoc ks outnumbered decli ning ones by about 1.3 to 1 on the N YSE, whil e on the N as daq, decli ners edged advancers by about 1.2 to 1. ( Additi on al r eporting by Richard Leong and Ellis Mnyandu; Editi ng by Leslie
Adl er) Copyright 2008 R euters, Clic k for Res triction C ompanies : LEH | AIG | PJC | GE | FRE Articl e C ontrols E-Mail| E-Mail N ewsl etters del.icio.us| Digg It! | | Shar e | RSS R elated Sec tions H ome> Br eaki ng N ews '); //--> News Headlines | More From For bes .c om | Speci al R epor ts Rel ated Busi nes s T opic s Starti ng A Small Busi nessSmall Busi ness Loans Tr adi ng Center Br ought to you by the sponsors below CEO Book Cl ub Book R eview Book R eview Kr ys tle M . D avis Yes, waiters will s ometimes spit in your food.
ARTIC LEID: 16295
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: FOR EX-Dollar, yen eas e as Lehman hopes fuel ris k appetite
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T he economic c alendar Friday i ncl udes the l atest readi ngs of U.S. retail s ales , producer prices and U ni versity of Mic higan c ons umer s entiment.
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LOND ON, Sept 12 (R euters) - The doll ar and yen weakened broadl y on Fri day as hope that tr oubl ed U .S. inves tment bank Lehman Brothers will be saved boos te d equiti es and pr ompted c urrenc y deal ers to c as h i n on the currenci es' rec ent s trong rallies . Both the dollar and yen remain fir ml y on trac k for s olid g ains this week, fuelled by a general c utting of ris k, unwi ndi ng of long-held leverag ed positi ons and falling c ommodity pric es. The liqui dation of many long -ter m currenc y bets over the l ast two months dr ove the dollar to a one- year high ag ains t a bas ket of c urrenci es on T hurs day, the euro to a year-low under $1.40, and the yen to a two-year hig h agains t the eur o. But the pull bac k on Friday c omes as tr aders across all mar kets eye devel opments surr ounding embattl ed U.S. i nvestment bank Lehman Br others (nys e: LEH - news - peopl e ). Sourc es s ay the U .S. F ederal Res er ve and Tr eas ur y are invol ved in tal ks with potenti al s uitors for Lehman, whic h c oul d c ome to a c onclusi on this weekend. See [ID:nLC665058]. T his spec ulati on fuell ed a late
rally on Wall Street on T hurs day. In earl y tr ade on Friday the major Eur opean stoc k mar kets wer e up more than 1 perc ent. Onc e again, inves tors will take their c ue fr om the banking s ector, equi ty mar kets and g eneral ris k appeti te ins tead of economic news . T he economic c alendar Friday i ncludes the latest r eadings of U.S. r etail sal es, pr oduc er prices and Uni versity of Michig an cons umer senti ment. 'T oday's foc us will definitel y be what plays out in the banki ng s ector. T he dollar has c ompletel y detached fr om any U.S. ec onomic fundamentals ,' sai d D avid Powell, currenc y str ategist at Bank of America (nys e: BAC - news - people ) i n London. 'The taki ng off of ris k has been dollar-positi ve, and an i ncreas e in ris k appetite has been dollar negati ve, whic h is what we're s eeing today,' Powell sai d. At 0825 GMT the dollar i nde x, a measure of the greenbac k's val ue agains t a bas ket of si x maj or c urrencies , was down a third of perc ent on the day at 79. 56.
ARTIC LEID: 16296
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Long-ter m Tr eas ur ys fall i n vol atile trading
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: Bodydue i n part by a better-than- expected reading on September c ons umer s entiment from a R euters /Uni versity of Michig an sur vey
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due i n part by a better-than-expected reading on September c ons umer senti ment fr om a R euters /Uni versity of Michigan sur vey. Trading was extr emel y volatil e, with traders unc ertai n about the futur e of Lehman Br others Hol dings Inc . (nyse: LEH - news - people ) In l ate tr adi ng, the benchmar k 10- year Treas ur y note slipped 19/32 to 102 8/32. Its yiel d r ose to 3.72 percent from 3.64 perc ent l ate T hurs day, acc ordi ng to BGC antor Mar ket D ata. Yi elds move i n the opposite dir ecti on from pric es. The 30- year long bond fell 1 18/32 to 103 1/32, while i ts yi eld r ose to 4.32 perc ent fr om 4.23 late T hursday. The 2- year note ros e 1/32 to 100 10/32, with a yi eld of 2.22 perc ent, the same as l ate T hurs day. The yi eld on the 3-month Treas ur y bill was 1.48 percent, down fr om 1.
ARTIC LEID: 16300
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Pr ecious metals bounc e bac k as doll ar retreats
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: Tr aders also ar e l ooki ng to economic data due out later i n the s essi on for clues as to the futur e direc tion of the doll ar. U .S. retail s ales numbers and PPI data for Aug ust are due out at 1230 GMT, and the R euters/Uni versity of Mic higan cons umer confi denc e data is due at 1355 GMT
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United King dom - * D ollar slips from highs as traders await news on Lehman * Oil climbs more than $1 a barrel * Plati num, pall adi um bounce bac k after sharp s ell-off (Updates throughout, c hang es dateli ne, pvs SIN GAPOR E) LONDON, Sept 12 (R euters) - Gol d bounc ed mor e than 2 percent in Europe on Fri day from the pr evious ses sion's 11- month l ow, r efl ecti ng gains across the boar d for preci ous metals, as the doll ar retreated from highs ag ains t the eur o. Spot g old ros e to $753.90/755.10 an ounc e at 0959 GMT from $739.60/741.20 an ounc e l ate in New Yor k. Earlier it rallied more than 2 perc ent to a s essi on high of $757.90. 'The higher euro- doll ar has taken away s elling press ure fr om inves tors,' C ommerzbank s eni or tr ader Mic hael Kempins ki s aid. The dollar eas ed broadl y as a mor e optimis tic vi ew of i nvestment bank Lehman Brothers ( nys e: LEH - news - peopl e )' future boosted equi ties and pr ompted c urrenc y traders to c as h in on r ec ent gai ns. Gol d typic all y moves i n the opposite dir ection to the U.S. c urrenc y, as it is often boug ht as a
currenc y hedge. Tr aders are awaiting further news on Lehman later i n the day, ami d s pecul ati on the bank may be pl anni ng an an nounc ement. Gold als o is being helped by a pic k- up in crude prices. Oil r os e over $1 a barrel on fears H urricane Ike c oul d affect pr oduc tion in the United States , the world's biggest energ y c ons umer. Tr aders also ar e l ooki ng to ec onomic data due out later i n the s essi on for clues as to the future direc tion of the dollar. U .S. retail s ales numbers and PPI data for Aug ust ar e due out at 1230 GMT, and the R euters/Uni versity of Mi chigan c ons umer c onfidenc e data is due at 1355 GMT. 'The U.S. ec onomic data rel eased i n the afternoon might be negati ve for gold, as our U.S. ec onomists expect that the cons ensus might be s urpris ed with better figures for retail s ales and PPI,' Dres dner Klei nwort s aid. DOWNWARD RISK Anal ysts r emai n c autious over the outlook for gol d. Although the dollar is s ofteni ng, overall the U.S. unit is expected to tr end higher. Tr aders s ay they have s een firm demand for gol d c oins , bars and jeweller y, but
the s upport this l ends to pric es may not be felt until they fall to l ower l evels. ' Physical demand incr eased agai n around the $750 levels , but a lot of c ustomers expect a bigger ( price) drop i n the future,' Kempi ns ki s aid. 'Some c ustomers are looki ng for $700.' Among other precious metals, plati num and pall adi um both bounc ed up after rec ent l oss es. Platinum has dr opped 14 percent sinc e l ast Friday, and i s mor e than 50 percent below the all-ti me high of $2,290 an ounc e it hi t in Marc h. Palladium als o has s hed 9 perc ent of i ts value sinc e l ast Fri day, and touched a near three- year l ow of $212 on T hurs day. While the metals have r ebounded from lows as bargai n hunters cl ose in, 'we'll pr obabl y need to hear s ome positi ve news fr om the auto sector to bri ng fundamental s upport', UBS ( nys e: U BS - news - peopl e ) anal ys t J ohn R eade s aid in a note. Spot pl ati num was at $1,166.00/1,186.00, up fr om $1,126.50/1,146.50 l ate in New Y or k on bargain hunting, havi ng earlier hit a s essi on high of $1,180. Pall adi um cli mbed to $243.00/251.00 agai nst
$226.50/234.50. Spot sil ver was at $10.80/10.87 agai nst $10.43/10.51. Earlier the metal rallied more than 5 perc ent to a s essi on high of $10.91. (R eporti ng by Jan H ar vey; Editing by Mic hael R oddy) Copyright 2008 R euters, Clic k for Res triction '); //--> News H eadlines | Mor e Fr om F orbes.c om | Special R eports Rel ated Busi ness T opic s Starti ng A Small Busi nessSmall Busi ness Loa ns Tr adi ng Center Brought to you by the sponsors below CEO Book Cl ub Book R eview Book R eview Kr ys tle M. D avis Yes, waiters will s ometimes spit in your food .
ARTIC LEID: 16308
Date: 9/14/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: GM rolls on rough r oad as i t nears 100th birthday
OTS: 13764305
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: 'This is the worst crisis they ever have faced,' s aid Davi d Lewis, profes sor emeritus at the Uni versity of Michig an who taught busi nes s hi stor y for 43 years until retiring earlier this year. 'Bec aus e they're r eall y in dang er of failing.' F or all i ts warts, GM can poi nt to pr ogress, especi all y on the expens e si de of the ledger.
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In his 43 years as a General Motors C orp. factor y wor ker, R oger Ezell has s een rec essi ons , gas oline price s pi kes , s ales slumps and multi billion doll ar loss es . Eac h ti me, he s ays , the giant automaker has sur vi ved to make billions in later years . But as GM c elebrates its 100th anniversar y Tues day, the c ompany that was onc e the nati on's larges t empl oyer faces a crisis li ke no other in i ts s toried histor y. GM has l ost $57.5 billion i n the pas t 18 months, incl udi ng $15.5 billion in the s ec ond q uarter. It's bur ning more than $1 billion a month in cash, has mor e than $32 billion i n l ong -term debt, and a slumping U .S. market has forc ed it to close factories and shed wor kers. In J ul y, i t s us pended its di vi dend for the first ti me in 86 years, and the c ompany has been i n per petual res truc turi ng sinc e at least 200 2. 'We' ve seen them down further than what they ar e, and they g ot bac k up,' s aid Ez ell, 63, who pass ed up several earl y retir ement offers to keep wor ki ng at a factor y near Ponti ac that makes the C hevrol et M alibu and Ponti ac G6 midsiz e sedans . 'I beli eve in
GM. T her e's no doubt in my mind.' Yet industr y anal ysts wonder whether GM c an make it if the U.S. ec onomy stays i n a funk and cons umers conti nue to shun tr uc ks and s port utility vehicl es for s mall, fuel-efficient c ars. One anal ys t even mentioned bankr uptc y pr otecti on for the company that devel oped the first full y automatic tra ns mission, the first V-8 engine, the first hydr ogen fuel c ell vehicl e and even the first mec hanical heart-lung mac hine. 'This is the worst crisis they ever have fac ed,' sai d D avid Lewis, pr ofess or emeritus at the U ni versity of Mic higan who taught busi nes s histor y for 43 years until retiri ng earlier this year. 'B ec aus e they're r eally in dang er of failing.' F or all its warts, GM can poi nt to pr ogress , especi ally on the expens e si de of t he ledger. A his toric c ontract r eac hed las t year wi th the United Auto Wor kers will save the c ompany about $3 billion per year , mai nl y by s hifting $46.
ARTIC LEID: 16038
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: enXco Pr omotes Mar k Thol ke to Southwest R egional Director
OTS: 13764305
Subject: Alumni T opic s
Summ ar y: M ar k has a joi nt M BA/MS i n Envir onmental Science from the Uni versity of Michig an and undergraduate degr ees in Environmental Scienc e & Economic s fr om the U ni versity of C alifor nia at Santa Cruz .
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enXc o, an ED F Energies N ouvelles C ompany (Paris:EEN), announces the pr omoti on of M ar k T hol ke to Southwes t R egional Director . In this r ole, M ark is r esponsibl e for managing the c ompany's renewable energ y devel opment progra m in Californi a, N ew M exic o, Arizona and N evada, i ncludi ng managi ng land acq uisition, per mitti ng, power mar keti ng and s hepher ding proj ects through the i nterconnecti on proc ess. Mar k joi ned enXc o i n 2006 as Regi onal Proj ect D evelopment Manager and will c ontinue to be bas ed out of enXc o's regional offic e in San Ramon, Cali for nia. 'I am delighted to s ee M ark taking on greater res ponsi bility i n the c ompany. Since day one, he has fi t perfectl y in the ' doer' cor por ate c ulture of enXco. His wit, his method and his commitment have made, and will c ontinue to make, an i mpact in the organization,' commented Tristan Gri mbert, Pr esident and C EO. Previ ousl y, M ar k hel d positions of Vic e Presi dent for Busi ness Devel opment at Eurus Energ y, Commercial Leader at GE Wi nd Energ y, and Wes ter n R egion Mar keti ng Manager
at Green Mountain Energ y. Prior to his car eer i n r enewabl e energ y, M ar k wor ked at a r es earc h affili ate of the H einz Foundati on and the Natur e C onser vanc y i n Washi ngton, DC. M ar k has a joi nt M BA/MS i n Environmental Scie nc e fr om the Uni versity of Michig an and undergraduate degrees i n Envir onmental Sci ence & Ec onomics from the Uni versity of Cal iforni a at Santa Cruz. About enXc o, an EDF EN Company: enXc o ( www.enxco.com) - an EDF Energies N ouvell es C ompany ( www.edf-energies.nouvelles.com) - devel ops, constr ucts , operates and manages renewable energ y proj ects throughout the Uni ted States. For more than t wo decades, we have been a leader i n wind- energy focusing on large-sc ale wind proj ects .
ARTIC LEID: 16311
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: PR EVIEW- What the Fed is c onsi deri ng at its Sept meeting
OTS: 13764305
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey of c onsumers preli minar y senti ment index for September was a s trong 73.1, up fr om 63.0 the pr evious month. INFLATION - A TURN IN TH E TIDE Inflati on press ures have s tarted to r evers e sinc e the F OMC last gathered. U .S. crude oil futur es hit $94.13 on Monday..Pl unging crude oil pric es also helped pus h do wn cons umers' one- year and fi ve- year inflation expec tations, whic h are part of the U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey.
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United St ates - * What: F ederal Res er ve inter est rate-s etti ng meeti ng * When: Sept. 16; s tatement around 2:15 p.m. ( 1815 GMT) * F ed vi ews s haken up by Wall Str eet tur moil CH ICAGO (Reuters) - A radical shake-up on Wall Street and heavy loss es i n financi al mar kets have r ecast the debate for T ues day's F eder al Open Mar ket C ommittee meeting to s et inter est r ate polic y. F ed officials will as se mble as a stor m rag es over the gl obal fi nanci al s ys tem, overs hadowing disc ussi on of s uch br ead-and-butter iss ues as the medi um-ter m growth and inflation outlook. As rec entl y as Friday, anal ys ts had expected the Fed to keep benchmar k i nteres t rates steady Tu es day as it weighs a s putteri ng ec onomy and an ebbing of i nfl ation pres sur e. On Monday, however, bets that the F ed will be forc ed into a quarter- poi nt c ut to the federal funds rate, to 1.75 percent from 2 percent, wer e rising. Dealers now s ee more than an even-money chanc e of a rate c ut. 'F ed views have s wung dr amaticall y i n r es pons e to the gut-wr etc hing devel opments ,' sai d M arc C handler,
currenc y s trategist at Br own Br others H arriman in New Yor k. The F OMC hel d r ates steady when the panel met in J une and August, after lowering them i n April. T hat c ut bought the fed funds rate down by a c umul ati ve 3.25 percentage points fr om mi d-September 2007. Foll owing are some fac tors polic y- makers are c onsi dering: FIN ANCIAL IN STITUT ION S: Wall Street is in crisis mode. On Sunday, investment bank Lehman Brothers H oldi ngs Inc ( nyse: LEH - news - peopl e ) fil ed for bankruptc y, triggering fears of c asc ading l oss es acros s a range of fi nancial ins titutions . Lehman's demis e c ame a week after the government crafted a resc ue plan f or U.S. mortgag e fi nanc e c ompanies F annie Mae ( nys e: FNM - news - peopl e ) and Fr eddie Mac (nyse: FRE - news - peopl e ), whic h had been brought to their knees by the housi ng mar ket coll aps e. Late Sunday, the F ed announced a sl ate of measur es to enhance its liqui dity pr ovisions and keep the fi nanci al s ys tem afl oat as the global credit crunc h, now in its s ec ond year, s eems to be ge tting wors e, not
better. U.S. stoc k mar kets were hit hard on M onday. The D ow J ones industrial averag e tumbl ed mor e than 2 percent. ECON OMY TEETER S T he U.S. unemployment r ate s pi ked to 6.1 percent in August from 5.7 perc ent in Jul y, a s urpris e move to the hig hes t level i n al mos t fi ve years . Empl oyers cut payr olls by 84,000 nonfar m jobs for an eighth s traight month of declines . Revi sed figures showed second-q uarter growth was a strong 3.3 perc ent as c onsumer s pending got a lift from the g overnment's tax rebate c he c ks. But most pundits s ee the res ult as transitor y and expect growth to sl ow again. August r etail sal es were a bust. T he closel y watched c ore measur e that strips out autos, gas oline and buil ding materials fell 0.2 perc ent after risi ng 0.4 percent in J ul y. U.S. manufac turing r emai ns on the c usp between expansi on and c ontraction at a ti me when the revi vi ng U.S. dollar c oul d li mit what has been a robust export mar ket. T he Institute for Suppl y Management's index of national factor y acti vity in August was 49.9 agai nst 50.0 i n J ul y. ISM's non-
manufacturing i ndex clawed up to 50.6 fr om 49.5. Dur able g oods orders, excluding the volatile transportati on sector, ros e 0.7 percent i n J ul y after posti ng a sur prising 2.4 perc ent jump i n J une. T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey of c onsumers preli minar y s enti ment index for September was a s trong 73.1, up fr om 63.0 the pr evious month. IN FLAT ION - A TURN IN TH E TID E Inflati on pr ess ures have s tarted to r evers e si nc e the F OMC las t gathered. U.S. cr ude oil futures hi t $94.13 on M onday, down 36 percent from their recor d high of $147.27 per barrel on Jul y 11. Si milarl y, the Commodi ty R esearc h Bur ea u i ndex is far off i ts highs and bac k to levels first reac hed i n 2006. Inflation expec tati ons have fall en s har pl y. T en- year inflati on forec as ts reflec ted i n Tr eas ur y Inflati on Pr otected Sec urities , or TIPS, are at the l owest l evel in fi ve years at under 2 percent. Pl unging crude oil prices also helped pus h down cons umers' one- year and fi ve- year inflation expec tati ons, whic h are part of the U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey. T he c ons umer pric e i ndex r os e
0.8 perc ent i n J ul y for a 5.6 perc ent advance fr om a year ago -- the s harpest year-on- year rise since Januar y 1991. Cor e C PI, whic h excl udes vol atile food and energ y prices , r ose 0.3 percent and was up 2.5 percent on the year. August C PI figures will be iss ued Tues day mor ning. Headli ne C PI is forecas t to fall 0.1 perc ent after Aug ust pr oduc er pric es dropped a bigger-than- expec ted 0.9 perc ent. HOU SING - ST ILL SUFF ERING F orecl osur e r ates are slowing a bit as meas ures to inter vene i n troubl ed mortg ages take hold, and other i ndic ators have been hinti ng the mar ket is n ear a bottom. Still, F ed officials have warned not to expect the housing s ec tor to r ec over muc h this year. H ousing s tar ts dro pped 11 percent in Jul y, reversi ng what was seen as an aberration i n J une, and are for ec ast to have sli pped again in August. Existi ng home s ales in J ul y r os e 3.1 perc ent to a 5.0 million unit annual r ate. But those sal es came at a median price that was dow n 7.1 perc ent fr om a year earlier. U .S. c ons truc tion s pending fell 0.6 perc ent i n J ul y after the previ ous
month was revis ed to a s mall incr ease. Weakness i n residential housi ng c onti nues to over whel m gains in public c ons truc tion. ( Editi ng by D an Grebl er) Copyright 2008 R euters, Clic k for Res triction '); //--> News Headlines | Mor e From For bes.c om | Speci al R eports Rel ated Business T opics Starting A Small Business Small Business Loa ns Tr adi ng C enter Brought to you by the s pons ors bel ow C EO Book Club Book R evi ew Boo k R evi ew Kr ystl e M. D avis Yes, waiters will s ometi mes s pit i n your food.
ARTIC LEID: 16313
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: T he Emotional Impact Of T he Wall Str eet Crisis
OTS: 13764305
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: What's mor e, a new study out of UC LA and the Uni versity of Mic higan, Ann Arbor, is demonstr ati ng that they c an less en people' s par ticipation i n ever ything fr om c hurc h groups and c harities to c ountr y clubs.
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With the news going from bad to wors e on Wall Str eet, employees of s ome of the fi nanci al industr y's giants ar e li kel y experienci ng an emotional state that's unus ual to them--c ompl ete and utter uncertainty about their futures . T he Lehman Brothers (nyse: LEH - news - people ) bankr uptc y filing 'Employees and the public had the expectation, like wi th the Titanic, that you di dn't have to worr y about thes e fir ms,' s ays Maurice El vekrog, a manag ement ps ychologist and c hair man of the Bl oomfiel d Hills, Mic h.- bas ed pers onal money- management c ompany Seger-El vekrog. 'It's not that peopl e are worried about starvi ng or something, but they jus t don't know what's going to happen.' Wa ves of Worr y Although firms ar e probabl y already beginni ng to roll out s upport groups, employees' conc erns at this poi nt ar e typic all y mor e c oncrete, says London, a licens ed clinic al s oci al wor ker and c ertifi ed employee-as sistanc e profes sional who once counsel ed Lehman Brothers' wor kers. 'They want ans wers about when they're going to be l aid off and what their pac kages
are g oing to be li ke,' London s ays. 'They'r e not ready to tal k about how awful they're feeling yet.' Mid-level managers may be i n s ome of the most diffic ult situati ons, s ays Chris C avaz os, chi ef oper ati ng officer of Harris R othenberg Internati onal, whic h s pecializ es i n provi ding employee-assistance pr ograms to financial c ompanies. T hey have to deal with their staff tur ning to them for constant, hones t updates a nd they have to manage the after math of the crisis, all while knowing their own j obs may be on the c h opping bloc k. T hes e iss ues c an caus e depres sion or anxiety disor ders and di srupt famil y life. What's more, a new s tudy out of UCLA and the U ni versity of Mic higan, Ann Ar bor, is demonstrating that they can l ess en peopl e's participati on in ever ything fr om church groups and c hariti es to countr y cl ubs .
ARTIC LEID: 16318
Date: 9/17/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Sus tai nability Educ ati on Innovator Ric k Bunc h Appointed as M anaging Direc tor of Er b Ins titute at U ni versity of
OTS: 13764305
Subject: Staff
Summ ar y: T he Er b Insti tute for Gl obal Sus tai nabl e Enterpris e at the U ni versity of Mic higan today announced that it has named Ric k Bunc h, one of the foremost sustai nabl e busi ness educ ati on experts i n the world, as its managing direc tor. Bunch bri ngs mor e than 20 years of experi enc e i n s ustainable business education to Erb, which c elebrates i ts 15th anni ver s ar y this year and is poised to conti nue on a tr ajec tor y of signific ant growth.
Bod y:

ANN AR BOR, Mic h., Sept. 17 /PRN ews wire/ -- The Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise at the Uni versity of Mic higan today announc ed that it has named Ric k Bunch, one of the for emos t s ustainable business education experts in the world, as its managing dir ector. Bunch bri ngs mor e than 20 years of experienc e i n s ustainable business education to Erb, which cel ebrates i ts 15th anni vers ar y this year and is poised to conti nue on a tr ajec tor y of signific ant growth. Bunch c omes to the Er b Insti tute from The As pen Ins titute, wher e he launc hed t he C hines e CSR Busi nes s Educ ation Initi ati ve, whic h hel ped C hi nes e business sc hools and c ompanies devel op cor por ate s ocial res ponsi bility (CSR) pr ograms. Prior to his tenure at The As pen Ins titute, Bunc h was exec uti ve dir ector of the groundbreaking Bai nbridge Graduate Institute in Was hington state, the first i ndependent business school foc used on s ustainable business in the U .S. Bunch fostered tremendous suc ces s at Bai nbridge, where he oversaw the development of a unique, rigor ous
sustainability-focus ed c urriculum, recruited mor e than 20 fac ulty from leadi ng busi ness sc hools , and tri pled enr ollment numbers within jus t two years. 'I' ve been c hampioning sus tai nabl e busi ness educ ati on pr ograms for years , and I know that the Uni versity of Mic higan has set the gol d s tandard through Erb,' sai d Bunc h. 'T he Er b Insti tute's fac ulty, students and alumni ar e a highl y engaged group doing fas cinati ng wor k all acros s the globe, which is part of why Michig an perenniall y plac es so high on the Beyond Gr ey Pins tripes r anki ng o f s ustainability programs. Now is the ti me to l ook at promoti ng our research, offering new pr ograms and expanding our reach and rep utation. Er b is a great pl ace to be, and this is a terrific ti me to be here.
ARTIC LEID: 16322
Date: 9/18/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Inc yte Appoints C hief C ommercial Officer
OTS: 13764305
Subject: Alumni T opic s
Summ ar y: . She has an M BA from the U ni versity of Michigan and a BA fr om Br own Uni versity. Dr. Friedman stated, ' We ar e ver y fortunate to have Pat joi n our manag ement team. Her s trong s ales and mar keti ng bac kground, as well as her business devel opment and str ategic pl anning experi enc e, will be i nval uabl e as we c ontinue to advanc e our pipeline and pr epare for the potential commercializ ation of our first pr oduc t.' Ms. Andr ews s tated,
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Inc yte Cor por ation (N as daq:INCY) announc ed today the appointment of Patrici a S. Andrews as executi ve vice pr esident and chi ef commercial officer, a new position r eporting to Paul Friedman, M.D., Inc yte's presi dent and c hief exec uti ve officer. Ms. Andr ews will j oin Inc yte on October 20, 2008. Ms. Andrews has held a broad range of str ategic pl anni ng and commercial positi ons at Pfiz er since 1991. She was most r ecentl y vic e presi dent and gener al manager of the U S Onc ol ogy Business Uni t, with P&L r es ponsi bility for the $900 million portfolio of produc ts i n c olor ectal c ancer, br east c ancer and renal cell carci noma. M s. Andrews led the highl y succ ess ful launc h of Sutent, whic h is now the standard of c are i n r enal c ell c arcinoma and for refrac tor y g astr ointes tinal str omal tumors. She has als o played a maj or rol e i n prepari ng Sutent for us e i n other tumors i ncluding breast c anc er, and in pr eparing the US mar ket for other c ompounds i n devel opment. Previ ousl y, Ms. Andr ews was vic e president of mar keting for Pfiz er's $2.5 billion speci alty mar kets
portfoli o, the vic e president of a fi eld bas ed mar keti ng group, and a dir ector of c orporate str ategic pl anning foc us ed on business development. She has an M BA fr om the Uni versity of Michig an and a BA fr om Brown U ni versity. Dr. Friedman s tated, 'We are ver y fortunate to have Pat joi n our manag ement team. Her strong s ales and mar keti ng bac kground, as well as her business devel opment and str ategic pl anning experi enc e, will be i nval uabl e as we c ontinue to advanc e our pipeline and pr epare for the potential commercializ ation of our first pr oduc t.' M s. Andrews stated, 'Inc yte stands out as a hig hl y promising disc over y and devel opment c ompany with an i mpr essi ve pipeline with great ther ap eutic and commercial potential. I l ook forward to j oini ng the team and to c ontri buting to Inc yte's conti nued s ucc ess .' Inc yte also announc ed the r ec ent resignation of J ohn A. Keller , Ph.D .
ARTIC LEID: 16327
Date: 9/22/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Z ac ks Earnings Pr eview: AutoZ one, H.B. F uller, KB H ome, Lennar and Ni ke
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: Friday: Final September U ni versity of Mic higan c onsumer c onfidence sur vey,
Bod y:

Zac ks .com releas es the lis t of c ompanies li kel y to iss ue earni ngs s urpris es. T his week's list i ncl udes AutoZone (NYSE: AZ O) and H .B. F uller (NYSE: FU L). T o s ee more earnings anal ysis, vi sit http://at.z ac ks .c om/?i d=3207. Ear nings Previ ew is written by C harles R otbl ut, CFA, Seni or Mar ket Anal yst for Z ac ks.c om. T he big bailout will be a key foc us of the mar kets. Congress is expected to meet over the weekend to disc uss legislation proposed by F ed C hair man Ben Bernanke and Treas ur y Secr etar y H enr y Pauls on. T he details of the propos al, and any additi onal meas ures designed to help homeowners struggling with mortgage payments, c ould impact mar ket direc tion. T he t empor ary ban on short selling could als o affec t tr adi ng earl y i n the week. Part of Friday's rall y was the res ult of quadr upl e witc hing. Traders ar e bei ng forc ed to cl ose short positi ons rather than r oll them over i nto new contr acts . On the ear nings front, we have c onfirmed reports from 33 c ompanies . Included in this group are S&P 500 members AutoZ one (N YSE: AZ O), KB Home
(NYSE: KBH), Lennar (NYSE: LEN) and Ni ke (NYSE: NKE). I expect onl y li mited reacti on to the homebuilders (KBH and LEN), becaus e of the pro posal under disc ussion. The ec onomic c al endar incl udes two repor ts on Augus t home s ales , but is otherwis e light. -- Wednesday: August exi sting home sal es, weekl y cr ude i nventori es -- T hurs day: August durable goods or ders , August new home s ales , weekl y ini tial j obl ess clai ms -- Fri day: Fi nal September Uni versity of Michigan c ons umer c onfidenc e s ur vey, fi nal Q2 GDP Bernanke has thr ee schedul ed appearanc es befor e C ongr ess. On T ues day, he will discuss the fi nanci al mar kets before the Senate banki ng c ommittee. T he chair man will provi de his economic outl ook to the J oint Economic C ommi ttee on Wednesday. Finall y, on T hurs day, Bernanke will r eview the rec ent propos als and acti ons befor e the Hous e fi nanci al s er vices c ommittee. C ompanies That C ould Iss ue Positi ve Ear ni ngs Surpris es AutoZ one Inc.
ARTIC LEID: 16330
Date: 9/22/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Inovar N ames T om C arlin Presi dent
OTS: 13764305
Subject: Alumni T opic s
Summ ar y: C arlin hol ds a Bachelor of Science in engineeri ng from the U ni versity of Michigan and an MBA from H ar vard U ni versity
Bod y:

Leading c ontrac t elec tronics manufacturer Inovar, a di vision of inthi nc, Inc ., today announc ed that T om C arlin has been named president of Inovar. T he announcement was made by Bl ake Kir by, president and c hief operating offic er of i nthinc. 'I am excite d about T om j oini ng our team,' Kirby s aid. 'He brings financi al and oper ational expertis e that will gui de Inovar thr oug h str ategic growth. H e will dri ve conti nuous i mprovement, ens uring that we conti nue to deli ver world-cl ass ser vic e to our c ustomers .' 'Joini ng Inovar at this ti me is a tr emendous opportuni ty,' Carlin s ai d. 'T oday's OEM ( Original Equipment M anufac tur er) faces signific ant press ur e to be res ponsi ve to busi ness needs and to r educ e c osts. I believe Inovar is the right c ompany to hel p addr ess thes e c hall eng es. T his is a c ompany with a rich his tor y that is s ynonymous with quality and dependability. I am looki ng forward to wor king with the Inovar team to help our c ustomers deli ver incr eased value.' C arlin's executi ve manag ement experience spans mor e than 15 years. Mos t recentl y, he ser ved
as presi dent and COO of MSD Perfor manc e, a leadi ng automoti ve perfor manc e c ompany. Prior to MSD Perfor mance, Carli n was presi dent of Edge Pr oducts, which was twic e named to Inc . magazi ne's 500 fastest growi ng c ompanies. He joi ned Edge Produc ts after a s ucc ess ful tenur e with Mc Kins ey & C ompany i n both its Atl anta and Sydney, Australi a, offices . C arlin hol ds a Bachelor of Science in engineering from the U ni versity of Mic higan and an MBA from H ar vard U ni versity. About I novar Inovar , a di visi on of i nthinc , Inc.
ARTIC LEID: 16331
Date: 9/22/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Stanford Law Sc hool D ean Larry Kr amer Appl auds the Intr oduc tion of D aniel Webster Congressi onal Cl er kshi p Bill
OTS: 13764305
Subject: F ac ulty
Summ ar y: Befor e joi ning the Stanfor d fac ulty i n 2004, D ean Kr amer s er ved as As soci ate D ean for Res earch and Ac ademics and R uss ell D. Nil es Profess or of Law at N ew Yor k Uni versity Sc hool of Law; pr ofess or of law at the U ni versity of C hicag o an d U ni versi ty of Mic higan law schools
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Stanfor d Law Sc hool D ean Larry Kr amer today thanked Sen. Charles E. Sc humer (D-N Y) and his c o-sponsor Sen. Hillar y Cli nton (D-NY) for their l eadershi p i n introducing a bill to establis h the D ani el Webster C ongre ssional Cler ks hip Pr ogram. T he H ouse versi on of the bill (H.R . 6475) pas sed earli er this month ( September 9) and woul d establ ish two- year cler kshi p posi tions for 12 hig hl y qualified l aw sc hool gr aduates to s er ve an equal number of members in both the H ouse and the Senate. T he bill was c hampi oned in the United States H ous e of Repres entati ves by Rep. Dan Lungren (R -Calif.), R ep. Z oe Lofgren (D-C alif.), and addi tionall y co-s pons ored by R ep. Gabriell e Giffords (D-AZ) and R ep. Lynn Woolsey (D-Calif). 'I appl aud Senators Sc humer and Clinton for supporti ng this bill in the Senate and for the c ollec ti ve effor ts of Repres entati ves Lungren , Lofgren, Gi ffords, and Wools ey to get the D aniel Webster Congressi onal Cl er kshi p Program bill pas sed i n the H ous e,' s ai d Stanford Law Sc hool D ean Larry Kr amer. 'The leg al pr ofessi on ser ves a
critical rol e i n hel ping to educ ate the public about government and gover nment ac tion. Whether the questi on is about j udici al appointments, c ons titutional amendments, legislati on affecti ng ci vil rights , or nati onal s ec urity, the media and public turn to leaders i n the l egal professi on for g uidance and c ommentar y. At pr esent, our profes sion is heavil y court-c enter ed. It woul d be enor mousl y beneficial for the profession and for the public i f young lawyers developed an eq ual sens e of the national legislatur e.' Stanford Law Sc hool D ean Larry Kr amer first envi sioned the i de a i n 2005 of cr eating a c ongr essional inter nshi p program model ed after the federal judicial cler ks hip pr ogram, whic h pr ovi des new l aw sc hool gr aduates with an invaluable i nsi der's understanding of the j udici al decision-maki ng pr oc ess, bec aus e there was nothing simil ar for educating young l awyers in the legislati ve proces s. H e s pent the ens uing years rall yi ng s uppor t fr om within the l egal profes sion, i ncludi ng from law school deans across the countr y. 'Part of the reas on the legal pr ofession
in this c ountr y tends to emphasiz e litigation and the j udici ar y over legislation and the l awmaki ng proc ess is bec ause legal e ducation has traditi onall y been tilted toward the c ourts,' Kramer s aid. 'What's mor e, the top l aw graduates i n the nation go on to begin their c are ers as j udici al cler ks. T hose former cl er ks then go on di spr oportionatel y to ass ume leaders hip positi ons in the bar and in the pr ofession. At a ti me when this nati on faces momentous challenges , it is vital to engage the most gifted of our future leaders i n the legisl ati ve proc ess at the outs et of their car eers . T o have l eaders of the profes sion whos e first, for mati ve experienc e w as i n C ongress woul d do muc h to improve understandi ng and appreci ati on of the legislati ve pr oc ess.' T he pr opos ed cl er kshi ps are being named for D ani el Webs ter, the great Americ an or ator, s ecretary of s tate, and s enator who als o helped es tablis h c ons titutio nal pr ec edents as a l awyer. U nder the program created by the Senate bill, cl er ks will be chos en fr om a pool of exc eptional law sch ool graduates who have
demonstrated a c ommitment to public s er vic e and a s trong interest i n public polic y. N o fewer than si x cler ks will be chos en for eac h c hamber and cl er ks will be di vi ded equall y between the parti es. Cl er ks will r ecei ve the s ame pay and equi val ent benefits as a first year l aw cl erk s er ving i n the U.S. Dis trict C ourt for the District of Col umbi a. About Larr y Kr amer , Ric har d E. Lang Profess or of Law and D ean Larry Kr amer has written and taught in s uc h varied fiel ds as c onflict of laws , ci vil proc edur e, federalis m and its histor y, and most rec entl y, the r ole of c ourts in soci ety. His book, T he Peopl e T hems el ves: P opular Constituti onalis m and Judicial Revi ew, spar ked renewed inter est i n the ong oing debate about the rel ati onshi p between the Su preme Court of the Uni ted States and politics. H e is an elected fell ow of the Americ an Ac ademy of Arts and Scienc es and a mem ber of the American Philosophical Society and the Americ an Law Ins titute. Befor e joi ning the Stanfor d fac ulty i n 2004, D ean Kr amer ser ved as Associ ate D ean for Res earch and Ac ademics
and R uss ell D. Niles Profes sor of Law at N ew Yor k U ni versity School of Law; pr ofess or of l aw at the U ni versi ty of C hic ago and U ni versity of Michigan l aw sc hools ; and c onsul tant for M ayer, Brown, Rowe & M a w LLP. Early in his car eer, Dean Kramer cler ked for J ustic e William J . Brennan, Jr. of the U .S. Supreme C ourt and J udge Henr y J. Friendl y of the U .S. Court of Appeals for the Sec ond Circuit. D ean Kramer has appoi ntments (by c ourtes y) wi th the Stanford U ni versity D epartment of His tor y and Gr aduate School of Busi ness. About Stanford Law Sc hool Stanfor d Law Sc hool is one of the nation's leading instituti ons for legal sc hol arshi p and educ ati on. Its alumni are among the most infl uenti al deci sion makers in l aw, p olitics, busi nes s, and tec hnol og y. F ac ulty members argue befor e the Supreme C our t, tes tify befor e C ongr es s, and write books a nd articl es for ac ademic audi ences , as well as the popul ar press . Along with offering tr aditi onal l aw sc hool clas ses , the sc hool has embr aced new s ubj ects and new ways of teac hing. ')
ARTIC LEID: 16332
Date: 9/22/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: CEO C onfidence Up Slightl y for First Ti me Sinc e Spring 2007
OTS: 13764305
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: 'The g ain i n c onfidenc e expr ess ed in the Q3 Index is too s mall to indicate a trend towards opti mis m, wi th firms still expres sing unc ertainty about the ec onomic outlook,' s ays Richard Curti n, Ph.D., a c onsultant for the Vistage C EO Confi denc e Index an d director of consumer sur veys at the Uni versity of Michig an i n Ann Arbor
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CEOs ar e expr essi ng tempered optimis m about the economy's future. The Q3 2008 Vistage CEO C onfidence Index s ettled at 72.4, up nearl y three poi nts from las t quarter. T he nati onal Vistage C EO Confi denc e Index has dr opped ni ne points fr om the level of 81.4 r ecor ded i n Q3 2007 and almos t 30 points si nce the s urvey's i nc eption in Q2 2003. T his q uarter r eflects a 2.8 perc ent ris e and mar ks the first increase in CEO c onfidence in the past si x quarters . 'The g ain i n c onfidence expr ess ed in the Q3 Index is too s mall to indicate a trend towards opti mis m, with fir ms s till expres sing unc ertainty about the ec onomic outlook,' s ays Richard Cur tin, Ph.D., a c onsultant for the Vistage C EO Confi denc e Index and direc tor of cons umer sur veys at the Uni versity of Michig an i n Ann Arbor. D es pite c ontinued pessi mis m about the ec onomy, Vistage C EO members conti nue to be opti mistic about their own business es at approxi matel y the s ame level as i n previ ous quarters ; 84 percent expect revenues to be the s ame or i ncreas e i n the c oming year ; and 84 perc ent
expec t to hire new staff or keep their employment l evels the s ame during the next 12 months. The Vistage C EO Confi denc e Index is the l argest nati onal s ur vey among CEOs of s mall and mi d-sized business es, with 2,049 C EOs registering their vi ews on the economy and the upcoming presi denti al elec tion. R egar ding the presi denti al elec tion, C EOs over whel mi ngly s uppor t J ohn McC ain with 65 percent sayi ng they will vote for hi m and 66 perc ent s aying he woul d do a better job i n handling the economy. Barac k Obama g arnered 23 percent support fr om the Vistage C EOs. When as ked who they would hire among the four c andi dates to run their c ompany - J ohn McCai n, Barac k Obama, Joe Biden or Sarah Palin - 49 perc ent s aid none of the four, and 29 percent chos e Governor Pali n. McC ai n, Obama and Biden trail ed her at 10 perc ent, 8 percent and 4 perc ent, r especti vel y.
ARTIC LEID: 16334
Date: 9/23/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Li feVantage Cor por ati on Announc es Q4 and F Y 2008 Fi nancial and Operati ng Results
OTS: 13764305
Subject: R es earc h, Other
Summ ar y: A tr emendous amount of scienti fic research was c onducted on Protandi m(R) duri ng fisc al year 2008. Thos e instituti ons invol ved in suc h r es earc h i ncluded, among others, the U ni versity of C ol orado at Denver H ealth Sci enc e C enter, the U ni versity of Minnes ota, Ohi o State Uni versity, U ni versity H ospi tal i n Brno, C zec h R epublic, the U ni versity of Mic higan, Virg inia Commonwealth Uni versity and Louisiana State Uni versity. T he studi es r elate to vari ous c onditi ons incl udi ng diabetes , s ki n c ancer, pul monar y hypertension, non- alcoholic fatty li ver diseas e, D uc henne mus cul ar dystrophy, cor onar y arter y bypass graft failure, renal failure, and photo ag ing of the s kin.
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LifeVantage Cor porati on (OTC BB: LFVN), maker of Protandi m(R), today announc ed res ults for its year ended J une 30, 2008. The C ompany r ec orded net r evenues of $3.2 million and a net loss of $(2.1) million, or $(0.09) per share, for its year ended June 30, 2008. F or its year ended June 30, 2007, the C ompany reported net r even ues of $5.1 million and a net l oss of $(3.7) million, or $(0.17) per s har e. For i ts fourth fisc al quarter 2008, the Company rec orded net revenues of $0.8 million and a net l oss of $( 0.7) million, or $( 0.03) per s har e. F or its fourth fiscal q uarter 2007, the C ompany reported net r evenues of $0.8 million and a net los s of $(0.5) million, or $(0.02) per s hare. Davi d Brown, LifeVantage Pr esident and C EO, c ommented, ' We ar e pl eased that in the s hort ti me the new management team has been i n plac e, we have been abl e to s tabilize sal es and keep expenditur es in line. Our effor ts to i ncreas e brand awareness thr oug h televi sion and r adi o c ommerci als, as well as thr oug h inter net mar keting, have res ulted in i ncr eas es i n new c ustomer
acquisiti on. We have als o added new retail acc ounts for the first ti me in nearl y a year and a hal f. Additi onall y, we antici pate ac hievi ng signific ant savi ngs in manufacturing c osts in the l atter hal f of fiscal 2009 as a r es ult of our rec entl y announc ed agreement with C ornerstone R es earc h & D evel opment.' D uring fiscal year 2008, the C ompany r aised gros s pr oc eeds of $1,490,000 through a pri vate pl acement offeri ng of debentur es c onverti ble i nto the C ompany's c ommon s toc k. T he pr oc eeds are being us ed pri marily for sal es, mar keti ng, promotional effor ts, new produc t devel opment, and scienti fic res earch and development. A tr emendous amount of sci entific research was c onducted on Protandi m(R) duri ng fisc al year 2008. Thos e i nstituti ons invol ved in suc h r es earc h i ncluded, among others, the U ni versity of C ol orado at D enver Health Sci enc e C enter, the U ni versity of Mi nnes ota, Ohi o State U ni versity, U ni versity H ospi tal i n Brno, C zec h R epublic, the U ni versity of Mic higan, Virginia Commonwealth Uni versity and Louisiana State Uni versity. T he studi es
relate to various conditions i ncl udi ng di abetes, s ki n c ancer, pul monary hypertensi on, non-alc oholic fatty li ver dis eas e, Duc henne muscul ar dystr ophy, c oronar y arter y bypas s graft failur e, r enal failur e, and photo ag i ng of the s kin. In additi on to the C ompany's dir ect to c ons umer c hannel, Pr otandi m(R) conti nues to be distri buted through retail outlets s uc h as GNC, Vitami n Shoppe, Vitamin Cottage, S eattle Super Supplements, Aki n's and C hamberlins' Natur al F oods M ar kets and Drugstore.com. Several retailers have rec entl y been added, i ncluding Swans on's H ealth (a l eadi ng e-c ommerc e and mail order c ompany), Let's Tal k Health ( an on-line natur al health pr oduc ts retail er) and Motion Grid, Inc. ( a direct sal es company curr entl y s elling to over 50,000 cus tomers i n the fitness i ndustr y) . T he Company has devel oped mar keting and promotional pl ans i n an effort to increas e s ales in the r etail channel, and we have also developed a networ k of highl y r egarded retail brokers to give us greater pres ence in the channel. With r egard to the Comp any's
inter national efforts, Mr. Br own c ommented, 'The C ompany's previ ousl y announced plan to obtain dis tribution i n J apan c ontinues to move ahead. We ar e now wai ting for offici al government appr oval from the Japanes e Minis tr y of H eal th in order to shi p th e produc t i nto J apan.' About Pr otandi m(R) Protandim(R) is a groundbr eaki ng, cli nicall y proven and patented dietar y supplement that i ncreas es the body's natur al antioxi dant pr otecti on by inducing protecti ve enz ymes i ncluding, superoxi de dis mustas e ( SOD) and catal ase (CAT). Thes e natur all y occurring enz ymes si mpl y bec ome over whel med by free r adic als as we g et older. Oxi dati ve stres s (c ell damag e c aused by free radic als) occurs as a pers on ages, when subjected to environmental stres ses or as an ass ociated fac tor i n c ertain illnesses. T BAR S are labor ator y mar kers for oxidati ve s tres s in the body. N ew data from a sci enti fic study i n men and women s how that after 30 days of taking Protandi m(R), the l evel of circ ulati ng T BAR S decr eased an aver age of 40 perc ent, with this decr ease shown to
be mai ntained at 120 days. Protandim(R) s trengthens a pers on's defenses ag ains t oxidati ve s tress by incr easing the body's natur al antioxi dant enz ymes. For more infor mation, pl eas e vi sit the Protandi m(R) produc t web site at www.pr otandi m.c om. About LifeVantage C orporation LifeVantage Cor por ati on is a publicl y tr aded (OTC BB: LFVN), sci enc e-bas ed, natur al produc ts c ompany, dedicated to helpi ng peopl e reac h their health and wellness goals thr oug h sci ence- bas ed s olutions to oxi dati ve str ess. Founded in 2003 and bas ed in San Diego, C alifor ni a, LifeVantag e devel ops nutr ac euti cal products , including Protandi m(R), that leverage the Company's expertise and that are i ntended to deli ver signific ant health benefits to c onsumers. F or more i nfor mation, vi sit www.lifevantag e.c om or c ontac t J an Strode at 619-890- 4040. Exc ept for historical i nformati on contai ned her ein, this document c ontains for ward-l ooki ng statements within the meani ng of the Pri vate Sec uriti es Litigati on Refor m Act of 1995 and applicabl e c ommon l aw. T he C ompany uses the
words 'anticipate,' 'believe,' 'c oul d,' 'should,' ' esti mate,' 'expect,' 'intend,' 'may,' 'pr edic t,' 'pr ojec t,' 'target' and si milar ter ms and phras es , incl uding refer ences to ass umptions, to identify for ward-looki ng statements . T hese forward-l ooki ng statements are based on the Company's expec tations and beliefs c oncer ning future events affecting the C ompany and i nvol ve known and unknown ris ks and unc ertai nti es that may caus e the C ompany's actual r esul ts or outcomes to be materiall y different from thos e anticipated and disc uss ed herei n. T hese factors are difficult to accur atel y predict and may be beyond the c ontrol of the C ompany. The foll owing factors are among thos e that may caus e actual res ults to differ materiall y from our for war d-looking s tatements: the C ompany's li mited cash flow and the rapid development of tec hnolog y, lac k of liquidity for the Compan y's common stoc k, worki ng c api tal shortag es and the l ength of ti me for sci entific advanc es to r eac h the mar ket (if they e ver reac h the mar ket). T hes e and other additional ris k fac tors and
unc ertainties ar e discussed i n greater detail i n the Company's Annual Report on For m 10-KSB and other doc uments fil ed with the Sec urities and Exchange C ommission. For ward-l ooki ng statements made by the C ompany i n this news rel ease or els ewhere speak onl y as of the date made. N ew uncer tai nties and ris ks come up fr o m ti me to time, and it is impossibl e for the C ompany to pr edict these events or how they may affect the C ompany. The C ompany has no duty to, and does not intend to, update or revi se the for ward-l ooki ng statements in this news releas e after the date it is is sued. In light of thes e ris ks and unc ertai nti es, investors s houl d keep i n mi nd that the res ults , events or developments dis clos ed in any for ward-looki ng statement made in this news releas e may not occ ur. - 0- *T LIF EVANT AGE C ORPORAT ION AN D SUBSID IAR Y C ONDEN SED CON SOLID ATED ST AT EMENT S OF OPERAT ION S F or the fisc al years and quarters e nded J une 30, 2008 and June 30, 2007 F ourth F ourth Q uarter Quarter Fisc al year Fis cal year ended ended
ended ended J une 30, J une 30, June 30, J une 30, 2008 2007 2008 2007 ----------- ----------- ------------ ------------ Sales , net $812,497 $843,470 $3,200,174 $5,050,988 C ost of s ales 157,174 184,548 695,38 6 1,022,792 ------------------------------------------------- Gross profi t 655,323 658,922 2,504,788 4,028,196 Operati ng expenses: M ar keting and c us tomer s er vice 634,350 385,686 1,655,461 2,991,302 General and administr ati ve 501,412 748,979 2,108,338 4,355 ,803 Researc h and devel opment 80,172 49,907 324,106 245,561 Depreci ati on and amortiz ati on 59,940 15,797 219,690 92,433 Loss o n dis pos al of ass ets - 9,967 - 105,621 ------------------------------------------------- Total operati ng expenses 1,275,874 1,210,336 4,307,595 7,790,720 ------------------------------------------------- Oper ati ng (loss) ( 620,551) ( 551,414) ( 1,802,807) ( 3,762,524) ------------------------------------------------- Total other ( expens e) inc ome (128,747) 25,383 (251,632) 68,946 ------------------------------------------------- Net (loss) $( 749,298) $( 526,031) $(2,054,439) $( 3,693,578)
================================================= Net (loss) per s hare, basic and dil uted $( 0.03) $(0.02) $(0.09) $( 0.17) Weighted aver age s hares outs tanding, basic and diluted 22,710,096 22,268,034 22,710,096 22,268,034 *T -0- *T LIF EVANT AGE COR POR ATION AND SUBSIDIAR Y COND EN SED CON SOLID ATED BALANCE SH EETS As of J une 30, 2008 and J une 30, 2007 J une 30, 2008 June 30, 2007 ------------------------------ ASSET S -------------------------------------- Current ass ets Cas h and cash equi val ents $196,883 $ 160,760 Mar ketable securiti es, available for sal e 1,100,000 - Ac counts r ec ei vable, net 98,008 398,463 Inventor y 104,415 27,834 D eferred expenses 72,049 117,807 D eposit wi th manufacturer 277,979 388,791 Pr epai d expenses 124,049 60,175 ------------------------------ Total curr ent assets 1,973,383 1,153,830 Long-ter m assets Property and equi pment, net 63,559 108,915 Intangible ass ets, net 2,270,163 2,311,110 D eferr ed debt offering c os ts, net 193,484 - Deposits 48,447 340,440 ------------------------------
TOTAL ASSET S $4,549,036 $3,914,295 ============================== LIABILITIES AN D ST OC KHOLDER S' EQUIT Y -------------------------------------- Current liabilities Revol vi ng line of cr edi t and accr ued i nterest $166,620 $ - Accounts payabl e 139,803 148,699 Accrued expens es 338,268 230,811 D eferred revenue 510,765 818,250 C apital l ease obligati ons, c urrent portion 846 2,301 ------------------------------ Total c urrent li abiliti es 1,156,302 1,200,061 Long-ter m li abiliti es C apital l ease obligati ons , net of c urrent portion - 846 Convertibl e debt, net of disc ount 223,484 - ------------------------------ Total liabilities 1,379,786 1,200,907 ------------------------------ Stoc khol ders' equity 3,169,250 2,713,388 ------------------------------ TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOC KH OLD ERS' EQU ITY $4,549,036 $3,914,295 ============================== *T ')
ARTIC LEID: 16335
Date: 9/25/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Bi oSpecifics Tec hnol ogies C orp. Announc es Appointment of Dr. M atthew Geller to Boar d of Dir ectors
OTS: 13764305
Subject: F ac ulty
Summ ar y: Earlier i n his c areer, he was a fac ulty member at the Uni versity of Californi a at Ber kel ey; the Uni versity of Michigan, Ann Ar bor and Duke Uni versity and published extensi vel y. About Bi oSpecifics T ec hnol ogies C orp. Bi oSpecifics Tec hnol ogies C or p. is a bi ophar mac eutical c ompany that has devel oped and lic ensed i njec table coll agenase for thr ee clinic al i ndic ati ons: D upuytren's dis e ase, Peyr oni e's diseas e and froz en s houlder (adhesi ve caps ulitis
Bod y:

LYN BROOK, N.Y., Sept. 24 /PRN ews wire-FirstC all/ -- BioSpecifics Technol ogies Cor p. ( OTC Bulletin Boar d: BSTC), a biophar maceutic al c ompany devel opi ng first in cl ass coll agenas e based products , today announced the appointment of Matthew Geller, Ph.D., to its Board of Directors , increasing the Board to 7 memb ers. Dr. Geller brings to Bi oSpecifics extensi ve fi nanci al experience with biotec hnol ogy compani es as he has s erved for over 15 years as a s ell-side anal yst and inves tment banker c overing biotec hnol ogy c ompani es. 'We are ver y pl eas ed that Dr. Geller is j oini ng our Board. His financial and scienti fic acumen and extensi ve experience in the i ndus tr y will be i nvaluabl e to our organiz ati on as our lead c ollagenas e pr oduc t XIAF LEX(TM) moves through late-stage clinic al trials and towards the mar ketpl ac e,' stated T homas Weg man, Pr esident of Bi oSpecifics T ec hnologi es C orp. 'We l ook for war d to his many str ategic contri butions.' 'I c onsider it a g reat honor to be i nvited to j oin BioSpeci fics' Boar d,' s aid Dr. Gell er. 'Havi ng demons trated its
ability to s ucc essfull y devel op an appr oved product and to develop thr oug h a pi votal phas e III trial a potenti al bloc kbuster drug that fills a large uns atisfi ed pati ent need, BioSpecifics now has the opportunity to emerge as a maj or financial success. It is a pri vileg e to par ticipate in and contri bute to this great step for ward.' Dr. Geller will s er ve as the fi nanci al expert on the audit c ommittee and will be an i ndependent class 1 dir ector. Dr. Geller has been a Pri ncipal with T orreya Partners, a life s ciences advis or y firm. He former l y s er ved as Head of H eal thc are Investment Banking and Seni or Managing Direc tor for R odman & R ens haw, r anked number one in PIPE tr ansac tions and registered direct trans acti ons. Prior to R odman & R ens haw, he s er ved as Seni or Bi otec hnolog y Anal yst at Oppenh eimer and C IBC World Mar kets for 12 years. H e was c onsistentl y r anked as the top anal yst at the fir m both internall y and by clients and was named one of the bes t s toc k- pic kers in bi otec hnolog y in the Wall Street J ournal's 'Best on the Street' Anal ysts Sur vey, was
selec ted by Instituti onal Investor mag azine as a member of its All-Star H ome-R un Hi tters res earch team and has been a member of the public ation's All-Americ a r esearc h team. Dr. Geller is often quoted in industr y and g eneral pr ess, incl udi ng the Wall Str eet J our nal, the New Yor k Ti mes, and has made frequent tel evision appear ances on CN BC, Bl oomberg tel evision and CNN. Dr. Geller has also ser ved as a c onsultant to venture capital fir ms, bi otec hnolog y compani es and portfolio managers and anal ysts . Earlier i n his c areer, he was a fac ulty member at the U ni versity of C aliforni a at Ber keley; the U ni versi ty of Mic higan, Ann Arbor and D u ke U ni versi ty and publis hed extensi vel y. About BioSpecific s T echnologies Cor p. Bi oSpecifics T ec hnologi es C orp. is a biophar ma ceutic al c ompany that has devel oped and lic ens ed i njectabl e c ollagenase for three cli nical i ndications: D upuytren's diseas e, Peyro nie's dis eas e and froz en s houl der ( adhesi ve c aps ulitis). It has a devel opment and lic ensing agreement with Auxilium Phar maceutic als, Inc. Positi ve top line
results fr om the Phase III clinic al trials with XIAFLEX(TM) for treatment of D upuytren's di seas e were r eleas ed in June 2008. Mor e i nformati on about the c ompany may be found on i ts websi te at www.biospecifics .com. SOURC E BioSpecifics Technol ogies Cor p. C opyright © 2004 PR N ews wire All rights res er ved. ')
ARTIC LEID: 16336
Date: 9/24/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Uni versity of Mic higan Book Advances Disc ussi on on U.S. Adaptati on to Cli mate Change
OTS: 13764305
Subject: R es earc h, Earth Sci ences
Summ ar y: T he Uni versity of Mic higan, through i ts School of N atural R es ourc es and Environment, has published the pr oc eedings from the school's May 2007 Nati onal Summi t on Coping with Cli mate C hange. T he event - the firs t of its kind i n the nation - foc us ed on helpi ng the United States prepare for the i mpact of climate c hang e.
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ANN AR BOR, Mic h., Sept. 24 /PRN ews wire-USN ews wir e/ -- T he Uni versity of Michig an, through i ts School of N atural R es ourc es and Enviro nment, has published the pr oc eedings from the school's May 2007 N ati onal Summi t on Coping with Cli mate C hange. The event - the firs t of its ki nd in the nati on - focused on helpi ng the Uni ted States prepar e for the i mpac t of cli mate c hange. (Photo: http://www.newsc om.c om/cgi-bi n/pr nh/20080924/DC 34869 ) Copi ng with Climate C hange: N ati onal Summit Pr oceedings c aptures the i deas of top environmental l eaders regar ding national adaptati on str ategies to climate c hang e. T he 256-page book c ontai ns keynote speec hes , tr ans cripts of breakout s essions and panel disc ussi ons , and the c andi d and val uable insights from s ec tor s ynthes es and s cenar io s ummari es. The book als o i ncludes an executi ve summar y fr om SNRE Dean R osina M. Bi erbaum and a c ompani on CD, whic h c ontains many PowerPoi nt pres entations as well as photos fr om the Summit. SNR E organiz ed the May 8-10 Summit as the
uni versity's c ommitment to the Clinton Global Initiati ve, a non-partis an effor t to devi se and i mpl ement sol uti ons to world c hallenges. Mor e than 150 experts from ac ademi a, gover nment, busi ness and the non-pr ofit sector partici pated. External s ponsors hip came from Google Inc., the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundati on, the Frey Found ati on, the N ational Science F oundati on and the U.S. Environmental Protecti on Ag enc y. 'T he nati on has l ost a dec ade i n thinki ng s eriousl y about coping wi th climate c hang e. T his Summit was an effort to j ump-start that conversation with s cienc e and polic y leaders and put SNR E in the forefr ont of i nnovati ve thi nking to confr ont cli mate change,' Bier baum s aid. 'The event made a signi ficant contributi on to the much- needed national di alog ue on adaptati on to cli mate change,' Bierbaum added. 'The material pres ented i n the book and c ompani on CD r emai ns as fas cinating and relevant today as i t did during the Summit. Buildi ng on this wor k will be essenti al to preparing our nation to confr ont cli mate change.' One of the
Summit's most innovati ve ac ti vities , pres ented in depth i n the book, foc used around pl ausibl e future i mpacts of cli mate chang e. Summit organiz ers posed to participants fi ve regional i mpact sc enarios - repres entati ve of ong oing and proj ected c hanges - in or der to jump-start think ing about pl anning and management. T he sc enarios wer e desig ned to be ' what-if' sc enari os; that is, 'if' they occ urred, ' what' response would be needed. T he scenarios wer e: -- C oas tal Communi ty R api dl y Losing Shoreli ne: A c oas tal communi ty has los t 250 feet of s hor eline already and the loss c ontinues at a r ate of 10 feet per year. -- Drought in the Southwes t: T he Southwest has been in a state of s evere dr ought for 10 years, and grazi ng lands , fir e fr equenc y and water avail ability ar e all being affec ted. -- Fail ure of the Power Grid: Increas ed freq uenc y of extreme heat events leads to failur e of the power grid - on the sc al e of r ecent Midwest/East C oast events - onc e ever y fi ve years . -- Rapi dl y D eclining Snowpac k i n the N orthwest: C ommuniti es in the Pacific Northwest are
experienci ng a two- week earlier peak in runoff than in 1980, with 30 percent lower s nowpac k and thes e trends ar e expec ted to conti nue -- Great Lakes Levels F all: T he aver age l evels of the Great Lakes fall fi ve feet below current levels As part of other ac ti vitie s and disc ussions , partici pants identifi ed four critic al adapti on sec tors for the United States: public health, energy indus tr y, water quality and fis heri es. T hey devel oped options for acti ons to be taken at loc al, state and national levels to help pr epare cities, c ounties and states as well as business and indus try. D an Br own, SNRE's ass ociate dean for res earc h, and J an McAl pine, a visiting s cholar from the U .S. D epartment of State, c o-edited the book along with Bi erbaum. It is available through Island Pr ess, a nonpr ofit publis her of environmental books, as well as other online book-s elling sites. Mor e infor mation about the Summit is available at: http://www.snr e.umi ch.edu/climate_c hange T o order the book from Islan d Press , visit: http://www.isl andpress .org/books tor e/details.php?pr od_i d=1851
About the School of N atural R es ourc es and Environment The Sc hool of N atural Res ources and Envir onment's over archi ng objecti ve is to contri bute to the pr otecti on of the Earth's res ources and the achi evement of a sus tai nabl e s ociety. Thr oug h res earch, teachi ng, and outreac h, fac ulty, staff, and students are devoted to generati ng knowl edg e and devel opi ng policies, tec hniques and s kills to help pr actiti oners manag e and c onser ve natur al and envir onmental res ources to meet the full range of human needs on a s ustainable basis. http://www.s nre.umic h.edu/ M edia contact: Kevi n M errill, Sc hool of Natur al Resources and Envir onment. O: 734.936.2447. C : 734.417.7392 merrillk@ umic h.edu SOURC E U ni versity of Mic higan School of N atural R es ourc es and Environment Copyright  © 2004 PR N ews wire All rights res er ved. ')
ARTIC LEID: 16340
Date: 9/24/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: J acqueline P. Kane, Ni na G. Vac a Appointed to the C omeric a Inc orporated Board of Directors
OTS: 13764305
Subject: Alumni T opic s
Summ ar y: She als o c ompl eted the exec uti ve program at the Uni versity of Michigan.
Bod y:

DALLAS, Sept. 24 /PRN ews wire-FirstC all/ -- J acqueline P. Kane and Ni na G. Vac a (pr ofessi onal name of Xi mena G. H umrichouse) have been appoi nted to the Comerica Incor por ated (NYSE: CMA) Boar d of Dir ectors, effec ti ve September 23, 2008. Kane is s eni or vic e presi dent of Human Resources and C orporate Affairs at The Cl orox Company (NYSE: C LX), an Oakl and, Californi a-bas ed manufacturer and mar keter of c ons umer pr oduc ts. Vaca is c hief executi ve officer of Pi nnacl e T ec hnic al R esourc es, Inc., a D allas, T exas-bas ed infor mation tec hnol ogy s er vic es provi der. Kane will ser ve as a member of the Board's Gover nanc e, Compens ati on and Nomi n ating C ommittee and Vac a will s er ve as a member of the Board's Enterprise Ris k C ommittee. T he announcement was made by Ral ph W. Babb Jr., c hair man and c hief exec uti ve offic er. ( Log o: http://www.newsc om.c om/cgi -bi n/pr nh/20010807/CM ALOGO ) ' We welc ome J ac kie and Ni na to Comerica,' sai d Babb. 'T hey have an i mpr essi ve tr ac k r ecor d of suc ces s at their res pecti ve c ompanies , which
are based i n two of our growth mar kets. We look for war d to their input and expertise as we c ontinue to foc us on exec uti ng our s trateg y.' Kane, 56, was named to her curr ent positi on in 2005, havi ng joi ned T he Clor ox C ompany i n 2004. Prior to that, s he s erved i n leaders hip positi ons with T he Hewl ett- Pac kar d C ompany (2000 to 2004) , and as s enior vic e president, human resources at both Bank of Americ a ( 1998-2000) and a predeces sor, Conti nental Illi nois Bank (1978- 1988) . Kane has ser ved on charitable and industr y boar ds, incl udi ng s er vice as pr es ident of the larges t human res ources organiz ation i n C hicag o. She now s er ves as a member of the Oakl and M us eum Boar d. She is a graduate of D ePaul U ni versi ty. She als o c ompl eted the exec uti ve program at the Uni versity of Mic higan.
ARTIC LEID: 16342
Date: 9/24/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: T he Emotional Impact Of T he Crisis
OTS: 13764305
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: What's mor e, a new study out of UC LA and the Uni versity of Mic higan, Ann Arbor, is demonstr ati ng that they c an less en people's par ticipation i n ever ything fr om c hurc h groups and c harities to c ountr y clubs.
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With the news going from bad to wors e on Wall Str eet, employees of s ome of the fi nanci al industr y's giants ar e li kel y experienci ng an emotional state that's unus ual to them--c ompl ete and utter uncertainty about their futures . T he Lehman Brothers (nyse: LEH - news - people ) bankr uptc y filing 'Employees and the public had the expectatio n, like wi th the Titanic, that you di dn't have to worr y about thes e fir ms,' s ays Maurice El vekrog, a manag ement ps ychologist and c hair man of the Bl oomfiel d Hills, Mic h.- bas ed pers onal money- management c ompany Seger-El vekrog. 'It's not that peopl e are worried about starvi ng or something, but they jus t don't know what's going to happen.' Waves of Worr y Although firms ar e probabl y already beginni ng to roll out s upport groups, employees' conc erns at this poi nt ar e typic all y mor e c oncrete, says London, a licens ed clinic al s oci al wor ker and c ertifi ed employee-as sistanc e profes sional who once counsel ed Lehman Brothers' wor kers. 'They want ans wers about when they're going to be l aid off and what their pac kages
are g oing to be li ke,' London s ays. 'They'r e not ready t o tal k about how awful they're feeling yet.' Mid-level managers may be i n s ome of the most diffic ult situati ons, s ays Chris C avaz os, chi ef oper ati ng officer of Harris R othenberg Internati onal, whic h s pecializ es i n provi ding employee-assistance pr ograms to financial c ompanies. T hey have to deal with their staff tur ning to them for constant, hones t updates and they have to manage the after math of the crisis, all while knowing their own j obs may be on the c hopping bloc k. T hes e iss ues c an caus e depres sion or anxiety disor ders and di srupt famil y life. What's more, a new s tudy out of UCLA and the U ni versity of Mic higan, Ann Ar bor, is demonstrating that they can l ess en peopl e's participati on in ever ything from church groups and c hariti es to countr y cl ubs .
ARTIC LEID: 16343
Date: 9/25/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: SensiGen HPV Ass ay Enables Maj or Br eakthrough i n Diag nosis and Tr eatment of Head and N ec k C ancer
OTS: 13764305
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: T hese studi es, carried out by the H ead and Nec k Onc olog y Team at the U ni versity of Michigan and publis hed i n the J ournal of Clinic al Onc ol ogy, demonstrate that head and nec k c ancer patients with higher conc entrati ons of H PV, a virus long known to be ass ociated wi th head and nec k canc er, c er vical canc er, and others, are muc h more li kel y to res pond to organ-sparing c hemotherapy than pati ents wi thout high c oncentr ati ons of the virus . . 'The data clearl y s how the importanc e of q uantitati ve H PV testi ng in pati ents diagnos ed with head and nec k canc er,' s aid Dr. Thomas C arey, l eader of the Uni versity of Michig an bas ed team that reported the breakthrough r es ults this summer.
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SensiGen LLC , a pri vatel y hel d biotec hnol og y c ompany foc us ed on devel opi ng pr opri etar y gene- based molecul ar di agnostic tests announc ed today a new program to make the Company's AttoSens e(TM) HPV ass ay available to head and nec k canc er researchers worldwi de after rec ent s tudies s howed that the s ucc ess or fail ure of vari ous treatment options (c hemotherapy, radiati on, extensi ve s urger y) ar e larg el y deter mined by the viral l oad of Human Papillomavirus (H PV) i n tissue samples from pati ents. Thes e studies , c arried out by the Head and N eck Onc olog y T eam at the U ni versity of Mic higan and published in the J our nal of Clinic al Onc olog y, demons trate that head and nec k canc er pati ents wi th higher c oncentr ations of HPV, a vir us l ong known to be as soci ated with head and nec k c ancer, cer vic al c ancer , and others , are muc h more li kel y to res pond to orga n-sparing c hemotherapy than patients wi thout high c oncentr ati ons of the virus. T his finding c ould offer sig nificant hope for thous ands of head and nec k canc er patients facing unc ertain and
unpleas ant tr eatments . 'The data cl earl y s how the i mportance of quantitati ve HPV tes ting i n pati ents diag nosed with head and nec k c ancer ,' sai d Dr. Thomas C arey, leader of the U ni versity of Michiga n based team that r eported the br eakthr oug h results this s ummer. 'Wi th the AttoSense(TM) H PV test and other biomar kers, we ma y s oon be abl e to pinpoi nt the right therapy for each pati ent and maxi mize the chance of s ucc ess on the first tr y, thus reduci ng the number of peopl e who mus t endur e multipl e c os tl y and uncomfortabl e treatments.' SensiGen's AttoSense(TM) diag nostic ass ays ar e c apable of ac cur atel y identifyi ng minute quantiti es - i n s ome cases as littl e as a si ngle c opy - of the biomar kers that signal the ons et of major diseas es or the pathogens that caus e them.
ARTIC LEID: 16346
Date: 9/26/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Crisis damps U S c onsumer r ecover y i n Sept--s ur vey
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: BodyT he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan Sur veys of Cons umers sai d the final readi ng of its index of c onfi denc e ro se to 70.3 i n September fr om 63.0 in August. It was the highest final reading si nce 70.8 i n F ebr uar y. H owever, it was bel ow ec onomists' expectations for a reading of 71.0, acc ordi ng to the medi an of their for ecasts i n a R euters poll. It was als o down fr om 73.1 rec orded in the Sur veys' of C ons umers' preli mi nar y r eport releas ed on Sept 12. 'The rebound in c ons umer confi denc e ended ami d heig htened conc erns about the growing fi nanci al crisis, although thes e c onc erns ar ose too late i n the month to c ompl etel y eras e the earlier g ains ,' the r eport sai d.
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The Reuters/U ni versi ty of Mic higan Sur veys of Cons umers sai d the fi nal readi ng of its index of c onfi denc e ros e to 70.3 i n September fr om 63.0 in August. It was the highest fi nal readi ng si nce 70.8 i n F ebr uar y. H owever, i t was bel ow ec onomists' expectations for a r eadi ng of 71.0, acc ordi ng to the medi an of their for ecasts i n a R euters poll. It was als o down from 73.1 rec orded in the Sur veys' of C ons umers' pr elimi nar y report rel eas ed on Sept 12. 'The r ebou nd in c ons umer c onfi denc e ended ami d heig htened c onc erns about the growi ng financial crisis, although these conc erns ar ose too late i n the month to c ompl etel y eras e the earlier gains,' the report s aid. Financial mar kets are in the grips of a year -long cr edit crisis c aused by the worst U .S. housing slump si nce the Gr eat Depr ession, whic h has also slowed the br oader economy. The credit tur moil has worsened in r ec ent days, and pressur e mounted on l awmakers on Fri day to agree on a $700 billion financial r esc ue pl an after tal ks at the White H ouse br oke down in acri mony and the biggest bank
closur e i n U.S. histor y r oiled global mar kets . F or details s ee [ID:nLQ501615]. H owever , hel ping c onsumers' outl ook, worries o ver inflation moderated this month, but also not as muc h as pr eviousl y thought. T he sur vey's r eading on one- year inflation expec tations fell to 4.3 percent -- the l owest sinc e 4.3 perc ent i n Marc h -- from 4.8 perc ent i n Aug ust.
ARTIC LEID: 16348
Date: 9/26/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: U.S. 2nd-qtr growth r evis ed down on soft s pending
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: At mi d-morni ng, a R euters /Uni versity of Michig an sur vey showed that cons umer opti mis m beg an to nos edi ve during September as a drumbe at of bad news about the ec onomy and the banki ng s ys tem grew in intensity. T he final r eading on its cons umer senti ment index sli pped to 70.3 from 73.1 at the s tar t of September
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By Glenn Somer ville WASHIN GTON (Reuters) - The U .S. economy grew l ess strongl y than pr eviousl y thought during the s econd quarter as c onsumers boosted s pending l ess vig orousl y and business es trimmed s ome i nvestments, a sign c onfidence was s agging even before financi al mar ket tur moil deepened. T he Commerce Department sai d Friday gross domes tic produc t, the measur e of total g oods and ser vic es output within U.S. bor ders , expanded at a 2.8 perc ent r ate in the April-June q uarter rather than the 3.3 percent rate it esti mated a month ag o. 'It pr etty much corr oborates the fact that the weaknes s in the U.S. ec onomy is reall y starti ng to take hol d,' s aid Boris Sc hl oss berg, direc tor of curr enc y res earch at GFT F orex i n N e w Yor k. 'All the l atest data that we have seen on the empl oyment fr ont and the production front ... suggest that GDP growth is g oing to slow materiall y i nto the s ec ond hal f of the year.' The new evi dence of fadi ng economic acti vity came amid confusi on in W as hington about whether a pl an to bail out U .S. fi nanci al fir ms by
havi ng the government us e $700 billion of tax money to buy their bad debts c an be r evi ved. Pr esident Bush has warned the c ountr y faces a painful rec essi on i f it is not and, on Friday, he s ought to c alm mar kets in a brief appear anc e at the White H ouse. 'We are going to get a package pass ed,' Bus h s aid. 'We will ris e to the occ asion. Republic ans and D emocr ats will come together and pass a s ubstantial r esc ue pl an.' At mid- morni ng, a Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey s howed that c onsumer optimis m began to nos edi ve duri ng September as a dr umbe at of bad news about the eco nomy and the banki ng s ystem grew in i ntensity. The final reading on its c ons umer s enti ment index slipped to 70.3 from 73.1 at the s tart of September -- a month i n which the government s eized c ontrol of mor tgage finance compani es F anni e M ae (nyse: FNM - news - people ) and Freddie Mac (nys e: FRE - news - peopl e ) and Wall Street i nvestment bank Lehman Br others H ol dings Inc .
ARTIC LEID: 16349
Date: 9/26/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: TREASURIES-Bonds gai n on bailout doubts , WaM u fail ure
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: On the ec onomic data fr ont, a cl os el y watc hed measur e of cons umer s enti ment slipped i n l ate September fr om earlier this month as the financial crisis mus hroomed. A joi nt s ur vey by R euters and U ni versity of Mic higan s howed on Fri day that the c onsumer c onfidenc e gauge finis hed at 70.3 c ompar ed with 73.1 i n earl y September and 63.0 l ate Aug ust. S Among other Treas ury maturiti es, fi ve-year debt was up 10/32 i n price to yiel d 2.99 perc ent,
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United States - * Bonds up after tal ks on bank bail out fall apart T hurs day * Was hi ngton M utual ( nys e: WM - news - people )'s failure als o r enews safety bids * Signs of persistent cr edit str ain weigh on s toc ks (Update mar ket action) N EW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. Treasur y debt pric es r ose on Fri day as s afety bids re- emerged after the breakdown of tal ks on a government bank bailout and the fail ure of Was hington Mutual, the biggest bank cl osur e i n U. S. his tor y. Mar ket anxiety flooded bac k as the $700 billion financial s ector r esc ue pl an remained in li mbo after some members of C ongress oppos ed it. The s toc k mar ket gave bac k s ome of T hurs day's gai ns, whic h c ame on hopes for pass age of the Tr oubl ed Ass et Reli ef Program (TAR P) by this weekend. Tr aders were still hol ding out hopes of a bail out plan to pass, as fresh data s howed t he mar ket crisis's toll on the economy and c onsumer c onfidence. 'The l ast thing the Congres s wants to do is to tank the s toc k mar ket. T he health of the global financial s ystem is dependent on the U.S. c omi ng wi th a
(bailout) pl an,' sai d J essic a H oversen, fi xed-inc ome market anal yst at MF Global Res earch i n C hic ago. Addi ng to worries about the financial s ystem was the cl osur e of Was hington Mutual , onc e the biggest U.S. savi ngs and l oan and one of the banks hardest hi t by the housing downtur n and cr edi t cri sis. Renewed jitters als o s par ked bets the F ederal R es er ve may opt for an emergenc y inter est r ate c ut or sl as h key r ates by half a perc entag e poi nt from the c urrent 2.00 perc ent, ac cor ding to i nteres t rate futur es. With no r elief in sight, investors floc ke d to the s afety of c ash and U.S. g overnment s ecuriti es. The price of two- year Tr eas ur y notes , the maturity that garners the most safety bids , were up 10/32 at 99-31/32. T heir yi eld, which moves inversel y to price, was 2.02 percent, 17 basis poi nts down fr om late Thurs day. Longer 10-year debt was up 16/32 in pric e to yi el d 3.80 percent, down 6 basis poi nts from l ate T hurs day. The gap between between two- year and 10- year notes grew to 178 basis points fr om 168 basis poi nts l ate T hursday. CRED IT
RISKS R ISE AGAIN M oney mar kets turned col d once agai n, as investors floc ked to the s afety of c as h and U .S. government s ec urities . Ami d this scra mble for Treas uries, the Treasur y Department sol d $60 billion i n 101-day c as h management bills, meaning i t has flooded the market with $224 billion in T-bills and $58 billion i n notes . One- month T- bill rates <U S1MT=RR> wer e down 12 basis points at 0.25 perc ent. Cr edit avail ability dwi ndl ed as inves tors shunned s ecuriti es not explicitl y bac ked by the g over nment, raisi ng ris k premi ums and keepi ng mar ket i nteres t rates hig h. T he ris k premi um or spr ead on three- month doll ar funds in the i nterbank mar ket over the expec ted thr ee- month r ate on benchmar k U .S. federal funds hit a r ec ord high on Friday. That s pread, a closel y watched distress meas ure on cr edit mar kets, grew to 202.18800 basis poi nts, 4 basis points wider than Thurs day. C ontinued strai n on the banking s ystem reverber ated acr oss all mar kets and bloc ked muc h needed funds to c as h-strapped c ompanies and c ons umers. U .S. stoc ks
were down sharpl y with key i ndic es down as much as 1 percent. On the ec onomic data fr ont, a cl os el y watc hed measur e of c ons umer s enti ment slipped i n l ate September fr om earlier this month as the financi al crisis mus hroomed. A joi nt s ur vey by R euters and U ni versity of Mic higan s howed on Fri day that the c onsumer c onfidence g aug e fi nished at 70.3 c ompared with 73.1 in earl y September and 63.0 late Augus t. S Among other Tr eas ur y maturities , fi ve- year debt was up 10/32 in pric e to yi eld 2.99 perc ent, down 6 basis points fr om l ate T hurs day, and the 30- year bond was up 25/32 for a 4.35 perc ent yiel d, down 5 basis points fr om l ate T hurs day. C opyrig ht 2008 R euters , Clic k for R estric tion '); //--> News H eadli nes | More From F or bes .com | Speci al Reports R elated Business Topics Starting A Small Business Small Busines s Loans Trading C enter Brought to you by the s pons ors bel ow C EO Book Club Book Revi ew Book Revi ew Kr ystl e M. Davis Yes, wai ters will s ometi mes s pit i n your food.
ARTIC LEID: 16352
Date: 9/26/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: U.S. GDP Deflates
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan Sur veys of Cons umers reported the fi nal readi ng of its index of c onfidence ros e to 70.3 i n September fr om 63. 0 i n Aug ust, the highes t fi nal readi ng sinc e 70.8 in Febr uar y. Whil e that may have been nic e, the figure was still bel ow econ omists' expectated 71.0, acc ordi ng to R euters . It was also down fr om 73.1 r ec orded in a preli minar y r eport r eleas ed on Sept 1 2. 'The rebound in cons umer confi denc e ended ami d heightened conc erns about the growing financial crisis , al though thes e c onc erns aros e too late in the month to c ompl etel y eras e the earlier g ains ,' the r eport sai d
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with sl ower-than- expec ted growth i n the s ec ond q uarter and l ess confi denc e fr om c onsumers than had been expected. Americ a's s econd-quarter grew onl y 2.8%, not the 3.3% first thought. Wall Str eet had expected the r evis ed figure, which was reported by the U .S. Commerce Department Friday morni ng, t o r emai n unchang ed. (See ) T he Reuters/U ni versi ty of Mic higan Sur veys of Cons umers reported the fi nal r eadi ng of its index of c onfidence ros e to 70.3 in September fr om 63.0 i n Aug ust, the highes t fi nal r eadi ng sinc e 70.8 in Februar y. Whil e that may ha ve been nic e, the fig ure was still bel ow economists' expec tated 71.0, acc ording to Reuters. It was als o down from 73.1 rec or ded i n a pr eli minar y report rel eased on Sept 12. 'T he rebound i n c onsumer c onfidence ended amid heightened c oncer ns about the growi ng fi nanci al crisis, although thes e c oncer ns aros e too l ate in the month to c ompletel y er ase the earlier gai ns,' the report s aid. T he yiel d on the benchmar k 10- year U.S. Tr easur y note dropped to 3.81%, from Thursday's 3.86%. Acc ordi ng to
the U.S. C ommerce Depar tment, the overall g ain of the GD P was primaril y due to exports, from special tax r ebates and g overnment s pendi ng, whic h offs et such thi ngs li ke pri vate i nventor y i nvestment. Wall Street is alr eady feeling the s ting, with , fr oz en credit and . (See ) T he nation's unemployment r ate jumped to 6.
ARTIC LEID: 16353
Date: 9/26/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: US ST OCKS-Futur es plunge on bailout i mpas se, bank c ollaps e
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: Fi nanci al stoc ks wer e under pr ess ure, with the U.S. electronic-traded fund that trac ks the fi nanci al s ector down 3.8 perc ent befor e the bell. Friday's economic data i ncludes a fi nal es ti ma te of s econd-quarter gros s domestic pr oduct at 8:30 a.m. (1230 GMT) and a final reading on c onsumer s entiment for September when a Reuters/U ni versi ty of Mic higan report is r eleas ed at 9:55 a.m. (1355 GMT). The fail ure of Was hington Mutual
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es - * Stall ed bailout pact fuels i nvestor unease * Washi ngton M utual (nyse: WM - news - peopl e ) s eiz ed in biggest US bank failur e * Financial s hares set to l ead decline * Congressi onal l eaders ai m for deal by wee kend By Ellis M nyandu NEW YORK (R euters) - U.S. s toc k index futur es fell Friday after congressi onal tal ks on a $700 billion fi nancial sector bailout stalled and authorities s eized the l argest U.S. thrift, heightening worries about the fallout fr om the cr edit crisis. C ongressional leaders wer e s et to tr y agai n on Friday to agree on a r esc ue pl an, one of the c ostli est sinc e the Great D epressi on, after tal ks desc ended into chaos over night. Meanwhil e, i nvestors moved to pare bac k ris k, with s toc k mar kets falling i n Asia and in Europe. In another worr yi ng development, U.S. banki ng authorities closed Washi ngton M utualin by far the lar g est fail ure of a U.S. bank. WaM u had about $307 billion of ass ets and $188 of deposits. Its banking ass ets wer e s old to J PMorgan C hase (nys e: JPM - news - peopl e ) & C o for $1.9 billion. 'T he negotiati ons over the
bail out are s appi ng the enthusias m that peopl e c ould have for the mar ket,' sai d Ric k Mec kl er, president of i nvestment fir m LibertyView C apital Management in N ew Yor k. 'I thi nk with no agreement, it's goi ng to be hard for the mar ket to push ahead.' S&P 500 futur es fell 22 points and were below fai r val ue, a for mul a that evaluates pricing by taki ng into ac count i nteres t rates , di vidends and ti me to expirati on on the c ontrac t. D ow J ones industrial averag e futures dr opped 178 poi nts and Nas daq 100 s hed 24 poi nts. The tal ks on the proposed bailout are due to enter a ni nth day Friday, but it was uncertai n whether a group of bal king H ous e Republic ans woul d partici pate. Fi nanci al stoc ks wer e under pr ess ure, with the U.S. el ectronic-tr aded fund that trac ks the fi nanci al s ector down 3.8 perc ent befor e the bell. Friday's economic data i ncludes a fi nal es ti mate of second-quarter gross domestic product at 8:30 a.m. (1230 GMT) and a final reading on cons umer senti ment for September when a R euters /Uni versity of Michig an report is rel eased at 9:55 a.m. (1355
GMT). T he failure of Washi ngton M utual , a s avings and loan founded i n Seattl e i n 1889, is another blot on the U .S. fi nanci al landscape, comi ng nearl y two weeks after U.S. i nvestment bank Lehman Br others Hol dings ( nys e: LEH - news - peopl e ) fil ed for bankruptc y protecti on. Washi ngton M utual shar es were down 82 perc ent at 29 c ents before the bell. In Eur ope i nvestors' jitters hi t Belgian-Dutch financial ser vic es firm Fortis (other-otc : F ORSY.PK - news - people ), whose stoc k s ank nearl y 10 perc ent, on mar ket conc erns ab out its liquidity and fundi ng. Across the world, centr al banks scrambled to meet a desperate demand for c as h, both in their o wn c urrencies and the U.S. doll ar, as news of the bailout hitti ng new r oadbloc ks kept ner vous banks from l endi ng to eac h other. Pr esi dent Bush reiterated T hursday that the U nited States was faci ng a seri ous fi nancial crisis and urged bi partisan c ooperation on the bailout bill. Wall Street had snapped a three-day l osing streak Thursday on hopes that a deal on the bailout might be i mmin ent. ( Edi ting by
Kenneth Barry) C opyright 2008 R euters , Clic k for R es triction Article Contr ols E-M ail| E-Mail N ewsletters del.ici o.us| Digg It! | | Share | RSS Rel ated Secti ons Home> Breaking N ews '); //--> N ews H eadlines | M ore Fr om F orbes.c om | Special Reports R elated Busi ness T opics Starting A Small Busi nes sSmall Busi nes s Loans Tradi ng Center Br oug ht to you by the sponsors below CEO Book Cl ub Book R eview Book R eview Kr ys tle M . D avis Yes , waiters will s ometi mes s pit in your food.
ARTIC LEID: 16354
Date: 9/26/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: FOR EX-Ris k aversi on boosts yen after U .S. bailout stalls
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: C oming up is the rel ease of fi nal U .S. s ec ond quarter GD P data, while the l atest Uni versity of Michigan cons umer c onfi denc e s ur vey will be eyed for a sign of how the recent financial mar ket tur bul enc e is feeding thr oug h into s enti ment. 'T he Michigan cons umer s enti ment reading ... c ould pr esent some s hort ter m tr adi ng oppor tu nities,' Gar y T homson, head of s ales trading at CMC Mar kets s aid i n a note to clients.
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United States - * Yen gai ns more than 1 perc ent vs doll ar, eur o * Inves tors shun ris k, high yiel ding c urrenci es si nk * Euro weighed on worries over Eur opean banks * U.S. bailout plan tal ks to resume l ater on Fri day (Rec asts, updates prices , adds q uotes , c hanges byline) LONDON, Sept 26 (Reuters) - T he Japanes e yen gained broadl y on Fri day as inves tors cut ris k expos ur e due to the s talli ng of a pr opos ed $700 billion finan cial s ystem bailout and cl osur e of Was hington Mutual (nyse: WM - news - people ) in the biggest ever U.S. bank failur e. Investors rushed to buy the low- yi eldi ng safe haven Japanes e c urrenc y, s ending it mor e than one perc ent higher agai nst the euro and dollar as European s har es fell 2 perc ent, led by declines i n banking stoc ks. Shar es i n D utc h-Belgian bank F ortis ( other- otc: FOR SY.PK - news - people ) dropped 12 percent on Fri day after hitting a 14- year low the previous day on fears that the bank c oul d become the next vic tim of the fi nanci al mar ket turmoil. F ortis deni ed liquidity pr obl ems. 'Concer ns over the E uropean
banki ng s ystem have added to jitters over the U.S. bailout pl an and the yen is pic ki ng up renewed s upport,' s aid Ian Stannard, s eni or foreign exchang e s trategist at BN P Paribas ( other- otc: BN PQY.PK - news - peopl e ). At 1125 GMT, the dollar was down 1 percent ag ains t the yen at 105.31 yen, whil e the eur o lost 1.2 perc ent to 153.77 yen. T he eur o was i nched down agai nst th e dollar to $1.4601. M eanwhile, the high- yi eldi ng Austr alian doll ar fell mor e than 1 percent agai nst the U.S. doll ar and more than 1.5 perc ent agains t the yen as inves tors unwound bets on higher-risk currenci es. Centr al banks c oordi nated to provi de further liqui dity on Friday as fund demand ahead of the q uarter -end exac erbated already dysfunc tional money mar kets. U.S. DEAL TO BE R EACH ED M ar ket partici pants still expec t the $700 billi on U .S. bank bailout pac kage to be agreed i n s ome form and they are unwilli ng to adopt big positi ons as a res ult, anal ysts s aid. Tal ks over the plan will r es ume on Friday. 'The over whelmi ng s ens e is t hat s ome deal will be s truc k,' Standard
Chartered ( other- otc: SC BEF .PK - news - people ) curr enc y str ategist R ob Mini ki n s aid. 'But the general feeling is that bec aus e i t is endi ng up as an uneas y c ompr omise, it is li kel y to be less s atisfactor y than the clearc ut Pauls on sol uti on.' News of the Was hi ngton M utual fail ure further damaged s enti ment, although the third-l argest U .S. bank JPM organ Chas e (nyse: J PM - news - people ) & C o s ai d it boug ht the deposits of the bank, whic h had s een its s toc k price virtuall y wiped out bec ause of massi ve amounts of bad mortg ages. Comi ng up is the r elease of final U.S. sec ond quarter GDP data, whil e th e lates t U ni versi ty of Mic higan c onsumer c onfidence sur vey will be eyed for a sign of how the rec ent fi nanci al mar ket turbule nc e is feedi ng through into s enti ment. 'The Mic higan c onsumer s entiment r eading ... coul d pres ent s ome s hort term tr adi ng opportuni ties ,' Gar y T homs on, head of sal es tr ading at CMC Mar kets sai d i n a note to clients . 'Confi denc e has been improvi ng of l ate bu t the landsc ape has c hanged dramatic all y this month. Whether this will
be pic ked up in the September sur vey r emai ns to be s een but anything that's poi nti ng even marginall y l ower thi s ti me around s tands to be amplifi ed signific antl y in the Oc tober readi ng'. (Additi onal r eporti ng by Jessica Morti mer; editing by Patric k Graham) C opyright 2008 R euters , Clic k for R estricti on Compani es: WM | FORSY.PK | BNPQY.PK | SC BEF .PK | JPM '); //--> News H eadlines | Mor e Fr om F orbes.c om | Special R eports Rel ated Busi ness T opic s S tarti ng A Small Busi nessSmall Busi ness Loans Tr adi ng Center Brought to you by the sponsors bel ow C EO Book Club Book R evi ew Bo ok R evi ew Kr ystle M. D avis Yes, waiters will s ometi mes s pit in your food.
ARTIC LEID: 16376
Date: 9/9/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: DTE Energy and Uni versity of Mic higan Launc h Cl ean Energ y Prize Entrepreneurs hip Competition
OTS: 13764305
Subject: Partnershi ps
Summ ar y: DT E Energy and the U ni versity of Mic higan will announce the start of c ompetition for the Cl ean Energ y Priz e, whic h c hallenges teams from Mic higan c olleges and uni versiti es to devel op the bes t busi ness plan for bringing a new clean energy technolog y to mar ket. The teams with wi nni ng ideas will s har e $100,000 i n priz e money, which will be awar ded i n the s pring of 2009
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What: DT E Energy and the U ni versity of Mic higan will announce the start of c ompetition for the Cl ean Energ y Priz e, whic h c hallenges teams from Mic higan c olleges and uni versiti es to devel op the bes t busi ness plan for bringing a new clean energy technolog y to mar ket. The teams wi th winning i deas will s hare $100,000 in prize money, whic h will be awarded in the spring of 2009. T he goal of the priz e is to dri ve promisi ng clean energy ideas and tec hnol ogies from the research lab to commercializ ati on. When: 3 p.m. Frid ay ( Sept. 12) Wher e: Stamps Auditori um (in the Walgreen Dr ama Center on the U-M north c ampus, approxi matel y two miles fr om c entral c ampus) 1226 M urfi n Ave. Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1265 F or direc tions to the Walgreen Dr ama Center, g o to: http://uuis.umich.edu/cic/buil ding project/i ndex.cfm?Buildi ngID=526# Visitor par ki ng is avail abl e i n a metered lot adj ac ent to the Drama C enter. F or a par king map of N orth C ampus, go to: http://pts.umich.edu/maps/north_medic al.
ARTIC LEID: 16369
Date: 9/29/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Seniors i n Poor Areas M ore Li kel y to Di e After Surger y
OTS: 13764305
Subject: R es earc h, Lif e Scienc es
Summ ar y: "It may be that hos pitals that treat patients of l ower s oci oeconomic status have lower quality of car e due to fewer r esourc es, suc h as technologicall y advanc ed equipment or s pecialists ," lead author Dr. N anc y Bir kmeyer, an ass ociate pr ofess or of s urger y at the U ni ver sity of Mic higan, s aid in a C enter for the Advanc ement of H ealth news r eleas e.T he study was pu blis hed i n the September iss ue of the journal M edic al C are."While some prior studi es have demonstr ated s ocioec onomic dispariti es i n the outc omes of i ndi vidual pr ocedures , ours is the first to show that the r elations hip is c onsis tent acr oss a wi de range of s urgical pr oc edures ," Birkmeyer s aid.
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MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthD ay News) -- Elderl y Americ ans who li ve i n l ow-inc ome ZIP c odes are mor e li kel y to die after surger y than thos e who live i n higher-income Z IP codes, acc ordi ng to new res earch. T he study anal yzed death rates among more than one million older adul ts who had one of si x common high-risk heart or c anc er s urgeries between 1999 and 2003. The ris k of death was between 17 percent and 39 percent higher for patients in low-inc ome ZIP c odes , mainl y bec aus e the q uality of c are is lower at hospi tals i n l ower soci oeconomic areas, the study authors sai d. In fact, all pati ents (reg ardless of i nc ome) who had s urger y at hos pitals in the poor est ar eas wer e more li kel y to di e, while all patients who had surger y at hos pitals i n the richest ar eas wer e l ess li kel y to di e. 'It may be that hos pitals that tr eat patients of l ower soci oecon omi c status have lower quality of car e due to fewer r es ourc es, such as technologicall y advanc ed equipment or s pecialists ,' lead aut hor Dr. N anc y Birkmeyer, an associate profes sor of surger y at the U ni versity of
Michigan, s aid in a C enter for the Advanc ement of H eal th news r eleas e. T he study was publis hed i n the September iss ue of the j our nal . 'While s ome prior studi es have demons trat ed s ocioec onomic dis pariti es i n the outcomes of indi vidual pr ocedures , ours is the first to show that the relations hip is c onsis tent acr oss a wi de range of s urgical pr oc edures,' Bir kmeyer sai d. While the study c an improve understandi ng of patter ns of car e, i t does n't offer c oncr ete ans wers for el derl y patients who need surger y, s aid Dr. Harl an Kr umholz, a professor of medicine, epi demi olog y and public health at Yal e U ni versity.
ARTIC LEID: 16374
Date: 9/9/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F orbes Online (forbes.c om)
Head lin e: Uni versity of Mic higan Launc hes N ew Infor mation Age M ajor: Informatics
OTS: 13764305
Subject: C ours es
Summ ar y: U ni versity of Mic higan undergraduates have a new maj or on their list of choic es, one highl y rel evant in the age of Google and Web 2.0: infor matics . Infor matics is the s tudy of infor mation and the ways infor mation is us ed by and affec ts people and s ocial s ystems. Exp erts i n this fiel d design infor mation tec hnol og y tools for sci entific, business , and c ultural needs, and study how s uch tools ar e used. 'The program offers students an oppor tunity to develop the s kills to be l eaders in an i nfor mati on-centric world,' says Martha E. Poll ac k, dean of the School of Infor mation.
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ANN AR BOR, Mic h., Sept. 9 /PRN ews wire-U SNews wire/ -- Uni versity of Michigan undergraduates have a new maj or on their list of c hoic es , one highl y r elevant i n the ag e of Google and Web 2.0: i nfor matic s. Infor matics is the study of i nformati on and the ways i nfor mati on is used by and affec ts people and s ocial s ystems. Experts i n this field design infor mation tec hnol og y tools for sci entific, business , and c ultural needs, and study how s uch tools ar e used. Informatics speci alists, for example, might help develop the s ystems that l et your doc tor q uic kl y s hare your medic al rec or ds with a s pecialist whil e still ensuri ng your pri vac y. 'T he pr ogram offers students an opportunity to devel op the s kills to be leaders i n an infor mation-c entric worl d,' s ays M artha E. Pollac k, dean of the Sc hool of Infor mation. 'Think of the anal ogy to biol ogy: biolog y majors ar e experts in li vi ng organis ms; infor matics majors will be experts in infor mation, i n all its forms .' 'Tremendous progress i n c omputer sci ence and c ommunications is radicall y changing the way we do medic al
science, s har e and r etrieve i nfor mati on, acc ess ser vic es, and for m c ommunities,' adds Profes sor F arnam J ahanian, c hair of C omputer Sci enc e and Engineering. 'Infor matics s tudents will appl y princi ples from c omputer sci enc e, statistic s, and us er-centered design to provi de the expertis e needed to shape thes e c hang es.' Key to the new conc entrati on is its bri nging together of both technol ogical and social perspecti ves, givi ng students a groundi ng in c omputer sci enc e, mathematics, and statis tics, c ombined with study of the ethic al and s ocial scienc e di mensi ons of c omplex infor mation s ystems.
ARTIC LEID: 1654
Date: 9/9/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F ox N ews Online (foxnews .com)
Head lin e: Politic al Gr apevi ne
OTS: 9207632
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: N ow s ome fresh pic ki ngs fr om the : Left Hook There is further evi denc e that the nomi nation of Sarah Pali n for vic e presi dent has sent el ements of the American l eft ar ound the bend. J uan C ol e, a profes sor at the U ni versity of Michigan, writes on the liber al Web site Salon.c om that Palin, a Bi ble C hurch Christi an, is a r eligious extremist. ' What is the differ ence between Palin and M usli m fundamentalists? Li pstic k,' Col e s aid.
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Politic al Grapevi ne




Now s ome fresh pic ki ngs fr om the : Left Hook There is further evi denc e that the nomi nation of Sarah Pali n for vic e presi dent has sent el ements of the American l eft ar ound the bend. J uan C ol e, a profess or at the U ni versity of Mic higan, writes on the liberal Web site Salon.c om that Pali n, a Bibl e C hurch C hristi an, is a r eligious extremist. 'What is the differ ence between Palin and M usli m fundamentalists ? Li pstic k,' Col e s aid. Another Salon writer, writer-at-large Gar y Kami ya c ompar es Pali n to a whip- wi eldi ng dominatri x who he says is attempting to seduc e independent voters, addi ng that the GOP is now the party of s ex, women and fun . In l ang uage that c an't be us ed here, he says del egates wer e s exuall y arous ed by Palin. Sal on's bio of Kami ya, by the way, s ays his bac kground i ncludes 'a bri ef LSD-riddl ed sti nt at Yale.' Vicious Vendor Meanwhil e, s omeone posti ng on the li ber al site D emocraticU nderground.com created a fake eBay page clai mi ng to s ell Governor Palin's young est chil d, Trig. T he medi a watc hdog site N ews Bus ters .org, a c onser vati ve
site, reports it r ead ' baby us ed pr op newbor n boy three to si x months speci al needs .' The bogus page i ncluded a pictur e of Pali n hol ding Trig during the R epublican N ati onal C onventi on. T he starting bid was $40 and the pag e listed Trig Palin's father as unknown. It als o i ncluded a des cripti on that c alled Governor Palin a 'pushy s ocial climber, unwilling to let pr egnanc y and c hildr en stand i n the way of ambition.' T he fake auc tion posting is no l ong er on the site. Citiz ens of the Worl d T he lates t U.S. polls s how John McC ain with a slight l ead over Senator Obama. But a new poll fr om the BBC i ndicates peopl e acros s the worl d woul d overwhelmi ngl y rather s ee Obama i n the White Hous e. In fact, peopl e i n all 22 c ountri es c overed i n the poll woul d prefer to see an Obama pr esidenc y by a margin of 48 to 12 over J ohn McCai n. Peopl e in 17 of thos e countries sai d if that happens they expec t rel ati ons to i mprove.
ARTIC LEID: 6458
Date: 9/30/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F ox N ews Online (foxnews .com)
Head lin e: Bus- Sized Di nos aur Br eathed Li ke Birds Do
OTS: 9207632
Subject: R es earc h, Other
Summ ar y: 'It's another piec e of evi denc e that's piling onto the lis t of thi ngs that link bir ds with dinos aurs ,' sai d r esearc her J effre y Wils on, a pal eontol ogist at the U ni versi ty of Mic higan. "
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Bus- Sized Di nosaur Breathed Li ke Bir ds D o




A huge c arni vorous dinos aur that lived about 85 million years ago had a br eathi ng s ys tem muc h li ke that of today's birds, a n ew anal ysis of fossils r eveals , rei nforcing the evoluti onar y li nk between dinos and moder n birds. The finding s heds light on the tr ansi tion between ther opods ( a group of two-legged c arni vorous dinos aurs) and the emergence of bir ds. Sci entists thi nk birds evol ved fr om a group of ther opods c alled manir aptors, s ome 150 million years ago during the J urassi c period, whic h l asted fr om about 206 million to 144 million years ago. 'It's another piece of evi dence that's piling onto the list of thi ngs that li nk birds wi th di nos aurs,' s aid res earc her Jeffr ey Wilson, a paleontologist at the Uni versity of Michigan. " Clic k here to visit F OXN ews.com's Evoluti on & Paleontolog y C enter. Flighty di nosaur C alled Aer osteon ri ocol or adensis, the bipedal di nos aur woul d have s tood at about 8 feet (2.5 meters) at its hi ps with a body length of 30 feet (9 meters), about the length of a sc hool bus. Wils on al ong with U ni versity of Chic ago paleontol ogist Paul
Ser eno and others discover ed the s kel etal remains of A. ri ocol oradensis during a 1996 expedition to Argenti na. In years follo wi ng the disc over y, the s cientists cl eaned up the bones and sc anned them with c omputed tomography. The sc ans s howed s mall openings i n the vertebrae, cl avicl es (c hes t bone that for ms the wis hbone) and hi p bones th at l ed into large, hollow s pac es. When the di nosaur li ved, the hollow spac es would have been lined with s oft tiss ue and fille d with air. T hese c hambers res embl ed s uch featur es found i n the s ame bones of modern birds . While there's no evi dence to s uggest the dinos aur wor e a c oat of feathers or flew li ke a bird when ali ve, the new fi ndi ngs s uggest i t breathed li ke one. Moder n bir ds have rigid lungs that don't expand and contr act li ke ours . Instead, a s ys tem of air sac s pumps air through the lungs.
ARTIC LEID: 10760
Date: 9/2/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Chic kenpox Vacci ne Sl ashes Virus by 90 Percent
OTS: 7901545
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: Dr. Gar y Freed, direc tor of the Di vision of General Pedi atrics for the U ni versi ty of Mic higan H ealth Sys tem, agrees . "T he public should [unders tand] how many hos pitaliz ati ons and deaths were avoi ded by the us e of the vacci ne," he says.
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Chicken pox Vaccin e Slashes Viru s b y 90 Per cent




Study Urges T wo-Shot Sc hedul e; Experts Worry Some Ki ds Still Go U nprotec ted




By D AN CHILD S
ABC N ews Medical Unit




Sept. 2, 2008—




While r esearc hers now s ay the c hic kenpox vacci ne has slas hed the oc currenc e of the dis eas e i n c hildr en by 90 percent, infec tious dis eas e experts remained c oncer ned that too few parents take the dis ease s eriousl y enoug h to g et their kids vacci nated.




In a s tudy r eleas ed Tues day i n the journal Pediatrics, r esearc hers from the U .S. C enters for Diseas e C ontrol and Preventi on report that the pl ummeting r eports of chic kenpox (als o known as varic ella) between 1995 and 2005 has dr agged down c hic kenpox-r elated hospitaliz ations by 75 perc ent and reduc ed deaths by 74 perc ent -- with the greatest i mprovements i n young c hildren.




"The U.S. varicell a vacci nation program has dramatic all y reduced varic ella i ncidence and rel ated c omplic ations , hos pitalizations and deaths ," the authors c onclude.




But they add that the effec ti veness of a single dos e of the vacci ne -- about 85 percent -- is not sufficient to stop the s pread of the virus in "high contact" s etti ngs, s uc h as sc hools . T hey ther efore rec ommend that a two-dos e sc hedul e be adopted for all chil dren.




But infec tious dis eas e exper ts worry that too many parents may neglec t to have their ki ds vacci nated for chic kenpox -- i n many c ases bec ause they believe the vir al diseas e is not harmful.




"In my failing memor y, chic kenpox was res ponsi ble for 100- 200 deaths per year in the U .S.," s ai d Dr. J ames King, professor of pediatrics at the U ni versity of M ar yland Sc hool of Medicine.




"It woul d be a virtual c ertainty that c hic kenpox woul d become wi des pr ead again if there wer e a reducti on of the use of the varic ella vac cine," he s aid. "It jus t amaz es me that vaccines are not val ued as they have been one of the most s uccessful advances in medicine."




Dr. Gary Freed, direc tor of the Di vi sion of General Pedi atrics for the U ni versity of Mic higan H ealth System, agrees.




"The public s hould [unders tand] how many hos pitaliz ati ons and deaths were avoi ded by the us e of the vacci ne," he says.




Chic kenpox N ot Kid's Stuff




For anyone not born wi thi n the pas t c oupl e of decades, however, chic kenpox may seem l ess of a scourge and mor e of a rite of pass age. Childhood memori es of the scal y, red scabs, the itc hy bumps and the s mell of cal amine l oti on ar e c ommon even among the 30-something s et.




But Mar k Slifka, as soci ate s cientist at the Vacci ne and Gene Therapy Institute at the Oregon H ealth and Scienc e U ni versity, s ays the ver y fact that mos t young Americans have been s par ed thes e unpl easant memories is a victor y in and of itself.




"This is r eall y quite an ac hievement," he s ays. "In just one g eneration, we have c hanged c hic kenpox fr om a vir us that nearl y ever y c hild had to s uffer, to a virus that is c ausing onl y a handful of infecti ons."




The benefits may not be jus t for the younger set. King s ays varic ella i nfecti on is par ticul arly hard on adol esc ents and adult s. And even if parents don't catch the dis ease thems el ves, many may fac e an unenvi able j uggling ac t when it comes to bal anci ng their wor k with caring for a child who will li kel y be sic k for about seven days.




"I am ... amaz ed how ec onomists do not place muc h of a financial val ue on a week's missed s chool, which is c ommon," Ki ng says.




Par ents, too, may lac k c onc ern over the potenti al health and financi al i mplicati ons of the illness . Some still adhere to the tr aditi on of "c hic kenpox sl eepovers ," in whic h non- nfected chil dren are exposed to infec ted c hildr en in order to expose them to the illness, i n ess ence all owing par ents to plan for when their ki ds fall ill and subs equentl y develop chic kenpox i mmuni ty.




"It is irres ponsible for par ents to pur posefull y expose their c hildr en to a wild-type vir us when there is a vaccine available," Slifka says. "T he vacci ne is a vastl y weaker str ain of the same vir us, and ther efore muc h s afer and with fewer si de effects or diseas e c omplicati ons."




"The chic kenpox party i s ver y 'ol d sc hool,'" Fr eed s ays . "T he key is having par ents understand they can prevent dis eas e.




"Even if the ris k of hospitaliz ation and death is rel ati vel y l ow, their c hildren no longer need to experience the disc omfort and suffering that is ass oci ated with chi c kenpox."




The End of C hic kenpox?




But whil e a dose of the varic ella vac cinati on may be effec ti ve -- and two dos es even mor e s o -- r esearc hers say we ar e s till a l ong way off fr om eradicating the illness .




"Unfortunatel y, it is unli kel y that we will get rid of c hic kenpox in our lifeti me," Slifka s ays, addi ng that the virus c an "hi de" in the body of s eemi ngl y healthy indi vi duals, re-emerging years l ater i n the form of s hingles. " Sinc e it c an hi de in otherwis e healthy peopl e for s o l ong befor e 'j umpi ng out' as i nfecti ous virus , it will be nearl y i mpossi ble to c ompl etel y eradicate it -- at l east with the c urrent vac cines that we have avail abl e at this ti me."




But the vaccine is a start. And Freed says that parents who downplay the i mportanc e of the vacci ne or fear its use in their c hildren must bear in mi nd the ris ks of the ill nes s.




"The ris k of the vacci ne is far l ess than the ris k of the diseas e," he s ays.
ARTIC LEID: 10761
Date: 9/5/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Google R eigns as World's M ost Power ful 10-Year-Ol d
OTS: 7901545
Subject: Alumni T opic s
Summ ar y: Pag e, a U ni versi ty of Mic higan graduate, and Bri n, a U ni versi ty of M ar yland al um, began wor king on a searc h engine — origin all y c alled Bac kR ub — i n 1996 becaus e they beli eved a l ot of important c ontent was n't bei ng found on the Web.
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Google R eign s as W orld's Mo st Po werful 10-Year-Old




Still feeli ng luc ky: As Google tur ns 10, management s earches for more fronti ers to c onquer




By MICH AEL LIEDT KE




The As soci ated Pr ess




MOUNT AIN VIEW , Calif .




When Larr y Page and Sergey Brin founded Googl e Inc. on Sept. 7, 1998, they had littl e mor e than their i ngenuity, four c omputers and an inves tor's $100,000 bet on their belief that an Inter net s earc h engi ne could c hange the world.




It s ounded preposterous 10 years ago, but look now: Google dr aws upon a gargantuan computer networ k, nearl y 20,000 empl oyees and a $150 billion mar ket value to redefine medi a, mar keting and technolog y.




Per haps Google's biggest test i n the next dec ade will be fi nding a way to pursu e its s eemi ngly boundles s ambiti ons without triggering a bac kl as h that der ails the c ompany.




"You c an't do some of the thi ngs that they are tr ying to do without eventuall y facing s ome c hall enges fr om the government and your ri vals ," s aid Danny Sulli van, who has followed Google si nc e its inc eption and is now editor-in-chi ef of Searc hEngineLand.




Google's expandi ng c ontr ol over the flow of Internet traffic and adver tising already is raisi ng monopol y c onc erns.




The intensifyi ng regul ator y and political scruti ny on Google's expansion c ould pr esent mor e roadbl oc ks in the futur e. Even now, there's a chance U.S. antitrus t r egulators will challenge Google's plans to s ell ads for Yahoo Inc., a fadi ng Internet star whos e recent struggles have been magnifi ed by Goog le's s ucc ess.




Privac y watchdogs als o have s har pened their attac ks on Google's r etention of potenti all y s ensiti ve infor mation about the 650 million peopl e who us e its s earc h engine and other Internet s er vices li ke YouT ube, Maps and Gmail. If the har ping eventuall y i nspir es rul es that res trict Google's data coll ecti on, it could make its s earc h engine less rel evant and its ad networ k less pr ofitable.




To protec t its i nteres ts, Google has hired l obbyis ts to bend the ears of lawmakers and r amped up i ts public r elati ons s taff to s way opini on as management gears up to c onq uer new fr ontiers.




"Google will keep pushi ng the envelope," predicted J ohn Battelle, who wr ote a book about the company and now r uns F ederated M edi a, a conduit for Internet publis hers and advertis ers. "I t's one of the thi ngs that s eems to make them happy."




In the l atest exampl e of i ts r elentless expansion, Googl e has jus t rel eased a Web br ows er to make its s earch engine and other online s er vices even more ac cessi ble and appeali ng. Not ever y peripheral s te p has gone s moothl y, though; s everal of the c ompany's ancillar y products have fl opped or never li ved up to the hype.




Extending Google's ubiquity to cell phones and other mobile devic es sits at the top of management's agenda for the next decade.




But the lengthy to-do list als o i ncludes: maki ng digital c opi es of all the world's books ; establis hing electronic file c abinets for peopl e's health rec ords ; l eading the alternati ve energy c harge away from fos sil fuels ; s elling c omputer pr ograms to busi nes ses over the Internet; and tweaki ng its s earch engine s o it can better unders tand req ues ts s tated i n plai n language, just li ke a human woul d.




"Ther e are people who thi nk we are pl enty full of oursel ves right now, but from insi de at l eas t, it doesn't look that way," s aid Craig Sil verstein, Google's tec hnolog y direc tor and the first employee hir ed by Page and Bri n. " I think what keeps us humbl e is r ealizi ng how muc h further we have to go."




Page and Brin, both 35 now and worth nearl y $19 billion api ec e, declined to be i nt er viewed for this s tor y. But they have never l eft any doubt they view Googl e as a force for good — a phil osophy punc tuated by their cor por ate motto: "D on't Be Evil."




"If we had a lights aber, we woul d be Luke (Skywal ker)," Silverstein s aid.




A "Star Wars" anal ogy can j ust as easil y be used to depict Google as an i mposi ng empire. It hol ds c ommanding l eads i n both the Inter net s earch and advertising mar kets. The c ompany proces ses nearly two-thir ds of the world's online s earc h r equests, accor ding to the r es earc h firm c omSc ore Inc., and s ells about thr ee-fourths of the ads tied to searc h req ues ts, ac cor ding to another fir m, eM ar keter Inc .




The dominance has enabl ed Google to rake i n $48 billion fr om Internet ads sinc e 2001. Google has n't hoarded all of that money: the company has paid $15 billion i n c ommissions to the Web sites that run its ads during the s ame period, helpi ng to s uppor t major onli ne desti nations li ke AOL, As k.com and M ySpace as well as an array of bl oggers.




"Google is the oxyg en in this ec os ystem," Battelle s aid.




The company hopes to i nhale even more Inter net advertisi ng from the biggest deal in i ts s hort histor y — a $3.2 billion acquisi tion of online mar keti ng s ervi ce D oubl eClic k Inc . that was completed si x months ago.




Google also is tr yi ng to mi ne more money fr om its s econd-largest acquisition, YouTube, the Internet's l eadi ng video c hannel. YouTube is expec ted to generate about $200 million in revenue this year, an amount that anal ysts believe barel y scratches the video site's moneymaki ng potenti al.




Eventually, Google C hairman Eric Sc hmidt wants the entir e c ompany to g enerate $100 billion i n annual r evenue, which would make i t roughl y as big as the two l argest infor mation-technolog y c ompanies — H ewlett-Pac kard Co. and IBM C orp. — each ar e now. T his year, Google will sur pass the $20 billion thres hold for the first time.




Schmi dt, 53, who became Google's C EO in 2001, seems determi ned to stic k ar ound to r eac h his g oal. He, Brin and Page have made an i nformal pact to remain the c ompany's brai n tr ust thr oug h 2024, at l east.




But s ome rivals are deter mined to thwart Google. TV and movi e c onglomer ate Viac om Inc . is s uing Google for $1 billion for alleged c opyright i nfring ement at YouTube, while Micr os oft signal ed how des per atel y it wants to topple Google by offering to buy Yahoo for $47.5 billion this year.




Microsoft withdrew the takeover bi d in a dis pute over Yahoo's val ue, but s ome anal ysts still think those two c ompanies may get tog ether i f they fall farther behi nd Google.




The noti on that Micros oft — the ric hest tec hnol ogy c ompany — would spend so muc h time worr ying about Google seemed i nc onc ei vabl e i n September 1998, when Page and Brin deci ded to convert their res earc h proj ect in Stanford U ni versity's c omputer sci ence graduate pr ogram i nto a for mal company.




Page, a U ni versity of Mic higan graduate, and Brin, a U ni versity of M ar yland al um, began wor king on a searc h engine — origin ally c alled Bac kR ub — i n 1996 bec aus e they beli eved a l ot of important content was n't bei ng found on the Web. At the time, the compani es behind the Internet's major search engines — Yahoo, AltaVis ta and Excite — were incr easi ngl y foc used on buil ding multifaceted Web sites.




Internet searc h was c onsidered s uc h a low pri ority at the time that Page and Brin c oul dn't even fi nd anyone willing to pay a c oupl e of million dollars to buy their tec hnolog y. Instead, they got a $100,000 investment from one of Sun Micros ystems Inc .'s co- founders, Andy Bec htols hei m, and fil ed inc orporation papers s o they c oul d c as h a c hec k made out to Google Inc. In a nod to their geeky r oots as c hildr en of c omputer sci ence and math pr ofess ors, Pag e and Brin had deri ved the name from the mathematic al ter m "googol" — a 1 foll owed by 100 z eros.




Later they would r ais e a total of about $26 milli on from famil y, friends and venture capitalists to help fund the c ompany and pay for now-famous empl oyee per ks li ke fr ee meals and snac ks .




Even after Google bec ame an offici al c ompany i n 1998, the busi ness c ontinued to operate out of the founders' Stanford dor m rooms.




Li ke Google's stripped- down home page, the company its elf had a bar e-bones aesthetic. Page's r oom was converted into a "s er ver farm" for the three c omputers that r an the searc h engine, whic h then pr oc ess ed about 10,000 r equests per day c ompared with about 1.5 billion per day now. The headquarters were i n Brin's room i n a neighboring dor m hall, wh ere the founders and Sil verstein wr estl ed for c ontrol of another c omputer to bang out programmi ng code.




Within a few weeks after inc orporating, Google moved into the garag e of a M enl o Par k, C alif., home owned by Sus an Wojcic ki, who became a Google exec uti ve and is now Brin's sis ter-in-l aw (Google bought the house in 2006). Even bac k in 1998, there was s ome free food — usuall y bags o f M&M s and Silverstein's homemade br ead.




Jump bac k to today: T he company occupies a 1.5 million-sq uar e-foot headquarters c alled the "Googleplex" — as well as two doz en other U .S. offic es and hubs in mor e than 30 other countries . And its searc h engine — believed to i ndex at least 40 billion Web pages — now r uns on hundr eds of thous ands of c omputers kept i n massi ve data centers around the world.




The growth dumbfounds Sil vers tei n, whose onl y g oal when he s tarted was to help make Google s ucc ess ful enough to empl oy 80 peopl e.




"It's natural when a company gets big that some people bec ome fearful of that," Sil verstein sai d. " All we c an do is to be as upfr ont and s traightfor ward as possi ble. We ar e not tr yi ng to be malicious or have some s neaky plan to put you in our thr all. T her e are s ome people who wil l never believe that."




— — —




On the N et:




A glimps e at what Google l ooked li ke in 1998:
http://web.arc hi ve.org/web/19981111183552/google.s tanford.edu




Google's phil osophy:




http://www.google.com/cor por ate/tenthings.html
ARTIC LEID: 10762
Date: 9/7/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Google turns 10 years old
OTS: 7901545
Subject: Alumni T opic s
Summ ar y: Pag e, a U ni versi ty of Mic higan graduate, and Bri n, a U ni versi ty of M ar yland al um, began wor king on a searc h engine originall y call ed Bac kR ub in 1996 becaus e they believed a lot of i mportant c ontent was n't being found on the Web.
Bod y:




Google turn s 10 year s old




By Mic hael Liedtke, AP T ec hnolog y Writer




MOUNT AIN VIEW , Calif .




When Larr y Page and Sergey Brin founded Googl e Inc. on Sept. 7, 1998, they had littl e mor e than their i ngenuity, four c omputers and an inves tor's $100,000 bet on their belief that an Inter net s earc h engi ne could c hange the world.




It s ounded preposterous 10 years ago, but look now: Google dr aws upon a gargantuan computer networ k, nearl y 20,000 empl oyees and a $150 billion mar ket value to redefine medi a, mar keting and technolog y.




Per haps Google's biggest test i n the next dec ade will be fi nding a way to pursue its s eemi ngly boundles s ambiti ons without triggering a bac kl as h that der ails the c ompany.




"You c an't do some of the thi ngs that they are tr ying to do without eventuall y facing s ome c hall enges fr om the government and your ri vals ," s aid Danny Sulli van, who has followed Google si nc e its inc eption and is now editor-in-chi ef of Searc hEngineLand.




Google's expandi ng c ontr ol over the flow of Internet traffic and adver tising already is raisi ng monopol y c onc erns.




The intensifyi ng regul ator y and political scruti ny on Google's expansion c ould pr esent mor e roadbl oc ks in the futur e. Even now, there's a chance U.S. antitrus t r egulators will challenge Google's plans to s ell ads for Yahoo Inc., a fadi ng Internet star whos e recent struggles have been magnifi ed by Google's s ucc ess.




Privac y watchdogs als o have s har pened their attac ks on Google's r etention of potenti all y s ensiti ve infor mation about the 650 million peopl e who us e its s earc h engine and other Internet s er vices li ke YouT ube, Maps and Gmail. If the har ping eventuall y i nspir es rul es that res trict Google's data coll ecti on, it could make its s earc h engine less rel evant and its ad networ k less pr ofitable.




To protec t its i nteres ts, Google has hired l obbyis ts to bend the ears of lawmakers and r amped up i ts public r elati ons s taff to s way opini on as management gears up to c onq uer new fr ontiers.




"Google will keep pushi ng the envelope," predicted J ohn Battelle, who wr ote a book about the company and now r uns F ederated M edi a, a conduit for Internet publis hers and advertis ers. "It's one of the thi ngs that s eems to make them happy."




In the l atest exampl e of i ts r elentless expansion, Googl e has jus t rel eased a Web br ows er to make its s earch engine and other online s er vices even more ac cessi ble and appeali ng. Not ever y peripheral s tep has gone s moothl y, though; s everal of the c ompany's ancillar y products have fl opped or never li ved up to the hype.




Extending Google's ubiquity to cell phones and other mobile devi ces sits at the top of management's ag enda for the next dec ade.




But the lengthy to-do list als o i ncludes: maki ng digital c opi es of all the world's books ; establis hing electronic file c abinets for peopl e's health rec ords ; l eading the alternati ve energy c harge away from fos sil fuels ; s elling c omputer pr ograms to busi nes ses over the I nternet; and tweaki ng its s earch engine s o it can better unders tand req ues ts s tated i n plai n language, just li ke a human woul d.




"Ther e are people who thi nk we are pl enty full of oursel ves right now, but from insi de at l eas t, it doesn't look that way," s aid Craig Sil verstein, Google's tec hnolog y direc tor and the first employee hir ed by Page and Bri n. " I think what keeps us humbl e is r ealizi ng how muc h further we have to go."




Page and Brin, both 35 now and worth nearl y $19 billion api ec e, declined to be i nter viewed for this s tor y. But they have never l eft any doubt they view Googl e as a force for good            a phil os ophy punc tuated by t heir cor por ate motto: "Don't Be Evil."




"If we had a lights aber, we woul d be Luke (Skywal ker)," Silverstein s aid.




A Star Wars anal ogy c an j ust as easil y be us ed to depict Google as an i mposi ng empire. It hol ds c ommanding l eads i n both the Internet s earch and advertising mar kets. The company pr ocesses nearly two-thir ds of the world's online s earc h r equests , accor ding to the r es earc h fir m c omScor e Inc ., and sells about thr ee-fourths of the ads ti ed to s earc h r equests , acc ording to another firm, eM ar keter.




The dominance has enabl ed Google to rake i n $48 billion fr om Internet ads sinc e 2001. Google has n't hoarded all of that money: the company has paid $15 billion i n c ommissions to the websites that run its ads during the s ame period, helpi ng to s uppor t maj or onli ne desti nations like AOL, As k.c om and M ySpac e as well as an array of bloggers.




"Google is the oxyg en in this ec os ystem," Battelle s aid.




The company hopes to i nhale even more Inter net advertisi ng from the biggest deal in i ts s hort histor y        a $3.2 billion acq uisition of online mar keting s er vice DoubleClic k Inc. that was completed si x months ago.




Google also is tr yi ng to mi ne more money fr om its s econd-largest acquisition, YouTube, the Internet's l eadi ng video c hannel. YouTube is expec ted to generate about $200 million in revenue this year, an amount that anal ysts believe barel y scratches the video site's moneymaki ng potenti al.




Eventually, Google C hairman Eric Sc hmidt wants the entir e c ompany to g enerate $100 billion i n annual r evenue, which would make i t roughl y as big as the two l argest infor mation-technolog y c ompanies                 H ewl ett- Pac kar d and IBM C orp.    eac h are now. T his year, Google will s urpass the $20 billion threshold for the first time.




Schmi dt, 53, who became Google's C EO in 2001, seems determi ned to stic k ar ound to r eac h his g oal. He, Brin and Page have made an i nformal pact to remain the c ompany's brai n tr ust thr oug h 2024, at l e ast.




But s ome rivals are deter mined to thwart Google. TV and movi e c onglomer ate Viac om Inc . is s uing Google for $1 billion for alleged c opyright i nfring ement at YouTube, while Micr os oft signal ed how des per atel y it wants to topple Google by offering to buy Yahoo for $47.5 billion this year.




Microsoft withdrew the takeover bi d in a dis pute over Yahoo's val ue, but s ome anal ysts still think those two c ompanies may get tog ether i f they fall farther behi nd Google.




The noti on that Micros oft   the richest tec hnol og y c ompany     would s pend s o much ti me worr yi ng about Googl e s eemed inc onc ei vable in September 1998, when Page and Bri n deci ded to c onvert their research pr ojec t i n Stanford Uni versity's computer scienc e graduate program i nto a for mal company.




Page, a U ni versity of Mic higan graduate, and Brin, a U ni versity of M ar yland al um, began wor king on a searc h engine        originall y c alled Bac kRub    in 1996 becaus e they believed a lot of i mportant c ontent wasn't being found on the Web. At the ti me, the c ompanies behi nd the Internet's major searc h engines                Yahoo, AltaVista and Excite       wer e i ncreasingl y foc us ed on buildi ng multifac eted websites.




Internet searc h was c onsidered s uc h a low pri ority at the time that Page and Brin c oul dn't even fi nd anyone willing to pay a c oupl e of million dollars to buy their tec hnolog y. Instead, they got a $100,000 investment from one of Sun Micros ystems Inc .'s co- founders, Andy Bec htols hei m, and fil ed inc orporation papers s o they c oul d c as h a c hec k made out to Google Inc. In a nod to th eir geeky r oots as c hildr en of c omputer sci ence and math pr ofess ors, Pag e and Brin had deri ved the name from the mathematic al ter m "googol"   a 1 followed by 100 z eros .




Later they would r ais e a total of about $26 milli on from famil y, friends and venture capitalists to help fund the c ompany and pay for now-famous empl oyee per ks li ke fr ee meals and snac ks .




Even after Google bec ame an offici al c ompany i n 1998, the busi ness c ontinued to operate out of the founders' Stanford dor m ro oms.




Li ke Google's stripped- down home page, the company its elf had a bar e-bones aesthetic. Page's r oom was converted into a "s er ver farm" for the three c omputers that r an the searc h engine, whic h then pr oc ess ed about 10,000 r equests per day c ompared with about 1.5 billion per day now. The headquarters were i n Brin's room i n a neighboring dor m hall, where the founders and Sil verstein wr estl ed for c ontrol of another c omputer to bang out programmi ng code.




Within a few weeks after inc orporating, Google moved into the garag e of a M enl o Par k, C alif., home owned by Sus an Wojcic ki, who became a Google exec uti ve and is now Brin's sis ter-in-l aw (Google bought the house in 2006). Even bac k in 1998, there was s ome free food                           usuall y bags of M &Ms and Sil vers tei n's homemade bread.




Jump bac k to today: T he company occupies a 1.5 million-sq uar e-foot headquarters c alled the "Googleplex"              as well as two dozen other U.S. offic es and hubs i n mor e than 30 other countries . And its s earc h engi ne        beli eved to index at l east 40 billion Web pages      now runs on hundr eds of thousands of c omputers kept in massi ve data c enters ar ound the worl d.




The growth dumbfounds Sil vers tei n, whose onl y g oal when he s tarted was to help make Google s ucc ess ful enough to empl oy 80 peopl e.




"It's natural when a company gets big that some people bec ome fearful of that," Sil verstein sai d. " All we c an do is to be as upfr ont and s traightfor ward as possi ble. We ar e not tr yi ng to be malicious or have some s neaky plan to put you in our thr all. T her e are s ome people who wil l never believe that."
ARTIC LEID: 10764
Date: 9/8/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Scientists Hope for Sur prises in Big Bang Experiment
OTS: 7901545
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: " What I would like to see is t he unexpected," s ai d Gerar dus t'Hooft of the U ni versity of Mic higan. Perhaps , he suggested, the Large H adron C ollider ( LHC) m achi ne at the heart of the experiment " will s how us things we didn't know existed."
Bod y:




Scientists Hop e for Surpr ises in Big Bang Exp eriment




By R obert Evans




Reuters




GEN EVA




Scientists invol ved in a his toric " Big Bang" experi ment to begi n this week hope it will tur n up many s urpris es about the uni vers e and i ts origins -- but rej ect sugges tions it will bring the end of the worl d.




And R obert Aymar, the Fr enc h physicist who heads the C ERN research c entre, pr edic ted that disc overies to emerge from his organizati on's 6.4 billion eur o ( $9.2 billion) project would spar k major advanc es for human s ociety.




"If s ome of what we expect to fi nd does not turn up, and things we did not fores ee do, that will be even mor e sti mulating becaus e it means that we unders tand le ss than we thought about natur e," s aid Britis h physicist Brian C ox.




"What I would li ke to see is the unexpected," s aid Gerar dus t'Hooft of the U ni versi ty of Mic higan. Perhaps , he sugges ted, the Large H adr on Colli der ( LHC) machi ne at the heart of the experi ment " will s how us things we didn't know existed."




Onc e it starts up on Wednes day, s cientists pl an to s mas h particl e beams tog ether at clos e to the speed of light insi de CERN's tightl y-s eal ed Large H adron C ollider to create multi ple mi ni- versi ons of the primeval Big Bang.




Cos mol ogists say that that expl osi on of an objec t the siz e of a s mall c oin oc curred about 13.7 billion years ago a nd led to for mati on of stars, pl anets -- and eventuall y to life on earth.




A key ai m of the C ERN experi ment is to fi nd the "Higgs boson," named after Sc ottis h physicist Peter Higgs who i n 1964 poi nted to s uch a particle as the force that gave mass to matter and made the uni verse possi ble.




But other mys teri es of physics and cos mol og y -- s upers ymmetr y, dar k matter and dar k energ y among them -- ar e at the foc us of experiments in the 27-km (17-mil e) circ ular tunnel deep underneath the Swiss-Frenc h bor der .




FEAR S OF DISAST ER




CERN, the Eur opean Centr e for N uclear R esearc h, s ays its key res earchers -- and many or dinar y s taff -- have been i nundated by e- mails voici ng fears about the experiment.




Ther e have been cl ai ms that i t will create " blac k hol es" of intensi ve gravity suc king i n C ERN, Eur ope and perhaps the whol e planet, or that it will open the way for beings from another uni vers e to i nvade through a " wor m hol e" i n s pace-ti me.




But a s afety r eview by sci entists at CERN and in the United States and R ussi a, iss ued at the weekend, rej ected the pr ospec t of s uc h outc omes .




"The LHC will enabl e us to s tudy i n detail what nature is doing all around us," Aymar, who has led C ERN for fi ve years, sai d i n res ponse to that revi ew. "The LHC is safe, and any s uggesti on that it might pres ent a ris k is pure ficti on."




Cox, from the Sc hool of Physics and As tronomy at Britai n's Manc hester Uni versity, was even more trenc hant. "I am immensel y ir ritated by the c ons pirac y theorists who spr ead this nons ens e around," he s aid.




When the experi ment begins soon after 9 a.m. ( 0700 GMT) on September 10, disaster sc enarists will have little to wor k on.




In the firs t tests, a particl e beam will be s hot all the way ar ound the LH C c hannel i n j ust one dir ection. If all g oes well, c ollisions might be tri ed withi n the c oming weeks, but at low intensity. Any b angs at this s tage, s aid one CERN res earcher, " will be littl e ones."




(Editi ng by Laura M acInnis)
ARTIC LEID: 10767
Date: 9/9/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: J ob Loss Has Long-Term Impac t on Social Li ves
OTS: 7901545
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: T he study, by r es earc hers at the U ni versity of C alifor nia, Los Angel es, and the Uni versity of Michigan, Ann Ar bor , found that wor kers who had experienced even one invol untar y j ob loss were 35 perc ent l ess li kel y to b e invol ved in their c ommuniti es than those who had never been out of wor k bec aus e of l ayoff, res tructuring or a busi ness cl osi ng or r eloc ati ng.
Bod y:




Job Lo ss H as Long-Term Imp act on Social Liv es




Those dis plac ed more li kel y to wi thdraw from clubs, but ol der wor kers fare better, study fi nds .




By Kevi n Mc Keever




Sept. 10




TUESD AY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Getti ng lai d off affects not onl y one's economic well-bei ng, it als o c urtails one's invol vement in communi ty and s oci al acti viti es, a new study found.




The study, by r es earc hers at the Uni versity of C alifor nia, Los Angel es, and the U ni versity of Michigan, Ann Ar bor, found that wor kers who had experienced even one invol untar y j ob los s were 35 perc ent l ess li kel y to be invol ved in their c ommuniti es than thos e who had never been out of wor k bec aus e of l ayoff, res tructuring or a busi ness cl osing or r eloc ati ng.




The br eak fr om c ommunity i nvol vement -- whether it meant droppi ng out from a book cl ub or no longer participati ng in the PT A -- c onti nued for the r emai nder of the wor kers' li ves, not j ust for the period of unemployment, ac cor ding to the s tudy.




"Soci al eng agement often i nvol ves an el ement of s ocial trus t and a s ense that things are reci proc al -- that you gi ve some s upport i f you get some s upport, and you benefi t fr om s ociety if society benefits from you," study lead author J ennie E. Br and, a UCLA s oci ologist, sai d i n a uni versity ne ws r eleas e. " When wor kers ar e displ ac ed, the tendenc y is to feel as though the s oci al c ontract has been vi ol ated, and we foun d that they are les s li kel y to reciprocate."




The findi ngs, which exami ned the long-ter m impact of job displ ac ement on s oci al partici pation, were published in the September is sue of the j ournal Soci al Forc es . T he res earc h was based on infor mati on from a study that tr ac ked 4,373 Wisconsi n high sc hool gr aduates (clas s of 1957) for m ore than 45 years.




Displac ed wor kers were most li kel y to withdraw from participati ng in youth and communi ty groups, followed by c hurch and c hurc h groups, c haritable organiz ations and leis urel y ac ti vities, s uc h as c ountr y cl ub attendanc e. Profes sional organizations were the least likel y to be affec ted by a disruption of employment.




"Displac ed workers may be more li kel y to keep up wi th pr ofessional groups than other groups, bec aus e they're tr ying to make up for los t ground with r es pec t to their c areers," Brand s aid.




The social withdrawal occ urred mos t with thos e displ ac ed during their peak ear ning years -- between 35 and 53 years of ag e. Empl oyees who l ost jobs near the end of their c areers were les s li kel y to withdr aw than wor kers who wer e displ ac ed earlier i n their car eers .




"Bei ng lai d off doesn't appear to be as sociall y damaging for older wor kers as younger ones," Br and s ai d. "T he s hame fac tor of downsizing your lifestyle jus t is n't there, bec aus e your peers may be downsizing as well, and you can play off your dis pl acement as an earl y r etirement even though it may be forced r etirement."




The findi ngs have c onsiderable ramific ati ons not jus t for s ociety, but als o for the indi vi dual's attempt to find new wor k, Br and contended.




"If wor kers wi thdraw sociall y after bei ng lai d off, then they're experiencing double-j eopar dy," Br and s aid. "T hey'r e losing their jobs, and then they're not par ticipating i n s oci ety, s o they're not keeping up with s oci al c ontac ts that might hel p them fi nd a new j ob."




Brand sai d c harities and c ommunity groups might want to wor k har der at reachi ng out to displ ac ed wor kers for the good of the organiz ati on and for the wor ker's own good.




"Ever ybody los es when peopl e withdr aw from s oci ety," Br and s ai d.




More inform ation




The U.S. D epartment of Labor has mor e about dealing wi th a j ob loss.




SOURC E: U ni versity of C aliforni a, Los Ang eles, news releas e, Sept. 1, 2008
ARTIC LEID: 10768
Date: 9/11/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News O nline ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Bull ying T op C onc er n of Par ents With Over weight Chil d
OTS: 7901545
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: Par ents of thes e c hildr en, aged 6 to 13, also ar e much mor e li kel y than par ents of chil dren at a healthy weight to c all bull yi ng a top health is sue for ki ds, ac cor ding to a r eport r eleas ed Monday by the Uni versity of Michig an C.S. M ott Chil dren's Hospital N ati onal Poll on C hildren's H eal th. 'We found that parents with over weight or obes e c hildr en ac tuall y vi ew bullyi ng as a greater pr obl em than chil dhood obesity,' Dr. Matthew M . D avis, director of the National Poll on C hildr en's Health, s ai d in a uni versity news rel ease.
Bod y:




Bullying Top Con cer n of Parent s W ith Over weight Child




They view intimi dation as even greater pr obl em than obesity itself, study s ays .




By Kevi n Mc Keever




Sept. 12




THURSDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Bull ying is the top " health" c oncer n among par ents with overweight and obes e c hildr en, accor ding to a new r eport.




Par ents of thes e c hildr en, ag ed 6 to 13, als o are much more li kel y than par ents of chil dren at a healthy weight to c all bull yi ng a top health is sue for ki ds, ac cor ding to a r eport r eleas ed Monday by the Uni versity of Michig an C .S. M ott Chil dren's Hos pital N ati onal Poll on Chil dren's Health.




"We found that par ents with over weight or obese c hildren actuall y vi ew bull ying as a gr eater problem than c hildhood obesity," Dr. Matthew M . D avis, direc tor of the National Poll on C hildr en's Health, s ai d in a uni versity news rel ease. "Si nc e bull yi ng is known to be a problem for c hildren wi th i ncr eas ed weight, bull ying preventi on progr ams will need to be mindful of obesity as a pote ntial trigger for bull ying behavior and of par ents c oncer ns s urroundi ng this iss ue."




Over all, par ents don't take childhood obesi ty lightl y, ranki ng it N o. 1 is among heal th conc ern for kids in the N ati onal Poll on C hildren's H eal th. Still, onl y two-thirds of parents actuall y enforc e s uc h li mits with their c hildren on junk food and time spent i n fr ont of a T V or c omputer sc reen, the poll found. Still, many parents ar e tal ki ng with their c hildr en about havi ng healthier diets and i ncreasi ng their physical ac ti vity, whic h D avis sai d is an i mportant first step in setting the stag e for a healthier lifestyl e.




Nearl y two in fi ve of the families polled i ncluded one or more over weight or obes e c hild between the ages of 6 and 13. T he poll also showed that c hildren who were obes e or over weight wer e almos t twic e as li kel y to have an obes e parent as heal thy weight c hildr en.




"In many families, obesity is a two-generation phenomenon among par ents and their c hildren. This trend c ould be the res ult of genetics or behavi ors s uc h as eating habits and physical ac ti vity that ar e s har ed among parents and their chil dren," s aid Davi s, an associate profes sor of g eneral pedi atrics and internal medici ne at the U-M M edic al Sc hool.




More inform ation




The Nemours F oundati on has mor e about obesity and c hildr en.




SOURC E: U ni versity of Mic higan H eal th Sys tem, news rel eas e, Sept. 8, 2008
ARTIC LEID: 10769
Date: 9/14/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: GM Rolls on R oug h R oad as It N ears 100th Birthday
OTS: 7901545
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: "T his is the worst crisis they ever have fac ed," s aid D avi d Lewis , profess or emeritus at the U ni versity of Michigan who taug ht business his tor y for 43 years until r etiring earli er this year. "Bec ause they're really in dang er of failing."
Bod y:




GM Rolls on Rough Road as It Near s 100th B irthd ay




Li ke a roc k: Gener al Motors rolling on rough r oad but expects to li ve on for another centur y




By T OM KR ISH ER




The As soci ated Pr ess




DETROIT




In his 43 years as a General Motors C orp. factor y wor ker, R oger Ezell has s een rec essi ons , gas oline price s pi kes , s ales slumps and multi billion doll ar loss es .




Eac h time, he s ays , the giant automaker has s ur vi ved to make billions in later years.




But as GM cel ebrates i ts 100th anni versar y Tues day, the c ompany that was onc e the nation's larges t empl oyer faces a crisis li ke no other in its s tori ed his tor y.




GM has l ost $57.5 billion in the past 18 months , including $15.5 billion in the second quarter . It's burni ng mor e than $1 billion a month i n c as h, has mor e than $32 billion in l ong-ter m debt, and a sl umpi ng U.S. mar ket has forced it to cl ose factories and s hed wor kers .




In J ul y, it s us pended its di vidend for the first ti me i n 86 years, and the company has been i n per petual r estructuring since at least 2002.




"We' ve s een them down further than what they ar e, and they got bac k up," s aid Ezell, 63, who pas sed up s ever al earl y r etireme nt offers to keep wor king at a fac tor y near Pontiac that makes the Chevr olet Mali bu and Pontiac G6 mi dsiz e s edans. " I beli eve in GM. There's no doubt in my mind."




Yet industr y anal ys ts wonder whether GM can make it i f the U.S. ec onomy stays i n a funk and cons umers conti nue to shun tr uc ks and sport utility vehicl es for s mall, fuel-efficient cars . One anal yst even mentioned bankr uptc y pr otection for the c ompany that developed the first ful ly automatic tr ans missi on, the firs t V- 8 engi ne, the first hydrog en fuel c ell vehi cle and even the first mec hanic al heart-lung machi ne.




"This is the worst crisis they ever have fac ed," s aid D avi d Lewis , profess or emeritus at the U ni versity of Michigan who taug ht business histor y for 43 years until r etiring earlier this year. "Bec aus e they're r eally in dang er of failing."




For all i ts warts, GM can poi nt to pr ogress , especi ally on the expens e si de of the ledger. A historic c ontract r eac hed las t year wi th the U nited Auto Wor kers will save the company about $3 billion per year, mainl y by shi fting $46.7 billion i n retiree health c are expens es from GM's books to a U AW-administered trus t in 2010. But the company has to sink mor e than $33 billion into the trust.




The new c ontract als o incl udes $14 hourl y wages for some new hir es, half the pay rate of ol der wor kers.




GM als o has tri mmed its U.S. wor k force and clos ed factories. In 2006 it had 113,000 U .S. hourl y empl oyees , but that is now do wn to about 55,000. Its U.S. sal aried wor k force dr opped from 44,000 i n 2000 to about 32,000 l ast year.




While it's shrinki ng i n N orth America, GM's global s ales ar e up 19 perc ent i n the pas t dec ade with large incr eases in emerging mar kets suc h as C hi na, R ussia, India and Br azil. It's als o spendi ng heavil y to bec ome a leader i n new tec hnologies, i ncludi ng the C hevrol et Volt elec tric car due out i n 2010.




"We' ve got a ver y, ver y g ood business model now," C hi ef Fi nanci al Offic er Ray Young s ai d in a rec ent i ntervi ew. "We' ve dri ven a lot of effici enc y and producti vity into our N orth American operations. We' ve broug ht down our break-even poi nts ."




Yet critics say GM, since Ric k Wagoner became C EO in 2000, has n't adj usted quic kl y enough to its dwi ndli ng U.S. mar ket s har e, whic h has fallen to about 23 perc ent this year fr om a peak of nearl y 51 perc ent i n 1962.




GM's roots date to Sept. 16, 1908, when Bill y Dur ant s tarted the c ompany with the Buic k namepl ate. Olds mobile was added the s ame year, wi th C adillac, GMC and what is now Pontiac in 1909. Dur ant started Chevr olet in 1911, and Satur n, H ummer and Saab were added as the c ompany grew.




Although it s hed Olds mobil e after the 2004 model year, GM still has too many brands and models that overlap, all cr eatur es of a cos t s tructure that's still too high, sai d anal yst Kevi n T ynan of New Yor k-bas ed Argus Res earch Cor p.




Tynan sugges ts pari ng the company bac k to C hevr olet as a mai nstr eam br and, GMC for truc ks, C adillac for l uxur y buyers — and getting rid of the res t.




"What you'd have is r adic all y different Gener al Motors than we've known in thes e past 100 years," he s aid. "T her e's defi nitel y buyers for your produc t globall y, domestic all y," T ynan s aid. " Why c an't we j ust build fewer and be profi table on all of it?"




GM's histor y, he s ai d, hur ts it in the l ong r un bec ause pr oud c ompany executi ves have troubl e acc epting that mar ket s hare is likel y to dr op even further as demand c ontinues to s hift away from truc ks to cars .




"You get s o married to the hi stor y that you can't g o for war d," T ynan s aid. "There's too many dealers hi ps. T here's too many mo dels and not enough profitability. Unl ess you addr ess thes e iss ues, you're just goi ng to c ontinue to s hrink."




Among GM's biggest probl ems is i ts debt, whi ch is roughl y $3,400 for each of the 9.37 million vehicles it s ol d globall y l ast year. Although the automaker is tr ying to avoi d mor e l oans by cutting cos ts and selling ass ets , it mig ht borr ow more, possi bl y fr om the U.S. g overnment.




But Young s ai d GM can manage the debt, whic h will be repai d over a long period, i n s ome c as es up to 30 years.




"It's not like you have to repay it tomorrow," he sai d. " We recog nize that our bal ance sheet does have a lot of debt, and that's why wer e ver y foc us ed on c as h fl ow generati on right now."




Repayi ng debt while covering l oss es, r etooli ng factories and tr yi ng to fund r esearc h on cars of the future will not be eas y.




"You' ve g ot to pay that debt bac k with i nteres t, and you're not making money now," sai d the U ni versity of Mic higan's Lewis.




But Young and other GM exec uti ves poi nt to the new mi dsiz e C hevr olet Mali bu as a s hini ng example of how the c ompany c an buil d a top- notc h c ar that c an win buyers bac k fr om J apanes e brands and make money for the c ompany.




GM s old 119,665 Mali bus through August, up 47 perc ent from the s ame ti me last year. It's als o selling for an aver age of $4,00 0 more than its nondescri pt predecessor.




Ezell sai d GM paid mor e attention to the new M alibu than any other model he's s een i n his four dec ades with the company.




"The quality that they put i nto them is unbelievabl e," he s aid. " We have to make s ure it goes out right the first ti me."




The Mali bu, Young s ai d, will s et the standar d for each new GM vehicl e from her e on out.




"Ever y vehicl e that we l aunc h is goi ng to be mor e profi table, better exec uted, better s uppor ted," he s aid.




But Lewis sai d the c ompetiti on also i s bri nging out great new pr oducts, s o GM's mission will onl y get harder.




Still, histor y has shown that D etr oit automakers have made repeated c omebac ks from har d times i n the past.




"When they s tart to make money, they make a lot of money," Lewis sai d. " That's happened many times ."
ARTIC LEID: 10771
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: All Eyes on F ed Ahead of N ext Meeti ng
OTS: 7901545
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey of c onsumers preli minar y senti ment index for September was a s trong 73.1, up fr om 63.0 the pr evious month.Pl unging crude oil pric es also helped pus h down cons umers' one- year and fi ve- year inflation expec tati ons, whic h are part of the U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey.T he cons umer pric e index r ose 0.8 percent in Jul y for a 5.6 percent advanc e from a year ago -- the s har pest year-on- year rise sinc e J anuar y 1991.
Bod y:




All Eyes on F ed Ah ead of N ext Meeting




By R os Kras ny




Reuters




CHICAGO




A radic al s hake-up on Wall Str eet and heavy los ses in financial mar kets have rec ast the debate for Tues day's Federal Open Mar ket Committee meeting to set inter est rate polic y.




Fed officials will as semble as a stor m rag es over the gl obal fi nanci al s ys tem, overs hadowing disc ussi on of s uch br ead-and-butter iss ues as the medi um-ter m gr owth and i nflation outlook.




As recentl y as Friday, anal ysts had expected the Fed to keep benc hmar k i nteres t r ates steady on T ues day as it weighs a sputtering ec onomy and an ebbi ng of inflation press ure.




On M onday, however , bets that the F ed will be forc ed into a q uarter-point c ut to the federal funds rate, to 1.75 perc ent fr om 2 perc ent, were rising. D ealers now s ee mor e than an even- money c hanc e of a rate c ut.




"Fed views have s wung dr amaticall y i n r esponse to the gut-wr enchi ng developments ," s aid Marc Chandl er, c urrenc y s trategist at Br own Br others H arriman in New Yor k.




The FOMC held rates steady when the panel met i n J une and Augus t, after l oweri ng them in April. That cut bought the fed funds r ate down by a cumulati ve 3.25 perc entag e poi nts from mid-September 2007.




Followi ng ar e s ome factors polic y- makers ar e c onsidering:




FINANCIAL IN STITUT ION S:




Wall Str eet is i n crisis mode. On Sunday, i nvestment bank Lehman Br others Hol dings Inc filed for bankr uptc y, triggering fears of c asc adi ng los ses across a range of financial i nstituti ons.




Lehman's demis e came a week after the government cr afted a resc ue plan for U .S. mortg age financ e compani es F anni e Mae and Freddi e M ac , which had been br oug ht to their knees by the housing mar ket c ollapse.




Late on Sunday, the F ed announced a sl ate of measur es to enhance its liqui dity pr ovisions and keep the fi nanci al s ys tem afl oat as the global credit crunch, now in i ts s ec ond year, s eems to be getting worse, not better.




U.S. stoc k mar kets were hit hard on M onday. The D ow J ones industrial averag e <.DJ I> tumbl ed mor e than 2 percent.




ECON OMY T EETER S




The U.S. unemployment r ate s pi ked to 6.1 percent in August from 5.7 percent in Jul y, a s urprise move to the highest level i n almos t fi ve years. Empl oyers c ut payrolls by 84,000 nonfar m j obs for an eighth straight month of decli nes .




Revised figures s howed s econd-quarter growth was a strong 3.3 perc ent as c onsumer s pending g ot a lift from the govern ment's tax r ebate c hec ks. But mos t pundi ts s ee the res ult as transitor y and expect growth to slow ag ain.




August r etail sal es were a bust. T he closel y watched c ore measur e that strips out autos, gas oline and buil ding materials fell 0.2 perc ent after risi ng 0.4 percent in Jul y.




U.S. manufac turi ng remains on the c us p between expansion and contr action at a ti me when the revi vi ng U.S. dollar c ould li mit what has been a robust export mar ket.




The Institute for Suppl y M anagement's index of national factor y acti vity in Augus t was 49.9 agai nst 50.0 i n J ul y. ISM's non- manufacturing i ndex clawed up to 50.6 fr om 49.5.




Durable goods or ders, excluding the volatile trans portati on s ector, rose 0.7 percent in Jul y after posti ng a sur prising 2.4 perc ent j ump in J une.




The Reuters/U ni versi ty of Mic higan s ur vey of c onsumers preli minar y s enti ment index for September was a s trong 73.1, up fr om 63.0 the pr evious month.




INFLATION - A TURN IN TH E TID E




Infl ati on pr ess ures have started to revers e si nce the FOMC l ast gathered.




U.S. crude oil futur es hit $94.13 on Monday, down 36 perc ent fr om their r ec ord high of $147.27 per barrel on Jul y 11. Si milar l y, the Commodity R es earc h Bur eau i ndex is far off its highs and bac k to levels first r eac hed in 2006.




Infl ati on expectations have fallen s harpl y. Ten- year i nfl ation for ec asts refl ected in Treas ur y Infl ation Protec ted Securiti es, or T IPS, are at the lowes t level i n fi ve years at under 2 perc ent.




Plunging crude oil pric es also helped pus h down cons umers' one- year and fi ve- year i nflation expec tations, whic h are part of the U ni versity of Michigan s ur vey.




The cons umer pric e index r ose 0.8 percent in Jul y for a 5.6 percent advance from a year ago -- the s har pest year-on- year rise sinc e J anuar y 1991.




Core C PI, which excl udes volatil e food and energy pric es, r os e 0.3 perc ent and was up 2.5 perc ent on the year.




August C PI figures will be iss ued Tues day morning. Headline CPI is for ec ast to fall 0.1 percent after Augus t produc er prices dr opped a bigger-than-expected 0.9 percent.




HOUSIN G - STILL SU FFER ING




Forecl os ure r ates are slowi ng a bit as meas ures to inter vene in troubl ed mortg ages take hold, and other i ndicators have been hi nti ng the mar ket is near a bottom.




Still, F ed offici als have warned not to expec t the housing s ec tor to rec over muc h this year.




Housi ng starts dr opped 11 perc ent i n J ul y, r eversing what was s een as an aberration i n J une, and ar e forecas t to have slipped agai n i n August.




Existi ng home sal es i n J ul y r os e 3.1 perc ent to a 5.0 million unit annual rate. But those sal es came at a medi an price that was down 7.1 perc ent fr om a year earlier.




U.S. constr ucti on s pendi ng fell 0.6 perc ent in J ul y after the pr evious month was r evised to a s mall i ncreas e. Weakness in r esi denti al housing c onti nues to over whel m gai ns i n public c onstr ucti on.




(Editi ng by Dan Grebler)
ARTIC LEID: 10772
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Estrog en Cream Flunks Sun Damage Test, Study Fi nds
OTS: 7901545
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: T he creams do hel p s ki n that is pr otected fr om the sun to pr oduc e more coll agen -- the substanc e that makes s ki n appear smooth. But this s kin is usuall y far l ess wri nkled than s ki n that has s een the light of day, the team at the U ni versity of Mic higan repor ted."M ost of the time you want to get rid of wrinkl es on your face, your hands, your nec k," sai d Laure Ritti e, who hel ped l ead the s tudy, pai d for in part by Pfiz er Inc .She sai d s he was s urpris ed by the fi ndi ng."Generall y es trogen is thought to be b eneficial for s ki n. A lot of c ompanies offer pr oducts that tell you es trogen c an hel p fig ht s ki n aging. T his is onl y partiall y true," Ri ttie sai d i n a telephone inter vi ew.
Bod y:




Estrog en C ream Flun ks Sun D am age Test, Stud y Find s




By M aggie Fox, H ealth and Science Editor




Reuters




W ASHINGT ON




Estrog en creams do not hel p reduce wrinkl es, es peciall y thos e c aused by the s un, r esearc hers reported on Monday.




The creams do hel p s ki n that is pr otected from the sun to pr oduc e more collag en -- the substance that makes s ki n appear s mooth. But this s kin is usuall y far l ess wri nkled than s kin that has s een the light of day, the team at the U ni versity of Mic higan repor ted.




"Most of the ti me you want to g et ri d of wri nkles on your fac e, your hands , your nec k," s aid Laur e Ritti e, who hel ped lead the study, pai d for i n part by Pfizer Inc.




She s aid s he was sur prised by the finding.




"Gener all y estrog en is thoug ht to be beneficial for s kin. A lot of c ompanies offer produc ts that tell you estr ogen c an help fight s ki n aging. T his is onl y parti all y tr ue," Ritti e s aid in a tel ephone i nter view.




"It c an onl y be beneficial for s kin on areas that ar e not expos ed to s unlight."




Her team wor ked with 70 men and women wi th an average age of 75, although s ome were i n their earl y 50s .




They made various cr eams c ontai ning estr adi ol, the acti ve for m of es trogen, and had their vol unteers appl y them to forearms a nd hips three ti mes ever y other day for two weeks.




On the hips, whic h are g enerall y protected from sun, the es trogen-treated s ki n started pr oduci ng mor e c ollagen, Ritti e's team reported.




"Sur prisingly, no signific ant c hanges in pr oduc tion were obser ved in women or men after two- week es tradiol treatment of photo- aged forearm or face s kin," they wrote in the Arc hi ves of D ermatolog y.




Aging al one can c ause fine wri nkles , l oos e s kin and s agging. Addi ng s un damag e makes s ki n appear dr y, wi th uneven pigmentatio n.




As s ki n is damag ed by sun, the cells stop pr oduci ng coll agen. D ead coll agen hel ps c ause a wrinkl ed appearanc e.




Creams suc h as tretinoin and pr oc edures s uch as c arbon di oxide l as er res urfacing c an sti mulate coll agen produc tion.




Rittie had hoped to si mulate the effects wi th es trogen cr eam. " We ar e not goi ng to c onsider estrog en any more," Ritti e s ai d.




(Editi ng by Bill Tr ott)
ARTIC LEID: 10773
Date: 9/16/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Immune System Biomar kers May Pr edic t Earl y Lung C ancer
OTS: 7901545
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: tes t that uses i mmune s ys tem bi omar kers to detect l ung canc er c an identify the pres enc e of the diseas e a year before di agnosis, l ong before a patient experiences any s ymptoms, acc ordi ng to res earchers at the Fr ed H utc hins on C anc er R es earc h C enter i n Seattle and the Uni versity of Michigan. They noted the immune s ystem mounts a res pons e agai nst specific antigens , or pr oteins , pr oduc ed by l ung tumors in their earl y stages of development.
Bod y:




Immun e Syst em B iom ar ker s M ay Pred ict Early Lun g C ancer




Method c ould eventuall y prove effec ti ve in identifying other common types of dis ease, study s ays.




By R obert Prei dt




Sept. 16




MONDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthD ay News) -- A tes t that us es i mmune s ystem bi omar kers to detect lung canc er c an identify the presenc e of the diseas e a year before di agnosis, l ong before a patient experienc es any s ymptoms, acc ordi ng to researc hers at the Fred H utc hins on C anc er Research Center i n Seattl e and the U ni versity of Mic higan.




They noted the i mmune s ys tem mounts a r esponse ag ains t s pecific antigens, or proteins, produced by l ung tumors i n their earl y stages of devel opment.




"This ki nd of i mmune res pons e won't nec ess aril y kill the tumor , but it c an act as a canary in a coal mi ne, signaling l ung c ancer at an early stage, before ac tual s ymptoms emerge. It is an i mportant s tep toward developing a biomar ker-based blood test for the earl y detec tion of l ung cancer," Dr. Samir M. Hanash, head of the M olec ular Di agnostic Pr ogram in the Public Health Scienc es Di visi on at the H utc hins on C enter, sai d i n a news rel eas e.




Hanas h and c olleagues tested the sensiti vity and s pecificity of three antigens linked to earl y stage, pr e-s ymptomatic lung canc er -- annexi n1, 14-3-3 theta, and LAMR 1. The r esearc hers us ed bl ood samples taken from 85 c urrent or for mer s mokers wi thi n a year of being di agnos ed with lung c anc er and blood s ampl es from 85 c urrent or for mer smokers who di dn't develop l ung c anc er.




The three antigens wer e found i n the blood of 51 percent of the s mokers who devel oped l ung c ancer and in 18 perc ent of thos e who di dn't develop the diseas e.




"The fact that we got a signal like this with jus t three biomar kers is ver y sig nificant. If we enl arge this ( biomar ker) panel by adding a few mor e, we c ould devel op a blood test wi th sufficient sensiti vi ty and specificity for detec ting lung c ancer muc h earlier than c urrent s creeni ng methods allow," H anas h s aid.




The study was published onli ne Sept. 15 in the Jour nal of Clinic al Onc ology.




Within fi ve years, it may be possi ble to have a bl ood tes t that c an be us ed in conj unc tion with CT sc ans and other i maging techniques to improve earl y detec tion of l ung canc er in high-ris k people, H anas h s aid.




He also sai d this method may pr ove effecti ve i n earl y detecti on of other c ommon ki nds of canc er.




"If we c oul d i dentify those antigens that pr ovide the best signature for not onl y l ung canc er, but also for canc ers of the c ol on, br east, pr ostate, ovar y and the li ke, then with the ti nies t drop of blood, we c ould have a scr eening tes t for all the common types of canc er to c atc h them at their earli est stag es, when c ure r ates are high. T hat woul d be phenomenal," H anas h s aid.




More inform ation




The National Canc er Institute has more about l ung canc er.




SOURC E: Fr ed Hutc hins on Canc er R esearc h C enter, news r eleas e, Sept. 15, 2008
ARTIC LEID: 10774
Date: 9/16/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Reports Criticiz e Obama, McC ain Health Plans
OTS: 7901545
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: McC ain's pl an would likel y have littl e i mmediate effect on the number of peopl e l ac king health i ns urance and c oul d eventuall y add 20 million mor e, sai d T homas Buchmueller of the U ni versity of Mic higan's busi ness sc hool a nd coll eag ues
Bod y:




Reports Criticize Ob am a, M cC ain H ealth Plans




Reuters




W ASHINGT ON




Democr atic pr esidential candi date Barac k Obama's heal th car e plan woul d c os t too muc h and create more r egul ation, whil e R epublican J ohn McC ai n's pl an woul d leave 60 million Americans without health i nsur ance and reduce cover age, exper ts s aid on T uesday.




Neither plan would full y fi x the broken U.S. health car e s ys tem, the s eparate teams of experts concl uded in the journal Health Affairs.




Both candidates agree that major health c are refor m is needed, with 46 milli on Americans havi ng no health ins uranc e and s tudi es s howi ng that while the U nited States spends mor e per capita than any other industrializ ed countr y for health car e, Americ ans are not any healthier.




A s ur vey of benefits manag ers rel eased on Tues day s howed wi de dis approval of both plans , als o.




"Rather than taxing wor kers' heal th benefi ts and c ompelling employers to provi de c overage they c an't affor d, c andi dates s hould foc us on initi ati ves to contr ol c osts and pr omo te top quali ty c are," J ames Kl ein, pr esi dent of the American Benefits Council, which repres ents empl oyer -sponsor ed health pl ans, sai d in a statement.




Joe Antos of the right-leani ng American Enter prise Institute, Gail Wil ens ky of Proj ect HOPE and c olleagues s aid Obama's plan failed to addr ess inc en ti ves that encourag e tests and proc edures that c ost money but may not i mpr ove health.




Wilens ky, an unpai d advis er to the McC ain c ampaign, sai d the anal ysis refl ected onl y her own vi ews .




Obama has promis ed s omethi ng res embling the Federal Empl oyees H ealth Benefits pr ogram for most Americans.




The mos t popular of thes e, offer ed by Bl ue Cros s and Blue Shi eld, c osts about $12,000 a year, Wilens ky's team noted. T he pr emi ums from suc h a plan " would not be affordabl e for many families without s ubsidi es that ar e even greater than the g overnment's curr ent c ontributions ," they wrote.




A c heaper $5,000-a year-pl an available to mail handl ers c harges mor e i n c o-pays and deduc tibl es, and offers fewer benefi ts, they sai d. It "is pr obabl y not what the candidate's politic al bas e thi nks he has pr omised," they wrote.




McCain's plan would li kel y have littl e i mmediate effect on the number of peopl e lac king health i ns urance and c oul d eventuall y add 20 million mor e, sai d T homas Buchmueller of the U ni versi ty of Mic higan's busi ness sc hool and coll eag ues .




It woul d gi ve a refundabl e tax credit to peopl e who buy coverag e and encourag e Americans to move to a nati onal mar ket for nongroup ins uranc e, but this " will tend to r aise costs, reduce the g en erosity of benefits, and l eave peopl e with fewer c ons umer pr otecti ons," they wr ote.




"Studi es s uggest that many employers would be quic k to drop health benefits," they added.




The American Benefits Council s urvey found that managers want both c andidates to focus more on c ontrolling c osts and i mprovi ng the q uality of health c are.




It found that 74 perc ent of the 187 manag ers s ur veyed disappr oved of McC ain's tax pr opos al while 46 perc ent disliked Obama's pl an to requir e empl oyers to " pay or pl ay."




(Reporting by M aggie F ox and Juli e Steenhuys en, Edi ting by Sandra M aler)
ARTIC LEID: 10775
Date: 9/17/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: After Ike, Waiti ng for a Br eath of Reli ef
OTS: 7901545
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: T her e's goi ng to be l ots and lots of mol d," s aid Harriet Burge, a for mer profes sor at Har vard Uni versity and the Uni versit y of Michig an who now ser ves as dir ector of aer obi olog y for EM Lab P&K, an i ndoor air quality testing facility. " Based on the New Orleans experience, houses wer e fill ed wi th water and the water s at ther e for s o long that parts that weren't wet bec ame mol dy," owing to the condens ati on and humidi ty of the air, s he s aid.
Bod y:




After Ike, W aiting for a Br eath of Relief




Asthmatics Li kel y to Suffer Mos t in Stor m's M oldy After math




By J OSEPH BR OWNST EIN
ABC N ews Medical Unit




Sept. 17, 2008—




As the fl oodwaters left behi nd by Hurric ane Ike rec ede, resi dents of Gal veston, T exas, and other areas affec ted by the s tor m will li kel y r eturn h ome. But for many, an unwelc ome visitor will await: mol d.




And if the after math of Katrina is any i ndic ati on, this mold will likel y l eave some g aspi ng for air and others with a new all ergy to c ontend with.




"Ther e's goi ng to be l ots and lots of mold," s aid Harriet Burge, a former profes sor at Har vard Uni versity and the Uni versity of Michigan who now ser ves as director of aer obi olog y for EMLab P&K, an indoor air quality testing facility.




"Bas ed on the N ew Orleans experienc e, hous es wer e filled with water and the water s at there for s o long that parts that weren't wet became moldy," owing to the condens ation and humidity of the air, s he s aid.




And that mold created a pr obl em for people with asthma and mol d allergies.




"The air bor ne mol d levels in thos e plac es wer e ver y high bec ause of the plac es that wer e moldy," Burge s ai d.




While s ome s uffer fr om mold allergies , many mor e people suffer from as thma, the s ymptoms of which can be s et off by mold spor es .




"[Mold] is a trigger to as thma. Air ways narrow, and then you have a s hortage of breath," Dr. Maureen Lic htvel d s aid.




Lichtvel d, who c hairs the department of environmental health sci ences at the T ulane Uni versity Sc hool of Public Health and Tr opic al M edici ne, has s er ved as the pri mar y i nvestigator of HEAL (Head- off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana) , whic h l ooks at chil dhood as th ma i n pos t-Katrina New Orl eans.




She s aid that, foll owing a stor m li ke this, many asthmatic c hildr en face the dual pr obl em of a l ac k of medic al c are due to the stor m and a l ac k of car e bec aus e they c ome from poor famili es.




"In Katrina, the cli nical evaluati on that we are conduc ting ... was, for many of the chil dren, the first acc ess to clinic al c are they had post the stor m," Lichtveld s ai d.




As part of her study, Lichtvel d is l ooking at the four or fi ve most preval ent of 72 s peci es of mol d and their effects , but s he noted that people shoul d not waste time c onsidering whether the mold i n their homes is harmful .




Mold from Water and Fl ood D amage




"The gener al advic e fr om the public health pers pecti ve is i f ther e's mold i n your home, r emove it," s he s aid.




Burge noted that s ome non-asthmatics may develop a new pr obl em after Ike.




"Adults can devel op all ergies to mold, and that's li kel y to happen i n this cas e," s he sai d.




Some of the mis takes made by peopl e retur ning to New Orleans after Katrina c an be avoided after Ike, experts s aid.




Followi ng Katrina, some families retur ned to their homes, livi ng in one part of the home while other parts that wer e infected with mol d were still bei ng renovated.




"If you have mold i n par t of your house, you have mold spores ever ywhere," sai d Burge.




"I wouldn't r ecommend livi ng in a house and sleeping i n a hous e, where, for example, ther e was mold on the firs t fl oor."




Burge sai d that people worried about bec oming ill may want to wait a while before r eturni ng, although s he noted t hat that would be a personal decision.




However, she s ai d peopl e i n the affected areas were li kel y to be r esilient about their c onditi on, given the generall y humi d cli mate.




"It must be diffic ult for asthmatics to live i n Gal veston anyway," s aid Burge.




But for those hopi ng to r eturn, she s ai d it can be done.




"You c an actuall y r emove mol d -- you can g et rid of it," s he sai d.




"Know firs t what you're doing befor e you start cleani ng up," Lic htvel d s aid. "In the proc ess of strippi ng and getting rid of c arpet, thos e who are doing it ar e expos ed, and s o i t's ver y important to have personal pr otecti ve equi pment.




"The important thing is to aerate the buildi ng as best as possi ble and as quic kl y as pos sibl e."




Lichtvel d s aid that a c hlori ne sol uti on could effecti vel y kill mold, but for a bigger j ob, homeowners s houl d c ons ult a pr ofessional.




Also, cleaning s houl d onl y be done on s urfac es that c an't be discar ded.




"It's muc h better to g et rid of the materi al affected with it than to g et rid of it," s aid Lic htveld.




Mold In Your Home




While people may want to retur n to their homes i mmediatel y, s he c alled for a meas ured appr oac h.




Lichtvel d s tress ed that thr ee pr ecauti ons needed to be taken as peopl e retur n to the areas affected by Hurricane Ike.




She s aid peopl e with asthma s hould not be expos ed to the mold, peopl e who were cl eani ng mol d needed proper pr otection, s uch as mas ks and gl oves , and people with asthma, especiall y chil dren, need to stay on their medications.




"Ther e is no need to panic," Lic htveld s aid. "There is an abs olute need, though, for ver y cl ear and concis e c ommunic ation of the ris k."
ARTIC LEID: 10776
Date: 9/18/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Mass Tr ansi t: Subways and Bus es a Br eedi ng Gr ound t o C atc h C old and Flu?
OTS: 7901545
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: Get s omewher e and sit s omewhere els e," advises Dr. H oward M ar kel, profess or of the histor y of medicine and of pedi atrics and c ommunicable dis eas es at the U ni versi ty of Mic higan M edic al School. "If s omeone is c oug hing, I woul d avail mys elf that opportunity. Our mothers were right when they sai d, 'Don't let anyone cough on you.'" Mor e often than not, however, trai ns and bus es are so pac ked that it's diffic ult to remove yours elf from suc h si tuati ons. So, what do you do when you fi nd yours elf tr apped? " Breathe s hall owl y," M ar kel r ec ommends. "Tr y not to l et them c o ugh on you." In that way, he explai ns, trans missi on of ger ms c an be reduced.
Bod y:




Mass Tr an sit: Sub ways and Buses a Br eeding Ground to C atch Co ld and F lu?




Tips for Avoi ding the C old and Fl u on Buses and Tr ains




By J ENNY CHAN
ABC N ews Medical Unit




Sept. 18. 2008—




Higher gas pric es are dri ving more peopl e to take public trans portati on -- and as a res ult coul d dri ve up the number of col d and flu cas es this s eas on.




The American Public Tr ansportation Ass ociation announc ed that in the second quarter of 2008, more Americ ans opted to ri de public bus es and trai ns r ather than take their own c ars -- 140 million more trips than the s ame ti me las t year.




However, as mor e and more commuters pac k into trai ns and bus es, the chances that they will be pl aced i n cl os e proxi mity to s o meone who is already i nfected with a col d or fl u virus are sig nificantl y higher.




So what can we do as pass engers to avoid the col d and flu, other wis e known as the "cr owding diseas e"?




When You're N ext to Someone With the Col d or Fl u




We have all been in this situation befor e: The pers on you're sitti ng next to is constantl y c oughing and sneezing. It is prett y obvi ous that they are sic k, and you start to g et that creepy s ensati on as if some of their illness has s eeped into your s ystem. H ow does one escape fr om thi s scenario to avoid getting sic k?




"Get s omewher e and si t s omewhere els e," advises Dr. H oward M ar kel , profess or of the histor y of medici ne and of pedi atrics and communicable dis eases at the U ni versity of Mic higan Medic al School. "If s ome one is c oug hing, I woul d avail mysel f that opportunity. Our mothers were right when they s aid, 'Don't l et anyone c oug h on you.'"




More often than not, however, tr ains and bus es ar e s o pac ked that i t's difficul t to r emove yourself from s uch situations. So, what do you do when you fi nd yours elf trapped?




"Breathe shallowl y," Mar kel r ecommends . "Tr y not to l et them cough on you." In that way, he explai ns, tr ans missi on of ger ms can be reduced.




If you ar e s eated next to a chil d who is hac king up a storm, you s hould get up even faster.




"Children do not have good respir ator y etiquette," s ays Mar kel. One mig ht s ay that this is an unders tate ment; chil dren have the tendenc y to dr ool, and mostl y do not c over their mouths when s neezi ng or coughi ng.




In additi on to this, onc e adults have c hildr en, they doubl e their ris k of g etti ng the col d and flu, accor ding to C harles Gerb a, profes sor of environmental micr obi olog y at the Uni versity of Ariz ona. And c hildren tend to touch thems el ves with their hands about 40 ti mes per h our, about twice as often as adults do.




Also, washi ng your hands after you get off the subway or trai n is pr obabl y a good idea. Go od ol d s oap and water can eli minate any of the ger ms you may have coll ected whil e ridi ng al ongsi de s omeone with the col d or flu.




Strategic Sitti ng: Bes t Plac es to Par k Yoursel f?




Ther e is little evi denc e to sugges t that s ome s urfaces on public trans portati on ar e ger mi er than others . Accor ding to Gerba, there haven't been many s tudies done on g erms and public tr ansportation.




However, ther e ar e s ome facts to keep i n mi nd.




The metal poles and str aps that pas sengers hold on to are often contaminated with microbes and bacteria.




"Stai nless s teel is a g ood tr ansfer s urfac e," Gerba poi nts out, adding that about 50 perc ent of the g erms on thos e poles ar e pic ked up by human hands , making them great carriers of the col d and flu virus .




You c an also tr y and be awar e of your surr oundings and scope out wher e peopl e are sitti ng. T hat way, you c an pos sibl y r educ e your expos ure to the vir us.




"Go to the least us ed part of the bus," Gerba s uggests. "T he bac k of the bus seems like the l east us ed part."




And sitting next to an open wi ndow is not necessaril y the best place on the bus .




With reg ard to air bor ne ger ms, g ood ventilation " may dilute it a littl e," s ays Mar kel. H owever, ther e are no c onclusi ve s tudies that direc tl y s uggest the wi ndow seat on the bus is a fl u-free s anctuar y.




Standar d C old and Flu Pr eventi ve M easur es Important




Several studi es have shown that vir us es tend to be trans mitted fr om the hands to mouth, to eyes and other body parts that are touc hed. Ac cor ding to Ger ba, adults touc h thems el ves with their hands about 18 times per hour -- whic h makes frequent hand-was hing all the mor e i mportant.




"The best thing you c an do is hand hygiene," s aid Gerba. "The r ails and pol es you hol d on to -- that tends to be ger my."




If a si nk is not withi n reac h, carr ying around an anti microbial hand gel that is alcohol-based c an be a good alternati ve to soap and water.




"I would emphasiz e usi ng any anti microbial hand g el -- I take that on airlines ," recommends Dr. M ark D ykewicz, pr ofess or of inter nal medicine at St. Louis U ni versity Sc hool of M edici ne.




Other measur es nor mall y associated with c old and fl u prevention appl y on public transit as well. T his i ncl udes eating well an d exercising, g eneral good health practic es and g etti ng the flu shot ever y year.




"In general, if people would go and g et their fl u s hots, that might help stop some of the trans missi on," s ays Dr. Phyllis Koz ars ky, expert cons ultant in the Di visi on of Global Migration and Quar antine at the U.S. Centers for Dis ease Contr ol and Prevention.




And if you have the flu, Koz ars ky says, i t behooves you to r es pec t your fellow travelers by si mpl y staying home.




"Unfortunatel y, we're often in crowded pl ac es -- crowded shoppi ng malls before Christmas, sc hools, not j ust on public trans portati on." s ays Kozars ky. " It's i mportant to be c ourteous . When you yours elf have a fever or col d, it's best to stay at home. [Als o], keep your kids at home i f they're sic k."




No Love Fr om the Gl oves




Usuall y during the c old winter months, we don heavy c oats, scar ves and gloves to shi eld us from the blistering weather. But wearing thes e i tems whil e tr aveli ng does not nec ess aril y keep us safe from col d and flu virus es. Koz ars ky s ays that what you do with gloves afterward is key.




"You're sitting on the bus, touc hi ng the handles, the bars , touchi ng and rubbing your eyes and your face wi th your gloves ," s ays Kozars ky, addi ng that in mos t c ases, people ar e not washi ng or dis posing of their gloves after wearing them.




"They give people an artifici al s ense that they're helpi ng themsel ves," Koz ars ky r emar ks . "H and- was hi ng is mor e prefer abl e."




Scar ves that cover your fac e also do not act simil arl y to s urgical mas ks pr oven to effecti vel y keep g erms at bay. Although i t may s eem like they ac t as barriers , the microbes c an pass through the hol es wi thi n the knit s carf or fabric.




"I don't know any data that s uggest scar ves ar e protecti ve," Koz ars ky ac knowl edges.




If, however, you r eall y want to war d yours elf from the c ol d and fl u effec ti vel y, you c an emulate what l abor ator y sci enti sts wear as pr otecti on -- althoug h you may get funny l ooks fr om other pass engers .
"The first li nes of defens e -- the air and touc h -- are the bac kbone of public health preventi on," s ays Dr. Neil Kao, c hair of the Allergic Dis eas es and Asthma C enter in Greenville, S.C. "If you get a mas k, wear gloves, you have a 99 perc ent c hanc e of pr eventi ng yours elf from g etti ng the col d or fl u."
ARTIC LEID: 10777
Date: 9/18/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Calci um Supplements C ut Bl ood Lead Levels D uring Pregnanc y
OTS: 7901545
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: We and others have previ ousl y s hown that during pregnanc y, mothers c an transfer l ead from their bones to their unbor n -- with signific ant advers e c onseq uenc es -- making maternal bone lead stor es a threat even if current environmental l ead exposur es are low," pri ncipal i nvestigator H owar d H u, c hair man of the U ni versity of Michigan's D epartment of Envir on mental Health Scienc es, sai d
Bod y:




Calcium Sup plem ents Cut Blood Lead L evels During Pr egn an cy




Low-c ost ther apy reduces threat of transfer from mother's bones to fetus or nursing i nfant.




By Kevi n Mc Keever




Sept. 19




THURSDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- High dail y dos es of calci um s upplements may reduc e l ead l evels i n the bl ood of pr egnant women and cut down on fetal and infant exposur e, a new report s uggests .




The study, publis hed onli ne in Environmental H eal th Perspectiv es , found that women who take 1,200 milligrams of calci um dail y have up to a 31 perc ent r educti on in lead levels.




Women who us ed l ead-glazed cer amics or with high bone lead levels showed the larges t reductions , while the average reduc tion was about 11 perc ent.




"We and others have pr evi ousl y shown that during pr egnanc y, mothers c an transfer l ead fr om their bones to their unborn -- with signific ant advers e c onseq uenc es -- making maternal bone lead stores a threat even if c urrent environmental l ead exposur es are l ow," principal inves tigator H oward Hu, c hair man of the Uni versity of Michigan's D epartment of Envir onmental H ealth Scienc es, s aid i n a news rel ease i ssue d by the sc hool. "This study demonstrates that dietar y c alci um s upplementation during pr egnanc y may c onstitute a low-c os t and l ow-risk approac h for r educi ng this threat."




Expos ure to lead during fetal devel opment and infanc y can c ause low birth weight or sl ow weight gain after birth, cog niti ve d efects s uch as lower i ntelligenc e sc or es, l ower motor and vi sual s kills, or even misc arriage. Damage from l ead exposur e and pois oning is us ually per manent, the r esearc hers sai d.




Bone lead c an stay i n the body for decades, and the fetus or nursing i nfant c an still be at great ris k from mater nal s tor es of lead even with mi nimal environmental expos ure, the res earchers s aid.




"The bottom li ne is that obstetricians and pedi atrici ans should consi der addi ng c alcium s uppl ementati on to the prenatal vi tami ns normall y recommended in preg nant women, par ticul arly if their pati ents have a signific ant histor y of envir onmental or occ upational lead expos ure," Hu sai d.




The study, c onducted with 557 mostl y low- to moder ate-inc ome women recruited from Mexic an prenatal clinics, found reducti ons in bl ood l ead l evels were more evi dent in the sec ond tri mes ter ( 14 perc ent) than i n the third trimester ( 8 perc ent).




More inform ation




The U.S. N ati onal Libr ar y of M edici ne has mor e about l ead pois oning.




SOURC E: U ni versity of Mic higan School of Public H eal th, news rel eas e, Sept. 10, 2008
ARTIC LEID: 10778
Date: 9/19/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: As F ares and Fees Rise, Pass engers Want Ser vic e
OTS: 7901545
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: An annual U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey rel eas ed in May found c ustomers givi ng airlines the worst grades sinc e 2001. With the sl ow travel s eason now upon them, airlines face the dual challenges of increasing r evenue to c over heavy fuel c osts whil e also improvi ng their product to give air travel ers a retur n on their added investment.
Bod y:




As F ar es and Fees Rise, Passeng er s W ant Service




Airlines pus h to i mprove c us tomer s er vice as fares and fees cli mb




By H ARRY R. WEBER AP Business Writer




The As soci ated Pr ess




FORT W ORTH, T exas




On a r ec ent rai ny day at D allas-F ort Worth Internati onal Airport, a s uitc as e bound for Col orado Springs, Col o., lay on the ground outsi de a termi nal under a maze of Americ an Airlines c onveyor belts that ferr y bags to and from near by planes.A fi eld r epres entati ve for the airline who was s howi ng a reporter the long, circuitous route c hec ked bags take put the s uitc ase on a bel t wher e it was suppos ed to be. H e s aid it li kel y fell off a belt or a baggage handl er's vehicl e. H e didn't know how long it had been off its path.T he airlines have been imposing new fees, raisi ng fares , reducing flights and, in some c as es, cutti ng out free s nac ks i n c oach. But s ever al big and s mall airlines ali ke have str uggled relati ve to the industr y i n ter ms of baggage handling, on-ti me performance and other c us tomer s er vice metrics . An annual U ni versity of Mi chigan s ur vey rel eas ed i n May found c ustomers givi ng airlines the worst grades sinc e 2001.




With the sl ow tr avel seas on now upon them, airlines fac e the dual c hallenges of incr easi ng revenue to cover heavy fuel costs while als o i mprovi ng their product to give air travel ers a retur n on their added investment.




"We realize that in or der for us to reg ain that br and r ecog nition and the cus tomer loyalty that we us ed to own i n the '80s and '90s, we ought to do s omething ver y dramatic and differ ent," s ai d Mar k Mitc hell, American's managing dir ector of c ustomer experienc e.D elta Air Lines Inc .'s regional subsidi ar y C omair had the worst on-ti me perfor manc e in J ul y among airlines sur veyed by the Depar tment of Trans portati on. Fr om J anuar y through J ul y, American Airlines' on-ti me arri val rate was the l owest among U.S. carriers , while U AL Cor p.'s U nited Airlines' was sec ond-lowest. C omair had the highest mis handled baggage rate in Jul y, while the highest number of c onsumer c omplai nts r ec ei ved by the D OT that month wer e about D elta. C omair's on-time perfor mance from Januar y thr oug h J ul y r anked 17th out of 19 airlines, while Delta's r anked eighth.T he fourth-hig hes t number of c ons u mer c ompl aints rec ei ved by the DOT in Jul y wer e about T empe, Ariz.- based U S Airways , which sai d i n a Sept. 3 memo to employees that they woul d not be rec ei ving a $50
bonus for the month bec aus e the airline's on-ti me performance di d not plac e i n the top three among the 10 l argest U.S. c arriers.




Executi ves bl ame weather, c ong esti on in the N ortheast and air traffic c ontrol issues for some of the probl ems, but they als o ac knowl edge c ompany s pecific problems . T hey s ay there have been improvements si nc e the late st D OT fig ures were rel eas ed.




Americ an, a unit of F ort Wor th- bas ed AMR Cor p., is keepi ng pl anes on the ground l ong er in some ci ties before tur ning them for their next flight so that if something g oes wrong, there is extra ti me to board pass eng ers and baggag e. It plans to bl oc k a li mited number of seats fr om being s old on flights i n key mar kets this Thanksgi ving to gi ve it flexi bility i n re- acc ommodating cus tomers on pl anes that woul d other wis e be full.




The carri er als o is refurbis hing the i nteriors of its Boeing 757s, upgradi ng business class s eats on inter national flights , adding l eather headres ts to c oac h s eats on MD-80s and testing Wi-Fi s er vice on s ome aircraft.




And to make it easi er and quic ker to l oc ate mishandl ed bags, American is equi ppi ng pers onnel with automated handhel d bag tag s canners.




"Ther e are huge c os ts when you have i nc onvenienc ed your c ustomers," s aid Dan Garton, American's exec uti ve vic e president of m ar keting.




Dorothy Boydston, a 48- year-ol d electrician fr om H awaii, knows what Garton means .




On a r ec ent trip from Santa Barbara, C alif., to D enver to see her daug hter, Boyds ton had to spend a night at a Phoeni x hotel at her own expens e becaus e s he missed her US Air ways c onnecti ng flight after, s he s aid, an airline employee wr ote the wrong g ate number on her tic ket. That came after s he had to pay $15 to c hec k a bag s he tried to carr y on the plane to Phoeni x, when the airline tol d her there was no r oom in the overhead bi ns.




The next mor ning, she was still at Phoeni x Sky Har bor Inter national Airp ort, on standby for another flight to Denver.




"I coul d have r ented a c ar for what it's c osti ng me," s he s aid.As ked if pass eng ers s hould get better c ustomer s er vice in ligh t of the higher fares and fees they ar e payi ng c ompared to a year ago, Boydston s aid, "What cus tomer s er vice? T here's no c ustomer s er vic e anymore."




But Aaron Tr ompeter, 37, an English teac her who li ves i n Winchester, Va., sai d he still fi nds value i n the price of an airline tic ket thes e days, even if he has to deal with more hassl es, pay to c hec k bags and no longer gets fr ee s nac ks on some flights.




"It's so much better than a stagec oach or a c ar," Tr ompeter s aid at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Air port after getting off a United flight fr om Washi ngton. "So the lac k of ser vic e, or the perc ei ved l ac k of s er vice, is s till ver y muc h worth it."




Airline exec uti ves are unapologetic about the need to r aise mor e revenue thr oug h fee and fare incr eases to c over their hefty fuel bills. T hey als o s ay that certain offerings that were free to ever yon e befor e are still free for pr emi um passengers like elite fr equent-fliers and thos e peopl e who travel i n firs t cl ass or busi ness cl ass.




"Food is the easiest one for me to defend," Garton sai d of American's decisi on to c harge $3 for a c ookie or a c an of pot ato c hips in coac h. " When you open your mi nibar at the hotel tonight, it's not g oing to be fr ee. When you go to the movi e theater, the popcor n is g oing to c os t you mor e than the tic ket. Gi ving away food for free is an unus ual thing the airlines start ed 70 years ago, but I woul d argue it was all first-cl ass ser vic e 70 years ago."




Delta, the onl y one of the si x l egac y c arriers not c harging a fee for a first c hec ked bag, is using tec hnol og y and i nfras truc tur e upgrades to i mprove its baggage handli ng. It is about halfway through a $100 million c apital pr ojec t at its Atlanta hub that incl udes upgradi ng c onveyor belts and sorti ng s ys te ms . It also has i nvested $10 million this year to roll out more wireles s bag s canners s o i t c an keep better trac k of where bags ar e i n the tr ans fer proces s.




Lee M ac enc zak, D elta's exec uti ve vic e presi dent of s ales and mar keting, s ai d the airline holds its elf to a high s tandar d when it c omes to s peed and c onveni enc e.




"To the degree we don't deliver on that, it c ertai nl y does i mpact our br and," he s aid. " We are not s atis fied wher e we are. We have a lot of wor k to do."




Stephen Gor man, D elta's exec uti ve vic e president of operations, s aid weather iss ues c an s kew the on- time data. H e s aid the carrier is worki ng har d to i mprove what it can c ontrol .




"The foundati on is on- time, clean, with bags, and friendl y cus tomer s er vice," Gor man sai d. "T hose ar e the fundamentals we know we have to do right."




Southwest Airlines C o., whic h has not faced the same threat from fuel prices as other carriers bec aus e of its aggressi ve fuel hedgi ng pr ogram, boas ts i n rec ent T V commercials of still allowi ng all its pass engers to chec k two bags for free. Its on-ti me arri val r ate i n J ul y, thir d-highest among U.S. c arriers, was nearly 20 percentage points above C omair's.




The Dall as-bas ed airline l ed the indus tr y i n pass enger s atis fac tion i n the lates t U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey.




"We' ve got to be in the busi nes s to make money, but not to sacrific e what our br and and our produc t offering is," s aid D ar yl Krause, Southwest's s enior vic e presi dent of c ustomer s ervic es .




— — —




AP Business Writers C hris Kahn in Phoeni x and J os hua Freed in Mi nneapolis c ontributed to this r eport.
ARTIC LEID: 10780
Date: 9/23/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Car diac Arr est Sur vi val R ates Var y Widel y
OTS: 7901545
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: T he bes t way to i mprove s ur vi val is to standar dize the standard of car e for patients out of the hos pital," s aid study author Dr. C omilla Sass on, a Robert Wood J ohns on cli nical scholar in the U ni versity of Mic higan. " If we c ould focus res ources on patients who have the best chance of s ur vi val, we would be able to affect the outc ome
Bod y:




Cardiac Arr est Su rvival Rat es Var y W idely




Fivefold differ enc e i n 10 Nor th American sites.




B y Ed Edelson
HealthD ay R eporter




Sept. 24




TUESD AY, Sept. 23 (H eal thD ay N ews) -- Fr om city to city, there is a mor e than fi vefol d differenc e i n t he odds that someone will s ur vi ve s udden car diac arrest, wi th the chances res ting on whatever emergenc y r es pons e s ystem is i n plac e, a new study finds.




"I expected ther e woul d be s ome differ enc es, but the differ ences wer e greater than we expected, greater than for heart attac k and s troke," sai d s tudy author Dr. Gr aham Nic hol , dir ector of the C enter for Prehos pital Emergenc y C are at the Uni versity of Was hington, i n Seattle. His report was publis hed in the Sept. 24 issue of the Journal of the Americ an Medic al Associati on.




The study included data on all 20,520 c ases of c ardi ac arres t that occ urred in eig ht U.S. and two C anadian si tes , with a total populati on of 21.4 million, fr om May 2006 to April 2007. N o attempt at res uscitati on was made in al most half of all c as es. Among the 58 perc ent who got emergenc y treatment, the s ur vi val rate, c ommunity by community, r anged from 3 perc ent to 16.3 percent.




Of the more than 20,000 peopl e who suffered c ardi ac arres t, 954 ( 4.6 perc ent) of them li ved to be disc harged from a hospi tal.




The inci denc e of r eported c ardi ac arrest cases rec ei ving emergenc y tr eatment als o varied wi del y, fr om 40.3 per 100,000 i n the lowest-r eporti ng communi ty to 86.7 per 100,000 in the highest.




The great differenc e in s urvi val r ates are due " we think to inci denc e and ris k, as well as how the community r esponds to c ardi ac arres t," Nic hol sai d.




Ther e is no si ngle c ontinent- wide s tep that can be taken to bri ng up s ur vi val rates , he sai d. " Ever y city needs to understand how well i t is doi ng," Nic hol sai d. "Car diac arrest is a treatabl e c onditi on, and cities s hould wor k hard to treat it better, r ather than deter mini ng who s houl d not be treated ."




The las t part of the statement referred to another report i n the s ame issue of the j ournal, i n which res earc hers studied the effect of two s ets of do- not-treat r ules developed in C anada. F or exampl e, one set s aid r es uscitati on should not be attempted if the car diac arr est was not witness ed by emergenc y pers onnel, i f no shoc k was given to r estart the heart outsi de the hos pital, and if circul ation of the bl ood did not begin agai n.




"The best way to i mprove s ur vi val is to s tandar dize the standard of car e for patients out of the hos pital," s aid study author Dr. C omilla Sasson, a Robert Wood J ohns on clinic al s cholar i n the U ni versi ty of Mic higan. " If we c ould focus res ourc es on patients who have the best chance of sur vi val, we would be abl e to affec t the outcom e."




Dr. Arthur B. Sanders, who wrote an acc ompanying editori al, expr ess ed doubts about that contention. "I don't thi nk it woul d i mpact s urvi val i n c ardi ac arres t," he s aid. "It mig ht help a bit i n ter ms of overcrowdi ng and havi ng appr opriate faciliti es avail abl e at the appr opri ate ti me."




Nichol, Sanders and Sass on agreed on one point. All s aid that car diac arr est should be made a reportabl e diseas e, whic h it is not now, so that statis tics on inci denc e and sur vi val woul d be readil y available.




"That is the plac e to start," Sanders s aid. "I need to know your numbers . If we had numbers on, say, witness ed ventric ular fibrillati on, then we coul d use the basic princi ples we know about to i mpl ement c hanges that potentiall y coul d i mpr ove s ur vi val."




Ventric ular fi brillati on is a potenti ally fatal abnor mal heartbeat. The sur vi val rate of peopl e who had ventricul ar fi brillation i n the s tudy r ang ed from 7.7 percent to 39.9 percent.




Ventric ular fi brillati on was singl ed out, bec ause "it c an be treated successfull y with a defibrillator," whic h deli vers a heartbeat-res tori ng shoc k, Nic hol sai d. " But it is not s o si mple as putti ng defi brillators i nto a c ommunity setting. You need a s ystem of res pons e which incl udes rec ognition and tr eatment by the public."




The study is an i mportant first step towar d i mpr ovi ng emergenc y tr eatment of c ardiac arrest, s aid Dr. Lanc e Bec ker, director of the Center for R es uscitati on Sci ences at the Uni versity of Penns yl vani a, and a spokes man for the Americ an Heart Ass oci ation




"If you don't meas ure something, you don't know what you are doing and c an't fi x it," Bec ker sai d. " This is one of the l argest studi es ever done, beginning to make communiti es better and s afer plac es to li ve in ter ms of s ur vi ving c ardi ac arres t. C ommuniti es with l ower sur vi val rates have an opportunity to wor k on i mprovi ng those rates and improvi ng their chai n of s ur vi val ."




More inform ation




The signs of c ardiac arrest and how to res pond to them are described by the Americ an Heart Ass ociation.




SOURC ES: Gr aham Nic hol, M.D ., profes sor, medicine, Uni versity of Was hi ngton, Seattle; C omilla Sas son, M.D., Robert Wood J ohns on Clinic Sc holar, Uni versity of Michigan, Ann Ar bor ; Ar thur B. Sanders, pr ofess or, medici ne, U ni versi ty of Arizona, T ucs on; Lanc e Bec ker, M.D., dir ector, C enter for R es uscitati on Sci ences, U ni versity of Penns yl vani a, Philadel phia; Sept. 24, 2008, Journal of the Americ an Medic al Associati on




Copyri ght 2008 HealthD ayNew s, Inc . All rights r eserv ed. T his material may not be published, broadcas t, r ewritten or r edis tributed.
ARTIC LEID: 10781
Date: 9/26/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Sec ond-Quarter Growth Revis ed D own, Crisis D aunts Cons umers
OTS: 7901545
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan Sur veys of Cons umers sai d its fi nal cons umer senti ment index r eading sli pped to 70.3 fr om 73.1 i n earl y September -- its worst sli de within a single month si nce Augus t 2005, when H urricane Katri na caus ed wides pread disl oc ation.The Uni versity of Michig an index hi t a 28- year l ow i n J une but had been i mprovi ng since then, due mai nl y to a r etreat in oil prices .
Bod y:




Second-Qu art er Gro wth Revised Do wn, C risis D aunts C onsu mers




By Burton Friers on




Reuters




NEW YORK




The U.S. ec onomy grew muc h l ess vigorousl y than previ ousl y thought during the s ec ond q uarter and the s nowballing fi nanci al cr isis damped a rebound in cons umer s enti ment this month.




The lates t evidence of the pr ec arious state of the ec onomy came on Friday as lawmakers in Was hington wrangled over a $700 billion plan to r esc ue a financial s ystem teetering on the brink of c ollaps e.




The Commerce Department sai d gros s domestic pr oduct, the meas ure of total goods and s er vic es output withi n U .S. borders, expanded at a 2.8 percent rate from April to June, r ather than the 3.3 perc ent rate it esti mated a month ago.




The Reuters/U ni versi ty of Mic higan Sur veys of Cons umers sai d its fi nal cons umer senti ment index reading sli pped to 70.3 from 73.1 i n earl y September -- i ts worst sli de within a si ngle month since Augus t 2005, when H urricane Katrina caus ed wides pread disl oc ation.




"The financial crisis has peopl e worried," s aid C arl Lantz , U.S. interest r ate str ategist at Cr edi t Suiss e i n N ew Yor k.




"The cons umer was in big tr ouble anyway -- no access to cr edi t, r eal i nc ome falling.... T he third and fourth quarter ar e s hapi ng up to be pretty weak i n GD P ter ms, es peciall y on the c onsumer si de."




The cons umer senti ment i ndex was still the highes t si nce Februar y this year but it came duri ng a month i n which the g over nment s eized c ontrol of mortg age financ e compani es F anni e Mae and Freddi e M ac and Wall Street investment bank Lehman Brothers Hol dings Inc fil ed for bankr uptc y.




Growth i n c onsumer s pending was weaker than first es ti mated, pulling down the esti mate of over all growth, whil e busi nesses ma de bigger cuts to i nvestments, a sign c onfidence was s agging even before financial mar ket tur moil deepened.




Investors pai d s cant at tenti on to the day's ec onomic data, thoug h, wi th the bailout negoti ations and the bigges t bank cl os ure i n U .S. his tor y roiling global mar kets .




U.S. regul ators s eized bank Was hington M utual Inc T hurs day, s elling its assets to JPM organ Chas e & C o . Stoc ks on Wall Street <.DJI> fell but trade was volatil e as s ome tr aders cl ung to hopes that the government woul d manage some ki nd of bail out for the bel eag uer ed financ ial s ystem.




Government bonds, whic h us uall y benefit from signs of economic weakness, were hig her on the day.




"Honestl y the data is not having muc h i mpact," s aid Lantz, at Credit Suiss e in New Yor k.




U.S. President George W. Bus h has war ned the c ountr y fac es a pai nful reces sion without a bailout and, on Friday, he s oug ht to cal m mar kets i n a brief appearanc e at the White H ous e.




"We ar e goi ng to get a pac kage pass ed," Bush sai d. " We will ris e to the occ asion. Republic ans and D emocr ats will come together and pass a s ubstantial r esc ue pl an."




Befor e the fi nancial sector's latest downwar d s piral, the ec onomy was alr eady s truggling under the weight of high energ y c osts , eight months of j ob cuts thr oug hout the U nited States and the wors t housi ng slump si nc e the Gr eat D epr ession.




"UNRAVELING"




The GD P data is gener all y c onsidered bac kwar d-looking, given the fragile state of the ec onomy, but it also s ays nothi ng good about the months ahead.




"I'm afrai d that the r eal ec onomy is unr aveling ver y quic kl y," s aid Nigel Gault, chi ef U .S. economist for Global Insight i n L exington, M ass achus etts. " Growth may be between z ero and 1 percent in the current (thir d) quarter. I thi nk we'll be neg ati ve in the fourth q uarter."




Busi nesses appear ed to be growi ng mor e war y about ec onomic pros pects in the sec ond quar ter. Spending on eq uipment and s oftwar e, typic all y made when compani es are pl anning producti on incr eases , s hrank at a 5 percent rate r ather than the 3.2 perc ent rate pr eviousl y esti mated.




It was the s ec ond s traight quarter in whic h equipment and software s pending contr acted and was the steepest for any q uarter si nc e the beginning of 2002.




Pers onal s pending, whic h fuels two-thirds of U.S. ec onomic ac ti vity, grew at a r evised 1.2 perc ent r ate instead of the 1.7 percent previ ousl y esti mated, partl y bec ause spendi ng for costl y items like c ars contr acted mor e s har pl y. Anal ys ts expec t c onsumers to keep retrenchi ng as j ob loss es mount and doubts grow about whether the economy c an stay out of rec essi on.




The Uni versity of Michig an index hi t a 28- year l ow i n J une but had been i mprovi ng since then, due mai nl y to a r etreat in oil prices .




Worries over infl ati on moder ated this month, with readings on one- and fi ve- year i nfl ation expectations falli ng to their l owest i n si x months. However, they did not fall as muc h as previ ousl y thoug ht as oil prices have found s ome s upport fr om s uppl y disrupti ons c aused by H urricane Ike.




(Additional reporti ng by Luci a M uti kani in N ew Yor k and Glenn Somer vill e in Was hington; Edi ting by J ames D algleish)
ARTIC LEID: 10783
Date: 9/28/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: NASA hi ts 'cros sroads' at 50
OTS: 7901545
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: I' m i n the busi ness and I c an't tell you who's on the s pace stati on. I have no idea," s ays Lennard Fis k, a U ni versi ty of Mic higan s pace scienc e profess or.H e and others bl ame a lac k of fundi ng and l eaders hi p for the ag enc y's los t prominenc e. T he s pac e program "has moved for ward for more than 30 years without a g uidi ng vision," the experts who investigated the 2003 l oss of the shuttl e C olumbia s aid i n their report to N ASA.
Bod y:




NASA hit s ' cro ssroad s' at 50




By Tr aci Watson, USA T ODAY




HOUST ON




In a hangar here at the Johns on Spac e C enter, engineer Lori H ans on s hows off a model of the ag enc y's pri de and joy: the new spac es hip N ASA is designi ng to c arry astronauts bac k to the moon.




It will be bigger than the Apoll o c aps ul e, s he s ays, "bec ause the mis sion is ver y differ ent from Apollo." For the first ti me, N ASA will build a base on the moon, where humans could li ve for si x months at a str etc h.




Those who keep tabs on N ASA's fortunes worr y that the agenc y's plan to r eturn Americans to the moon in a decade won't amount to mor e than a clus ter of pl ywood frames i n a hangar. As NASA mar ks its 50th anni versar y Wednes day, s pace experts s ay NASA i s adrift, its future disturbi ngly mur ky.




The spac e s huttl e is due to retire i n two years. Its suc ces sor, bes et by budg et and technical pr obl ems, won't fl y until 2015 at the earliest, creati ng a str etc h of at least fi ve years when the United States will have no way to l aunc h humans i nto or bit.




"It's a rather unfortunate ti me to be c elebrating a 50th anni vers ar y," s ays s pac e historian J oan Johnson-Frees e of the N aval War C olleg e. "Right now, we're at best at a pl ateau, i f not        I hate to s ay this   heading downwards."




'Middle- aged bureaucrac y'




The spac e agenc y was born Oc t. 1, 1958, at the decr ee of Congress . Less than 11 years later, it l anded the first man on the moon, a feat that has yet to be equaled by any other nation.




Sinc e then, N ASA has s ent robots to ever y c orner of the sol ar s ys tem and built a s paceshi p, the s huttl e, more versatil e than any i n histor y. It als o lost astr onauts   14 di ed in two s huttle ac cidents   and t he nati on's attenti on.




"I've s een N ASA struggle wi th how & we get bac k to an Apoll o ki nd of excitement," s ays for mer spac e-ag enc y offici al Ray C olladay. "It's a middle- aged bureaucrac y now."




Presi dent Bus h tried i n 2004 to r einvigor ate N ASA, directing the agenc y to send astr onauts bac k to the moon by 2020 and to st art pl anning to send humans to M ars. Bush als o promis ed an i nfusi on of c ash to pay for it all, but the full s um failed to materializ e.




Even one of the authors of Bus h's moon plan says the pr esident's s pace legac y is i n ques tion.




"The ag enc y is at a crossr oads," s ays Bretton Alexander, a for mer Whi te H ous e aide now at the X Priz e F oundati on, a non- profit group that funds tec hnol og y c ontes ts. "The next admi nistr ati on has a big decisi on to make about whic h direc tion (NASA) will go."




Alexander and others cite a hos t of problems dogging the spac e agenc y as i t prepar es to cel ebr ate its 50th birthday:




" What to do with the s pace shuttle. At Bus h's directi on, N ASA plans to retir e the s huttle in mi d-2010, but ther e's s upport in Congress to keep the s huttl e fl yi ng. T hat c ould cos t $4 billion a year. N ASA needs that money to build the new moon vehicle.




The shuttle has had two deadl y ac cidents i n 124 flights. NASA chi ef Michael Griffi n tol d T he Orlando Sentinel this month that if the s huttl e's life is extended for fi ve more years, there woul d be a one-i n-eight ris k of l osing as tronauts in that period.




" How to get as tronauts to the Internati onal Spac e Station, an orbital l ab funded l argel y by the U .S. After the shuttle r etires, N ASA hopes to us e R ussi an craft to carr y U .S. crews to the s tation. Purchas e of the R ussian shi ps r equires congressi onal appr oval , which has yet to be granted.




" When the s huttl e's replacement will fl y. NASA is building a r oc ket, call ed the Ar es I, and cr ew c apsul e, the Orion, to carr y humans to or bit. Griffi n had hoped to have the two ready in 2013, three years after the shuttle stops fl yi ng. Instead, the first manned launch has been delayed until 2015.




Lac k of fundi ng, l eadershi p




It's a comedown for an agenc y that c ommanded more than 3% of the federal budget i n the 1960s. Today it g ets less than 1% .




After the Uni ted States beat the Soviets to the moon, inter est and funding coll aps ed. T he s pace agenc y was forced to shel ve grand pl ans for human expl orati on of the s olar s ystem.




Sinc e then, many of N ASA's greatest tri umphs have been the wor k of machi nes , not astronauts. Public interest has foc used on the H ubble Space Tel esc ope and the M ars r overs. T he s pac e s tation, though a tec hnical mar vel, draws sc ant attention, as do s huttl e flights.




"I'm i n the busi ness and I c an't tell you who's on the s pace stati on. I have no i dea ," s ays Lennar d Fis k, a U ni versity of Mic higan s pac e scienc e profess or.




He and others bl ame a lac k of fundi ng and leaders hip for the ag enc y's los t pr ominence. T he s pac e program "has moved forward f or mor e than 30 years without a guidi ng vision," the experts who inves tigated the 2003 l oss of the shuttle Col umbi a s aid in their report to N ASA.




Bus h tried to provi de a guidi ng visi on, though its s ucc ess depends on futur e admi nistr ations and Congress es . F or now, both presi denti al c andi dates have express ed s upport for the goal of s endi ng humans bac k to the moon. Both have promis ed to i ncreas e NASA's budget.




Neither has propos ed anythi ng close to the tens of billions of extr a doll ars Al exander s ays woul d be needed to prevent N ASA from tempor aril y losing its ability to l aunc h humans i nto orbit.




The forec ast for NASA's funding l ooks "bl eak," says Rog er Launi us, a his torian at the Smiths oni an Instituti on's Nati onal Air and Spac e M useum. NASA hopes to start wor k i n the c oming decade on a gi ant roc ket, c alled the Ares V, needed to s hoot c argo to the moon, but Launi us fears the nation won't find the money.




"I wouldn't be s urprised i f we don't, si mpl y becaus e there is no c ompelling r ati onale that I' ve s een for g oing to the moon," he s ays .




Still, Launius and others s ay that though the manned flight pr ogram is floundering, satellites and other robotic s pacecr aft ar e doi ng exciting scienc e and will c ontinue to do s o.




NASA's Griffin c onc eded in an i nter view wi th USA T ODAY that "it's a diffic ult ti me & (with) l ots of c hur n, l ots of turmoil, l ots of unc ertainty." All the s ame, he declar ed confi denc e that even if N ASA's budget does n't grow, it will buil d a moon bas e i n the next 15 years and send humans to M ars in 30 years.




"We're on a r eal ups wing i n ter ms of can-do attitude at N ASA," he s ai d. " We're not on a plateau. We're i n a good pl ac e."
ARTIC LEID: 10784
Date: 9/29/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Seniors i n Poor Areas M ore Li kel y to Di e After Surger y
OTS: 7901545
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: "It may be that hos pitals that treat patients of l ower s oci oeconomic status have lower quality of car e due to fewer r esourc es, suc h as technologicall y advanc ed equipment or s pecialists ," lead author Dr. N anc y Bir kmeyer, an ass ociate pr ofess or of s urger y at the U ni ver sity of Mic higan, s aid in a C enter for the Advanc ement of H ealth news r eleas e.T he study was publis hed i n the September iss ue of the journal M edic al C are."While some prior studi es have demonstr ated s ocioec onomic dispariti es i n the outc omes of i ndi vidual pr ocedures , ours is the first to show that the r elations hip is c onsis tent acr oss a wi de range of s urgical pr oc edures ," Birkmeyer s aid.
Bod y:




Sen ior s in Poo r Ar eas Mo re Likely to Die After Su rger y




Study rais es ques tions about dis pariti es i n outcomes, but offers no concrete ans wers.




By R obert Prei dt




Sept. 30




MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthD ay News) -- Elderl y Americ ans who li ve i n l ow-inc ome ZIP c odes are mor e li kel y to die after surger y than thos e who live i n higher-income Z IP codes, acc ordi ng to new res earch.




The study anal yz ed death rates among more than one million ol der adults who had one of si x common high-risk heart or c anc er s urgeries between 1999 and 2003.




The ris k of death was between 17 perc ent and 39 perc ent higher for pati ents in low-i ncome Z IP codes, mainl y bec ause the quality of c are is l ower at hos pitals in lower s ocioec onomic areas, the study authors s aid.




In fac t, all patients (r egardl ess of inc ome) who had surger y at hos pitals i n the poores t are as were more li kel y to die, whil e all pati ents who had s urger y at hospi tals in the ric hes t areas were less li kel y to di e.




"It may be that hos pitals that treat patients of lower s oci oec onomic status have lower quality of car e due to fewer r esourc es, suc h as technol ogicall y advanc ed equipment or s peci alists ," lead author Dr. N anc y Bir kmeyer, an ass ociate pr ofessor of s urger y at the U ni versity of Mic hi gan, sai d i n a C enter for the Advanc ement of Health news rel ease.




The study was published i n the September iss ue of the journal M edic al C are.




"Whil e s ome pri or studies have demonstrated s oci oec onomic dis parities i n the outc omes of indi vidual proc edures, ours is the first to s how that the rel ati ons hi p is c onsistent acros s a wide r ang e of s urgical proc edur es," Bir kmeyer s ai d.




While the s tudy c an i mpr ove understanding of patterns of c are, it does n't offer concrete ans wers for elderl y pati ents who nee d s urger y, s ai d Dr. H arlan Krumholz , a profess or of medici ne, epidemiol ogy and public health at Yal e U ni versity.




"The study c an onl y r eall y r ais e questi ons about inequaliti es in outcomes, bec aus e the authors have limi tations i n their ability to know the s oci oec onomic status of any partic ul ar pati ent and the c onditi on of the patient when they had the s urger y," Krumholz sai d i n the news rel eas e. "N everthel ess, i t is time for us to look clos el y at whether people ar e getti ng the same c are and outcomes r egardl ess of their financial circ umstances ."




More inform ation




The U.S. N ati onal Ins titute on Aging has mor e about s eni ors and surger y.




SOURC E: C enter for the Advanc ement of H eal th, news releas e, Sept. 11, 2008
ARTIC LEID: 10785
Date: 9/30/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: ABC News Online ( abc news.go.c om)
Head lin e: Oc cupational T her apy Pl us Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
OTS: 7901545
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: " Occupati onal therapy is r eall y the missing link in pr omoting wellness of peopl e with hip and knee osteoarthritis," study author Sus an L. Mur phy, an assistant profess or i n the D epartment of Physical M edicine and R ehabilitation at the U ni versity of Mic higan M edic al Sc hool and R es earc h H ealth Sci ence Specialist at the VA Ann Arbor H eal thc are System, s aid in a uni versity news rel eas e.
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Occup ational Th er ap y Plus Exercise B en efits Osteo arthrit is




Taking more ac ti ve rol e in their health helps pati ents s tave off decli ne, study fi nds.




By Krisha McC oy




Oct. 1




TUESD AY, Sept. 30 (H eal thD ay N ews) -- Adding occ upational ther apy to a str uctured exercise pr ogram increases physical acti vi ty for most peopl e who have hip and knee osteoarthritis, s ay res earc hers.




Osteoarthritis is a deg enerati ve dis ease that leads to the breakdown of the cartil age i n j oints. In peopl e with osteoarthritis, exercise helps maintain good joi nt health, manag e s ymptoms and pr event func tional decline.




But studies have s hown that the benefits of a s truc tur ed exercis e program are short-li ved. The benefici al effects usuall y fade soon after partici pation i n the program ends .




In a s tudy i n the October iss ue of Arthritis & Rheumatis m, researchers i nvestigated whether occ upati onal therapy c ould benefi t peopl e with hip and knee os teoar thritis.




The oc cupational ther apy program i n this study was designed to educ ate osteoarthritis patients about joi nt protection, pr oper body mec hanis ms , acti vity paci ng, and envir onmental barr iers.




The partici pants of the c urrent s tudy were di vi ded i nto two groups. The first group participated in a str uctured exercise progr am and the occ upati onal therapy program. T he sec ond group participated in the same exercise progr am, but recei ved health ed uc ation i n plac e of the occ upati onal therapy.




Onl y the group that eng aged in occupational ther apy increased the i ntensity of physic al acti vity at the end of the s tudy.




"Occupational therapy is r eall y the mis sing link in pr omoting wellness of peopl e with hip and knee osteoarthritis," study aut hor Sus an L. Mur phy, an assistant profess or i n the Department of Physic al M edici ne and R ehabilitation at the U ni versi ty of Mic higan M edic al School and R esearc h H ealth Sci enc e Speci alist at the VA Ann Arbor Healthc are Sys tem, s aid i n a uni versity news r eleas e.




Murphy poi nts out that mor e researc h is neces sar y to study the effects of occ upati onal therapy i n larg er groups of peopl e with osteoarthritis and to deter mine the long -ter m effects of the ther apy.




But Mur phy s ays that peopl e with osteoarthritis s houl d stri ve to expand their dail y physical ac ti vity and improve their over all health behavi ors.




"Peopl e with osteoarthritis tend to know more about surgical opti ons , and l ess about how they c an take an ac ti ve rol e in pr omoting their own health and well-being," she s ai d. " People wi th os teoarthritis need to be their own agents of c hange. T hey c an do s o muc h to manage s ymptoms and s tave off functi onal decli ne c aus ed by osteoarthritis j ust by being physicall y ac ti ve. T he bottom l ine is to find out ways to help peopl e cr eate and mai ntain thes e healthy habi ts."




More inform ation




The American Occ upati onal T herapy Ass ociation has mor e about occ upati onal therapy and arthritis.




SOURC E: U ni versity of Mic higan H eal th Sys tem, news rel eas e, Sept. 29, 2008
ARTIC LEID: 6309
Date: 9/25/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Wall Street J ournal Online ( wsj.com)
Head lin e: US EQUIT IES WEEK AH EAD: Wall Street R efor ms, H ome Sal es D ata
OTS: 5475705
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: D urable-goods data out Thursday ar e expected to s how a decli ne in Augus t or ders, while the final September figur e for the U ni versity of Mic higan C ons umer Senti ment Index, due Friday, could rise even further from preli minar y figure, whi ch showed a j ump in o pti mis m from the month before.
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US EQUIT IES WEEK AHEAD: Wall Street R efor ms, Home Sal es D ata




NEW YORK (Dow Jones)--All eyes will be on Wall Street next week to study the effects of refor ms imposed by regul ators in rec ent days and whether a plan is finaliz ed to take bad ass ets off fi nanci al fir ms' bal anc e sheets. Ec onomic reports on new- and existi ng-home s ales and quarterly res ults from three homebuilders will update vi ews on the struggling housi ng mar ket. The two pr esidential candidates meet next Friday in Oxford, Miss., for the first of their thr ee televis ed debates. U S M ay Buy Banks' Illiqui d Ass ets F eder al R eser ve C hairman Ben Bernanke and Treas ur y Secretar y H enr y Paulson will s pend another weekend wor king, this ti me on a pl an for the gover nment to buy illiquid ass ets from fi nancial ins titutions. They have s uggested creati ng an entity that would buy troubl ed mor tgage-linked ass ets from the balance s heets of banks and others holdi ng them. Lawmakers expect to s ee the details this weekend or n ext week, and the Hous e may vote as early as T ues day or Wednes day. Home Sal es D ata, Builders' Res ults Due KB Home Inc . (KBH)
and Lennar Cor p. ( LEN) are expected to pos t quarterl y los ses next week as the industr y c ontinues to suffer from declini ng pric es, a glut of uns old homes and tight cr edit. M eanwhile, ec onomic reports on August exis ting home sal es and new home s ales are to be r eleased Wednesday and T hurs day, r especti vel y. Experts predict new-home s ales will rise from J ul y while exi sting-home s ales will fall short. A Jul y jump i n new- home s ales had s ome peopl e declaring that demand had s tabilized. Final 2Q GDP Figure Friday T he government will rel ease its final figure on s ec ond-quar ter ec onomic growth Friday. A r evised number, gi ven late l ast month, showed a 3.3% incr ease in gross domestic pr oduct fr om April through June, mostl y due to str ong expor ts. Some predict the final figure will ris e to 3.4% . D urable-goods data out T hursday ar e expected to s how a decli ne in August or ders , while the final September figur e f or the U ni versity of Mic higan Cons umer Senti ment Index, due Friday, could rise even further from preli minar y figure, whic h sh owed a j ump in
optimis m from the month befor e. R egional manufac turi ng outl ooks are due from the Ric hmond F ed on Tues day and Kans as City F ed on T hurs day. Among appear ances by F ederal R es er ve official s: D allas Fed Presi dent Richar d Fis her disc uss es the U.S. ec onomy and fi nanci al industr y M onday i n C edar Cr eek, T exas; C hic ago F ed Presi dent Charles Evans gi ves wel comi ng remarks at the bank's 'Credit M ar ket T ur moil: Implic ati ons for Public Polic y' c onfer ence Thurs day; and F ed Governor Kevi n Warsh speaks at the conferenc e the s ame day. Tech Firms, Retail ers T o R eport T ec hnol ogy c ompani es and retailers ar e among the other c ompanies r eporti ng quarterl y r es ults next week. R es earch i n M oti on Ltd. (RIMM), which pr oduc es the Blac kberr y s martphone, reports T hurs day. R IM' s shares have fall en 30% sinc e hitti ng a 52- week hig h in June, a week befor e the c ompany reported i ts fis cal first-quar ter r esul ts. H ous ewar es c hain Bed, Bath & Beyond Inc. ( BBBY) and Ni ke Inc. (NKE) post res ults Wednes day whil e drugstore chai n Rite Aid C or p. (RAD)
reports T hursday. Bed, Bath & Beyond's pr ofits have fallen wi th the housing downturn after its ri val, Linens 'n Thi ngs, fil ed for bankruptc y protecti on in May and has been closi ng stores . Ni ke is expected to pos t ear nings of 93 c ents a s hare, down 17% fr om a year earlier. First IPO In Seven Weeks T he first i nitial public offering in seven weeks is expected to pric e l at e Monday. Fl uidig m C orp.'s IPO was postponed by lead under writer Morgan Stanl ey becaus e of the stoc k mar ket volatility this week. T he lab-tec hnolog y suppli er is expec ted to sell 5.3 million shares , with the price proj ected to c ome in between $14 and $16. The l ast IPO was Web site-hosti ng company Rac ks pac e H os ting Inc. (RAX), which declined 10% on its first day of tr adi ng. Google Smar tphone U nveil ed Tues day T he first mobile device powered by Google Inc .'s (GOOG) 'Android' mobile-phone s oftwar e will be l aunc hed Tues day in New Yor k. The s martphone is expected to s ell for $199. It will req uire a s er vic e c ontrac t with T-Mobile USA, whic h is hopi ng the pric e of the phone and the
data ser vic e will make it attracti ve to the mas s c ons umer mar ket, rather than j ust gadget lo vers. Obama, Mc Cai n F ace Off In D ebate Sens. Bar ac k Obama and John McC ain will tac kl e is sues of nati onal s ec urity and for eign polic y in their first offici al debate Friday at the U ni versi ty of Mississippi. PBS 'T he NewsHour' anc hor Jim Lehrer will moderate as the D emocratic and R epublican c andi dates put questi ons to eac h other in eight 10- minute s eg ments . UN Opens Annual Session World leaders will gather in New Yor k next week for the annual opening of the United N ations General Ass embl y's gener al debate. U.N . Secr etar y-General Ban Ki- moon will start off the pr oc eedings Tues day, followed by s peec hes by Presi dent Bus h, Iranian Presi dent Mahmoud Ahmadi nejad an d Georgia's Pr esi dent Mi kheil Saakas hvili among others. Bush will host s ome l eaders at the White Hous e l ater in the week, incl udi ng Indi an Pri me Minis ter M anmohan Sing h on Thurs day and Afghan leader H amid Karzai on Friday. Confer enc es Among the signific ant conferenc es next
week ar e the D eutsc he Bank Sec urities Inc. 2008 H omebuildi ng Symposium on M onday i n N e w Yor k, Thomas Weisel Partners C onsumer C onfer enc e on Monday and T uesday i n N ew Yor k, U BS Global Li fe Sci ences Conferenc e fr o m M onday through Thurs day in N ew Yor k, and D eutsc he Bank Sec urities Leveraged Fi nanc e C onference from Tues day through Friday i n Scotts dal e, Ariz. - By Kathy Shwiff, D ow J ones News wires; 201-938- 5975; kathy.shwiff@ dowj ones .com (Dow Jones N ews wires staff c ontri buted to thi s report.)
ARTIC LEID: 6426
Date: 9/29/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Wall Street J ournal Online ( wsj.com)
Head lin e: Cons umer IT Shar es H ammer ed Ami d Sagging Confi denc e
OTS: 5475705
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: A R euters/U ni versity of Michigan s ur vey of hous ehol d s enti ment rel eas ed last week c ame in l ower than for ecast. Nati onal R etail F ederation also s aid l ast week that holiday sal es duri ng November and Dec ember may be the weakest in si x years as rising food pric es force cons umers to c ut s pending on discretionar y items.
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Cons umer IT Shar es H ammer ed Ami d Sagging C onfidenc e




SAN FRANCISC O (Dow Jones)--Shares of c onsumer-technolog y c ompanies wer e hammered M onday amid conc erns that the fi nanci al crisis on Wall Street will affect s pendi ng on M ain Str eet. Leading tec hnol og y c ompanies whos e ear nings are affected by the behavi or of c onsumers, s uc h as har dware maker Apple Inc . (AAPL), Inter net advertisi ng giant Google Inc . (GOOG) and ec ommerc e c ompany eBay Inc. (EBAY), all dropped s harpl y as i nvestors worried that c onsumers woul d r ein i n s pending on di screti onar y i tems . T elec ommunic ati ons c ompani es, s uch as Comcas t C orp. (CMCSK, CMC SA), als o were hi t ami d expec tations c ons umers would cut bac k on fanc y pac kages or us age as purse strings tig hten. 'T his is ac knowl edgement that the economic s problem is muc h deeper than anticipated,' s aid Sandeep Aggarwal, an anal yst at C ollins Stewar t. 'Spending plans ar e li kel y to be delayed.' T he fall in cons umer -tec hnolog y names c ame as anal ysts and investors acc epted that a potentiall y long slowdown now fac ed the global ec onomy. Opti mis m
that the pai n c ould be blunted was quas hed when the U .S. Hous e of R epres entati ves failed to pass l egislati on that woul d have made $700 billion available to the g overnment to buy tr oubled debt fr om fi nanci al ins titutions, whic h might have freed credit and made it easier for c ons umers to borrow money. T he dr op in cons umer-tec hnol ogy shares mirrors an earlier fall i n s har es of technolog y giants , s uc h as Internati onal Business M ac hines C or p. (IBM) , Oracl e C orp. (ORC L) and H ewlett-Pac kard C o. (HPQ), which rel y on c orporate cus tomers. Thos e c ompani es have str uggled for s everal months amid worries that their clients will s cal e bac k tec hnolog y budg ets . In l ate afternoon trading, the tech- heavy N as daq was down 7.9% at 2010.79. An earlier drop was acc eler ated after the Hous e failed to pass the bailout bill. Aggar wal s aid September c ould be the wors t month in many years from a cons umer perspec ti ve. He s aid the fac t that the gover nment was tr ying to bail out banks was an i mplicit ac knowl edg ment of the economy's troubles . Apple shares were
among the hardest hi t, tumbling after a pair of anal ysts cut their i nvestment ratings becaus e of elevated ris ks from weakeni ng c ons umer spendi ng. Apple's shares rec entl y were down 16% at $107.46. R BC C apital M ar kets, whic h c ut i ts r ating to sector perform from outper for m, ci ted data from an R BC IQ/C hangewave s ur vey s howi ng 40% of c onsumers plan to spend l ess on elec tronics i n the next 90 days , the weakest o utl ook the s ur vey has ever s een. Shar es of Infineon Tec hnol ogies AG (IF X), which makes the chi ps that power Appl e's iPhone, were of f about 28% . Other hands et makers also suffered on the belief cons umers will likel y hold on to their c ellphones l onger and forego getting the latest devi ces . Blac kBerry maker R es earc h i n M otion Ltd. (R IMM) was down about 9.6% and handhel d c omputer ma ker Pal m Inc . (PALM ) was down about 9.9% after they recentl y war ned of wors eni ng c onditions in the c ons umer mar ket. ' We believe the already c ompetiti ve hands et i ndus tr y is enteri ng a mor e diffic ult phas e, dri ven by slowi ng c ons umer and
enter prise,' s ai d Ji m Suva, an anal ys t at Ci tigroup. Susquehanna Fi nanci al Gr oup on Monday tri mmed its forec as ts for Internet advertising l eaders Google and Yahoo Inc. ( YHOO). T heir shares wer e each down about 7.5%. Mobile phone maker M otorol a Inc . (MOT) was off 12%, while eBay and Amaz on were down nearly 7% and 8% , respecti vel y. Communic ati ons giants di dn't far e either. Wir eles s c arrier Sprint N extel C or p. (S) and c able gi ant Comcas t were downgraded by Oppenhei mer & C o. on fears that the c onsumer envir onment will worsen notic e abl y in the s ec ond half. Sprint and C omcas t s hares were eac h down about 12% . T he dr op in cons umer -technolog y shares follows r ec ent data highlighting a notable decline i n c onsumer c onfidence in the U .S. and Eur ope. New data on Monday showed European ec onomic s enti ment dr opped to an al most seven- year low in September, highlighti ng the ris k that the economy will sink into rec essi on. A R euters/U ni versity of Michigan s ur vey of hous ehol d s enti ment releas ed las t week c ame in l ower than
forecas t. N ati onal R etail F ederation also sai d l ast week that holiday s ales during N ovember and D ec ember may be the weakest in si x years as rising food pric es forc e c ons umers to c ut spendi ng on discr etionar y items. M onday's declines add to a woeful year i n whic h a number of cons umer -tec hnol ogy compani es have seen their shares c ut i n hal f. Shares of the world's N o. 2 vi deogame publis her , Redwood Ci ty, C alif.- based Elec tronic Arts Inc . (ERT S), are off 52% this year, while Motor ola has fallen 57% and online travel agent Expedia Inc. ( EXPE) is down mor e than 54% so far this year. -By Sc ott Morris on, D ow J ones N ews wir es; 415- 765-6118; sc ott.morris on@dowjones.c om (R oger C heng c ontributed to this report.)
ARTIC LEID: 3702
Date: 9/17/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Wall Street J ournal Online ( wsj.com)
Head lin e: Infl ation Eases on Oil Pric e Dr op
OTS: 5475705
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: H ousehol ds sur veyed by the Uni versity of Michigan r eported this month that they expect pric es to advanc e 3.6% annuall y over the next fi ve to ten years , down fr om the 5.1% they expected in Jul y. When inflation expectati ons are l ower, it bec omes mor e diffic ult for c ompanies to pass on pric e increases.
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Infl ati on Eas es on Oil Price Dr op




Dow J ones Reprints: T his c opy is for your pers onal, non-commercial us e onl y. T o order pr es entation-ready copies for distributi on to your coll eagues , clients or customers, us e the Order R eprints tool at the bottom of any article or visi t www.djreprints.c om As the credit crisis c ontinues to wall op the ec onomy, one piec e of go od news s tands out: Inflati on is s ubsidi ng in the U .S. and par ts of Eur ope and Asi a. U.S. c onsumer prices fell last month for the first ti me in two years, the Labor Department sai d T uesday, whil e the c onsumer-price index fell 0.1% i n August after rising 0. 8% the previ ous month. A 3.1% decli ne in energ y prices was the mai n forc e behind the overall price dr op; excluding food and energ y, the C PI r os e 0.2%. Wi th pric e press ures easi ng, U.S. infl ati on should conti nue to cool i n the months to c ome. Partl y that is the result of s agging demand globall y and the turnaround i n the dollar , which has been cli mbing in value si nc e the end of J ul y. Damped i nfl ati on is i mportant bec ause it hel ps eas e the str ain of rising prices on c onsumer
poc ketbooks and c ompany pr ofits. It als o makes it easi er for the Federal R es er ve to c ombat the weak ec onomy by l owering inter est r ates. The sig ns of i nfl ation ebbi ng ar e abundant. Energ y and other commodity prices wer e c ontinui ng to fall Tues day, wi th crude oil at a seven-month low of $91.1 5 a barrel in late trading i n N ew Yor k, down fr om a J ul y 3 all-time high of $145.29. Prices of i mported goods slipped las t month, and are expected to c onti nue to head south. Inflation expec tations have als o r atc heted l ower . H ous ehol ds s ur veyed by the U ni versity of Michigan r eported this month that they expect pric es to advanc e 3.6% annuall y over the next fi ve to ten years, down fr om the 5.1% they expected i n J ul y. When inflati on expectati ons are l ower , it becomes more di ffic ult for c ompanies to pas s o n price incr eases . 'Inflation, the fear seems to be passing right now,' s ays Gl obal Insight c hief economis t N ariman Behraves h.
ARTIC LEID: 16357
Date: 9/27/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: C hicag o Tribune Online (c hicag otribune.com)
Head lin e: September c onsumer s entiment i ndex lower than for ecast
OTS: 3299493
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan fi nal index of hous ehol d s enti ment declined to 70.3, lower than forec ast, after a reading of 73.1 earlier i n September. Si nce the pr elimi nar y report was iss ued Sept. 12, Lehman Brothers H oldi ngs Inc. has filed for bankr uptc y, the federal gover nment has taken over American Internati onal Group Inc.,
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Americ an cons umers los t c onfidence i n September as they saw the credit crisis deepen, a sign they coul d c urtail spendi ng. T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan fi nal index of hous ehold s entiment declined to 70.3, lower than for ec ast, after a readi ng of 73.1 earlier i n September. Since the pr elimi nar y report was iss ued Sept. 12, Lehman Brothers H oldi ngs Inc. has filed for bankruptc y, the federal gover nment has taken over American Internati onal Group Inc., and stoc ks have plummeted. T he bigges t fi nanci al mel tdown since the Great Depres sion is li kel y to hurt cons u mer spendi ng and the economy for the res t of the year.
ARTIC LEID: 16309
Date: 9/14/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: C hicag o Tribune Online (c hicag otribune.com)
Head lin e: Li ke a r oc k: Gener al Motors rolling on rough r oad but expec ts to li ve on for another centur y
OTS: 3299493
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: 'This is the worst crisis they ever have faced,' s aid Davi d Lewis, profes sor emeritus at the Uni versity of Michig an who taught busi nes s hi stor y for 43 years until retiring earlier this year. 'Bec aus e they're r eall y in dang er of failing.' F or all i ts warts, GM can poi nt to pr ogress, especi all y on the expens e si de of the ledger.
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DETROIT (AP) _ In his 43 years as a General M otors C orp. factor y wor ker, Rog er Ezell has s een r ec essions, gas oline price spi kes, s ales slumps and multi billion dollar l oss es.Each ti me, he says, the giant automaker has s ur vi ved to make billions i n l ater years.But as GM c elebrates i ts 100th anni versar y Tues day, the c ompany that was onc e the nation's larges t empl oyer faces a crisis l i ke no other in its s tori ed his tor y.GM has lost $57.5 billion i n the past 18 months, i ncludi ng $15.5 billion i n the s ec ond q uarter. It's bur ning more than $1 billion a month in c ash, has mor e than $32 billion in l ong -ter m debt, and a slumpi ng U.S. mar ket has forced it to close factories and shed wor kers. In J ul y, it s us pended its di vi dend for the first ti me in 86 years, and the compan y has been i n per petual restruc turi ng sinc e at least 2002.' We've s een them down further than what they are, and they got bac k up,' s ai d Ezell, 63, who passed up s everal earl y r etirement offers to keep wor king at a fac tor y near Pontiac that makes the Chevr olet Mali bu and Pontiac G6 mi dsiz e
sedans. 'I believe i n GM. T here's no doubt in my mi nd.'Yet industr y anal ysts wonder whether GM ca n make it if the U.S. ec onomy stays i n a funk and cons umers conti nue to shun tr uc ks and s port utility vehicl es for small, fuel-efficient c ars. One anal ys t even mentioned bankr uptc y pr otection for the company that developed the first full y automatic tra ns missi on, the first V- 8 engine, the first hydrogen fuel c ell vehicl e and even the first mec hanic al heart-lung machi ne.'This is the worst crisis they ever have fac ed,' sai d D avi d Lewis, pr ofess or emeritus at the U ni versity of Mic hi gan who taught busi ness histor y for 43 years until retiring earlier this year. 'Bec ause they're reall y in danger of failing.'F or all i ts warts, GM can poi nt to pr ogress, especi ally on the expens e si de of the ledger. A historic c ontract r eac hed las t year wi th the U nited Auto Wor kers will save the c ompany about $3 billion per year, mainl y by shi fting $46.
ARTIC LEID: 7715
Date: 9/8/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ews week
Head lin e: Why I Am Leavi ng Guyl and;
OTS: 3138889
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: M eanwhile, saddled with an aver age of $20,000 in student debt and r ear ed with a sens e of entitl ement that stops them fr om taking any old job, the perc entage of 26- year-ol ds li ving wi th their par ents has nearl y doubled si nce 1970, fr om 11 to 20 percent, accor ding to economist Bob Sc hoeni's res earc h wi th the Population Studi es C enter at the Uni versity of Michig an.
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Newsweek



September 8, 2008
U.S. Edition



Why I Am Leaving Guyland;
Peter Pans aren't as happy as they seem.

BYLINE: By Tony Dokoupil



SECTION: SOCIETY; CULTURE; Pg. 70 Vol. 152 No. 10 ISSN: 0028-9604



LENGTH: 1620 words



It's "booze o'clock" on a recent Thursday night on New York's Fire Island--a rolling, inexact hour when 10
vacationing guys decide to kick off their nightly binge. Between tequila shots and pulls of beer, the sun-
baked twentysomethings roar on the deck of their rented beach house, sounding the depths of maledom:
sexual conquests, mastery of fire ("I'll grill that potato salad") and escape from the monotony of girlfriends
and work. "I like starting things," says one guy, as if to sum up his generation. "Then it gets boring."

The banter may seem like an open dish-session between friends, but masculine law chokes out the sissy
stuff. There's scorn when water is used to dilute a whisky, and disbelief when one of the crew suggests
dinner that night to celebrate his birthday. "This isn't a friendship trip," chides one of the guys. "We're here
to get women." During the week, most of the guys say they've reached their goal--a few more than once.

Once the preserve of whacked-out teens and college slackers, this testosterone-filled landscape is the
new normal for American males until what used to be considered creeping middle age, according to the
sociologist Michael Kimmel. In his new book, "Guyland," the State University of New York at Stony Brook
professor notes that the traditional markers of manhood--leaving home, getting an education, finding a
partner, starting work and becoming a father--have moved downfield as the passage from adolescence to
adulthood has evolved from "a transitional moment to a whole new stage of life." In 1960, almost 70
percent of men had reached these milestones by the age of 30. Today, less than a third of males that age
can say the same.

"What used to be regressive weekends are now whole years in the lives of some guys," Kimmel tells
NEWSWEEK. In almost 400 interviews with mainly white, college-educated twentysomethings, he found
that the lockstep march to manhood is often interrupted by a debauched and decadelong odyssey, in
which youths buddy together in search of new ways to feel like men. Actually, it's more like all the old
ways--drinking, smoking, kidding, carousing--turned up a notch in a world where adolescent
demonstrations of manhood have replaced the real thing: responsibility. Kimmel's testosterone tract adds
to a forest of recent research into protracted adolescents (or "thresholders" and "kidults," as they've also
been dubbed) and the reluctance of today's guys to don their fathers' robes--and commitments. They "see
grown-up life as such a loss," says Kimmel, explaining why so many guys are content to sit out their 20s
in duct-taped beanbag chairs. The trouble is that the very thing they're running from may be the thing they
need.

At least, that's what I hope. On the weekend this story goes to print I am getting married in a loft in
midtown Manhattan, tying the knot at 27--the national average for guys. But by the way some of my single
male friends reacted, you'd think I was appearing on an episode of "Engaged and Underage." "Maybe
you're making a big mistake," said one buddy when I told him of the engagement. A 27-year-old
technology consultant living in New York, he can't remember the names of the women he's slept with (let
alone the number), and gives them nicknames like "Biff," "Dino" and "the Little Maniac." I'm happy to take
in the night with him every few weeks, but still a little uncomfortable belting out "Sweet Caroline" to a bar
full of people, and tickled pink when I'm back home with my girlfriend--soon to be wife. Guyland is not
without its charms, but it pales next to what I have known with her over the past three years.

A bad attitude about marriage is not the only thing that's holding these guys back. A series of social and
economic reversals are making it harder than ever to climb the ladder of adulthood. Since 1971, annual
salaries for males 25 to 34 with full-time jobs have plummeted almost 20 percent, according to the Center
for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University. At the same time, women have crashed just about all
the old male haunts, and are showing some signs of outpacing their husbands and boyfriends as
breadwinners and heads of family, at least in urban centers. Last year, researchers at Queens College in
New York determined that women between 21 and 30 in at least five major cities, including Dallas,
Chicago and New York, have not only made up the wage gap since 1970--they now earn upwards of 15
percent more than their male counterparts. As a result, many men feel redundant.

Today's guys are perhaps the first downwardly mobile--and endlessly adolescent--generation of men in
U.S. history. They're also among the most distraught--men between the ages of 16 and 26 have the
highest suicide rate for any group except men above 70--and socially isolated, despite their image as a
band of backslapping buddies. According to the General Social Survey, a highly regarded decadeslong
University of Chicago project to map changes in American culture, twentysomething guys are bowling
alone when compared with the rest of society. They are less likely to read a newspaper, attend church,
vote for president or believe that people are basically trustworthy, helpful and fair. Meanwhile, saddled
with an average of $20,000 in student debt and reared with a sense of entitlement that stops them from
taking any old job, the percentage of 26-year-olds living with their parents has nearly doubled since 1970,
from 11 to 20 percent, according to economist Bob Schoeni's research with the Population Studies Center
at the University of Michigan.

The failure to launch is perhaps no surprise given the onslaught of messages that suggest settling down
is tantamount to ripping up one's ticket to the party. To turn on television or see a movie is to find a
smorgasbord of regressive adventures for the single man of every stripe. Movies like "Pineapple
Express," Judd Apatow's latest celebration of beta male bonding; TV shows like HBO's hypermasculine
pal party "Entourage," and beer commercials like Miller Lite's "Man Laws" ads make delayed adulthood
seem like a lark--roguish, fun and, most of all, normal. Meanwhile, the denizens of Guyland eat this stuff
up, with males 16 to 26 constituting the single most coveted consumer group. As evidence, Kimmel points
to the litany of "guysploitation" media, including ever frat-tastic magazines such as Maxim and FHM, and
Spike TV, "the first network for men."

The happy family man, on the other hand, is an alien concept in Guyland, and all too scarce in popular
culture. Men like me, who actually embrace married life in their 20s, are seen as aberrations--or just a bit
odd. According to a study released last month by the Parents Television Council, prime-time broadcast
audiences are three times more likely to hear about people having sex with pets, corpses or two other
people simultaneously than they are to see a blissed-out married couple between the sheets. If the
domestic man does appear, the study finds, the guy who pants in Lamaze class rather than a stranger's
bedroom is portrayed as freakish, fuddy-duddy and frequently religious: an uptight Boy Scout in a Peter
Pan culture. "Today's prime-time television," the PTC concludes, "seems to be actively seeking to
undermine marriage by consistently painting it in a negative light."
But while the glorified Isle of Guy makes many men feel inadequate, its attractions are often illusory--or
worse. Binge drinking is shown to cause learning disabilities in lab rats; almost 20 percent of college guys
said they would commit rape if they knew they wouldn't be caught, according to a 2005 UCLA study, and
fraternity hazing has resulted in at least one reported fatality for each of the last 10 years.

Beyond the practical dangers, the world of twentysomething males can also be an alienating place, where
the entrance fee is conformity and the ride is less than advertised. At a waterfront bar on Fire Island,
there is gleeful solidarity as the guys chink glasses and catcall en masse to passing women (who resist).
But on their own and without their liquid courage, there is also isolation and discontent. A 28-year-old
Emory graduate, who declined to be named for fear of ridicule, talked of feeling ashamed of his life, which
has led to countless conquests but not the literary success he'd hoped for; he's living at home in New
Jersey and working at a hotel front desk in the meantime. Another guy, 26, an Arizona State alum who
lives in Tempe, is a coupon-book salesman, but clearly self-conscious: he carries fake business cards
touting him as an MTV entertainment executive.

If only all the posturing paid off. College guys believe that 80 percent of their friends are getting laid each
weekend, says Kimmel, whose survey of 13,000 kids, mostly 18 to 22 years old, puts the actual figure at
closer to 10 percent. After college, he says, the percentages merely get worse.

Meanwhile, the angst associated with adulthood may not be warranted. A raft of recent studies suggest
that married men are happier, more sexually satisfied and less likely to end up in the emergency room
than their unmarried counterparts. They also earn more, are promoted ahead of their single counterparts
and are more likely to own a home.

"Men benefit from just being married, regardless of the quality of the relationship. It makes them healthier,
wealthier and more generous with their relatives," says Scott Coltrane, author of "Gender and Families"
and dean of the University of Oregon College of Arts and Science. It accelerates men's journey toward
stability and security. "In general, those are the things that lead to happiness," he adds.

At least, that's what I am hoping. Ask me in 20 years.
ARTIC LEID: 5035
Date: 9/19/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Yahoo News Online ( news .yahoo.c om)
Head lin e: As fares and fees rise, pas sengers want ser vic e
OTS: 2948483
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: T he airlines have been i mposing new fees, r aising far es, r educi ng flights and, i n s ome c ases, c utting out fr ee snac ks in coac h. But several big and s mall airlines ali ke have struggled r elati ve to the i ndus tr y in terms of baggag e handling, on-ti me per for manc e and other customer ser vic e metrics. An annual Uni versity of Michig an sur vey r eleas ed in M ay found customers gi vi ng airlines the worst gr ades si nc e 2001.
Bod y:

As fares and fees ris e, passengers want ser vic e




By HARRY R. WEBER, AP Business Writer                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Fri Sep 19, 2:03 PM ET




On a r ec ent rai ny day at D allas-F ort Worth Internati onal Airport, a s uitc as e bound for Col orado Springs, Col o., lay on the ground outsi de a termi nal under a maze of Americ an Airlines c onveyor belts that ferr y bags to and from near by planes.




A fi eld r epres entati ve for the airline who was s howi ng a reporter the l ong, circuitous route c hec ked bags take put the s uitc ase on a belt wher e it was s upposed to be. H e s ai d it li kel y fell off a belt or a baggag e handl er's vehicl e. H e didn't know how long it had been off its path.




The airlines have been imposing new fees, r aising far es, r educi ng flights and, i n s ome c ases , c utting out fr ee snac ks in coac h. But s everal big and s mall airlines ali ke have struggled rel ati ve to the i ndus tr y in terms of baggag e handli ng, on-ti me per for manc e and other c ustomer s er vice metrics . An annual U ni versit y of Mic higan s urvey releas ed in May found c ustomers givi ng airlines the worst grades sinc e 2001.




With the sl ow tr avel seas on now upon them, airlines fac e the dual c hallenges of incr easi ng revenue to cover heavy fuel costs while als o i mprovi ng their product to give air travel ers a retur n on their added investment.




"We realize that in or der for us to reg ain that br and r ecog nition and the cus tomer loyalty that we us ed to own i n the '80s and '90s, we ought to do s omething ver y dramatic and differ ent," s ai d Mar k Mitc hell, American's managing dir ector of c ustomer experienc e.




Delta Air Lines Inc.'s regi onal s ubsidi ar y Comair had the worst on-time perfor mance in Jul y among airlines s ur veyed by the D epartment of Tr ansportation. From Januar y thr oug h J ul y, American Airlines' on- time arrival r ate was the lowes t among U.S. c arriers, whil e U AL C or p.'s U nited Airlines' was s econd-lowest. Comair had the highest mis handled baggag e rate in J ul y, whil e the highest number of c onsumer c ompl aints recei ved by the DOT that month wer e about D elta. C omair's on-ti me per for manc e from J anuar y thr ough J ul y ranked 17th out of 19 airlines , while D elta's ranked eighth.




The fourth-hig hes t number of c ons umer compl aints rec ei ved by the DOT in Jul y wer e about T empe, Ariz.- based U S Airways, whic h sai d i n a Sept. 3 memo to empl oyees that they woul d not be rec ei ving a $50 bonus for the month bec aus e the airline's on-ti me per for manc e did not place in the top three among the 10 larges t U.S. carriers .




Executi ves bl ame weather, c ong esti on in the N ortheast and air traffic c ontrol issues for some of the probl ems, but they als o ac knowl edge c ompany s pecific problems . T hey s ay there have been improvements si nc e the latest D OT fig ures were rel eas ed.




Americ an, a unit of F ort Wor th- bas ed AMR Cor p., is keepi ng pl anes on the ground l ong er in some ci ties before tur ning them for their next flight so that if something g oes wrong, there is extra ti me to board pass eng ers and baggag e. It plans to bl oc k a li mited number of seats fr om being s old on flights i n key mar kets this Thanksgi ving to gi ve it fle xi bility i n re- acc ommodating cus tomers on pl anes that woul d other wis e be full.




The carri er als o is refurbis hing the i nteriors of its Boeing 757s, upgradi ng business class s eats on inter national flights , adding l eather headres ts to c oac h s eats on MD-80s and testing Wi-Fi s er vice on s ome aircraft.




And to make it easi er and quic ker to l oc ate mishandl ed bags, American is equi ppi ng pers onn el with automated handhel d bag tag s canners.




"Ther e are huge c os ts when you have i nc onvenienc ed your c ustomers," s aid Dan Garton, American's exec uti ve vic e president of m ar keting.




Dorothy Boydston, a 48- year-ol d electrician fr om H awaii, knows what Garton means .




On a r ec ent trip from Santa Barbara, C alif., to D enver to see her daug hter, Boyds ton had to spend a night at a Phoeni x hotel at her own expens e becaus e s he missed her US Air ways c onnecti ng flight after, s he s aid, an airline employee wr ote the wrong g ate number on her tic ket. That came after s he had to pay $15 to c hec k a bag s he tried to carr y on the plane to Phoeni x, when the airline tol d her there was no r oom in the overhead bi ns.




The next mor ning, she was still at Phoeni x Sky Har bor Inter national Airport, on standby for another flight to Denver.




"I coul d have r ented a c ar for what it's c osti ng me," s he s aid.




As ked i f pas sengers shoul d g et better c ustomer ser vic e i n light of the higher fares and fees they are payi ng compared to a ye ar ag o, Boyds ton s ai d, " What c ustomer ser vic e? T her e's no c us tomer s er vice anymore."




But Aaron Tr ompeter, 37, an English teac her who li ves i n Winchester, Va., sai d he still fi nds value i n the price of an airline tic ket thes e days, even if he has to deal with more hassl es, pa y to c hec k bags and no longer gets fr ee s nac ks on some flights.




"It's so much better than a stagec oach or a c ar," Tr ompeter s aid at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Air port after getting off a United flight fr om Washi ngton. "So the lac k of ser vic e, or t he perc ei ved l ac k of s er vice, is s till ver y muc h worth it."




Airline exec uti ves are unapologetic about the need to r aise mor e revenue thr oug h fee and fare incr eases to c over their hefty fuel bills. T hey als o s ay that certain offerings that were free to ever yone befor e are still free for pr emi um passengers like elite fr equent-fliers and thos e peopl e who travel i n firs t cl ass or busi ness cl ass.




"Food is the easiest one for me to defend," Garton sai d of American's decisi on to c harge $3 for a c ookie or a c an of potato c hips in coac h. " When you open your mi nibar at the hotel tonight, it's not g oing to be fr ee. When you go to the movi e theater, the popcor n is g oing to c os t you mor e than the tic ket. Gi ving away food for free is an unus ual thing the airlines started 70 years ago, but I woul d argue it was all first-cl ass ser vic e 70 years ago."




Delta, the onl y one of the si x l egac y c arriers not c harging a fee for a first c hec ked bag, is using tec hnol og y and i nfras truc tur e upgrades to i mprove its baggage handli ng. It is about halfway through a $100 million c apital pr ojec t at its Atlanta hub that incl udes upgradi ng c onveyor belts and sorti ng s ys tems . It also has i nvested $10 million this year to roll out more wireles s bag s canners s o i t c an keep better trac k of where bags ar e i n the tr ans fer proces s.




Lee M ac enc zak, D elta's exec uti ve vic e presi dent of s ales and mar keting, s ai d the airline holds its elf to a high s tandar d when it c omes to s peed and c onveni enc e.




"To the degree we don't deliver on that, it c ertai nl y does i mpact our br and," he s aid. " We are not s atis fied wher e we are. We have a lot of wor k to do."




Stephen Gor man, D elta's exec uti ve vic e president of operations, s aid weather iss ues c an s kew the on- time data. H e s aid the carrier is worki ng har d to i mprove what it can c ontrol .




"The foundati on is on- time, clean, with bags, and friendl y cus tomer s er vice," Gor man sai d. "T hose ar e the fundamentals we know we have to do right."




Southwest Airlines C o., whic h has not faced the same threat from fuel prices as other carriers bec aus e of its aggressi ve fuel hedgi ng pr ogram, boas ts i n rec ent T V commercials of still allowi ng all its pass engers to chec k two bags for free. Its on-ti me arri val r ate i n J ul y, thir d-highest among U.S. c arriers, was nearly 20 percentage points above C omair's.




The Dall as-bas ed airline l ed the indus tr y i n pass enger s atis fac tion i n the lates t U ni versit y of Mic higan s ur vey.




"We' ve got to be in the busi nes s to make money, but not to sacrific e what our br and and our produc t offering is," s aid D ar yl Krause, Southwest's s enior vic e presi dent of c ustomer s ervic es .




AP Business Writers C hris Kahn in Phoeni x and J os hua Freed in Mi nneapolis c ontributed to this r eport.
ARTIC LEID: 2212
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Yahoo News Online ( news .yahoo.c om)
Head lin e: Gr oup: Gl obal warmi ng c oul d c ost Ohio its buc keyes
OTS: 2948483
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: D onald R. Zak, an ec olog y pr ofess or at the Uni versity of Mic higan, s aid it's not unusual to find a buc keye tree i n s outhern Michigan, where the climate and soil is li ke that in norther n Ohi o.T he Great Lakes r egion has experienced cli mate c hange often, incl uding when glaci ers s haped the landscape and then pulled bac k. But global war mi ng pr esents a real c oncer n now, Z ak s aid."Humans are the caus e of this war ming, and that's no l ong er a debate among scientists," he s aid.
Bod y:

Group: Gl obal war ming c oul d c os t Ohio its buc keyes




By M.R. KROPKO, Associated Press Writer                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Fri Sep 12, 7:19 PM ET




It's not the best-researched global- warmi ng theor y, but it c oul d be the most horrifyi ng to c ertain fans of coll ege football: Envir onmentalis ts s aid Friday that cli mate c hange might push the growing r ange of Ohi o's iconic buc keye tree out of the state, l eavi ng it for arc hrival Mic higan.




Save T he Buc keye, a coalition of environmental acti vi sts and outdoor enthusi asts , has a billboard i n C olumbus warni ng about t he fate of the buc keye tree, and bac kers plan to hold r allies during football tailgati ng events . T hey'r e hoping to channel Ohi o pride into environmental awareness and acti on.




"Peopl e had thought of global war ming as s omething far away, affec ting pol ar bears," s ai d T om Bulloc k, an advoc ate for the Pe w Environment Gr oup i n Ohi o. "If we don't get s tarted now we will r educ e the opportunit y to reduce global war ming and c urb its worst effects ."




The bill board next to the Buc keye H all of F ame and Cafe and along a highway near Ohio Stadium s ays : "Mic higan Buc keye? Gl obal War mi ng is Sendi ng Ohio's Buc keye Nor th."




Although found i n other parts of the Midwest, the buc keye tr ee is the offici al state tree of Ohi o, and the buc keye nut pr ovided the name for s ports teams at Ohio State U ni versi t y, whose football ri val is the Uni versit y of Mic higan. T he br own nut's lighter circ ular " eye," r es embli ng the e ye of a buc k deer, gave the tree its name.




The coaliti on doesn't have any evi denc e that the buc keye's range has been pus hed north but says global war mi ng thr eatens to make that happen.




David Lytle, c hief of the Di vision of For estr y in the Ohi o D epartment of N atural Res ources , s aid the campaig n has merit bec aus e i t c alls attention to i mpor tant ec ologic al iss ues .




"I think it's a lighthearted way of addres sing a s erious s ubjec t," he s aid.




Lytl e s aid heal thy adult buc keye trees c an toler ate a wi de climate r ang e, although seedlings are more s ensiti ve. Minnesota, Wisc onsi n and Mic higan c oul d eventuall y gi ve buc keye tr ees a mor e c omfortabl e habitat, he s ai d.




Football fans may not want to hear this, but Michigan already has s ome buc keye tr ees .




Donald R. Z ak, an ec olog y pr ofessor at the Uni versit y of Mic higan, s aid i t's not unusual to find a buc keye tree i n s outhern Michigan, where the climate and soil is li ke that in norther n Ohio.




The Gr eat Lakes r egion has experienced climate c hange often, including when glaciers shaped the landsc ape and then pull ed bac k. But global war ming pres ents a r eal conc ern now, Z ak sai d.




"Humans are the caus e of this war mi ng, and that's no longer a debate among scientis ts," he s aid.
ARTIC LEID: 1682
Date: 9/12/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Yahoo News Online ( news .yahoo.c om)
Head lin e: Stoc ks fall after drop i n retail s al es
OTS: 2948483
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: N ot all economic news was unwelcome. Another gover nment report showi ng a bigger-than-expected dr op in wholes ale inflati on — the steepes t decli ne in nearl y two years — at leas t eas es i nvestors' worries about rising prices. And a R euters /Uni versity of Michig an sur vey on cons umer senti ment s howed c ons umers are more upbeat than they were earlier in the summer when energ y prices wer e higher.
Bod y:

Stoc ks fall after drop i n retail sal es




By TIM PARADIS, AP Business Writer                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              17 mi nutes ag o




Stoc ks pulled bac k Friday foll owing an unexpected sl owdown at c as h r egisters l ast month and as i nvestors tri ed to glean insights i nto Lehman Bro thers H oldi ngs Inc.'s r ac e to s ell its elf or s omehow s hore up Wall Str eet's c onfidenc e.




The Commerce Department's r eport Friday that r etail sal es fell by 0.3 percent i n Aug ust unner ved some i nvestors who expected that a decli ne in g as prices from their mi d-Jul y high would leave mor e money i n c ons umers' wallets .




Sluggishnes s in buyi ng is an unner ving prospect for Wall Str eet bec ause co ns umer spendi ng ac counts for more than two-thirds of U.S. ec onomic ac ti vity.




Most of Wall Street's attenti on remained on Lehman and the fi nanci al s ector, however. Lehman s har es have spir aled lower this week, heapi ng pr ess ure on top exec uti ves at the No. 4 U.S. i nvestment bank to line up a buyer. M any mar ket obser vers are doubtful that Lehman will remain independent. Executi ves have been wor king to find s omeone willing to buy all or par t of the c ompany, bankers and industr y executi ves cl ose to the situation tol d T he Ass oci ated Pr ess.




Lehman shares , which tumbl ed 42 percent T hursday and ar e off mor e than 94 perc ent for the year , fell 48 cents , or 11 percent, to $3.74 i n the earl y g oing Friday.




Bank of America C or p., Japan's N omur a Securiti es, France's BN P Paribas, Deutsche Bank AG and Britai n's Barcl ay's PLC have been menti oned this week as potenti al buyers for the bel eag uer ed investment bank.




In the firs t hour of tr ading, the D ow J ones industrial averag e fell 141.42, or 1.24 perc ent, to 11,292.29.




Broader stoc k indic ators als o fell. The Standard & Poor's 500 i ndex fell 13.11, or 1.05 perc ent, to 1,235.94, and the N asdaq c omposite i ndex fell 25.28, or 1.12 percent, 2,232.94. T he maj or indexes eac h rose mor e than 1 percent Thursday so some r etr acing Friday wouldn't c ome as a s urpris e to traders.




Bond pric es r os e. T he yiel d on the benchmar k 10- year Treas ur y note, which moves opposite its price, fell to 3.63 percent from 3.64 perc ent l ate T hurs day. T he doll ar was mi xe d agai nst other maj or c urrencies , while g old prices rose.




Light, s weet crude rose 65 c ents to $101.52 on the New Yor k M ercantile Exchang e.




Not all economic news was unwelcome. Another gover nment r eport showing a bigger-than-expected drop i n wholes ale infl ati on — the steepest decli ne i n nearl y two years — at least eas es i nvestors' worries about rising prices . And a R euters /Uni versit y of Michig an sur vey on c ons umer s enti ment s howed c onsumers are mor e upbeat than they were earlier i n the s ummer when energ y prices were hi gher.




Beyond worries about Lehman, investors als o will be examini ng Was hi ngton M utual Inc ., whic h j umped Thurs day after falling s har pl y Wednesday. The nation's l argest savi ngs and l oan s ai d T hurs day it pl ans to book another multibillion write-off for wr ong- way bets on mortgag e s ecuriti es. The company sai d, however, that it has adequate c api tal to fund its operations. The s toc k fell 9 c ents, or 3.2 perc ent, to $2.74 after rising 22 perc ent T hurs day.




Overs eas, J apan's Ni kkei s toc k aver age r ose 0.93 percent. In afternoon trading, Britain's F TS E 100 r ose 0.38 percent, Ger many's D AX index added 0.06 perc ent, and France's C AC-40 climbed 0.50 perc ent.
ARTIC LEID: 5072
Date: 9/20/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: M SNBC Online ( ms nbc .com)
Head lin e: Air travelers demand bang for buc ks
OTS: 2879877
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: An annual U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey rel eas ed in May found c ustomers givi ng airlines the worst grades sinc e 2001.With the sl ow tr avel seas on now upon them, airlines fac e the dual c hallenges of incr easi ng revenue to cover heavy fuel costs while als o i mprovi ng their product to give air travel ers a retur n on their added investment
Bod y:




Air travel ers demand bang for buc ks




FORT WORTH , T exas - On a rec ent rai ny day at D allas-Fort Worth Internati onal Airport, a suitcas e bound for Col orado Springs , Col o., lay on the ground outsi de a termi nal under a maz e of Americ an Airlines conveyor belts that ferry bags to and from near by pla nes.A fi eld repres entati ve for the airline who was s howi ng a reporter the long, circuitous route c hec ked bags take put the s uitc ase on a bel t wher e it was suppos ed to be. H e s aid it li kel y fell off a belt or a baggag e handl erâ€Â â„¢s vehicl e. H e didn†Â℠¢t know how long it had been off its path.T he airlines have been i mposi ng new fees, raisi ng far es, reducing fli ghts and, in some c as es, cutting out free s nac ks i n c oach. But sever al big and s mall airlines alike have str uggled r elati ve t o the industr y i n ter ms of baggage handling, on-ti me perfor mance and other c ustomer s er vic e metrics. An annual U ni versity of Michigan s ur vey rel eased i n M ay found cus tomers gi ving airlines the wors t grades si nce 2001.Wi th the slow travel s eason now upon them, airlines face the dual challenges of
increasing r evenue to c over heavy fuel c osts whil e also impr oving their pr oduct to gi ve air travelers a r eturn on their added i nvestment.â€Â Å“We r ealiz e that in order for us to regai n that brand rec ogni tion and th e c ustomer loyalty that we used to own i n the â€Â â„¢80s and ⠀ ™90s , we oug ht to do s omethi ng ver y dramatic and differ ent,† sai d M ar k Mitc hell, American†Â℠¢s managing director of cus tomer experienc e.D elta Air Lines I nc.†Â℠¢s regi onal s ubsidi ar y C omair had the worst on-ti me perfor manc e i n J ul y among airlines s ur veyed by the D epartment of Tr ans portation. From J anuar y thr ough J ul y, Americ an Air lines â €Â℠¢ on-ti me arrival r ate was the lowest among U.S. c arriers, whil e UAL C orp.â€Â â„¢s Uni ted Airlinesâ€Â â„¢ was second-l owes t. C omair had the highest mishandl ed baggage r ate i n J ul y, while the highest number of cons umer complai nts rec ei ved by t he DOT that month were about Del ta.
ARTIC LEID: 5073
Date: 9/19/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: M SNBC Online ( ms nbc .com)
Head lin e: As fares and fees rise, pas sengers want ser vic e
OTS: 2879877
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: An annual U ni versity of Mic higan s ur vey rel eas ed in May found c ustomers givi ng airlines the worst grades sinc e 2001.With the sl ow tr avel seas on now upon them, airlines fac e the dual c hallenges of incr easi ng revenue to cover heavy fuel costs while als o i mprovi ng their product to give air travel ers a retur n on their added investment.
Bod y:




As fares and fees ris e, passengers want ser vic e




FORT WORTH , T exas - On a rec ent rai ny day at D allas-Fort Worth Internati onal Airport, a suitcas e bound for Col orado Springs , Col o., lay on the ground outsi de a termi nal under a maz e of Americ an Airlines conveyor belts that ferry bags to and from near by planes.A fi eld repres entati ve for the airline who was s howi ng a reporter the long, circuitous route c hec ked bags take put the s uitc ase on a bel t wher e it was suppos ed to be. H e s aid it li kel y f ell off a belt or a baggag e handl erâ€Â â„¢s vehicl e. H e didn†Â℠¢t know how long it had been off its path.T he airli nes have been i mposi ng new fees, raisi ng far es, reducing flights and, in some c as es, cutting out free s nac ks i n c oach. But se ver al big and s mall airlines alike have str uggled r elati ve to the industr y i n ter ms of baggage handling, on-ti me perfor mance and other c ustomer s er vic e metrics. An annual U ni versity of Michigan s ur vey rel eased i n M ay found cus tomers gi ving airlines the wors t grades si nce 2001.Wi th the slow travel s eason now upon them, airlines face the dual challenges of
increasing r evenue to c over heavy fuel c osts whil e also impr oving their pr oduct to gi ve air travelers a r eturn on their added i nvestment.â€Â Å“We r ealiz e that in order for us to regai n that brand rec ogni tion and the c ustomer loyalty that we used to own i n the â€Â â„¢80s and ⠀ ™90s , we oug ht to do s omethi ng ver y dramatic and differ ent,† sai d M ar k Mitc hell, American†Â℠¢s managing director of cus tomer experienc e.D elta Air Lines Inc.†Â℠¢s regi onal s ubsidi ar y C omair had the worst on-ti me perfor manc e i n J ul y among airlines s ur veyed by the D epartment of Tr ans portation. From J anuar y thr ough J ul y, Americ an Air lines â €Â℠¢ on-ti me arrival r ate was the lowest among U.S. c arriers, whil e UAL C orp.â€Â â„¢s Uni ted Airlinesâ€Â â„¢ was second-l owes t. C omair had the highest mishandl ed baggage r ate i n J ul y, while the highest number of cons umer complai nts rec ei ved by the DOT that month were about Del ta.
ARTIC LEID: 2259
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Business Week Online ( business weekonline.c om)
Head lin e: Stoc ks End Mi xed ami d Fi nanci al-Sector Tumult
OTS: 2362675
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: J ul y business i nventori es rose 1.1%, while the U ni versity of Michigan c onsumer s enti ment index s urged to to 73.1 from 63.0 i n August. The U ni versity of Mic higan's U.S. cons umer s enti ment index preli minar y reading s urged to 73.1 in September from 63.0 i n August. The impr ovement is muc h better than the 64.0 expected, and l argel y from the drop i n energy pric es. The ec onomic outloo k index jumped to 70.9 from 57.9 in August, while current conditions ros e to 76.5 fr om 71.0.
Bod y:




Stoc ks End Mi xed amid Fi nanci al-Sector T umult




Major U.S. stoc k i ndexes finis hed mos tl y higher on Friday, even as Wall Street q uaked with fear at the pos sibility of further meltdowns withi n the fi nancial industr y. The tal k that Lehman Brothers H oldi ngs (LEH) was des peratel y s hopping i tsel f to pros pecti ve buyers set the tone for the gloom, but jitters about additi onal l oss es at American Internati onal Group (AIG) and the pros pects for Was hington Mutual ( WM) fi ndi ng a buyer als o kept stoc ks under press ure during a volatile trading s essi on.




Mar ket rumors of a j oint bi d for Lehman invol vi ng Bank of Americ a (BAC) and other parties wer e circ ulating, notes S&P M ar ketSc ope.




Other fi nanci al s toc ks were i n the hot s eat Friday. Shares of AIG pl ung ed nearl y 31% after Standard & Poor's R ati ngs Ser vic e put the ins uranc e giant's cr edi t ratings on negati ve watch. T he mar ket is worried AIG may have trouble r olling over $40 billion i n debt and won't be abl e to r aise additional capital i n the c urrent cr edit environment. M errill Lynch (MER) and Was hington Mutual ( WM) ended down, though off their earlier l ows.




Bonds were l ower after reports Friday s howed that pr oduc er pric es, excluding food and energy, were up 0.2% i n Aug ust, whil e t he over all index fell 0.9%. Headli ne Augus t retail sal es fell 0.3%, and were down 0.9% excludi ng autos. Jul y busi ness inventories r os e 1.1%, whil e the Uni versity of Mic higan c onsumer s enti ment index s ur ged to to 73.1 from 63.0 i n August.




The dollar i ndex traded lower. Gol d futures wer e higher. Crude oil and gas oline futur es cli mb ed as H urricane Ike approac hed the T exas c oast.




On Friday, the D ow J ones industrial average rebounded fr om a 150-point drop to cl os e 11.72 poi nts , or 0.10% , lower at 11,421.99. T he broader S&P 500 i ndex g ained 2.65 points , or 0.21% , to finis h at 1,251.70. And the tech- heavy Nas daq composite index ended 3.05 poi nts , or 0.14%, higher at 2,261.27. By the end of the week, the S&P had recouped 27 of the 43 points it l ost on Sept. 9, while the Nas daq had bounc ed 51 points after a 60- poi nt dr op on Sept. 9.




On the N ew York Stoc k Exchange, 18 s toc ks advanc ed in price for ever y 14 that declined. T he rati o on the Nasdaq was 15- 14 negati ve.




Shares of Lehman Brothers were in focus Friday as i nvestors waited for news on the firm's fate. S&P s ays it woul d be in favor of a possi ble Bank of Americ a (BAC)/Lehman combo, onl y with government bac king. Ladenburg Thal mann beli eves that BofA will be a winning bi dder for Lehman, addi ng that there is a "natural fit" between the two c ompanies .




Some anal ysts are sayi ng that Lehman Brothers is n't under as much pr ess ure as Bear Stear ns was si x months ag o to s ec ure a deal bec aus e it still has access to the F ed's dis count wi ndow if it needs c apital . But Christopher Whal en, managing director at Ins titutional Ris k Anal yti cs, a T orran ce, C alif.-bas ed fir m that buil ds c ustomiz ed ris k management tools , thi nks Lehman is headed for bankr uptc y if it does n't fi nd a buyer ver y s oon.




The pr obl em is that nobody c an buy it without havi ng to write down a big chunk of its ass ets right away bec ause of the debt-laden real estate busi ness, Whal en s ays.




"The onl y possibl e s avi or is a foreign buyer. I c ant s ee Bank of Americ a [buying] this bec ause the board would sac k Ken Lewis ," he says. "D on't forget C ountr ywide," whic h di dn't s how up on BofA's books i n the s ec ond q uarter becaus e the acquisiti on clos ed at the s tart of J ul y. When it shows up i n BofA's third-quarter res ults , the bank will s tart to look " fairl y gritty" , he says.




Even a for eign buyer would understand that "the best way to buy Lehman is on the other wi de of a bankruptc y bec ause then it will be cl ean," s ays Whal en.




Bel eag uer ed bank Washi ngton M utual was als o i n the s potlight Friday. WaMu expects its c apital rati os at the end of the third q uarter to r emai n sig nificantl y above the levels for well-capitalized i nstituti ons and it conti nues to be c onfi dent that it has s uffici ent liqui dity and capital to support operations while it r etur ns to pr ofitability. Acc ordi ng to a Wall Str eet J our nal r eport, WaM u s ai d late Thurs day that it had about $50 billion in liqui dity from "r eliable funding s ources" and reported that retail deposit bal ances at the end of August " wer e ess entiall y unchanged" from the end of 2007.




WaMu shares s pi ked Friday after noon on reports fr om Americ an Banker and R euters that the Seattl e-bas ed bank was i n " advanc ed" tal ks with J PMorgan C hase & Co. about a pos sibl e deal, onl y to sli de bac k after CNBC Business Ne ws repor ted there was no s uc h deal.




Acc ording to a New Yor k Ti mes report, i nvestors fear that Americ an Inter national Gr oup will fac e billions in additional los ses due to its ti es to home loans whos e values have plummeted. Meanwhil e, R euters repor ts that cr edi t protecti on c osts for financial firms ros e i n early trading on Friday, l ed by AIG, Lehman, and J PMorgan C hase (JPM), as investors awai ted news on the fate of Lehman.




In ec onomic news Friday, the U.S. producer pric e index fell 0.9% i n Aug ust, lower than the 0.4% decline the mar ket expec ted, whil e the c ore r ate edg ed up 0.2%, whic h was i n li ne with expectati ons . T his c omes after gai ns of 1.2% and 0.7%, res pecti vel y, i n J ul y. Headli ne pric es dec el erated to a 9.6% ris e over las t year from 9.8% pr eviousl y. C ore prices accel erated to 3.6% over l ast year fr om 3.5% pr eviousl y. Energ y plunged 4.6% , to explai n the weakness i n the headli ne index. Gasoli ne pric es dropped 3.5%, whil e food prices were up 0.3%. Light tr uc k prices dr opped 1.9% , while computers fell 1.2%.




U.S. retail s ales fell 0.3% in Augus t; excl udi ng autos , s ales wer e down 0.7% . T hos e figures ar e weaker than the mar ket had expected. On a year-over- year basis , s ales were down 0.4% [vs . 4.5% previ ousl y], and ex-autos sal es were runni ng at a 4.2% cli p [vs. 7.9% pr eviousl y]. Jul y's headli ne 0.1% dip was revis ed lower to - 0.5%. The 0.4% incr ease i n J ul y ex- autos was revis ed to 0.3% . J une data wer e als o revis ed down. Excl uding autos , gas , and building materials, s ale fell 0.2% .




The components of the report wer e mi xed. Weakness was evi dent i n g as stati ons [- 2.5%], nonstore retail ers [-2.3%], buildi ng materi als [- 2.2%], and electronics [-1.3% ]. M otor vehicl e s al es were up 1.9%; food s ales rose 0.7% , and s porting g oods were up 0.5% .




U.S. business inventories r os e 1.1% i n J ul y, while s ales ros e 0.5%. June's 0.7% ris e in inventories was r evis ed higher to 0.8% . T he 1.7% J une surge in s al es was n ot r evised. The i nventor y-s ale rati o edg ed up to 1.24, from 1.23 in June.




The Uni versity of Michig an's U .S. c ons umer senti ment i ndex preli mi nar y r eadi ng surged to 73.1 i n September fr om 63.0 in August. T he improvement is muc h better than the 64.0 expected, and l argel y from the drop i n energy pric es. The ec onomic outlook i ndex jumped to 70.9 fr om 57.9 i n Aug ust, whil e c urrent co ndi tions r ose to 76.5 from 71.0.




Next week, all eyes will be on the F ederal Res er ve, whose polic y committee meets to decide whether to change its 2% i nterest rate on Sept. 16. "The F ed remai ns tr apped between the problems in the financial mar kets, a weak ec onomy, and i nflation fears," an S&P res earch note s aid. " With c ore i nfl ation acc eler ati ng and above target, it is hard to s ee the m l ooseni ng, especi ally whil e gross domestic product [GD P] gr owth remains positi ve. On the other hand, the conti nui ng weakness i n the labor mar ket and the tur moil in the mortgag e and r elated fi nanci al mar kets make any tighteni ng difficul t. Lower oil prices could pr ovide s ome c over to loos en in comi ng months i f the economy deterior ates." S&P sai d it expect the Fed to keep the funds r ate at 2% until mi d-2009, with the next move a hi ke.




In energ y mar kets Friday morni ng, October r eformulated g asoli ne futures wer e up 5.68 c ents to 280.56 c ents as Hurricane Ike moved closer to the Texas coast and the H ous ton area, home to 26 refi neri es that acc ount for one-fourth of U.S. refini ng capacity. H undreds of thous ands of people fled c oastal ar eas in the path of the as the storm gather ed str ength. Ike was a C ategor y 2 s tor m with 105 mph [165 kph] winds and likel y will come ashor e late on Fri day or e arly on Satur day. R efi neri es are built to wi ths tand high winds , but fl ooding c an disrupt oper ations and -- as happened i n Louisiana after H urricane Gustav -- power outages c an s hut down equipment for days or weeks. An extended s hutdown c ould lead to higher g asoli ne pric es.




October West T exas Inter medi ate crude oil futures settled up 24 cents at $101.18 per barrel on Friday.




Among other s toc ks in the news Friday, C hipotl e M exic an Grill (CMG) s aid that bas ed on thir d-quarter results to date, the i mpact of t he weakened ec onomy has been greater than anticipated, r esul ting in further s al es dec el erati on leadi ng to c ompar abl e-restaurant s al es i n the low-single digits for the quar ter. The c ompany says the c ombi nation of a weak economy as well as food costs risi ng faster than expected during the quarter will res ult i n its EPS for the period bei ng slightl y below thos of a year ago.




Deutsc he Bank AG (D B) reportedl y agreed to buy nearl y 30% of Postbank for $3.9 billion.




Potras h C orp. (POT) announced that its Board of Direc tors has appr oved, s ubj ect to regul ator y approval, an i ncreas e to the s hare r epurc hase pr ogram authorized i n J anuar y, 20 08, r aising the c eiling to appr oxi matel y 10% of the public fl oat or 31.5 million of the c ompany's iss ued and outs tanding c ommon s hares .




LDK Solar ( LDK) says it has signed an 11- year proc essi ng s ervic e agreement to pr oc ess upgraded metall urgical grade [UMG] s olar-grade silicon provi ded by Ger many- based Q-Cells AG into wafers. LD K will proc ess a mini mum of 20,000 metric tons of UM G s olar-grade silicon i n the years 2008-2018, with an opti on to proc ess an additi onal 21,000 metric tons duri ng the same peri od.




Cemex (CX) expec ts third-quarter EBITD A to be about $1.25 billion, a decreas e of about 3% on a li ke-to-like basis for ong oing operations vs. the year- earlier quar ter, whil e operati ng income is expected to be clos e to $800 million. The c ompany sees thir d-quarter s ales of about $5.9 billion, fl at with a year ago. It als o s ees 2008 EBITD A of $4.6-$4.7 billion. About half of the drop in its EBITDA gui danc e is the r esul t of the l ower expec ted perfor mance from U .S. operations. Cemex als o expects lower EBITDA contri butions fr om Spanish and UK operati ons.




Eur opean i ndexes wer e higher Fri day. In London, the FTSE 100 index added 0.84% to 5,363 .30. In Paris, the C AC 40 index r ose 0.87% to 4,286.19. Ger many's D AX index gai ned 0.25% to 6,194.42.




Major Asian i ndexes finis hed mi xed Friday. J apan's Ni kkei 225 index rose 0.93% to 12,214.76. In Hong Kong, the H ang Seng inde x fell 0.18% to 19,352.90.




Treas ur y mar ket




Treas ur y prices ended l ower after Friday's round of ec onomic data. The 10- year note was down 20/32 at 102-09/32 for a yi eld of 3.72% , and the 30- year bond fell 1-19/32 to 103- 02/32 for a yi eld of 4.31.




Copyright © 2008 T he Mc Graw-Hill Compani es, Inc., All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 2260
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Business Week Online ( business weekonline.c om)
Head lin e: Data: Infl ati on Cools; Retail Sal es Slip
OTS: 2362675
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T he Uni versity of Mic higan's U .S. c ons umer s entiment preli minar y r eading surged to 73.1 in September fr om 63.0 i n Aug ust. T he i mprovement is muc h better than the 64.0 expected, and s tems largel y from the dr op in energ y prices . T he ec onomic outl ook ind ex j umped to 70.9, from 57.9 i n August, whil e c urrent c onditi ons rose to 76.5, from 71.0.
Bod y:




Data: Inflati on Cools; Retail Sal es Slip




By Busi ness Week, Standar d & Poor's, and Acti on Ec onomics staff




A batch of U.S. ec onomic r eports releas ed on Sept. 12 c arried some mi xed messag es for the U.S. ec onomy: M eas ures of wholes ale infl ati on di pped in Augus t, and a clos el y foll owed r eading of cons umer senti ment s urged in September. But another r eport painted a different picture of the cons umer: Retail sal es dr opped by a worse-than- expec ted amount i n Aug ust. A separate r eleas e s howed a s urge i n busi ness i nventories in Jul y.




The U.S. producer price index [PPI] fell 0.9% in August, l ower than the 0.4% decli ne the mar kets expected, while the c ore rate edged up 0.2%, which was in line with Wall Street esti mates. This comes after g ains of 1.2% and 0.7% , r especti vel y, in Jul y. Year-over- year, overall PPI decel erated to 9.6% , fr om 9.8% i n J ul y. Cor e prices, excluding food and energ y, acc eler ated to 3.6% over las t year from 3.5% pr eviousl y.




Energy pl ung ed 4.6%, to expl ain the weakness in the headline i ndex. Gas oline prices dropped 3.5% , while food pric es were up 0.3% . Light truc k pric es dropped 1.9%, whil e c omputers fell 1.2% .




Lehman Brothers ( LEH) ec onomist Michelle Meyer s aid in a Sept. 12 note that while the year-over- year c ore rate came i n at a "s till el evated" 3.6%, " we remain comfortable wi th our vi ew that i nflation is li kel y to trend lower as c ommodity pric es conti nue to cool and sl ac k develops in the economy."




Mixed Components




U.S. retail s ales fell 0.3% in Augus t; excl udi ng autos , s ales wer e down 0.7% . Mar kets expected a 0.3% i ncreas e for the over all index and a flat readi ng for the ex- autos i ndex. Sales ar e down 0.4% over l ast year [decel erating fr om + 4.5% previ ousl y], with ex- autos s ales up 4.2% , bel ow the +7.9% r ate pr evi ousl y. M oreover , J ul y's headli ne 0.1% di p was r evis ed lower to - 0.5%. Jul y ex- autos was revi sed to 0.3% fr om +0.4% befor e. J une data were als o r evised down.




The components of the report wer e mi xed. Excluding autos, g as, and buildi ng materials , s ales fell 0.2%. Gas s tation s ales fell 2.5%, nons tor e retail ers were down 2 .3%, while buildi ng materials fell 2.2%. Vehicl e s ales wer e up 1.9%; food s ales ros e 0.7% .




"Retail sal es thr oug h August were muc h weaker than we expec ted, though it was di ffic ult to g aug e the li kel y ti ming of the r ebate boos t to s pending and the ens uing unwi nd," wrote Ac tion Ec onomics anal ys ts i n a Sept. 12 Web site pos ting.




Inventori es U p




U.S. business inventories r os e 1.1% i n J ul y, while s ales ros e 0.5%. The June inventories figure was revis ed hig her, to 0.8%, from 0.7% before. T he 1.7% J une surge in sal es was not r evised. The i nventor y-s ale rati o edg ed up to 1.24, from 1.23 in June.




The Uni versity of Michig an's U .S. c ons umer senti ment preli minar y r eading s urged to 73.1 in September fr om 63.0 i n Aug ust. The i mprovement is muc h better than the 64.0 expected, and s tems largel y from the dr op i n energ y prices . T he ec onomic outl ook index jumped to 70.9, from 57.9 i n August, whil e c urrent c onditi ons rose to 76.5, from 71.0.




The one- year-ahead inflati on meas ure fell sharpl y to 3.6%, from 4.8% in Augus t and an all-ti me high of 5.2% as rec entl y as M ay. "This dr op bri ngs this meas ure now well bel ow the prior l ong -held 4.8% recor d-high from October 1990, as the 'panic up-trend' i n price that c ons umers percei ved through the first half of the year is now unwinding," wr ote Acti on Ec onomics anal ysts .




"The reversal in i nfl ation expectations will provi de a s ense of reli ef to the F eder al R eser ve," wrote M eyer of Lehman Brothers.




Copyright © 2008 T he Mc Graw-Hill Compani es, Inc., All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 2261
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Business Week Online ( business weekonline.c om)
Head lin e: Boeing Stri ke: N o End i n Sig ht
OTS: 2362675
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: McN erney " wants the flexi bility to do what's right for the business," says N oel Tichy, a management profess or at the U ni versi ty of Mic higan who has known McN erney si nc e he was a rising star at General Elec tric (GE) in the 1980s. It's an iss ue, Tic hy says , on whic h the CEO c an't compromis e. "Can you together work out a reasonabl e c ompromis e? Yes," says the pr ofess or. " But I think it's [McN erney's] positi on that ther e are some things that he does c onsi der non-negoti abl e, and the other side is s aying the s ame thing."
Bod y:




Boeing Stri ke: N o End i n Sight




As the stri ke by 27,000 machi nists at Boeing ( BA) is pois ed to move i nto a s ec ond week, l abor and manag ement seem as far apart as ever. Es timates for how l ong the i mpas se will li nger range from about three weeks, whic h woul d mar k the ti me when health i nsur ance cover age lapses for the stri kers, to until a c oupl e of weeks befor e T hanksgi ving, when pros pects for a l ean C hristmas begin to weigh heavil y on both sides .




For now, both managers and uni on officials say, no tal ks are sc heduled. Each is waiting for a c all fr om the other and a federal medi ator.




Just how Boei ng and its wor kers went off the cliff [Business Week.c om, 9/5/08], yet ag ain, may be an obj ect less on in how toug h it c an be to bridg e the gap between l abor and management i n a globall y competiti ve, old-line business . If Chi ef Exec uti ve W. James M cNer ney Jr. wanted to use this go-round to br eak a nearl y 60- year c ycle of acrimonious r elations between Boeing and the Inter national Ass oci ation of Mac hi nists & Aer os pac e Wor kers [IAM], he certainl y has n't s ucc eeded. And if the IAM leaders figured this was the ti me when they c oul d humbl e management and right the wrongs they felt d one to them i n prior c ontrac ts, they seem to have badl y misj udged the determi nation of the C EO and his managers.




A Different Tone?




Certai nl y, McNer ney & Co. s oug ht to set a different tone fr om 2005, when the IAM l ast went on s trike. Then, the mac hinists s hut down c ommercial planemaki ng at Boeing for 28 days . T his ti me a fr es h team of Boeing negoti ators, tryi ng to iron out differ enc es well i n advance, beg an las t May to s ound out the uni on leaders hip on what c ontrac t ter ms might fl y and what would be dead on arri val. T he effort was par t of a drive to "listen ver y car efull y to our employees," chi ef management neg oti ator Doug Kig ht s aid. T he c ompany, he argued, wanted to s har e i ts s ucc ess with the wor kers even while maki ng sur e it coul d stay competiti ve.




In a M ay memo, Kight sai d the earl y tal ks wer e a c hanc e " to have open and res pectful conversati ons."




For the union l eaders, however, the early start did littl e mor e than rais e s us picions. Boei ng, they figured, j ust wanted mor e time to sell i ts leas t pal atabl e plans to the wor kers. Among them: proposals to eli mi nate medical benefi ts for s ome retirees and to kill off a tr aditi onal pensi on program for new hires while givi ng them a 401[k]-li ke retirement pl an ins tead. T hough s keptical , uni on chi ef negoti ator Mar k Bl ondi n went al ong wi th the earl y start to tal ks. N ow, he s ays , "I sens ed a PR thing c oming, and s ure enough that's what happened."




Just how muc h listeni ng reall y took plac e is far from clear. By Jul y, the uni on l eaders didn't thi nk they were maki ng muc h headway. T he proposed "gi vebac ks" on medic al and pensi on benefits, whic h the uni on leaders had war ned were sur e s trike-starters, r emai ned on the tabl e. So the l eaders told their members to start s avi ng for another s trike, whic h would be the s eventh l aunc hed by the IAM ag ains t Boeing si nc e Worl d War II. Sur e that a wal kout was inevitabl e, some l ongti me wor kers canc eled s ummer vacations and set aside enough c as h s o they c oul d get by on the $150 a week i n stri ke benefits .




False Start




Despi te the earl y start, no r eal movement took pl ac e until the end of August. Wi th a Sept. 3 s tri ke vote looming, management c aved in on the plan to end medic al benefits for s ome retirees. They decided to s tic k with tr aditional pensions [Business Week.c om, 8/27/08], even hi ki ng th e amounts the company would contri bute. Kig ht and his team made a best-and-final offer on the Thurs day before Labor D ay, offering rais es of 5% in the first year of a new c ontract and 3% each for the two years afterward.




To pr y any doubters l oose, they s weetened the pot by offering mor e than $6,000 i n bonus es, s ome $2,500 of which depended on g etting a fast maj ority vote for the deal. The offer was, CEO McN erney tol d empl oyees in a memo, " the best c ontract i n the aer ospac e i ndustr y."




But the take-it- or-leave-it tac k, whic h barr ed fur ther tal ks before the vote, pr oved to be a dud. Boeing blitzed the Seattle radio waves wi th ads making the c as e for the deal and urged wor kers to read the details about its offer on the company Web site. But suc h tac tics, union l eaders c harged, amounted to i mproperl y going over the heads of the uni on bargainers. The c ommunic ati ons , they bristled, wer e nothi ng mor e than a bi d to bargai n direc tl y with wor kers -- an approac h that seemed q uic kl y to bac kfir e as the leaders condemned "gi vebac ks" that offended them.




The wor kers, meanwhile, were furi ous . Anger ed by propos als the c ompany was floati ng, they had been s taging marc hes ar ound the factories . T he dis tracti ons made it i mpossi ble to get wor k done, some wor kers s ay.




Outsourcing F ears




The union pored over the offer and pounc ed on ter ms it found objec tionable. Tri ms i n health-car e benefits loomed l arge, even t hough Boei ng offici als insist the c hanges on balanc e woul d be neutral , with higher co- pays offs et, for instanc e, by c uts i n premi ums. Even mor e problematic, however, is the c ompany's power to s ubcontr act wor k, t o let s uppliers from ar ound the U.S. and in other c ountries provi de parts and have nonuni on outsi ders deli ver such goods to the assembl y li nes in Was hington. T he uni on fe ars that such outs ourcing, whic h it s ays has been on the ups wi ng, will ul timatel y kill off jobs. Management c ontends that glo balizati on requir es it be able to have wor k done ar ound the world -- especi all y in c ountries wher e that might hel p it sell more pl anes.




McNerney " wants the flexi bility to do what's right for the busi ness," says N oel Tichy, a management profess or at the U ni versi ty of Mic higan who has known McNer ney si nce he was a risi ng star at General Elec tric (GE) in the 1980s. It's an iss ue, Tic hy s ays , on whic h the C EO can't c ompr omise.




"Can you tog ether wor k out a reas onable compromis e? Yes ," s ays the profess or. "But I thin k it's [M cNer ney's] positi on that there are s ome thi ngs that he does c onsider non-negotiable, and the other si de is s ayi ng the same thi ng."




Part of the pr obl em is union offi cials have long memories . Some are still tr oubled that the outs ourci ng power was put in pl ac e in a nettles ome contr act in 2002. That contr act went i nto forc e onl y bec ause the union fell s hort of getti ng a two- thirds vote for a stri ke, even though mos t members oppos ed the c ontrac t. T hen the union was unable to get the language pull ed in 2005. "It puts our members' jobs at ris k," s ays negoti ator Blondi n.




Stri king M ad




By Sept. 3, when 87% of the wor kers bac ked a wal kout, it was clear the uni on had long been s poiling for a fight. Sporting T-s hirts embl az oned with the sl ogan "It's Our Ti me This Time," the wor kers par aded to the uni on polls l ed by motorc ycle-ridi ng coll eag ues . M any wer e angr y when the union l eaders agreed to delay the stri ke for 48 hours, until l ate Sept. 5, to see if any common ground c oul d be found.




Some machi nists argue that Boei ng, whic h has been bl ess ed wi th rec ord pr ofits and its biggest bac kl og of plane or ders ever, can well afford to scrap all "gi vebac ks" and to "bargai n up," as a uni on spokes woman s aid. Gutting the outs ourci ng language is a key part of what the union hopes to gain. Its l eaders figur e that c oncer ns about further del ays for the new 787 Dr eamliner [Business Week.c om, 8/29/08], on Wall Street and in the Boei ng executi ve suite, give wor kers leverag e.




It's reall y anyone's g ues s just how dr awn out and c ostl y thi s fight will ul timatel y be. Anal ys t C ai von R umohr of Cowen & Co. (COWN) figures a stri ke c oul d l ast between 29 and 65 days, pus hing a c onclusion into mid-N ovember at the lates t. H e figures the end of health-car e c overage, at the opening of October, will put the first bit of seri ous pr ess ure on wor kers, whil e i n N ovember the appr oach of the holidays steps it up. T he uni on we nt on s trike at Boei ng for 69 days i n 1995.




Interneci ne Cos ts




Von R umohr esti mates Boeing could los e as muc h as $2.3 billion i n revenues this quarter. Some of that, of c ourse, c oul d i nclude deferred r ather than los t s ales , but c ompany offici als do fr et that demand for planes c oul d slip over time, especiall y as the global ec onomy slows.




Some wor kers say they' d l ove to s ee a c hange i n the c ontenti ous rel ati onshi p between the company and the uni on that fl ares anew with ever y contr act round. "M y famil y and I ar e c ompletel y exhaus ted with g oing through a financial dis aster or potential dis aster ever y three years ," says one 21-year veteran wor ker. On the other hand, he looks on the IAM as one of the last s trong unions able to hol d the line on hard-fought gains, while other industrial l abor groups have fol ded.




For the c ompany's part, when Kig ht beg an the tal ks with the uni on bac k in M ay, h e seemed to do s o wi th the best i ntentions. "Boeing's goal is to create an open and hones t envir onment by c ommunic ati ng freq uentl y and havi ng robus t discussions," he tol d managers bac k then in an e-mail messag e. But when the differenc es -- and distr ust -- ar e deep, honesty may do little to bri dge the gap. Instead, i t boils down to which side c an stand the pain of a stri ke l ong enough to clai m vic tor y.




Copyright © 2008 T he Mc Graw-Hill Compani es, Inc., All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 1189
Date: 9/2/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Business Week Online ( business weekonline.c om)
Head lin e: T echs Lead Stoc ks Lower
OTS: 2362675
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: U.S. cons umer senti ment i mpr oved to 63 i n Aug ust, accor ding to the final number from the U ni versity of Michigan, up from the preli minar y number of 61.7 and from 61.2 i n J ul y. Als o, the U .S. Chic ago purc hasi ng managers i ndex r os e to 57.9 in August, fr om 50.8 in J ul y.
Bod y:




Tec hs Lead Stoc ks Lower




Stoc ks fell Fri day after Dell (D ELL) posted weaker earni ngs and the rel ease of s ome mi xed ec onomic data.




Traders were als o watc hing the path of Tropic al Stor m Gustav, wondering how the stor m c oul d affec t oil pric es as it heads for the Gulf of M exic o. H owever, after rising more than $3 in the morni ng, October cr ude oil s ettl ed 13 c ents lower on Fri day at $115.46 per barrel .




On Friday, the D ow J ones industrial average fell 171.22 points, or 1.46%, to 11,543.96. T h e broader S&P 500 i ndex dr opped 17.86 points, or 1.37%, to 1,282.82. And the tec h-heavy N asdaq c omposite i ndex lost 44.12 poi nts , or 1.83% , to 2,367.52.




Vol ume was slow. On the N ew York Stoc k Exchange, 19 s toc ks tr aded l ower for ever y 11 in positi ve territor y. On the N as daq, the rati o was 18 to 10 negati ve.




Major i ndexes ess entiall y broke even in Augus t. T he D ow was off 0.34% and the S&P 500 lost 0.11% i n the month. The N as daq, ho wever , was up 1.62% .




Dell posted ear nings of 31 c ents per s har e, vs. 33 c ents a year ago. Wall Str eet anal ysts predicted earni ngs of 36 c ents per s hare. Narr ower profit margins offset an 11% ris e i n revenue. The company says it will i nc ur c osts to c ut j obs and i nves t i n infras truc tur e and acquisiti ons. It expec ts c onser vati ve s pending on infor mation tec hnol og y in the U.S., Wes ter n Europe and s everal countries in Asi a. Standard & Poor's equity anal ysts downgraded the stoc k from buy to hol d.




U.S. personal inc ome fell 0.7% i n J ul y, whil e s pending rose 0.2% . Dis posable inc ome fell 1.1%, foll owing a 1.9% dr op i n J une. T he U.S. s avi ngs rate fell from 2.5% in June to 1.2% l ast month. The PCE defl ator ros e 0.6% , after rising 0.7% i n J une.




U.S. cons umer senti ment i mpr oved to 63 i n Aug ust, accor ding to the final number from the U ni versity of Michigan, up fr om the preli minar y number of 61.7 and from 61.2 i n J ul y. Als o, the U .S. Chic ago purchasi ng managers i ndex r os e to 57.9 in August, fr om 50.8 in J ul y.




"Cons umer s enti ment was li kel y lifted by l ower energ y prices but we think the outl ook for cons umer spendi ng in the sec ond half of the year is fairl y negati ve i n the fac e of rising j ob los ses , rising for eclos ur es, falling home pric es, and the endi ng of tempor ar y sti mulus," s ays John Ryding of RDQ Ec onomics.




Among other s toc ks in the news Friday, Google ( GOOG) c hief executi ve Eric Sc hmidt told Bl oomberg tel evision that his firm will move for ward on an adver tising partnershi p with Yahoo (YHOO) des pite a U.S. Justic e D epartment pr obe of the deal .




Microsoft (MSF T) will acq uire Greenfiel d Online ( SRVY), the operator of European price-c omparis on shoppi ng sites, i n a $486 million deal.




Qualcomm (QCOM) announc ed a feder al judge found the firm viol ated inj unctions designed to pr event infringement of thr ee patents owned by Broadcom (BRCM).




PetSmart (PETM) posted earni ngs of 30 cents per s hare, vs. 35 c ents a year ago, as same-store sal es were 4% higher and total s ales ros e 11%. Wall Street anal ysts were expecti ng earni ngs of 28 c ents.




Mar vell T ec hnolog y (MRVL) posted ear nings of 24 c ents per shar e, vs . 6 c ents a year ag o, as r evenue ros e 28%. The firm expects earni ngs of 24 to 26 cents per s hare this quarter, but sai d the U.S. ec onomy was weakening.




Major Eur opean stoc k i ndexes were mostl y higher Friday. In London, the FT SE 100 index gai ned 0.63% to 5 ,636.60. In Paris, the CAC 40 i ndex r os e 0.47% to 4,482.60. Ger many's D AX index edg ed up 0.03% to 6,422.30.




Major Asian i ndexes were higher. Japan's Ni kkei 225 index ros e 2.39% to 13,072.87. In Hong Kong, the Hang Seng index added 1. 38% to 21,261.89.




Treas ur y mar ket




Treas uries wer e narr owl y lower Friday. T wo- year notes wer e unc hang ed at 100 for a yi eld of 2.380%, whil e the 10- year Treasur y was off 17/32 to 101-17/32 for a yiel d of 3.821% and the 30- year bond fell 35/32 to 101-08/32 for a yiel d of 4.427%.




Copyright © 2008 T he Mc Graw-Hill Compani es, Inc., All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 6424
Date: 9/29/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Business Week Online ( business weekonline.c om)
Head lin e: T he GD P R evision R aises R ecession Ris k
OTS: 2362675
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: Indeed, downward r evisi ons to s ec ond-quarter gross domestic pr oduct and the U ni versity of Mic higan's clos el y watc hed gauge of cons umer s enti ment ar e li kel y prec ursors , in both c as es, of worse news to come. For Mic higan s enti ment, it is clear that a r ebound i n gasoline prices , the two hurric anes, and the s eemi ngly endless bad news from the financial mar kets are c apping the c onfidence rebound earlier i n the month and may suggest a renewed weakeni ng in c onfi denc e as we enter October.
Bod y:




The GD P R evision R ais es R ec ession Ris k




As if the worries about a c ongres sional stalemate on the g over nment's pr opos ed $700 billion fi nanci al res cue plan weren't eno ugh, two economic reports r eleas ed on Sept. 26 both added to pessi mis m about whether the U .S. economy c an s kirt a r ec ession. Indeed, downwar d r evisi ons to s ec ond-quarter gross domestic pr oduc t and the U ni versity of Mic higan's clos el y watched gauge of cons umer senti ment ar e li kel y prec ur sors , i n both cas es, of worse news to come.




For GD P, des pite what is still a r emar kabl y i mpr essi ve 2.8% s ec ond-quarter GD P gai n, this downwar dl y revi sed growth figure is pois ed to be followed by slower growth i n both the third and fourt h quarters. F or Mic higan s entiment, it is cl ear that a rebound in gas oline prices, the two hurricanes, and the seemingl y endl ess bad news from the financial mar kets are capping the c onfide nce rebound earlier in the month and may sugges t a renewed weakening i n c onfidence as we enter October.




The downwar d bump i n the fi nal 2.8% U.S. s ec ond-quarter GD P gai n fr om the 3.3% preli minar y figure was led by a s urprisi ng revisi on lower for s er vice cons umption that took r e al [inflation-adjus ted] growth for this c omponent fr om 1.3% to 0.7% . T his occ urred al ongside a largel y as- expected $4 billion boos t to fi xed i nvestment, and a downward $5 billion bump to net exports . We al so saw a s mall and unexpected $1 billion downward i nventor y adjustment.




A Big N et Export




The final s ec ond-quarter GD P figur es still depict a quarter with a big net expor t c ontribution, whic h is now pegged at a massi ve $81 billion that added 2.8% to sec ond-quarter growth -- basic all y acc ounti ng for the entir e headline increase -- al ongsi de a big $40 billion inventor y s ubtracti on that dr ained 1.6%. Growth in the sec ond quarter was als o boos ted by a 1.2% r eal growth rate for c ons umption, with a muc h l arger rebate-fuel ed 5.5% nominal [unadj usted for inflati on] c onsumpti on clip that was mostl y offset by price g ains , alongside a robust 18. 5% pace for nonr esidential co nstr ucti on.




Government s pending posted a soli d 3.9% growth clip, whil e equi pment and software spendi ng contr acted at a 5.0% r ate. R esi denti al c ons truc tion c ontinued its downward spir al, thoug h at a di minis hed r ate of 13.3% followi ng quarterl y rates of decline of 20% to 27% in eac h of the prior three q uarters.




We at Acti on Ec onomics will keep our third-q uarter GD P growth forec ast at 1.7% until the Sept. 29 rel ease of the August pers onal i nc ome report, thoug h ther e is downside ris k to our esti mate from the lower s er vice cons umption tr ajector y in the sec ond-quarter GD P data.




Esti mate Knoc kdowns




The ec onomy is now entering the fourth quarter on a partic ularl y weak footi ng, with notable downside ris k from our 0.6% GDP f orec ast. A negati ve headline GDP readi ng in the fourth q uarter woul d almos t c ertai nl y mean that the National Bureau of Economic Research [N BER ] business-c ycle dating committee -- the body that i s the mor e or les s offici al ar biter of U.S. rec essi ons -- will bac k-date a r ec ession to the start of 2008, despi te the notabl y positi ve growth rates i n the s ec ond and, li kel y, third quar ter as well. T he data in the Aug ust inc ome repor t, as well as the evol ution of events in the mar kets over the next few busi ness days, might well knoc k down our fourth quart er GD P esti mate enough to make it mor e li kel y than not that all of 2008 will meet the NBER's reces sion criterion.




The Michigan senti ment index revealed a downward bump to 70.3 in the final September report fr om the 73.1 figure in the preli minar y r eport, modestl y narrowing the g ap from the 63.0 August r eading and the c yclical low of 56.4 i n J une. The futur e expec tati ons i ndex was l owered to 67.2 from 70.9, though the figure is still well above the 57.9 Aug ust readi ng and 49.2 June c yclic al low. T he do wnwar d adj ustment i n the c urrent c onditi ons index to 75.0 fr om the 76.5 preli mi nar y r eadi ng narrowed the s mall er gap for this measur e fr om the 71.0 August readi ng and 67.6 J une c yclical l ow.




The other avail abl e monthl y confi denc e measur es r ose in September, and this is especi ally true for the i ndexes that wer e rel eased early in the month, ahead of the rus h of negati ve Wall Street headlines. T he September confi denc e bounc e earl y i n the month r efl ected a big boost from falling energ y prices and a s urging doll ar. Jarring news headlines and a l ate-month energy pric e s urge is li kel y capping the gai ns, and coul d further drai n c onfidence as we enter October.




We now expect the C onfer ence Boar d's c onsumer c onfidenc e r eport to reveal a s mall er September bounce than we pre vi ousl y ass umed, to 63.0 from 56.9 in Augus t and a c yclical l ow of 51.0 in June. Early in the month we had expec ted a bounce to as high as 68, but we tri mmed that esti mate to 65 wi th the two hurricanes and the gasoli ne pric e pop, before the l ast down war d revisi on in our forecas t on Sept. 29.




Copyright © 2008 T he Mc Graw-Hill Compani es, Inc., All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 6425
Date: 9/29/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Business Week Online ( business weekonline.c om)
Head lin e: Stoc ks End Mi xed on Bailout H opes
OTS: 2362675
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T he Uni versity of Mic higan's U .S. c ons umer s entiment i ndex pulled bac k a bit to 70.3 in the September final r eading, compared to the 73.1 in the preli mi nar y print [63.0 in Augus t]. The c urrent conditions outlook di pped to 75.0 from the pr elimi nar y 76.5 [71.0 in Augus t]. The futur e outlook i ndex dropped to 67.2 fr om the preli min ar y 70.9 [57.9 i n Aug ust].
Bod y:




Stoc ks End Mi xed on Bailout H opes




U.S. stoc ks finis hed mi xed Friday as the debate over the pr opos ed $700 billion bailout of the financial s ystem c ontinued i n W as hington, with many on Wall Street hopi ng an agreement would be s truc k someti me over the weekend. Late buyi ng boosted blue c hips and fi nanci als, but l eft the Nas daq composite index l ower.




Mar kets remained jitter y amid Friday's politic al c haos surroundi ng the pl an, which ran i nto maj or s nags late T hursday. Rebelling c ons er vati ve R epublic ans offered an alter nati ve pl an that includes ins ur anc e for toxic s ecuriti es.




Meanwhile, the financial crisis clai med another big victi m. In what is by far the l argest bank failur e in U.S. histor y, feder al r egulators seiz ed Washi ngton M utual (WM) and struc k a deal to s ell the bul k of its oper ati ons to J PMorgan C hase (JPM).




In a brief statement Friday morni ng, Pr esident Bush s aid a financi al r esc ue pac kage, stalled by politic al posturing and public oppositi on, will be passed. He s aid " all legisl ators know something must be done." Later, D emocr atic Senators H arr y R eid of Nevada and Chris topher D odd of C onnectic ut also s aid that a pl an will be r eac hed, but di dn't s ay when.




On Friday, the blue-chi p D ow J ones industrial averag e fi nished higher by 121.07 points, or 1.1%, to 11,143.13. The broader S&P 500 i n dex gained 4.09 points, or 0.34%, to 1,213.27. T he tech- heavy Nas daq composite index s hed 3.23 poi nts , or 0.15% , to 2,183.34, paced by a s har p decli ne in Res earch in M oti on (RIMM).




Acti vity in the broader mar ket was negati ve. On the N ew Yor k Stoc k Exc hang e, 21 stoc ks declined i n pric e for ever y 10 that ros e. The r atio on the N as daq was 16-12 neg ati ve. Tr adi ng was sl ow.




Bonds and gol d futur es were up in a flight to s afety ami d fears of reces sion if the plan is not enacted. T he dollar i ndex fell as second-quarter U.S. gross domes tic produc t growth was r evis ed down to 2.8% from 3.3% and a cl osel y watched gauge of c ons umer s enti ment fell i n September. Oil futures wer e lower.




Mar kets around the globe fell ami d the uncertainty i n Washi ngton. In London, the FT SE 100 i ndex declined 2.09% to 5,088.47. In Paris, the CAC 40 i ndex dropped 1.5% to 4,163.38. Ger many's D AX index decli ned 1.77% to 6,063.50.




Japan's Ni kkei 225 index declined 0.94% to fi nish at 11,893.16. In Hong Kong, the H ang Seng i ndex was down 1.33% to end at 18,682.09. Shanghai's benc hmar k index edg ed lower by 0.16%.




Investors i nitiall y embrac ed news during T hurs day's s essi on that congressi onal l eaders had r eached a fundamental agr eement on a financial sec tor r esc ue pl an, with major stoc k i ndexes finis hing s harpl y higher on the s essi on.




But in Was hington these days , nothi ng can be taken for granted.




Partici pants in a meeti ng late T hursday after noon that Presi dent Bus h had at the White H ous e wi th congressi onal l eaders and presi denti al c andi dates John McC ain and Barac k Obama s aid i t desc ended into arguments.




Sen. Ric hard Shel by, an Alabama R epublican, s aid on a CBS broadcast that many GOP lawmakers disli ke the pr opos al that has been pus hed on the adminis tration's behalf pri ncipall y by Pauls on.




"Basic all y, I beli eve the Paulson proposal is badl y s tructured," Shel by sai d. " It does nothing basicall y for the stressed mortgag e payer. It does a lot for three or four or fi ve banks ... "




Rep. Bar ney Frank [D-Mass .], the chairman of the H ouse Financial Ser vic es Committee declared Friday that an agreement on l egislati on to r elieve a s preadi ng fi nanci al crisis depends on H ous e R epublicans " dropping this r evolt" agai nst Presi dent Bus h. Frank s aid Democrats on C apitol Hill were shoc ked by the level of di visi venes s that s urfaced at a White H ouse meeti ng Thursday, not long after key c ongressional players of both parti es declar ed they'd achi eved the broad outlines of an agreement on a bill i mpl ementing the admi nistration's pr opos ed $700 billion bailout pl an.




Frank sai d he di d not thi nk that D emocrats were g oing to s ee a s ubstanti all y different pr opos al fr om the pl an the adminis trati on has b een tr ying to sell to lawmakers and which had been the focal point of cl os ed- door tal ks for days. "It's an ambus h plan," he s aid.




McCain's l eadershi p i n the negotiati ons "is to tr y to stop us from yelli ng at eac h other , announcing deals that don't exi st, to actuall y tal k to the H ous e and the Senate and g et agreement and then go to the press ," Gr aham s ai d. "Tr y to create organization out of c haos . T hree days ago [Sen.] H arr y R eid sai d there'll be no deal without John McC ain's support. Nothi ng happened for thr ee days. J ohn c omes bac k to town, now he's being criticiz ed for c oming bac k."




McCain sai d he will attend Friday's presidential debate even though the bill is not done.




JPMorgan C hase s aid it has acq uired all deposits, ass ets and c ertai n liabilities of WaMu's banki ng operati ons fr om the F ederal Deposit Ins uranc e C orp. [FDIC ] for about $1.9 billi on after the r egul ator had s eized the giant thrift. Excl uded fr om the tr ans acti on are s enior unsecur ed debt, s ubor dinated debt, and pr eferred stoc k of WaM u's banks . In c onjuncti on with this acquisiti on, J PMorgan will mar k down the acquir ed loan portfolio by about $31 billion. J PMorgan sai d the deal is expec ted to be i mmedi atel y accreti ve to its earni ngs and to add mor e than 50 cents per s har e i n 2009. Separatel y, JPM organ pric ed a $10 billion offering of about 246.9 million s hares of stoc k at $40.50 per s hare.




Apart from WaMu, the tall y of U .S. fi nancial giants that have ei ther been s eized by the g over nment or s ol d themsel ves off to s tronger fir ms i n r ecent weeks incl udes mortg age ti tans F anni e M ae (FNM) and Freddie M ac (FR E), i ns urer Americ an Inter national Gr oup ( AIG), and Wall Str eet fir ms Lehman Br others H ol dings ( LEH) and Merrill Lync h (MER).




Elsewhere i n the fi nanci al s ector, Wachovi a ( WB) shares wer e down s harpl y Friday, amid news of the failure of WaM u and unc ertai nty over the outcome of the g over nment bailout pl an. T he New Yor k Ti mes' DealBook r eports that Wac hovia has begun pr elimi nar y tal ks with Ci tigroup (C) about a potenti al merger , peopl e briefed on the matter sai d Friday after noon. T hese tal ks are earl y, however, and no deal may emerge fr om them, these peopl e s aid.




Sec urities fir m R aymond J ames Fi nancial (RJF) announced plans to file to become a bank holdi ng company, li ke larger peers Morgan Stanl ey (M S) and Goldman Sac hs ( GS). The move is part of a l ong-dis cus sed plan to convert R aymond J ames Bank from a thrift to a c ommerc ial ba nk, acc ordi ng to the fir m. The c hang e woul d per mit a higher pr oporti on of c orporate l endi ng, which the company believes is mor e profitable and bears l ess i nteres t rate ris k than i ts c urrent portfolio, whic h i ncludes a signifi cant home mortg age hol dings.




In ec onomic news Friday, U.S. s ec ond-quarter gross domes tic product growth was revis ed down to 2.8% vs. the 3.3% pac e r ecor ded i n the preli minar y r eport. Cons umption growth was r evis ed down to a 1.2% clip from 1.7% before. Fi xed i nvestment was r evised higher to a - 1.7% pac e fr om - 2.5%. Gover nment spendi ng was not revis ed at a 3.9% pac e. Inventories subtr acted $40 billion compar ed to -$39 billion pr eviousl y. Net tr ade added $80.7 billion vs. $85 billion pr eviousl y. The chain pric e index i nc hed up to a 4.3% pace from 4.2% previ ousl y, while the c ore price defl ator edged up to 2.2% from 2.1%.




The Uni versity of Michig an's U .S. c ons umer senti ment i ndex pulled bac k a bi t to 70.3 in the September final r eading, compared to the 73.1 in the preli mi nar y print [63.0 in Augus t]. The c urrent condi tions outlook di pped to 75.0 from the pr elimi nar y 76.5 [71.0 in Augus t]. The futur e outlook index dr opped to 67.2 from the preli mi nar y 70.9 [57.9 in Augus t].




The er osion li kel y c aptured s ome of the rec ent anxieti es and str ess es i n the fi nancial mar kets , but mor e of an i mpact is li kel y to be s een i n the October reading, acc ordi ng to Acti on Ec onomics .




The unc ertai nty was taking i ts toll i n the credit mar kets Friday. R euters reported that c entral banks across the world scr ambl ed to meet des perate demand for c ash on Fri day, with Eur ope's big three offering billions of one- week dollars for the first ti me to br eak a quarter-end money mar ket logj am. As the fi nanci al crisis went fr om bad to wors e, the European Centr al Bank, the Bank of England and Swiss N ati onal Bank coll ecti vel y put up $74 billi on of one week money. D emand fr om c as h-hungr y banks, par ticul arly for the EC B c as h, was hefty as l ending between banks on money mar kets remained virtuall y paral yz ed .




The Fed i nter vened with a $20 billion reverse repo Friday, and announced another three-day weekend fundi ng operati on, drai ning reser ves from the s ystem whil e i njec ting much needed c ollateral on to the Str eet. T he funds rate c ontinues to trade well below targ et at 1.5% thanks to the hundr eds of billions of reser ves i n the s ystem. T he Fed and other c entral banks have been fl oodi ng the s ystem with c as h ahead of what c oul d be an extr emel y tight quarter end.




The credit default s wap mar ket is jumping i n the wake of the politic al tur moil and the WaMu failure, acc ordi ng to Ac tion Ec onomics. The CD S on the North American inves tment gr ade bonds cli mbed 12 basis points to 173 basis points.




The 10- year Tr easur y note was higher in price at 101-20/32 for a yi eld of 3.806%, while the 30- year bond r ose to 102-19/32 for a yiel d of 4.348%.




Money mar kets were paral yzed despite i ncreas ed liquidity inj ecti ons fr om c entral banks ar ound the world, says S&P M arketSc ope. Doll ar borrowi ng rates stayed high and pr emiums paid over U .S. government borrowi ng rates wer e wi de, partic ularl y for three month money. T he money mar ket s tress was exac erbated by the loomi ng quarter end.




The dollar i ndex was lower Friday after noon. T he eur o fell on a R euters report that mar ket expec tations for ECB rate cuts in the first half of next year are "r easonabl e," acc ordi ng to unnamed c entral bank officials .




Oil futur es were down Friday after noon on fears congressi onal failur e t o enac t a fi nanci al res cue plan will r esul t in a rec essi on that will c aus e a r educ e i n demand for c ommoditi es. November WT I cr ude oil futures wer e off $2 to $106.02 per barrel.




December gol d futures wer e up at $891.90 per ounce ami d s afe-haven buyi ng of t he yell ow metal.




Among other s toc ks in the news Friday, R es earc h i n M otion (RIMM) shares fell s har pl y after the c ompany pos ted l ower-than- expec ted s ec ond-quarter EPS of 86 c ents , vs . 50 cents one year earlier, on an 88% r evenue rise.




Acc entur e Ltd. (ACN) reported four th-quarter EPS of 67 cents , vs . 50 cents one year earlier, on a 17% revenue ris e. The c ompany hi ked i ts annual di vi dend to 50 ce nts per s hare from 42 c ents.




Copyright © 2008 T he Mc Graw-Hill Compani es, Inc., All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 6396
Date: 9/26/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Business Week Online ( business weekonline.c om)
Head lin e: Stoc ks Bounce as Bailout Takes Shape
OTS: 2362675
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: On Friday, traders will get r eports on U .S. final s ec ond-quarter gross domes tic product, August pers onal income, and the Uni versity of Michig an cons umer senti ment index for September.
Bod y:




Stoc ks Bounc e as Bail out T akes Shape




Are we there yet?




Ants y fi nanci al mar kets have been as ki ng the question about the g overnment's pl ans for a massi ve financial-s ector bail out si nce news of the pac kage broke las t week.




And now, after a few detours, Congress , li ke the ever-pati ent par ent parr ying the bac k-s eat queries of littl e Max and M adis on about the inter mi nable family trip to Aunt Tilly's, can finall y ans wer: Al most.




U.S. stoc ks finis hed soli dl y higher Thursday, though well below the s essi on's best levels, as inves tors embrac ed news that c ongres sional leaders have reached a fundamental agreement on a fi nanci al s ector resc ue plan. C onc erns about the fate of the plan weighed on the mar ket earlier this week. U.S. lawmakers s aid they will submit the $7 00 billion resc ue plan to the Bush administr ati on, with the goal of a vote by both hous es of C ongress wi thi n days. T he Whi te Hous e s et a summit Thurs day afternoon featuring Pr esi dent Bush and major Presi denti al candi dates Barac k Obama and J ohn McC ain.




Of c ourse, not ever yone is pl eased with the i dea of a big-tic ket r elief pac kage for the financi al s ector. Lawmakers and taxpayers have expres sed s trong opposi tion to the l egislati on ami d c harges that the plan amounts to a bailout of Wall Str eet.




Bonds were mi xed. T he dollar index pulled bac k from earlier highs in a volatil e s essi on. Gold futures pl ung ed. Oil futur es r ose on the bail out news.




Traders weighed r eports Thurs day that weekl y initi al jobl ess cl ai ms r ose 32,000 to 493,000; August durabl e goods orders fell 4.5%; and U.S. new home s ales slumped 11.5% in August.




On Thursday, the bl ue-c hi p Dow J ones i ndus trial aver age finis hed higher by 196.89 poi nts, or 1.82%, at 11,022.06. The broader S&P 500 index added 23.40 points, or 1.97%, to end the s ession at 1 ,209.27. The tech- heavy Nas daq composite index cli mbed 30.89 points, or 1.43%, to 2,186.57.




On the N ew York Stoc k Exchange, 23 s toc ks were higher in pric e for ever y 9 that fell. T he ratio on the N as daq was 17-11 positi ve. Trading was light.




Financi al and energy iss ues wer e among the s ession's bes t perfor mers .




The bailout pl an will appr ove a $700 billion fund that woul d be avail abl e i n ins tall ments, acc ordi ng to a Wall Street J ournal report. T he first tranc he woul d be a sizable $250 billion, however, compared to the original $150 billion pr opos al, whic h s houl d plac ate the markets s omewhat, says Acti on Ec onomics . T he bill will ha ve li mits on g olden parac hutes for executi ves and equity warrants woul d appl y to all c ompanies s eeki ng to unwi nd assets. The alter ati on of bankr uptc y l aws appears to remain unres ol ved for another day. T here could als o be s ome benchmar king to gauge the success of the plan, whic h is expected to be pass ed before mar kets open on M onday.




Reuters i s reporting that s ome H ous e R epublicans ar e offering an alternati ve i ns urance pl an to the bail out.




Paulson and Federal R es er ve Chairman Ben Ber nanke tes tified befor e C ongress agai n T hurs day, this ti me to the Hous e Fi nanci al Ser vic es C ommittee on the Bush administr ati on's financial r esc ue pl an.




"We believe a bailout pac kage will be approved with c ompr omises . We think the eq uity mar kets will respond positi vel y to this ac tion," wr ote S&P c hief i nvestment str ategist Sam Stovall in a note late Wednes day.




As if to undersc ore the ris ks the economy fac es, the mar kets rec ei ved some disc our aging news Thursday from a U .S . bell wether c ompany. General El ectric ( GE) c ut its third quarter earni ngs per s hare g uidance from 50-54 c ents to 43-48 c ents, reflecti ng " unprec edented" weakness and vol atility i n financial s er vic es mar kets. T he c ongl omer ate does not expec t diffic ult c onditi ons i n fi nanci al s ervi ces mar kets to i mpr ove in the near futur e. GE als o cut its $2.20- $2.30 2008 EPS gui danc e to $1.95- $2.10, and s uspended stoc k buybac ks. S&P Ratings Ser vic es affirmed its AAA long -ter m c orporate credit r ating on GE.




More gloomy news c ame in the form of T hurs day's key economic reports. U.S. j obl ess cl ai ms r ose 32,000 to 493,000 i n the week ended September 2 0. T he reading was well above the 450,000 expec ted, following the upwar dl y revi sed 461,000 level the week before [previ ousl y 455,000]. C ontinuing cl ai ms j umped 63,000 to 3,542,000 i n the week ended September 13. H owever, Hurric ane Gus tav distortions have reportedl y added 50,000 to the headline figure, s ays S&P Ec onomics.




U.S. durable goods or ders pl ung ed 4.5% in Augus t after a downwar d r evised 0.8% incr ease in J ul y [1.3% previ ousl y]. Mar kets expected a mor e modest -1.5% dr op in orders. Trans portati on or ders pl ummeted 8.9% , to explain much of the decline. Nondefens e aircraft wer e down 38.1 % and autos fell 8.1%. H owever, excludi ng trans portati on, orders were down 3.0%. N ondefense capital goods orders excluding aircraft dropped 2.0%, er asing g ains the prior t wo months. Shipments declined 2.5%, while inventories r os e 0.7%, pus hing the inventor y-shi pment rati o up to 1.61 from 1.54 pr eviousl y.




The muc h weaker than expec ted data will incr ease mar ket fears that financial mar ket tur moil is filtering into the r eal ec onom y, acc ordi ng to S&P Economic s.




U.S. new home s al es plunged 11.5% to a 460,000 pac e i n Augus t, from 520,000 in Jul y. Weakness was seen in the Wes t [- 36.1%], South [-2.1%] and Northeas t [- 31.9%]. the Midwest was up 7.2%. New home s ales ar e down 34.5% over las t year , with all regions are down s har pl y. T he months' s uppl y of homes j umped to 10.9 from 10.3. The medi an home price falling to $221,900 fr om $234,900 pr evi ousl y [revi sed fr om $230,700]. Pric es are down 12.7% year- over- year.




"It's possi ble that s ome of the weakness in Augus t N ew H ome Sales was c aused by the s pi ke in mortg age r ates over the summer, whic h has sinc e been r evers ed as the government has s upported the GSEs and announced plans to begin outright purchas es of MBS," wr ote Mor gan Stanl ey (M S) economis t D avid Gr eenlaw in a note T hurs day. "T his r evers al i n mortgage rates has hel ped lift housi ng affordability bac k to war ds historical highs, s o we may s ee a return to the pr evi ous stabilizi ng trend in new home sal es i n the months ahead."




On Friday, traders will g et r eports on U.S. final s ec ond-quarter gross domes tic produc t, August personal income, and the Uni versity of Michigan cons umer s enti ment index for September.




Among other s toc ks in the news Thursday, Pilgrim's Pride C orp. (PPC) s ees a signific ant l oss i n the four th quar ter due to hig h feed-ingredient c osts, c ontinued weak pricing and demand for br eas t meat, and the significant negati ve impact of hedged grain positi ons during the four th q uarter. T he c ompany r ecentl y infor med i ts lenders that it does not expect to be i n c ompliance with its fi xed-c harge cover age r atio c ovenant under i ts princi pal credit faciliti es as of the fisc al year endi ng Sept. 27, but expec ts to be i n c ompli anc e wi th all other covenants as of the end of fisc al 2008.




Nike, Inc . (NKE) reported better-than-expected first q uarter EPS of $1.03, vs. $1.12 one year earlier, as the abs enc e of a year-ago 20 cents per s har e tax benefi t offs et a 17% revenue rise and wider gros s margin. Ni ke notes changes i n for eign exc hange rates i ncreas ed revenue growth by 7 perc entage points. The c ompany sai d worldwide futur es orders for athletic footwear and apparel, sc heduled for deli ver y from September, 2008, through J anuar y, 2009, totaled $6.8 billion, 10% higher than such or ders r eported for year ago period.




Mccor mic k & C o. (M KC) reported third quar ter EPS of 52 c ents, vs. 43 c ents one year earli er, on a 9% s ales rise. Th e company rais ed its 2008 EPS gui danc e by one cent to a range of $2.04-$2.08.




Red Hat (RHT) pos ted s ec ond q uarter non-GAAP EPS of 20 c ents, vs. 17 c ents one year earli er, on a 29% revenue rise. T he Li nux s oftware c ompany s ees third-quarter non- GAAP EPS of 16- 17 cents on r evenue of $169-$171 million.




Eur opean stoc k i ndexes r allied T hurs day. In London, the FT SE 100 index added 1.99% to 5,197.02. In Paris, the C AC 40 index r ose 2.73% to 4,226.81. Ger many's D AX index gai ned 1.99% to 6,173.03.




Asian i ndexes finis hed mi xed in Thurs day's ses sion. J apan's Ni kkei 225 i ndex fell 0.9% to 12,006.53. In H ong Kong, the H ang Seng i ndex eas ed 0.15% to 18,934.43. Shanghai's benchmar k i ndex ros e 3.64%.




In other mar kets Thursday, N ovember Wes t T exas Inter mediate crude oil futur es r allied late on r eports C ongress was clos e to a deal on a fi nanci al rescue plan. Many believe plan woul d gi ve stoc ks and economy bit of boost. Futur es, down mos t of the day, were up $2.21 to $107.94 in l ate tr adi ng.




December gol d futures wer e off $20.30 to $874.70 per ounce Thursday after noon.




Treas uries wer e mi xed in the after noon ami d c autious senti ment as the bond mar ket awaited further details about the governmen t's resc ue plan for the fi nanci al s ector. 10-year note fell 12/32 to 101-04/32 for a yiel d of 3.86%. 30- year bond rose 05/32 to 101-21/32 for a yiel d of 4.40%. Stoc ks were holdi ng onto big gains in the after noon, albeit ami d pretty l ow volume, r efl ecti ng opti mis m that the C ongress will approve an effec ti ve pac kage. Crude oil futur es r allied whil e gol d fell.




Copyright © 2008 T he Mc Graw-Hill Compani es, Inc., All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 6342
Date: 9/25/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Business Week Online ( business weekonline.c om)
Head lin e: Trac king 'Soci al Entr epr eneurs' Gets Easier
OTS: 2362675
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: c ommon set of metrics will be rec orded for eac h organization s o donors and i nvestors c an chec k regul arl y and tr ac k their prog res s or spot trouble. Soci al entr epr eneurs will be able to benchmar k their res ults ag ains t those for si milar organiz ati ons around the world. "T his provi des rigor," s ays Rober t Kennedy, professor of cor porate s trateg y and i nternati onal business at the U ni versity of Michigan's R oss Sc hool of Business . "It forces c ompani es to be more anal ytical and honest i n ass essing their own perfor mance."
Bod y:




Trac king 'Soci al Entr epr eneurs' Gets Easier




Ther e's pl enty to love about organizations that focus on sol vi ng the world's poverty and health probl ems -- but their i mpact is often hard to meas ure. That can make it hard for philanthropies and i nves tors to tell whether their money is well s pent and leaves s ome of them rel uctant to channel funds to the s ocial sector.




A few foundations hope to change that by sheddi ng mor e light on the trac k rec ord of organiz ati ons that aim to do g ood. A grou p l ed by Ac umen Fund, Sal esforc e.c om F oundation, and Skoll F ounda tion has formed to cr eate an online databas e for us e by hundreds of donors, investors, and s ocial enterpris es.




The Portfolio Data M anag ement Sys tem [PDM S] will focus on s o-c alled s ocial entr epr eneurs, or groups tr ying to bring about social c hang e while also functioning li ke a business -- i n s ome c ases even tryi ng to make money. Some social enter prises ar e nonprofi ts, while others s eek a retur n on inves tment. Perhaps the most promi nent social entrepreneur is Muhammad Yunus of Grameen Bank [Busi ness Week.c om, 10/13/06], the pioneer of micr ofi nanc e and wi nner of the N obel Peac e Prize.




Digging Deeper




Whatever the busi ness approac h, soci al enter prise perfor mance can and mus t be meas ured, s ay i nvestors and foundati ons . " When you have no metrics, i t is diffic ult to meas ure i mpact, and decisi ons get made bas ed on anecdotes, not real data," says J acqueline N ovogratz, founder and C EO of A cumen Fund, a nonprofit ventur e fund that bac ks s ocial entr epr eneurs. " While you c an't meas ure ever ything, we need to dig dee per i nto what wor ks and be eq uall y as hones t about what does n't wor k."




Roug hl y s peaki ng, PMD S will be to s ocial entr epr eneurs what regul ator y fili ngs ar e to publicl y-tr aded c ompanies registered with the Sec urities & Exchange C ommission. The trac ki ng s ys tem, to be announced at the Cli nton Gl obal Initi ati ve s ummit i n N ew Yor k on Sept. 25, is expected to be available for br oad us e i n J anuar y. U ntil now, donors and i nvestors have tended to keep their own tr ac king s ystems, often usi ng basic spr eads heet software on PCs. T he PMDS is better becaus e the data from many organizations c an be put i n one databas e that's ac cessi ble from anywher e in the world via the Internet.




A c ommon s et of metrics will be r ec orded for eac h organiz ati on s o donors and inves tors can chec k r egul arly and tr ac k their progress or spot troubl e. Social entr epr eneurs will be abl e to benchmar k their res ults agai nst thos e for simil ar organiz ati ons ar ound the world. "T his provi des rigor," says Robert Kennedy, pr ofess or of c orporate strateg y and inter national business at the Uni versity of Mic higan's R oss Sc hool of Busi nes s. "It forc es c ompanies to be mor e anal ytic al and honest in ass essi ng their own perfor manc e."




Vas t Latent C apital




Ther e have been si mil ar efforts i n the pas t but nothi ng came of them -- either becaus e di vers e organizations c ouldn't agree on appr oac h or the right technol og y was n't avail abl e. "N ow is the ti me to get movi ng on this ," s ays Antony Bugg-Levi ne, a managing director at the R oc kefeller F oundation, who's been testi ng PMD S. "T here's a huge amount of l atent c apital that will move i nto this s ystem if we c an c ome up wi th the right metrics and measur es of perfor mance."




The PMD S proj ect has been under way behind the sc enes for two years, and about 15 i nvestor or donor organiz ati ons ar e using a tes t version. It was headed by Bri an Trels tad, Ac umen's c hief inves tment offic er, and muc h of the grunt wor k was done b y M arc M anara, an Ac umen staffer. A br eakthr oug h c ame when Sal esforce.com Foundati on, the phil anthr opic offs hoot of s oftware company Salesforce.com (CRM), committed to wor k with pr ogrammers from Google (GOOG) and Ac umen to buil d the s ys tem and run it on Sal esforce.c om's ser vers. Manag ers fr om Pric ewater hous eC oopers ar e hel ping to make it eas y to c ompare data from different types of c ompanies . T he organiz ers hope that about 25 donors and inves tors will be using the full y functi oni ng s ys tem by earl y next year to tr ac k upwar ds of 500 enterpris es.




The s ystem will provi de a deep res er voir of vital stats . All listed compani es will use the same financial acc ounti ng methods. They'll be measur ed bas ed on s even basic metrics , including r evenue growth, net i ncome, the number of cus tomers s er ved, jobs created, wag e growth, local s uppliers supported, and addi tional money rais ed. Additi onall y, i nvestors and soci al enter prises can c us tomiz e the s ys tem to include their own goals and acc omplis hments.




Free to Nonprofi ts




SoFi E [Society of Fi nanci al Econometrics ] is available free of charge from Sal esforc e.c om to nonprofits. For-pr ofit organiz ations can g et it at an 80% disc ount fr om nor mal rates. Acumen has r ais ed money fr om the Skoll F oundation and other philanthropies to pa y for developi ng the trac ki ng s ystem, which Ac umen expects to c ost about $700,000.




Acumen F und has been using earl y test versions of PMD S for 20 months to trac k about 30 of the c ompanies it has inves ted i n. Already, the fund managers have made follow-on i nvestments i n s ome compani es based on their outstandi ng performance. T hey also us e it as an early- warning s ystem. For i nstance, a f ew months ag o Acumen managers notic ed that an ambul anc e company in M umbai, Indi a, didn't have enough pati ents per day ri ding i n s ome of its vehicles. Ac umen s ent a r epr esentati ve who hel ped the c ompany, Dial 1298 for Ambulanc e, anal yze its oper ati ons and s hift thi ngs around to make more efficient us e of vehicl es and personnel. " They c ame up with a beautiful model that will make it possi ble to break even on every ambulanc e," s ays Sweta M ang al, c hief executi ve of the ambul ance outfit.




While there's s till a lot of tec hnic al wor k to be done on PMDS, its supporters are c onvi nc ed that, over ti me, the s ys tem will have a maj or i mpac t on the soci al s ector. And the more organiz ations that joi n, the better. Says Preston D. Pi nkett III, head of Prudenti al Soci al I nvestments , the social i nvestment ar m of ins uranc e giant Pr udential Fi nanci al (PRU) , whi ch has more than $500 million inves ted: "It l eaves me with a s ens e of hope that we can create an i ndus tr y that produces a big fl ow of capital to do a lot of good i n the worl d."




Copyright © 2008 T he Mc Graw-Hill Compani es, Inc., All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 6389
Date: 9/29/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U SA Today
Head lin e: NASA at missi on ' crossr oads ' after 50 years
OTS: 2220863
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: "I' m i n the busi ness, and I c an't tell you who's on the spac e s tati on. I have no idea," s ays Lennard Fis k, a U ni versity of Michigan s pace sci enc e professor.H e and others blame a l ac k of funding and l eadershi p for the agenc y's lost promi nenc e. The s pace pr ogram " has moved forward for mor e than 30 years without a guidi ng vision," the experts who inves tigated the 2003 l oss of the shuttle Col umbi a s aid in their report to N ASA.
Bod y:




NASA at missi on ' cros sroads ' after 50 years




HOUST ON -- In a hangar here at the Johnson Spac e C enter, engineer Lori H ans on s hows off a model of the agenc y's pride and joy: the new spac eshi p N ASA is designi ng to c arry as tronauts bac k to the moon.




It will be bigger than the Apoll o c aps ul e, s he s ays, "bec ause the mis sion is ver y differ ent from Apollo." For the first ti me, N ASA will build a base on the moon, where humans could li ve for si x months at a str etc h.




Those who keep tabs on N ASA's fortunes worr y that the agenc y's plan to r eturn Americans to the moon in a decade won't amount to mor e than a clus ter of pl ywood frames i n a hangar. As NASA mar ks its 50th anni versar y Wednes day, s pace experts s ay NASA i s adrift, its future disturbi ngly mur ky.




The spac e s huttl e is due to retire i n two years. Its suc ces sor, bes et by budg et and technical pr obl ems, won't fl y until 2015 at the earliest, creati ng a str etc h of at least fi ve years when the United States will have no wa y to l aunc h humans i nto or bit.




"It's a rather unfortunate ti me to be c elebrating a 50th anni vers ar y," s ays s pac e historian J oan Johnson-Frees e of the N aval War C olleg e. "Right now, we're at best at a pl ateau, i f not -- I hate to s ay this -- headi ng downwar ds."




'Middle- aged bureaucrac y'




The spac e agenc y was born Oc t. 1, 1958, at the decr ee of Congress . Less than 11 years later, it l anded the first man on the moon, a feat that has yet to be equaled by any other nation.




Sinc e then, N ASA has s ent robots to ever y c orner of the sol ar s ys tem and built a s paceshi p, the s huttl e, more versatil e than any i n histor y. It als o lost astr onauts -- 14 died in two s huttl e accidents -- and the nati on's attenti on.




"I've s een N ASA struggle wi th how ... we g et bac k to an Apollo ki nd of excitement," s ays former s pace- agenc y official R ay C olladay. " It's a middl e-aged bur eaucr ac y now."




Presi dent Bus h tried i n 2004 to r einvigor ate N ASA, directing the agenc y to send astr onauts bac k to the moon by 2020 and to st art pl anning to send humans to M ars. Bush als o promis ed an i nfusi on of c ash to pay for it all, but the full s um failed to materializ e.




Even one of the authors of Bus h's moon plan says the pr esident's s pace legac y is i n ques tion.




"The ag enc y is at a crossr oads," s ays Bretton Alexander, a for mer Whi te H ous e aide now at the X Priz e F oundati on, a group that funds technolog y contests . "T he next adminis trati o n has a big decision to make about which dir ecti on (NASA) will go."




Alexander and others cite a hos t of problems dogging the spac e agenc y as i t prepar es to cel ebr ate its 50th birthday:




*What to do with the s pace shuttle. At Bus h's directi on, N ASA plans to retir e the s huttle in mi d-2010, but ther e's s uppor t in Congress to keep the s huttl e fl yi ng. T hat c ould cos t $4 billion a year. N ASA needs that money to build the new moon vehicle.




The shuttle has had two deadl y ac cidents i n 124 flights. NASA chi ef Michael Griffi n tol d T he Orlando Sentinel this month that if the s huttl e's life is extended for fi ve more years, there woul d be a one-i n-eight ris k of l osing as tronauts in that period.




*How to g et as tronauts to the Internati onal Spac e Station, an orbital l ab funded l argel y by the U .S. After the shuttle r etire s, N ASA hopes to us e R ussi an craft to carr y U .S. crews to the s tation. Purc hase of th e R ussian shi ps r equires congressi onal appr oval , which has yet to be granted.




*When the s huttl e's replacement will fl y. NASA is building a r oc ket, call ed the Ar es I, and cr ew c apsul e, the Orion, to carr y humans to or bit. Griffi n had hoped to have the two ready in 2013, three years after the shuttle stops fl yi ng. Instead, the first manned launch has been delayed until 2015.




Lac k of fundi ng, l eadershi p




It's a comedown for an agenc y that c ommanded more than 3% of the federal budget i n the 1960s. Today it g ets less than 1% .




After the Uni ted States beat the Soviets to the moon, inter est and funding coll aps ed. T he s pace agenc y was forced to shel ve g rand pl ans for human expl orati on of the s olar s ystem.




Sinc e then, many of N ASA's greatest tri umphs have been the wor k of machi nes , not astronauts. Public interest has foc used on the H ubble Space Tel esc ope and the M ars r overs. T he s pac e s tation, though a tec hnical mar vel, draws sc ant attention, as do s huttl e flights.




"I'm i n the busi ness, and I c an't tell you who's on the spac e stati on. I have no idea," s ays Lennard Fis k, a U ni versity of Mic higan s pace sci enc e profes sor.




He and others bl ame a lac k of fundi ng and leaders hip for the ag enc y's los t pr ominence. T he s pac e program "has moved forward f or mor e than 30 years without a guidi ng vision," the experts who inves tigated the 2003 l oss of the shuttle Col umbi a s aid in their report to N ASA.




Bus h tried to provi de a guidi ng visi on, though its s ucc ess depends on futur e admi nistr ations and Congress es . F or now, both presi denti al c andi dates have express ed s upport for the goal of s endi ng humans bac k to the moon. Both have promis ed to i ncreas e NASA's budget.




Neither has propos ed anythi ng close to the tens of billions of extr a doll ars Al exander s ays woul d be needed to prevent N ASA from tempor aril y losing its ability to l aunc h humans i nto orbit.




The forec ast for NASA's funding l ooks "bl eak," says Rog er Launi us, a his torian at the Smiths oni an Instituti on's Nati onal Air and Spac e M useum. NASA hopes to start wor k i n the c oming decade on a gi ant roc ket, c alled the Ares V, needed to s hoot c argo to the moon, but Launi us fears the nation won't find the money.




"I wouldn't be s urprised i f we don't, si mpl y becaus e there is no c ompelling r ati onale that I' ve s een for g oing to the moon," he s ays .




Still, Launius and others s ay that though the manned flight pr ogram is floundering, satellites and other robotic s pacecr aft ar e doi ng exciting scienc e and will c ontinue to do s o.




NASA's Griffin c onc eded in an i nter view wi th USA T ODAY that "it's a diffic ult ti me ... ( with) lots of c hurn, lots of tur moil, lots of uncer tai nty." All the s ame, he decl ared c onfidence that even if NASA's budg et does n't grow, it will build a moon base in the next 15 years and s end humans to M ars in 30 years.




"We're on a r eal ups wing i n ter ms of can-do attitude at N ASA," he s ai d. " We're not on a plateau. We're i n a good pl ac e."




The following fiel ds overflowed:




OBJ ECT = a_nas a29 A043_APOLLO_29.jpg 29 A04_M an_on_Moon_29.jpg 29 A04_SHEPARD _29.jpg29 A04_HUBBLE_29.j pg29 A04_Challenger_29.j pg29




Copyright © 2008 U SA TOD AY
ARTIC LEID: 6181
Date: 9/23/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U SA Today
Head lin e: A losi ng pr opositi on
OTS: 2220863
Subject: Leg al N ews
Summ ar y: When the U.S. Supr eme Court weighed in on affir mati ve acti on i n c olleg e admissi ons in 2003 -- in two cases invol ving the U ni versity of Michigan -- nearl y 70 Fortune 500 c ompanies signed on to friend-of-the-c ourt bri efs urging the justices to l eave the uni versity's rac e-consci ous admissi ons policies intac t.
Bod y:




A losing proposi tion




W




hen Sen. John McC ain voic ed s upport over the summer for a propos ed Arizona ballot meas ure curtailing the us e of affir mati ve-ac tion preferenc es, some critic s s aid he was l atc hing onto a wedge issue l ong us ed by the GOP to s plit D emocrats al ong r acial lines.




In the two months si nc e McC ain's r emar ks to ABC's George Stephanopoulos , the s enator of Arizona has been cons picuousl y sil ent on the is sue. Gi ven the politics of affirmati ve acti on, that may well be a wise decisi on.




After all, it's a mistake to ass ume McC ain stands onl y to gai n politicall y by supporti ng s uch meas ures , which appear li kel y to be on the ball ot i n C olor ado and N ebras ka this November.




Affir mati ve ac tion is indeed a wedge iss ue. But this wedge has not j ust di vi ded D emocrats. It has also has badl y spli t t he GOP.




Soci al c onser vati ves may have c heered McC ain's oppositi on to affir mati ve- acti on pr eferenc es by public coll eges and other government entities, but his s tand c oul d c ost hi m s upport among other key Rep ublic an c ons tituencies.




Many leaders of big busi ness, for example, have l ong embr ac ed affirmati ve acti on as a c ost- effecti ve tool for s tavi ng off discri minati on c ompl aints and di versifying their wor kforc es. When the U.S. Supreme C our t weighed i n on affirmati ve ac tion in c ollege admissions i n 2003 -- in two c as es i nvol ving the U ni versity of Mic higan -- nearly 70 F ortune 500 compani es signed on to friend-of- the-court briefs urging the jus tices to leave the uni versity's r ac e-consci ous admissi ons policies intac t.




Meanwhile, R epublic an political pr agmatists have l ong worried that oppositi on to affir mati ve ac tion will alienate the nati on's growi ng Hispanic elec tor ate and li mit the GOP's appeal among women. If Mc Cai n's critics are able to use his affir mati ve ac tion s tand -- or his i ncreasi ngly toug h stand on i mmig rati on -- to paint him as raci all y i nsensiti ve, he c ould los e s upport from moderate voters.




An unavoi dable iss ue




Avoi ding the affir mati ve-ac tion iss ue pr obabl y was not an opti on for any presidential candi date this elec tion year, even i f the state ball ot me asur es had not come up. T he politic al rise of Democr atic nomi nee Barac k Obama -- who opposes s uch ballot ini tiati ve as thr eateni ng the progress of mi noriti es and women and " all too often designed to dri ve a wedg e between peopl e" -- almost naturall y evokes disc ussi ons of how muc h the nation has moved beyond its past raci al di visions, and whether bl ac ks and other mi noriti es s till need the l eg up that affirmati ve acti on offers .




But in all yi ng hi ms elf with thos e who s eek to abolish such pr eferences, McC ain is c harging off in a dir ecti on where no r ecent GOP president has gotten far.




Ronald Reagan harshl y criticized affir mati ve acti on, but in two terms in offic e, he failed to is sue a si ngle executi ve or der endi ng or even res tricting i ts use by the federal government. His adminis trati on was left g un-s hy as a r es ult of the upr oar over its attempt in 1982 to res tor e the tax-exempt status of South C aroli na's pri vate Bob J ones Uni versity, whic h prohi bited i nterraci al dati ng. (It took just days for his admi nistr ation to reverse its elf.)




Reag an's R epublican s ucc ess or, George H.W. Bush, took a more moder ate approac h. H e r eined in appoi ntees when they c hall eng ed affirmati ve acti on too aggressi vel y, and his admi nistration disavowed asserti ons by the Educ ation D epartment's assistant s ecr etar y for ci vil rights, Michael Williams, that mos t c ollege sc hol arshi ps for members of minority groups vi olate fe deral antidis crimi nation law.




Unless Pr esident George W. Bus h s urpris es people by doi ng something drastic to cur b affir mati ve actio n i n his l ast few months i n offic e, he too will have dis appointed s ocial cons er vati ves in his deali ngs with this is sue.




His administr ati on has g one one step beyond wher e his father's di d, by challenging minority-onl y coll ege sc holars hips and programs, but other wise has handled affirmati ve acti on gingerl y. Its positi on on the U ni versi ty of Mic higan c as es was wi del y regar ded as a contortionistic attempt to pl eas e ever ybody: Bush had his lawyers file a brief opposing Mic higan's policies , but he declined to c hall eng e race-c onscious admissions i n general, and then, oddl y, appl auded when the Supr eme Court r ejec ted most of his lawyers' arguments an d upheld the Mic higan l aw sc hool's c onsideration of applic ants' rac e.




Rall y the bas e?




Recent his tor y als o does not l end muc h s upport to the idea that havi ng affir mati ve- acti on bans on the ballot in C ol orado -- a s wi ng state -- and N ebras ka will help McC ai n's chanc es by mobilizi ng cons er vati ve voters . In the three other states that have adopted s uc h m easur es -- C alifor nia (in 1996, with 54% of the vote), Was hington s tate (i n 1998, with 58%) and Mic higan (in 2006, als o with 58%) -- many of the R epublican c andi dates who s hared the state ballot far ed poorl y.




Affir mati ve ac tion is unpopul ar enoug h to be vulnerable when put to a vote, but i t appears that muc h of the electorate is cap abl e of simultaneousl y rej ecti ng affirmati ve acti on while bac king the D emocrats who defend it.




McCain might have chos en to voic e opposition to affirmati ve-ac tion prefer enc es out of adher enc e to some princi ple s uch as a belief that gover nment should be c olor-bli nd. After all, he has c onsistentl y opposed r acial quotas. But if he based his decision on some political calc ulati on, his c ampaign might want to cr unch thos e numbers again.




His rec ent silenc e on the issue, at the Republic an National Convention and els ewhere, s uggests he might have already j oined t he Republic an pr esidents he hopes to s ucc eed in c oncludi ng that an aggressi ve fight against affir mati ve acti on is politic all y a losing proposi tion.




Peter Sc hmidt is a s eni or writer at T he Chr onicl e of Hig her Educ ati on and the author of C olor and M oney: H ow Ric h White Ki ds Are Wi nni ng the War Over Coll ege Affirmati ve Acti on. He bl ogs about r ace, cl ass and education acc ess at www.c olor andmoney.c om.




Copyright © 2008 U SA TOD AY
ARTIC LEID: 3703
Date: 9/17/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U SA Today
Head lin e: Over weight ki ds li kel y to have mor e headaches, study fi nds
OTS: 2220863
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: Stress, too, triggers headac hes , and the bull yi ng fac ed by heavy c hildr en can be terribl y s tres sful , adds M atthew D avis, a pedi atrici an at the Uni versity of Michig an's C .S. Mott C hildr en's H os pital. Par ents of over weight and obes e ki ds r ated bull ying as their top health concer n for c hildr en, far hig her than par ents of normal - weight c hildren, in a new onli ne poll directed by D avis." We know from other studies that these over weight ki ds tend to be the targets of bullies , and that their over all quality of life is lower," he s ays.
Bod y:




Over weight ki ds likel y to have more headaches, study fi nds




The mor e over weight chil dren and teenagers ar e, the more freq uent and dis abling their headaches , accor ding to the first natio nal study to l ook at possibl e links between obesity and headac hes in kids .




A great payoff of slimmi ng down is that heavy ki ds tend to gai n s ome relief fr om headac hes, says Andrew Hers hey, a pedi atric neurol ogist at Ci ncinnati C hildr en's H os pital Medic al Center, who l ed the study at s eve n U .S. headac he c enters . T he r eport on 913 chil dren and teenag ers, followed for si x months, is published onli ne i n H eadac he.




Adult obesi ty already has been tied to headaches, s o hel ping ki ds get i nto the nor mal weight range could pr event years of pai n and disability, Hers hey s ays .




Chronic headac hes are common in chil dhood, with s ur veys s uggesti ng they're experienc ed by anywher e fr om one out of four to one out of 10 ki ds. In H ershey's s tudy, some had headac hes nearly ever y other day. T he more over weight a c hild, the more headaches and the wors e the pai n.




But the over weight childr en who had los t weight thr ee months after their first visit r eported about half as many headaches as the heavy ki ds who c onti nued to g ain weight. On the other hand, gai ning or losing weight had littl e effect on headac hes for ki ds of a nor mal weight.




Children and teens i n pai n fr om headac hes may be less physicall y ac ti ve, pr ompting them to pac k on pounds, Hers hey s pecul ates.




Also, ther e's s ome evi denc e that adul ts with migrai nes have l ow levels of lepti n, a hormone that caus es a feeling of full ness after eating. T his can encourag e over eating, H ers hey s ays.




So the heavy ki ds with headaches may have low lepti n levels, too, H ershey sugges ts. T hat would help acc ount for the ti e betwe en their extra weight and headac hes.




Childhood headac hes also could be due to dehydrati on. "Over weight ki ds don't li ke to dri nk water, and they're ver y often dehydr ated, whic h l eads to headac hes," s ays Meli nda Sothern, an exercis e physiol ogist who has tr eated thousands of heavy c hildr en at Louisiana State Uni versity H ealth Sci ences Center i n N ew Orl eans.




Stres s, too, triggers headac hes , and the bull yi ng faced by heavy c hildr en can be terribl y s tress ful , adds M atthew D avis, a pedi atrician at the Uni versity of Michigan's C .S. Mott C hildr en's H os pital. Par ents of over weight and obes e ki ds r ated bull ying as their top health c onc ern for childr en, far hig her than par ents of normal- weight c hildren, in a new onli ne poll directed by D avis.




"We know from other studies that these over weight ki ds tend to be the targ ets of bullies , and that their over all quality of life is lower," he s ays.




Copyright © 2008 U SA TOD AY
ARTIC LEID: 167
Date: 9/1/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t
Head lin e: Bes t National Uni versiti es
OTS: 2034333
Subject: R anki ngs
Summ ar y: T he Uni versity of Mic higan was ranked number 26 in the C arnegie Foundati ons list of Overall Peer Graduati on and Scor e Asses me nt Retenti on Rank Sc ore. It was als o r anked fi fth in the Top 50 Public N ational Uni versiti es List.
Bod y:




Bes t N ational U ni versiti es




To rank coll eges and uni versities , U.S. News first assig ns sc hools to a group of their peers, bas ed on the basic c ategories d eveloped by the Car negie Foundati on for the Advanc ement of T eachi ng in 2006. Thos e i n t he N ational Uni ver-sities group ar e the 262 Americ an uni versities ( 164 public and 98 private) that offer a wi de range of undergraduate majors as well as master's and doctoral degrees ; s ome emphasiz e r esearc h. A list of the top 50 public uni versiti es is on Pag e 80.




In each categ or y, data on up to 15 indic ators of academic quality are gathered fr om eac h school and tabul ated. Schools are r anked within categ ories by their total weighted sc ore. School s that recei ve the s ame number ed rank are tied and ar e listed in al phabetic al order.




More i nformati on on the 1,400- plus coll eges we sur vey is availabl e online at us news.c om/ coll eges.




Part 1 Rank Sc hool (State) (* Public) Overall Peer Gr aduation and sc ore ass ess ment r etenti on rank scor e ( 5.0= highest) 1. Har vard Uni versity (M A) 100 4.9 1 2. Princ eton Uni versity (NJ) 99 4.8 2 3. Yal e U ni versity (CT) 98 4.8 2 4. Massachus etts Inst. of 94 4.9 10 T ec hnolog y 4. Stanfor d Uni versity (CA) 94 4.9 5 6. C alifor nia Institute of 93 4.6 19 T ec hnol ogy 6. U ni versity of Penns yl vani a 93 4.5 5 8. Col umbi a U ni versi ty (NY) 90 4.5 8 8. D uke U ni versity (NC) 90 4.4 10 8. U ni versi ty of C hic ago 90 4.6 19 11. D artmouth C olleg e (NH) 89 4.3 8 12. N orthwes tern Uni versity 87 4.3 10 (IL) 12. Was hington Uni versity in 87 4.1 15 St. Louis 14. C ornell U ni versity (NY) 86 4.5 15 15. J ohns Hopki ns U ni versi ty 85 4.5 19 (MD) 16. Br own Uni versity (RI) 84 4.3 5 17. Ric e U ni versity (T X) 80 4.0 15 18. Emor y U ni versity (GA) 79 3.9 30 18. Uni versity of Notre D ame 79 3.9 4 ( IN) 18. Vanderbilt U ni versity (TN) 79 4.0 25 21. U ni versity of 77 4.7 25 C aliforni a--Ber keley* 22. C arnegie M ellon U ni versi ty 75 4.1 30 (PA) 23. Georgetown Uni versity (DC) 74 4.0 10 23. U ni versity of
Virginia* 74 4.3 14 25. U ni v. of C alifor nia--Los 73 4.2 24 Angeles* 26. U ni versity of Mic higan--Ann 72 4.4 27 Arbor* 27. U ni v. of Souther n 71 3.9 32 C alifor nia 28. T ufts U ni versity (MA) 70 3.6 19 28. Wake F ores t U ni versity (NC) 70 3.5 27 30. U. of North 69 4.1 32 C ar olina--C hapel Hill* 31. Br andeis U ni versity (MA) 67 3.5 27 32. C olleg e of William and Mar y 65 3.7 18 ( VA)* 33. New Yor k U ni versity 64 3.8 37 34. Bos ton C ollege 63 3.5 19 35. Georgia Institute of 62 4.0 58 Tec hnol og y* 35. Lehigh U ni versity ( PA) 62 3.2 32 35. U ni v. of Californi a--San 62 3.8 32 Dieg o* 35. U ni versi ty of R oc hester 62 3.4 38 (NY) 35. U ni v. of 62 4.1 46 Wisconsi n--Madis on* 40. U. of 61 4.0 38 Illi nois--Urbana-C hampaig n* 41. C ase Wes ter n R es er ve Uni v. 59 3.4 46 (OH) 41. R enssel aer Pol ytec hnic 59 3.5 38 Inst. (NY) 41. U ni versity of Washi ngton* 59 3.9 64 44. U ni versity of 58 3.8 44 Californi a--Davis* 44. Uni versity of 58 3.5 41 C alifor nia--Ir vine* 44. Uni v. of C alifor nia--Santa 58 3.5 46 Bar bar a* 47. Penns yl vani a State 57 3.7 36 U.--Uni versity Par k* 47. U ni versity of 57 4.0
58 Texas--Aus tin* 49. U ni versity of Florida* 56 3.6 41 50. Yes hi va Uni versity (N Y) 55 2.8 49 --- Part 2 R ank Aver age 2007 2007 2007 graduati on Fac ulty freshman graduati on graduation r ate:Over-performanc e res ources retenti on r ate: r ate: (+)U nder-perfor mance r ank rate Pr edi cted Actual (-) 1. 97% 94% 97% + 3 1 2. 98% 95% 95% N one 3 3. 99% 96% 96% N one 10 4. 98% 95% 93% -2 18 4. 98% 93% 95% +2 12 6. 98% 94% 89% - 5 5 6. 98% 95% 95% N one 2 8. 98% 92% 94% +2 8 8. 97% 93% 94% +1 5 8. 97% 91% 90% -1 4 11. 98% 93% 93% N one 15 12. 97% 92% 93% +1 5 12. 97% 95% 92% - 3 9 14. 96% 90% 92% +2 16 15. 97% 91% 91% N one 21 16. 98% 93% 95% +2 17 17. 97% 92% 91% - 1 14 18. 94% 93% 88% - 5 11 18. 98% 92% 95% +3 20 18. 96% 90% 91% +1 12 21. 97% 84% 88% + 4 33 22. 94% 89% 87% - 2 18 23. 97% 90% 93% +3 40 23. 97% 87% 93% +6 35 25. 97% 83% 90% + 7 42 26. 96% 81% 88% + 7 72 27. 96% 87% 85% -2 25 28. 96% 87% 89% +2 22 28. 94% 88% 89% + 1 35 30. 96% 81% 83% +2 50 31. 95%
86% 88% +2 27 32. 95% 86% 92% + 6 44 33. 92% 86% 84% -2 24 34. 96% 86% 91% +5 52 35. 92% 82% 78% -4 65 35. 94% 82% 83% + 1 40 35. 94% 86% 84% -2 90 35. 94% 85% 81% -4 35 35. 93% 76% 80% +4 72 40. 92% 76% 82% + 6 81 41. 91% 88% 81% -7 33 41. 92% 83% 82% -1 42 41. 93% 69% 75% +6 129 44. 90% 80% 79% -1 100 44. 94% 79% 80% +1 44 44. 91% 81% 85% +4 30 47. 94% 64% 84% + 20 149 47. 93% 73% 78% +5 107 49. 94% 78% 81% +3 129 50. 88% 83% 85% +2 23 --- Part 3 R ank % of % of Student/ % of Selec tivity SAT/ACT Fr es hmen cl ass es cl ass es fac ulty fac ulty r ank 25th-75th i n top under of 50 r ati o who ar e perc entile 10% of HS 20 or mor e ('07) full ('07) clas s ('07) ('07) time ('07) ('07) 1. 75% 9% 7/1 93% 2 1400-1590 95% 2. 73% 10% 5/1 93% 2 1390- 1580 96% (5) 3. 75% 8% 6/1 87% 2 1400- 1590 97% (5) 4. 64% 12% 6/1 90% 2 1380- 1560 97% 4. 74% 11% 6/1 99% 9 1340- 1550 91% 6. 69% 8% 3/1 98% 1 1470- 1580 99% 6. 74% 7% 6/1 86% 6 1330-1530 96% 8. 76% 8% 6/1 91% 6 1360- 1540 94% 8.
70% 5% 8/1 97% 11 1340- 1540 90% (5) 8. 72% 4% 6/1 87% 21 1330- 1530 83% 11. 64% 9% 8/1 93% 11 1330-1550 91% (5) 12. 75% 7% 7/1 96% 14 1350- 1520 85% (5) 12. 73% 9% 7/1 94% 6 1370- 1530 95% 14. 60% 17% 10/1 98% 14 1290- 1500 87%(5) 15. 65% 11% 11/1 97% 21 1290- 1500 82% (5) 16. 70% 9% 8/1 94% 9 1330-1530 92% (5) 17. 68% 7% 5/1 93% 18 1310- 1530 83% 18. 68% 7% 7/1 95% 18 1300- 1470 88%(5) 18. 56% 10% 12/1 97% 14 1300-1510 86% 18. 67% 6% 9/1 95% 27 1300- 1480 80% ( 5) 21. 62% 14% 15/1 90% 14 1220- 1470 99% 22. 65% 9% 11/1 93% 31 1290-1490 73% ( 5) 23. 58% 7% 11/1 80% 13 1300-1490 90% ( 5) 23. 49% 14% 15/1 98% 28 1200-1420 87% ( 5) 25. 53% 20% 16/1 90% 21 1180- 1430 97% 26. 45% 18% 15/1 92% 18 27- 31 92% 27. 64% 12% 9/1 82% 21 1270- 1460 86% (5) 28. 75% 4% 8/1 84% 25 1340-1490 80% 28. 57% 2% 10/1 92% 37 1240-1410 64% 30. 44% 12% 14/1 98% 34 1210- 1400 76% 31. 66% 6% 8/1 89% 28 1280- 1460 79% 32. 49% 7% 11/1 91% 31 1250-1450 79% ( 5) 33.
58% 12% 12/1 75% 36 1240-1430 66% ( 5) 34. 48% 7% 13/1 76% 28 1240-1430 80% ( 5) 35. 40% 22% 14/1 100% 42 1240-1420 66% 35. 47% 10% 9/1 88% 25 1240-1390 93% ( 5) 35. 44% 30% 19/1 93% 31 1130- 1360 99% 35. 62% 12% 9/1 86% 35 1230-1420 72% ( 5) 35. 44% 18% 13/1 94% 42 26- 30 60% 40. 38% 19% 17/1 99% 50 26-31 55% 41. 62% 10% 9/1 92% 48 1200-1410 66% 41. 53% 10% 14/1 95% 40 1250- 1420 64% 41. 35% 17% 11/1 93% 50 1090- 1320 86% (5) 44. 35% 28% 19/1 94% 48 1030-1290 95% 44. 49% 17% 19/1 90% 42 1070-1300 96% 44. 50% 17% 17/1 95% 37 1070-1310 96% 47. 33% 17% 17/1 96% 85 1090-1300 45% 47. 35% 23% 18/1 97% 52 1110-1370 69% 49. 41% 20% 22/1 99% 42 1140- 1360 76% 50. 69% 1% 9/1 87% 59 1110- 1360 61% (5) ( 2) --- Part 4 R ank Ac ceptance Financial Alumni Aver age alumni gi ving r ate rate ('07) r es ourc es gi ving r ank rank 1. 9% 7 5 41% 2. 10% 14 1 60% 3. 10% 2 4 43% 4. 12% 3 10 37% 4. 10% 10 13 36% 6. 17% 1 24 29% 6. 16% 9 8 38% 8. 11% 16 13 36% 8. 23% 11 7
40% 8. 35% 7 21 32% 11. 15% 11 2 53% 12. 27% 13 23 31% 12. 17% 5 10 37% 14. 21% 17 16 34% 15. 24% 3 18 33% 16. 14% 25 6 40% 17. 25% 23 15 34% 18. 27% 17 12 36% 18. 24% 40 3 51% 18. 33% 14 31 25% 21. 23% 44 118 14% 22. 28% 23 47 22% 23. 21% 37 27 28% 23. 35% 63 32 24% 25. 24% 26 109 14% 26. 50% 35 74 18% 27. 25% 38 8 38% 28. 27% 31 40 23% 28. 42% 6 18 32% 30. 35% 31 36 23% 31. 34% 50 17 33% 32. 34% 111 43 23% 33. 37% 38 154 11% 34. 27% 70 50 21% 35. 63% 47 22 31% 35. 32% 50 18 33% 35. 43% 28 190 8% 35. 41% 19 71 18% 35. 56% 50 118 13% 40. 71% 63 109 14% 41. 75% 21 109 14% 41. 49% 43 74 18% 41. 65% 29 81 17% 44. 59% 31 131 12% 44. 56% 55 124 13% 44. 54% 94 62 19% 47. 51% 65 47 22% 47. 51% 94 89 16% 49. 42% 44 74 17% 50. 69% 19 36 23%




Part 1 Rank Sc hool (State) Overall Peer Aver age fres hman ( *Public) s cor e ass ess ment retenti on rate s cor e (5.0= highest) 51. T ulane Uni versity (LA) 54 3.3 88% ( 8) 51. Uni versity of Miami 54 3.2 89% (FL) 53. George Was hington 53 3.4 92% U ni v. (DC) 53. Syracus e U ni versity 53 3.3 92% (N Y) 53. U. of 53 3.6 93% M ar yland--C ollege Par k* 56. Ohi o State 52 3.6 91% U ni v.--C olumbus * 56. Pepperdi ne U ni versity 52 3.1 89% (C A) 58. Uni versity of Georgia* 51 3.4 93% 58. U ni versity of 51 3.4 90% Pitts burg h* 60. Bos ton U ni versity 50 3.4 91% 61. Clems on Uni versity 49 3.1 89% (SC)* 61. For dham U ni versity 49 3.1 89% (NY) 61. U. of Minnesota--T win 49 3.6 87% Citi es* 64. Rutgers, St. U. of 48 3.3 89% N .J.--N.Brun.* 64. T exas A&M U.--Col. 48 3.5 92% Stati on* 66. Miami U ni v.--Oxfor d 47 3.2 90% (OH)* 66. Pur due U .--W. 47 3.7 85% Lafayette (IN)* 66. Souther n M ethodist 47 3.0 88% U ni v. (T X) 66. Uni versity of 47 3.1 92% C onnectic ut* 66. Uni versity of Iowa* 47 3.5 84% 71. Indi ana 46 3.7 88% Uni v.--Bloomington* 71. Mic higan State 46 3.4 91%
Uni versity* 71. U ni versity of 46 3.0 90% Del awar e* 71. Virginia Tec h* 46 3.3 90% 71. Worc ester Pol y. Inst. 46 2.7 92% (MA) 76. Bayl or Uni versity (TX) 45 3.1 84% 77. Marquette U ni versity 44 3.0 90% (WI) 77. SUN Y--Bi nghamton* 44 3.0 90% 77. U ni v. of 44 3.4 84% C olor ado--Boulder* 80. Cl ar k U ni versity (MA) 43 2.8 87% 80. Col orado Sc hool of 43 3.0 83% Mi nes* 80. St. Louis Uni versity 43 2.9 85% 83. Americ an Uni versity 42 2.9 88% (DC) 83. N.C. State 42 3.1 90% U.--Ral eigh* 83. Stevens Insti tute of 42 2.6 89% T ec h. (NJ) 83. SUNY Col . Envir. Sci. 42 2.5 85% & For.* 83. Uni versity of Alabama* 42 2.9 86% 83. Uni versity of T ulsa 42 2.5 85% (OK) 89. Drexel U ni versit y ( PA) 41 2.8 82% 89. Iowa State U ni versity* 41 3.1 85% 89. U ni v. of 41 3.1 85% C alifor nia--Ri versi de* 89. U ni versity of D enver 41 2.6 88% 89. Uni versity of Kansas* 41 3.3 81% 89. Uni v. of 41 3.1 83% Nebras ka--Li nc oln* 89. Uni versity of Ver mont* 41 2.9 86% 96. Auburn U ni versity 40 3.0 85% (AL)* 96. N ortheastern 40 2.9 90% U ni versity (MA) 96. SUNY--Stony Brook* 40 3.2
88% 96. U ni versity of Arizona* 40 3.5 79% 96. U . of 40 3.1 89% Californi a--Santa Cruz* 96. Uni v. of 40 3.2 85% Missouri--Columbia* 102. Florida State 39 3.0 88% Uni versity* 102. H oward U ni versity (DC) 39 2.8 89% 102. Illi nois Institute of 39 2.7 84% T echnolog y 102. U. of M ass.--Amherst* 39 3.2 83% 102. U ni versity of San 39 2.7 85% Di ego 102. U ni versity of the 39 2.5 84% Pacific (C A) 108. U ni versity of D ayton 38 2.5 87% (OH) 108. Uni versity of 38 2.9 85% Oklahoma* 108. U ni versity of Oreg on* 38 3.3 85% 108. U. of S.C.--Col umbi a* 38 2.9 85% 108. U ni versity of 38 3.0 81% T enness ee* 113. Brigham Young 37 2.9 90% U .--Provo (UT) 113. T exas C hristian 37 2.6 84% Uni versity 113. U ni versi ty of N ew 37 2.8 86% Hamps hire* --- Par t 2 Rank 2007 2007 % of % of % of SAT /ACT graduation graduation cl ass es cl ass es fac ulty 25th-75th rate:Pr edic ted r ate:Actual under of 50 who are perc entile 20 or more full ('07) ('07) ('07) ti me ('07) 51. 84% 76% 62% 8% 82% 1190-1370 51. 77% 76% 47% 6% 87% 1180-1370 53. 80% 78% 57% 11% 69%
1200-1380 53. 74% 82% 62% 8% 83% 1110-1330 53. 74% 80% 34% 14% 89% 1170-1380 56. 64% 71% 35% 19% 89% 25-29 56. 82% 80% 68% 3% 80% 1130-1350 58. 72% 78% 38% 11% 92% 1130-1310 58. 67% 75% 43% 15% 92% 1150-1340 60. 83% 82% 52% 10% 82% 1170- 1370 61. 72% 78% 48% 11% 95% 1130- 1320 61. 69% 80% 47% 1% 80% 1130-1330 61. 67% 63% 43% 16% 94% 24-29 64. 68% 73% 41% 20% 85% 1090- 1300 (3) 64. 74% 78% 22% 23% 94% 1080-1300 66. 68% 80% 35% 9% 85% 24-28 66. 64% 69% 34% 19% 96% 1020- 1270 66. 72% 71% 58% 9% 85% 1130-1330 66. 64% 75% 44% 16% 90% 1090-1290 66. 63% 66% 51% 10% 98% 23-27 (3) 71. 60% 72% 39% 17% 94% 1030-1260 71. 62% 74% 25% 22% 95% 23-27 71. 68% 78% 43% 13% 93% 1100- 1310 71. 70% 78% 23% 22% 95% 1100-1300 71. 80% 76% 70% 9% 92% 1190- 1380 (9) 76. 72% 72% 41% 9% 91% 1110- 1310 77. 70% 75% 38% 11% 80% 24-29 77. 66% 79% 41% 14% 86% 1180-1350 77. 65% 67% 50% 14% 85% 23-28 80. 69% 76%
58% 5% 84% 1096-1310 80. 76% 62% 43% 13% 86% 25-29 80. 72% 75% 52% 6% 85% 24-29 83. 74% 73% 46% 3% 79% 1170-1360 83. 69% 69% 32% 16% 96% 1070-1260 83. 81% 76% 38% 8% 80% 1170- 1360 83. 59% 67% 77% 8% 94% 1040-1220 83. 60% 65% 43% 16% 91% 21-27 83. 78% 64% 62% 1% 93% 24-30 89. 68% 64% 62% 5% 84% 1090-1300 89. 61% 66% 35% 17% 94% 22- 27 89. 69% 70% 37% 21% 94% 920-1170 89. 68% 74% 62% 4% 75% 23-28 89. 66% 60% 40% 12% 98% 22- 27 89. 61% 63% 39% 14% 100% 22- 28 89. 63% 72% 50% 11% 91% 1080-1270 96. 62% 63% 27% 14% 96% 22- 27 96. 67% 66% 49% 9% 87% 1170- 1340 96. 61% 59% 36% 22% 84% 1080- 1280 96. 61% 56% 38% 12% 99% 970-1220 (2) 96. 79% 68% 32% 23% 88% 1020- 1250 96. 69% 68% (8) 47% 14% 99% 23-28 (3) 102. 69% 69% 34% 15% 92% 1090-1270 102. 57% 68% 63% 5% 85% 900-1310 102. 79% 67% 58% 3% 78% 25-30 ( 2) 102. 60% 67% 40% 17% 95% 1030-1240 102. 73% 74% 41% 0.4% 73% 1080-1280 102. 66% 67%
61% 5% 80% 1055-1300 108. 69% 76% 36% 5% 80% 23-28 108. 65% 62% 49% 10% 91% 23-28 108. 58% 67% 39% 16% 87% 982-1217 108. 60% 63% 46% 10% 88% 1080- 1280 108. 62% 58% 32% 8% 98% 23-28 113. 75% 73% (8) 47% 10% 89% 25-30 (3) 113. 71% 69% 46% 7% 82% 1060-1260 113. 61% 73% 44% 15% 87% 1010-1230 --- Part 3 R ank Fr eshmen Acc eptanc e Aver age alumni gi ving r ate in top rate ('07) 10% of H S cl ass ('07) 51. 50% 44% 23% 51. 65% 38% 19% 53. 66% 37% 10% 53. 42% (5) 51% 19% 53. 71% 47% 14% 56. 52% 59% 16% 56. 46% 35% 13% 58. 53% 54% 14% 58. 48% 56% 15% 60. 51% (5) 59% 7% (4) 61. 52% 50% 28% 61. 43% (5) 42% 21% 61. 44% 57% 15% 64. 40% 56% 15% 64. 45% 76% 17% 66. 35% 75% 18% 66. 31% 79% 17% 66. 40% (5) 50% 14% 66. 40% 49% 19% 66. 23% 83% 14% 71. 31% 70% 13% 71. 29% 74% 15% 71. 41% 56% 16% 71. 40% 67% 21% 71. 48% 66% 18% 76. 45% 44% 26% 77. 34% 67% 19% 77. 49% (5) 39% 10% 77. 25% 82% 8% 80. 32% (5) 56% 24% 80. 53%
61% 28% (4) 80. 37% 80% 17% 83. 50% ( 5) 53% 14% 83. 34% 60% 24% 83. 47% (5) 51% 22% 83. 24% 51% 29% 83. 38% 64% 30% 83. 64% 51% 24% 89. 31% 72% 19% 89. 26% 89% 16% 89. 94% 82% 8% 89. 35% 74% 12% 89. 28% 92% 20% 89. 27% 62% 24% 89. 23% 70% 18% 96. 38% 69% 19% 96. 42% 39% 10% 96. 36% (5) 43% 13% 96. 34% 80% 7% 96. 96% 82% 12% 96. 26% 86% 13% 102. 33% 55% 22% 102. 23% 54% 19% 102. 43% 57% 13% 102. 22% 66% 12% 102. 38% 48% 11% 102. 41% (5) 59% 12% 108. 23% 82% 24% 108. 33% 89% 21% 108. 23% 87% 17% 108. 29% 59% 22% 108. 39% ( 5) 71% 12% 113. 49% 74% 15% ( 7) 113. 30% 49% 23% 113. 24% 59% 11%




The Top 50 Public N ational Uni versiti es




Rank Sc hool (State) 1. U ni v. of Californi a--Ber kel ey 2. Uni versity of Virginia 3. U. of C alifor nia--Los Angeles 4. U ni v. of Michigan--Ann Ar bor 5. U. of N.C.--C hapel Hill 6. Col . of William and Mar y ( VA) 7. Georgia Institute of T ec h. 7. Uni v. of C aliforni a--San Di ego 7. Uni v. of Wisc onsin--Madis on 10. U. of Ill.--Urbana-Champaign 11. U ni versity of Was hington 12. Uni versity of C alifor nia--Davis 12. Uni versity of Cali for nia--Ir vine 12. U . of C alif.--Santa Barbara 15. Penn. State--Uni versity Par k 15. U ni versity of T exas--Austi n 17. Uni versity of Flori da 18. U. of Mar yland--C ollege Par k 19. Ohio State Uni v.--C olumbus 20. Uni versity of Georgia 20. Uni versity of Pitts burgh 22. Clems on U ni versity (SC) 22. U. of Mi nnes ota--Twi n Citi es 24. R utgers , the State Uni v. of 24. T exas A&M U ni v.--C ol. Station 26. Mi ami Uni versity--Oxfor d (OH) 26. Purdue U.-- W. Lafayette (IN) 26. U ni versity of C onnectic ut 26. U ni versity of Iowa 30. Indi ana U ni v.--Bl oomi ngton 30. Mic higan State Uni versity 30. U ni versity of Del awar e 30. Virginia T ec h 34. SUN Y--Bi nghamton 34. U ni v. of
Color ado--Boul der 36. C olor ado Sc hool of Mines 37. N.C . State U.--Ral eigh 37. SUNY Col. Envir. Sci. & F or. 37. U ni versity of Al abama 40. Iowa State U ni versity 40. U ni v. of Californi a--Ri versi de 40. U ni versity of Kansas 40. Uni v. of N ebr as ka--Li ncol n 40. U ni versity of Ver mont 45. Aubur n U ni versi ty (AL) 45. SUNY--Stony Brook 45. U ni versity of Arizona 45. U. of Califor nia--Santa Cruz 45. Uni v. of Miss ouri--Col umbi a 50. Fl orida State Uni versity 50. U . of M ass .--Amherst




The Top U ni versities--M aster's




North




Rank Sc hool (State) 1. Villanova U ni versity ( PA) 2. Loyola C olleg e in Mar yl and 3. Pr ovidence Coll ege (RI) 4. Bentley Coll ege (M A) 4. F airfiel d U ni versity (CT) 6. C ollege of N ew J ersey* 7. Ithac a C olleg e (NY) 8. St. J os eph's U ni versity (PA) 9. R oc hes ter Inst. of Tech. (NY) 9. Uni versity of Scr anton ( PA)




South




Rank Sc hool (State) 1. R ollins Colleg e (F L) 2. El on U ni versity (NC) 3. Stets on Uni versity (F L) 4. J ames M adis on U ni v. ( VA)* 5. T he Ci tadel (SC)* 5. Loyola Uni v. N ew Orl eans 7. U. of Mar y Was hington (VA)* 8. M ercer U ni versity ( GA) 9. Appalachi an State U ni v. (NC)* 9. C ollege of C harleston (SC)*




Midwes t




Rank Sc hool (State) 1. Cr eighton Uni versity (NE) 2. Xavi er U ni versi ty (OH) 3. Valparais o U ni versity (IN) 4. Butl er Uni versity (IN) 5. Dr ake Uni versity (IA) 6. Br adl ey U ni versity (IL) 7. J ohn Carroll U ni versity ( OH) 8. Truman State Uni v. (MO)* 9. H amli ne Uni versity (MN) 10. Dr ur y U ni versity (MO)




West




Rank Sc hool (State) 1. Tri nity U ni versi ty (TX) 2. Santa Clar a U ni versi ty (CA) 3. Gonzag a U ni versity (WA) 4. Loyol a M ar ymount U ni v. (CA) 4. Mills C ollege (CA) 6. Seattle Uni versity 6. Whi tworth U ni versity ( WA) 8. Uni versity of R edl ands (C A) 9. U ni versi ty of Portland (OR) 10. C al Pol y--San Luis Obispo* 10. Chapman U ni versity (CA)




The Top Bacc alaureate C olleges




North




Rank Sc hool (State) 1. C ooper Uni on (NY) 2. U.S. C oast Guard Ac ad. (CT)* 3. Bard Col . at Simon's Roc k (MA) 4. U.S. M erch. M arine Acad. (N Y)* 5. El mira C olleg e (NY) 6. Eliz abethtown C ollege ( PA) 6. Mes siah C ollege (PA) 8. Lebanon Valley Coll ege ( PA) 8. R oger Williams Uni versity (RI) 10. M aine M aritime Ac ademy*




South




Rank Sc hool (State) 1. Ouac hita Baptist Uni v. (AR) 2. Ers ki ne Coll ege ( SC) 3. J ohn Brown U ni versity ( AR) 4. C ovenant C ollege (GA) 5. High Poi nt U ni versity (NC) 6. Milligan C ollege (TN) 7. LaGrange C olleg e (GA) 7. T us kegee U ni versity (AL) 7. U ni versity of the Oz arks (AR) 10. Florida Southern Coll ege




Midwes t




Rank Sc hool (State) 1. T ayl or Uni versity (IN) 2. Ohi o N orthern Uni versity 3. Augus tana C ollege (SD) 4. C edar ville Uni versity (OH) 4. N orthwes ter n C ollege (IA) 6. Dor dt C olleg e (IA) <
ARTIC LEID: 210
Date: 9/1/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t
Head lin e: A New Perspec ti ve: N ational Uni versiti es
OTS: 2034333
Subject: R anki ngs
Summ ar y: T he Uni veristy of Mic higan ranked number 20 in the N ati onal U ni versi ties list put out by U S News and World R eport.
Bod y:




A N ew Pers pec ti ve: N ational U ni versiti es




National U ni versiti es




       1. H ar var d U ni versity (MA) 4.9 1. Mas sac husetts Inst. of T echnolog y 4.9 1. Princ eton U ni versity (NJ) 4.9 1. Yal e U ni versi ty (CT) 4.9 5. Brown U ni versity (RI) 4.8 5. C olumbi a U ni versity (NY) 4.8 5. C ornell U ni versity (NY) 4.8 5. Stanford U ni versity (C A) 4.8 9. C alifor nia Institute of Tec hnolog y 4.7 9. Dartmouth Coll ege (NH) 4.7 9. D uke U ni versity (NC) 4.7 9. Georgetown U ni versity (DC) 4.7 9. J ohns H opkins Uni versity (MD) 4.7 9. Northwestern Uni versity (IL) 4.7 9. Uni versity of Californi a--Ber kel ey 4.7 9. U ni versity of Penns yl vania 4.7 17. C arnegie M ellon Uni versity (PA) 4.6 17. Uni versity of C hicago 4.6 17. Uni versity of Virgini a 4.6 20. Rice Uni versity (TX) 4.5 20. U. of North C aroli na--C hapel Hill 4.5 20. U ni versity of Michigan--Ann Ar bor 4.5 20. U ni versi ty of N otr e D ame (IN) 4.5 20. Was hington U ni versity in St. Louis 4.5 25. Bos ton Coll ege 4.4 25. C ollege of William and M ar y (VA) 4.4 25. Emor y U ni versity (GA) 4.4 25. Georgia Institute of Tec hnol og y 4.4 25. New Yor k U ni versi ty 4.4 25. T ufts Uni versity (MA) 4.4 25. Uni v. of C aliforni a--Los
       Angel es 4.4 25. U ni v. of Souther n C alifor nia 4.4 25. Vander bilt U ni versi ty (TN) 4.4




Copyright © 2008 U .S. News & Worl d R eport




ARTIC LEID: 211
Date: 9/1/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t
Head lin e: T he Art of Selling Yoursel f
OTS: 2034333
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: " Writing, 'I s at i n Lorc h H all,' doesn't help me feel li ke that student knows more about us ," s ays Erica Sanders, direc tor of recr uitment and operations at the U ni versity of Michigan-Ann Ar bor.
Bod y:




The Art of Selling Yours elf




Selling yoursel f to a c ollege is eas y. You j ust have to convi nce the admissions committee that you're one i n 2.5 million.




That's the number of applic ants that four- year s chools will be si fting thr oug h this year. So let go of the noti on that the fat envel ope would already be in the mail if you c ould j ust crac k the admissi ons c ode. "It would be a l ot easier if ther e was a magic formula," s ays D avi d duKor-Jac ks on, ass ociate dean of admissi ons at Buc knell Uni versity, " but ther e is n't." T here's no magic ess ay topic, either. Says Annal ee Niss enholtz, coll ege c ouns el or at Ladue H orton Watkins High Sc hool in St. Louis : "If I hear about one mor e ki d who's savi ng the poor ... ! The first ki d or two who di d it--they wer e r eall y i nteres ting, and then ever yone heard that mus t be the tric k. There really is no tric k. It's digging deep and tr ying to figure out what makes you i nteresti ng."




That's good news. Instead of tr ying to decipher what they want, your tas k is to tell your s tor y--to c onvey, i n today's coll ege app watchwords , a s ense of your passion and commitment. Coll eges are tr ying to understand s omet hi ng: " Who is thi s pers on, and why would we want hi m or her to j oin this c ommunity?" s ays Jennifer Del ahunty, dean of admissi ons and fi nanci al aid at Kenyon C ollege. Us e each part of the pr oces s to acc entuate your positi ves and s how how you will c ontribute to the greater good. " We no l ong er ar e just l ooki ng to pic k up students," says Jed Liston, assistant vic e president of enroll ment ser vic es at the Uni versity of Montana-Miss oul a. " We're l ooki ng for citiz ens."




Making the grade. T he first thi ng c olleges look at is your high school tr ans cript. "If you're not i n the ball par k, extracurricul ars aren't goi ng to get you in," s ays Ji m Jump, ac ademic dean and director of gui danc e at St. C hristopher's School in Richmond, Va.--"unl ess you've won the Nobel Prize or have your own sitc om." But beyond the A's, B's, and C's, admis sions s taffs li ke to see ac ademic ris k takers . "Students as k us, 'Is it better to get an A in a regul ar cl ass or a B in an AP clas s?'" s ays Keith Gr amling, direc tor of undergraduate admis sions at Loyol a U niversity N ew Orleans . " Well, it's better to get an A i n an AP cl ass. But we ar e looki ng for students who have challenged themsel ves ."




Still, piling on class es to i mpr ess your dr eam c ollege can bac kfire. "Oftentimes I find mys elf tr ying to tal k students off th e AP l edg e," says Ric k Bisc hoff, director of admissi ons at C alifornia Institute of Tec hnol og y. " I s ee students who are doing all they c an to keep up with the wor k and don't have ti me to keep up wi th the l earning. We're not counting APs . H as this student taken a rigorous c urricul um? Has it prepared them? ... It's that engagement that's c entral ." Adds Stephen Far mer, assistant provos t and director of undergraduate admissi ons of the U ni versity of N orth Car olina- Chapel Hill: "What we want for s tudents is the feeling that ever yone is l ooki ng for the next great thi ng the y need to know. We li ke to s ee a sens e of j oy and curi osity."




Expr ess yoursel f. If the goal is helpi ng coll eges pic tur e who you are, the essay, as one longtime admissions officer says is, "the peek through the c urtain." Applicants often ass ume that the pee k should r eveal not a s ubtle landscape but a dramatic pers pecti ve. " Students feel, 'I need to fi nd that exotic thing that sel ls,'" says T ony Cabasc o, dean of admission and financial aid at Whi tman C ollege. In truth, he s ays , what you write about "doesn't have to be a week in Afric a. It c an be you were a cler k at Safeway for the s ummer and that c hanged the way you view rac e r elations or the environment." Adds Ted O'Neill, dean of admis sions at the U ni versity of Chic ago, "Tur ning points in their li ves are kind of premature for kids of this age." D elahunty's idea of a "tr ul y excepti onal ess ay" at Kenyon: one in whic h " a s tudent travels in a few s wift paragr aphs from one perspecti ve to another and has s een the deeper meaning, l earned the l ess on, or found t he humor."




"We're looki ng for a thoughtful, earnes t pr es entation that s hows c omplicated inter ests and thinki ng," s ays O'Neill. This c an be ac hieved in stories r efl ecti ng on life's s maller slic es--why you li ke hel ping your dad fi x up old c ars on the weekend, being the onl y boy i n a famil y of seven girls, why you li ke to write birthday limeric ks. Lis ton at Montana-Miss oul a recalls r eadi ng one student's ans wer to the q uestion " What was the most signific ant inventi on of all ti me?" It was " a ver y elegant essay on the spor k," he s ays. "You left s ayi ng, 'That was quir ky, that was funny, but that was well thought out.'"
Make sur e your authentic voice comes thr ough, avoidi ng the appearanc e of what Ingrid H ayes, as soci ate vic e presi dent for enr ollment management at Spel man Coll ege, calls a " manufac tur ed es say." Adds D elahunty: " Sometimes, we'll s ay, 'Didn't the mom write a beautiful appli cati on?' ... When you s ee the wor d her etofor e, that's a clue." F ar worse than parent-as sisted ess ays ar e the ready- made ones available for r oughl y the s ame pric e as two tic kets to the movi es, a stratag em that will almos t c ertai nl y g o awr y. Loyol a N ew Orl eans r ec ei ved the s ame ess ay--purchas ed online--from differ ent applicants; they were, not s urprisingl y, denied. A variation on the same r ule: Don't exaggerate. "Al ways, al ways, al ways be honest," says Miss y Sanchez, dir ector of c olleg e c ouns eling at Woodward Ac ademy in Atl anta. "Maybe you're goi ng to get luc ky, but the r eal professionals on the other side--they're going to as k questi ons ."




Be sur e the inner s elf you expos e is one you're proud to cl ai m. Poorl y c hosen words c an make a bad impression. One applic ant " wr ot e about an argument duri ng whic h he broke a wall," s ays UNC's Far mer. "R ather than writing what he learned, he jus tified his behavior . ... H e c ame across as s hoc ki ngl y i ncuri ous [and] seemed unteachable. You thought: H e's goi ng to s pend four years maki ng speeches."




Show a littl e l ove. Although most students appl y to multipl e c olleg es, s howing genuine enthusi as m for each sc hool on your list is s uc h a must that coll eges have a name for it: "demons trated inter est." No c ollege wants to pl ay sec ond or fifth--or 15th--fi ddl e. " We want ki ds who want us," says J ean Jor dan, dean of admissi on at Emor y U ni versity. Tail or eac h application i ndi vi du all y, with concr ete examples of why you c an s ee yours elf there. "If you can take out Ric e U ni versi ty and put i n Vanderbilt an d not make a differ enc e," s ays C hris Muñoz, Rice's vic e president for enr ollment, "that's not g oing to wor k." As al ways, your pres entation is cruci al. " Writi ng, 'I s at in Lorch Hall,' does n't hel p me feel li ke that student knows more about us," s ays Eric a Sanders, dir ector of r ecruitment and oper ations at the Uni versity of Michig an- Ann Arbor . "Saying Profes sor So-and-s o's cl ass hel ped me become even mor e i nterested--or made me realiz e I really don't know what I want to pursue--can make a di fference." And do your homewor k. Cl ai ming that you want to go to
XYZ uni versi ty for engineering when the sc hool doesn't offer suc h a program will ma ke your applicati on memorabl e--but not in a good way.




Find your fans. If the applic ation is your c hance to tal k about what makes you stand out, think of teacher recs as a way to r einforc e your themes. The best choic e is n't al ways the teac her whos e cl ass you aced, s ays Sanc hez; better to pic k the one who c an descri be what you're li ke as a pers on. " As k i f they c an write you a strong rec ommendation," advis es Seattle-bas ed educ ational c ons ultant J udy M acKenzie. "If the teac her hesitates, bac k off." Once you' ve got an advocate, type up bullet poi nts s ummarizing your ac ti vities , c ommunity ser vic e, jobs--and a few pl uses the teacher might not know about. And plan ahead. A rus hed writer is rarel y as pers uasi ve as one who has had mulling ti me.




Depth beats breadth. While it might seem i mpressi ve to joi n si x clubs and vol unteer at a s oup kitc hen i n your seni or year, admissions officers can see thr ough s uch a pl oy. Besides, it's unnecessar y, s ays Steven Roy Goodman, a Washi ngton, D.C., educ ational c ons ultant and the c oauthor of C ollege Admissions Together: It T akes a F amil y. He notes: "It's i mportant to be well lopsi ded r ather than well r ounded. That enabl es you to foc us on what you're good at." Adds C altec h's Bisc hoff: "Applicants worr y far too muc h--do they have the s er vic e and the leaders hip, and are they a musici an, and, boy, if they c ould pic k up a s port." Li ke Goodman, he believes in doing l ess but doi ng it well. But avoid being one-di mensional . "If your pres entati on is one-sided," s ays Liston, "s tart wor ki ng on other sides. Show that you're not jus t that one thing." An ything you're passi onate about has merit, incl udi ng an after -sc hool j ob.




The inter vi ew. Some i nter views ar e infor mati onal, some are evaluati ve; some s chool s enc ourage them, others don't gi ve them at all. Bes t advic e: Take any fac e time offer ed unless you know you'll be putti ng your worst foot for ward. Goodman's examples : If you got into s erious tr ouble in high sc hool and "the de tails ar e mess y," or you are i nclined to demonstr ate disi nteres t becaus e " your parents ar e making you appl y to that coll ege," s kip it. Otherwis e, one-on-ones ar e a way to undersc ore your desir e to attend. Befor e you go, polish with pr actic e: Rehearse your q ues tions and tal king poi nts with an adult. C ommunicate not jus t your strengths but also your enthusi as m. Say cl earl y and politel y, 'T his is what I' ve ac hieved, and I'm pr oud of i t,'" s ays Goodman. If your inter vi ew takes place on c ampus , sc hedule it toward the end of your visit. "After you' ve gone on the tour and met s ome ki ds," s ays Sanchez of Woodwar d Academy, " you've g ot s omet hing to tal k about."




Full dis clos ure. Did your s tell ar academic rec ord nos e-di ve one semester? Is there an obvious hole i n your c ours ewor k? A s us pensi on? T he temptation is to hope it goes unnotic ed. T h e bes t approac h is full discl os ure. Add a letter explai ning the si tuati on. But for it to have a mitigating effec t, Sanc hez s ays , " you have to have rec overed" fr om whatever tri pped you u p, ac cepted the cons equences , and done what you c oul d to make amends. Goodman s ays : "You've g ot to show us that you l earned something." If you g ot s us pended from s chool for dri nking, for exampl e, " and the punis hment is 20 community s er vic e hours, do 50." And don't whine. If your grades took a tumbl e, don't expect admissions staff " to be moved by nor mal thi ngs that happen i n lif e," says M uñoz. "'My boyfri end broke up with me' is not goi ng to c ut it, nor is 'I overextended mys elf' or 'I got reall y i nvol ved with being the lead pers on for the pr om.'"




My bad ... T her e's you, the s erious c ollege applicant. Then there's the other you--the one wi th the E- mail addr ess and voic e mail greeting that your fri ends find hilarious. Maybe you even put up thos e sas s y beac h pictures on F ac ebook. Admissions s taffers--many of them fairl y recent graduates thems el ves--someti mes c hec k out s ocial networ king sites. So, if you're J ekyll and H yde, cl ean up your split pers onality. "Students don't always realize the extreme public natur e of the Web," s ays Gramli ng. "They say, 'Oh no, no, that's my site for me and my friends.'" Befor e pos ting on M ySpace, as k, "' Are thes e photos you would s how to your mom?'" If the ans wer's no, you probabl y don't want the admissions committee at your N o. 1 colleg e to g et a peek, either.




A word to parents . In the s pirit of tr ying to s ee your chil d in the round, a s mall but growi ng number of sc hools are as ki ng for par ent rec ommendations. T o tal k about your s on or daughter , advis es Sanc hez, " thi nk about the thr ee or four thi ngs peopl e al ways br ag to you about your child." T hen, give exampl es to show how these characteristics c ome thr ough: "Suz y is a great organiz er. She us ed the whol e s eni or cl ass to help the lower sc hool cl ean up the playground on Earth D ay." A nd remar k on whatever your chil d's passi on may be: "He loves to pl ay his guitar, and we're reall y goi ng to miss music in the hous e 24-7." Remember, your j ob is to pres ent your vision by pr ovidi ng the facts, not to s ell. So feel free to s ay, "She has the mes sies t room I' ve ever seen." " You can s ay stuff," Sanchez says. "T hey know they'r e not perfect. T hey're teenagers ."




Remember to stay on the si deli nes , c heering but not over whelmi ngly. And no matter how anxious you get, r esist calli ng the admissions office pr etending to be your c hild, not r ealizi ng that your voic e s ounds more li ke a 40- year-ol d than a 17- year-ol d. Beli eve us. It happens .




TIP




Be genui ne. Ever y student knows an overambiti ous class mate who pic ked up an acti vity (or i nstrument or s por t) to look good on paper. C olleges can spot that sor t of thi ng a mil e off.




Copyright © 2008 U .S. News & Worl d R eport




ARTIC LEID: 1582
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t
Head lin e: Copi ng Wi th Sexual Woes
OTS: 2034333
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: Millions of women experience pain associated with one or another of these conditions; vul vodynia al one may acc ount for as many as 1 million new c as es per year, acc ordi ng to a r ecent Uni versity of Michigan study.
Bod y:




Copi ng With Sexual Woes




Thanks , H ollywood, for making s ex look s o eas y. In real bedrooms, the rest of us must wrangle with s ome not-s o-s exy iss ues: uns atisfactor y erec tions, unti mel y ejac ulation, pain, low libi do, and more. Yet tending to a probl em might save not onl y a rel ati ons hip but als o your life. " Sexual health pr oblems are ver y often the first sig n of underl ying s erious medic al iss ues," says Michael Kr ychman, medic al director of sexual medici ne at Hoag M emorial Hos pital Pres byterian i n N ewport




Beac h, C alif. In women, for exampl e, dulled desir e may signal thyr oid dysfunc tion or other hor monal tr oubl es; painful s ex could even be an early s ymptom of pel vic c anc er. And er ectile dysfunc tion is now r ecog nized as an earl y whiff of loomi ng car diovasc ular dis ease. "Your pr oblems s houldn't be ignored," he s ays.




Of c ourse, they ar e ignored, jammed deepl y i nto bac k c orners of br ains , denied. Patients and doctors, it's cl ear, have troubl e tal ki ng sex. M any adults would like to disc uss s exual problems , research indic ates, but don't--for fear that doctors will dis miss their conc erns , or worse. Women appear es peciall y li kel y to s tay mum, s ays Anita Clayton, a pr ofess or of ps yc hiatry at the U ni versity of Virginia and coauthor of Satisfacti on: Women, Sex, and the Quest for Intimac y. "Ever yone has the right to a s atisfyi ng s ex life."




Satisfying sex has been li nked to incr eased l ong evity, better i mmunity, better str ess-c opi ng abilities, and enhanced connec ti vity with a partner, s ays Kr yc hman. So, if you're si nking, not sailing, between the sh eets, help can come i n many forms , fr om s ex therapy to various phar macol ogical options . Most i mportant, if you're not getting the ans wers that you're l ooki ng for, " keep s eeki ng," s ays Ir win Golds tei n, direc tor of sexual medici ne at San Di ego's Al var ado H os pital . Your s ex life--and heal th-- will thank you. H er e ar e a few pl aces to s tart:




More T han Just an Er ectil e Pr oblem




Men, you may not realize i t, but you've g ot a c anar y i n your pants. Doctors now r ec ogniz e that the penis functi ons as an exq uisitel y si mpl e g auge for detecti ng i mpendi ng heart problems . T hat's one reas on flagging erec tions, whic h affec t more than a third of men over the age of 40, s hould not be ignored. Another: Drugs li ke Vi agra, whic h c el ebr ated i ts 10th birthday this year, ar e j ust one set--among s everal--of ti me- tes ted treatments.




A dec ade into the medic al r evol uti on that turned er ectil e dysfuncti on i nto a hous ehol d ter m, a s hift in thinki ng is afoot. T here's ampl e evidence that Vi agra, Levitr a, and Cialis c an revi taliz e a man's sex life; in trials , Viagra enabled 83 perc ent of men str uggling with ED to have intercours e at l east once compared with 45 perc ent of thos e taking a placebo. Still, other dr ugs may be necessar y to deal with vasc ular dis ease or diabetes, whic h often accompany ED . And l ong-impotent men may want to c onsi der opti ons li ke penil e i mplants bec aus e, as vascul ar diseas e progress es , the useful nes s of Viagra and its kin often wanes .




ED her alds hear t tr ouble bec ause arteries in the penis have about a quarter the di ameter of cor onar y arteries . When plaque builds up, the sl ender vess els reac h the str angling point first--but car diac pr oblems are often jus t around the c orner. " In many c as es, er ectil e dysfunction i s quite literall y vasc ular dis ease under the belt," s ays Randy F agin, a urol ogist and direc tor of the Pr ostate C enter of Austi n. Symptoms often occ ur three to four years before car diac pr obl ems, such as ches t pai n or heart attac k, begin to crop up, s ays Robert Kloner, a c ardiol ogis t at the Uni versity of Souther n C alifor nia. N ew gui deli nes in 2006 advis ed physici ans to c onsider a man with erectile dysfunc tion and no c ardi ac s ymptoms a c ardi ac pati ent until proved other wis e.




In additi on to any tr eatment they may need for vasc ul ar dis ease or di abetes, men have opti ons for fi xi ng ED. Eati ng better and exercising r egul arly can not onl y stave off pl aque buil dup i n arteri es but revers e it, research has shown. A 2004 study of obes e men with erec tile dys functi on found, for exampl e, that erectile func tion i mproved in a thir d of men who adopted healthful behavi ors and l ost about 30 pounds.




Among medic al opti ons, doctors s ay, one of the bes t is to inj ect a medi cati on s uc h as alprostadil i nto the bas e or si de of the penis. A quic k, r elati vel y painl ess shot, whic h can produce an erec tion within 10 mi nutes, c osts about twic e as muc h as a dose of an or al ED dr ug.




Other ED fi xes ar e made to l ast. Vac uum pumps put neg ati ve pr ess ure on the penis, creati ng an erec tion that can be mai ntained for about 30 minutes by placi ng an el astic band around its base. Studi es repor t s ucc ess rates of 70 to 94 perc ent with the devices , but si de effects c an incl ude pain, numbness, br uising, and obs tructed ejac ulation. Surgical i mpl ants are prici er but have upsi des. M en c an infl ate the i mpl ants at will, using a pump placed i n the scr otu m. Satisfacti on r ates are high.




Yet des pite the avail ability of s olutions, many harried doctors are not as aggressi ve as they c ould be about sl euthi ng out s exual problems . T hat puts the bur den of speaking up on men.




Paci ng Performanc e




Is pr ematur e ejac ul ation the most common form of male sexual dysfunction? T he ans wer is debated, but one thing is clear: For men who have the pr obl em, i t c an be a s howstopper. "I see young g uys who si mpl y c annot establish a r elations hip wi th a woman bec aus e of this," s ays Ira Sharlip, a s pokes person for the Americ an Urol ogical Ass ociation.




The past few years have brought a surge of i nterest from pharmac eutical res earc hers ai mi ng to reli eve the pr obl em with a pill. So far, no medication has been approved for the purpos e; the Fo od and Drug Admi nistr ation tur ned down a dr ug call ed dapoxeti ne in 2005. Yet doctors can and often do pr escribe drugs that ar e approved for other conditions, such as the anti depres sants paroxetine (Paxil) and fl uoxetine (Pr oz ac), whic h have been s hown to lengthen i nterc ourse by a few minutes. Potential downsides, experts s ay, incl ude di minis hed intensity of a man's orgas m and li bi do and a hamper ed ability to mai ntain an erec tion.




Creams and gels that numb the sensiti vi ty of the penis are another option. They us uall y c ontai n lidoc aine or prilocai ne. Studi es have s hown them to be effecti ve, but some c oupl es fi nd them di ffic ult to us e. T h ey generall y i nvol ve a mess y application within a condom and c an numb a partner .




A man's mi nd-s et can play a rol e. " It's pretty unus ual to s ee pr ematur e ejac ulation without s ome degree of ps yc hol ogical component," s ays Fagin, the Prostate C enter of Aus tin urol ogist. Therapists c an wor k wi th men to addr ess anxiety, stres s, g uilt, and depr essi on--and c an impart tec hniq ues li ke the " stop and go" method or the "squeeze" method to hel p men slow down. H ones t partner -to-partner communi cati on is als o critic al, s ays Barry McC arthy, c oauthor of C opi ng With Pr ematur e Ejac ulation. F or exampl e, he s ays, some women si mpl y can't ac hieve orgas m through vagi nal penetr ation, yet a partner might bl ame hi ms elf unl ess the couple disc uss es how the woman c an reac h a cli max.




More often than not, the onl y r eal pr obl em may be outsiz e hopes. In various s ur veys, between 20 and 40 perc ent of men compl ain abo ut the short durati on of interc ourse. But fewer than 5 perc ent have a s us tai ned dis order in whic h they c onsistentl y ejac ulate in a mi nute or less , esti mates M arcel Waldi nger, ass oci ate profess or i n s exual ps yc hopharmac olog y at the H ague Leyenburg H os pital i n the N etherl ands.




"Nobody reall y knows how long is nor mal. It's ver y s ubj ecti ve," says M artin Miner, a cli nical assis tant pr ofess or of famil y medici ne at Br own Uni versity Medic al Sc hool . In a M arch sur vey, s ex therapists typicall y sai d s atisfac tor y i nterc ours e s houl d last thr ee to 13 mi nutes. T hat's a far cry fr om the 30-pl us mi nutes that many men s ay they want.




Overc oming an Anticli max




It begins as a s welling of excitement and tension. Then, it's li ke falling off a cliff. T hat's how Linda Banner, 59, describes an orgas m, the delicious s ensation that s he c oul dn't experienc e for the first dec ade of her s ex life.




Orgas m eludes many women; upwards of 10 perc ent have never sexually cli maxed, and many others do s o erraticall y. Often, women just need s ome education about how their bodi es wor k or professi onal c ouns eling to address anxi ety or i nhi bitions, s ays Sher yl Kings berg, a ps yc hologist at Uni versity Hos pitals C as e Medic al C enter i n Cl evel and. "You have to kic k out every nun, r abbi, parent, and grandmother that's in your head," s he expl ains . "Get them all out of the bedr oom first."




Banner, whos e experienc e is n't atypical, pi ns the r oot of her "anorgas mia" on a jumble of "goofy" ideas--like rigid notions that sex is for keepi ng men s atis fied and that women shouldn't touch their nether r egions. T hings finall y clic ked for the Cali for nian when s he lear ned to grant hers elf lic ense to rel ax, explor e, and enjoy her s ens uality.




Of c ourse, medic al factors c an mute or kill orgas ms in women who once felt them, and such cas es may requir e tr eatment. Medic ations ar e big offenders, es peciall y anti depres sants that boost ser otoni n i n the brain. Di abetes, neurologic al diseas es li ke Par ki nson's, and conditions that caus e clitoral scarring or numbing can also affect orgas m. So, too, c an s exual pai n problems or anything that may lower libi do, s uc h as a hor monal i mbal anc e. But medicine might fi x what me dicine has c aus ed: T he J our nal of the American M edi cal Ass oci ation r ecentl y reported that Vi agra may counter act anti depressant-rel ated org as m problems .




Researc h s uggests that women c an learn to intensify their orgas ms , gi ving hope to thos e who don't nor mall y experi ence them. By studyi ng the brains of thos e who can cli max j ust by thinki ng about it, behavi oral neur osci entis t Barr y Komis ar uk and his R utgers Uni versity team found that both physic al sti mulati on and thoug hts of physic al s timul ation acti vate many of the s ame br ain ar eas. H e is now s howing anorgas mic women real-time s cans of their brai n acti vity as they s elf-sti mulate, ai mi ng to s ee if they c an teach thems el ves to cli max.




Even s ome women who c an orgas m don't experienc e all thr ee known types: vaginal , c er vical, and clitoral. In fact, onl y a mi nority of women can r eliabl y orgas m through penetr ati on al one; mos t req uire clitor al sti mulati on, as by oral sex or touc hing. A long-standing theor y sugges ts that if a woman's clitoris is more than an inc h from her vag ina, penetrati ve sex is l ess li kel y to produce a cli max, s ays Ki m Wallen, a neuroscientis t in Emor y U ni versity's ps ychol ogy d epartment. No matter, he s ays . "F or many women, a hel ping hand wor ks j ust fine."




When Sex Dri ve Dries U p
For years , Kate J ohnson didn't know s he had a s ex drive. On the birth contr ol pill sinc e age 17, she partici pated without desire. Now, s he us es a differ ent c ontrac epti ve-- and often makes the first advanc e wi th her hus band. Ironic as i t may s eem, s uppressed li bido is a known side ef fec t of the pill. "It was a reli ef to figure out that I was nor mal," s ays J ohns on, 39, of Littleton, C olo., " as oppos ed to s o me s ort of undersexed pers on."




Many women fi nd thems el ves s tall ed by sluggish sex dri ves, and the pill is n't al ways the c ulprit. H ypoacti ve s exual desire dis order, the medical ter m, is recogniz ed as the most pr eval ent s exual complai nt among females . It c an affect young and ol d ali ke, stemming from a c omplic ated stew of fac tors from partner problems to medic al iss ues, li ke depr ession ( and s ome of its tr eatments) and waning hormones . Although no dr ug has been appr oved by the FDA, medic al s oluti ons do exis t. " Somethi ng can be done," s ays Golds tei n of Al var ado H os pital, thoug h it us ually requir es a thorough medi cal and ps ychologic al eval uation.




For s ome women, especi all y those who are aging, low testosterone is the tr ouble. T hat hor mone is li nked to libi do in both s exes, not j ust men. While defici enci es won't always create problems , s pecialists li ke Golds tei n may us e testos ter one products that ar e approved for men to rekindl e femal e desire. Of cours e, doses ar e sc al ed way bac k: T oo muc h of the hormone can caus e a c ollec tion of effec ts, li ke voic e deepening, ac ne, and exc essi ve hair growth. T estos ter one r epl ac ement appears s afe, s ays G olds tei n, although s ome experts worr y that its us e i n breast canc er s ur vi vors might trigger recurrenc e. Some als o warn agai nst usi ng it i n women who c ould become preg nant.




A nonhor monal opti on targets the hub of s exual desire: the br ain. T he anti depres sant bupr opi on has been shown to lift libi do in premenopaus al women and may be hel pful for others , too, s ays the Uni versity of Virginia's Clayton. She has s tudi ed i ts effec ts in res earch sponsor ed by the manufacturer of Well butri n, a brand name for bupropi on .




One thi ng remai ns clear: As men have gotten pill after pill to c ombat a chi ef s exual pr obl em, women who' ve los t their sexual appe tite have been l eft hungr y. Althoug h pharmac eutic al compani es are raci ng to c hange that-- drugs i n the pipeline include a testosterone gel and a pill that reduces s erotonin ac tion i n the br ain-- women will have to wait for their " pink Vi agra." For now, treatment remains largel y experimental and in the hands of a s kille d few, agree Golds tei n and Cl ayton, who have both done wor k for compani es devel opi ng new medic ati ons. " We j ust don't have many opti ons right now," s ays Clayton. "We're l ooki ng for equality."




When Sex Hur ts




For Michel e Gaymon, 38, pai n with s ex has been the nor m fr om the ver y firs t enc ounter--and the burni ng dis comfort that follows can l ast for hours or days after ward. " What is s upposed to be pleas urable and fun is not," s ays the Somers et, N.J ., woman. In rel ati onshi ps, Gaymon has n't al ways disclosed her condition, choosing to bear the pain of interc ours e sil entl y. And while her most rec ent partner was unders tanding when s he s har ed her c onditi on, his fear of hurti ng her put a damper on their attemp ts.




While many women experienc e the itc hing or bur ning of a yeast infec tion fr om ti me to time, experts say that's nothing li ke th e pai n s uffer ed by women with more s erious conditions, whic h c an range from endometriosis to an ovarian c yst to a dis order c alled vul vodyni a. Millions of women experi enc e pain ass oci ated wi th one or another of thes e c onditi ons; vul vodyni a alone may a ccount for as many as 1 million new c ases per year, acc ordi ng to a rec ent U ni versi ty of Mic higan study.




Li ke many women, Gaymon saw multi ple doc tors i n vai n. Some i nitiall y told her to "rel ax, have a few drinks , c al m down," r ec alls the s eni or account s pecialis t at M errill Lynch. Others mis diag nosed. " I was put on so many differ ent yeas t i nfecti on medications it was ridic ulous," she sa ys . Fi ve g ynec ol ogists and two ur ologists l ater, s he was fi nally di agnos ed with vul vodynia, whic h made the entr yway of her vagi na bec ome irritated with penetrati on.




The caus es of vul vodynia, whic h c an produce pain even when s ex is not being attempted, are not well understood. Asi de from th e g enitals, the ner vous s ystem is thought to be invol ved, s ays J enni fer Gunter, direc tor of pel vic pain and vul vovaginal di sor ders at Kais er Per manente San Fr ancis co Medical Center. And becaus e no medic ations ar e approve d for the c onditi on, s he says, i t's difficul t for s ome to get tr eatments cover ed. Gunter and other experts retool therapies suc h as tric yclic antidepress ants, antis eiz ure drugs, steroi d and Botox inj ecti ons, i mplantabl e devi ces to sti mulate misfiring ner ves, and s urger y.




For Gaymon, reli ef has fi nally come wi th lidocai ne cream, the drug C ymbalta, and physic al ther apy that i nvol ves techniques to pi npoint and r elax mus cle tensi on. She also found s uppor t in the National Vul vodynia Ass oci ati on. Getting hel p fr om multipl e s ources--incl uding a s ex ther apis t (Page 62)--is often critic al to treati ng the caus es of painful i ntercours e, experts agree.




Gunter, who s ays Kais er Per manente c overs a full ars enal of treatments, es timates about 80 percent of her patients i mprove co nsi der abl y. But pati ents who wai t months or years let their pain bec ome entr enc hed, c omplic ati ng treatment. Says Gunter: " Pain begets pain; the more your ner vous s ys tem is sti mulated by pain, the mor e pai n bec omes your nor m."




Copyright © 2008 U .S. News & Worl d R eport




ARTIC LEID: 1583
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t
Head lin e: Tr ying to Climb a Broken Ladder
OTS: 2034333
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: M any don't unders tand why or how to fill out a FAF SA. And no wonder . T he for m, with 145 ques tions, is longer and mor e eye-cr ossing than the standard tax for m. U ni versity of Mic higan ec onomist Susan D ynars ki esti mates that it takes the aver age applic ant about 10 hours to gather all the documents--W2s , tax r eturns , etc.--and fill out the for m.
Bod y:




Tryi ng to Climb a Broken Ladder




Airis Graham thought s he' d be spendi ng this fall i n grad sc hool, wor ki ng towar d a pharmac y degree. Ins tead, s he's still one year away from a bac hel or's, wor king 9 to 5 weekdays as a low- pai d phar mac y tec hnici an at a c hai n s tor e. On Friday eveni ngs, s he wal ks to the al most furnitur e-less apar tment she s hares wi th her sister, r ests for a few hours, and then takes a bus to start her sec ond job--the all-night weekend shift at a McD onal d's.




Graham, a B- minus bi otech maj or, has had to l eave sc hool and wor k 70 hours a week for 15 months bec ause the sc hol arshi ps she got to attend Claflin U ni versity i n Or ang eburg, S.C., didn't keep up with the c ollege's tuiti on increases. She borrowed and wor ked as much as s he coul d, but she c ouldn't scr ape up enoug h to pay her j unior- year tuiti on bill. Cl afli n now insis ts that s he pay the $7,000 overdue bill before it will rel eas e her transcri pt s o Graham c an transfer and finis h her degree at a less expensi ve public uni versity near her hometown of C arbondal e, Ill.




The ol dest daughter of a single mom, Gr aham believes educ ati on is her l adder out of poverty. But c an she affor d to finis h the cli mb? She's on trac k to make her l ast payment to Cl aflin by the end of the year. But s he doesn't quite know how s he will scr ape together the $7,000 more s he'll need to pay her fi nal year's tuiti on. "I g ot g ood grades. I was doi ng what I was suppos ed to be doing. But I feel li ke I' ve been dealt a bad c ard," s he s ays. "The onl y tic ket out of poverty is an educ ati on, and the onl y reas on I'm not in school is becaus e I don't have any money."




Big numbers. The Americ an dr eam is founded on the noti on that anyone who is s mart and discipli ned c an get an education and s ucc eed. But the financial ai d s ys tem meant to help needy students affor d c ollege is cr ac king under the str ains of s kyr oc keti ng tuition and a cr umbli ng ec onomy. Thi s is happening even though taxpayers, colleg es, charities, and employers are coll ecti vel y s pending more than ever on financial aid--an es timat ed $74 billion in grants this ac ademic year, more than doubl e the amount handed out i n 2000.




The basic probl em is that this big number has been over whel med by s ome bigger ones. In the past dec ade, coll ege enr ollment has j umped by nearl y 4 million to more than 18 million, and the annual c osts of the typic al four-year c ollege have al most doubl ed to more than $14,000. The r es ult of that one-two punch: T he total amount of grant money handed out nati onwi de per s tudent has risen by less than $2,000 over the pas t dec ade. T he stic ker price for a year at a typic al public uni versity, meanwhil e, has ris en by al most $6,600.




The mis match between demand for and s uppl y of fi nanci al ai d is a mai n reas on a panel of the nati on's l eading educ ati on experts is readying a c all f or dramatic r eforms for what even the U.S. secretar y of educ ati on c alls a "fundamentall y fl awed" s ystem.




Worsening the s hor tage of funds , they s ay, is the haphaz ard and often mysterious way the scarc e funds are distri buted. T he s ystem has bec ome so complic ated that mor e than a million students per year who might q ualify for ai d fail to pursue it. Students not l uc ky enough to ha ve grown up in one of the towns or states with g enerous financial aid or smart enough to win admissi on to the handful of rich, highl y s elec ti ve sc hools are often heartbroken becaus e the government and the c olleg es have unrealistic all y high expec tati ons of what they can afford. M eanwhile, a gr owing number of sc hools and states are choosing to di vert sc arc e fi nanci al aid dollars to g ood but c ompar ati vel y wealthy students. Studies s how states that fund merit grants thr ough lotteries, such as Georgia, T ennessee, and Fl orida, generall y funnel money away from poor, uneducated ti c ket buyers to wealthier families , who can affor d to gi ve th eir teens the tutoring they need to g et g ood grades and tes t sc ores . One r esearc her esti mates that $2.3 billion in state, pri vate, and sc hool
scholars hips is awar ded annuall y to students from the richest 10 perc ent of families.




The res ult: Some s mart, diligent, but r elati vel y poor ki ds ar e bei ng pric ed out of c ollege. T he C olleg e Board calc ul ates that fewer than 30 perc ent of l ow-inc ome, c olleg e-qualifi ed students ar e ear ning c ollege degrees. Al most 75 perc ent of their rich peers ar e getting degrees , however . T his educ ational gap appears to be g etti ng wors e. The D epartment of Educ ati on repor ts that 8 perc ent of ac ademic all y elite but low-inc ome c ollege freshmen who star ted i n 2004 had dropped out--at l east tempor arily-- by 2006, the l atest year for which data are available. T hat's al most twic e the stoppage r ate of si mil ar freshmen who s tar ted i n 1996.




Of c ourse, that's tragic for the i ndi vi duals . In today's credenti al-craz ed workpl ace, those job s eekers lac ki ng a c ollege degree will have tr oubl e getting anything but low- paying, dead-end jobs . But, more i mpor tant, it's a disas ter for the nation, whic h needs an educ ated wor kforc e to s ustain its ec onomy agai nst bigger or hungrier c ompetitors around the globe.




Limi ted options. "Famili es are under press ure. H eating, food, transportati on bills are up," even as state budget c uts and stoc k mar ket troubl es are pus hing more coll eges to hi ke tuiti on, s ays Maril yn C argill, presi dent of the N ational As soci ati on of State Student Gr ant and Aid Pr ograms and dir ector of Ver m ont's financial ai d programs. T he onl y way many families paid tui tion bills in rec ent years was with loans. But the cr edit cr unc h h as wi ped out many families' ability to get a second mor tgage or pri vate educ ati onal l oan, s he notes. As a res ult, some l ow- and mi ddl e-inc ome families may be running out of c olleg e fundi ng opti ons . "I have wor ked i n this fiel d for 24 years, and I don't know th at it has ever been worse than it is now," s he s ays. " It is sc ar y."




What's scari ng parents, s tudents, and coll ege offi cials ought to c onc ern all Americans, says William Kirwan, c hanc ellor of the Uni versity of Mar yl and s ystem. " I hate to s ound apocal yptic ," he says. " But the proporti on of s tudents who need financial aid is rising at a rate fas ter than we are res ponding as a nation. We are goi ng to have hug e economic and s oci al pr oblems i f we don't do a better j ob of fi nanci ng higher educ ati on."




When it came time to pay for coll ege, Orenthious "OJ" Hill fell thr oug h the crac ks. His father was never ar ound much, and his mother l eft hi m with his grandfather in Gaines ville, Fla., when he was 7. His grandfather kept him in school and encourag ed hi m to pursue his dream of bec omi ng a histor y teac her. Hill enroll ed at Flori da State U ni versity of Florida, but sinc e dropping out for fi nanci al reas ons in 2003, he's been wor king full ti me and taki ng what classes he can affor d. N ow he c an't even get a federal student l oan for s chool bec aus e none of the adults in his life will fill out the Fr ee Applicati on for F ederal Student Ai d, the si ngle most important form that qualifies students for the vas t majority of loans and grants . N ow that he's 24, he c an fi nall y appl y for need- bas ed aid on his own. If he had been able to at l eas t get s ome student l oans earlier, he figur es, he'd be a teacher by now. At this r ate, the soones t he'll get into a high school cl assroom is 2010.




"You hear par ents and churches sayi ng, 'Go to coll ege!' But they never r eall y say anythi ng about how to fund c olleg e," Hill s ays . "I di dn't know what a Pell grant or that stuff was until my first semester i n c ollege."And his grandfather is still s us picious of Hill's desire to take out federal s tudent loans.




Fine print. R es earc h by the American C ouncil on Education indic ates there ar e mor e than 1 million students li ke Hill acros s t he c ountr y who may ver y well be eligible to recei ve aid but ar e not getting it. One reas on: M any don't unders tand why or how to fill out a FAF SA. And no wonder. T he form, with 145 q ues tions, is longer and mor e eye-cr ossi ng than the standard tax for m. U ni versity of Michigan ec onomist Sus an D ynars ki esti mates that i t takes the aver age applic ant about 10 hours to g ather all the doc ume nts--W2s, tax retur ns, etc.--and fill out the form. F or parents who don't speak Englis h well or who don't want to r eveal s uc h exhausti ve financi al i nformati on to the government, this form c an be i nsur mountable. Indeed, Secr etary of Educ ati on M argaret Spellings s ays the applicati on is s o c onvol uted that "it is as if we are tr ying to keep people out of coll ege."




Those who make it past the F AF SA then have to make s ens e of the fi ne pri nt s urroundi ng many g over nment, sc hool, and c haritable aid pr ograms. Some coll ege financial aid offic ers, for exampl e, are bal ki ng at hel ping students appl y for the new federal $4,000-a- year "TEACH Grants," which ar e s uppos ed to hel p aspiring teac hers pay for coll ege. The r eas on: D es pite the name, they are not grants. T hey are loans that will be forgi ven onl y if the student gets c ertifi ed as "hig hl y qualified" and wor ks full ti me teac hing a " high-need" subject at a federall y desi gnated, l ow-inc ome sc hool for at l east four years withi n eight years of graduation. Thos e who don't jump thr ough all thos e hoops c ould se e $16,000 worth of "grants" turn into a $24,000 bill after i nteres t c harges. T hat's one r eas on T ed Mal one, head of financial ai d for the U ni vers ity of Al as ka, won't proc ess TEACH Grant applic ations for undercl ass men, even th oug h he knows many need the money. "Virtuall y all of the financial aid offic ers I know would bleed for our students," he s ays . "But we have to
admi nister pr ograms that have insane rul es."




Mar y Borg, an ec onomis t at the U ni versi ty of N orth Fl orida in Jac ks onvill e, s ays unrealistic ai d rul es are one reas on her low-i nc ome students j oke that UNF stands for "U Never Fi nish." M any of the biggest aid pr ograms will gi ve money onl y to students who attend full ti me. But ev en thos e programs rar el y gi ve enough to full y fund a student's educ ation. So l ow-inc ome students end up having to wor k extra hours to cover the c os ts, whic h s ometimes forces them to dr op a cours e and go par t ti me, a status that disqualifi es them fr om recei vi ng the r est of their aid and forces them then to wor k even mor e hours and take even fewer class es . " We're maki ng the kids fr om low inc omes reall y s truggle," Borg says, while ric her kids who can afford to attend full ti me and get good grades often qualify for full-tuiti on merit schol arshi ps. " It's a rev erse Robin Hood effect," s he says. D onal d H ossl er, an Indi ana U ni versity profess or of educ ati onal l eadershi p who als o managed the c olleg e's fi nanci al ai d programs , s ays, "It's li ke the s olutions and pr obl ems got s haken up in a
garbag e c an."




Despi te the difficulty of navig ati ng the financial aid s ys tem, a rec ord 9 million parents and students have c ompl eted federal applicati ons s o far this year--up 15 percent from l ast year. That als o means a r ec ord number of s tudents are li kel y to be disappoi nted this year. Bec ause there simpl y is n't enough grant money to go ar ound, g over nments and c olleges are as ki ng families to kic k i n what many--s uch as the Rudolphs of Portland, T exas--ar e fi ndi ng to be si mpl y unaffordabl e amounts of money. Solidl y mi ddl e cl ass, with a hous e, pic kup truc k, and heal th ins urance, the R udolphs completed a F AF SA that showed Jayme and Ric k earned about $84,000 l ast year fr om jobs at a natural gas c ompany and a s mall fa mil y business . T he federal g overnment c alcul ated they should be abl e to pay about $7,500 api ec e for their two older daughters' c ollege educati ons. U nfortunatel y, their oldest daughter, M eag an, recei ved no grants to attend Texas A&M U ni versity- Kings vill e for the c oming year, leavi ng the famil y wi th bills i n exc ess of $15,000 j ust for her. T hat
meant the R udol phs woul d have to come up with more than $20,000 to send both daug hters to c olleg e this year, a pros pect that made Jayme "want to tear my hair out."




Out of poc ket. What governments and sc hools thi nk families c an affor d to pay differs dramatic all y fr om the fi nanci al realities mos t hous ehol ds fac e. The feder al government, for example, c alcul ates its Expected F amil y Contri buti on by ass uming that a famil y of fi ve, li ke the R udolphs, should be abl e to s et asi de for c ollege at leas t 22 cents of ever y dollar of inc ome above the first $36,000 or so that it earned. T he government arrived at that number by looki ng at the s pending patterns of a low-income famil y i n 1967, then adjusting that 41- year-ol d budget upward by the cons umer price index. N ever mind that today's par ents are under far more pressur e to s ave for their own r etirements, face new ki nds of health cos ts, and ar e payi ng unprec edented gas oline and utility bills.




The Rudolphs' budget, for example, has been wiped out bec ause their young s on was recentl y di agnosed with autis m s pectr um dis or der and r equires expensi ve ther apy s essions that ar en't cover ed by medic al ins ur anc e. The Ec onomic Polic y Institute c alc ulates that a mor e reali stic mini mum budget for s elf-sufficienc y-- payi ng for health insur anc e, li ving in a s afe hous e, etc .--for a fi ve- member famil y in the Cor pus Christi region l ast year was $55,200. In high-rent ci ties such as Was hington, San Francisc o, and Boston, it was over $80,000.




The final i ns ult: T here's not even enough grant money available to make sur e that most parents have to pay out onl y their EFC. T he feder al Pell grant, the biggest and most common grant awar ded s ol el y to l ower-income s tudents, is capped this year at $4,731. T hat will take c ar e of most costs at community c olleg es but does n't begin to c over, s ay, the $ 23,000 in-s tate pric e tag at the U ni versity of Mic higan. F ewer than 100 of the nati on's 4,300 coll eges are able to c obbl e together enoug h feder al, s tate, and sc hool money to make sur e par ents have to pay onl y their EFC. The r est, on average, c ome up wi th o nl y enough to as k the parents for about $5,300 mor e than their EFC. M os t al so expect the s tudent to kic k in anywher e fr om $2,000 to $4,000 in earni ngs and l oans. Many, especi ally big pri vate uni versi ties, add $10,000 to the parents' EFC.




Ralph Perri, direc tor of financial ai d at the T exas A&M- Kings ville campus, says he tries to make sur e that the poorest s tudents get enoug h grants a nd low-c ost loans to c over all their c osts . But ther e si mpl y is n't enough grant money to gi ve students ever ything they need. The app roximatel y $400 million the state of Texas is s pending on grants this year does n't even c over half the students who qualify. T hat means that tens of thous ands of families s uc h as the R udol phs , who have proved they need money for c olleg e even under today's sting y r ules , get no grants at all. T hey si mpl y have to borrow more, work mor e, or sc al e bac k their educ ati onal ambi tio ns.




Meagan R udol ph will fund her sophomore year by wor king and borrowing more to s uppl ement her parents' contributi on of $2,000 t o $3,000. H er younger sister, Elizabeth, will wor k this fall instead of enrolling as a fres hman. She's consi deri ng taking a c orres pondenc e c ourse or two and hopes to enroll at the near by C orpus C hristi c ampus of T exas A&M this spri ng. T he pr ec ariousness of their c hildr en's coll ege funding worries the R udolphs . T hey eac h had to leave c ollege for financial r easons. " We really want to make sur e our chil dren get an education. We know how i mportant it is," Jayme s ays . But how to pay for i t? "I feel li ke I am c aught in a trap. I have no retirement if I pay for their c olleg e," s he adds. "It is reall y sc ar y."




Getting worse. F or the s hort term, at l eas t, pl enty more s tudents and parents are li kel y to be scar ed. As j ob pr ospec ts for those with less educ ati on dr y up, enterprising Americ ans have little choice but to enr oll in coll ege. About two thirds of rec ent high school graduates now enrol l in c ollege, up from less than half in 1980, raisi ng the number of coll ege s tudents by 50 perc ent to 18 million this year . T hat means fi nanci al aid "is hel ping more people ever y year. It is als o failing to help more peopl e ever y year," says Sandy Baum, a Ski dmor e economist and cochair of the bl ue-ribbon panel that i s c alling for fi nanci al ai d r efor m.




The few recent hopeful devel opments, such as the nearl y $700 i ncreas e i n the maximum federal Pell grant over the past two years, have been mor e than over whel med by incr eas es in colleg e bills. T he c ost pressur es are onl y li kel y to g et worse as economic tr oubles ar e forci ng many states, i ncl udi ng Californi a, Rhode Island, and New Yor k, to consi der drastic tuiti on incr eases . M eanwhile, the housing and cr edi t cru nc hes are r educi ng the availability of home eq uity and pri vate educ ational loans that many par ents had c ounted on as a last r esor t. All this means that what Baum describes as the "horrible" gap between low-income and high-inc ome c ollege graduation r ates c ould get wors e. T he aid s ystem is bec omi ng s o dysfuncti onal, s he s ays, that " at s ome poi nt it will bl ow up."




A si mpl er s ystem. As dire as that sounds, it may the best hope for students for the l ong ter m. Members of the R ethinki ng Student Ai d Study Gr oup hope that a growi ng sens e of crisis will rall y s upport for their propos als--the details of which they will rel eas e next month--for a si mple s ys tem that "pr ovides ever y s tudent with enough grants so that they c an s ucc eed and g et a bachelor's degr ee wi th reasonabl e amounts of wor k and borrowi ng."




They have r eas on to be opti mis tic. Both pr esidential candidates are pus hing for fi nanci al aid simplific ati on and i mpr ovements. A growing number of sc hools, c ommunities, and donors have started maki ng clearer and mor e gener ou s fi nanci al aid pledges, s uc h as the Kal amaz oo, Mich., and El Dor ado, Ar k., promis es, whic h guarantee full in-s tate tui tion sc holars hips to ki ds who pass kinderg arten thr ough 12th grade in their c ommuniti es' public sc hools . H ar var d upped the si mplicity and gener osity ante late las t year when it promis ed enoug h grants so that families earning up to $180,000 would be as ked to pay n o more than 10 percent of their inc ome. And a number of highl y s elec ti ve c olleges guarantee that students from famili es that earn l ess than $60,000 will r ecei ve enough ai d to graduate debt fr ee. F or the luc ky s tudents who qualify for thes e new pr ograms, such as Vic toria Rduc h of San Antoni o, the outlook is bright.




Rduc h, the daughter of a si ngle mother who teaches high sc hool Spanis h, will graduate fr om Amherst C ollege next J une without a penny in debt. Amhers t's rec ent pledge to pr ovide enough grants to eli minate loans fr om its standard financial ai d offers does n't mean it is offering free ri des to students li ke Rduc h. T o scra pe together the appr oxi matel y $10,000 a year Amhers t felt the famil y shoul d be abl e to affor d without borrowi ng, the Rduc hs tapped a s mall c ollege savi ngs plan a grandparent had set aside. Victoria, who was s alutatorian of her hig h sc hool and sc ored 1550 on her SAT s, wor ked hard to get sever al thous and dollars a year in pri vate sc hol arshi ps. Her mother, Evita, c ontributed the remaini ng $2,000 a year or so to c over pl ane tic kets and other c osts .
Evita was reli eved she didn't have to take out a s econd mortgage or drai n her own retirement s avings. "And I g ot to buy some fr uit i nstead of eati ng hot dogs for the l ast few years," she j okes. What's mor e, her daughter will be able to buy a car , if s he needs one, to get to her first pos tgraduati on j ob. " People clai m the mi ddl e cl ass g et the s haft," Rduc h s ays . "But I' m middle class, s o I c an tell you no, no, no."




Not, at least, for the brightest or most g eographicall y l uc ky students . Ever ybody els e, however, is faci ng a more di ffic ult and uncertai n cli mb.




Scholars hi ps Lag Behi nd Tuiti on F ees




$15,000




12,000




9,000




6,000




3,000




0




1998




'99




'00




'01




'02




'03




'04




'05




'06




'07




2008




Aver age i n-state tuiti on, fees, r oom and board at a public uni versity




Grant doll ars per student




Sources: C ollege Board, U.S. Senate, U .S. Department of Education, U.S. N ews esti mates




Academicall y Elite, Fi nanci all y Struggling




The perc entage of low-i nc ome students who left c olleg e without a degree within three years has nearl y doubled si nc e 1998.




Note: F or s tudents who took rigorous high sc hool class es and got at leas t a B aver age




4.2%




8%




1998




2006




Sources: N ati onal C enter for Educ ati on Statistics , Institute for Hig her Educ ati on Polic y




Copyright © 2008 U .S. News & Worl d R eport




ARTIC LEID: 6375
Date: 9/26/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t
Head lin e: Michig an Sc hools Hi t by E. C oli Outbreak
OTS: 2034333
Subject: Students
Summ ar y: A c oupl e c ases of bad food pois oni ng that s ent a hal f-dozen Mic higan State students to the hos pital two weeks bac k turns out to be a statewide outbr eak of E. c oli. State health offici als have c onfir med 24 c as es of E. c oli poisoni ng in Mic higan, i ncludi ng seven fr om M SU and three from the U ni versity of Mic higan. The r est of the confir med cas es wer e s pread acr oss the state, i ncluding fi ve in a county j ail. Aside from what the health offici als c ould verify, MSU offici als s uspec t an addi tional 20 or s o students had E. c oli pois oning
Bod y:




Michigan Sc hools Hit by E. C oli Outbr eak




A c ouple c ases of bad food pois oni ng that s ent a hal f-dozen Mic higan State students to the hos pital two weeks bac k turns out to be a statewide outbr eak of E. c oli. State health offici als have confir med 24 c as es of E. coli poisoni ng in Mic higan, i ncludi ng seven fr om M SU and three fr om the Uni ver sity of Mic higan. T he res t of the c onfirmed c as es were spr ead across the state, incl udi ng fi ve i n a c ounty jail. Asi de from what the heal th officials coul d verify, M SU officials sus pect an additi onal 20 or so students had E. coli poisoni ng. All 24 of the c onfirmed s tatewide c as es were caus ed by the s ame someti mes-fatal 0157:H 7 strai n, whic h c auses bl oody di arrhea and c an lead to li ver and kidney damage. Researchers say the Michigan's c as es are a g enetic match to E. c oli in New Yor k, Oreg on, Ohio, and Illinois . C ampus and state health admi nistrators have yet to identify the s ource. As a prec aution, M SU has removed fr ozen tur key and partic ular produce items fr om its cafeteria for the ti me being. Now that no inci dents have been reported for al most a week,
school officials have also begun s ur veyi ng students fr om s ever al dor ms, as king them what they had eaten i n the past thr ee weeks. The ans wers c oul d hel p the local and state health departments narrow their s earc h for the s ource of the outbreak.
ARTIC LEID: 6427
Date: 9/29/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t
Head lin e: Har vard Is Mos t M enti oned U ni versi ty
OTS: 2034333
Subject: Ins titution Over all
Summ ar y: T he Gl obal Language Monitor tallied up how many ti mes uni versities and c olleges were mentioned in the print medi a and onli ne (incl udi ng bl ogs). N ot s urprisi ngly, H ar var d topped the list ( with this blog post onl y hel ping its c ause), whil e C olumbia and the Uni versity of Michigan rounded out the top three.
Bod y:




Har var d Is Mos t M entioned U ni versity




The Gl obal Language M onitor tallied up how many ti mes uni versities and c olleges were mentioned in the print media and onli ne (includi ng bl ogs). N ot s urprisi ngly, H ar var d topped the list ( with this blog post onl y hel ping its c aus e), while Col umbia and the U ni versity of Michigan r ounded out the top three. C ol orado Coll ege, Williams Coll ege, and the Uni versity of Ric hmond wer e tops i n the liberal arts c ollege ca tegor y. As for the bac khanded c ompli ment categ or y, otherwis e known as 'Most Momentum,' Vanderbilt, the Uni versity of Virgini a, and Emor y were the most i mproved uni versities; H amilton, Pomona, and Ski dmor e c olleges were best i n the liberal arts group.
ARTIC LEID: 6459
Date: 9/30/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t
Head lin e: Bus- Sized Di nos aur Br eathed Li ke Birds
OTS: 2034333
Subject: R es earc h, Other
Summ ar y: 'It's another piec e of evi denc e that's piling onto the lis t of thi ngs that link bir ds with dinos aurs ,' sai d r esearc her J effrey Wils on, a pal eontol ogist at the U ni versi ty of Mic higan. "
Bod y:




Bus- Sized Di nosaur Breathed Li ke Bir ds




A huge c arni vorous dinos aur that lived about 85 million years ago had a br eathi ng s ys tem muc h li ke that of today's birds, a new anal ysis of fossils r eveals , rei nforcing the evoluti onar y li nk between dinos and moder n birds. The finding s heds light on the tr ansi tion between ther opods ( a group of two-legged c arni vorous dinos aurs) and the emergence of bir ds. Sci entists thi nk birds evol ved fr om a group of ther opods c alled manir aptors, s ome 150 million years ago during the J urassi c period, whic h l asted fr om about 206 million to 144 million years ago. 'It's another piece of evi dence that's piling onto the list of thi ngs that li nk birds wi th di nos aurs,' s aid res earc her Jeffr ey Wilson, a paleontologist at the Uni versity of Michigan. Flighty di nos aur Call ed Aeros teon rioc ol oradensis, the bi pedal di nosaur woul d have stood at about 8 feet (2.5 meters) at its hi ps with a body length of 30 feet (9 meters), about the l ength of a sc hool bus . Wilson al ong with U ni versity of C hic ago paleontol ogist Paul Ser eno a nd others discover ed the s kel etal remai ns of A. ri oc oloradensis
duri ng a 1996 expediti on to Argenti na. In years followi ng the dis cover y, the scientis ts cl eaned up the bones and s canned them with c omputed tomography. The scans showed s mall openings i n the vertebr ae, cl avicles (chest bone that for ms the wis hbone) and hi p bones that l ed into large, holl ow s paces . When the dinos aur li ved, the holl ow s paces would have been lined with s oft tiss ue and fill ed with air. Thes e c hambers resembled s uc h features found in the same bones of moder n birds. Whil e ther e's no evi denc e to sugges t the di nosaur wore a coat of feathers or fl ew li ke a bir d when ali ve, the new findings sugges t it br eathed li ke one. M odern bir ds have rigid l ungs that don't expand and c ontrac t li ke our s. Instead, a s ystem of air s acs pumps air thr oug h the lungs. This novel featur e is the r eas on birds can fl y hig her and faster than bats , which, li ke all mammals , expand their l ungs in a l ess efficient br eathi ng pr ocess.
ARTIC LEID: 6460
Date: 9/30/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t
Head lin e: Oc cupational T her apy Pl us Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
OTS: 2034333
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: 'Occ upational ther apy is reall y the missi ng link in promoti ng well ness of people with hi p and knee osteoarthritis,' study author Sus an L. M urphy, an assistant professor i n the D epartment of Physical Medicine and R ehabilitation at the U ni versity of Michigan M edical Sc hool and R es earc h H ealth Sci ence Specialist at the VA Ann Arbor H eal thc are System, s aid in a uni versity news rel eas e.
Bod y:




Occupati onal T her apy Pl us Exercise Benefi ts Osteoarthritis
TUESD AY, Sept. 30 (H eal thD ay N ews) -- Adding occ upational ther apy to a str uctured exercise pr ogram increases physical acti vi ty for most peopl e who have hip and kne e osteoarthritis, s ay res earc hers. Osteoarthritis is a degener ati ve dis eas e that l eads to the br eakdown of the cartil age i n joi nts . In people with osteoarthritis, exercise helps mai ntain good j oint health, manage s ympto ms and prevent functi onal decline. But s tudies have s hown that the benefits of a structured exercis e program ar e s hor t-lived. T he beneficial effec ts us uall y fade s oon after participati on in the program ends. In a study in the October i ssue of Arthritis & R heumatis m, r es earc hers investig ated whether occ upational ther apy coul d benefit people with hi p and knee osteoarthritis. T he occupational ther apy program i n this study was designed to educ ate osteoarthritis patients about joi nt pr otecti on, pr oper body mec h anis ms , acti vity paci ng, and envir onmental barriers. The participants of the current study were di vi ded i nto two groups. T he first group participated in a structur ed
exercis e program and the occupational therapy program. The sec ond group par ticipated in the s ame exercis e program, but rec ei ved health education i n plac e of the occ upational ther apy. Onl y the group that eng aged in occupational ther apy increased the i ntensity of physic al activity at the end of the s tudy. 'Occ upati onal therapy is reall y the missi ng link i n promoti ng wellness of people wi th hi p and knee os teoarthritis ,' study author Sus an L. Mur phy, an assistant profess or i n the Department of Physic al M edicine and R ehabilitation at the U ni versi ty of Mic hi gan M edic al Sc hool and R es earc h H ealth Sci ence Specialist at the VA Ann Arbor H eal thc are System, s aid in a uni versity news rel eas e. Mur phy poi nts out that more res earch is nec ess ar y to study the effects of oc cupational ther apy in larger groups of people with osteoarthritis and to deter mine the l ong -term effects of the ther apy.
ARTIC LEID: 6423
Date: 9/29/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t
Head lin e: Seniors i n Poor Areas M ore Li kel y to Di e After Surger y
OTS: 2034333
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: 'It may be that hos pitals that tr eat pati ents of lower s ocioec onomic s tatus have l ower q uality of c are due to fewer res ources , s uc h as tec hnol ogicall y advanc ed equi pment or speci alists,' l ead author Dr. Nanc y Bir kmeyer, an ass oci ate pr ofess or of s urger y at the U ni ver sity of Mic higan, s aid in a C enter for the Advanc ement of H ealth news r eleas e.
Bod y:




Seniors in Poor Areas M ore Li kel y to Die After Surgery




MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthD ay News) -- Elderl y Americ ans who li ve i n l ow-inc ome ZIP c odes are mor e li kel y to die after surger y than thos e who live i n higher-income Z IP codes, acc ordi ng to new res earch. T he study anal yzed death rates among more than one million older adul ts who had one of si x common high-risk heart or c anc er s urgeries between 1999 and 2003. The ris k of death was between 17 percent and 39 percent higher for patients in low-inc ome ZIP c odes , mainl y bec aus e the q uality of c are is lower at hospi tals i n l ower soci oeconomic areas, the study authors sai d. In fact, all pati ents (reg ardless of i nc ome) who had s urger y at hos pitals in the poor est ar eas wer e more li kel y to di e, while all patients who had surger y at hos pitals i n the richest ar eas wer e l ess li kel y to di e. 'It may be that hos pitals that tr eat patients of l ower soci oeconomi c status have lower quality of car e due to fewer r es ourc es, such as technologicall y advanc ed equipment or s pecialists ,' lead author Dr. N anc y Birkmeyer, an associate profes sor of surger y at the U ni versity of
Michigan, s aid in a C enter for the Advanc ement of H eal th news r eleas e. T he study was publis hed i n the September iss ue of the j our nal M edical C are. ' Whil e s ome prior studi es have demons trated s ocioec onomic dis pariti es i n the outcomes of indi vidual pr oc edures , ours is the fir st to s how that the rel ati ons hi p is c onsistent acros s a wide r ang e of s urgical proc edur es,' Bir kmeyer s aid. Whil e the study c an i mpr ove unders tanding of patterns of c are, it does n't offer c o ncrete ans wers for elderly pati ents who need s urger y, s aid Dr. H arlan Krumholz , a pr ofess or of medicine, epidemiol ogy and public health at Yale U ni versity.
ARTIC LEID: 12012
Date: 9/6/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Fi nanci al Ti mes Online (ft.c om)
Head lin e: Highway T o H eaven
OTS: 1856283
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: Whatever the drawbac ks, R V r entals ar e big business , worth $350m a year in the US and enj oying fas t growth, acc or ding to a s tudy by the U ni versity of Michigan. But for N orth Americ an resi dents , to own one s eems a better bet. Ownershi p of motorhomes and of " fifth wheel" tr ailers, whic h mount to the beds of pic k- up truc ks, has r eached rec ord levels i n the pas t few years.
Bod y:




High way To H eav en




By J ohn Griffiths




Published: September 6 2008 03:00 | Las t updated: September 6 2008 03:00




It is known as one of the world's greatest dri ves, thr oug h s pectacul ar, c hoc olate-box scener y. Fr om C algar y, Alberta's oil capital and home of the Stampede - the s elf-pr oclai med "greates t outdoor show on earth", with chuc kwagon r ac es that make F ormula One s eem the height of boredom - head west on the Trans-Canada Highway. T hread through the foothills of the Roc kies , then pass towering M ount R undle en r oute to the fairytal e mountain res ort of Banff.




Press on nor th, up the 200- mile Ic efi elds Par kway, vi a Lake Louis e, with its el egant c hateau s et agai nst a bac kdrop of one of C anada's most dr amatic glaci ers. Onwards still to the ic efi elds themsel ves: dr aped over 800 square mil es, their ic e up to 4,000ft thic k.




Along the rest of the par kway there ar e onl y br eathtaki ng pi ne-cl ad mountains . And more mountai ns. And yet more. With luc k you'll s pot el k, moose, deer or bears doing their own roadsi de touris m, looki ng bac k at humans . At the road's norther n end li es the r esort of J as per, with a rustic beauty all its own. It als o s er ves as g ateway to Maligne Lake and its Spirit Isl and - one of the most haunti ngly beautiful pl aces on earth.




So what could be better, for a visi ting Eur opean, than to see it all from a r oomy, all-mod-c ons, come-and-go-as- you- pleas e, N orth Americ an motor home - or RV (recr eati onal vehicle) as the l oc als c all them? T he roads are empty and unc hall engi ng, Canadi an dri vers polite, and - since Al ber ta i s four ti mes the size of Britai n - it shouldn't be hard to par k.




After a few days on the road in one of them, though, qui te a l ot could be better. F or a s tart, the C algar y-to-J as per r un is no longer the i dyll it was when I li ved here, many years ago. D uring Al ber ta's s hort s ummer (it c an snow on the icefiel ds i n J ul y), Banff, Lake Louise and J asper heave with humanity. Don't arrive at short notic e s eeki ng R V s pace or a hotel room.




Our R V - a s mallish 22ft "Adventur er" built by Wester n RV - was far fr om inexpensi ve, at a basic weekl y r ental of nearl y $1,700. It was also p oor for mountai n-gazi ng. T he three main c abin windows wer e all irritati ngl y s mall. And by heavens, it rattled. The c ooker top shook s o much it was eventuall y stowed under bedclothes ; but other c ac ophoni es persis ted. And then there was wind noi se...




Ther e are many thi ngs about a s olid Americ an RV that s hould make European motor home makers, wi th their c heap veneered c hipboar d and flims y fittings, feel as hamed. But aer odynamic design is not among them. Above 50mph, the wi nd roar was loud, i nc essant and dispiriti ng.




The beds - per manent double at the rear, over-cab double at the front - wer e c omfortabl e enoug h, and the shower , loo, fridge and other ancillaries all wor ked well. But there was no l ac k of further downsi des. Over 1,500 miles , the Adventur er's 5.7 litr e petrol F or d V8 drank a g allon ever y 11 mil es - better than many of its larger counterparts, but for a week's trip the fuel bill was more than £390.




Whatever the drawbac ks, R V r entals ar e big business , worth $350m a year in the US and enjoyi ng fast growth, acc ordi ng to a s tudy by the U ni versity of Michigan. But for N orth Americ an resi dents , to own one s eems a better bet. Ownershi p of motorhomes and of " fifth wheel" tr ailers, which mount to the beds of pic k- up tr uc ks , has reached recor d levels in the past few years. There ar e now s ome 8 million on America's roads , with annual sal es of about $11.4bn. Gi ven that one c an buy a fift h- wheel unit 27ft long, with all mod cons, for ar ound £15,000, that s houl d not be too sur prising.




From Calg ary we head north towards the provi nci al c apital of Edmonton. At the pleas ant city of R ed Deer we turn left, bound for Syl van Lake. It nes tles in the foothills, 15 miles of s hi mmering water.




The surr ounding s mall towns and far mland c ontai n their own modest s ecrets and pleas ures . At M ar ker ville, s eemi ngl y in the middle of nowher e, is the restored house of the late, great Ic el andic poet Stephan Stephans son, l eadi ng light of an Icel andic c ommunity that s ettled her e in the mid- 19th centur y. Get your ti ming right and s mall towns s uch as Bentley and Benalto offer up their rodeos , wher e youngsters rope c al ves li ke veterans. At Roc ky M ountain Hous e, 40 miles f arther west, the nati onal agenc y Par ks C anada pr otects a 500- acre site c ontai ning the four fur-tradi ng pos ts - of the ri val H uds on's Bay and North West compani es - on which Al berta's economy was founded. N ear by, bis on graz e the fi elds . H ere, an entire day c an fl y by.




Our goal, however, is 400 mil es to the nor th, close to wher e all roads end and further travel must be by air. We are b ound for F ort McM urray. It is Cree Indian territor y, and site of the Athabasca oil s ands, wher e extr acti on compani es will eventuall y stri pmine an ar ea the size of N ew Yor k state.




Under l owering s kies and in las hing r ain we par k the motorhome i n the s hadow of cranes of i mpossi ble height, and draglines wi th 20 r otating exc avati on buc kets eac h as big as a bus. The s cene is overpoweri ng; one of environmental nightmare perhaps , but also of s avag e i ndus trial beauty. In comparison, choc olate box-top mountai ns are ten- a-penny.




ARTIC LEID: 12013
Date: 9/13/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Fi nanci al Ti mes Online (ft.c om)
Head lin e: US retail s ales fell in Augus t
OTS: 1856283
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: H owever, falling energy pric es hel ped lift c onsumer c onfidence to its highest level si nc e J anuar y during the first part of September, acc ordi ng to a s ur vey by R euters and the Uni versit y of Michigan. Fi ve- year inflati on expectati ons fell to 2.9 per cent from 3.2 per c ent last month.Other i ndicators als o s uggest easing i nfl ation. Pr oduc er price i nfl ation fell by 0.9 per cent in August, followi ng a rise of 1.2 per c ent i n J ul y.
Bod y:




US r etail sales f ell in Au gust




By D ani el Piml ott




Published: September 13 2008 03:00 | Last updated: September 13 2008 03:00




US retail s al es fell for a s ec ond month in a r ow i n August as the boos t fr om the $100bn (€ 70bn, £56bn) i n tax r ebates fell away and a fall i n oil pric es fail ed to enc ourage cons umers to s pend on other goods , data from the commerce department s howed.




Retail sal es fell 0.3 per cent las t month, ag ains t expec tati ons of a 0.2 per cent rise. The fall was l ed by a 2.5 per c ent fall i n s pending at petrol stati ons .




However, falli ng energy prices hel ped lift c onsumer c onfidence to its highest level si nce J anuary during the firs t part of September, acc ordi ng to a s ur vey by R euters and the Uni versity of Michigan. Fi ve- year infl ati on expectati ons fell to 2.9 per cent from 3.2 per cent las t month.




Other i ndic ators also s uggest easing i nflation. Produc er pric e inflation fell by 0.9 per cent i n Aug ust, followi ng a rise of 1.2 per c ent in Jul y.




Dani el Piml ott, N ew Yor k




ARTIC LEID: 12015
Date: 9/27/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Fi nanci al Ti mes Online (ft.c om)
Head lin e: Reality Chec k
OTS: 1856283
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: A study by U ni versity of Mic higan H eal th Sys tem res earc hers in 2005 found that women tended to overes timate their ris k of g etti ng br east c ancer by about three ti mes. The s ame year , the European J ournal of C ancer publis hed a s tudy from Irel and whic h found that 66 per c ent of women over esti mated their ris k of developing breast canc er and 88 per c ent underes timated the age at whic h it was mos t li kel y to devel op.
Bod y:




Realit y Check




By M argaret McCar tney




Published: September 27 2008 03:00 | Last updated: September 27 2008 03:00




One morni ng in 1991, haz el thor nton found a letter on her door mat i nviti ng her to attend an NH S breast c anc er scr eeni ng. T hor nton, a s elf-employed busi ness woman, then aged 57, deci ded s he'd go. T his was what r esponsibl e people di d, after all, and she was nothi ng if not r es ponsi ble: aware of her body, i nter ested in keeping healthy, and happy to c ompl y with gui deli nes on medical chec k- ups.




The screening r evealed a " ductal c arcinoma in situ" , or DCIS, whic h meant that the cells li ning T hornton's milk duc ts were canc erous. However, those c ells had remained in the ducts: they hadn't grown through to s urrounding tissue. DCIS is an unc ertain condi tion. It is someti mes consi der ed pr e-canc erous or non-invasi ve but it may, over time, develop i nto invasi ve breast c anc er, spr eading i nto other tiss ue.




Immedi atel y after c onfir mation of the diagnosis - reac hed by s urgical excisi on of the affected area of tis sue - T hornton was offered a place in a U K DC IS trial. This was the moment her eas y c ompliance ended: all of this s eemed too sudden. The s tudy she'd been i nvited to j oin woul d s tar t her on one of s everal treatments: r adi other apy, the drug T amoxi fen, radiotherapy plus T amoxifen or no treatment at all. T hornton was str uc k by the magni tude of differenc e in the opti ons. H er own r es earc h, meanwhile, had s uggested that DC IS pati ents might do j ust as well untreated. And if she were to enter the tri al, s he realised, two of the tri al opti ons i nvol ved radi other apy, which she knew s he wanted to avoid.




Thor nton was astounded by how poor the infor mation gi ven to her was, by the unc ertai nty about her diag nosis - and by the s peed with which s he was expected to make decisi ons after bei ng di agnosed wi th, well, "c anc er". She wr ote to the organisers of the study as well as her s urgeon, and then, realising this was an iss ue whic h must als o affec t others , s he wrote to the medical pr ess outlini ng her c oncer ns. T hat piece, published in The Lanc et, turned out to be the beginning of a sec ond car eer i n advocac y.




In 1995, Thornton c o-founded, wi th Michael Baum, profess or emeritus of surger y at U ni versity C ollege London, the Cons umers' Advisor y Group for Clinic al Tri als, a j oint lay and professi onal group. She als o beg an to publish papers i n academic j our nals (she is now a c ontributing editor at the International J our nal of Surger y), and in 2002 s he was awar ded a n honorar y doctorate of scienc e fr om the U ni versity of Leic es ter.




That year , too, s he began a book pr ojec t with two others, Imogen Evans , a medic al doctor and journalist, and Sir Iai n C halmers, a heal th ser vic es r es earc her . Published in 2006, Testing Tr eat ments: Better Research for Better H ealthcar e was hail ed for its critic al appr aisal of how uncertai nties in healthcar e s hould be ass ess ed and how treatments shoul d be eval uated fairl y.




Thor nton's 17- year odyssey in the worl d of breast canc er has , then, had far-reachi ng and posi ti ve outc omes. U nfortunatel y, that has not been the experi enc e for ever yone in Britain with the dis ease.




It's al most Oc tober , whi ch is Br east C ancer Awarenes s month i n the U K. F or 31 days we will be i nvited to buy watches, bags, T-s hirts, tr aini ng shoes, brooc hes, body was hes and more, all in a certain s hade of pink, to aid res earch and br east c ancer " awareness". T here will be fun runs, cake stalls , bingo evenings. It's a phenomenon that started i n 1993, two years after T hornton's di agn osis, when Evel yn Lauder, a philanthropist in s earch of a c aus e (s he had married into the Lauder beauty empire) founded the Br east C ancer R es earch Foundati on. T he group funds breast c anc er r esearc h around the world, as well as pr ogrammes ai med at "incr easi ng public awarenes s about good breast health". As Lauder expl ained to T he Independent news paper fi ve years ag o, "the older ge ner ati on jus t does n't dis cus s [c ancer ]... in my vi ew, the mor e you s peak about something, the mor e knowl edge you have. And the mor e knowl edge you have, the l ess fear you have."
Fair enough. Yet recent studi es s uggest that Lauder's for mul a - that awarenes s c ampaigns incr eas e knowledge and decr eas e fear - does not bear scruti ny. A study by U ni versity of Mic higan Health System r esearc hers in 2005 found that women tended to over esti mate their risk of g etti ng br eas t c ancer by about three ti mes. The s ame year, the Euro pean J ournal of C anc er publis hed a s tudy from Irel and which found that 66 per c ent of women over esti mated their ris k of devel oping breast canc er and 88 per c ent underesti mated the ag e at whic h it was most li kel y to develop. Fifty-si x per c ent of thes e women als o under esti mated the fi ve-year s ur vi val r ate after a diagnosis of br east c anc er. In other wor ds, young women think that they ar e more li kel y to get br eas t c ancer than they are; ol der women do not realis e that their incr eased age pl aces them at higher risk; and all underesti mate how li kel y they ar e to s ur vi ve.




The fact is that the incidenc e of br east c ancer has been i ncreasing i n the U K in rec ent decades. In 1975, the rate of di agnosis was 74 per 100,000 women. In 2005, that rate had incr eased to 123. C onc urrentl y, s ur vi val r ates from breast c anc er have i ncr eas ed. T he fi ve- year s ur vival rate for women di agnos ed i n the U K between 1971 and 1975 was 52 per c ent. F or women diag nosed between 2001 and 2003, it was 80 per c ent. Some of this is down to better, innovati ve treatments for breast canc er. H owever, s ome of the appar ent i mpr ovements ar e, at l east i n part, artifici al. DCIS is a di agnosis produced by breast c anc er scr eeni ng, but the c ondition is s eldom fatal. T hus it appears that more women ar e s ur vi ving breast c anc er for l ong er. But these ar e not the canc ers that pose the greates t threat to life.




While the most r ec ent res earch into breas t c anc er s creeni ng points to i t bei ng effecti ve i n reducing death from breast c anc er, the margins are slender and do not take i nto account the possibility of over diagnosis : c ounti ng women as c ured when they never had a life-thr eatening c anc er i n the first pl ac e. T he las t s ystematic revi ew of br eas t c ancer s creeni ng studi es, published in the C oc hra ne Librar y, was updated in 2006. It found that scr eening does , i n fact, lead to overdi agnosis and overtreatment. "F or ever y 2,000 women i nvited for scre ening throughout 10 years , one will have her life pr olonged," the authors sai d. " In addi tion, 10 healthy women, who woul d not have been di agnosed if ther e had not been scr eening, will be diag nos ed as breast canc er patients and will be tr eated unnec ess arily."




The revi ew c oncluded: "It is thus not cl ear whether s creeni ng does more g ood than har m. Women i nvited to scr eeni ng should be full y i nformed of both benefits and harms."




Cornelia Baines was deputy dir ector of the C anadi an N ational Br east Screening Study when s he was di agnos ed with the canc er in 2004. She might have been expec ted to us e the experienc e to fuel a c ampaign to incr ease "awareness". But Bai nes, an emeritus profes sor i n the department of public health sci enc es at the Uni versity of T oronto, s ays ins tead that the experienc e made her realise the extent to whic h ris ks of getting breas t c anc er have been exaggerated, and the effecti veness of screening overstated.




"In N orth America," s he s ays, "ther e is virtually an epidemic of l obul ar canc er in situ." T his is where the cells in the l obes of a woman's br easts have undergone c hanges . And while i t may i ncreas e a woman's c hanc es of a c anc er di agnosis i n the future, many screening experts woul d c ounter that suc h women do not have breas t c anc er but have simpl y been overdi agnosed. And yet, says Bai nes , " women with this di agnosis [who then undergo treatment of one sort or another] believe they have been cur ed of c anc er".




As it is, Bai nes s ays, "the attitude I fr equentl y enc ounter is that of a state of al most terr or about br east c anc er - even befor e the diagnosis is enc ounter ed." Women, s he s ays, have been educ ated to be afr aid and to beli eve in mammography as their s al vation. Baines met one woman in her twenties who was s o afr aid of a br east c anc er di agnosis that she s aid s he wi shed s he could have a mammogram dail y.




Some women will al ways be this anxi ous, even without the awar eness c ampaigns: the grandmother of the woman referred to by Baines had had br east c ancer, after all. But it's als o clear how the media i nfl uenc es women's fears. When Kylie Minogue announc ed she had br eas t cancer i n M ay 2005, some hos pitals r eported a surge in young women turni ng up at breas t clinic s as king to be scr eened. A report in T he Lancet in 2006 showed that one clinic had recei ved a huge surge in referrals for younger women but, despi te thi s, no mor e breast canc ers were found compared with the abs ol ute numbers that would have been expec ted anyway. T his meant that mor e women were expos ed to X-r ays. And conc erns wer e express ed elsewher e that ol der women wi th worr ying breas t s ymptoms had been pushed down the queue.




Meanwhile, critics of breas t c anc er scr eeni ng face an uphill battle. Bai nes s ays: "In the past I was on the advi sor y committe e of a ver y l arge c anc er vol untar y organis ati on. We wer e discussing s cientific is sues about br eas t c ancer screeni ng. We were tol d at the end of the day that 'we c an't accept the committee's r ecommendati ons bec ause they ar e c ounter to the beli efs of the fun draisi ng volunteers and their support is essenti al'."




Donald Berr y agrees with Bai nes' vi ew. A statistici an and profess or of c ancer res earc h at the U ni versity of Texas , he has s pent much of his c areer invol ved in the design and exec uti on of br east c anc er tr ials . Most signi ficantl y, he ser ved on a N ati onal Ins titutes of H eal th "cons ensus devel opment" panel in 1997 whic h drew up U S gui delines for scr eeni ng women in their forti es for breast canc er. T he group r ec ommended that women be gi ven i nformati on about " posi ti ves and negati ves" associated with scr eeni ng, and be all owed to make their own decisions about whether to be screened - i n c onsultati on with their doctors. "T his hit the press all over the world," rec alls Berr y. "[We wer e] wi del y criticis ed. We had all kinds of charges ag ains t us, s uggesti ng that we hated women, even thoug h over half the panel wer e women."




"If you find breas t c anc er at a ver y earl y stage," adds Berr y, " you don't know what you' ve g ot. You don't know if that canc er is never g oing to har m anyone - it might even be dis pos ed of by the body. What woul d this ki nd of tes t lead to: doubl e mastectomy i n most of the population?"




"In this countr y," he s ays, referring to the U S, "we have many res earc hers looki ng for earlier and earlier means of detecti ng br eas t c ancer. And it s car es the bej es us out of me."




Berr y wants the s ame thing Lauder wants : a knowl edg eabl e popul ati on. "I don't li ke ig nor anc e," he s ays . But he sees the enthusi as m for s creeni ng without consider ation of its li mitations as ini mic al to the s pread of knowl edge. " I don't li ke it when s ome people's opini ons are fois ted on others... I' ve never understood what possibl y could be s o wr ong about spelling out [the pros and c ons of s creeni ng]. 'T hes e are the benefits as we know them - they are uncer tai n. T hese ar e the ris ks as we know them - and thes e are mor e c ertai n.' What c oul d be a rati onal argument agai nst letting wo men know what we know?"




Supporters of breas t c anc er scr eeni ng say that it is a proven saver of li ves . C ertai nl y, s ystematic r eviews exami ning the quality evi denc e on the subject s uggest that is true. But this decreas e in mortality comes at the pric e of man y other women being diag nos ed and tr eated for a cancer that was never goi ng to s horten life. Some woman may be happy with thi s unc ertai nty; others may wish to make differ ent decisi ons. Apart from overtreatment - r adi other apy and operations for canc ers that were never going to impact on mortality - the other har ms incl ude those of radi ation to the breas t, and the anxiety and damage c onnected wi th the di agnosis and all of thes e tests .




The two women i n the bes t posi tion to r elay this infor mation to the Britis h public are Jane H atfi eld, dir ector of polic y and c ampaigns at Br east C ancer C ar e, a U K-bas ed br eas t c ancer c harity, and Pr ofess or Juli etta Patnic k, direc tor of the NHS Canc er Scr eeni ng Pr ogrammes .




Type "br east c anc er" into a U K web br ows er, and Breast Canc er Car e's site is the first li nk to appear . T he group is "the U K's l eading provi der of infor mati on, pr actic al assistanc e and emotional support for anyone affec ted by breas t c anc er". As for the content of that infor mation, H atfi eld says, " we [awareness advoc ates] don't always get it right" . She is r es ponding to my questi on about a woman's chances of getti ng br eas t c ancer. The number often quoted in this countr y is one in ni ne but in fac t for a woman aged up to 85 the ris k is one i n 10. F or a woman aged 50 or younger , her esti mated ris k of bei ng diagnos ed with br east c anc er is one i n 50. Women under the age of 30 ar e looki ng at od ds of one in 1,900.




I can't help but feel that " one i n nine" - whic h has featur ed in high-str eet advertisi ng c ampaigns and is quoted by many br eas t c ancer c harities - mus t c ontribute to the fear Bai nes and other doctors descri be seei ng in patients.




"Peopl e obviousl y as k what the i nci denc e of breast canc er is, and yes, we have used this statistic ," s ays H atfiel d. " But we also look to stres s the link between age and ris k. We would al ways promote breast awareness among any ag e group of women s o women g et us ed to knowing what is nor mal for them and notici ng any chang es."




Las t year, a study appear ed in The British Journal of General Practic e s howi ng that less than 1 per c ent of women sur veyed knew that the risk for br east c anc er was hig hes t in the ol dest age grou ps. It concl uded that there was " a serious lac k of knowl edge" about the s ubjec t. D espite the fact that Patnic k was one of the study's two authors, the standard l eaflets provi ded by her NHS pr ogramme say mer el y that " one in ni ne women will develop breast ca nc er at s ome ti me in their life. Breas t scr eening is mor e c ommon i n women over 50."




When I c onfr ont Patnic k about the si mplis tic use of this s tatistic, and the failur e to poi nt out that the risk of c ancer i ncreas es wi th age, s he s ays: "Well, that is the po pul ar figur e, so to give a different figur e was goi ng to c ause confusi on.




"I'll tell you what happened," s he adds. "We were debating what to put on the leafl et and I was goi ng to wor k, foll owing a bus. And there it was, 'one i n nine', on an advert on the b us. I realis ed that if we [di dn't] put that on, we wer e goi ng to c onfuse like mad."




I pr ess her: s houl d c onsis tenc y trump acc urac y? "We do advertis e our website i n our l eaflet. [There] women c an get mor e infor mati on."




Jane Keidan is no stranger to s erious illness. A pr actisi ng haematologist, s he deals with patients who have seri ous blood and l ymphatic dis eas e. But, s he says, "i n my line of wor k, the options for people ar e more clearl y bl ac k and whi te, and I c an ther efor e advi se a pati ent on the best course of acti on." When s he was di agnos ed with br east c ancer , however, there were huge decisions to make, and even wi th a medical bac kground, s he found it ver y diffic ult to unders tand all the i nformati on and make infor med, dis passi onate c hoices .




Just after her diagnosis, Keidan read about the drug H ercepti n, whic h was bei ng prais ed as an "i nstant c ure- all" in the popular pr ess. The r eleas e of the drug's trial data at an onc olog y conferenc e prompted a standing ovati on. And yet the N ati onal Ins titute for Health and Cli nical Exc ellence (Nice) needed to rule on i ts c ost- effecti veness befor e it could be made available in Britain, and Kei dan needed to decide whether she c ould wait.




"At the ti me, from what I c oul d r ead on the Br eas t C ancer C are website and i n the medi a i n gener al, i t didn't s eem logical to deny women the drug... I wrote to the Pri mar y Car e Tr ust, my M P, the prime mi nister - ever yone I c ould thi nk of, reall y. T he Sun newspaper c ontacted me. The i dea was that they woul d s omehow 'shame' people into g etti ng us this drug. It fel t ver y nice. Someone was offering to help."




At that stage, she was r el ying on the popul ar repor ting of H ercepti n; when s he took advantag e of her r ole as a doc tor to learn more, fr om professi onals, she decided not to take the drug: " I was f ortunate becaus e I als o started to disc uss it with medic al c olleagues - other onc ologi sts - an immense pri vil ege." But the feeling that the offer of help from The Sun prompted in Keidan is telling. If br eas t c ancer c harities have s ucc eeded, it i s in maki ng peopl e with the diseas e feel c ared for and empowered. If they have failed, it is i n doi ng s o at the expens e of a well-informed popul ati on, that is i nstead unnec ess aril y fearful and misunderstands the real c hanc es of getti ng breast canc er.




But at l eas t this s hows us what the critics of the c urrent s ystem need to do in order to change it: if doctors and r esearc hers want pati ents to trust them, they need to tal k to thos e patients - all of them, not just the haematologists among them - as people needi ng both i nformati on and empathy. Pushi ng women towar ds breast c anc er scr eeni ng and ever y i nter venti on avail abl e for the diseas e is, in the end, not al ways the same thi ng as c aring about their heal th.




Margaret McCar tney is the FT Weekend Magazine's health c olumnist.




ARTIC LEID: 7702
Date: 9/30/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N PR
Head lin e: How Healthy Are The C andi dates?
OTS: 1760000
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: Physician and medi cal historian H owar d M ar kel of the Uni versity of Michig an believes i n the pri vac y of medic al recor ds. But n ot when i t c omes to presi denti al c andi dates .
Bod y:




National Public Radio (NPR)



September 30, 2008 Tuesday



SHOW: All Things Considered 9:00 PM EST NPR



How Healthy Are The Candidates?

LENGTH: 764 words
MELISSA BLOCK, host:

This is All Things Considered from NPR News, I'm Melissa Block. Running for president involves giving
up most privacy a candidate may have had. That includes medical privacy. John McCain's history of skin
cancer and Barack Obama's former smoking habit have already come up in this presidential campaign.
But as NPR's Joanne Silberner reports, questions remain.

JOANNE SILBERNER: Physician and medical historian Howard Markel of the University of Michigan
believes in the privacy of medical records. But not when it comes to presidential candidates.

Dr. HOWARD MARKEL (Professor, University of Michigan): The President of the United States is
literally the most powerful person on the planet. And his or her health - mental health, physical health, and
so on - really can affect so many things in our world.

SILBERNER: Polls show that Americans are very interested in the health of presidents, and by extension,
candidates for president. But there's a long history of not learning the complete story to long after a
presidency is over.

Dr. MARKEL: John F. Kennedy wasn't exactly forthcoming about his Addison's disease, nor was
Eisenhower forthcoming about his history of a serious heart attack when he ran for re-election in 1956.

SILBERNER: This time around, 72-year-old Senator John McCain has been asked about his health often
enough that he jokes it off. Like at this campaign stop last year.

Senator JOHN MCCAIN (Republican, Arizona, Presidential Candidate): People will judge by the vigor and
enthusiasm associated with our campaign. Every campaign I've ever been in my life and I have out
campaigned, all of my opponents, and I'm confident that I will and thanks for the question, you old jerk.

SILBERNER: On Memorial Day weekend last May, McCain allowed reporters a three-hour peek at his
records, and were permitted to question his doctors during a 45-minute tele-conference. Journalists from
about 20 organizations, including NPR, flipped through more than a thousand pages of doctors' reports,
pathology findings, and surgical descriptions. They couldn't make photocopies or take pictures or tape
record. Nick Muzin, a physician and a senior medical adviser to the McCain campaign said reporters got
all the information they needed.

Dr. NICK MUZIN (Senior Medical Adviser): This is everything. This is every single piece of paper that has
been produced in relation to Senators McCain's medical care since 2000.

SILBERNER: But that's not enough, says physician Lawrence Altman, senior medical correspondent for
the New York Times.

Dr. LAWRENCE ALTMAN (Senior Medical Correspondent, New York Times): That is not an adequate
amount of time for anyone to be able to read and take notes and not photocopy and analyze the
information that is there.

SILBERNER: Altman is known in the media and to medical historians as the dean of presidential health
reporters. He pretty much invented the genre and has interviewed many of the candidates over the last
three decades. The McCain campaign though, didn't invite him in last May. One of the things Altman and
others still want to know is why one melanoma removed in 2000 was interpreted differently by two groups
of pathologists.
Dr. ALTMAN: The pathology report raises questions that were not answered - at least not answered fully
in the news conference and not from the records.

SILBERNER: Altman's also got questions about Senator Obama's health, revealed only in a doctor's
letter.

Dr. ALTMAN: Senator Obama's letter from his physician is a single-page, six-paragraph letter is a test to
Mr. Obama's health, and there's no reason to believe that Mr. Obama has ill health. But the question is,
why was the letter undated and why has the Obama campaign not allowed his doctor speak to reporters.

SILBERNER: A spokesperson for the Obama campaign says that the senator's health is obvious, that
reporters have noted that he works out all the time. Obama has been a smoker. Earlier this year, on a
WJLA TV news show, he talked about quitting.

Senator BARACK OBAMA (Democrat, Illinois, Presidential Candidate): This was a nasty habit but it
wasn't a heavy one, so I didn't get the shakes or anything like that.

SILBERNER: The letter from the physician says Obama has quit on several occasions, and is using
Nicorette gum. Both campaigns told NPR not to expect more information on the presidential candidates.
As for the vice presidential candidates - Senator Joseph Biden's press secretary said they'd be releasing
records very, very soon. No word so far from McCain's campaign about Governor Sarah Palin. Joanne
Silberner, NPR News.
ARTIC LEID: 1655
Date: 9/9/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t Online ( usnews .com)
Head lin e: J ob Loss Has Long-Term Impac t on Social Li ves
OTS: 1490178
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: T he study, by r es earc hers at the U ni versity of C alifor nia, Los Angel es, and the Uni versity of Michigan, Ann Ar bor , found that wor kers who had experienced even one invol untar y j ob loss were 35 perc ent l ess li kel y to be invol ved in their c ommuniti es than those who had never been out of wor k bec aus e of l ayoff, res tructuring or a busi ness cl osi ng or r eloc ati ng. T he br eak fr om c ommunity i nvol vement -- whether it meant droppi ng out from a book cl ub or no longer participati ng in the PTA -- conti nued for the remai nder of the wor kers' li ves, not j us t for the period of unemployment, ac cor ding to the s tudy.
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Job Loss Has Long-Ter m Impact on Soci al Li ves




TUESD AY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Getti ng lai d off affects not onl y one's economic well-bei ng, it als o c urtails one's invol vement in communi ty and s oci al acti viti es, a new study found. The study, by researc hers at the Uni versity of Californi a, Los Angeles , and the U ni versi ty of Michigan, Ann Ar bor, found that wor kers who had experienced even one invol untar y j ob loss were 35 perc ent l ess li kel y to be invol ved in their c ommuniti es than thos e who had never been out of wor k becaus e of l ayoff, restruc turi ng or a business closi ng or relocating. T he break from communi ty i nvol vement -- whether it meant dr opping out from a book club or no longer partici pating i n the PTA -- conti nued for the remainder of the wor kers' li ves, not j ust for the period of unemployment, acc ordi ng to the study. ' Soci al eng agement often invol ves an el ement of social tr ust and a s ens e that things are reci proc al -- that you give some s upport if you g et some s upport, and you benefit fr om s ociety if soci ety benefits from you,' study l ead au thor J enni e E. Brand, a UC LA sociol ogist, s aid
in a uni versity news rel ease. 'When wor kers are dis plac ed, the tendenc y is to feel as though the social c ontract has been viol ated, and we found that they ar e l ess li kel y to r ecipr oc ate.' T he findings , which examined the long-ter m i mpact of j ob displ acement on s ocial participati on, were published in the September is sue of the j ournal Soci al Forc es . T he res earc h was based on i nfor mati on from a study that tr ac ked 4,373 Wisco nsi n high sc hool graduates (class of 1957) for more than 45 years. Dis pl aced wor kers wer e most likel y to withdraw fr om partici pating in youth and c ommunity groups , followed by c hurc h and churc h groups , c haritable organizations and leis urel y ac ti vities , s uc h as c ountr y club attendanc e. Professi onal organizations were the least li kel y to be affec ted by a disrupti on of empl oyment.
ARTIC LEID: 2256
Date: 9/16/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t Online ( usnews .com)
Head lin e: Fi x for Stuffy N oses
OTS: 1490178
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: Granted, the idea of squirti ng water up one's nose has a c ertain 'ick' fac tor. But 'al mos t all of the pati ents I s ee, no matter how I treat them or what I tr eat them for, benefit from nasal irrigation,' s ays M eliss a Pynnonen, an as sistant pr ofess or of otolar yngol ogy at the University of Michigan who s peci alizes in treati ng c hr onic si nusi tis. M ost doctors who don't s pecializ e in it tend to recommend over-the-counter nos e s prays to their pati ents, Pynnonen says. She and coll eag ues at the U ni versity of Mic higan tested s aline nos e s pr ays and saline ri nses in 121 adul ts, all of whom had s tuffiness , si nus pain, and other chr onic nas al and si nus s ymptoms.
Bod y:




Fix for Stuffy N os es




Granted, the idea of squirti ng water up one's nos e has a c ertain 'ic k' fac tor. But ' almos t all of the pati ents I s ee, no matter how I treat them or what I tr eat them for, benefit from nasal irrigation,' s ays M elissa Pynnonen, an assis tant pr ofess or of otolar yngolog y at the Uni versit y of Michigan who s pecializ es i n tr eating c hronic sinusitis. Mos t doctors who don't speci alize i n it tend to r ec ommend over -the-c ounter nose spr ays to their patients , Pynnonen s ays. She and c olleagues at the U ni versity of Michigan tes ted s aline nose s prays and s aline rins es i n 121 adults, all of whom had stuffiness, sinus pain, and other chr onic nas al and si nus s ymptoms. All reported fewer s ymptoms after eight weeks of tr eatment wi th either s aline nos e s pray or a twic e-dail y rins e with 8 ounc es of s alt water, using a plastic sq ueez e bottle. But the nas al rins e group showed far greater i mprove ment in severity and fr equenc y of s ymptoms, with 40 percent of the rins e group s aying they s till had s ymptoms 'often or al ways,' c ompared with 61 perc ent of the s pray gr oup. 'Mos t pati ents, by
the ti me they c ome to my office, they're s o bothered by the s ymptoms that they'r e beyond the ic k factor,' P ynnonen s ays. 'I tell them that it's a s trange s ensation; nobody r eall y li kes the i dea of doing i t. But most patients, once t hey tr y [a ri ns e], they realize that it hel ps, and they don't want to stop doi ng it.' Her study was published in the November Arc hi ves of Otol ar yng olog y. Otol aryngol ogists and all ergists s ay they' ve known for dec ades that s aline rinses help, and they often r ecommend them, partic ularl y for people with sinus infecti ons or who have had sinus s urger y. R ec ent res earch, including a J ul y 2007 anal ysis by the Coc hrane R eview, fi nds c onsi stent benefits. Indeed, the whole idea of nos e was hing as g ood hygiene is thous ands of years ol d. Indi an neti pots have been sol d for years in health-food stores, and drugs tor es now stoc k an ass ortment of s alin e s prays and squeeze bottles .
ARTIC LEID: 1697
Date: 9/11/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t Online ( usnews .com)
Head lin e: Bull ying T op C onc er n of Par ents With Over weight Chil d
OTS: 1490178
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: Par ents of thes e c hildr en, aged 6 to 13, also ar e much mor e li kel y than par ents of chil dren at a healthy weight to c all bull yi ng a top health is sue for ki ds, ac cor ding to a r eport r eleas ed Monday by the Uni versity of Michig an C.S. M ott Chil dren's Hospital N ati onal Poll on C hildren's H eal th. 'We found that parents with over weight or obes e c hildr en ac tuall y vi ew bullyi ng as a greater pr obl em than chil dhood obesity,' Dr. Matthew M . D avis, director of the National Poll on C hildr en's Health, s ai d in a uni versity news rel ease.
Bod y:




Bull yi ng Top C oncer n of Par ents With Overweight Chil d




THURSDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Bull ying is the top 'health' conc ern among parents wi th over weight and obes e childr en, acc ordi ng to a new r eport. Parents of thes e c hildren, ag ed 6 to 13, als o are muc h more likel y than par ents of childr en at a healthy weight to c all bul lyi ng a top health is sue for ki ds, ac cor ding to a r eport r eleas ed Monday by the Uni versity of Michigan C .S. M ott Childr en's Hos pital N ational Poll on Chil dren's Health. 'We found that parents wi th over weig ht or obes e c hildr en ac tuall y vi ew bull yi ng as a greater probl em than childhoo d obesity,' Dr. M atthew M. Davis , direc tor of the N ati onal Poll on C hildren's H eal th, s aid in a uni versity news releas e. 'Sinc e bullyi ng is known to be a probl em for c hildren wi th incr eas ed weight, bull ying preventi on pr ograms will need to be mindful of ob esity as a potential trigger for bull yi ng behavi or and of parents conc erns s urrounding this is sue.' Over all, par ents don't ta ke childhood obesi ty lightl y, ranki ng it N o. 1 is among heal th conc ern for kids in the N ati onal Poll on C hildren's H eal th. Still, onl y
two-thirds of parents actuall y enforce suc h li mits with their chil dren on j unk food and ti me s pent in front of a TV or c omputer screen, the poll found. Still, many parents ar e tal king with their c hildr en about havi ng heal thi er di ets and increasing their physic al acti vity, whic h D avis s aid is an i mportant first s tep i n s etti ng the stage for a healthi er lifes tyle. N earl y two in fi ve of the families polled i ncluded one or more over weight or obes e c hild between the ages of 6 and 13.
ARTIC LEID: 1698
Date: 9/11/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t Online ( usnews .com)
Head lin e: Some Must T ouch Before They Buy
OTS: 1490178
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: When high need-for-touch peopl e c an't touch products , they become fr ustr ated and los e confi denc e i n their j udgments of products , Pec k s aid. Using that sc ale, Ar adhna Kris hna of the U ni versity of Mic higan and M aureen Morrin of Rutgers U ni versity, C amden, found that c onsumers with a high need for touch rated water s erved i n a stiff c up as tasti er than the same water s er ved i n a fli ms y cup. Subj ects with a lower need-for-touch di dn't let the cup's s tiffness i nfluence t heir opini on of the beverage.
Bod y:




Some M ust Touc h Before T hey Buy




The feel of a cup can affec t how tasty people fi nd the bever age i n it, especi all y those with a 'high need' for touch Don't j udge a book by its c over. Or a slur p of c offee by its c up. R ecent res earch might yi eld the l atter advice, especi all y. A tas te test s howed that the feel of a cup c an affec t how tasty peopl e fi nd the beverage withi n it, especi all y those who have a 'high need' for touc h when it c omes to ass essi ng pr oducts. A need-for-touch sc ale was developed by Joann Pec k, a mar keti ng pr ofessor at the Uni versity of Wisc onsi n, M adison. Peopl e with a high or low need for touc h fall either above or bel ow the midpoint on this c onti nuous s cal e. When high need-for-touc h people can't touch pr oduc ts, they bec ome frus trated and l ose c onfidenc e i n their judgments of pr oduc ts, Pec k s aid. Usi ng that sc ale, Aradhna Kris hna of the Uni versi ty of Mic higan and M aur een M orrin of R utg ers U ni versi ty, C amden, found that cons umers with a hig h need for touc h r ated water ser ved in a stiff c up as tasti er than the s ame water ser ved in a fli ms y c up. Subj ects with a lower
need-for-touch di dn't l et the cup's s tiffnes s influence their opi nion of the beverage. T he res ults were detailed earlier this year in the J ournal of C onsumer R esearc h. C onsumers obvi ousl y r el y on their s enses of sigh t, and someti mes s mell or hearing or taste, to determi ne what pr oduc ts to buy, but r es earc h on the rol e of touc h has been sporadic. 'Touch res earch i n mar keting is still in its i nfanc y, s o r es earc hers ar e j ust beginni ng to l ook mor e cl osel y at multi-sens or y phenomena,' Pec k told Li veScienc e. T he first Sensor y Mar keti ng Conferenc e, organized by Krishna, took pl ace this J une at the Uni versity of Michigan to foster the growth of this fiel d and demonstr ate the rel evanc e of sight, s ound, s mell, touc h and tas te to mar keters. 'Our sens es are an inherent part of us,' sai d Krishna. 'They aren't g oing anywhere.' By connec ting marketing r es earc h with findings from fiel ds s uc h as ps yc hol og y and neur oscienc e, r es earc hers hope to hel p mar keters better understand the rel ati ons hi p between touc h and percei ved value. For exampl e, a 2006 study in the
Jour nal of Mar keti ng found that making an organiz ati on's pamphlet more tangibl y pl easi ng c oul d increase the c hanc e of r ecei vi ng a donation. And a paper by Pec k c urrentl y under revi ew for the J ournal of C onsumer R esearc h s hows that touc hing an objec t i ncreas es a s ense of owners hip and leads peopl e to be willing to pay more for the item. Pec k says res ults li ke thes e bear on online shoppi ng, which is bec oming i ncreasi ngly popul ar , rising this year as high g as prices compelled mor e c onsumers to shop fr om home. A ris e in online purchas es fr om c ompanies s uch as the Gap, Victoria's Secr et and JCPenney has hel ped offs et i n-store s al es l oss es this year, for exampl e. And Forrester Res earch says that i nternet s al es overall s houl d s urpass $200 billion in 2008, c ompared to $175 billion last year. T his ris e of onli ne sh oppi ng may hel p acc ount for the interest i n touch among peopl e who study mar keti ng, Pec k s aid. A digital image of a c ell phon e and a lis t of its functions, siz e and weight can c ompens ate for the inability to touc h it. But a photo on a
computer monitor of a s weater labeled as 's oft' is i ns uffici ent for people who prefer to feel a s weater's fabric befor e buyi ng it, s he sai d.
ARTIC LEID: 3705
Date: 9/16/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t Online ( usnews .com)
Head lin e: Estrog en Cream No Match for Sun-Damaged Ski n
OTS: 1490178
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: 'Des pite c ommonl y held beliefs, estr ogen was not abl e to r ais e c ollagen when the s kin was damag ed by s unlight,' s aid s tudy author Laur e Ritti, a researc h inves tigator in the department of der matolog y at the Uni versity of Michigan M edical Sc hool i n Ann Arbor. 'Appar entl y, c hronic exposur e to s unlight breaks so mething i n the way estr ogen increas es c ollagen, whic h makes damaged s ki n even harder to r epair.' U nfortunatel y, thes e ar e the exact areas that ar e most i n need of r epair. 'T her e was a general beli ef that es trogen was good for the s ki n,' Ritti explai ned.
Bod y:




Estrog en Cream N o M atc h for Sun-Damaged Skin




TUESD AY, Sept. 16 (H eal thD ay N ews) -- T he hor mone cr eam es tradiol c an repair aging s kin, but onl y i f that s ki n has never been touched by the damaging UV rays of s u nlight, new research fi nds . D ecades of sun damage on the fac e and ar ms and other expos ed ar eas s eem to under mine the power of the cr eam, accor ding to a study in the September issue of the Arc hi ves of D ermatolog y. 'Des pite c ommonl y held beliefs, estr ogen was not abl e to r aise coll agen when the s ki n was damag ed by sunlight,' sai d s tudy author Laur e Ritti , a res earch investig ator in the department of der matolog y at the Uni versity of Michigan M edical Sc hool i n Ann Arbor. 'A ppar entl y, c hronic exposur e to s unlight breaks something i n the way estr ogen increases c ollagen, whic h makes damaged s ki n even harder to r epair.' U nfortunatel y, these ar e the exact areas that ar e most in need of r epair. 'T her e was a general belief that estrog en was good for the s kin,' Ritti explai ned. But most, if not all, previ ous s tudies that had purported to show this looked at s un- protected areas of the
ski n, not sun-exposed areas . 'When we look for tr eatments for aging s kin, we usuall y want to treat the fac e or hands or nec k, i n other words , s un-exposed areas,' Ritti expl ained. ' We deci ded to g o ahead and car efull y test these q uestions.' R es earc hers applied topical es tradiol for two weeks to both s un-exposed areas on the forear m and non-expos ed s kin near the hi p i n 40 women and 30 men, average ag e 75. A bi ops y was taken fr om eac h vol unteer 24 hours after the last tr eatment. The cr eam sti mulated c ollagen producti on in sun-pr otected s ki n areas but not i n s un-damaged areas . T he coll agen-promoti ng effects wer e found i n both men and women but were mor e pronounced i n women vol unteers. Both types of s kin, however, had si milar levels of es trogen-rec eptor expression. Estr adiol acti vity s eemed to be the same, regardless of whether the s kin had or had not been damaged by the s un. T he study was parti all y s upported by Pfiz er.
ARTIC LEID: 5032
Date: 9/18/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t Online ( usnews .com)
Head lin e: Calci um Supplements C ut Bl ood Lead Levels D uring Pregnanc y
OTS: 1490178
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: ' We and others have pr eviousl y shown that duri ng pr egnanc y, mothers can transfer lead fr om their bones to their unborn -- wi th signific ant adverse c ons equences -- maki ng mater nal bone lead stores a thr eat even if c urrent environmental lead expos ures ar e l ow,' principal i nvestigator H owar d H u, c hair man of the U ni versity of Michigan's D epartment of Envir onmental Health Scienc es, sai d i n a news rel eas e is sued by the sc hool. 'This s tudy demonstr ates that di etary c alcium suppl ementati on during preg nanc y may cons titute a low-c ost and low-ris k approac h for r educi ng this threat.'
Bod y:




Calcium Supplements C ut Bl ood Lead Levels During Preg nanc y




THURSDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- High dail y dos es of calci um s upplements may reduc e l ead l evels i n the bl ood of pr egnant women and cut down on fetal and infant exposur e, a new report s uggests . T he study, publis hed online in Environmental H ealth Perspec ti ves , found that women who take 1,200 milligrams of calci um dail y have up to a 31 percent r ed uc tion i n lead levels . Women who us ed lead-glazed c er amic s or with hig h bone lead levels showed the l argest reductions, whil e the aver age r educ tion was about 11 perc ent. ' We and others have pr eviousl y shown that duri ng pr egnanc y, mothers can transfer lead fr om their bones to their unborn -- with signific ant advers e c onsequenc es -- making maternal bone lead stores a threat even if c urrent environmental l ead expos ures are l ow,' princi pal i nvestigator H oward H u, chair man of the U ni versity of Michigan's D epart ment of Envir onmental Health Scienc es, sai d i n a news rel eas e is sued by the sc hool. 'T his s tudy demonstr ates that dietar y c alcium s uppl ementati on during preg nanc y may
constitute a low-c os t and l ow-risk appr oach for reducing this thr eat.' Expos ure to lead during fetal devel opment and i nfanc y c an c ause low birth weight or sl ow weight g ain after birth, c ogni ti ve defects such as lower intelligenc e sc ores, l ower motor and vis ual s kills, or even miscar riage. D amag e fr om lead expos ure and pois oni ng is us uall y perm anent, the res earchers s aid. Bone lead c an stay i n the body for decades, and the fetus or nursing i nfant c an still be at great ris k from mater nal stor es of lead even with mi nimal environmental expos ure, the res earc hers sai d.
ARTIC LEID: 5033
Date: 9/18/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U S N ews and World Repor t Online ( usnews .com)
Head lin e: Michig an to Launc h ' ATM of Books'
OTS: 1490178
Subject: Other
Summ ar y: T he Uni versity of Mic higan is installing an 'ATM of books' i n one of i ts libr aries , which will allow students to pri nt c opies of books from its digitized c ollec tion. The Espr ess o Book Mac hine, whic h will go online October 1, will print and bind any of the uni versity's 2 million digitized out-of-copyright books, as well as thousands of public ations from Open C ontent Alli anc e. Eac h book will c ost ar ound $10 and take 5 to 7 minutes to pr oduc e. Acc ordi ng to Michig an officials , this mac hine is the first to be used i n a uni versity librar y.
Bod y:




Michigan to Launch 'ATM of Books'




The Uni versity of Michig an is ins talli ng an 'ATM of books' i n one of i ts libr aries , whic h will allow students to pri nt c opies of books from i ts digitized c ollec tion. T he Espr ess o Book M ac hine, whic h will go online October 1, will print and bind any of the uni versity's 2 million digitized out-of-c opyright books , as well as thous ands of publicati ons fr om Open Content Alliance. Eac h book will cost around $10 and take 5 t o 7 mi nutes to produc e. Ac cor ding to Mic higan offici als, this mac hi ne is the first to be us ed in a uni versi ty libr ar y.
ARTIC LEID: 5064
Date: 9/22/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: G.E., a Giant of Lendi ng, Is Dragged D own Al ong With Banks
OTS: 1037828
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: ''Immelt wants financial ser vic es to evol ve i nto a c ash c ow, and the i nfr astructure and technol og y business es to be the growth engi nes of the c ompany,'' sai d N oel M. Tic hy, a pr ofess or at the Uni versity of Mic higan Busi ness School who once ran G.E.'s management school at Crotonville, N.Y.
Bod y:




G.E., a Giant of Lendi ng, Is Dragged D own Al ong With Banks




Gener al Electric is bes t known as an i ndustri al powerhouse, with manufacturing prowess i n business es that r ange fr om giant g enerators to jet engines to al ter nati ve energ y tec hnol ogies li ke wi nd mills and s olar panels.




Yet Gener al El ectric is as much a bank as a blue-chi p i ndustri al c ompany. H alf of its profits c ome fr om its giant fi nanc e ar m, GE Capital, whose global portfoli o s pans aircra ft l easing, commercial r eal es tate lendi ng, cr edit c ards and home mor tgages .




Indeed, G.E. is the l argest nonbank fi nanc e c ompany i n the U nited States, with assets of $696 billion and $545 billion in debt. If it wer e a bank, GE C api tal would be the nation's fifth-largest.
So G.E. found its elf eng ulfed l ast week i n the mar ket tur moil, treated by fearful i nvestors as another fi nanci al c ompany potentiall y in peril, until news of a pl anned federal bail out brought a rebound in the mar kets l ate T hurs day and Fri day.




At one point on T hursday, G.E. s har es were down 20 percent for the week, before they r evi ved to cl ose at $26.62 a shar e on Friday -- down just 0.5 perc ent from M onday.




Per haps more telling, the c ost to ins ur e the debt of GE C apital, wi th so-c alled cr edi t default s waps, had mor e than doubl ed by Wednes day. T he i nsur ance cos t had drop ped by Fri day, thoug h it r emai ned well above the l evel of a week earlier. G.E. was not among the nearl y 800 financi al c ompani es that the Securiti es and Exc hang e C ommission s aid it would tempor aril y pr otect from short selling, but the company expects to be added to the list, acc ordi ng to a G.E. spokes man, Gar y Sheffer.




Gi ven the c ontinuing uncertai nty and vol atility in the financi al mar kets, G.E. will r emai n i n the s potlight and is li kel y to be under press ure. In a r eport on T hurs day, the i ndependent credit r ating agenc y Egan-J ones c oncluded, ''With the ts unami s weeping over the financial s ec tor, it is unrealistic to expect that G.E. will not get wet.''




G.E., acc ordi ng to anal ysts and i nstituti onal i nvestors, will not fac e the huge write- downs of fi nancial as set values that sets off a liquidity crisis -- the downwar d s piral seen at the failed i nvestment banks. G.E., they s ay, does not have l arge hol dings of exotic s ecuriti es and is c ons er vati vel y manag ed.




G.E. also has far l ess debt than mos t banks , givi ng it more fi nancial ballas t and flexi bility i n di ffic ult ti mes. Its rati o of debt to equity is l ess than 8, c ompar ed with 15 for s ome larg e c ommerci al banks and 30 or mor e for s ome inves tment banks befor e they ran i nto troubl e.




But the fi nancial mar ket crisis, anal ysts s ay, does pres ent G.E. with c hallenges to its financi al perfor manc e, its s trateg y and perhaps even its busi ness model of usi ng stabl e profi ts fr om the fi nanc e uni t to c us hion the c ompany from up-and- down c ycles in i ndus trial s ales. T he upheaval als o makes it more difficult for G.E. to par e s ome of its holdi ngs, li ke N BC U ni vers al and the cr edi t c ard oper ati ons , and make its elf l ess r eliant on the fi nanci al s ector.




In g eneral, anal ysts share the sel f-ass ess ment offered this week by the pr esident of GE Capital, Mic hael A. Neal. ''We're a ver y c ons ervati ve finance company and not a Wall Str eet wannabe,'' Mr. N eal, a lo ng-time G.E. executi ve who took over as head of GE C apital in Jul y, s ai d in a bri ef i nter view l ast week.




The outl ook for the c urrent quarter is uncertain. G.E. had already startl ed Wall Street with lower-than-expected earni ngs in the first q uarter, when the mar kets seiz ed up wi th the coll aps e of Bear Stearns . Some anal ysts retooled their fi nanci al models last week and now esti mate that GE C apital's earnings in 2009 will decline 5 to 15 percent, c ompared wi th pr evious proj ecti ons that the fi nanc e unit's pr ofit would hol d steady.




The financial turmoil, they s ay, also pos es a threat to the pac e of the s trateg y of G.E.'s c hi ef executi ve, J effr ey R . Immelt, to si mplify the s prawling company and reduce its r eliance on the financ e business . T he pl an is to trim the contributi on fr om fi nanc e to about 40 perc ent, whil e tilti ng mor e toward suppl yi ng equipment for what it calls ''infrastr ucture'' industries li ke trans por tation and energ y, as well as health c are, which G.E. consi ders a high-growth fiel d.




''Immelt wants financial ser vic es to evol ve i nto a c ash cow, and the i nfrastruc tur e and technol og y busi ness es to be the growt h engi nes of the c ompany,'' sai d N oel M . Tic hy, a pr ofess or at the Uni versity of Mic higan Business Sc hool who once ran G.E.'s manag ement sc hool at Cr otonvill e, N .Y.




Sell-offs i ntended to acc elerate the str ateg y will be more difficult in a time of credit-cri mped economic weakness. G.E., for example, has s aid it wants to s ell off its c onsumer applianc e uni t. But with housi ng in a slump and c onsumers tighteni ng their belts, potential buyers ar e li kel y to be scarc e and pic ky. G.E. has s aid i t will not sell at fire-s ale pric es. The c ompany has s aid its pri mar y focus now will be to s pin off both its cons umer appli anc e unit and the lighti ng busi ness.




Simil arly, the c ompany wants to sell its private-label credit car d busi ness i n N orth America, wher e G.E. handl es cr edit c ards for c omp ani es li ke Wal-Mart Stores , IKEA, Br ooks Br others , Dillar d's and Lowe's. T hat business is still profi table for G.E., bringing i n an es timate d $500 million profi t this year, acc ording to Nicholas P. H eymann, an anal yst for the br okerage firm Ster ne, Ag ee & Leach. Yet that busi ness too is becomi ng mor e diffic ult to sell at an attracti ve pric e as c onsumer s pending falls and delinqu encies rise.




Most anal ys ts expect that G.E. will eventuall y s ell its film and televi sion business, NBC Uni versal . Ti me War ner has l ooked at buying N BC U ni vers al, acc ordi ng to executi ves at the medi a c ompany, who are not authoriz ed to s peak publicl y. But if G.E. were to s ell NBC U ni versal befor e it can r educ e its dependenc e on GE Capital, the r esul t woul d be that the fi nanc e busi ness woul d l oom larger i n the over all c ompany. So s elling NBC Uni versal , anal ysts s ay, is pr obabl y a c oupl e years down the road no w.




G.E. did not avoid mortg age l ending woes i n the Uni ted States altogether, but it r ecog nized the problem earl y and got out. In 2004, G.E. bought a subprime l ender in C aliforni a, WMC M ortgag e. But G.E. grew alar med by the ris ks and sol d it off i n 2007, t aki ng a total los s of about $1 billion. ''That was a big mi stake,'' said Robert Spr emulli, an anal yst at the inves tment compa ny TIAA-CREF, whic h owns G.E. shares. ''But it wasn't a dis aster for G.E.''




On Sept. 14, G.E. did post a letter to investors on its Web site describi ng its l ending practic es. In both its c ommerci al and residential mortgag e busi ness, G.E. holds the l oans it makes i nstead of passi ng them on to others . It was the originate-to-sell model of some mortgag e br okers, who took none of the ris k on the loans they marketed, that pr oved an invi tation to irresponsibility and fraud.




Nearl y 100 percent of G.E.'s resi denti al mortgages ar e outside the U nited States . A G.E. s pokes man sai d expos ur e it had to the embattl ed American Internati onal Group, a big mortgag e i nsur er, was r esol ved by the i nsur er's federal bailout.




G.E.'s c ommercial real estate lending is mainl y outside the U nited States, and the aver age l oan is a cons er vati ve 68 perc ent of the val ue of the pr operty. G.E.'s fi nanc e busi ness hing es on the company's bl ue-c hip tripl e-A r ati ng from the big credit r ati ng ag enci es, Standard & Poor's and M oody's. A top r ating allows G.E. to borr ow for less, and it l ends mainl y to midsize cor por ati ons , which typicall y have a lower, tripl e-B r ating.




Sean J. Egan, manager of the cr edit rati ng des k at Egan-Jones, ques tions G.E.'s top-line rati ng. In his firm's r eport l ast week, he wr ote, ''G.E. does not look, sound or ac t li ke a AAA credit and, ther efore, pr obabl y is not a r eal AAA.''




In an inter vi ew, Mr. Eg an sai d most of G.E.'s business es -- not j ust finance -- would face incr easing profi t press ures in a weak ec onomy. T he company als o needs to r ais e $80 billion over the next 15 months, mos tl y i n c ommerci al paper. ''It all begs the questi on of whether G.E. c an gener ate the levels of earni ngs and c as h that it has i n the past,'' s aid Mr. Eg an, whos e agenc y r ates G.E. at A+, sever al n otc hes bel ow AAA.




But G.E. insis ts its blue-chi p cr edit rati ng is both jus tified and safe. In a peril ous ti me for many financial compani es, GE Capital reported a $5.2 billion profit i n the first half of the year alone. In a conferenc e c all with anal ysts in Jul y, Keith S. Sheri n, G.E.'s c hief fi nanci al offic er, s ai d that maintai ning the c ompany's top credit r ati ng was the pri ority. ' 'Ever ything we do is about making sur e we keep it AAA,'' he s aid.




PHOT OS: G.E.'s chi ef, J effr ey Immelt, wants to c ut bac k on fi nanc e. (PHOT OGR APH BY FR ED R . C ONRAD) ( pg.C1); Michael A. N eal of GE C apital c alled the uni t ''ver y c onser vati ve,'' adding that it was ''not a Wall Str eet wannabe.'' (PH OTOGRAPH BY JAMIE R ECT OR/BLOOMBERG N EWS) ( pg.C5)




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 5065
Date: 9/22/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: Looking Ahead
OTS: 1037828
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: Other r eports will i ncl ude dur abl e goods for Aug ust (Thursday) and final s ec ond-quarter gross domestic pr oduct and the R euters/U ni versity of Michigan c ons umer s enti ment index (Friday).
Bod y:




Looki ng Ahead




ECON OMIC R EPORTS Investors will get a sens e of where the housi ng mar ket is headed with r eports on existi ng-home s al es for Aug ust ( Wednesday) and new-home sal es for August (Thursday).




Other r eports will i nclude dur abl e goods for Aug ust (T hursday) and final s ec ond-quar ter gros s domestic pr oduct and the R euters/U ni versity of Michigan c onsumer s enti ment index (Friday).




THE R EGU LAT ORS The Tr easur y secretar y, Henr y M. Pauls on Jr.; the c hair man of the Federal R es er ve, Ben S. Ber nanke; and the ch air man of the Securiti es and Exc hang e C ommis sion, C hristopher Cox, are to testify befor e the Senate Banki ng C ommi ttee on the government' s takeover of F anni e Mae and Freddi e M ac (T uesday).




Mr. Pauls on, Mr. Bernanke and federal housing offici als will testi fy befor e the H ous e Fi nanci al Ser vic es C ommittee on the takeover of F annie and Freddie (T hursday).




Mr. Bernanke will als o testify on the ec onomic outlook before the Joi nt Ec onomic C ommittee (Wednes day) .




COMPANY R EPORT S It is a light week for earni ngs, with r eports comi ng fr om 3Com (M onday), Lennar (T uesday), Bed, Bath & Beyond and Ni ke ( Wednesday), Ri te Ai d and R es earc h i n Motion (T hurs day) and KB Home (Friday).




ET C ETER A J ur y s election begins i n N ew Yor k i n the fr aud trial of Al berto W. Vil ar and Gar y T anaka, the founders of Amerindo Investment Advis ors (Monday).




The first i niti al public offering in s even weeks, Flui digm, is expec ted to be priced after bei ng postponed last week (Monday) .




The first mobile device powered by Google's mobil e phone softwar e will be intr oduc ed in New Yor k (T ues day).




PHOT O




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 5069
Date: 9/21/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: T he Camera-Friendl y, Perfec tl y Pi xel ated, Easil y D ownloadable Cel ebrity Ac ademic
OTS: 1037828
Subject: F ac ulty
Summ ar y: Gi ven the diffic ulty of c alcul ating r ati ngs Webwide, the viewershi p for thes e lectures is typic ally gauged by how they perfor m on iT unes U, where each video must be full y downloaded ( and not merel y clic ked on) before it ear ns a popularity point. T he top of the iT unes U chart features some s elf- hel p fl uff on abs and g uitar ins tructi on, but it als o brims with provoc ati ve titl es li ke ''How Di d H anni bal Cr oss the Alps?'' by Patric k Hunt of Stanford (audi o onl y) ; ''String T heor y: What Is It Good F or?'' by Sera Cremoni ni of the U ni versity of Mic higan;
Bod y:




The Camera-Friendl y, Perfec tl y Pi xel ated, Easil y Downloadable Cel ebrity Academic




Some J apanese have an expression for a c harmi ng pr ofess or: a c haris ma-sens ei. You know the type. He's actorl y, perhaps a littl e too s mooth; he enthralls s tudents. N ot too long ag o, uni versity authorities consi der ed hi m s us pect. He was c ool, sur e, but was he sc holarl y enough? A c haris ma-sens ei's tenure battl e, during which dour publish-or- peris h admi nistrators dis paraged his s weet nes s and light, might be a fres hman's or s ophomore's first exposur e to i ntellectual and moral i njur y. He was Pr ofess or C hips; he was Prof. Jean Br odi e.




Oh, but thos e days are long gone. N ow a c haris ma-sens ei -- luci d, affable, groomed for ''The C harli e R ose Show'' -- is all but a tenure shoo-in, an ass et no blue-chi p uni versity c an be without. On TV or billboar ded on the Barnes & N oble front tabl e, the c haris ma-sens ei is an emissar y for the r elevance and exuberance of the brand, be i t H arvar d, Yal e or C hauc er. Bes t of all, his onli ne lec tur es now might go vir al, playi ng ar ound the world -- beyond the reach even of C harlie R os e! -- alongside cli ps of the C hines e Ol ympi an Qi u Ji an or the Lebanes e si nger Fairuz in conc ert. What better way to prove an instit ution's embr ac e of globalism, new technolog y and populist models of infor mati on diss eminati on?




Las t D ec ember, T he Ti mes c hronicled the rise to i nter national glor y of Walter H. G. Lewin, a physics profess or at M .I.T . whos e l ectures, available free on the Web using the uni versity's proprietar y OpenC ours eWar e s oftwar e (developed i n 2002), are among the Inter net's mos t downloaded. T he y also regul arl y i nspir e e-raptur es: ''Throug h your ins piring vi deo l ectures I have managed to s ee jus t how beautiful physics is, b oth astoundi ng and si mple,'' wrote one c ommenter, a 17- year-old from Indi a.




M.I.T. had a head start with its s oftware, but in s hort or der other uni versities began cl amori ng to broadc as t their l ectures fr ee. Duke, Yal e and Stanfor d now ser ve as ''pr oviders'' on iTunes U , which appeared i n May of l ast year to make lectures available to download (under one Apple roof). T hen, s ever al months later, a lightweight Web site c alled Big Thi nk s tarted: an ad- driven forum for videos of l ectures by intell ectuals , s ome with uni versity appointments .
Many online l ectures ar e now listed on various platforms, i ncluding iT unes U, uni versity sites ( OYC.yal e.edu, oc w.mit.edu, bu.edu/today/buni verse), all-pur pos e i nstr ucti on sites (Rice Uni versity's C nx.org and OERC ommons .c om) and gener al-interes t vi deo clearinghouses li ke YouT ube.




Gi ven the diffic ulty of calc ul ating r ati ngs Webwide, the viewershi p for thes e lectures is typic ally gauged by how they perfor m on iT unes U, where each video must be full y downloaded ( and not merel y clic ked on) before it ear ns a popularity point. T he top of the iT unes U c hart features some s elf- hel p fl uff on abs and g uitar instr ucti on, but it als o brims with provoc ati ve titl es li ke ''How Di d H anni bal Cr oss the Alps?'' by Patric k Hunt of Stanford (audi o onl y); ''String T heor y: What Is It Good F or?'' by Sera Cr emoni ni of the U ni versity of Mic higan; and ''What M akes a T errorist?'' by Alan B. Krueger of Pri nceton ( also audio onl y).




Recentl y, I set out to l ear n s omethi ng -- anythi ng, as l ong as it was a littl e bit i mpr essi ve -- fr om l ecture vi deos online. Though s ome of the audio- onl y tr ac ks on iT unes U interested me, I chos e to foc us on l ectures I c ould als o watc h. I didn't know how to be s ystematic, s o I wasn't. Instead, I watc hed lec tur es that s eemed pres tigious, popular, both and neither; I followed my i nteres ts and I followed other peoples' interes ts. I got a partic ul ar kic k out of seeing l ecturers -- like H ar vey M ans fiel d of H ar var d -- that I'd heard wer e l egendar y and whose disq uisitions I'd i ns ecur el y i magined as cons piratorial meetings i n whic h it was for mall y deci ded that thos e present wer e tr ul y educ ated and the res t of us weren't. And so, fi nally, I would be i n on the secrets! And trul y educ ated! Herewith, the fi ve c haris ma-sens eis that no onli ne student s hould mis s.




Walter H . G. Lewi n, Powers of 10, M.I.T. ( Video)




Why lecture at all ? Why not jus t make students buy your book? T ake one look at Walter H . G. Lewi n, a profes sor of physics at M.I.T., and you'll never as k ag ain. Lewin, a prizewi nni ng t eac her, has pr oved to be box-offic e gol d si nce his c ours es went onli ne in 2003, as part of M.I.T.'s pi oneering OpenC ours eWar e proj ect. And it's no accident that he's a virtuos o at teac hing: he evidentl y r efi nes thos e l ectures -- on subjec ts li ke rai nbows , pendul ums and r oc ketr y -- as if they wer e mathematic al proofs . H e c uts ever y extr aneous wor d and s treamlines the s tagecraft until what's l eft is a 50- minute pedagogical master piec e.




Repl ete with s eemingl y off-the-cuff asides and anecdotes , eac h Lewin l ect ure is actuall y 25 hours i n the making, during which Lewin deci des when exactl y to write on the board, to physicall y demons tr ate s omething, to recr uit a student or to make a j oke. T he s eries is a s har p, potent teac hing weapon, one that slic ed to ribb ons even this humaniti es s tudent's resistanc e to physics, mathematics and hard s cienc e.




Lewi n, a r ang y and good-l ooki ng 70-s omethi ng who onstage has the physic ality of a much younger man, c oul d be pl ayed by Ral ph Fiennes or Ed H arris. His decisi ve chal k s trokes on the rolli ng, mul tilayer M.I.T. chal kboards al one manage to turn high-l evel numerac y into a tennislike s por t: s omethi ng req uiring aggressi on, hand-eye c oordinati on and l aserli ke foc us. But not onl y does Lewi n c onvey enthusi as m for his s ubj ect -- a ''Dead Poets Society'' tal ent that perhaps ought to be s uperfluous i n a nucl ear physicis t s peaki ng to the best and the brightest - - but he als o empowers his students by demons trating the way of the physicist and as sumi ng you can wal k it with hi m. Watchi ng t he lec tur es, I keenl y wanted to ris e to Lewi n's c onfidence; I dr edged up anythi ng I could possi ble remember about high-level math and us ed i t to foll ow his demonstrations. Sometimes , I g ot l ost. But al ways I felt both s mart and challenged. And pr epared, as the next lec tur e roll ed, to tr y again.




Randy Paus ch, Reall y Ac hievi ng Your Chil dhood Dreams, C arnegie M ellon ( Video)




For months I r esisted the hugel y popular ''Last Lectur e'' of R andy Pausch, who was a c omputer-scienc e profess or at C arnegie M ellon until he di ed of pancreatic canc er in Jul y. I worried that the spi el, whic h later became a book c alled ''The Last Lectur e,'' would be too inspirational, too elegiac , too s ad. T oo Tony Robbi ns. It wouldn't q ualify, i n s hort, as an academic lec tur e. But once I s et the video rolling, I c hang ed my mind before Pausc h finis hed his opening thank- yous.




Most stri king, Paus ch embodies a partic ularl y American profess orial i deal. Looking li ke an off-duty fighter pilot in a polo shirt, earl y on he dr ops and gi ves the audi ence s ome one- armed pus h- ups . N o lecture i n a c ultural-studi es course c oul d s um up as s uccinc tl y the Americ an charisma-s ens ei with his r eal- world experi enc e, his conversational styl e and his c ommitment to ''fun.'' (That hol y word turns up s o many ti mes I los t c ount. T owar d the end, Paus ch, who knew at the ti me he had onl y months to li ve, s ums up his approac h to c omputer sci ence, s aying , ''I'm dying and I'm havi ng fun.'')




What's mor e, the i mag e of the Americ an educator-s ales man is a great global export. Students i n Asia, facing the riddl e of admis sion to g ood c olleg e and pos t-coll egiate programs , especi all y in the scienc es, may well find Pausc h's c ombi nation of bona fide ac ademic ac hievement, nerdy humor, pers onal discl osur e and tech evangelis m inspiring i n the wa y of George Luc as or Bill Gates -- other highl y dec or ated maveric ks who tal k without irony about foll owing dreams. (At least one of Pausc h's lec tur es is alr eady available i n C hines e tr anslation.)




In Pausc h's c as e, however, the American idea of dreams-bec oming-reality takes on a c uriousl y nonmetaphorical di mensi on, since his ac ademic speci alty was vir tual reality, the liter al enc oding and r eific ation of fantasi es. His enthusiastic tal es of wor king at Disney designi ng rides and starting a c ourse at Car negi e Mell on c alled ''Buil ding Virtual Worl ds'' are at bottom littl e mor e than adventur es i n alliance buildi ng and bur eaucrac y avoidi ng. But his capacity to fi nd opportuni ties for herois m in i nstituti onal politics is sur prisingl y moving -- and qui te enough to make an as piring engineer , her e or abroad, r esol ve to vanquis h nays ayers or s oftwar e bugs and turn his most arc ane mental pl easur es i nto c hanc es for pr ofit and laurels.




Dan Ariel y, Predictabl y Irrati onal, Duke and M.I.T. ( Video)




Dan Ariel y had a revel ation while bedridden after a horribl e acci dent that burned 70 percent of his body. His nurs es, wonderfull y c aring people who knew well the scienc e of bur ns, nonetheles s s ubj ected him to unneces sar y agony, he decided, becaus e they beli eved that bandag es oug ht to be tor n off q uic kl y, when -- as his subs equent r esearc h s howed -- mos t people pr efer low-grade pain at length to high-intensity pain for short spurts. T his revel ation, and the s ubs equent making of a ''behavi oral ec onomist,'' whic h is what Ariel y now is -- he teac hes at both Duke and M.I.T. -- is the s ubjec t of Ariel y's firs t bite-siz e l ecture online, ''How an Inj ur y Led M e to Irrati onality.''




The ins tall ments in his ''Predictabl y Irrati onal'' series are s hort -- the length of pop songs -- and padded with too many cr edits , ti tles and pr omotions for both D uke and Ari el y's book. They are, however, enj oyabl e and thought- provoking. Ari el y appears half-lighted i n a tuxedo, s ometi mes with jac ket and s ometi mes without, as he tells of s mall insig hts i nto s eemingl y ordi nar y events. Montages of c ontempor ar y i mag es play to illumi nate his insights. The plac ebo effect, pr ocras tinati on and the all ure of free thi ngs c ome in for anal ysis and are brightl y put into c ontext. ( An example: maki ng the registr y of a hybrid c ar free would be a way for the government to enc our age their purc has e, he argues.)




Even for thos e of us who are not s ur e that i ndi vi dual mar keting breakthroughs -- whic h admittedl y foll ow a s atisfyi ng narrati ve arc -- ought to be taught as ec onomics have to c oncede that this g uy is cool. F urther more, his willingness to factor human wac ki ness i nto macroec onomic phenomena demons trates i ntellec tual i ngenuity and a gift -- li ke Pausc h's -- for havi ng fun. While pres enting how to design r esearc h projects and mor eover how to pac kage insig hts, Ari el y makes the potent c as e that the brai n c an be an organ of s ur vi val.




Langdon Hammer, M oder n Poetr y, Yale (Video)




It's hard not to be bi ased i n favor of the Open Yal e c ours es at OYC.yale.edu si mpl y bec ause they ar e pres ented i n s uc h a fr ank, unfuss y way. The silky audiovis uals s tart without graphic rigamar ole and don't stall till they're over. Profess ors wear clip- on microphones but other wis e s eem to c onduct the cl ass es j ust for the students, as in the case of Langdon Hammer, whose set of l ectures on moder n poetr y are weak on sizzl e but s trong on s teak. Hammer c an als o be s een distri buting handouts and enc our aging students to do their homewor k; he's not pl ayi ng to the online bleac her seats or would- be book buyers. This is the real N ew H aven stuff.




I chos e one of Hammer's first l ectures on Hart Crane, as Crane is the s ubjec t of s everal of Hammer books , incl uding ''Hart Cr ane and Allen T ate: Janus-Faced M odernis m.'' Indeed, he appears to take great s atisfac tion in si mpl y readi ng Crane al oud. His sig natur e ges tur e is an outstr etc hed ar m from whic h he twists his hand as i f turni ng a stiff dial on the el a bor ate das hboard of a s pac es hip. With this, he s uggests how well a poet enc aps ul ates or compresses an idea. His voic e is neither blas e nor s porty, li ke Ari el y's or Pausch's. Instead, it's s uave and nervous at onc e: call i t the humani ties voic e. Pausch stu mbl es as he ad-libs -- unli ke the others, he evidentl y keeps no notes, onl y poems, in front of hi m -- but pic ks up fluenc y, tellingl y, when he reads from Crane (or Eliot or Pound; it's a canonic al s yll abus of moder nists).




Hammer s tress es that his c ours e is not specific all y for English maj ors. T he poets under disc ussi on knew s omething about ec ono mics, sci enc e, mathematics and other fiel ds -- and di dn't consi der poetry a dis cipline apart from the rest of the world. As a cons equenc e of Hammer's emphasis, his poets c ome acros s as much mor e than emoti onal cr ooners (as might the adol esc ent- friendl y R omantics); they're s ophis ticated, canny prac titioners of tr anslati on and quotati on.




This s eems li ke the right tac k to take with thes e urbane modernis ts, who sli p i n and out of l ang uag es and dial ects and citi es and who are i mpres si ve not so muc h as foll owers of dreams but as boulevar diers i n bowl ers -- or open-c ollar ed shirts and c as hmer e, whic h is what H ammer seems to opt for. Keen, witty, col d-eyed obs er vers of the turni ng worl d: what undergraduate doesn't li ke to s ee hi ms elf i n the Eliot paradigm?




Christine H ayes, Introduction to the Old Testament (H ebrew Bibl e), Yal e ( Video)




In C hristi ne H ayes's firs t lecture, she breez es i nto her subjec t -- weari ng an open aqua bl ue s hirt and matc hing tank top, as if on a cruis e -- and q uic kl y becomes, personall y, a c ompelling enigma. M aybe it's i mmatur e to wonder, but what's her stor y?




Here is a speci alist i n T al mudic-Midrashic studi es, who is the Rober t F. and Patrici a R oss Weis profess or of r eligious studi es i n cl assic al J udaic a at Yale. As she l ays out for a crowd of s tudents how tenaci ous the monotheis m of the earl y Isr aelites has been, how i nfluential , how r eall y mir acul ous, she s hows a rousi ng philo- Semitis m. It s eems to ki ndl e a warm glow i n anyone rais ed as J ewish, C hristian or Muslim.




Her enthusias m for the conc ept of one God might make more sens e c oming fr om a ki ndl y rabbi or Sunday-s chool teac her. D eli ver ed by a pr ofess or at Yal e, where you might expect mor e c ultural r elati vis m and fr ank atheis m, Introduction to the Ol d T estament seems at first a littl e off -- a high-toned monothei sm infomercial.




Exc ept that it's not. H ayes's s eemingl y si mple for mulati ons twi nkl e with fasci nating i mplicati ons for c ontemporar y r eligious life. In the l ast two c enturies, s he s ays, with the help of archaeol ogy, we first glimps ed the ancient world; that world incl uded many extinc t c ultures and one that had c uriousl y s ur vi ved; the s ur vi val of the Jews is tes tament to the vers atility and might of the Bi ble. While the cours e si des teps theologic al iss ues and H ayes str ess es that q ues tio ns about the Bibl e's di vine i nspir ation will be tabl ed, s he nonethel ess r eveals that the Hebrew Bible s tirs in her a s pecial ki nd of l onging and delight. Students with even a passing famili arity with the Bibl e will fi nd i t har d to keep al oof fr om H ayes's a ffecti on.




Intellec tual purs uits can satisfy r eligious longings: that's a powerful l ess on, and one that Hayes unfolds and demons tra tes with pati ence and s pirit.




Pic k Your F avorite Video at T he M edi um blog




DRAWINGS (DR AWINGS BY BR YAN ISCH E, MINNEAPOLIS COLLEGE OF ART AND D ESIGN ; LETT ERIN G BY CHRISTOPH MOR ABITO, C ALIFORNIA INST ITUTE OF THE ART S) (pg.MM 84, 85, 86, and 87)




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 5070
Date: 9/21/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: Mars hall Sahli ns on Lesli e A. White
OTS: 1037828
Subject: F ac ulty
Summ ar y: In the pre-'60s at the Uni versity of Michigan, rebelli on consisted of lis tening gleefull y to the anthr opol ogist Lesli e White going mano a mano with God. White was one of thos e maveric k intell ectuals and politici ans , li ke T hors tei n Veblen, Charles Bear d and R obert La F ollette, who came out of the r ural Americ an heartland to off the pi eties-and powers-that- be. Some of thes e intell ectuals wer e vill age atheis ts fr om the beginni ng. Others, li ke White, onl y s hook off the idi ocies of r ural life when they went to the city and the uni versi ty.
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Marshall Sahlins on Lesli e A. White




In the pre-'60s at the Uni versity of Michigan, rebelli on consisted of listening gleefull y to the anthr opol ogist Lesli e Whi te going mano a mano with God. White was one of thos e maveric k intellectuals and politici ans , li ke T horstei n Veblen, C harles Bear d and R obert La F ollette, who came out of the rur al American heartl and to off the pieties- and powers-that-be. Some of thes e i ntellec tuals were village atheists from the beginning. Others , li ke White, onl y s hook off the i dioci es of rur al life when they went to the city and the uni versity.




We never knew White was a member of the Socialis t Labor Party i n the '30s and earl y '40s, contri buting articles to T he Weekl y People under the name J ohn Steel. N or c oul d you have g ues sed fr om his s o-Americaniz ed versi on of M arxis m: a theor y of c ultur al evol uti on bas ed singularl y on technol ogical progr ess. Progress i n the Neolithic, he cl aimed, ca me fr om the increase in the amount of energy harness ed per c apita bec ause of plant and ani mal domes tication. H e was not amuse d when I objected that energ y ''per capita'' was the same as i n the Ol d Stone Age, si nce the pri mary mechanic al s ource remained the human body.




On the other hand, I have never repudi ated White's c oncept of c ultur e as a thoroughl y s ymbolic phenomenon. I never tired of repeating his dictum that no ape c an appreci ate the difference between hol y water and distilled water -- bec ause ther e is none, chemicall y speaking. That, for me, res ol ved the contr adic tion i n his own teac hing and that of the many human scientis ts who separate culture from pr actic al acti vity, as if the s ymbolic di mensi on of economic behavi or were an afterthought of the material. T he ''ec onomic basis'' of soci ety is c ulturall y c onstructed. Even our suppos edl y ''rational c hoic es'' ar e bas ed on another, meani ngful l ogic that, for example, makes steak a mor e pres tigious food than hamburger, or women's cl othes different i n sig nificant ways fr om men's. It tur ns out that materialis m is a form of idealism, bec aus e it's wr ong, too.




DRAWING (DRAWIN G BY JENN A BROU SE, MINN EAPOLIS C OLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN)




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 6179
Date: 9/23/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: Michael Moore's El ecti on- Year Freebie
OTS: 1037828
Subject: Other
Summ ar y: Some critics (incl udi ng those for The Mic higan Dail y, at the U ni versi ty of Mic higan, and Inside T oronto) have s ai d the fil m a mounts to little mor e than a highlight reel of Mr. Moores trip, s uggesti ng that its theatrical pr os pec ts were di m.
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Michael M oor e's El ecti on- Year Fr eebie




Michael M oor e, the politic al provoc ateur behind the fil ms ''Fahrenheit 9/11'' and ''Sic ko,'' is r eleasing a new fil m T uesday. But you will not be abl e to fi nd ''Slac ker U prising'' at any theater .




Instead he is pl acing the film on the Internet for free vi ewing, at Slac kerUprisi ng.com. Mr. M oore s ai d the unorthodox roll out is a gift to his fans and a rall yi ng cr y for the c oming election.




''At times ther e's nothing wr ong wi th pr eac hing to the choir,'' he s aid in a tel ephone i nt er view from his office in Traverse City, Mich. Liberals have been ''pretty beaten down over the l ast 28 years.''
''The c hoir, es peciall y on our side of the politic al fenc e, is often fairl y dejec ted,'' he obser ved, ''and coul d use a good song ever y now and then.''




The song i n this anal ogy is a 100- minute look at Mr. M oor e's tour of c ollege campuses during the fall of 2004. Cameras followed hi m to 62 ci ties as he urged young peopl e to vote for John Kerr y. The r esul ting footage s at on the s helf for a few years befor e Mr. M oor e s pliced tog ether a versi on of the fil m, then ti tled ''Captai n Mi ke Acros s Americ a,'' and showed it at the T oronto Inter national Film Fes ti val a year ago.




After the festi val scr eeni ng Mr. Moore retur ned to the editing r oom to give the film ''mor e heft and substance,'' he s aid. It incl udes exchang es with Mr. Moore's detractors and their attempts to i nterrupt his tour, raisi ng fr ee-s peec h iss ues and cr eating s ome c omedic moments. Some critics (includi ng thos e for T he Mic higan Dail y, at the U ni versity of Mic higan, and Insi de T oronto) have s aid the fil m amounts to little mor e than a ''highlight reel'' of Mr. Moor e' s trip, s uggesting that its theatrical prospects were di m. Mr. Moore dis putes that, sayi ng that his agent, Ari Emanuel, beli e ved the film could net $20 million to $40 million. (''Sicko'' brought in $24.5 million domestic all y.)




''I prohi bited hi m from contacti ng any studi os to as k them whether they wer e i nter ested,'' Mr. Moore s aid. ''I just s aid straight up, 'I want to gi ve this away for fr ee.' He thought I s houl d have my head exami ned.''




The Wei nstein Company owned the distri bution rights to the pr oject, so Mr. M oor e bought bac k the North Americ an rights for an undiscl osed amount. ''The irony is that I beli eve peopl e s houl d s ee movi es in theaters,'' Mr. Moore sai d, pr aising what he call ed the communal experi enc e. ''You get s o much mor e out of it, emotionall y, c athartic all y.''




Per haps for that reason Mr. Moore sai d he hoped fans would set up screenings and us e the fil m to rais e mone y for candi dates. Visitors to the Web site will be able to str eam and download it fr ee, thanks to Mr. Moore's partnershi p wit h Blip.tv, a c ompany dis tributi ng online vi deos ; additionall y a $10 DVD will be distributed, and free c opies can be req ues ted for li braries.




Robert Greenwal d -- another member of the s mall fraternity of advoc ate filmmakers, whose pr oducti on c ompany s pecializ es i n tyi ng video proj ects t o off-line organizi ng -- s aid a supporter in Al as ka was already pl anni ng a screening. T he fil m is ''quite an adrenaline boost, even thoug h it's got a s ad ending,'' he s aid.




The ending, of cours e, is the r e-el ecti on of George W. Bus h in 2004. T he fil m notes that voters under the age of 30 were the onl y demographic that Mr. Kerr y won outright. ''Unfortunatel y,'' reads a graphic at the end of the film, ''their parents voted for Bus h.''




Mr. Moore s uggested that the 2004 elec tion results were a prel ude to the Obama movement, whic h was ''ignited by young peopl e.''




''The road to getti ng where we want to be has to be filled with a certain amount of failur e,'' he s aid, drawi ng a parall el to the U nited Auto Wor kers' labor movement 70 years ago.




Mr. Moore r emai ns c oy about the subj ect of his next movi e, although he sai d fil ming was well under way. H e has denied r umors that it will be a seq uel to ''Fahr enheit 9/11,'' but he has not q uas hed reports that his next fil m will explor e what he vi ews as American i mperi alism. T he recent tur moil of the fi nanci al mar kets may be gi vi ng hi m even mor e material.




''Some weeks, like this past week, I wonder if we're going to have to cr edi t others with the screenplay,'' he s aid.




PHOT OS: T he filmmaker Mic hael M oor e, near a cl os ed factor y in Flint, Mic h., where his father wor ked.; Mr. M oore at the Uni ver sity of Centr al Flori da in 2004.( PHOT OGR APH BY F ABR IZIO COST ANTINI FOR THE NEW YOR K T IMES)




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 3706
Date: 9/16/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: Pr ematurity May Lead to Adult Problems
OTS: 1037828
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: Dr. M arjori e Treadwell, a pr ofess or of obs tetrics and g ynec ol ogy at the Uni versity of Mic higan, who was not invol ved i n the s tudy, s aid it c arried an i mportant l ess on. ''We're all aware of the mor e s erious c ons equenc es of pr ematurity,'' Dr. Treadwell s aid, ''but there's a tendenc y to thi nk that if they don't have thes e s erious thi ngs wrong then we can l et i t go. T his article says that maybe we shoul d be looki ng at pos tnatal inter ventions that c an be hel pful.''
Bod y:




Prematurity May Lead to Adult Probl ems




Prematur e babi es, even those with no apparent treatabl e medic al problems , may fac e an incr eased ris k of medic al and s oci al dis abilities i n adulthood.




Researc hers studi ed all i nfants born ali ve in Nor way fr om 1967 to 1983, usi ng government databases that c ontai n detail ed infor mation on health, educ ati on, empl oyment and other demographic factors to follow them into adulthood.




Their anal ysis , published i n the J ul y 17 is sue of The N ew England J ournal of M edici ne, was adj usted for age, sex, si ngle mother hood, parental education and other variabl es.




The res earchers found s trong as soci ati ons between pr ematurity and a lower educ ati onal level, lower income and l ower likelihood of havi ng c hildren.




Dr. Dag M oster, the s tudy's l ead author and a neonatol ogist at H aukel and Uni versity H os pital in Bergen, emphasized that whil e there was an increased r elati ve ris k for these pr obl ems, ''the differ ences ar e not great.''




The authors ac knowl edge that their res ults could be attri butable to unknown factors, li ke par ental I.Q., or the us e of alc ohol, tobacc o or dr ugs. And they c ould not r ule out the possibility that s ome u nknown condi tions l ed to both pr eter m deli ver y and the pr obl ems l ater s uffered.




Dr. Marjori e Treadwell, a pr ofess or of obs tetrics and g ynec olog y at the Uni versity of Michig an, who was not invol ved i n the s tudy, sai d it c arried an i mportant l ess on.




''We're all aware of the mor e s erious c ons equenc es of pr ematurity,'' Dr. Treadwell s aid, ''but there's a tendenc y to thi nk th at if they don't have thes e serious thi ngs wr ong then we can l et i t go. T his article says that maybe we shoul d be looki ng at pos tnatal in ter ventions that c an be helpful.''




CHART: R ELAT IVE CH ANCES OF .. .: Compl eting high school. C hart details bar graphs.




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 1593
Date: 9/5/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: Detroit's M ayor Will Leave Office and Go to Jail
OTS: 1037828
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: ''This plays to some of the s ter eotypes about the city, that it is c orrupt and has iss ues with cri me and various s oci al ills,'' sai d Vinc ent H utc hings, a politic al sci enc e professor at the Uni versity of Michig an. ''The el ephant in the room is the iss ue of r ace. T her e is an urban c ore-s uburban c onflict, whic h is als o a blac k- white c onflict
Bod y:




Detroi t's Mayor Will Leave Offic e and Go to J ail




Mayor Kwame M. Kilpatric k pleaded g uilty to fel ony c harges here on T hursday and agreed to r esign from offic e and ser ve 120 days i n j ail, ending eight months of politic al tur moil but also openi ng a new era of unc ertainty for the city.




After the agreement, Gov. J ennifer M. Gr anholm of Mic higan suspended her hearing on whether to remove Mr. Kilpatric k for misconduc t, r elievi ng her of being i n the awkwar d posi tion of possibl y ousti ng the mayor, a fell ow D emocrat, fr om offic e.




''It is my profound hope that we c an now write a new histor y for this great but embattled ci ty and that the citizens of Detroit begin the heali ng pr oces s to move for war d,'' she s ai d. But even as the fate of Mr. Kilpatric k became clear on T hursday, a new l ayer of potenti al pi tfalls came into view.




The City C ouncil that will now tr y to bring stability to the nation's 11th l argest city is known for i ts volatility. Its two top leaders, Kenneth V. C oc krel Jr., the council pr esident who will now be interi m mayor, and M onica Conyers, who will bec ome pr esident of the C ouncil, wer e r ecently invol ved in a public shouting matc h that has be come a r unning j oke.




And s ome members of the C ouncil are under feder al inves tigati on for possi bl y taki ng payoffs before approvi ng a multi million-dollar s ewage contr act.




''Moving for ward will r equire all of us to put aside the anger and bi tterness of the past few months,'' s aid Mr. C oc krel, 42, ''and heal as a c ommunity.''




Mr. Coc kr el, whose father, a ci vil rights ac ti vist, di ed in 1989 befor e he c oul d achi eve his own mayoral as pirations and whos e stepmother is a c urrent council member , s aid chi ef among his r esponsibiliti es woul d be ''restori ng the credibility of not onl y the mayor but als o of the city of D etr oit.''




In an evening addr ess from his office, an upbeat Mr. Kilpatric k took a parti ng s wipe at M s. Granhol m. H e als o ac knowl edg ed what he c alled his ''poor j udg ment,'' as ked the city to throw its s upport behi nd Mr. C oc krel and gave a litany of his ac hievements.




''I want to emphasize tonight that I take full res ponsi bility for my own ac tions,'' he s aid. ''I wis h with all my heart that we coul d turn bac k the hands of ti me and tell that young man to make better c hoices. But I can't. Our c hall enge now is to put the anguis h and tur moil of r ecent months behind us and joi n i n a c ommon c ause to love our city, to l ove one another and move forward together .''




Polic e C hief Ell a Bull y-Cummi ngs, a mayoral appointee, announc ed her r etirement i mmedi atel y after Mr. Kilpatric k's plea, and a hos t of other city offici als and staff members ar e expec ted to l eave their j obs . It all adds up to a tr emendous amount of tumult f or a poverty-stric ken city that had been experiencing gli mmers of a renais sanc e after dec ades of populati on los s and decline.




''If you drove over the city 10 years ago and now, you' d s ee many points of evidenc e that i ndeed there ar e good things g oing on in Detroit,'' s aid Michael Smith, a historian of the city. ''The sad thi ng is, Kwame Kilpatric k was bec oming a good mayor and maki ng s ome progr ess. H e had a brilliant future.''




Much of the new enthusi as m i n downtown D etroi t is cr edi ted to Mr . Kil patric k, a c harismatic leader who br oug ht a high l evel o f energ y and expec tations to office when he was el ected for the first ti me in 2001 at just 31 years old. With new attrac tions along a redevel oped ri ver front, fresh business investment downtown and new housi ng in the ci ty c ore, things seemed to be moving i n the right dir ection.




''I think we c an g et the momentum bac k that we had before this happened,'' s aid D oug Rothwell, the presi dent of D etroit Renaiss anc e, a group of business leaders that pr omotes ec onomic de velopment in the ci ty. ''There's no questi on that things have been put on paus e during thes e eight months.''




Mr. Kilpatric k's ordeal als o l eaves ripple effec ts i n the for m of aggravated r acial tensi on between whites and bl ac ks and the city and its subur bs at a ti me when the region is suffering through a serious ec onomic downtur n.
Earlier this year, Mr. Kil patric k cl aimed he was victi miz ed by a ''lynch mob mentality.'' His s uppor ters were critic al of the possi bility that Ms. Granhol m, who is white, mig ht oust the blac k mayor, who was call ed raci al epithets and anonymousl y pilloried in city graffiti and on l oc al Web sites. Bad fe elings linger.




''The peopl e who used to occ upy D etr oit befor e they fl ed for the s uburbs want it bac k,'' sai d Mic hael Wils on, a dri ver for a hotel, ec hoing a s enti ment that is not unc ommon in s truggling neighbor hoods. ''They want to s et up a power str ucture they like.''




''This plays to s ome of the s ter eotypes about the city, that it is c orrupt and has iss ues with cri me and various s oci al ills,'' sai d Vi nc ent H utc hings, a politic al sci enc e professor at the Uni versity of Michigan. ''The el ephant in the room is the iss ue of r ace. T her e is an urban cor e-suburban c onflict, whic h is als o a blac k- white c onflict.''




''They'll be abl e to r ecover i n that whatever tai nt is ass ociated with Kilpatric k need not follow his successor,'' Mr. H utc hi ngs s aid. ''But his successor would still have to grapple with the endemic pr obl ems ass ociated with li vi ng in suc h a segregated state.''




In r ecent weeks , the city government bec ame progressi vel y more paral yzed duri ng the pl aying out of the scandal, whic h s temmed mai nl y from the r evel ati on that the mayor had an extr amarital affair with his c hief of s taff, C hristi ne Beatty, and his efforts to keep that affair s ecr et.




Mr. Kilpatric k was ac cus ed of forci ng three polic e offic ers out of their jobs, and then, when they s ued the city over their dis miss al, of usi ng $8.4 million i n public money to settl e the laws uit on favorable terms befor e the affair coul d be discl os ed i n c ourt tes timony.




The affair bec ame public anyway, when The D etr oit Fr ee Pr ess publis hed s teamy text mess ages sent from a cit y-owned pager that detailed much of the romance between Mr. Kil patric k and Ms . Beatty, who resigned when the affair bec ame public. T he text messag es and the affair contr adic ted tes ti mony Mr. Kil patric k had gi ven under oath, res ulti ng in eight felony c h arges. Later, he was c harged with two mor e feloni es for ass aul t when, i nvestigators sai d, he inter fer ed with police offic ers tr yi ng to s er ve a subpoena r elated to the text- mes sage c ase.




Mr. Kilpatric k's l awyers tried unsuccessfull y in rec ent days to negoti ate plea agreements that would not invol ve jail time, but pr osecutors were adamant. Mr. Kilpatric k will s er ve 120 days i n c ounty jail for the guilty pleas to two felony c ounts of obstr ucti on of jus tice. H e also pl eaded no contest to one of the ass ault c h arges. T he others wer e dis missed.




Mr. Kilpatric k will gi ve up his pension and l aw lic ens e and pay $1 million in res titution to the City of D etr oit as par t of t he plea deal, and he will be on probation for fi ve years after his sentence.




But what happens to D etr oit is l ess clear. T here are hig h hopes ami d the uncertainty.




''I woul d think that at this point in ti me Mr. C oc kr el will get the benefit of the proverbi al honeymoon and have the benefit of the City C ouncil rall ying around hi m,'' s aid Larry Dubin, profess or of l aw at the U ni versity of Detr oit M erc y Sc hool of Law. ''There's a great deal of optimis m i n this r egion. I think Detroiters are ver y r esilient peopl e.''




PHOT OS: Mayor Kwame M . Kilpatric k pleaded guilty on Thursday to two c ounts of obstruc tion of justi ce. (PH OTOGRAPH BY BILL PUGLIANO/GETTY IMAGES); C hristi ne Beatty, Mr. Kilpatric k's for mer chi ef of staff, and her lawyer, J effrey Morganroth, wer e i n the c ourt for the heari ng. (PH OTOGRAPH BY JEFF KOWALSKY/EU ROPEAN PRESSPHOT O AGENCY)( A16); Kenneth V. Coc krel Jr ., s hown in June, will be interi m mayor. (PH OTOGRAPH BY C AR LOS OSORIO/ASSOCIATED PR ESS)(A20)




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 1668
Date: 9/11/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: Pr otons and C hampagne Mi x as N ew Particl e C ollider Is Revved U p
OTS: 1037828
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: T he buzz was worl dwide. On the bl og ''Cos mic Vari anc e,'' Gordon Kane of the U ni versity of Mic higan c alled the new collider '' a why mac hine.''
Bod y:




Protons and C hampagne Mi x as N ew Particle C ollider Is Revved U p




Scienc e rode a beam of subatomic particl es and a ri ver of C hampag ne into the futur e on Wednes day.




After 14 years of l abor, scientis ts at the C ERN l aborator y outsi de Geneva suc cess full y ac ti vated the Larg e Hadr on C ollider, the world's l argest, most powerful particl e c ollider and, at $8 billion, the most expensi ve scientific experiment to date.




At 4:28 a.m., Eastern ti me, the sci entists announc ed that a beam of pr otons had c ompl eted its first circ uit around the collider's 17- mile-long racetrac k, 300 feet underneath the Swiss-Fr ench border. T hey then sent the beam ar ound s everal more ti mes .




''It's a fantastic moment,'' said Lyn Evans, who has been the proj ect dir ector of the c ollider sin ce i ts i ncepti on in 1994. ''We c an now l ook forwar d to a new er a of understanding about the origins and evolution of the uni vers e.''




Eventually, the c ollider is expec ted to acc el erate protons to energies of s even trillion el ectr on volts and then s mash the m together , recr eating c onditi ons i n the pri mordi al fireball onl y a trillionth of a sec ond after the Big Bang. Scientists hope the mac hine will be a s ort of H ubbl e Spac e T el esc ope of i nner s pac e, allowi ng them to detect new s ubatomic particles and forc es of nature.




An oc ean away from Geneva, the new colli der's acti vati on was watc hed with r ueful exci tement her e at the F er mi National Ac cel erator Laborator y, or F er milab, whic h has had the reigni ng particl e c ollider.




Several doz en physicis ts, students and onlookers, and thr ee loc al mayors gathered over night to watc h the dawn of a new high-energ y physics. They appl auded eac h milestone as the sci entists methodicall y steer ed the protons on their cours e at C ERN, the European Organiz ation for N uclear R esearc h.




Many of them, i ncluding the l ab's direc tor , Pi er Oddone, were wearing paj amas or bathrobes or even nightc aps bearing F er milab '' paj ama party'' patches on them.




Outside, a half moon was hanging l ow i n a cl oudy s ky, a r eminder that the uni verse was beautiful a nd mysterious and that another s mall s tep i nto that mys ter y was about to be taken.




Dr. Oddone, who earlier in the day admi tted it was a ''bitters weet moment,'' lauded the new mac hi ne as the r es ult of ''two an d a hal f dec ades of dreams to open up this hug e new territor y i n the expl orati on of the natur al worl d.''




Roger Aymar, CERN's direc tor , c alled the new collider a ''disc overy machi ne.'' The buzz was worl dwide. On the bl og ''Cos mic Vari anc e,'' Gordon Kane of the U ni versity of Mic higan c alled the new collider ''a why mac hine.''




Others, worried about spec ulati on that a blac k hol e c oul d emerge from the pr oton collisi ons , had c alled i t a doomsday mac hine, to the dis may of CERN physicis ts who c an point to a variety of s tudi es and r eports that say that this fe ar is nothing but sci ence ficti on.




But Boaz Klima, a Fer milab particle physicist, s aid that the s pec ul ation had nevertheless hel ped create buzz about particl e physics. ''This is s omethi ng that people can tal k to their neighbors about,'' he sai d.




The onl y thi ng physicis ts agree on is that they do not know what will happen -- what laws and parti cles will prevail -- when the c ollisions r each the energies jus t after the Big Bang.




''That there ar e many theories means we don't have a cl ue,'' sai d Dr. Oddone. ''That's what makes i t s o exciti ng.''




Many physicis ts hope to materializ e a hypothetical particle c alled the Higgs boson, whic h acc ordi ng to theor y endows other particl es with mass . T hey als o hope to identify the natur e of the i nvisibl e dar k matter that ma kes up 25 perc ent of the uni vers e and provi des the sc affol ding for gal axies. Some dream of r eveali ng new di mensi ons of s pace-ti me.




But those disc overies ar e in the futur e. If the new c ollider wer e a c ar, then what physicis ts did Wednes day was turn on an engine that will now warm up for a c oupl e of months befor e anyone dri ves it anywher e. T he first meaningful c ollisions, at an energ y of fi ve trillion el ectr on volts, will not happen until l ate fall.




Never theles s, the s ymbolis m of the moment was not l ost on all those gathered her e.




Onc e upon a ti me the U nited States r uled par ticle physics. F or the last two decades, F er milab's Tevatron, whic h hurls protons and their mirror opposites, anti protons, tog ether at energies of a trillion elec tron volts apiec e, was t he worl d's larges t particl e mac hine.




By year's end, when the C ERN c ollider has r evved up to fi ve trillion elec tron volts, the Fer milab mac hine will be a dis tant sec ond. El ectr on volts are the curr enc y of c hoice i n physics for both mass and energ y. The more you have, the cl oser and hotter you c an punch bac k in ti me toward the Big Bang.




In 1993, the U nited States Congress canc eled plans for an even bigger c ollider and more powerful mac hine, the Superconduc ting Superc ollider, after its c ost ballooned to $11 billion. In the United States, particle physics never reall y recovered, sai d the s uperc ollider's for mer dir ector, Roy F. Sc hwitters of the U ni versity of Texas i n Austin. ''One nonr enewabl e resource is a pers on's ti me and good years,'' he sai d.




Dr. Oddone, Fer milab's direc tor, sai d the uncertainties of steady Congressi onal financing made physics i n the U nited States u ndul y ''sus penseful.''




CERN, on the other hand, is an organiz ati on of 20 c ountries with a stable budg et established by tr eaty. T he year after the supercollider was kill ed, CERN deci ded to build i ts own colli der.




Fermil ab and the U nited States, whic h eventuall y c ontributed $531 million for the c ollider, have not exac tl y been shut out. Dr. Oddone sai d that Americ ans c ons titute about a quarter of the sci entists who built the four giant detectors that sit at points around the racetrac k to c ollec t and anal yz e the debris fr om the primordi al fir eballs.




In fac t, a r emote contr ol room for moni toring one of those experiments, known i nel egantl y as the C ompac t Muon Sol enoid, was built at F er milab, j ust off the lobby of the main buildi ng here.




''The mood is great at this place,'' he sai d, noti ng that the Tevatr on was hummi ng pr oducti vel y and still might find the Higg s bos on befor e the new hadr on colli der.




Another targ et of physicists is a princi ple call ed supers ymmetr y, which pr edic ts, among other things, that a vast population of new particl e s pecies is l eft over fr om the Big Bang and waiti ng to be disc overed, one of whic h could be the l ong -sought dar k matter.
The festi viti es s tarted at 2 a.m. Chic ago ti me. Speaking by s atellite, Dr. Evans, the c ollider proj ect direc tor at CERN , outlined the plan for the eveni ng: s endi ng a bunch of protons cl oc kwis e farther and farther around the c ollider, s top ping them and c hec king their or bit, until they made it all the way. He noted that for a previ ous CERN accel erator i t had taken 12 hours. ''I hope this will go muc h faster,'' he s aid.




Twenty mi nutes later, the dis plays in the contr ol room s howed that the b eam had made it to its first s toppi ng poi nt. A few minutes l ater, the physicists erupted in c heers when their c ons ol es s howed that the muon sol enoid had detec ted c ollisions between the beam and stray gas molec ules in the other wise vac uum beam pipe. Th eir detec tor was ali ve and wor king.




Finall y at 3:28 C hic ago ti me ( 10:28 a.m. at CER N), the dis pl ay s howed the protons had made it all the way ar ound to another big detector named Atl as.




At F er milab, they broke out the C hampagne. Dr. Oddone c ongratul ated his coll eag ues ar ound the worl d. ''We have all wor ked together and br oug ht this mac hine to life,'' he s aid. ''We're so excited abo ut sending a beam around. Wai t until we start havi ng c ollisions and doi ng phys ics.''




PHOT OS: Some sci entists at the Fer milab i n Batavi a, Ill., showed up i n paj amas on Wednes day for the ac ti vation of the collider near Geneva. (PH OTOGRAPH BY PETER WYNN THOM PSON F OR TH E N EW YORK TIM ES); The entranc e to the C ERN l aborator y near Geneva. After 14 years of l abor, scientis ts acti vated their new particl e c ollider. ( PHOT OGR APH BY ANJA NIEDRINGH AU S/ASSOCIAT ED PR ESS)




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 3698
Date: 9/16/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: McC ain's R adic al Agenda
OTS: 1037828
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: A study c oming out T uesday from schol ars at C olumbia, H ar var d, Pur due and Michigan proj ects that 20 million Americans who have empl oyment-based health i ns uranc e woul d lose it under the McCai n plan.
Bod y:




McCain's R adical Agenda




Tal k about a s hoc k to the s ystem. H as anyone bother ed to notic e the r adic al c hanges that J ohn M cCai n and Sar ah Palin ar e planni ng for the nati on's heal th ins uranc e s ystem?




These ar e c hanges that will s et i n motion nothing less than the dis mantling of the e mpl oyer-based c overag e that protec ts most American families .




A study c oming out T uesday from schol ars at C olumbia, H arvar d, Pur due and Michigan proj ects that 20 milli on Americans who have empl oyment-based health i ns uranc e woul d lose it under the McCai n plan.




Ther e is nothing s ecret about Senator McC ain's far-reachi ng propos als, but they haven't gotten much attention bec aus e the c hatter in this campaign has mostl y been about nons ense -- lipstic k, c elebriti es and ''Drill, baby, drill!''




For starters, the McC ain health pl an woul d tr eat empl oyer- pai d health benefits as inc ome that empl oyees would have to pay taxes on.




''It means your empl oyer is goi ng to have to make an esti mate on how much the employer is paying for health i ns urance on your behal f, and you are going to have to pay taxes on that money,'' s aid Sherr y Glied, an economist who c hairs the D epartment of H ealth Polic y and Management at C olumbia Uni versity's M ailman School of Public H eal th.




Ms. Gli ed is one of the four sc holars who have j ust completed an independent j oint study of the plan. Their fi ndi ngs ar e bei ng published on the Web site of the polic y journal, Health Affairs.




Acc ording to the study: ''The McC ain pl an will forc e millions of Americans i nto the weakes t s egment of the pri vate ins uranc e s ystem -- the nongroup mar ket -- where c ost-s hari ng is hig h, c overed s er vic es are li mited and people will l os e acc ess to benefits they have now.''




The net effect of the pl an, the study s aid, ''almos t c ertai nl y will be to i ncreas e famil y c osts for medic al c are.''




Under the McC ain pl an (now the McC ain-Palin pl an) employees who c ontinue to rec ei ve empl oyer-pai d health benefits would look at their pay stubs each week or eac h month and fi nd that additi onal money had been withheld to cover the taxes on the value of their benefits .




While there mig ht be les s money i n the paychec k, that woul d not be anything to worr y about, accor ding to Senator McC ain. T hat's bec ause the g over nment would be offeri ng all taxpayers a refundabl e tax credit -- $2,500 for a si ngle wor ker and $5,000 per famil y -- to be us ed ''to hel p pay for your health car e.''




You may thi nk this is a good move or a bad one -- but it's a monumental change i n the way health c overage would be provi ded to sc ores of millions of Americ ans. Why not more attenti on?




The whole idea of the McC ain pl an is to g et families out of empl oyer- pai d health c overage and into the heal th ins uranc e marketpl ace, wher e naked c ompeti tion is s uppos ed to take c are of all ills. ( We're seeing i n the Bear Stear ns, F anni e M ae, Freddie Mac , Lehman Brothers and Merrill Lync h fi asc os j ust how well t he unfettered mar ketplac e has been wor ki ng.)




Taxing employer-paid heal th benefits is the first step i n this tr ansition, the equi val ent of i njecti ng pois on into the s ystem. It's the beginni ng of the end.




When younger , healthier wor kers start s eeing additi onal taxes taken out of their payc hec ks, some ( per haps many) will opt out of the empl oyer- bas ed plans -- either to buy c heaper ins uranc e on their own or to go wi thout c overage.




That will leave empl oyers with a pool of older, l ess healthy wor kers to cover. That cover age will nec ess aril y be mor e expensi ve, which will enc our age more and mor e empl oyers to gi ve up on the idea of provi ding c overag e at all.




The ups hot is that many more Americans -- millions more -- will find themsel ves on their own i n the bewil dering and often treac her ous health ins uranc e mar ketpl ac e. As Senator McC ain has s aid: ''I believe the key to real r eform is to r est ore contr ol over our health c are s ystem to the pati ents thems el ves.''




Yet another r adic al element of McCai n's pl an is his proposal to under mine state health insur anc e r egulations by allowi ng c onsumers to buy i nsur ance from sell ers anywhere i n the c ountr y. So a r equirement i n one s tate that ins ur ers c over, for example, vacci nations, or annual physic als, or breas t exami nations, wo uld es senti all y be meani ngless .




In a r efrai n we' ve hear d many ti mes i n rec ent years, Mr. McCai n s ai d he is c ommi tted to ridding t he mar ket of these ''needless and c ostl y'' ins uranc e r egulations.




This entire McC ain health ins ur anc e transformati on is right out of the right- wing R epublicans' ideologic al pl aybook: fewer r egul ations; let the mar ket deci de; and s end unsophistic ated cons u mers into the cr uci ble alone.




You woul d thi nk that wi th some of the most venerable houses on Wall Street crumbling li ke s and c astl es right befor e our eyes, we'd be a little war y about spr eading this toxic for mul a even further into the health car e s ystem.




But we're not even payi ng much attention.




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 3700
Date: 9/17/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: Detroit Faces $3 Million Elec tion for an 8-M onth Mayor
OTS: 1037828
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: Vinc ent H utc hings , a pr ofess or of politic al s cienc e at the U ni versity of Mic higan, s aid that the winner of the May elec tion woul d have a clear advantag e i n N ovember and that Mr. C oc kr el c oul d wi n both ti mes . Mr. H utchi ngs s aid r esidents should not blame the C ouncil for the expense as much as Mr. Kilpatric k for dragging out an i nevitabl e resignation.
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Detroi t F aces $3 Million Election for an 8-Month Mayor




Although s ome resi dents might argue that Mayor Kwame M. Kil patric k's efforts to cover up an affair with his c hief of staff have c ost this cash-s tar ved city enough money, D etr oit plans to spend as much as $3 million more on a s pecial election to replac e hi m.




The City C ouncil voted r eluc tantl y but unani mousl y on T uesday to hold a speci al electi on in May, s ayi ng the city's c harter l eft no other opti on, even thoug h Mr. Kilpatric k's ter m expires at the end of 2009.




The decisi on means that D etroi t residents will be as ked to vote for mayor four ti mes next year. T he top two finis hers in a Feb. 24 nonpartisan primar y will fac e off in the M ay 5 el ecti on appr oved Tues day, with the wi nner taki ng offic e for 239 days. The proc ess will repeat i n Aug us t and N ovember to deter mine who will s erve a four- year ter m s tarti ng Jan. 1, 2010. ''The c har ter is so clear that we must have a s pecial election,'' Council woman Barbara-R os e C ollins s ai d. ''It does n't matter how much it c osts .''




The $3 million will add to a pr ojec ted budget deficit of up to $130 million in the next fisc al year . And it brings the city's expenditur es rel ated to the Kilpatric k affair t o more than $13 million.




The bul k of that c ame i n an $8.4 million s ettlement with for mer police offic ers who clai med they wer e fir ed to halt an i nvestigati on that c oul d have exposed the affair between Mr. Kilpatric k and his top ai de, C hristine Beatty. Leg al fees and i nteres t bring the city's li ability in that cas e to more than $10 million.




Mr. Kilpatric k, 38, who was first elec ted i n 2001, will l eave office Thurs day, two weeks after he pl eaded guilty to two c ounts of obstructing j ustic e and entered a no contes t pl ea on an ass ault c harge. H e is to ser ve 120 days i n j ail, starti ng Oc t. 28, and pay the city $1 million withi n five years.




The mayor r esigned nearl y eight months after The D etr oit Fr ee Press published text messag es detaili ng his r omanc e with Ms . Be atty, c ontrar y to the testi mony they gave l ast year i n the offic ers' laws uit.




In an account of a depositi on of Mr. Kilpatric k on T uesday as part of a l aws uit ai med at reveali ng mor e details of the settlement, the news paper sai d the mayor had invoked his Fifth Amendment right agai nst self-i ncrimi nation 82 ti mes in 75 mi nutes and ''occ asi onall y cr ac ked j okes.''




Ms. Beatty resigned in J anuar y and opted this week to stand tri al on charges i ncl udi ng perjur y and obstr ucti on of justic e rather than ac cept a pl ea deal that incl uded fi ve months of j ail ti me.
During rus h hour T ues day evening, r adio traffic reports warned that dri vers wer e sl owing down on Interstate 696 to watc h wor kers eras e Mr. Kilpatric k's name from a mural on the water tower at the Detroit Zoo.




On Friday, the c ouncil president, Kenneth V. Coc krel Jr., will be s worn i n as i nterim mayor. Mr. Coc krel, 42, has s ai d he pl ans to run for mayor next year.




Mr. Coc kr el voted in favor of the speci al el ecti on but sai d he woul d prefer to ass ume his new j ob without ''the dis tracti on of tr yi ng to keep i t in fi ve months .'' Still, Mr. Coc kr el s aid: ''We fought with the curr ent mayor for eight months over his failur e to follow the c harter. If we don't follow it, that would make us look li ke hypocrites.''




Vinc ent H utc hings, a pr ofess or of politic al s cience at the U ni versity of Mic higan, s aid that the winner of the May electi on woul d have a clear advantag e in November and that Mr. C oc kr el c oul d wi n both ti mes .




Mr. Hutc hi ngs s aid r esidents should not blame the C ouncil for the expens e as muc h as Mr. Kilpatric k for dr agging out an inevitabl e r esignation.




The ti ming makes a differenc e: H ad the mayor q uit two months ago, a suc ces sor c ould have been s elected i n the gener al electi on this N ovember.




''That's unfortunate,'' Mr. H utc hi ngs sai d, ''bec ause Detroit's not i n a positi on to sq uander that sort of money.''




PHOT O: Kenneth V. Coc krel Jr., s oon to be interi m mayor i n D etroi t.(PH OTOGRAPH BY PAU L SANC YA/ASSOCIATED PR ESS)




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 1555
Date: 9/4/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: Governor H ears C as e On Mayor Of D etr oit
OTS: 1037828
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: ''I'm sur e the governor was wis hing it woul dn't come to this , bec ause it puts her in an awkward position,'' s aid John R. C hamberlin, a pr ofess or at the Geral d R . F ord Sc hool of Public Polic y at the U ni versi ty of Mic higan. ''But as muc h as it complic ates politics for her and the D emocr atic Party, i t was ti me for this.''
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Governor H ears Cas e On Mayor Of D etr oit




After months of leg al c hall enges meant to stop her, Gov. J enni fer M . Gr anholm of Mic higan opened an unus ual hearing on Wednes day to deter mi ne whether she s houl d r emove M ayor Kwame M. Kilpatric k of Detroit from offic e for misc onduct.




Though his fate hangs on her decisi on, Mr. Kilpatric k di d not s how up to defend hi msel f, i nstead, his spokes man sai d, going to wor k at City H all as us ual. But Mr. Kil patric k's abs ence sugges ted that he might be r edoubli ng an effort behi nd the sc enes to br oker a pl ea deal with prosecutors, a res olution that could render Ms. Gr anholm's proceedings moot, as any deal is likel y to in vol ve his resig nation.




Late in the day an as sistant to the Wayne C ounty pros ec utor, Kym L. Worthy, s ent out an e- mail messag e to members of the news medi a and others with the s ubj ect line: ''Defendant Kilpatric k to Pl ead Guilty.'' The plea was to come wit hin minutes, the mess age sai d. A frenz y s wept through the spectators at the hearing, whic h was expected to last s everal days.




But within mi nutes, another e- mail messag e went out, c orrec ting the first one: T here would be no pl ea. It stated that Mr. Kilpatric k would be i n c our t on Thursday mor ning for a previ ousl y sc heduled hearing.




It was unclear whether a deal had fallen thr ough at the last mi nute or if ther e had never been one to begin wi th. T he mayor s tands acc used of 10 fel ony c ounts in two crimi nal c ases .




''There is no c onfir mati on of anything yet,'' a s pokes man for Mr. Kilpatric k's l egal team, M arcus Rees e, sai d Wednesday night. ''Becaus e of the mis takes today, we feel we need to g et s ome facts together.'' Mr. Rees e s aid pl ea negoti ati ons were c ontin ui ng.




The bac k- and-forth added to the feeling among s ome of Mr. Kilpatric k's s upporters her e that offici als at vari ous levels were tr ying to outdo one another in hasteni ng his ous ter.




''It's unbeli evabl e,'' sai d Adolph M ongo, a political cons ultant and fri end of Mr . Kil patric k. ''How many agencies does it ta ke to pros ec ute one mayor?''




Even without the late- day s urpris e, D etr oit was already c ons umed with the legal dr ama.




The awkwar d s pec tacle of a Democratic gover nor possibl y removing the D emocratic mayor of the s tate's l argest city was i mpossi ble to ignor e, as Ms. Granhol m's hearing was broadcast li ve on televisi on, leading to a protest and a c ounter protes t, and g enerall y dis tracti ng ever yone from their wor k.




''The mayor's s aga is c oming to a head and most fol ks are aware that his ti me as mayor is limited,'' sai d a D etroi t historian , Mic hael Smith, director of the Walter P. R euther Librar y at Wayne State U ni versity. ''All I know is that the mayor has onl y one bargai ning c hip left: H e is mayor. H e woul d l os e that if the g overnor ousted him.''




The Detroit City C ouncil, whic h has no authority to r emove Mr. Kilpatric k from offic e, as ked Ms. Granhol m to take up the matter i n M ay after havi ng urged the mayor to r esign.




Even as the hearing began, Mr. Kilpatric k's defense team was filing an emergenc y appeal to the Michigan Supreme C ourt to s top i t. J ames T homas, a lawyer for Mr. Kilpatric k, argued that the g over nor was not an unbi ased j udg e in this matter and that the standar d for deter mi ning guilt was too vag ue.




The Supreme Court di d not act, and s o the hearing went for war d, as i t had been deemed by a l ower court on T uesday to be withi n Ms. Gr anhol m's authority.




''The bur den of proof is to be s uffici ent evidence s atisfactor y to the g over nor,'' Ms. Gr anholm s aid at the outs et. ''I canno t order punishment, suc h as jail or res titution or fi nes or fees . T his iss ue is s olel y about removal fr o m offic e.''




The governor's inter vention fanned the fl ames of raci al tension here. And things were alr eady tens e, as a certain s egment of blac k D etroi ters see a her o i n Mr. Kilpatric k, 38, a bl ac k man who has brought s ome positi ve c hange in terms of new busi nes s and housi ng.




It also complicates D emocr atic party uni ty i n a s wi ng state that is i n play in the pr esidential el ecti on.




''I'm sur e the governor was wis hing it wouldn't come to this , bec ause it puts her in an awkwar d position,'' s aid John R. C hamberlin, a pr ofess or at the Geral d R. F ord Sc hool of Public Polic y at the U ni versity of Mic higan. ''But as muc h as it complicates politics for her and the D emocratic Par ty, it was ti me for this.''




In the hearing, Ms. Granhol m was attenti ve and unemoti onal. She kept the tone ci vil when it threatened to bec ome heated.




The City C ouncil has s tated i n l egal papers that it believes Mr. Kil patrick dec ei ved members when he persuaded them to s ettle a police whistl e-bl ower laws uit l ast year for $8.4 million pri marily to hi de evi dence of an affair with his c hi ef of staff.




In an openi ng statement, William Goodman, a l awyer for the Council, s aid the case ''was s ettl ed to c over up the truth.''




''These ar e not minor tr ansgressions , Gov. Gr anholm,'' Mr. Goodman sai d. ''They have br oug ht the ci ty of D etr oit to a grinding halt.''




Sharon Mc Phail, a l awyer for Mr. Kilpatric k, call ed that c ontenti on ridic ulous. ''Suc h a posi tion is too s tupi d to be pl ausibl e,'' she s aid in her openi ng statement.




The hearing was sc heduled to conti nue on T hurs day.




PHOT O: Gov. J ennifer M. Gr anholm at the hearing in Detroit on Wednesday, whic h M ayor Kwame M. Kilpatric k di d not attend.(PHOT OGR APH BY POOL PH OTOGRAPH BY CAR LOS OSORIO)(pg. A20)




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 1589
Date: 9/7/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: 24/7 Sc hool R eform
OTS: 1037828
Subject: F ac ulty
Summ ar y: In 2001, Neuman, an educ ati on sc hol ar at the U ni versity of Mic higan, was r ecruited to a s enior position i n George W. Bus h's Department of Educ ation, helpi ng to oversee the devel opment and then the impl ementati on of No Chil d Left Behi nd. She quit in 2 003, disill us ioned with the law, and became c onvinc ed that its c entral goal -- to r aise dis advantaged c hildr en to a high level of achi evement thr oug h sc hools al one -- was si mpl y i mpossi ble.
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24/7 Sc hool R efor m




In an el ecti on s eas on when D emocrats fi nd thems el ves unus uall y unifi ed on ever ythi ng fr om tax polic y to for eign affairs, one issue s till di vi des them: educ ati on. It is a s urprisi ng fault line, per haps , gi ven the party's long dominanc e on the is sue. Voters c onsis tentl y say they tr ust the Democra ts over the Republic ans on educ ati on, by a wi de margin. But the split in the party is real, deep and i ntens e, and it shows no signs of healing any ti me s oon.




On one side are the members of the two hug e teachers' unions and the many parents who s upport them. To them, the big problem i n public educ ati on is N o C hild Left Behi nd, Presi dent Bus h's signature educ ati on law. T eac hers have ma ny c ompl aints about the l aw: i t enc ourages ''teac hi ng to the test'' at the expense of ar t, music and other el ecti ves , they s a y; it blames teac hers, especi ally thos e i n i nner-city s chools, for the poor per for manc e of dis advantaged c hildr en; and it demands better res ults without provi di ng educators wi th the r es ourc es they need.




On the other side are the party's s elf-defi ned ''education r eformers.'' Members of this group -- a loos e c oaliti on of mayors and s uperintendents , c harter-sc hool proponents and ci vil rights advoc ates -- actuall y admire the ac countability provi sions i n N o C hild Left Behi nd, although they often criticize the law's i mplementation. T hey poi nt ins tead to a bigger, mor e s ystemic crisis. T hes e refor mers descri be the under perfor manc e of the c o untry's sc hoolchil dren, and es peciall y of poor minorities, as a national crisis that demands a dr astic overhaul of the way s chools ar e run. In order to get better teac hers into faili ng clas srooms, they support performance bonus es, les s protecti on for low- per for ming teac hers , alter nati ve cer tification programs to attr act young, ambiti ous teac hers and flexi ble contr acts that c oul d allow for l onger sc hool days and an extended sc hool year. T he unions see thes e propos als as attac ks on their members' j ob sec urity -- whic h, i n many ways, they ar e.
As the fall c ampaign and a new sc hool year begin, both the unionists and the refor mers fi nd the ms el ves distracted by the same ques tion: Whic h side is Barac k Obama on? Eac h c amp has tried to clai m hi m as its own -- and Obama, for his part, has done his bes t to make it eas y for them. H e r eas sur es the uni ons by s aying he will refor m N o C hil d Left Behind s o teac hers will no longer ''be forc ed to s pend the academic year preparing students to fill i n bubbl es on standardiz ed tests,'' and he placates refor mers by calli ng hi ms elf a ''strong c hampion of charter sc hools.'' T he r efor mers point to his s peec h i n J ul y to the N ati onal Educ ati on As soci ati on, during whic h he was booed, briefl y, for endorsing chang es to teac hers' c ompens ati on structure. The uni onists, in turn, emphasiz e his s peec h a week l ater to the American F eder ation of Teachers, during which h e s aid , ''I am tired of heari ng you, the teac hers who wor k so hard, bl amed for our pr oblems.'' On blogs and at c onfer ences , the two si des have conti nued to s nipe at eac h other, all the while parsing
Obama's speeches and polic y pronounc ements , looki ng for new cl ues to his true posi tions.




It's possi ble, though, that both c amps ar e looki ng in the wr ong pl ace for ans wers. What is mos t inter esti ng and novel about Obama's education plans is how muc h they i nvol ve i nstituti ons other than sc hools.




The American s oci al c ontract has al ways i denti fied public sc hools as the one plac e wher e the s tate can and shoul d play a rol e i n the pr oc ess of chil d-reari ng. Outside the sc hool's walls (except in cas es of s erious abus e or neglec t), s ociety is seen to have neither a right nor a r es ponsi bility to i nter vene. But a new and growing movement of res earchers and advoc ates has begun to argue that the longstan ding and sharp c onc eptual di vi de between s chool and not-s chool is out of date. It ignores , they s ay, over whel ming evi denc e of the i mpac t of famil y and community environments on chil dren's achi evement. At the most basic level, it ignores the fact that poor chil dren, on average, arri ve in kindergarten far behi nd their mi ddl e-clas s peers. There is evidence that sc hools c an do a lot to eras e that di vi de, but the reality is that mos t sc hools do not. If we trul y want to counter the effects of poverty on the achi evement of chil dren, thes e advoc ates argue, we need to start a whol e l ot earli er and do a whole lot mor e.




The three people who have done the most to pr opel this nasc ent movement are James J. H ec kman, Sus an B. N euman and Geoffrey Canada -- though eac h of them c omes at the problem from a differ ent angle, and none of them woul d necessaril y ci te the other two as cl os e allies. H ec kman, an occasional infor mal Obama advi ser, is an ec onomis t at the U ni versity of C hicag o, and in a series of r ecent papers and books h e has developed something of a unified theor y of Americ an poverty. M ore than ever before, H ec kman argues, the pr obl em of persistent poverty is at its r oot a pr obl em of s kills -- what ec onomis ts often c all human capital. Poor c hildr en grow i nto poor adults becaus e they are never abl e, either at home or at sc hool, to acquire the abilities and res ourc es they need to c ompete i n a hig h-tec h ser vic e-dri ven ec onomy -- and H ec kman emphasizes that those nec ess ar y s kills are both c ogniti ve (the ability to read and c ompute) and noncogni ti ve (the ability to s tic k to a s chedul e, to delay gratific ati on and to s hake off dis appointments). The good
news , H ec kman says, is that s pecific i nter ventions in the li ves of poor chil dren c an di mi nish that s kill gap -- as l ong as thos e i nter venti ons begin earl y (ideall y in i nfanc y) and c ontinue throughout c hildhood.




What kind of inter ventions ? Well, that's where the wor k of Sus an Neuman bec omes rel evant. In 2001, N euman, an educ ati on schol ar at the U ni versity of Mic higan, was r ecruited to a s enior position i n George W. Bus h's Department of Education, helpi ng to overs ee the development and then the implementation of No Chil d Left Behind. She quit in 2003, disillusioned with the l aw, and bec ame convi nc ed that its centr al goal -- to rais e dis advantaged c hildren to a high level of ac hievement through schools alone -- was si mpl y impossi ble. Her wor k sinc e then can be seen as s omethi ng of a vast mea c ul pa for her ti me in Was hi ngton. After l eavi ng gover nment, Neuman spent s everal years crisscr ossi ng the nati on, exami ning and anal yzi ng pr ograms i ntended to i mpr ove the li ves of disadvantag ed chil dren. H er s earch has c ul minated in a book, ''Changing the Odds for C hildr en at Ris k,'' to be published in November, in whic h s he descri bes ni ne nonsc hool i nter venti ons . She i ncludes the N urse-F amil y Partners hi p, which s ends trai ned nurs es to visit and counsel
poor mothers during and after their pr egnanci es; Earl y H ead Start, a federal program, c onsi derabl y more ambi tious than Head Start its elf, that offers l ow-inc ome famili es par ental support, medic al c are and day-c are centers duri ng the first thr ee years of the li ves of their c hildr en; Avanc e, a ni ne- month l anguag e-enrichment program for Spanis h-speaki ng par ents, mostl y i mmigrants fr om Mexi co, that operates in Texas and Los Angel es; and Bright Beginnings, a pr e-K program in the C harlotte-Mec klenburg sc hool district in N orth C aroli na that enrolls 4- year-olds who sc ore the l owest on a scr eening tes t of c ogni ti ve ability and manages to bring most of them up to grade l evel by the first day of ki ndergarten.




Neuman's favorite programs s har e c ertai n c harac teristics -- they start early, foc us on the families that need them the most and pr ovide i ntensi ve support. M any of the inter ventions wor k with parents to make ho me environments more s ti mul ating; others wor k direc tl y with c hildr en to i mprove their language devel opment ( a critic al factor i n l ater sc hool s ucc ess). All of them, N euman s ays , demonstrate impr essi ve res ults . T he pr obl em right now is that the pr ograms ar e isol ated and sc attered acr oss the c ountr y, and they are usuall y directed at onl y a few years of a c hild's life, whic h means that their positi ve effects tend to fade onc e the inter vention ends .




This is where Geoffrey Canada c omes i n. H e r uns the first and so far the onl y organizati on in the countr y that pulls together under a single umbrella integrated s oci al and educ ati onal s er vice s for thous ands of c hildren at onc e. C anada's ag enc y, the H arlem C hildr en's Z one, has a $58 milli on budg et this year, drawn m ostl y fr om pri vate donors; it c urrentl y s er ves 8,000 ki ds i n a 97- bloc k neighbor hood of H arlem. (I' ve spent the l ast fi ve years r eporti ng on his organizati on's wor k and its i mplications for the c ountr y.) C anada shares many of the views of the education r ef ormers -- he runs two i ntensi ve K- 12 charter sc hools wi th extended hours and no uni on c ontract -- but at the same time he offers what he calls a ''conveyor belt'' of s oci al pr ograms, beginning with Baby Colleg e, a nine- week parenti ng pr ogram that encourag es par ents to c hoose alternati ves to cor poral punis hment and to read and tal k more with t heir chil dren. As s tudents progres s through an all-day preki ndergarten and then thr oug h a c harter sc hool , they have c onti nuous acc ess to
community supports li ke family c ouns eling, after-sc hool tutoring and a health clinic, all designed to mimic the often-invi sibl e c ocoon of support and nurturanc e t hat follows middle-cl ass and upper- middle-cl ass ki ds thr ough their chil dhoods . T he goal, i n the end, is to produce chil dren with the abilities and the c har acter to s ur vi ve adoles cenc e in a hig h-poverty neighborhood, to make i t to c olleg e and to gr aduate.




Though the conveyor belt is still bei ng c ons truc ted i n H arlem, earl y res ults ar e posi ti ve. Las t year , the c harter sc hools' i naugur al kindergarten class reac hed third grade and took their firs t N ew Yor k s tate ac hi evement tes ts: 68 perc ent of the students passed the r eading tes t, whic h beat the N ew Yor k City averag e and c ame within two perc entage poi nts of the state aver age, and 9 7 percent of them pass ed the math test, well above both the city and state average.




Obama has embrac ed, directl y or indirectl y, all three of thes e new thinkers. His c ampaign i nvited Hec kman to critique its educ ati on polic y, and Obama has proposed l arge-sc ale expansi ons of two of Neuman's c hosen i nter venti ons, the N urse-F amil y Partnershi p and Earl y Head Start. M ost ambitiousl y, Obama has pledged to replicate the H arlem C hildr en's Zone in 20 ci ties acr oss the c ountr y. ''The phil os ophy behi nd the pr ojec t is si mple,'' Obama s aid i n a s peec h l ast year announci ng his pl an. ''If poverty is a diseas e that i nfects an entire community in the form of unempl oyment and vi olenc e, failing s chools and broken homes, then we c an't jus t tr eat those s ymptoms in isol ati on. We h ave to heal that entir e c ommunity. And we have to focus on what actuall y wor ks.''




Obama has propos ed that thes e r eplic ati on pr ojec ts, whic h he has l abel ed Pr omise Neighborhoods, be r un as pri vate/public par tnershi ps, with the federal government pr ovi ding half the funds and the r est being r aised by l oc al governments and pri vate phil anthr opi es and busines ses. It would cost the fe der al government ''a few billion dollars a year,'' he ac knowledged i n his s peec h. ''But we will find the money to do this , bec ause we can't affor d not to.''




It remains to be s een, of c ours e, whether Obama will c onvi nc e voters with this positi on, and whether, i f el ected, he will do the heavy lifti ng requir ed to put such an ambi tious national pr ogram i n pl ac e. T here ar e many potential o bstacles. A l ot of cons er vati ves would oppose a new multi billion- doll ar federal pr ogram as a Gr eat Soci ety-s tyle giveaway to the poor. And many liberals ar e war y of any program that tries to c hange the behavi or of i nner-city par ents; to them, teachi ng poor par ents to behave mor e li ke middl e-class parents c an feel pater nalis tic. U nion l eaders will find i t har d to s upport an effort that has nonuni on charter sc hools at its heart. Educ ation r efor mers often s upport C anada's wor k, but his pr emise -- that sc hools alone are not enough to make a differ enc e i n poor c hildr en's li ves -- makes many of them anxi ous. And in c ontrast to the c amps arr ayed on either si de of the sc hool-refor m debate, there is no natural c onstituenc y for the initi ati ve: no uni on or interest group that s tands to l and new jobs or new c ontracts, no deep- poc keted
phil anthr opy devoted to s preadi ng the messag e.




The real c hall eng e Obama faces is to convince voters that the under perfor manc e of poor chil dren is trul y a national iss ue -- that it s houl d matter to anyone who is n't poor. Hec kman, es peciall y, argues that we should addr ess the probl em not out of any mus hy sens e of moral obligation, but for hardheaded r easons of global c ompetiti veness. At a moment when nations compete mostl y thr oug h the s kill l evel of their wor k forc e, he argues , we c annot affor d to l et that level decli ne.




Obama's contention is that the traditi onal D emocr atic sol uti on -- more money for public s chools -- is no longer enough. In Febr uar y, in an i nter view wi th the editori al board of The Journal Senti nel in Mil waukee, he c alled for ''a c ultural chang e in educ ation i n i nner-city c ommuniti es and low-inc ome c ommuniti es acros s the c ountr y -- not j ust inner-city, but also r ural.'' In many low-i nc ome communi ties, Obama sai d, ''ther e's this s ense that education is somehow a passi ve acti vity, and you ti p your head over and pour educ ati on in somebody's ear. And that's not how it wor ks. So we're goi ng to have to work with par ents.''




In the end, the kind of policies that Obama is pr oposi ng will requir e an even br oader c ultur al c hange -- not j ust in the way poor Americans thi nk about educ ati on but als o i n the way mi ddl e-class Americans thi nk about poverty. And that won't be eas y. N o matter how pers uasi ve the statis tics H ec kman is abl e to muster or how impressi ve the res ults that Canada is able to achi eve, many Americans will conti nue to simpl y bl ame parents or teac her s for the underperfor manc e of poor ki ds. Obama's c halleng e -- if he deci des to take i t on -- will be to c onvinc e voters that soci ety as a whol e has a cruci al rol e to pl ay i n the li ves of disadvantag ed chil dren, not j ust in the cl assr oom but outsi de sc hools as well.




PHOT O (PH OTOGRAPH BY Al ex T ehrani)
CHART: GRAD E EXPECTAT ION S: Bright Beginni ngs, a pre- K program i n N orth Car olina, enrolls 4- year olds wi th the lowest scor es on c ogniti ve-ability tes ts. The numbers bel ow c hart one group's progress after c ompleti ng the pr ogram. T hey s how the perc entag e of s tudents at or above grade l evel on literac y ass ess ments, compar ed with a group wi th si milar demographics and with all other students of a s ame ag e. C hart details pie-c hart of comparis on group.




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 1584
Date: 9/8/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: LOOKIN G AHEAD
OTS: 1037828
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: R eports this week will pr ovide a broad look at the state of the ec onomy. They will i nclude c onsumer credit for Jul y (Monday); pendi ng home s ales for Jul y and whol esal e i nventories for J ul y (T ues day); trade deficit for Jul y and i mport pric es for Aug ust (T hurs day); and the Pr oduc er Pric e Index for Augus t, r etail s ales, the Reuters-Uni versity of Michig an cons umer senti ment s ur vey and busi ness i nventories for J ul y (Friday
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LOOKIN G AHEAD




ECON OMIC SIGNALS Reports this week will provi de a br oad l ook at the s tate of the ec onomy.




They will incl ude cons umer credit for J ul y (M onday) ; pending home s ales for J ul y and wholes ale inventories for Jul y (Tuesday) ; trade deficit for J ul y and i mport prices for August (Thurs day); and the Pr oduc er Price Index for August, retail s ales , the R euters-U ni versity of Mic higan consumer s entiment sur vey and business inventories for J ul y (Fri day).




COMPANY EARNINGS It is a quiet week for earni ngs, wi th onl y one major company, C ampbell Soup, reporti ng, on Thurs day.




TRADE DELIBER ATIONS The Organiz ati on of the Petr oleum Exporti ng Countries meets in Vi enna to disc uss possibl e production cuts (Tues day).




The Doha round of worl d tr ade tal ks res umes i n Geneva (T uesday).




THE R EGU LAT ORS The chairman of the F eder al Reser ve, Ben S. Bernanke, s peaks in Was hington about educ ati on, at the Whi te Hous e Initi ati ve on Historic all y Blac k Coll eges and Uni versiti es (T ues day) .




A F ed governor, D onald L. Kohn, above, will speak about fi nanci al reg ulati on res earch, at the Brookings Instituti on in Was hington.




PHOT O




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 6397
Date: 9/26/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: Sui ng a Dr ug Company
OTS: 1037828
Subject: F ac ulty
Summ ar y: Sui ng a Drug C ompanyTo the Editor: R e ''Drug Label, Mai med Pati ent and Crucial T est for J ustic es'' (front pag e, Sept. 19) : T he real argument about F.D.A. pre- emption is not whether the F ood and Drug Admi nistr ation s ets mini mal or opti mal standards . R ather, the issue turns on versi ons of the Watergate questions : What di d a c ompany know? When di d it know i t? Henr y Greens pan Ann Ar bor, Mich., Sept. 19, 2008 T he writer teac hes about the F.D .A. , ethics and polic y at the U ni versi ty of Mic higan, Ann Arbor.
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Sui ng a Drug C ompany




To the Editor:




Re ''Drug Label, Mai med Pati ent and Crucial T est for J ustic es'' (front pag e, Sept. 19):




The real argument about F.D.A. pr e-emption is not whether the F ood and Drug Admi nistr ation sets mini mal or opti mal standards. R ather , the iss ue tur ns on versions of the Watergate ques tions: What did a company know? When did it know it?




What di d it do?




While thes e questi ons ar e tangenti al in Wyeth v. Levi ne, they ar e at the c ore of litigati on invol ving drugs like Vioxx, Bayc ol, fen-phen and others. Di d the F.D .A. have the i nformati on requir ed to make reasonabl e ass ess ments? Did compani es allow the F .D.A. to do s o?




The Levi ne case is an outlier. Har d as it is to believe, the Bush F.D.A. and the Department of J ustic e have ass erted that dr ug c ompanies should be s hiel ded from ci vil li ability even if F.D.A. approval is based on deliberatel y faked or hidden data. T hat is , even i f approval is obtained through fel ony fr aud.




That is the c ore iss ue regar ding F.D .A. pre-empti on. T he res t is mostl y dis trac tion.




Henr y Greens pan
Ann Arbor, Mic h., Sept. 19, 2008




The writer teac hes about the F.D .A., ethics and polic y at the U ni versity of Mic higan, Ann Ar bor.




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 6394
Date: 9/27/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: Esti mate of 2nd-Quarter Growth Lower ed
OTS: 1037828
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan Sur vey of Cons umers sai d its c ons umer senti ment i ndex r eadi ng slipped to 70.3, from 73.1 in earl y September, i ts worst sli de within a si ngle month si nce Augus t 2005, when H urricane Katri na caus ed wides pread disl oc ation.
Bod y:




Esti mate of 2nd-Quar ter Growth Lower ed
The nati on's ec onomy grew less vigor ousl y than pr eviousl y thought during the s econd quarter and the s nowballing fi nancial crisis damped a r ebound i n c onsumer s entiment this month.




The Commerce Department sai d gros s domestic pr oduct, the meas ure of total goods and s er vic es output, expanded at a 2.8 perc ent rate from April throug h J une, rather than the 3.3 percent rate it es ti mated a month ago.




The Reuters/U ni versi ty of Mic higan Sur vey of Cons umers sai d its c ons umer senti ment i ndex r eading slipped to 70.3, from 73.1 in earl y September, i ts worst sli de within a si ngle month since A ugus t 2005, when H urricane Katrina caus ed wides pread disl oc ation.




''The fi nanci al crisis has peopl e worried,'' sai d C arl Lantz, a U nited States inter est r ate s trategist at Credit Suiss e i n N ew Yor k.




''The third and fourth q uarter are s hapi ng up to be pretty weak i n G.D.P. ter ms, especi ally on the c onsumer si de,'' Mr. Lantz s ai d, noting that acc ess to credit is li mited and inc omes are falling.




The cons umer senti ment i ndex was still the highes t si nce Februar y.




Growth i n c onsumer s pending was weaker than first es ti mated, pulling down the esti mate of over all growth, whil e busi nesses ma de bigger cuts i n inves tments , a sign confi denc e was s agging even befor e fi nanci al mar ket turmoil deepened.




Investors pai d s cant attenti on to the day's ec onomic data, thoug h, wi th the negoti ati ons on a financi al s ystem bailout and the s eizur e of Was hington Mutual, the biggest bank closur e in United States histor y, r oiling global mar kets.




CHART: R eal Economic Gr owth: Annual r ate of chang e i n the gross domes tic product, bas ed on quarterl y figur es adj usted for i nflation and seas onal fl uctuations.( Sourc e: C ommerc e D epartment) C hart s hows bar graph.




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 6199
Date: 9/24/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ew Yor k Times
Head lin e: Congress Pass es Great Lakes Protec tion Bill
OTS: 1037828
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: ''If water c oul d be exported will y- nilly without any ability of the Gr eat Lakes states to evaluate the ec ological and economic i mpact, you' d have to think bad t hings would come of that,'' said J. D avi d Allan, acti ng dean of the Uni versity of Mic higan Sc hool of Natur al R es ourc es and Environment. ''You're benefiti ng the countr y by keepi ng water where it s er ves the i mmediate needs of millions of people.''
Bod y:




Congress Pas ses Gr eat Lakes Protec tion Bill




The Hous e approved a bill Tues day to protec t the vast body of fr es h water in the Great Lakes regi on by pr ohi biting al most any di versi on of it to pl ac es outside the l akes' basin an d req uiring the eight s tates bordering the l akes to follow new c ons ervati on standards .




The vote was 390 to 25 in favor of the bill, whic h has already been pass ed by the Senate and is expec ted to be signed by Pr esi dent Bush.




The meas ure, the Gr eat Lakes C ompac t, was negoti ated by the eight s tates . A dec ade in the making, it is intended to ease l ong standing fears that s tates outsi de the region, or even other c ountri es, could tap into the l akes, possibl y deplete them and do l ong -term damag e to their basin's natural envir onment and ec onomy.




Together, the fi ve Great Lakes account for 20 perc ent of the world's s uppl y of fr esh s urfac e wat er, and an esti mated 40 million people get their water from the lakes' basi n. Sci entists and environmental advocates who bac ked the l egislati on s aid they consider ed the l akes not a regional res ourc e but a national one, whose health and integrity, the y s aid, ar e in the entir e c ountr y's i nteres t.




''If water c oul d be exported will y- nilly without any ability of the Gr eat Lakes states to evaluate the ec ological and economic impact, you' d have to thi nk bad t hings woul d c ome of that,'' s aid J. D avi d Allan, acti ng dean of the Uni versity of Michig an Sc hool of Natur al Resources and Envir onment. ''You're benefiting the c ountr y by keeping water wher e it ser ves the i mmedi ate needs of millions of peopl e.''




Christy Leavitt, clean- water advoc ate at Envir onment Americ a, agreed. ''Keeping the water in the basin is critic al,'' Ms. Leavitt s aid, ''and so is req uiring all the Great Lakes states to d evelop c onser vati on and effici enc y programs .''




The compact will g enerall y pr event water's di versi on from the basi n except under r are circums tanc es, and even then onl y with appr oval of all eight bor dering states: Illinois , Indiana, Mic higan, Minnes ota, N ew Yor k, Ohio, Penns yl vani a and Wisc onsin.




The Hous e vote c apped an effort, beg un in 1998, to reac h a mul tistate s et of agreements o n manag ement of the lakes. Though s ome lawmakers posed l ast- minute obj ecti ons that the pact was not s trong enoug h -- the export of bottl ed water, for ins tanc e, would be exempted fr om the ban -- a wi de range of Great Lakes advoc ates call ed the bill a powerf ul one whose ti me was overdue.




''It shows that our nati onal l eaders unders tand that c onser vi ng water is vital for the economy,'' sai d C amer on Davis , c hief e xecuti ve of the Allianc e for the Great Lakes. ''It sig nals to the res t of the woul d that water, the oil of the c entur y, is a global i mperati ve.''




Copyright © 2008 T he N ew Yor k Times C ompany




ARTIC LEID: 7674
Date: 9/29/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Business Week
Head lin e: McN ERNEY'S BUMPY RID E AT BOEIN G; Fr om a s howdown with D efens e to Dreamli ner dis appointments , the CEO has a mi xed r ec ord
OTS: 933566
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: McN erney " will be judged by what l abor rel ati ons look li ke over the next fi ve years ," s ays N oel M. Tichy, a management profess or at the U ni versi ty of Mic higan's Ross School of Busi ness.
Bod y:




Factiv a                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Dow J ones

      SE        What's Next -- Strategies


     HD         McNERN EY' S BUM PY RIDE AT B OEING; F rom a sho wdo wn with Def ense to Dreamlin er disappo intm ents, the CEO h as a mixed r ecord


     BY         By J os eph Weber


     WC         714 words


     PD         29 September 2008


     SN         Busi ness Week


     SC         BW


   NGC          Busi ness Week - Print and Onli ne


     GC         CTGBWK


     PG         74


    VOL         , Volume 4101, Iss ue


      LA        English


     CY         (c) 2008 McGr aw-Hill, Inc.


      LP        W. James McN er ney Jr., who pitc hed for Yale U ni versity nearl y 40 years ago, c an pl ay hardball. Take the ulti matum the Boeing c hief executi ve officer deli ver ed to a top defense offici al in late Aug ust. Gi ve Boei ng si x more months and a l egitimate s hot to bi d on the now i nfamous $35 billion airborne-refueling tanker plane deal, McN er ney sai d. Otherwis e he woul d qui t the c ompetiti on--leavi ng a sol e bidder and a potentiall y expl osi ve reacti on from Congress . "H e put the Secretar y of D efens e i nto a real cr ac k," s ays a c ongressional staffer familiar with the meeting. "T o McN erney's cr edit, i t wor ked."


      TD        Scor e that one for McNer ney, who may pr ove to be one of the most hard- nosed l eaders in Boei ng's his tor y. T wenty days after the s howdown, the Defens e D ept. abr uptl y c ancel ed the c ompetiti on, pos tp oning the tanker decision until the next Admi nistration. T hat stunning tur n in a tortuous seven- year fight was McN erney's s ec ond triumph i n the battl e: Earlier this year he mounted a highl y unusual protes t that c aus ed the Pentagon to reopen the decisi on to awar d the c ontrac t to a ri val allianc e of Northrop Grumman a nd European Aer onautic D efence & Spac e, maker of Airbus planes. "He handl ed that ver y deftl y," s ays Boeing director Edward M. Liddy, who has j ust been named C EO of American Inter nati onal Group.




                McNerney has had a mi xed rec ord since being tapped in 2005 to run Boei ng after bac k-to-bac k sc andals . One C EO's tenur e ended when a Boeing c hief fi nanci al offic er and a Pentagon offici al were found guilty of impr oprieties in the first go-r ound on a tanker deal in 2002; a s ec ond C EO's car eer was cut s hort after an affair with another Boeing executi ve. McN erney cl eaned house, pai d a $615 million fi ne, and toughened in- hous e ethical oversight, i mpr essi ng Boei ng's hars hes t critic, Senator J ohn McCai n. Southwest Airlines C EO Gar y C. Kell y, a big c ustomer of Boeing's, adds: "I' m glad that Ji m M cNer ney is at the hel m."




                Internall y, the for mer 3M chi ef and GE veteran has recei ved fewer acc ol ades. Even as he was winning i n Washi ngton, he was losi ng a battl e i n Seattle wi th the Inter national Ass oci ati on of Machi nists & Aeros pace Wor kers. T he IAM's 27,000 Boei ng wor kers s truc k on Sept. 6, r eplaying a l ate 2005 wal kout that hobbled Boei ng's commercial pl ane buil ding operations for 28 days. T he new stoppage c ould s tretch deep into the fall.




                WORTH THE PAIN ?




                McNerney, who declined to c omment, insis ts that Boei ng needs fl exibility in its labor c ontracts, s ayi ng in an i n-hous e memo that it mus t "pr otect [its ] long-ter m competiti veness ." He's betti ng that the right to outsource-- per haps to countries that may then buy Boei ng pl anes--is worth the pai n of a stri ke. McN erney " will be judged by what l abor rel ati ons look li ke over the next fi ve years ," s ays N oel M. Tichy, a management profess or at the Un iver sit y of Michig an's R oss Sc hool of Business .




                Critics als o s ay McN er ney took too long to replace exec uti ves i n c harge of a much del ayed new 787 j et. So far, Boei ng has announc ed three postponements totaling mor e than a year i n bringing out the s o-called Dr eamli ner. McN erney & C o. c ould have " moved more aggressi vel y" to fi x the problems, s ays Cai von R umohr, an anal yst with C owen & C o. Boei ng exec uti ves hope for a flight test by year end--unles s the stri ke forc es further lags.




                Those delays may be the l argest factor weighing down Boei ng's stoc k price. After s oaring past 107 las t year , s har es have fallen to about 62. Sinc e that's a c oupl e of dollars bel ow the price when McN erney became C EO i n J ul y 2005, it may be his lowest mar k yet.




                JIM McNERNEY: A MIDTERM REPORT

                DISCIPLINE
                Revamped Boeing after repeated scandals: POSITIVE

                PLAYING WITH OTHERS
                May compete anew for a $35 billion airborne tanker Defense contract:
                POSITIVE
                  TEAM BUILDING
                  Battling with machinists, but outsourcing may reduce costs: NEUTRAL

                  PUNCTUALITY
                  Unable to deliver a new 787 on time: NEGATIVE

                  PRESENTATION
                  The stock trades lower as he struggles to win over Wall Street: NEGATIVE

     ART          photograph| | | Photograph: When M cNer ney took over, he right away tightened i n-house ethic al oversight PHOT OGR APH BY M ATTHEW GILSON|



       CO         boeing : T he Boei ng C ompany



       IN         iaer : Aerospac e/D efens e | i364 : Aeros pace Pr oducts/Parts | i3640010 : Ci vil Aircraft



       NS         c41 : M anag ement Iss ues | ccat : C or por ate/Indus trial N ews | nc at : C ontent T ypes | nfact : F ac ti va Filters | nfc pin : FC &E I ndustr y News Filter



       RE         usa : U nited States | namz : North Americ an Countries /Regi ons



     PUB          The McGr aw-Hill Companies, Inc .



       AN         Document BW00000020080925e49t0000p

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  © 2008 F ac ti va, Inc. All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 7675
Date: 9/22/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Business Week
Head lin e: A LAYOFF'S RIPPLE EFF ECT
OTS: 933566
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: Losing a job is n't j ust a car eer setbac k, it c an be a permanent bl ow to the c ommunity, a r ecent study fi nds . Usi ng data from the Wisc onsin Longitudi nal Study, whic h trac ked 4,000 high sc hool graduates over 45 years , researchers at UCLA and the U ni ver sity of Mic hig an studi ed the community i nvol vement of wor kers ag ed 35 to 53.
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Factiv a                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Dow J ones

       SE         The Busi ness Week -- BT W


       HD         A L AYOFF'S RIPPL E EFFECT


       BY         By Ben Levi sohn Edited by D eborah Stead


       WC         136 words


       PD         22 September 2008


       SN         Busi ness Week


       SC         BW


     NGC          Busi ness Week - Print and Onli ne


       GC         CTGBWK


       PG         18


     VOL          , Volume 4100, Iss ue


       LA         English


       CY         (c) 2008 McGr aw-Hill, Inc.


       LP         Losi ng a job is n't j ust a car eer s etbac k, it c an be a permanent bl ow to the c ommunity, a recent study fi nds . Usi ng data from the Wisc onsin Longitudi nal Study, whic h trac ked 4,000 high sc hool gr aduates over 45 years , researchers at UCLA and the Un iver sit y of Michig an studi ed the c ommunity i nvol vement of wor kers aged 35 to 53. Their fi ndi ng: After bei ng lai d off, empl oyees wer e 35% less li kel y than before to participate i n c ommunity or churc h groups , c haritable organizations--even bowli ng teams . And few r eturned onc e they got new jobs. Instead, they foc us ed their energies on professi onal and political groups--in the belief, hypothesizes UCLA soci olog y professor Jennie Brand, that both c oul d have an i mpac t on findi ng and keeping wor k.



       NS         gjob : Labor Iss ues | gcat : Politic al/Gener al N ews | gcom : Soci ety/Community/Wor k



       RE         usa : U nited States | namz : North Americ an Countries /Regi ons



     PUB          The McGr aw-Hill Companies, Inc .



       AN         Document BW00000020080918e49m00017

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  © 2008 F ac ti va, Inc. All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 6393
Date: 9/27/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Los Angel es Ti mes
Head lin e: Cons umers les s c onfident at end of September
OTS: 914584
Subject: C onsumer Senti ment Index
Summ ar y: T he Reuters/U ni versity of Mic higan fi nal index of hous ehol d s enti ment declined to 70.3, lower than forec ast, after a reading of 73.1 in earl y September. Since the preli mi nar y Michigan r eport was is sued Sept. 12, Lehman Br os. Hol dings Inc. fil ed for bankruptc y protection, the fed eral g overnment took over American Internati onal Group Inc. and stoc ks pl ummeted.
Bod y:




Cons umers less c onfident at end of September




Wire




Americ an cons umers los t c onfidence i n September as they saw the credit crisis deepen, a sign they will curtail s pending, ac cor ding to a s ur vey rel eased Fri day.




Meanwhile, a g over nment repor t s howed c ons umer s pendi ng was l ower than initi all y esti mated in th e s ec ond q uarter, slowi ng ec onomic growth.




The Reuters/U ni versi ty of Mic higan fi nal index of hous ehol d s entiment declined to 70.3, lower than forec ast, after a readi ng of 73.1 in earl y September. Since the preli mi nar y Mic higan r eport was is sued Sept. 12, L ehman Br os. Hol dings Inc . fil ed for bankruptc y pr otecti on, the federal gover nment took over Americ an International Gr oup Inc . and s toc ks plummeted.




"The credit crisis makes the outlook for growth more uncertai n," s aid J onathan Basile, an ec onomist at Credit Suisse Hol dings Inc. i n N ew Yor k. "The cons umer is under pres sur e, and all thes e fi nanci al and cr edit conc erns ar e goi ng to weigh on the economy at the s ame ti me that ther e's c onc ern about slowi ng growth outsi de the U .S."




Still, the number was higher than the Augus t reading of 63, r eflecting l ower g as oline pric es this month.




The confi denc e i ndex was forec ast to fall to 70.8, acc ording to the median esti mate of 62 economists sur veyed by Bl oomberg Ne ws. The g aug e of s enti ment averag ed 85.6 i n 2007.




The index of c onsumer expec tations for si x months from now, whic h mor e cl os el y proj ects the direc tion of spendi ng, decli ned to 67.2 fr om a preli minar y r eading of 70.9 i n earl y September. The measur e is up fr om 57.9 i n Aug ust.




Also Friday, the C ommerc e D epartment r eported that the U.S. ec onomy expanded at an annual r ate of 2.8% in the sec ond quar ter, down fr om a pr elimi nary esti mate of 3.3% iss ued las t month. Personal c ons umpti on, tr ade and business investment all c ontributed l ess to gross domes tic product than pr eviousl y es timated, the r eport s howed.




The bigges t part of the economy, c onsumer s pending, ros e at a 1.2% annual rate from April through J une, weaker than the 1.7% esti mated l ast month. Spendi ng rec ei ved a lift i n the s ec ond quarter fr om the government's sti mulus pl an.




The gross domes tic product r eport s howed that the F eder al R eser ve's preferred measur e of i nflation, whic h is tied to cons umer spendi ng and stri ps out food and energy cos ts, ros e at a 2.2% annual rate, higher than forecas t and fas ter than the 2.1% previ ousl y esti mated. Pric es over all c ame in l ower than anticipated.




A deterior ati ng labor mar ket is one reas on cons umer spendi ng is li kel y to stagnate this quar ter. The U .S. has los t jobs ever y month this year, and the unempl oyment rate in August jumped to a fi ve- year high of 6.1%, ac cor ding to the Labor D epartment.




Copyright © 2008 Los Ang eles Times




ARTIC LEID: 1585
Date: 9/8/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Los Angel es Ti mes
Head lin e: C'mon, g et happy
OTS: 914584
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: In a paper published in the Jul y iss ue of Pers pec ti ves on Ps yc hologic al Sci ence, lead researcher R onal d Inglehart, a profess or of political scienc e at the U ni versity of Mic higan, r efuted the l ong -hel d beli ef that happiness among societi es is cons tant. His r esearc h c oncl uded that signi ficant and enduring chang es i n happiness can occ ur not onl y for i ndi vi duals , but als o for entire societi es.
Bod y:




C'mon, g et happy




Infobox
Mainbar




True or fals e:




___ I woul d be happi er if I made mor e money, found the perfect mate, lost 10 pounds or moved to a new hous e.




___ H appi nes s is g enetic. You c an't change how happy you ar e any mor e than you c an c hange how tall you are.




___ Success brings happiness.




Ans wers: Fals e, false and false.




--




IF REC ENT s cientific res earc h on happi ness -- and there has been qui te a bit -- has proved anythi ng, it's that happi ness is not a goal. It's a proc ess . Although our tendenc y to be happy or not is partl y i nborn, it's als o partl y withi n our contr ol. And, perhaps more sur prising, happiness brings s ucc ess , not the other way around. T hough many people thi nk happiness is elusi ve, scie ntis ts have ac tuall y pinned it down and know how to get it.




For years , many in the fiel d of ps yc hol og y s aw the sci ence of happiness as an oxymoron. " We got no r es pec t," says Ed Di ener, a pr ofessor of ps yc hol og y at the U ni versity of Illi nois , who began s tudying happiness in 1981. "Critics s aid you couldn't s tudy happiness bec ause you coul dn't meas ure it." In the mi d-1990s , he and a few other r es earc hers started to pr ove the nays ayers wr ong. As a r es ult, Americans now have an abundanc e of cons umer books, ac ade mic articles, j our nals and ass ociations to help them find happiness.
"Many of us have material thi ngs and our basic needs met, s o we are l ooki ng for what c omes after that," s ays Diener, c o-author wi th his son, Robert Bis was-Di ener, of the for thc oming "H appi ness: U nloc king the M ys teri es of Ps yc hological Wealth." "M aterialis m is n't bad. It's onl y ba d if we us e i t to r epl ac e other thi ngs in li fe li ke meani ngful wor k, a good marriage, ki ds and friends . Peopl e are rec ognizi ng that thos e who make money more i mportant than love have lower l evels of life s atisfac tion."




In r ecent months, the following titles have hit bookstor e s hel ves : " What Happy Women Know," "The H appi ness Tr ap," "The H ow of Happiness: A Sci entific Approac h to Getti ng the Life You Want" and "H appi ness for T wo."




Christine C ardone, exec uti ve editor of ps yc hol ogy books for Wil ey-Bl ac kwell, whos e titles incl ude Di ener's forthc omi ng book, points to 2000 as the tipping poi nt: H appiness scienc e beg an to mushr oom and fl ood s oci ety wi th new, positi ve ways of thinki ng. T hat year , Mar tin Seligman, then-pr esi dent of the American Ps yc hol ogical Ass n., started the positi ve ps yc holog y movement, whic h foc us es on what makes peopl e mentall y healthy. T hat c onc ept g ot out to the media, spawning more interest and r es earc h. M eanwhile, neuros cientists wer e disc overi ng better ways to meas ure what's goi ng on i n the brai n.




"Popul ar inter est in happiness is onl y one driver," says Seligman, a ps yc holog y profess or at the U ni versity of Penns yl vania and dir ector of the Positi ve Ps yc holog y C enter ther e. "T he books ar e c oming out bec ause the scienc e is comi ng out." Academic publications have enjoyed a si mi l ar boon. Between 1980 and 1985, onl y 2,125 articl es were published on happiness , c ompared with 10,553 on depressi on. Fr om 2000 to 2005, the number of articles on happiness incr eas ed si xteenfol d to 35,069, whil e articles on depr ession numbered 80,161. Fr om 2006 to pr esent, just over 2 1/2 years, a searc h found 27,335 articles on happiness , mor e than half the 53,092 found on depres sion.




The fiel d of happi nes s al so now has its own publications -- the J ournal of Posi ti ve Ps ycholog y and the Journal of Happi ness Studi es -- and i ts own pr ofessi onal organiz ati on, which Diener started l ast year. T he Internati onal Positi ve Ps ychol ogy As sn. for academics and s cholars already has 3,500 members .




The trend s hows no signs of slowi ng. Sonja Lyubomirs ky, a profess or of ps yc holog y at UC Ri verside and author of "T he H ow of H appi nes s: A Scientifi c Approac h to Getting the Life You Want," beli eves that's bec ause happi ness is li ke the H ol y Grail. " People ar ound the worl d want it. If you as k people what they want for their c hildren, they'll s ay for them to be happy. It's i n our D ecl arati on of Independenc e. It matters to and affects ever yone."




Among the maj or fi ndi ngs of the last decade is that the pursuit of happiness is a worthy caus e, Di ener s ays . "H appiness doesn't just feel good. It's g ood for you and for soci ety. H appy people ar e more s ucc ess ful , have better rel ati ons hips, are healthi er and li ve longer."




Seligman adds, " We' ve learned i n 10 years that happy people ar e more producti ve at wor k, learn more in sc hool, g et promoted mor e, are mor e cr eati ve and ar e li ked mor e."




And if that does n't make you happy, here's more happy news: Ar ound the worl d, happiness is on the ris e.




--




Beyond your genes




Great if you happen to be one of the peopl e bor n happy, right? Not exac tl y. Another major fi nding is that about half of our tendenc y toward happi nes s is genetic, whil e the res t is contr olled by the indi vi dual.




Lyubomirs ky and her coll eag ues anal yz ed studi es on identic al twi ns and other res earc h and came to the conclusion that happiness is 50% genetic, 40% i ntentional and 10% circ umstantial. "Half of your predis position toward happi ness you can't c hang e," s he s ays. "It's i n your genes . Your circ umstanc es -- where you li ve, your health, your wor k, your marriage -- can be toug h to c hang e. But most peopl e ar e s urpris ed that circ umstanc es don't account for as muc h of their happi ness as they thi nk."




Life circums tanc es don't r es ult i n s ustained happi ness, she s ai d, becaus e we adapt. That new c ar, promoti on or hous e feels great at first. T hen we g et us ed to it. An old but often-cited study found l otter y wi nners were no happier than c ontrol groups after a year. That doesn't mean that getti ng out of a b ad job or a terrible marriag e won't gi ve your happi nes s a boost. But sustaini ng that good feeli ng requires s omethi ng els e: deliberate contr ol of how you ac t and thi nk. T hat's the 40% intenti onal part that Lyubomirs ky and others are most inter ested in.




In her res earc h, Lyubomirs ky led c ontroll ed studi es to deter mine what behaviors positi vel y affect happi ness, and h as c ome up with at leas t 12 strategies that measur abl y incr eas e l evels. F or i nstance, one str ateg y s he's tested is the pr actic e of gr atitude. In her gratitude study, she had a group of 57 subj ects express grati tude onc e a week in a journal. A s ec ond group of 58 expr ess ed gratitude i n a j our nal thr ee ti mes a week. And a c ontrol group of 32 did nothing. At the end of si x weeks, sh e r etested all thr ee groups and found a signific ant i ncreas e i n happi ness i n the first one. (T he participants who jour nal ed t hree ti mes a week s howed less c hange, per haps bec aus e the exercise di dn't feel as fres h, she theorized.)




She and other res earchers also rec ommend practici ng forgivenes s, s avoring posi ti ve moments and becomi ng mor e i nvol ved in your c hurch, s ynagogue or religious organiz ati on. "N ot ever y s trateg y fi ts ever yone," s he says. " People need to tr y a few to fi nd whic h ones wor k."




--




Happiness defi ned




Although Lyubomirs ky li kes to let peopl e define happiness for thems el ves, cli nicall y, s he describes it as " a c ombi nation of freq uent positi ve emotions, pl us the s ense that your life is good."




Seligman, who has written sever al books on the s ubj ect, including the bes ts elling "Authentic Happiness," says it's the pursuit of engaging and meaningful acti viti es. By engaging, he means bei ng in a state of flow or " at one with the music ." You get s o absor bed i n what you're doi ng that you los e tr ac k of ti me. Bu t one pers on's fl ow is another pers on's torture. What puts you in a state of fl ow is us ually an ac ti vity that us es your str engths and talents . It's even better when it's part of your wor k.




"Meaningful" woul d be usi ng what you're best at to s er ve others or to participate i n a c aus e that's bigger than yoursel f. (T o fi nd out what you're g ood at, or your s trengths , Seligman offers a fr ee s ur vey on his website, www.authentic happiness .org.)




"Your pur pos e does n't have to be gi ant," s ays Dan Baker, a ps ychologist who founded the life enhanc ement pr ogram at C anyon R anch in T ucs on and is the author of "What H appy Women Know." " If you're 17, your purpose c an be getting i nto the c ollege of your choic e. When y ou're a parent, it c an be getting your kids off to school s af el y and prepar ed for eac h day. You don't have to adopt a R omani an or phan or build a churc h in Chil e."




What happi ness is n't, Di ener adds , is getti ng ever ything right in your life. " A man might thi nk, 'If I get the right educ ati on, the right j ob and the right wi fe, I'll be happy.' But that's not how it wor ks. For i nstance, onc e basic needs are met, the effects of i ncome on happi ness get s mal ler and s maller. T hat's bec aus e happi ness li es in the way you live and look at the world.




"If you have no goal other than your pers onal happiness , you'll never ac hieve it. If you want to be happy, purs ue something els e vigor ousl y and happiness will c atch up with you."




--




External factors




Although happiness is largel y up to the i ndi vidual , new r es earc h s hows that what's goi ng on around you -- s pecific all y how muc h pers onal freedom you have -- als o plays a rol e.




In a paper published in the Jul y iss ue of Perspec ti ves on Ps yc hological Sci ence, lead researcher R onal d Inglehart, a pr ofess or of politic al s cienc e at the U ni versity of Mic higan, r efuted the l ong -hel d beli ef that happiness among soci eti es is constant. His research c oncl uded that si gnificant and enduring c hang es i n happi ness c an occ ur not onl y for i ndi vi duals, but als o for entire soci eti es.




The study, whic h Seligman c alls the bes t he's s een on happiness i n fi ve years, anal yzed polls taken from 1981 to 2007 b y the World Values Sur vey. T he sur veys consisted of 88 c ountri es c ontai ning 90% of the world's popul ation, and meas ured happiness and over all life satisfac tion. Among the 52 c ountries that completed all the s ur veys over the 17- year peri od, happi ness rose in 45 of them, or 86%. In si x c ountries, it declined, and i n one (Aus tralia), levels s howed no c hange. Over all, happi ness i ncr eas ed 6.8 percentage points.




Inglehart credits ec onomic development, democratization and i ncreasi ng social tol eranc e for the happi ness bump. Ec onomic g ains that bring mor e food, cl othing, s helter, medic al c are and longer life c an res ult in a substantial incr eas e i n s ubjec ti ve well-being for poor soci eti es, he s ays.




But onc e a s oci ety r eaches a c ertain thres hol d, further economic growt h brings onl y mini mal gai ns. Among the ric hes t s ocieties , i ncreas es in inc ome are onl y weakl y linked with higher l evels of su bjec ti ve well-bei ng.




While ec onomic growth helps pr omote happi nes s for s ome, democratization and risi ng social tol erance c ontribute even more. Democr ac y provi des more c hoice, which pr omotes happi nes s. Support for gender equality and tol eranc e of people who are differ ent fr om ones elf are al so s trongly linked, not just becaus e toler ant people ar e happi er, but becaus e li ving i n a toler ant s oci ety enhances ever yone's freedom, Ingl ehart s ays .




The fact that happi nes s and our understandi ng of it are on the ris e bode well. "In the future, mor e people will understand th e nature of happi nes s and its pr oc ess," Baker says. "T hey will understand th at they have to take an ac ti ve rol e if they want i t."




Appar entl y, more peopl e around the world ar e getting that mess age. "It's true," Seligman says. " We're happier. And mor e happiness i n the world is a great thing."




--




health@l ati mes.c om




--




(BEGIN T EXT OF INFOBOX)




Books on the bright si de of life




Cons umers looki ng for books on achi eving happiness will find no s hortage of titl es on store s hel ves.




"We're s eei ng mor e books on happiness becaus e the mar ket has n't been s ati ated on the s ubj ect, and becaus e the doc umentation behind happiness is s o muc h better," s ays M argot Sc hupf, ass ociate publis her for Colli ns Publishi ng Gr oup i n N ew Yor k. "Authors ar e begi nni ng to report real s cienc e and aren't just tal ki ng about a war m, fuzz y feeling."




Here are s ome of the happi nes s books that have hit s hel ves in rec ent months .




* "What H appy Women Know" by D an Baker
* "Happi ness: Unl oc king the M ysteries of Ps ychologic al Wealth" by Ed Diener and Robert Bis was-Di ener ( due out Sept. 16, accor ding to Amazon.c om)




* "The H appi nes s Trap: How to Stop Str uggling and Start Li ving" by Russ Harris




* "The H ow of H appi ness: A Sci enti fic Approac h to Getting the Life You Want" by Sonja Lyubomirs ky




* "Happi ness for T wo" by Alexandra Stoddard




* "Happi ness Is an Inside J ob: Prac ticing for a J oyful Life" by Syl via Boors tei n




* "Happi ness for D ummies" by W. D oyl e Gentr y




* "The C ompl ete Idi ot's Gui de to the Ps ychol ogy of H appiness" by Arl ene M atthews U hl




-- Marnell James on




--




How to s tay s unny




Count your bles sings. Expres s gratitude for what you have pri vatel y and als o by c onveyi ng appreci ati on to others.




Culti vate opti mis m. Keep a j ournal in whic h you write your best possi ble futur e. Prac tice s eei ng the bright side of ever y si tuati on.




Avoi d over-thi nking and soci al c omparison. When you start to dwell on problems or compare yoursel f to others , distrac t yours elf with positi ve thoug hts or acti vi ties .




Practic e ki ndness . D o good things for others.




Nurtur e r elati onshi ps. Pic k a relations hip that needs str engtheni ng, and i nvest ti me and energ y i n it.




Do more acti vi ties that trul y engag e you. Incr eas e the experi enc es at home or wor k in whic h you los e yourself in total abs orpti on.




Repl ay and savor life's joys. Pay attention, delight in and revi ew life's momentar y pl easur es.




Commit to your goals. Pic k one or more signific ant goals and devote ti me and effort to purs uing them.




Devel op c opi ng str ategies. Find and prac tice healthy ways to manag e str ess , har dshi p or tr auma.




Forgive. Keep a j our nal or write a l etter in whic h you l et go of ang er and res entment toward thos e who have hurt you.




Practic e spirituality. Get mor e i nvol ved i n your church, temple or mosque. R ead spiritual books.




Take c are of your body. Exercis e, meditate and laugh.




Source: "T he How of H appiness : A Scientific Appr oach to Getti ng the Li fe You Want," by Sonja Lyubomirs ky




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PHOT OGR APH ER:T he Penguin Pr ess




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PHOT OGR APH ER:Blac kwell Publis hing




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PHOT OGR APH ER:St. Marti n's Griffin




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PHOT OGR APH ER:M ARK BOST ER Los Angel es Ti mes




Copyright © 2008 Los Ang eles Times




ARTIC LEID: 1666
Date: 9/11/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Los Angel es Ti mes
Head lin e: UC profes sor s tudies Bin Laden rec ordi ngs
OTS: 914584
Subject: Alumni T opic s
Summ ar y: T he c ass ettes als o launched a remar kabl e sc holarl y j our ney for Miller, 40.H e grew up in Kansas City, Kan., the son of a l awyer and a high-sc hool Frenc h teac her. He spent a year as a foreign exchange s tudent in Tunisia when he was 17, and went on to study Ar abic at Dartmouth and l ater at Oxfor d and while getting his doc tor ate i n c ultur al anthr opolog y at the Uni versity of Michig an.
Bod y:




UC professor studi es Bin Laden recor dings




Heaped haphazar dl y i nto twi n c ardboar d boxes , the hundr eds of audiocas sette tapes looked more li ke a baby boomer's teenage detritus than a his toric al link to Osama bin Laden.




Flagg Miller knew their val ue.




The tapes were the UC D avis Arabic sc holar's portal i nto the earl y years of the Al Qaeda l eader behind the Sept. 11 attac ks who bec ame the world's most wanted terrorist.




On the seventh anni vers ar y of 9/11, Miller has pulled bac k the c urtai n on the mor e than 1,500 tapes r etrieved after Bin Laden fl ed U.S. tr oops advanci ng on his r esidenti al c ompound in Afghanis tan's Kandahar provi nc e.




They featur e Bin Laden tal king off the c uff at weddings, deli veri ng caj oling r ecruitment pitc hes, extolling true believers and dis hi ng up poetr y.




Taken tog ether, Miller s ays, the tapes s how the evol uti on of history's mos t infamous terrorist -- his metamorphosis from the bl ac k sheep of a wealthy Saudi famil y to a "fr eedom fighter" during the Sovi et occ upati on of Afgha nistan i n the 1980s to his exil e in Sudan and ulti matel y to bec oming the l eader of Al Qaeda.




Miller calls it the mos t c ompl ete audio libr ary of Bin Laden's past.




Compared to the stiff, taped pronounc ements the terr orist l eader deli vers thes e days fr om hidi ng, "it is all far l ess formal and official -- and i n that way i s ver y valuabl e," sai d Miller, an assis tant r eligious studies pr ofessor .
The cassettes also launched a remar kabl e sc hol arl y j our ney for Miller, 40.




He grew up in Kansas City, Kan., the son of a l awyer and a high-sc hool Frenc h teac her. He spent a year as a foreign exchange s tudent in Tunisia when he was 17, and went on to study Ar abic at D artmouth and later at Oxford and while getti ng his doctorate in c ultural anthropol ogy at the U ni versity of Mic higan.




Miller found he had an unc anny ear for language -- whic h has c ome in handy wi th the tapes si nc e he can listen to a r ecor ding i n Arabic and s peedil y type out a tr anslati on in English. He als o devel oped an expertise in Islam and its media, partic ularl y the cultural pr ocli vity toward recor ding life on audioc ass ette.




But these tapes took a sl ow and somewhat mirac ulous r oute to Miller's hands.




After Bi n Laden fl ed his walled Kandahar c ompound i n D ecember 2001, locals l ooted the r esidenc e.




When they were done, all that was left were a few boxes bri mmi ng with audio and vi deo tapes.




In the weeks that foll owed, CNN proc ured the tapes and aired the videos. But the c able networ k turned over the hundreds of audi oc ass ettes to U.S. i ntelligenc e agents .




Then, after the FBI deter mined them free of "any s moki ng guns" that would i ndic ate futur e s ec urity threats , the tapes found their way to the Williams Afghan Media Pr ojec t at Williams Coll ege i n M ass achus etts.




Experts ther e c alled in Miller.




He fl ew east, bl ear y from i ns omni a bor n of schol arly antici pation. In a spare room on campus, he opened the s hippi ng boxes to l ay eyes on the tapes, still bearing the dus t of Afg hanistan.




Many wer e battered, i n need of r epair. H e gentl y lai d them out on tables, s orti ng and c atal oging.




In the c oming days, the l anky ac ademician would fol d hi msel f into a chair for hours, hungr y to listen and transcri be.




"It was daunting," he r ecall ed.




And it would go on, i n s essi on after session, for another fi ve years.




The coll ecti on incl uded tapes fr om mor e than 200 s peakers fr om a doz en c ountri es. A few of them dated as far bac k as the late 1960s .




Identified on the labels , the s peakers i ncluded Islamic sc hol ars and s ome of the men who would become Al Qaeda's operational leaders. Miller waded through s er mons , politic al s peec hes, l ectures , tel ephone c onvers ati ons , r adi o broadc as ts, Islamic anthems, even rec ordi ngs of live battles .




Bin Laden, i n fact, is featured on just 20 of the tapes , a doz en of them never befor e publis hed i n any language.




Miller sai d they offer unprec edented insig ht i nto the wrangling goi ng on among Bin Laden's allies and critics in the fi ve years before 9/11. T hey also show his devel opment from a r elati vel y unpolis hed M usli m or ator and ji had r ecruiter to a l eader.




The earlies t Bi n Laden rec ordi ngs are from the l ate 1980s, when he was fres h fr o m battling the Sovi ets in Afg hanistan. In someti mes gor y detail, he rec ounted the battlefiel d death of a clos e c omrade, but noted how at peac e the man seemed near the end and how such br aver y can be a l ess on.




In each rec ordi ng, " he remains ver y even- keeled, ver y meas ured," Miller sai d. " But he's a militant above all. T his is what comes acr oss. And he's a ver y good recruiter."




Even a poet. Bin Laden's poems are " embedded" i nto his s peec hes at ti mes, offeri ng someti mes mac abr e insights into battl e and death, Miller s aid: "He c oac hes his audi enc es thr oug h their fears about dyi ng in a viol ent way. H e coac hes them to c onsi der such an end as nobl e and potentiall y benefici al to a l arger purpos e."




Much of the rhetoric is familiar Bi n Laden, as the worl d now knows hi m.




He c onsistentl y targets the U.S. as the prime enemy, especi ally bec ause of its support of Isr ael . H e tal ks of ec onomic imbala nc es, whether it is the wealth of the Saudi elite or the strength of the U.S. ec o nomy. H e c har acterizes Muslims as victi ms of global persec uti on and promotes himself as a refor mer who is setti ng Islam on a better path.




Miller's first res earch paper fr om the tapes will appear in the Oc tober i ssue of the j ournal Language & C ommunication. The tapes, meanwhile, have been moved to Yale Uni versity, where they ar e bei ng cl eaned and digitally rer ecor ded, a pr ocess th at will take s everal years to complete.




--




eric.bailey@lati mes .com




PHOT O: SCHOLAR: Fl agg Miller of UC D avis is seen i n 2003 at Williams C olleg e in Mas sac husetts , wher e he studi ed 1,500 audioc ass ette tapes r ec over ed from Os ama bi n Laden's compound in Afg ha nistan.




PHOT OGR APH ER: U C Davis




Copyright © 2008 Los Ang eles Times




ARTIC LEID: 1594
Date: 9/1/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Los Angel es Ti mes
Head lin e: T empest in a bottl e
OTS: 914584
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: In 2007, the U ni versity of Michigan's annual M onitori ng the Futur e s ur vey found that annual alc ohol us e by high sc hool senior s has dr opped from 77% i n 1991 to 66% l ast year.
Bod y:




Tempest in a bottl e




Infobox




Gor die BAILEY JR. had been in coll ege onl y one month before he overdosed on alcohol . Urged on by members of a fr at hous e he was i ntent on j oini ng, the 18- year- old drank until he pass ed out, was dumped onto a c ouch and was found dead the next morni ng. T he 2004 i nci dent at the U ni versity of Col orado was one of the appr oxi matel y 1,700 alc ohol-rel ated deaths that occ ur among coll ege students each year i n the Uni ted States. They i nclude tr affic accidents, falls, s uff oc ati on, drowning and alc ohol pois oning. H undr eds of thous ands of other students c ommi t cri mes, become cri me victi ms , fail cl asses, make poor s exual decisions or sic ken themsel ves by dri nking too much alc ohol. In a s ur vey published last year by the A merican C ollege Health Ass n., jus t over one-third of c ollege students admitted they had binged on alcohol at l eas t onc e i n the previ ous two weeks -- a number that appears to be rising.




Underag e drinking has l ong alar med coll ege administr ators and health profes sionals . But now a deep s chis m is for ming among thos e same people on how to addres s the pr obl em.




Las t month, mor e than 100 c ollege pr esidents signed a petition calling for a debate on whether the mini mum legal dri nking age shoul d be lowered from 21 to 18.




The statement says i n part: "Our experienc e as c olleg e and uni versity pr esidents convi nces us that twenty- one is not wor ki ng. A cul tur e of danger ous, cl andesti ne 'bing e-drinki ng' -- often conduc ted off-c ampus -- has devel oped."




Some health professi onals agree it's ti me to dis cus s the pr opos al, but other heal th experts and coll ege offici als are ag has t.




Eac h si de has statistic s to s upport its posi tion -- but most of the health and safety evidence falls squarel y on the si de of an ag e-21 li mit.




"Ther e is a growi ng body of knowledge that s uggests strong reas ons for par ents and other conc erned peopl e to tr y to keep alc ohol out of the han ds of young peopl e as l ong as we can," says Sus an F oster, vic e presi dent and director of polic y research at the N ational C ent er on Addic tion and Subs tanc e Abus e at C olumbia Uni versity.




Fewer traffic deaths




Statistics on traffic fatalities pr ove the law wor ks , s ays Michele Si mon, res earch and polic y direc tor at the Mari n Institute, an alc ohol industr y watchdog group i n San R afael, Calif. In 1984, a federal s tandar d was established setti ng the mi ni mum l egal drinki ng age at 21. Since then, traffic fatalities among dri vers ages 18 to 20 have fallen by an esti mated 13% , accor ding to the Nati onal Hig hway Traffic Safety Admi nistration.




"That is a r eall y i mportant meas ure of suc ces s," s ays Si mon. "Bac k in the 1970s when states s tarted l owering the drinki ng ag e to 18, that's when this experiment beg an. T her e were i ncr eas es i n traffic fatalities, and people s aid l et's go bac k to the way it was . We forget there is s o muc h sci ence and his toric al c ontext her e. We have been down this road befor e."
* Among thos e studies c omparing the years before 1984 wi th the current er a was a 2001 report fr om the N ational Institute on Drug Abus e, whic h found that coll ege s tudents who reported drinki ng in the l ast month fell fr om 82% in 1980 to 67% in 2000.




* In 2007, the U ni versity of Mic higan's annual Monitoring the F uture sur vey found that annual alcohol us e by high sc hool s eni ors has dropped fr om 77% in 1991 to 66% las t year .




Per haps the s tronges t evidence for the harmful heal th effects of dri nking at a young age come from studi es on bi olog y and addiction, Foster says.




* A 2002 r eport from the Americ an Medic al Assn., ci ting numerous studi es, concl uded that alcohol use during adolescenc e and young adulthood c auses damage to memor y and l ear ning c apabilities .




* A study in the 2006 Archi ves of Pediatrics & Adol esc ent M edici ne found that teens who began drinking before age 14 had a lifeti me ris k of alc ohol dependence of 47% c ompared with 9% for thos e who beg an drinki ng at 21. F or eac h additi onal year under age 21 of dri nking, the greater the odds he or she would develop alcohol dependenc e. T hough the c aus e of this c orr elation is unknown, some experts believe pure bi olog y -- primi ng the young br ain to need alc ohol -- is i nvol ved.




"This is a public health probl em and a medic al problem," Foster says. " It's about the national failure to recogniz e addic tion as a diseas e. If we thi nk of it as ki ds behavi ng badl y or br eaki ng the rul es, that gets in the way."




* And in a 2002 anal ysis of 33 high-quality st udi es on the ag e-21 drinki ng law's effects, U ni versity of Mi nnes ota r esearc her Tr aci L. Toomey found that all but one s tudy s howed the higher ag e res ulted in lower rates of alcohol c ons umption and traffic cr as hes .




"It is the most well-studi ed alc ohol contr ol polic y we have in this c ountr y," s ays T oomey, an as soci ate profes sor i n the sc hool of public health. "Us uall y we find no effect when we do polic y s tudies . H ere we have this polic y effect that is ver y c onsistent -- a big c hunk of the studies showi ng this i nvers e r elationshi p."




Evidence for change




A growing number of c olleg e admi nistrators and health pr ofessi onals aren't c onvinc ed that the age-21 l aws help cur b problem drinki ng.




"Not all the evi dence is on one side of the q ues tion," says J ohn M . McC ardell Jr., former presi dent of Middlebur y C ollege in Vermont and founder of C hoos e R es ponsi bility, a nonprofit group that advoc ates for c hang es in mini mum-drinki ng-age laws and that circ ulated the c ollege president's petiti on. " We're not ignoring sci enc e. There is sci ence on both sides of the questi on."




For example, the reduction i n traffic fatalities may be credited to other s afety meas ures, s uch as the use of res trai nts, bet ter automobile design, improved hospital tr auma car e and s tricter traffic l aws, i n additi on to the lower drinki ng ag e, s ome studies suggest.




Those on the age-18 si de have s tudies as well.




* A 2003 s tudy from the C enters for Dis eas e C ontrol and Pr eventi on found that, though fewer high s chool- age s tudents drink now c ompar ed wi th the late 1970s, the r ates of bi nge drinki ng among all adults 18 and ol der have risen. Publis hed i n the J ournal of the Americ an Medical Ass n., the study enc ompass es 1993 to 2001 and s howed rates of bi nge drinki ng have i ncr eas ed the most ( 56%) among underag e drinkers.




This out-of-c ontrol drinki ng may be fuel ed, McC ardell s ays, by the age- 21 laws, which dri ve underage youth to dri nk i n clandestine s ettings and apar t fr om ol der adults who might model mor e appropr iate behavi or.




"College pr esidents are limited on campus to a mess age of abs tinenc e-onl y," he s ays . "T hey c an't say dri nk moderatel y or drink res ponsi bl y. They can onl y s ay abstai n."




* Though alcohol-related tr affic deaths have declined over all since 1982, deaths have begun to i nch up agai n i n rec ent years, acc ordi ng t o the N ational Highway Tr affic Safety Adminis trati on.




* A 2003 s tudy showed that in many c ountries wi th lower mini mum drinking ages , 15- and 16- year-ol ds are less li kel y to bec ome intoxic ated c ompared wi th teens i n the U.S.




McCardell agr ees that studies show the young er someone s tarts drinki ng, the greater the li kelihood of developing alc ohol dependenc e. But, he s ays , the 2006 Arc hi ves of Pedi atrics & Adolescent Medicine s tudy shows that the corr elati on is greatest at younger ages .




"Between 13 and 18, the effec t is dramatic . But between 18 and 21 it's visi ble but insigni ficant," McCar dell says. " What we oug ht to l ook at is not ke eping 18- year-olds from dri nking, i t's keeping 13-year-olds fr om drinking."




A maj or questi on not ans wered by r es earc h is whether mil d or oc casi onal drinki ng, s uc h as a beer or glass of wine, c aus es any physical har m or pr ecipi tates har mful behavi or in 18- year-ol ds, s ays Brenda C habon, ass ociate pr ofess or of cli nical ps yc hi atr y and behavi oral s ciences at Montefi ore M edical C enter in New Yor k.




"It's the way peopl e drink, not the fact of drinki ng," C habon s ays. "What would harm a developing brai n is r epeated hangovers and blac kouts and head trauma fr om falling. But if s omeone were dri nking moderatel y from ag e 18, I haven't seen any data t o s how that would have harmful effects in the l ong run."




Ther e is little evi denc e i n humans to s uggest that mild to moderate drinki ng in late adol esc ence caus es any damage, s ays D avi d J. Hans on, profess or emeritus of sociol ogy at the State Uni versity of Ne w Yor k at Pots dam, who has s tudi ed the literatur e.




"The res earc h is al most exclusi vel y based on rats and humans who ar e alcohol addicted," he says. " It does n't l ook at moderate drinki ng at all. We' ve g ot a l ot of cros s-cultural evi denc e that i t is n't har mf ul at all."




Role of parents, i ndustr y




The argument over the mini mum legal dri nking age has heated up in r ec ent years due to publicity gi ven to out-of-c ontrol drinki ng among coll ege-ag e youth and tr agic deaths s uc h as Gor die Bailey Jr.'s.




"We need to as k what is dri ving this behavi or," F oster notes . " We're reall y tol erati ng a cul tur e of s ubstance abuse on our coll ege c ampus es . T her e is no evidence that lowering the drinki ng age woul d address these pr obl ems."




The alc ohol i ndus tr y, whic h advertis es heavil y to coll ege students, should come under the microsc ope, as well as the rol e of par ents i n s etti ng attitudes and expec tati ons for their chil dren, she s ays .




Bail ey's stepfather, Mic hael B. Lanahan, who has s tarted a foundation to r aise awareness about coll ege drinki ng, s ays he does n't know if a l ower drinki ng age woul d have saved his s teps on, but he's pleas ed that th e iss ue is getting attenti on.




"Par ents have to questi on their own governance of the chil dren i n high sc hool," says Lanahan, who li ves in Dall as. " Why do s o many kids have fake IDs and we l et i t go? Why do bars g et away with s er ving underage kids? If parents think coll ege presi dents are g oing to police this issue, they ar e s orel y mis taken."




Propos als to cur b youth drinking shoul d explor e all sol uti ons , not just l oweri ng the drinki ng age, Toomey s ays.




"You c an't make concl usions wi thout l ooki ng at what the res earch liter ature s ays ," s he s ays. "McCar dell makes thes e alter nati ve pr opos als without bac ki ng up that they wor k."




Next month, the N ati onal C enter on Addicti on and Substance Abus e at Col umbi a U ni versity will s pons or a c onfer ence, "How to Stop Wasti ng the B est and the Brightes t: Subs tanc e Abus e at Americ a's C olleges and U ni versiti es."




Choos e R esponsibility's pr opos al on l owering the dri nking age will be open for debate, F oster s ays. In addition to the petiti on as king c olleg e pr esi dents to c onsi der a lower dri nking age, C hoos e R esponsibility pr opos es that 18- year-ol ds s houl d be able to c onsume alcohol with parents and take a c ourse that , upon c ompl etion, grants a lic ens e to purc has e, poss ess and c ons ume alc ohol .




"It's not 1984 any more," McC ardell says. " Who c an objec t to examini ng this cl oser ? We need to do whatever we c an as parents , c ollege pr esidents , res ponsi ble citiz ens to mi nimiz e the har m that peopl e do to other people. T hat is a r eas onable goal of public polic y."




--




shari.r oan@lati mes.c om




--




(BEGIN T EXT OF INFOBOX)




Pros and cons of a lower drinki ng age




The evi denc e for and ag ainst lowering the mini mum l egal drinki ng ag e fr om 21 to 18:




Support for age 21 l aws:




Alcohol-r elated tr affic ac cidents have declined si nce the earl y 1980s.
Earlier onset of drinki ng leads to a higher ris k of l ater alcohol dependence.




The br ain develops thr ough the earl y 20s and alcohol may har m the devel opi ng br ain.




Countri es with l ower mi ni mum drinki ng ages have had s erious problems with binge drinki ng among youth.




Rates of drinki ng among high sc hool s tudents have dropped.




Support for a l ower mini mum dri nking age:




The decline i n traffic accidents may have to do with other fac tors besides a higher drinki ng age.




The bigges t effect on l ater ris k of alc ohol dependenc e is for peopl e who start drinki ng in their earl y teens as opposed to ag es 18 to 21.




Ther e is little evi denc e that mil d or moderate drinki ng har ms the devel opi ng br ain.




Some evidence exi sts that teens i n c ountri es with a l ower drinki ng age are less li kel y to drink to intoxic ati on.




Rates of bing e drinki ng among colleg e-age youths have i ncreas ed.




-- Shari Roan




PHOT O: ABR OAD : A c ustomer drinks beer i n England, one of many c ountries to have a l ower l egal drinki ng ag e than i n the U.S.




PHOT OGR APH ER:C hris R atcliffe Bloomberg N ews




PHOT O: ( no capti on)




PHOT OGR APH ER:Ric ardo D eAr atanha Los Angel es Ti mes




Copyright © 2008 Los Ang eles Times




ARTIC LEID: 11740
Date: 9/11/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Ec onomist, The Onli ne (ec onomis t.c om)
Head lin e: T he root of all evil?
OTS: 901756
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: M oreover , this phenomenon was not c onfined to l eukaemia. In 2003 a group of res earchers at the U ni versity of Michigan i n Ann Arbor, l ed by Max Wicha and Mic hael Clar ke, us ed a simil ar tric k on breast-c ancer cells. In this c as e the s urface pr oteins wer e known as CD24 and CD 44, and the minority were those positi ve onl y for CD 44. As with AM L, thes e mi nority c ells pr oduc ed c anc ers i n mic e, whereas the majority cells di d not.
Bod y:




The root of all evil?
Sep 11th 2008
From The Economist print edition
Cancer may be caused by stem cells gone bad. If that proves to be correct, it
should revolutionise treatment

Get article background


MUCH of medical research is a hard slog for small reward. But, just occasionally, a finding
revolutionises the field and cracks open a whole range of diseases. The discovery in the
19th century that many illnesses are caused by bacteria was one such. The unravelling of
Mendelian genetics was another. It now seems likely that medical science is on the brink of
a finding of equal significance. The underlying biology of that scourge of modern humanity,
cancer, looks as though it is about to yield its main secret. If it does, it is possible that the
headline-writer’s cliché, “a cure for cancer―, will come true over the years, just
as the antibiotics that followed from the discovery of bacteria swept away previously lethal
infectious diseases.

The discovery—or, rather, the hypothesis that is now being tested—is that cancers grow
from stem cells in the way that healthy organs do. A stem cell is one that, when it divides,
produces two unequal daughters. One remains a stem cell while the other multiplies into the
sorts of cells required by its organ. This matters for cancer because, at the moment, all the
cells of a tumour are seen as more or less equivalent. Therapies designed to kill them do
not distinguish between them. Success is defined as eliminating as many of them as
possible, so those therapies have been refined to do just that. However, if all that the
therapies are doing is killing the descendants of the non-stem-cell daughters, the problem
has not been eliminated. Instead of attacking the many, you have to attack the few. That
means aiming at the stem cells themselves.

Not all investigators support the cancer-stem-cell hypothesis, but the share who do so is
growing rapidly. A mere five years ago, few research papers on the subject were presented
at big academic meetings. This year there were hundreds at one such meeting alone.
Moreover, data from clinical trials based on the hypothesis suggest that it has real value for
patients. As a result, drug companies have taken notice and are trying to develop
substances that will kill cancer stem cells.
The virtu es of self- restr aint




The root cause of both cancer and stem cells is multicellularity. In the distant past, when all
living things had only one cell, that cell’s reproduction was at a premium. In the body of
an animal, however, most cells have taken a vow of self-denial. Reproduction is delegated
to the sex cells. The rest, called somatic cells, are merely supporting actors, specialised for
the tasks needed to give the sex cells a chance to get into the next generation. For this to
happen required the evolution of genes that were able to curb several billion years’
worth of instinct to proliferate without killing that instinct entirely. Only then could somatic
cells do their job, and be present in appropriate numbers.

The standard model of tumour formation was based on the fact that somatic cells slowly
accumulate mutations. Sometimes these disable the anti-proliferation genes. If enough of
the brakes come off in a somatic cell, so the theory went, it will recover its ancestral vigour
and start growing into a tumour. Cancer, then, is an inevitable cost of being multicellular.

The discovery of stem cells changed this picture subtly, but importantly. Blood stem cells
were found a long time ago, but only recently has it become apparent that all tissues have
stem cells. The instincts of stem cells lie halfway between those of sex cells and ordinary
body cells. They never stop reproducing, but they cannot look forward to making the
generational leap. When the body dies, so do they. However, they are few in number, and
because at cell division only one daughter continues to be a stem cell, that number does not
grow.

This division of labour may even be another type of anti-cancer mechanism. It allows
stringent locks to be put on somatic cells (which, for example, strictly limit the number of
times they can divide), yet it permits tissue to be renewed. Without stem cells, such tissue-
renewal would be the province of any and every somatic cell—a recipe, as the traditional
model observes, for tumorous disaster. The obverse of this, however, is that if a stem cell
does mutate into something bad, it is likely to be very bad indeed. That, in essence, is the
stem-cell hypothesis of cancer.

One obvious prediction of this hypothesis is that tumours will have at least two sorts of cell
in them: a dominant population of daughter cells and a minority one of stem cells. The first
person to show that to be true was John Dick, a molecular biologist at the University of
Toronto. In 1997 he isolated what looked like stem cells from a blood cancer called acute
myeloid leukaemia (AML). Blood cancers are easier to deal with in this context than solid
tumours because their cells do not have to be separated from one another before they are
examined. One characteristic of AML cells is that they have two sorts of a protein, called
CD34 and CD38, on their surfaces. Dr Dick thus used two sets of special antibodies for his
experiment. One sort stuck only to the CD34 molecule, the other only to CD38. Each sort
was also attached to a fluorescent tag.

By mixing the AML cells from his patients with the two antibodies and running them through
a machine that sorted them according to how they fluoresced, he showed that most were
positive for both proteins. However, a small fraction (as low as 0.2%) were positive only for
CD34. These, he suspected, were the stem cells.
He was able to confirm this by injecting the minority cells into mice. The resulting tumours
had the same mix of cells as those from human patients. However, when he injected mice
with samples from the majority cells, with both sorts of the protein, no tumours resulted.
The CD34-only cells thus acted as cancer stem cells.

Moreover, this phenomenon was not confined to leukaemia. In 2003 a group of researchers
at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, led by Max Wicha and Michael Clarke, used a
similar trick on breast-cancer cells. In this case the surface proteins were known as CD24
and CD44, and the minority were those positive only for CD44. As with AML, these minority
cells produced cancers in mice, whereas the majority cells did not.

Since these two pieces of work, the list of cancer stem cells has multiplied. It now includes
tumours of the breast, brain, prostate, colon, pancreas, ovary, lung, bladder, head and
neck, as well as melanoma, sarcoma, AML, chronic myelogenous leukaemia, Hodgkin’s
lymphoma and myeloma.

That is quite a list. The question is, what can be done with it? Jeremy Rich, a neurologist at
Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, has one idea. He created mice that had human
glioblastoma tumours, a form of brain cancer, growing in them. Then he treated these mice
with radiation (the standard therapy for such cancer in people). He found that the cancer
stem cells were more likely to survive this treatment than the other cells in the tumour.
That turned out to be because, although all the tumour cells suffered equal amounts of DNA
damage from the radiation, the stem cells were better able to repair this damage. When he
treated the mice simultaneously with radiation and with a drug that interferes with DNA
repair, however, the stem cells no longer had an advantage. They were killed by the
radiation along with the other cells.

If that result applies to people as well as rodents, it opens up a whole avenue of possibility.
In fact, Dr Rich is now in negotiations with several companies, with a view to testing the
idea in humans. That “if― is a real one, though. A mouse is not a human being.

Indeed, the stem-cell hypothesis is often criticised for its reliance on animal models of
disease. Some researchers worry that the experiments used to identify putative cancer stem
cells are too far removed from reality—human tumour cells do not naturally need to
survive in mice—and thus may not reflect human cancer biology at all.

Proponents of the hypothesis are alive to that concern, but they think that the same pattern
has been seen so often in so many different cancers that it is unlikely to be completely
wrong. The practical test, though, will be whether the hypothesis and ideas that emanate
from it, such as Dr Rich’s combination therapy, actually help patients survive.
Searching for the suspects




As a step towards discovering whether they do, William Matsui, an oncologist at Johns
Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, looked for cancer stem cells in
pancreatic-tumour samples taken from nearly 300 patients. His team found that patients
whose tumours did contain such stem cells survived for an average of 14 months. Those
whose tumours lacked them survived for 18 months.

That finding is consistent with the idea that cancer stem cells contribute to the most
aggressive forms of the disease, though it does not prove they cause tumours in the first
place. And although the absence of detectable stem cells in some tumours may be seen as
casting doubt on the whole idea, it may instead be that they are too rare to be easily
detected. If the stem-cell idea is confirmed, it may help doctors and patients choose how to
treat different tumours. Those with detectable stem cells might be candidates for aggressive
chemical and radiation therapies, while those without might best be treated with the
surgeon’s knife alone.

Breast-cancer researchers are also testing the stem-cell hypothesis in the clinic. Jenny
Chang’s group at Baylor College of Medicine, in Texas, took samples of tumours from
women before and after standard chemotherapy. When they counted the cells in the tissue
they found that the proportion of stem cells in a tumour increased after treatment. That
suggests the chemotherapy was killing the non-stem tumour cells and leaving the stem cells
behind. When the group repeated the experiment using a modern drug called Tykerb that
blocks what is known as the HER2 pathway, they got a different result. HER2 is a gene
which encodes a protein that acts as a receptor for molecules called growth factors which,
as their name suggests, encourage cell growth and proliferation. After the HER2-blocking
treatment, cancer stem cells formed the same proportion of the residual tumour as
beforehand. That suggests they, too, were being clobbered by the new treatment. It is
probably no coincidence that another drug, Herceptin, which also goes after HER2, is one of
the few medicines that is able to prolong the lives of people with advanced cancer.

The stem-cell hypothesis has also changed the way people do basic research. For example,
over the past few years cancer researchers have been grinding up pieces of tumour and
using what are known as gene-expression microarrays to work out which genes are active in
them. However, if the hypothesis is correct, this approach will probably yield the wrong
result, because the crucial cells make up but a small part of a tumour’s bulk and the
activity of their genes will be swamped by that of the genes of the more common non-stem
cells. The answer is to isolate the stem cells before the grinding starts.

This approach has already yielded one important finding. When Dr Chang used microarrays
to study gene expression in the CD44-positive cells from breast tumours, she noticed that
they did not look like those of the epithelial cells that make up the bulk of such a tumour.
Epithelial cells are immobile, grow in “cobblestone― patterns and produce proteins
that help them stick together. The gene expression of the putative stem cells, however,
resembled that of a mesenchymal cell. Mesenchymal cells rarely stick together. Indeed,
they are mobile and are able to slip through the matrix of proteins that holds epithelial cells
together.

That finding is important because mobile cells are more likely to escape from a tumour and
form secondary cancers elsewhere in the body. Once such secondaries are established,
successful treatment is much harder. And the CD44-positive cells also expressed genes that
are important for stem-cell self-renewal, particularly one called Notch that controls the flow
of chemical signals within a cell.

Researchers at OSI Pharmaceuticals, a firm that makes a drug called Tarceva, found a
similar pattern in lung cancer. Several years ago, they started looking for gene-expression
patterns that correlated with response to Tarceva. They found that tumours with a pattern
that resembled epithelial cells were sensitive to the drug. By contrast, those that had a
mesenchymal pattern were not. They hypothesised that as tumours develop, some of their
cells actually switch from a sticky, epithelial state to a mobile, mesenchymal one. This
epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, or EMT, is well known to biologists who study
embryonic development, but OSI’s results, and those of other researchers, suggest that
cancers may have hijacked it for their own use.
Robert Weinberg, a molecular biologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and
his colleagues have come to the same conclusion but they have taken the hypothesis one
step further. They think that tumour cells which have undergone EMT have acquired many
of the characteristics of cancer stem cells. Experiments in his laboratory, employing a
variety of animal models of breast cancer, suggest that communication between tumour
cells and surrounding non-cancerous support cells can lead some of the cancer cells to
undergo EMT.

That is intriguing. If this transition really can be induced in tumour cells, then any of them
might be able to become a cancer stem cell. So it may be that the fundamentalist version of
the stem-cell hypothesis is wrong, and the stem cells are a result of a cancer, rather than
its cause. That could be another reason why Dr Matsui found that pancreatic cancers do not
always seem to contain stem cells.

Dr Weinberg is sensitive to this point, and is cautious when talking about these
experiments. He refers to the cells that have undergone EMT as “having the qualities of
stem cells― but avoids actually calling them cancer stem cells. If his idea is correct,
though, it means that finding drugs which block the signals that induce EMT could reduce
the stem-cell population and prolong the survival of the patient. It also means that both the
epithelial cells and the mesenchymal ones will have to be attacked. And OSI is now testing a
drug that does just that.
Notch up a victory?




Breast-cancer researchers, too, are testing drugs that hit molecular targets highlighted by
cancer-stem-cell studies. Merck, for example, has turned to a drug it originally developed to
treat Alzheimer’s disease. Although this drug, code-named MK0752, did not slow that
disease, it does block activity of Notch, the stem-cell self-renewal gene, and might thus be
an appropriate weapon against breast-cancer stem cells. Dr Chang and Dr Wicha have
started a clinical trial which uses MK0752 in combination with standard chemotherapy. By
the end of the year they hope to have some idea of whether the combination kills cancer
cells in human tumours.

Attacking Notch is a high-risk approach, because this gene is used by healthy stem cells as
well as cancerous ones; healthy organs as well as tumours could be damaged. Some
researchers are therefore taking a different tack and looking for drugs that hit only the
unhealthy stem cells. Craig Jordan, a biologist at the University of Rochester Medical Centre,
in New York state, is one such. He has discovered that a chemical called parthenolide, found
in feverfew, a medicinal plant, kills AML stem cells. Normal stem cells, however, seem to be
able to tolerate the drug without difficulty. The reason is that the leukaemia cells are reliant
on a biochemical pathway that parthenolide blocks, whereas normal stem cells are not. If all
goes well, a trial to test the safety of a modified form of parthenolide will start in a few
months.

If the safety issues can be dealt with—and most researchers think they can—then
attacking cancer stem cells really could help patients survive. If, that is, the stem-cell
hypothesis is correct.

At the moment, scientists being scientists, few are willing to be anything other than
cautious. They have seen too many past cures for cancer vanish in a puff of smoke. The
proof needs to come from patients—preferably with them living longer. But if the stem-cell
hypothesis is indeed shown to be correct, it will have the great virtue of unifying and
simplifying the understanding of what cancer is. And that alone is reason for hope.
ARTIC LEID: 11741
Date: 9/19/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Ec onomist, The Onli ne (ec onomis t.c om)
Head lin e: C.K. Prahalad
OTS: 901756
Subject: F ac ulty
Summ ar y: H e first made his reputation with wor k he did wi th Gar y H amel, then a c olleague at the U ni versity of Mic higan. T heir 1990 Har vard Business Revi ew articl e on cor e c ompetencies (see article) is one of that magazine’s bes tselli ng articl es of all ti me. M ore rec entl y, Prahal ad has bec ome best known for his ideas about what he has call ed “the bottom of the pyr amid―,
Bod y:




C.K. Prahalad
Sep 19th 2008
From Economist.com


C.K. Prahalad (born 1941) is an unlikely guru. Born one of nine children in the teeming
Indian city of Madras (now Chennai), he was once described by Fast Company magazine as
“a moustachioed, bespectacled, slightly round man― with a rich baritone voice. He
first studied physics at university before being persuaded by his father, a senior judge and a
noted Sanskrit scholar, to work for Union Carbide, a chemicals company. He stayed there
for four years, a time he has described as a major inflexion point in his life.

Then he went to Harvard Business School before returning to India to teach management
for a number of years. But he found the protectionist Indian economic environment of the
time unaccepting of his ideas about multinational companies and multinationalism. He
returned to the United States to teach with, as he once put it, $18 in his pocket. A quarter
of a century later he had topped at least one widely respected poll of the world’s leading
management gurus.

He first made his reputation with work he did with Gary Hamel, then a colleague at the
University of Michigan. Their 1990 Harvard Business Review article on core competencies
(see article) is one of that magazine’s bestselling articles of all time. More recently,
Prahalad has become best known for his ideas about what he has called “the bottom of
the pyramid―, the idea that poor people around the world can be a good and profitable
market for businesses and should not be ignored.

In 2000 Prahalad left his university post and moved to California
to work for a high-tech start-up called Praja, a Sanskrit word meaning “the common
people―. The company created software that organised data not by words (as, for
instance, Google or any encyclopedia does) but by experience. It then aimed to allow the
“common people― unlimited access to its information. Prahalad argued: “We are
still operating as if we never left Gutenberg. If you look at keyword searches, the document
is still going to be the organising idea. But now the metaphor is not going to be the
document—it’s going to be the experience.―

Prahalad’s experience with Praja, however, was not a complete success. The company
was forced to lay off a big chunk of its workforce and was then sold to TIBCO, a software
company. Prahalad returned to his university post in Michigan and turned some of the ideas
he had developed at Praja into his book “The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid―,
which was voted top business book of the year (2004) by amazon.com.
Notable publications




With Hamel, G., “The Core Competence of the Corporation―, Harvard Business
Review, May–June 1990

With Hamel, G., “Competing for the Future―, Harvard Business School Press, 1994

“The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid: Eradicating Poverty Through Profits―,
Pearson Education, 2004
More management gurus




This profile is adapted from “The Economist Guide to Management Ideas and Gurus―,
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ARTIC LEID: 1185
Date: 9/15/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: F ortune
Head lin e: Michael D ell 'Friends' His C ustomers
OTS: 865850
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: T he lates t quarterly figur es fr om the U ni versity of Mic higan's cus tomer s atis fac tion i ndex show that D ell is at the top of the rankings agai n for Wi ndows PC makers, as ri vals H P and Gateway si nk.
Bod y:




Michael D ell 'Friends' His C ustomers




How Mr. PC is usi ng F acebook and other Web 2.0 sites to help tur n his c ompany around.




WRIT E SOM ETHIN G about D ell online, and c hanc es are the company will know about i t in an hour or s o. Dis the c ompany in a bl og or a F ac ebook group, and someone fr om a cr ac k r esponse team may even c hi me in, if onl y to l et ever yone know that Dell car es.




Spooky? Well, this is a new Dell: a littl e mor e attenti ve onli ne, and a littl e more paranoi d. When Michael Dell took bac k the r eins of his c ompany in earl y 2007, one of his first ac ts as C EO was to gi ve its web str ategy a kic k i n the pants . T he c omputer maker had pl enty of hairy busines s problems to deal with—fi nanci al irregul arities , a stagnati ng stoc k, pr ofits down 28% in a year— but per haps the mos t embarrassi ng was the thras hing i ts brand had taken online. On tec h blogs and cons umer for ums, D ell had b ecome al mos t a byword for l ous y c ustomer servic e.




It may be hard to remember now, but the c ompany used to be as famous for good s er vice as it was for g ood prices . In the early days Michael Dell us ed to include "Dear Mic hael" pos tc ards wi th the computers he s hi pped, i nviting cus tomers to help hi m i mprove them. As the c ompany ballooned, it los t s ome of that c onnecti on with c ustomer needs. How di d the D ell br and g et s o tar nished? The cons ens us in the tec h world seems to be that the company simpl y became arrogant and s et i n its ways.




The important thing is what D ell is doing about it. T he c ompany has been l ogging on, reachi ng out to potenti al c ustomers , and tr yi ng —s ometimes awkwardl y—to listen to them. And it's usi ng s ocial media to do s o. That's right, Web 2.0 isn't just for c ollege sophomores anymore. Appar entl y you c an us e i t to patc h up a $37 billion PC business too.




Of c ourse, it's not unus ual for compani es to car e about what peopl e are sayi ng onli ne; s pecialists li ke Buzzl ogic and Radian6, whic h s upplies the monitoring s er vice to D ell, do bris k business trac king web s entiment. What stands out about D ell is the i nvestment it has made i n its self-awareness. It has a sq uad of 42 empl oyees who spend their wor kdays engaging with the c ommuniti es on F acebook, T witter, and other s oci al medi a. What is this Team Web 2.0 learni ng? One i mportant nugget: that potential cus tomers s pend 99% of their ti me on the web doing res earc h and j ust 1% actuall y buyi ng. So the c ompany has tri ed to dial down the hard s ell and become— or at l east appear to bec ome— mor e hel pful. T he first step was to add blogs and messag e boards in the hope that irate c ustomers will tal k to the c ompany r ather than gripe to the whol e Internet. "If we don't do that at Dell.com, it's goi ng to be on CN ET or s omewhere," Michael Dell says . "I' d rather have that conversation i n m y li vi ng room than in somebody else's."




The next phase of D ell's listening campaign has been to go beyond damage contr ol and into buildi ng better products . D uring a rec ent c hat, the CEO was eag er to s how me a laptop his company developed wi th customer i nput. Eng ineers get a lot of their feedbac k the ol d-fashi oned way, hand-delivering early models to major buyers . But they al so pic k over a D ell site c alled IdeaStor m earl y i n the devel opment of a proj ect for a sens e of what the mass es c are about. T he site l ets anyone sign in and offer s uggestions —and vote other people's i deas up or down. If you've ever used the wis dom- of-cr owds social network Digg, you g et the i dea. "N ow you go to IdeaStorm and type i n any keywor d you c an thi nk of that has anyt hi ng to do wi th what you're wor king on, and s ee what peopl e are sayi ng," says Dell.




An example of this c ollecti ve- design approac h in ac tion is Dell's popular new Latitude laptop. D ell engineers granted the wis hes of IdeaStor m users by adding keyboards that light up i n the dar k, a fast connec tion tec hnol ogy c alled eSATA, longer batter y life, and a rainbow of col or choices . T he moves earned c autious prais e fr om J eremi ah Owyang, a F orrester R esearc h anal yst who has followed the c ompany. " We' ve frequentl y positioned them as a case study in letting c ustomers deci de where the company is headed," he s ays . "Ver y few ar e doi ng it as well as Dell."




Cons umers are noticing the c hang e too. T he lates t quarterly figur es fr om the U ni versity of Mic higan's customer s atis fac tion i ndex show that D ell is at the top of the rankings agai n for Wi ndows PC makers, as ri vals H P and Gateway sink. Accor ding to a study Dell c ommissi oned fr om meas urement fir m Visibl e T ec hnol ogies, negati ve s enti ment towar d the D ell br and has dropped fr om 48% in 2006 to 23% today. Even s ome of D ell's harshest critics are s ofteni ng a bi t after the c ompany's rec ent onli ne moves . Ben Popken, editor of th e C onsumerist bl og, s ays, "They' ve been downgraded fr om evil to bumbling."




The real questi on is whether c ustomer-friendl y oper ations li ke IdeaStor m tr anslate to better financi als. The j ur y's still out on that. (D ell's gross margins have i ncreas ed to 19.1%, up fr om 16.6% last year, thanks mostl y to cost c utting. Staying at that level won't be eas y—D ell has been l oweri ng pric es, whic h hel ped caus e a 17% fall in pr ofits las t quarter.) T he j ur y's also out on whether IdeaStorm refl ects the opi nions of the averag e Dell buyer. M any of the sites' most popular i deas invol ve adding the open-source Li nux operating s ystem ins tead of Wi ndows. If IdeaStor m votes were a true g auge of c ustomers, Linux PCs shoul d be fl yi ng off the s hel ves . T hey'r e not. "H ow much better is this as a way to measur e c ustomer demand?" wonders Mi ke Gotta, anal yst at Burton Group, a c onsul ting fir m. " It's not proven yet."




Maybe it's enough for now i f Dell's online adventur es l ead to mor e s atisfi ed c ustomers . A s elf-help site the c ompany recentl y l aunc hed lets peopl e s ol ve one another's tech pr obl ems, deli veri ng a twofer: It creates a Good Samaritan vi be around the D ell br and and saves the cost of s taffi ng a support call. Bob Pearson, a VP who l eads Dell's onli ne community efforts , s ays contri butors so far have offered 10,000 fi xes that have been vi ewed 2.5 million ti mes. Whic h, if nothi ng els e, helps keep down the "D ear M ic hael" postage.




FEED BAC K jfortt@fortunemail.com




[PU LLQUOT E]




STEP ONE: GET IRAT E CU STOM ERS TO GRIPE TO THE COM PAN Y—N OT TH E WHOLE INT ERNET.




"THEY'VE BEEN D OWNGR ADED FROM EVIL TO BUM BLING," SAYS A CR ITIC OF TH E N EW D ELL.




[BOX]




The User- Gener ated Laptop




Dell pic ked c ustomer br ains online when i t desig ned the Latitude laptop. Highlights:




13.3-INCH DISPLAY
Compact, but big enough to fit a full-siz ed keyboard underneath.




eSATA PORT
Lets us ers c onnect external hard dri ves at fast s peeds. H elps with vi deo e diting and other big j obs .




BAC KLIT KEYBOARD
Finall y. Bac klighting is already a popul ar feature on other brands.




COLOR OPTIONS
Okay, l ate on this one— onl y a dec ade or s o behind Appl e. D ell now puts a little zing i nto its traditi onall y blah business l apt ops . (Shown above right: the Ins piron.)




FINGER PRINT READ ER
Extra s ecurity appeas es jitter y IT managers .




BETT ER BATT ER Y LIF E
A gods end to travelers who need to wor k l ong er between eac h c harg e.




See also additional i mage(s) i n T able of Contents of same is sue.




See also rel ated articl e on page 38 of same iss ue.




PHOT O: BEN BAKER;, REDUX, NET WORKER SINC E D ELL R ETOOK THE REINS IN 2007, H IS C OMPAN Y HAS BEC OME A LITTLE M ORE ATT ENTIVE ON LIN E, AND A LITT LE MOR E PAR ANOID.




Copyright © 2008 Ti me Inc . All rights r eser ved.




ARTIC LEID: 12375
Date: 9/3/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ature Online (nature.com)
Head lin e: Big data: H ow do your data grow?
OTS: 690122
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: R es earc h bas ed at the U ni versity of Mic higan i n Ann Arbor, and the Protei n D ata Bank, whic h hol ds s truc tur al data for protei ns and nucl eic acids . T hese ar e s omewhat mature and have rel ati vel y s table f unding.
Bod y:




Big data: H ow do your data grow?
Clifford Lync h1




Clifford Lync h is the exec uti ve director of the C oalition for N etwor ked Infor mation, 21 D upont Circl e, Was hington DC 20036, USA, and an adjunct pr ofessor at the Sc hool of Informati on, U ni versi ty of C alifornia, Ber keley, C alifor nia, 94720- 4600, U SA.
Email: cliff@ cni.org




Top of pageAbstr actScientis ts need to ensur e that their res ults will be managed for the l ong haul. M ai ntaining data takes big organiz atio n, says Cliffor d Lync h.




D. ALLISON
Data c an be 'big' in differ ent ways. National and inter national pr ojec ts s uc h as the Large Hadron C ollider (LHC) at CERN , Europe's particl e-physics labor ator y near Geneva i n Switz erland, or the Large Synoptic Sur vey Tel esc ope pl anned for norther n C hile, ar e fr equentl y cited for the way they will c hallenge the s tate of the art in computation, networ king and data stor age. But r esearc h data can als o be big by bei ng of lasting signific anc e — a clinic al-trial r esult, or the obs er vation of a unique event. Data can be big becaus e of descripti ve challenges that may r equire context such as the experimental set-up. Becaus e digital data ar e s o easily s har ed and replicated and so rec ombi nabl e, they present tremendous reus e oppor tunities, acc eler ati ng investigations already under way and taki ng advantage of pas t i nvestments in sci enc e.




To enable r euse, data must be well pres er ved. In s ome cases the effects of data l oss ar e economic , becaus e experi ments have t o be re-run. In other cas es, data l oss r epr es ents an opportunity l ost for ever. F unders now rightl y vi ew data as assets that they ar e under writi ng and s o s eek the greatest pay- off for their investments. They demand that r esearc hers and host ins titutions doc ument and implement data-management and data-sharing plans that address the full life c ycle of data — including what happens after a grant finis hes. H os t uni versities thus find thems el ves with leg al and ethical obligations to pr ovi de a l egac y of fac ulty data. Publis hers mus t also identify the most effecti ve ways to connec t publications with data and pres er ve the sci entific r ecor d.




Devel oping i nfras truc tur e
Managing the life c ycl e of scientific data pres ents many c hallenges. Thes e i nclude deci ding r esponsibiliti es, funding, r es ourc e alloc ati on, what data should be kept and for how long.




In a s ense, l andmar k inter nati onal proj ects li ke the LHC ar e the least pr obl ematic: the cos ts of data management are explicit i n the budget and tend to be domi nated by technolog y expens es that decline over ti me. T hese pr ojects also incl ude dedic ated pers onnel; and, althoug h the vol ume of data is often vast, the streams fit wi thi n well defi ned descripti ve schemes.




But sci enc e's r eliance on digital data extends far beyond these inter national pr ojec ts. F undi ng pr ogrammes in Europe and the U nited States, for example, have i nvested substanti ally in common infrastr ucture for a mor e s ystematic relianc e on data, networ ks and computation. And there are vast numbers of s cientific r es ear c h proj ects pr oduci ng at most a few ter abytes per year of big data, or data that c an be aggregated into a big -data resource. F undi ng, s upport expertis e and s truc turi ng the data for long-ter m manag ement can be pr obl ematic for thes e projec ts. T his has been s hown i n r ecent years by studi es of faculty infor mati on manag ement needs thr oug h a wi de r ange of ac ademic disci plines1, 2.




The challenges her e ar e great, and will onl y be s ol ved by focused effort and coll aboration between funders, insti tutions and scientis ts.




Community standar ds for data des cripti on and exchange are cruci al. T hese facilitate data r eus e by maki ng it easier to i mport, export, c ompare, c ombi ne and understand data. Standar ds als o elimi nate the need for each data cr eator to develop unique descri pti ve pr actic es. T hey open the door to devel opment of disci plinar y repositories for s pecific class es of data and speci alized s oftwar e management tools . GenBank, the U S N ati onal Ins titutes of H eal th (N IH) genetic s equenc e databas e, and the U S N ati onal Virtual Obs er vator y ar e good exampl es of what is possi ble here. In 2007, the U S N ational Scienc e F oundati on, r ecog nizing the i mport ance of s uch standards , establis hed the C ommunity Bas ed Data Interoper ability Networ ks (INT EROP) funding programme for the devel opm ent of tools, standards and data manag ement best pr actic es wi thi n s pecific discipli nar y c ommunities. IN TER OP should make its first awards this autumn. Although many cl ass es of scienti fic data aren't r eady, or ar en't appr opri ate, for s tandar dization, well c hosen i nvestments i n
standardiz ati on s how a consistentl y high pay-off3.




The best stewards hip of data will c ome fr om engag ement with pr es ervati on institutions .
At the s tart of the data life c ycle, indi vi dual sci entists will have pri mar y responsibility for stewar dshi p. But l onger ter m, data pr es ervati on c an onl y be done by ins titutions. If data are to be cons olidated or s hared on a freq uent basis, ther e is a l ot to be s aid for movi ng to i nstituti onal control s ooner r ather than later. Sci entists ar e not nec ess aril y good data managers and c an mor e fr uitfull y s pend their ti me doing s cience. M oreover, it is unfair and unr easonabl e — and incr easi ngl y ineffec ti ve — to assign long-ter m i nformati on management tas ks to a rotati ng staff of s tudents and postdocs. Indeed, as specific data s ets bec ome dis tant from curr ent res earch ac ti vities, s tewardshi p c an bec ome a tax on sci enti fic produc ti vity.




Scientists need to act res ponsi bl y duri ng their stewards hip. T his i ncludes wor king through and honouring disci plinar y standar ds . It also incl udes defi ning and r ecor ding appr opriate metadata — s uc h as experi mental parameters and s et-up — to allow for data inter pretati on. T his is best done when the data are captured. Indeed, descri pti ve metadata are often i ntegrated withi n the experi mental design. D escri ption i ncludes traci ng pr ovenanc e — where the data c ame fr om, how they were derived, their de pendenc e on other data and all c hang es made si nce their capture. Proper stewar dshi p r equires doc umenti ng the storage formats . T hese may be c ommunity standards , or they may be l oc all y defined and often tied to loc all y devel oped s oftware. It is desirable to keep versions of s uch software al ong with the data s ets.




If data cannot s ur vi ve in the s hort ter m, i t is poi ntl ess to tal k about l ong-term us e. In a high-thr eat envir onment s uc h as a major uni versity's networ k, mac hines will often be c ompr omised if updates ar en' t appli ed; this c an mean data destr ucti on or corr upti on. Dis asters s uc h as H ur ricane Katrina, which destr oyed labs and computing faciliti es, are i mportant remi nders that data need to be bac ked up frequentl y and comprehensi vel y i n di verse and dis tant loc ati ons . Appropriate us e of IT s er vic es s uc h as s ec ure storage or hosti ng from the host i nsti tution may be val uabl e. In the l onger ter m, digital data is at ris k from vari ous for ms of tec hnol ogical obsol esc ence (particul arl y if l oc all y hel d removabl e s tor age media are us ed). T here is a need for new instituti onal s er vices that c an hel p with all thes e needs, handli ng traditi onal IT iss ues and infor mati on- management iss ues mor e familiar to librari ans and archi vis ts.




At s ome poi nt, the pri mar y copy needs to migrate to an ins titutional s er vice. T oday, thes e s er vic es are spars e. In the U nited Ki ngdom there are data s er vic es ass ociated with s everal of the scienc e-funding councils. Both NASA and the European Spac e Agenc y have pl anetar y s cienc e arc hi ves into whic h they pl ac e mis sion data. And in the Uni ted States, for exampl e, ther e ar e also other foc us ed arc hi ves c onnected to s ome dis ciplines, incl uding the c ollec tions at the N IH's National Center for Biotec hnol ogy Informati on, the s ocial scienc e archi ve of the Inter -Uni versi ty C onsorti um for Politic al and Social R es earc h based at the Uni versity of Michigan i n Ann Arbor, and the Protei n D ata Ba nk, whic h holds structural data for pr oteins and nucl eic acids. T hese ar e s omewhat mature and have r elati vel y stabl e fundi ng.




New discipli nar y reposi tories are als o s pringing up, and s ome uni versities ar e s etting up br oad-bas ed mul tidisci plinar y repository s er vices , usuall y wor king thr oug h the c ampus r esearc h libr ar y, to manag e their faculti es' research data. The N ati onal Scienc e F oundation is pr eparing to make its first awards under an Office of C yberinfrastructur e programme c alled D atanet that will inves t around U S$100 million over the next fi ve years for buil ding data-s tewards hi p c apabilities; the grants will go to large uni versity-led c onsorti a. There ar e pos sibl e rol es here for publis hers and sc hol arly s ocieties , but at pres ent it seems as if i n most di sci plines, l eadershi p will fall to s tewardshi p s er vices run by uni versiti es and government agencies .




These newer i nsti tutionaliz ed data s tewar dshi p s er vic es — whether s truc tur ed al ong uni versity or disci plinar y li nes — are still immature. T he handi ng o ver of data for deposit is not simpl e or well defined, and nec ess ary c ommunity standar ds are lac ki ng. F undi ng models are s k etc hy. Although stewards hip needs to be funded, funding agencies are not eag er to pay. Educ ati onal instituti ons ar e equally rel uctant to make open-ended c ommi tments . Per haps, ulti matel y, this c an be fac tor ed into overhead cos t negotiations. Effecti ve str uctures ar e needed to manage li mited res ources ; not ever ythi ng c an be pres er ved for ever, and we need methods for prioritiz ati on.




Ultimatel y, the best s tewardshi p of data will come from disci plinar y engag ement with pr es ervati on ins titutions . Gener al-purpose data management as provi ded by uni versities through their res earch librari es will have i ts li mits. Where there is no natural l oc us of disci plinar y s tewardship, uni versities will need to establis h c onsorti a to enabl e discipli nes to create and sustain s uc h engagement4.




The ti me is right for scientis ts to take stoc k of the i nsti tutionaliz ed data s er vic es that are avail abl e or under devel opment, to understand how thes e i nstituti ons are g over ned and financ ed, and to make c hoic es about the best str ategies for their dis ciplines. Can a disci pline-oriented sol ution wor k? If a uni versity-bas ed s ys tem seems more pr actic al, what c an be done to expedi te the move to uni versity c onsorti a s trategies ? As the volume of data, and the need to manag e it grows, disci plinar y c onsens us l eaders hi p will be ver y powerful fac tors in addr essing the c hall eng es ahead.




ARTIC LEID: 12377
Date: 9/24/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ature Online (nature.com)
Head lin e: Savi ng public uni versities
OTS: 690122
Subject: Ins titution Over all
Summ ar y: Higher educ ation i n the U nited States is s har ed between public and pri vate i nstituti ons . T he former, suc h as the U ni versity of Michigan or the Uni versity of C alifor nia, rec ei ve annual funding fr om their states. T he l atter, s uc h as Stanfor d U ni versity or Har vard, rel y on private revenue s ources , especi all y student fees and inc ome fr om endowments . In his book U nmaking the Public U ni versity, C hristopher Newfiel d, professor of English at the Uni versity of Californi a i n Santa Bar bar a, draws attention to the drop i n fundi ng for public uni versiti es si nc e the 1970s.
Bod y:




Savi ng public uni versities
John B. Clar k1




BOOK R EVIEWED
-Unmaki ng the Public Uni versity: The Forty- Year Ass ault on the Mi ddl e Cl ass
by C hristopher Newfi eld




Har var d U ni versity Pr ess: 2008. 408 pp. $29.95, £19.95, 22.50




Higher educ ation i n the U nited States is s har ed between public and pri vate instituti ons . T he former, suc h as the U ni versity of Mic higan or the Uni versity of C alifor nia, rec ei ve annual funding fr om their states. T he latter, s uc h as Stanfor d U ni versity or Har vard, rel y on pri vate revenue sourc es, es peciall y s tudent fees and i nc ome from endowments. Both types c ompete for r es earc h grants from the federal and state governments. The public uni versiti es were founded and are funded by their r espec ti ve states to promote the public i nteres t, es peci all y agricultural, ec onomic and s oci al devel opment.




In his book Unmaki ng the Public U ni versity, Christopher N ewfiel d, pr ofess or of English at the Uni versity of C alifor nia i n Santa Bar bara, dr aws attention to the dr op in funding for public uni versiti es si nc e the 1970s. Its decline, he argues c ontenti ousl y, is a r esul t of a c ampaign by " cultural c onser vati ves" who brand thes e i nstituti ons as breedi ng grounds for a 'liberal' middl e cl ass.




Newfiel d's l atest wor k s ucc eeds his 2003 book Ivy and Indus tr y (Duke Uni versity Press), whic h expl ored the problematic r elations hip between business and US uni versi ties. He argued that the li ber al-arts tradition and capitalist c ulture ar e c ontradictor y forc es that cr eate c onflic ts for both the ac ademy and the students wh o go on to c omprise muc h of the mi ddl e cl ass. He c hallenged the moder n Nor th American uni versity to pr omote the humaniti es while dr awing on the benefi ts of business organization and dis pensi ng with its negati ve as pec ts.




Now, N ewfi eld builds on his earli er wor k by pr es enting a c ompl ex, his toric al narrati ve of a ne w mi ddl e cl ass . T he new c ohort is c ompos ed of multiraci al, progres si ve and upwardl y mobile graduates of public uni versities. T hey are the knowledge wor kers i n the knowl edg e economy. T he public uni versi ties taught them the c ollabor ati ve worki ng styl es , res earch s kills and tec hnical abilities that enabl ed the success of c utting -edge compani es s uc h as thos e in Silic on Valley, Cali for nia. Newfiel d s uggests that c ultur al c onser vati ves targeted this gr oup becaus e they threatened the power of the traditional busi nes s and politi cal elites.




Newfiel d i denti fies the major adversaries of this new mi ddl e cl ass and the public uni versity as the s ame cons er vati ve c ultur e warriors who attac ked the li ber al influence on c ampus . His most stri ki ng clai m is that for the latter , "T he ulti mate prize was the r educ ed c ost and status of the middle class that the public uni versity created". N ewfi eld describes how c onser vati ves, in l eague with powerful figur es s uc h as R onald Reagan, a governor of C alifor nia and later U S presi dent, i nfluenced the r educ tion of fundi ng for public uni versiti es, cri ppli ng this new middle class . T he author als o blames uni versiti es for compromisi ng their i nstituti onal i ndependence through their busi ness dealings wi th government and c orporations.




Newfiel d s uggest s s ome obvi ous remedi es. Raci al equality must be re- established as a pri mar y nati onal g oal; the public uni versities must broaden their ac ces s and rais e their academic quality; f unding must be i ncreas ed; and human devel opment must be promoted together wi th ec onomic opportunity. Yet he neglects key iss ues that are familiar to thos e engag ed in the current debates over public higher education, maki ng his thesis questi onabl e.




A mor e plausi ble r eason for the decreasing financi al s upport for public uni versiti es, f or example, is the per enni al battle for scarc e r esourc es i n state-government budgets. Public higher educ ation must c ompete for funds with esc alati ng health-c are c osts , increasing primar y- and s econdar y-sc hool needs, and rising demands by other g over nment ag enci es. Thus, public uni versities have r esponded by s uppl ementi ng their s tate funds thr ough additional fund-raisi ng, joi nt pr ojec ts with pri vate compani es and higher student fees .




Newfiel d gi ves onl y one passi ng refer enc e to the important and growing phen omenon of community c olleg es, whic h offer two- year ac ademic and voc ati onal degrees to s tudents who cannot or choose not to attend a four- year c ours e at a coll ege or uni versity. Nationally, there are appr oxi matel y 6.7 million community- coll ege s tudents, and a signific ant number move on to further study on four-year degree programmes. Gi ven that c ommunity coll eges s er ve as a major gateway to a s eni or c ollege education, this is a critic al omis sion in the book.




Another weaknes s is the l ac k of historic al bac kground. U nlike pri vatel y funded insti tutions, state fundi ng has made ec onomic development an i ntegral part of the public uni versity's missi on for their home s tate. Prominent i n this r egard ar e the 'land grant' uni versi ties created by the M orrill Acts of 1862 and 1890, which wer e req uired to emphasize ins truc tion i n the agricul tur al and mechanical arts and sci ences .




One c ould g et the i mpressi on from readi ng Unmaki ng the Public Uni versity that the cul tur al battle has been one-sided. T he book makes no menti on of the major national higher-educational organizations suc h as the Americ an Associati on of State Coll eges and Uni versiti es, the N ational Associati on of St ate U ni versiti es and Land-Gr ant C olleges , or the American C ouncil on Education, whic h have led the fight for the fundi ng of public higher educ ati on at l ocal , state and nati onal levels .




Has the public uni versity been unmade and N ewfi eld's new middle clas s damaged? Har dl y. Gover nment funding has decr eased i n pu blic uni versiti es, but they still have a critic al rol e i n U S s ociety. In the pr estigious Ass ociation of American U ni versiti es, composed of the 60 l eadi ng res earc h uni versiti es i n the nation, more than hal f are public. The mi ddl e cl ass is s uffering s ome economic revers als, but the r eas ons are complex. Public higher education will c ontinue to have a l eadi ng role in pr ovidi ng acces s to a good-quality educ ation at an affor dable pric e, for thos e who wish to i mpr ove their standar d of li vi ng and quality of life.




ARTIC LEID: 12383
Date: 9/14/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: N ature Online (nature.com)
Head lin e: T he type IV mucolipi dosis-as soci ated pr otein TRPM L1 is an endol ys os omal iron rel eas e channel
OTS: 690122
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: T he type IV mucoli pidosis-associated protein TRPM L1 is an endol ysos omal iron rel ease channelXi an-Ping D ong1, Xi ping C heng1, Eric Mills 1, M ar kus D elling2, Fudi Wang 3, Ti no Kurz 4 & Haoxi ng Xu1The D epartment of M olecul ar, C ellul ar, and D evelopmental Biol ogy, T he U ni versity of Michigan, 3089 N atural Sci ence Buildi ng (Kraus), 8 30 Nor th U ni versity, Ann Ar bor , Michig an 48109, U SA
Bod y:




The type IV mucoli pidosis-associated protein TRPM L1 is an endol ysos omal iron rel ease channel
Xian-Pi ng Dong1, Xi ping C heng1, Eric Mills1, Mar kus D elling2, F udi Wang3, Tino Kurz 4 & H aoxi ng Xu1




The Department of Mol ec ular, Cell ular, and Devel opmental Bi olog y, The U ni versity of Mic higan, 3089 N atural Sci enc e Building ( Kraus), 830 North U ni versity, Ann Ar bor, Michigan 48109, U SA
The Department of Car diol og y, C hildr en's H os pital Boston, Enders 1350, 320 Long wood Avenue, Boston, Mas sac hus etts 02115, U SA
Insti tute for Nutritional Sci enc es , Shang hai Ins titutes for Biol ogical Scienc es, Chi nes e Ac ademy of Sci ences, Shanghai 200031, C hina
Department of Phar mac ol ogy, F ac ulty of H ealth Scienc e, U ni versi ty of Linköpi ng, S-58185 Li nköping, Sweden
Corres pondenc e to: Haoxing Xu1 Correspondence and reques ts for materials s houl d be address ed to H.X. (Email: haoxing x@umic h.edu).




Top of pageAbstr actTR PML1 ( mucoli pin 1, als o known as MCOLN 1) is predicted to be an i ntracellul ar l ate endosomal and l ys os omal i on c hannel protei n that belongs to the m ucoli pin subfamil y of transient rec eptor potential (TR P) proteins1, 2, 3. M utati ons in the human TR PM L1 gene c aus e muc olipi dosis type IV diseas e (ML4)4, 5. M L4 pati ents have motor i mpair ment, mental retardati on, retinal deg eneration and iron-defici enc y anaemia. Bec ause aberr ant iron metabolis m may c ause neural and r eti nal degener ation6, 7, it may be a pri mary c aus e of M L4 phenotypes. In mos t mammalian cells, rel eas e of iron from endos omes and l ysos omes after iron uptake by endoc ytosis of F e3+-bound tr ans ferrin rec eptors 6, or after l ysos omal degradation of ferritin–iron c ompl exes and autophagic i ngesti on of iron-c ontai ning macromolecules6, 8, is the chi ef source of c ellul ar iron. T he di val ent metal trans porter protei n DMT 1 (als o known as SLC 11A2) is the onl y endos omal Fe2+ tr ansporter known at present and it is highl y expr essed i n er ythroi d prec ursors 6, 9.
Genetic s tudies , however, s uggest the exis tenc e of a DMT 1-independent endosomal and l ysos omal Fe2+ transport protei n9. By measuring r adi olabelled iron uptake, by monitoring the l evels of c ytos olic and intr al ys osomal iron and by dir ectl y patc h-clamping the l ate endosomal and l ys os omal membrane, her e we s how that TR PML1 functi ons as a F e2+ permeabl e c hannel in l ate endos omes and l ys osomes . ML4 mutati ons ar e s hown to i mpair the ability of TRPM L1 to per meate Fe2+ at var yi ng degrees, whic h c orrelate well wi th the dis ease severity. A c omparison of TRPM L1-/- ML4 and c ontrol human s kin fibr obl asts s howed a reducti on i n c ytosolic Fe2+ l evels , an incr eas e i n i ntral ysos omal F e2+ l evels and an accumulation of li pofuscin-li ke mol ec ules in TRPM L1-/- cells. We pr opos e that TR PML1 mediates a mec hanis m by which F e2+ is rel eased fr om l ate endosomes and l ysos omes. Our res ults indicate that i mpaired iron transport may contri bute to both haematological and degenerati ve s ymptoms of M L4 pati ents.




Releas e of F e2+ from late endos omes and l ys os omes into the c ytosol is ess ential for c ellul ar iron metabolis m (s ee Suppl ementar y Fig. 1)6. Bec ause TRPM L1 is ubiq uitousl y expres sed (i n c ells of every tiss ue)5 and pri maril y l oc alized i n the late endos ome and l ys os ome ( LEL)1, 3, 10, we propose that TRPM L1 may act as an endol ys osomal F e2+ rel eas e c hannel. T he intrac ellul ar loc alization of wild-type TRPM L1 (refs 1, 3 and 10; s ee also Suppl ementar y Fig. 2), however, makes it difficul t to ass ay the functi on of this c han nel. T o overcome this problem, we recentl y developed a functi onal ass ay for TR PM L c hannels 11. A s pontaneous mous e mutati on (A419P) 12 mar kedl y increases TR PML3- mediated c urrents at the pl as ma membr ane without al teri ng its per meation proper ties 11. Mic e c arr ying this mutati on (variti nt- waddler, Va) are deaf and show s ki n pigmentation defects . When the Va mutati on (proli ne s ubs titution) was i ntroduced i nto a homolog ous positi on in TRPM L1 (V 432P), the mutant c hannel TR PML1Va was (mi s)loc alized i n many cell ular
compartments i ncluding both LEL and the plas ma membr ane ( Supplementar y Fig. 2) . N otabl y, TRPM L1Va, but not wil d-type TRPM L1, gener ated a c ationic whole-c ell c urrent that c an be meas ured by patch clamp11.




We studied TR PML pr oteins by transi entl y expr essi ng them i n H EK293T cell li nes. T o monitor expres sion, TR PM L c ha nnels wer e fus ed to enhanc ed green fluores cent pr otein ( EGF P) at their ami no termi ni. In res pons e to a voltage step pr otocol , TR PML1Va-expr essing cells showed strong i nwar dl y rectifyi ng step curr ents (Fig. 1a and Suppl ementar y Fig. 3) i n a standard extrac ellul ar bath sol uti on (a modi fied T yr ode's s olution). TR PML1Va- medi ated curr ent (ITR PML1Va) was 101 8.6 pA pF-1 at -80 mV ( mean s.e.m., n = 48). To mimic the aci dic envir onments of l ys os omes where the extrac ellul ar side ( anal ogous to the i ntral ys os omal lumi nal side) of the wild-type TR PML1 protei n is exposed to, extracell ular s olutions were adjusted to pH 4.6. N o siz abl e i nwar d c urrent was detected wh en N- methyl- d-glucami ne (NMDG+) was the onl y maj or c ation i n the bath (pH 4.6; Fig. 1b), i ndic ati ng that IT RPM L1Va is a proton-impermeabl e c ati onic curr ent11. Bath perfusion of 30 mM extrac ellul ar [F e2+ ] ([F e2+ ]o, pH 4.6) to TRPM L1Va-expressing c ells i nduc ed
large inwardl y rec tifying currents (Fig. 1c). T he curr ent density of [F e2+]o- elicited ITRPM L1Va (IF e/TR PM L1Va) at -80 mV was 74 8.6 pA pF-1 ( mean s .e.m., n = 24). T o keep Fe2+ i n a reduced s tate, asc orbic aci d was us ed as the counter anion i n the bath sol uti on. T he onl y other main c ation i n the 30 mM F e2+ s ol ution was NMDG+. Thus, IF e/TR PML1Va is c arried sol el y by F e2+. C onsistent with this, the amplitude of IFe/TRPM L1Va was str ongly dependent on [F e2+ ]o (Supplementary Fig. 4).




Figure 1: TR PML1Va- expr essi ng cells have a c onstituti vel y acti ve H+- modulated F e2+ curr ent.
a, A TR PML1Va- expr essi ng HEK293T c ell s howed a large inwardl y recti fying whole-c ell curr ent elicited by voltage steps (from - 140 mV to +80 mV in incr ements of 20 mV) i n the standard extrac ellul ar (T yrode's) bath s olution. Step duration, 90 ms; hol ding potenti al, 0 mV; Vm, membr ane potenti al. b, No signific ant inwar d c urrent was detected in NMD G+ (Na+-fr ee, C a2+-fr ee, pH 4.6) sol uti on. c, Inwar dl y rectifyi ng step c urrents were evoked by 30 mM Fe2+ s ol ution ( pH 4.6) in the same c ell as s hown i n a and b. d, pH-dependence of IF e/TR PML1Va. Whole-c ell c urrents were elicited by repeated voltage r amps (-100 to +100 mV; 400 ms) wi th a 4-s i nter val between r amps. Onl y a portion of the vol tage pr otoc ol is s hown. Hol ding potential, 0 mV. e, Large IF e/TR PML2Va was seen in the pr esenc e of 30 and 105 mM Fe2+ ( pH 4.6) . f, Littl e or no IFe was seen i n a TRPM L3Va-expr essing c ell.




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Both IF e/TRPM L1Va (Fig. 1e) and ITR PML1Va11 wer e enhanc ed at l ow pH. C ompar ed to experi ments conduc ted at physi ologic al pH (7.4), IFe/TRPM L1Va was enhanced 2-fold at pH 4.6 (appr oxi matel y the l uminal pH of l ysos omes). In cells transfected with TR PML2Va ( a s hort splic e variant; s ee Methods), a larg e c urrent (23.0 3.8pA pF-1 at -80 mV, n = 7) was evoked by 30 mM F e2+ (pH 4.6, Fig. 1e). Si milar to ITR PML1Va, ITR PML2Va was als o str ongly potentiated by l o w pH (Suppl ementar y Fig. 5). T he ratio of IF e/IT yrode for TRPM L2Va was 139 22% (at -80 mV, n = 7), whic h was even l arger than the rati o for TR PML1Va ( 72 7% , n = 11). In c ontras t with TR PML1Va and TRPM L2Va, the r atio of IF e/IT yrode for TR PML3Va was onl y 2.3 0.2% (n = 8; Fig. 1f). T hus, Fe2+ per meability is specific for TRPM L1 and TR PML2, but not for the closel y related TR PM L3. Cationic s el ecti vity anal ysis s uggested that TR PML1Va was als o permeabl e to most other di val ent tr ace metals incl udi ng Mn2+ and Zn2+, but not to F e3+ (Suppl ementar y Fig. 6).
Detailed anal ys es of the permeation properties of TR PML1Va s uggested that the c onducti on mechanis m of F e2+ res embl ed those of Na+ and Ca2+ (s ee Suppl ementar y Figs 7– 9).




Next, we tested whether the Fe2+ per meability of TRPM L1 is i mpair ed by ML4 mutations . Mor e than 15 M L4 mutations have been identified, mos t of which ar e l ocated i n the tr ans membrane regions of TRPM L1 (Suppl ementar y Fig. 10) 4, 5, 13, 14. We constr ucted si x of thes e M L4 mutants into the TR PML1Va bac kground and investig ated the F e2+ per meability of thes e c ombined mutati ons. We found that all M L4 mutant TRPM L1Va c hannels had signific antl y s maller IFe than TR PM L1Va. In particul ar , T 232P, D 362Y and V446L mutations (c ombi ned wi th the Va mutati on) completel y eli minated IF e, as well as IT yrode (Fig. 2a and Suppl ementar y Fig. 11), although the protei n expr essi on levels and subc ellul ar loc alization pattern of thes e mutants were si milar to thos e of the parental TRPM L1Va protei n (Suppl ementar y Figs 12 and 13). Pati ents c arr ying these mutations are reported to have sever e phenotypes 5, 15. On the other hand, a large IF e was detected in F 408-TR PML1Va-tr ans fected cells. T he averag e c urrent density of this mutant, however,
was s till signific antl y s maller than IF e/TR PML1Va. Pati ents c arr ying the F 408 mutati on have unus uall y mil d phenotypes 13, 15. Small but evident IFe was detected with expressi on of two other mutants (R403C and F 465L) . A pati ent c arr ying the R 403C mutation was reported to have a rel ati vel y mild phenotype14. T aken together, these res ults indicate that ML 4 mutati ons signific antl y i mpair the F e2+ per meability of TR PML1. The degree of the i mpaired F e2+ per meability s eems to c orrelate well wi th dis ease severity obs er ved i n M L4 pati ents.




Figure 2: F e2+ per meability of the TR PML1 channel is i mpair ed by ML4 mutations .
a, C urrent densi ties (mean s.e.m., n = 4– 10) of IF e (30 mM Fe2+, pH 4.6) for TR PML1Va and ML4 mutant TR PML1Va channels. Asteris k i ndic ates statistic al differenc e (P < 0.01) c ompar ed to TRPM L1Va. b, 55F e2+ uptake (nor maliz ed) in H EK293T c ells tr ans fec ted wi th vec tor c ontr ol, wi th TRPM L1Va, with F 408-TR PML1Va and with T 232P-TR PML1Va cons tructs. Error bars indicate the standard deviati on on the basis of two independent tri plicate experi ments. c , [Fe2+]o-dependent quenchi ng of F ura- 2 fl uor esc ence in TR PM L1Va- transfected c ells (arrows), but not in non-transfected c ontrol cells ( arrowheads) or T232P-TRPM L1Va-transfec ted c ells ( bottom row). The fluoresc enc e intensity was meas ured at an excitati on wavel ength of 360 nm (F 360). The original magni ficati on used for all micrographs was 200. d, Aver age nor malized responses of EGF P-positi ve TR PML1Va-tr ansfected cells (typic all y n = 20–40 c ells) to 1 or 10 mM F e2+ ( pH 4.6). e, N o sig nificant quenc hi ng was seen in T 232P-TR PML1Va-tr ans fected cells. f, Slightl y less
quenchi ng was obs er ved for the F408-TR PML1Va- expressi ng cells . g, A s mall but signific ant quenc hing reacti on was detec ted ( with 10 mM F e2+) i n R 403C-TR PML1Va-expr essing cells.




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To i nves tigate TR PML1Va- medi ated Fe2+ i nflux under less invasi ve c onditi ons in intac t c ells, we measur ed 55F e2+ uptake at l ow pH (pH 5.8, 1 M 55F e2+; Fig. 2b). Signific ant 55F e2+ uptake was s een in H EK293T c ells trans fec ted with TRPM L1Va, but not with T 232P-TRPM L1Va. An i ntermediate 55F e2+ uptake was s een for F 408-TR PML1Va. Thes e r esul ts i ndic ate that TR PM L1Va can mediate signific ant F e2+ entr y even at micromolar [Fe2+]o. We als o adopted a fluoresc enc e-based F e2+ quenchi ng as say to meas ure TRPM L1Va- mediated F e2+ entr y i n H EK293T cells. Heavy metals such as Mn2+ and F e2+ c an bi nd Ca2+ -sensiti ve dyes s uc h as F ura- 2 with higher affini ty, r es ulting i n s trong fluorescenc e quenchi ng effects 16. Subs tanti al quenchi ng of F ura-2 fl uor esc enc e was seen in TRPM L1Va-expressing c ells after the additi on of 1 mM F e2+ (pH 4.6; Fig. 2d, f). Increas ed q uenc hing was obser ved with the additi on of hig her c onc entr ati ons of F e2+ (10 mM, pH 4.6). In c ontr ast, no signific ant quenchi ng was detec ted i n neighbouri ng non-
transfected EGFP- neg ati ve c ells or TRPM L3Va-transfected c ells (1 mM F e2+; Suppl ementar y Fig. 14). M L4 mutant TR PM L1Va- expressi ng HEK293T c ells s howed an i mpairment of Fe2+ quenc hing. N o sig nificant Fe2+ quenchi ng was s een i n T 232P- (Fig. 2e), D362Y-, or V446L-TRPM L1Va- expressi ng c ells (data not s hown). Slightl y les s quenchi ng was obs er ved for F408-TR PML1Va (Fig. 2f). In c ontrast, R403C-TR PML1Va (Fig. 2g) and F 465L-TRPM L1Va s howed no res pons e to the additi on of 1 mM F e2+. H owever, a higher c oncentr ation of Fe2+ ( 10 mM) induc ed a sl ow but signific ant q uenc hing. T hes e res ults agree wi th the el ectrophysiol ogical measur ements of M L4 mutants , as well as the dis ease s everity of M L4 pati ents c arr ying these mutations 5, 13, 14, 15. T hus , M L4 phenotypes result from a loss- of-function of TRPML1 with res pect to Fe2+ and/or C a2+ per meability.




To validate our us e of TRPM L1Va as a model to extr apolate potential intr ac ellular func tions of wil d-type TRPM L1, and more importantl y, to c onfir m whether wild-type TR PML1 c onduc ts F e2+ from the l umen of LEL into the c ytos ol, we perfor med patc h-clamp recor dings direc tl y on nati ve LEL membranes (Fig. 3a and Suppl ementar y Fig. 15; s ee M etho ds). In TRPM L1Va-positi ve enl arged LEL, l arge i nwar dl y rectifyi ng curr ents were seen under the l ysos ome-attac hed config urati on (Fig. 3b, c). T he c urrents became s maller when the patc h was excis ed (l ys osome l uminal-side-out) and exposed to T yrode's sol uti on (Fig. 3c). T hes e l arge i nwar dl y rectifyi ng curr ents were not seen in TRPM L1Va-negati ve vac uol es, s uggesting that thes e l ys os omal curr ents are mediated by TR PML1Va (hereafter referr ed to as l ys os omal ITRPM L1Va). Note that i nwar d l ys os omal currents ar e actu ally c urrents that flow out of the l ysosomes. Si milar to ITR PML1Va r ec orded at the pl as ma membrane, l ysos omal ITR PML1Va was impermeabl e to NMD G+ and H+, but was
potenti ated by low pH or by r emoval of di valent cations i n the bath sol uti on (nominal di val ent-free; Fig. 3d, e). When the l uminal-side-out patc hes were exposed to 30 mM or 105 mM Fe2+ s olutions ( pH 4.6), s maller and l ess recti fying c urrents wer e s een, res embli ng IF e/TR PML1Va at the pl as ma membrane. T hese res ults indicate that TR PML1Va behaves si mil arl y at both plas ma and l ys osomal membr anes. Li kewis e, M L4 mutant TRPM L1Va c hannels als o behaved si milarl y as their pl as ma me mbrane c ounterparts (Supplementary Fig. 16), consis tent with our concl usion that ML4 mutations pri maril y affec t the c hannel functi on of TR PML1.




Figure 3: TR PML1 conduc ts F e2+ in l ate endos omes and l ys osomes.
a, C o-loc alization of mC herry–TRPM L1 and EGF P–LAMP1 at the membrane of an is ol ated enlarged LEL (s ee M ethods). T he patch pi pett e was fill ed with red r hodami ne B dye (s hown in bl ue for the purpos e of illus tration). b, C artoons of three distinct patc h-clamp c onfigurations of l ys os omal r ec ordings : l ys os ome- attac hed, l ysos ome l umi nal-side- out and whole-l ys os ome. In eac h configur ati on, the pi nk arrow i ndicates the direction of the inward ( at negati ve potenti als; flow out of the l ys osomes) c urrent mediated by TR PML1 ( as s hown in c–i). c, Ly sos omal ITRPM L 1Va. Switc hing from l ysos ome-attac hed to (l ysosome) lumi nal-si de- out c onfiguration signi ficantl y reduc ed the amplitude of the curre nt. T he lumi nal-si de- out patch was expos ed to the T yrode's sol uti on. A Cs+-bas ed s oluti on (147 mM Cs- methanesul phonate (Cs- MSA)) was used as a pi pette s oluti on for both configur ati ons . d, NMD G+ -imper meabl e l ys osomal ITRPM L1Va was much larger i n the absenc e of di val ent c ati ons (nominal di val ent-free). e, Lowering pH potentiated l ysos omal
ITRPM L1Va. f, IF e/TR PM L1Va induced by 30 mM and 105 mM Fe2+. g, Whol e-lys os ome c urrent i n an enlarged l ys os ome expr essing wil d-type TRPM L1. T he pi pette (lumen) sol uti on cont ai ned nomi nal di valent-fr ee T yrode s olution. A Cs+- based bath sol uti on (147 mM Cs-MSA) was us ed. h, Whol e-l ysosome ITRPM L1Va. i, Whole-l ys os ome IF e/TR PML1. T he pipette (l umen) s olution c ontai ned 105 mM F e2+ ( pH 4.6).




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Next we perfor med whole-l ys os ome rec ordi ngs on enlarged LEL expressing wild- type TR PM L1 and TRPM L1Va. Signific ant i nwar dl y rectifyi ng c urrents were seen in wild-type TR PML1-positi ve LEL ( 81.0 9.0 pA pF-1 at -120 mV, n = 6; Fig. 3g) with nominal di val ent-free s olution in the lumi nal side (that is, pi pette s olution), although the c urrent amplitude is still one order of magnitude s maller than the whol e-lysos ome c urrent r ecor ded from TR PM L1Va- positi ve LEL (1,713 404 pA pF-1 at -120 mV, n = 4; Fig. 3h). Bec ause we wer e not abl e to r ec ord any si gnificant whole-c ell c urrent fr om wild-type TR PML1-expr essing H EK293T c ells11, our res ults indicate that the Va mutati on affects both c hannel gati ng and tr affic ki ng (between LEL and t he pl as ma membrane) of TR PML1. When isotonic ( 105 mM) F e2+ sol uti on was included i n the lumi nal si de of wil d-type TR PM L1- posi ti ve enlarged LEL, inwardl y rec tifying currents with ver y posi ti ve reversal potential were obs er ved ( 18 4 pA pF- 1 at - 120 mV, n = 4; Fig. 3i). Coll ecti vel y, thes e r esul ts i ndic ate that wil d-
type TR PML1 is a l ysosomal F e2+- per meable channel, and that the Va mutati on does not al ter the permeation properties of the TRPM L1 c hannel .




Retention of F e2+ in LEL due to l oss or i nac ti vation of the F e2+ rel ease mec hanis m may r es ult i n an ins uffici ent s uppl y of c ytos olic F e2+. We ther efore meas ured the levels of free (c helat able) i ntracell ular F e2+ in s kin fibr obl asts fr om a ML4 patient (TRPM L1-/-) and the non- diseased parent (TR PML1+/-) using a fluoresc ence- based ir on de-quenc hing i maging method (s ee M ethods) 17. C hel atabl e F e2+ levels were signific antl y l ower i n TR PML1-/- c ells c ompar ed to the c ontrol TR PML1+/- c ells (Fig. 4a, b). TR PML1- defici ent s ki n fibr obl ast cells show autofluor esc ence (Fig. 4c) at excitation wavelengths between 440 nm and 500 nm, r eminisc ent of ac cumulated li pofusci n-li ke substanc es previ ousl y reported18. T he autofl uor esc enc e obser ved was primarily loc aliz ed in LAMP1 (a mar ker for LEL)-positi ve c ompartments (Fig. 4c), i ndi cati ve of a l ys os omal dysfunc tion i n TR PML1-/- c ells. Lipofusci n, als o referr ed to as an 'agei ng pig ment', is a non-degradable oxi dized pol ymeric s ubstance containi ng pr oteins , lipi ds, c arbohydrates and iron19. T he pr oducti on
of li pofus cin is facilitated by i ncreas ed intral ys os omal F e2+ levels 19. Our r es ults i ndic ate that an acc umul ation of autofl uor esc ent lipofusci n-like molecul es i n TR PML1-/- c ells might res ult from i mpair ed intr al ys osomal iron metabolis m. Consistent wi th this , l ys os omal ir on staini ng experi ments s howed that TR PML1-/- c ells had higher l ys osomal iron c ontent than contr ol c ells (Suppl ementar y Fig. 17) .




Figure 4: TR PML1-defici ent c ells have reduc ed fr ee (chelatable) iron levels and l ysosomal autofluoresc ence.
a, C ultured TR PML1-/- (ML1-/-) s ki n fibrobl asts showed less de-quenc hi ng of the iron-sensiti ve fl uoresc ence than M L1+ /- cells di d. D e-quenchi ng was achi eved by pr eloadi ng the fi broblas ts with an iron-sensiti ve dye, Phen Gr een SK (PG SK), and then addi ng the membrane- per meable transiti on metal chelator, 2,2' -bi pyridyl (BPD). 2,2'-BPD is pr edic ted to chelate free cell ular iron ( also referred to as chelatabl e or labile ir on), whic h s ubs equentl y incr eases PG SK fluorescenc e. T he original magnific ati on us ed was 200. b, T he aver age 2,2' -BPD induc ed normalized change of fluores cenc e (F/F 0) for M L4 cells (M L1- /-; n = 6 experi ments) is signific antl y ( asteris k, P < 0.01) lower than for the parental ML1+/- cells. Fibr obl ast cells (n = 10–20) were anal ysed for each indi vidual experiment. 4,4' -BPD, a 2,2'-BPD analogue that cannot bind F e2+ , did not i nduc e any signific ant r estoration of PG SK fl uor esc ence. Err or bars, s.e.m. c, A n ML1-/- s ki n fibr obl ast cell showed autofluorescenc e i n LAM P1- positi ve compartments . Autofluoresc enc e (green) was detected
within a range of exci tation wavel engths (shown with excitati on at 480 nm). N o signific ant autofluorescenc e was obser ved for a ML1+/+ cell. Lys os omes were stai ned with a LAMP1 antibody (red). Di ffer ential i nterference c ontrast (DIC) i mag es are shown for c omparison.




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We have demonstr ated that TRPM L1 has a critical role in cell ular ir on homeostasis by showi ng the c ytos olic Fe2+ deficienc y with c onc urrent i ntr al ys osomal iron overload in M L4 c ells. M L4 c ells s how a defect i n the l ate endoc ytic pathway10, 20, 21, s uggesti ng that TR PML1 may be req uired for C a2+ - dependent fusion or fissi on of LEL. However, this defect i n vesic ular trans port cannot expl ain the c ytos olic F e2+ deficienc y that we obs er ved bec aus e the i nternalization and r ec ycling of the transferrin r ec eptor is nor mal i n M L4 c ells20, and l ysosomal F e2+ releas e (into the c ytosol) is pr obabl y medi ated dir ectl y by an iron-c onducting channel/tr ans porter, as is the c as e for DMT 1 (ref. 22). T her efore, by far the si mpl est expl anati on of our r esul ts is that the Fe2+ rel ease pathway between the c ytos ol and the l ys os ome lumen is bloc ked or inacti vated in cells with ML4 mutati ons . Although a M L4-i nduc ed los s of C a2+ per meability may result in a defect i n l ys os omal traffic ki ng and s ubs equent acc umul ati on of various lipi ds i n LEL, the degradati on of thes e
materials is normal 20, 21. Ther efor e, thes e acc umul ated s ubs tanc es would become most har mful onl y i f they are oxi dized to g en erate lipofuscin-li ke non-degradable material s in the pr esenc e of high i ntr al ys osomal F e2+ (ref. 19). Li pofusci n-li ke mol ecul es prefer entiall y acc umulate i n post- mitotic c ells s uc h as muscle c ells and neurons, whic h are pri marily affected i n M L4 pati ents 21. Our wor k s uggests that l ys osome-targeti ng iron c hel ators might all eviate the degener ati ve s ymptoms of M L4 patients . From the cell biol og y pers pecti ve, an i mp ortant questi on to addr ess is how TR PML channels are regul ated by various c ytosolic and luminal fac tors , and/or by protein s and li pids i n the LEL membr ane, especi ally thos e of whic h are known to be invol ved in endol ys os omal traffic ki ng.




Top of pageM ethods Summar y
Endol ysos omal el ectr ophysi olog y
HEK293T cells were ei ther tr ansfected with EGFP–TRPM L1 al one or c o-transfec ted with mC herry–TR PM L1 and EGFP–LAMP1 (a mar ker for LEL). T he siz e of the LEL is usuall y < 0.5 m, whic h is s ub-opti mal for patch clamping. We therefor e tr eated c ells with 1 M vacuolin -1 (for 1– 2 h), a s mall c hemic al known to incr ease the size of endosomes and l ysosomes s el ecti vel y23. Large vac uol es ( up to 3 m; capacitanc e = 321 101 fF, n = 11) wer e obser ved in mos t vac uoli n-treated cells (Supplementar y Fig. 15). Occ asi onall y, enlarged LEL could als o been obtai ned from TRPM L1-tr ansfected cells without vac uolin-1 treatment. No signific ant di fference in TRPM L c hannel pr operti es was s een for enlarged LEL wi th or wi thout vac uoli n-1 treatment. T he vacuol es that were positi ve for both mCherr y–TRPM L1 and EGF P– LAM P1 wer e c onsi dered as enl arged LEL. Whol e-l ys osome, l ysosome-attached and l ys os ome luminal-side-out rec ordi ngs were perfor med on is olated enl arged LEL, simil ar to what was perfor med i n enl arged endosomes 24. In brief,
a patch pi pette (el ectr ode) was pres sed agai nst a cell and then quic kl y pulled away fr o m the c ell to slic e the c ell membrane. Enl arged LEL were r eleas ed into the dis h and i dentifi ed by monitoring the TR PML1– EGF P, the TR PML1– mC herr y or the LAM P1–EGFP fluores cence.




Iron quenc hi ng imaging
HEK293T cells were loaded with 5 M Fur a-2 AM (M olec ular Probes) in cul tur e medi um at 37 °C for 60 min. Cells wer e washed in T yrode's s oluti on for 10– 30 min and fl uor esc enc e i ntensity at wavelength 360 nm (F 360) was recor ded on an Eas yR atioPro s ys tem ( Photon T ec hnolog y Inter national). EGFP- positi ve c ells wer e i dentifi ed by monitoring fluoresc ence intensity at wavel ength 470 nm (F470). Images were anal ysed usi ng ER P s oftwar e.




Full methods acc ompany this paper.




Top of pageReferenc es
Venkatachal am, K., Hofmann, T. & Montell, C. Lysosomal localiz ati on of TRPM L3 depends on TRPM L2 and the muc olipidosis- ass ociated protei n TR PML1. J. Biol. Chem. 281, 17517–17527 (2006) | Articl e | PubM ed | ChemPort |
Clapham, D. E. TRP c hannels as cell ular s ens ors. N ature 426, 517– 524 ( 2003) | Article | PubMed | ISI | ChemPort |
Nilius, B., Owsi ani k, G., Voets, T . & Peters, J. A. Transient rec eptor potential cation c hannels in dis ease. Physi ol. R ev. 87, 165–217 (2007) | Articl e | PubM ed | ISI | ChemPort |
Bas si, M. T. et al. Cloning of the g ene encoding a novel integral membr ane protei n, muc olipi din- and i dentific ati on of the two major founder mutations causi ng muc olipi dosis type IV. Am. J. H um. Genet. 67, 1110–1120 ( 2000) | PubM ed | ISI | ChemPor t |
Sun, M . et al. M uc olipi dosis type IV is caus ed by mutati ons i n a gene enc odi ng a novel tr ansient r ec eptor potenti al c hannel . H um. M ol. Genet. 9, 2471–2478 ( 2000) | Article | PubMed | ISI | ChemPort |
Hentze, M. W., M uc kenthal er, M. U. & Andrews, N . C. Balanci ng ac ts: molecul ar c ontrol of mammalian iron metabolis m. C ell 117, 285–297 (2004) | Articl e | PubM ed | ISI | ChemPort |
Lee, D. W., Anders en, J . K. & Kaur, D . Ir on dysregul ati on and neurodeg eneration: the molecul ar c onnection. Mol. Inter v. 6, 89–97 ( 2006) | Article | PubM ed | ChemPort |
Kidane, T. Z ., Sauble, E. & Linder, M. C . R eleas e of iron from ferriti n req uires l ys os omal ac ti vity. Am. J. Physi ol. C ell Physi ol. 291, C 445–C455 (2006) | Article | PubMed | ChemPort |
Guns hin, H. et al. Slc 11a2 is r equired for i ntesti nal iron abs orption and er ythropoi esis but dis pens abl e i n plac enta and li ver. J. Clin. Invest. 115, 1258–1266 (2005) | Articl e | PubM ed | ChemPort |
Pr yor, P. R., Rei mann, F., Gribbl e, F . M. & Luzio, J. P. M ucoli pin- 1 is a l ys os omal membrane pr otein r equired for i ntr acell ular l actos ylc erami de traffic. Tra ffic 7, 1388– 1398 (2006) | Articl e | PubMed | ISI | ChemPort |
Xu, H., Delli ng, M., Li , L., Dong, X. & Cl apham, D. E. Acti vating mutati on in a muc olipi n tr ansi ent r eceptor potenti al c hannel l eads to melanoc yte loss in varitint- waddl er mice. Pr oc. Natl Ac ad. Sci. USA 104, 18321–18326 ( 2007) | Article | PubM ed |
Di Pal ma, F. et al. Mutati ons in Mc oln3 ass ociated with deafness and pig mentati on defects in variti nt- waddler ( Va) mic e. Pr oc. Natl Ac ad. Sci. USA 99, 14994– 14999 (2002) | Articl e | PubM ed | ChemPort |
Altar esc u, G. et al . T he neur ogenetics of muc olipi dosi s type IV. N eurol ogy 59, 306–313 (2002) | Articl e | PubM ed | ChemPort |
Gol din, E. et al. Tr ansfer of a mitochondri al DNA frag ment to MC OLN 1 c auses an i nherited c ase of mucoli pidosis IV. Hum. M utat. 24, 460–465 (2004) | Articl e | PubM ed | ChemPort |
Bargal, R., Goebel, H . H., Latta, E. & Bac h, G. Mucolipi dosis IV: novel mutation and di verse ultr astr uctural spectr um in the s kin. N eur opediatrics 33, 199–202 (2002) | Articl e | PubM ed | ChemPort |
Kress , G. J ., Di nel ey, K. E. & Reynolds, I. J . T he rel ations hip between i ntr acell ular free iron and cell i njur y i n c ultured n eur ons , astr oc ytes, and oligodendroc ytes. J. N eurosci. 22, 5848– 5855 ( 2002) | PubMed | C hemPort |
Petrat, F., de Groot, H. & Rauen, U. D eter minati on of the chel atabl e iron pool of single intac t c ells by laser scanning microscopy. Arc h. Bi ochem. Bi oph ys . 376, 74–81 ( 2000) | Article | PubM ed | ChemPor t |
Gol din, E., Blanc hette-Mac ki e, E. J., D wyer, N. K., Pentc hev, P. G. & Br ady, R. O. Cul tur ed s kin fi broblas ts deri ved from pati ents with muc olipi dosis 4 ar e auto-fl uor esc ent. Pedi atr. R es . 37, 687–692 (1995) | Arti cle | PubMed | ChemPort |
Kurz, T., T erman, A., Gustafs son, B. & Brunk, U. T. Lys os omes in iron metabolism, ageing a nd apoptosis . Histoc hem. C ell Bi ol. 129, 389–406 (2008) | Articl e | PubM ed | ChemPort |
Chen, C. S., Bac h, G. & Pagano, R. E. Abnor mal trans port al ong the l ysos omal pathway i n mucoli pidosis, type IV dis ease. Proc . N atl Acad. Sci . USA 95, 6373–6378 (1998) | Articl e | PubM ed | ChemPort |
Zeevi , D. A., Fr umkin, A. & Bac h, G. TRPM L and l ysos omal function. Bi oc him. Bi ophys. Acta. 1772, 851–858 (2007) | PubMed | ChemPort |
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Xu, H., Jin, J ., D eF elice, L. J., Andrews, N. C. & Cl apham, D . E. A s pontaneous, r ec urrent mutation i n di val ent metal tr ans porter- 1 expos es a c alcium entr y pathway. PLoS Biol. 2, E50 (2004) | Articl e | PubMed |




ARTIC LEID: 4788
Date: 9/8/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Washi ngton Post
Head lin e: McC ain's C onvenient Untruth
OTS: 635087
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: T ax hi kes, i n other wor ds, are not automatic j ob destr oyers . J oel Sl emrod of the U ni versi ty of Mic higan, a top expert on this subject, says bluntl y, "There is no compelling evi dence that a low-tax strateg y is better for the ec onomy over the medium or l ong run." J ust look at the Clinton era.
Bod y:




Factiv a                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Dow J ones

      SE       Editorial


     HD        McCain's Convenient Untruth


     BY        Sebastian M allaby


     WC        871 words


     PD        8 September 2008


     SN        The Was hington Pos t


     SC        WP


   NGC         The Was hington Pos t - Print and Online


     GC        CTGWP


     ED        FINAL


     PG        A17


      LA       English


     CY        Copyright 2008, T he Was hi ngton Post C o. All Rights R eser ved


      LP       When it comes to fighti ng wars, J ohn M cCai n s tands up and c alls for s acrifice. " We never hide fr om histor y; we make his tor y," he declar ed in his convention s peec h . But when it comes to taxes, McC ain is unwilling to demand even a teens y bit of s acrifice. In a McC ain adminis tration, Americ ans woul d not have to surrender a di me mor e of their money to a caus e larger than themsel ves .




               Why this bipol ar attitude toward sacrifice? Start with the ans wer that M cCai n himself pr ovides . "M y tax cuts will cr eate jobs. His tax i ncreas es will elimi nate them," he sai d at the convention, offering one of the s peec h's few polic y contr asts between Obama's platfor m and his own. In other words, McC ain is not calli ng for tax s acrific e bec ause he believes it would be c ounter pr oducti ve. On taxes, he is s ayi ng, you can s elfis hl y avoid sacrific e -- and ser ve the public good.


      TD       This, unfortunatel y, is a conveni ent untruth. Tax hi kes taken to an extr eme can i ndeed bac kfire, har ming growth and job cr eati on. But it's a s tretch to asser t that Bar ac k Obama's tax plan would do that. And it's downright s candal ous to pretend that t he economy c an be s trengthened in anything other than the s hort run by unaffor dabl e tax cuts.




               Obama is not proposi ng to rais e taxes for mos t Americ ans . T o the c ontrar y, he would tripl e the earned-inc ome tax cr edit for low- wage earners, i ncreasi ng wor k i nc enti ves at the bottom. H e woul d c ut taxes on people in the mi ddl e -- i ndeed, he would do s o more aggressi vel y than McCai n woul d. It is onl y the weal thi est Americans who woul d fac e higher tax bil ls under Obama. Acc ording to the nonpartis an Tax Polic y C enter , Obama's plan would r equire the richest 1 percent of Americans to s acrifice a modest 1.5 perc ent of their after-tax income i n 2012. By contr ast, no-s acrifice McCai n would award Americ a's elite a 9.5 percent incr eas e.




               How might this i mpac t jobs and the ec onomy? U nder Obama's pl an, top ear ners would pay a marginal federal tax rate of maybe 46.5 perc ent (that incl udes the Medicar e tax an d Obama's proposed hi ke in Soci al Sec urity taxes), consi der abl y mor e than the 37.9 perc ent they would pay under McC ain. T her e's no doubt that Obama's higher tax r ates woul d mean weaker i nc enti ves to wor k, take ris ks and i nnovate; and stronger i nc enti ves to waste ti me and effort on avoidi ng the tax man.




               But those bad effects mus t be weighed agains t a good one: Hig her tax rates mean a lower budget defici t. Acc ordi ng to the Tax Polic y C enter, over the cours e of a decade Obama's plan woul d r es ult in a nati onal debt $1.2 trillion s maller than you woul d get under M cCai n's pl an. Less g over nment borrowi ng ulti matel y means l ower interest r ates and more pri vate inves tment. T his posi ti ve effect may well outweigh the bl ow to growth and jobs from weaker wor k i nc enti ves.




               Tax hi kes, i n other words, are not automatic job destr oyers . J oel Sl emrod of the Univ er sit y of Michig an, a top expert on this s ubj ect, s ays bluntl y, "T her e is no c ompelling evidence that a low- tax str ategy is better for the ec onomy over the medi um or long run." Jus t l ook at the Cl inton era. In 1993, the top marginal rate (i ncome tax pl us M edic ar e) was rais ed to 42.5 percent -- the same r ate that Obama pr opos es but mi nus the candidate's pr opos ed increase in the payroll tax. D uring the res t of the Cli nton per iod, the ec onomy g enerated millions of new j obs, and c areful ac ademic postmortems fi nd that the 1993 tax hi ke caus ed littl e t o no damage to the i nc enti ves of top ear ners.




               So McCai n's s wi pe at Obama's tax pl an was s omethi ng other than straight tal k. As a share of the economy, Obama's pl an woul d cr eate an over all tax burden si milar to the one that exis ted i n R onal d Reagan's ti me. It would not choke off job cr eation; r ather, it woul d sl ow the growth of the deficit and s often inequality. But the r eall y depr essi ng thing is that McCai n hi msel f onc e knew that. He oppos ed the Bus h tax cuts befor e he supported them, s ayi ng that they woul d deepen i nequality. But now he touts a tax reduction that is larger and mor e radic al than even Pr esident Bush pr opos ed, and he slam s hi s opponent for hol ding the vi ew that he hi ms elf held until r ecentl y.




               McCain us ed to be a real str aight tal ker. On c ampaign finance, s pending ear mar ks, Iraq and i mmigrati on, he has fought bravel y for his princi ples ; and that r ec ord might have been a tru mp ag ains t an opponent who has taken al most no s uc h ris ks . But we ar e now witnessi ng what might be call ed McCai n's Pali nizati on. McC ai n onc e criticiz ed C hristian c onser vati ves as agents of i ntoleranc e, but he has c aved i n to their intol eranc e of a pro-c hoi ce r unni ng mate. McCai n cl ai ms to be devoted to his c ountr y, yet he would saddl e it with a vic e presi dent who is unpr epar ed to ser ve as commander in chi ef. In the s ame sad way, McC ain has c aved in to his party's anti-tax fanati cs. T he man of pri ncipl e has bec ome a panderer. T he straight tal ker flip- flops.




               smallaby@ cfr.org



      CT       http://www.was hingtonpost.com[http://www.washi ngtonpos t.c om]



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ARTIC LEID: 6463
Date: 9/27/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Washi ngton Post
Head lin e: Investors Fl ee From Banki ng Stoc ks
OTS: 635087
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: Ami yatos h Pur nanandam, a financ e professor at the Uni versity of Michig an's R oss Sc hool of Business , s aid banks are refusi ng to lend to one another bec ause they ar e no longer s ure that the money is mer el y needed to balance the books. They are now plag ued by the fear that the borrowing banks si mpl y lac k money. "Are you borrowi ng money bec ause you are in trouble or bec aus e you ar e s moothi ng things ? Banks cannot tell," Pur nanandam sai d.
Bod y:

Investors Fl ee From Banki ng Stoc ks

-- Avail abl e PDF --

Investors Fl ee From Banki ng Stoc ks N ati onal City, Wachovi a Plummet By Binyamin Appel baum Was hington Post StaffWriter A day after the c ollapse of the nati on's larges t thrift, Was hi ngton M utual, inves tors scurried yes ter day fr om the stoc ks of Wachovia, N ati onal City and other banks with l arge portfolios of troubled l oans, as c onc erns were r ekindled that thos e banks have yet to ac knowl edg e the full extent of their pr obable l oss es. The s toc k mar ket's maj or indic ators cli mbed modestl y on hopes that C ongress will approve a big-dollar bail out for the fi nanci al s ystem. T he Dow J ones i ndus trial aver age g ained 121.07 points, or 1.1 perc ent, to close at 1 1,143.13, rec ouping about a third of i ts losses fr om earlier i n the week. But that broader c onfi denc e did not extend to Wac hovia, whose shares los t 27 perc ent of their val ue yesterday, or to N ati onal City, which was down nearl y 26 percent. T he combi ned declines eras ed about $10 billion in shareholder value. Inves tors als o s ol d off Wac hovi a's bonds and bought i nsur ance agai nst the possi bility of a
default on those bonds . T he cost of ins uring a Wachovi a bond ag ains t default s oared as high as one-third of the value of the bond its elf. At these pric es, buyers wer e paying more for the i ns ur- See CRED IT, D 3, Gol. 1 ance than they woul d ear n from the bond. D onn Vic kr ey, co-founder of Gradi ent Anal ytics, an i ndependent res earc h firm, s aid i nvestors are punis hi ng compani es that hold highris k mortgag e loans. 'T he ones that are the mos t vulnerable ar e the ones that have eng aged in the mos t creati ve l endi ng," Vic kr ey sai d. Was hington Mutual was s ei zed by the government T hurs day after depositors withdr ew billions of doll ars, l eavi ng the Seattl e mortgage lender s hort on cash. Much of the c ompany was i mmedi atel y s old to J.P. M organ C has e, but the ter ms of the s ale have frightened i nvestors in other tr oubled banks. C ommercial banks wer e previ ousl y reg arded as unli kel y to fail duri ng the current crisis bec aus e their ample deposits offer a sourc e of fundi ng even if they c annot borr ow fr om inves tors . N ow it is clear that a r un on thos e deposits c an
des tabilize even a l arge bank and that the government will act s wi ftl y to shutter s uc h an ins titution, putting c oncer ns about the s tability of the financial s ystem and the s ec urity of deposits above the inter ests of inves tors . In the c as e of Washi ngton M utual, s harehol ders and bondholders are li kel y to be l eft empty- handed. "N ow i t's clear that you c oul d get wi ped out if you i nvest i n the wr ong bank," s aid Ed Frederic ks, a finance pr ofess or at Pepperdi ne Uni versity. 'That's what r eall y rattled the mar ket today. It's the understandi ng that if Wacho vi a does g o i nto fi nanci al dis tres s, the FD IC might do the s ame thing they did with Was hi ngton M utual." Als o, J.P. M organ i mmediatel y mar ked down the value of Was hington Mutual's mortg age-rel ated i nvestments by $31 billion, sugges ting that simil ar assets at other banks are being held at hi ghly infl ated values. Inves tors ar e c oncer ned about Wac hovi a, the larges t bank i n the Washi ngton area, bec aus e the c ompany owns l arge numbers of the s ame kind of loans that cr ushed Washi ngton M utual . T hes e " option"
mortgages all owed borrowers to pay less than the outstandi ng balanc e each month, as on a cr edit car d. It was a dis astr ous ide a. M any borrowers c ould not affor d to make the full payment when they wer e fi nall y r equired to do s o, and they are now defaulting i n droves. Wac hovia bought its way into trouble wi th the 2006 acquisi tion of Gol den West Financial, whic h had been one of Washi ngton M utual's l argest ri vals. T he C harlotte company posted a loss of $8.9 billion in the s ec ond q uarter, largel y becaus e of the declini ng val ue of the Gol den West mortg age por tfolio, and anal ysts say that further loss es are li ke- l y. Wachovi a is a muc h larger and mor e di vers e c ompany than Washi ngton M utual , and its exec uti ves have emphasized that it remains str ong. But the c ompany r ec entl y discussed a possibl e merger with M organ Stanley. Wac hovia chi ef exec uti ve R obert Steel sent an e- mail to employees yesterday sayi ng that the c ompany was " aggressi vel y addres sing our challenges" and expr ess ed hope that Congress would approve s ome version of a plan
to buy mortgager elated s ec urities from Wac hovi a and other banks . A s pokes woman s ai d c ustomers ar e c ontinuing to open bank accounts . T he conc ern over N ational City, bas ed in Cleveland, centers on its for mer rol e as one of the nation's l argest subpr ime l enders , through its subsidi ar y First Fr anklin. National City has s old off the busi ness and shutter ed its l ending oper ati ons in high-ris k s tates s uch as Flori da, wher e real estate prices ar e tumbling, but the c ompany r etai ns l arge q uantiti es of mortgag e-related i nvestments. N ati onal City s aid in April that it woul d revi ew its options, whic h is what c ompanies s ay when they're p utti ng themsel ves up for s ale. But no buyers emerged. While Was hington Mutual was prized for its large networ k of branc hes in gro wing areas, National City oper ates mainl y i n the R ust Belt, and s o even i ts core banki ng busi ness is consi der ed less desirabl e. T he unc ertainty s urrounding banks c ontinues to fr eeze the flow of loans between banks . A meas ure of the cost of borrowing money from another bank remained at historic
highs overnight T hurs day. T he London inter bank offered rate (LIBOR) showed that banks c ontin ue to pay about 3 perc entage poi nts mor e than the feder- al g over nment to borrow money. The pricing is prohibi ti ve, forcing banks to c urtail lendi ng to c ustomers, experts s ay. Banks borrow fr om one another to meet regul ator y req uirements that dictate how muc h money they must keep on hand. T he req uirement is based on the vol ume of outstandi ng loans ; banks that c annot r eliabl y bor row from one another at day's end are forced to limit their l ending based on the money they already have i n hand. Ami yatos h P urnanandam, a finance pr ofess or at the Uni versity of Mic higan's R oss Sc hool of Busi nes s, s aid banks are refusi ng to lend to one another becaus e they are no longer sur e that the money is mer el y needed to balanc e the books . T hey ar e now pl agued by the fear that the borrowi ng banks si mpl y lac k money. "Ar e you borrowi ng money bec ause you ar e in trouble or becaus e you ar e s moothing things ? Banks cannot tell," Pur nanandam s aid. "And right
now, they do not want to take the ris k." In an attempt to keep loans fl owing to customers, the Federal R es erve has opened its vaul ts to banks that c an't borrow from one another, lendi ng out mor e than $200 billion l ast week, a r ec ord s um. The F ed also has tried to make money available to banks i n Eur ope thr oug h arrang ements with o ther c entral banks. Early yesterday morni ng the Fed s aid it woul d i ncreas e the amount of money availabl e to Eur opean banks to $290 billion.
ARTIC LEID: 7667
Date: 9/30/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Washi ngton Post
Head lin e: Si mple Pl eas ur es Adrift Without M onumental Meani ng
OTS: 635087
Subject: Ins titution Over all
Summ ar y: T his " Wavefiel d" is the third in a seri es of si mil ar wor ks , with s maller versi ons at the U ni versity of Mic higan in Ann Ar bor and a federal c ourthous e in Miami. It comprises s even elongated mounds or ber ms, eac h one about 300 feet long and 14 feet hig h, risi ng li ke froz en oc ean s wells from the bottom of a grass y hollow.
Bod y:
Factiv a                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Dow J ones

     SE       Styl e


     HD       Simp le Pleasures Ad rift W ithout Monumental Meaning


     BY       Blake Gopni k


     CR       Washi ngton Post Staff Writer


    WC        1166 words


     PD       30 September 2008


     SN       The Was hington Pos t


     SC       WP


   NGC        The Was hington Pos t - Print and Online


     GC       CTGWP


     ED       FINAL


     PG       C01


     LA       English


     CY       Copyright 2008, T he Was hi ngton Post C o. All Rights R eser ved


     LP       Imagine, for a mi nute, that the Linc oln Memorial was i n fac t a monument to the memor y of Warren H ardi ng, pai d for by his s candal ous friends in T eapot D ome, Wyo.




              Or that the Was hington M onument s oar ed to the s ky i n honor of Millar d Fill mor e.


     TD       Woul d we still r ate them as highl y, as wor ks of art?




              Or does the glor y of a dedic atee s ometimes rub off on the monument that does the honoring?




              A trip to s ee the lates t wor k by N ew Yor k artist Maya Li n, whose Vi etnam Veterans M emori al s hot her to i nstant s tar dom bac k in 1982 when she was still a Yale student, got me thi nki ng al ong thos e lines. With this new pi ec e, her car eer see ms brac keted by wor ks whos e s ucc ess es and fail ures depend as much on whom they're for as how they l ook.




              First the new cr eation. Ti tled " Stor m Ki ng Wavefi eld," it is a huge earthwor k c ommissi oned by the Stor m King Art C enter here in U ps tate N ew Yor k. It takes up 185,000 squar e feet -- more than thr ee football fiel ds -- i n a far c orner of the c enter's 500- acre sc ulpture garden. T he projec t is not offici all y c ompl ete, but i t's pr etty cl ose. It is onl y wai ting for the grass that blankets it to take deeper r oot befor e it opens to the public, s ometi me next spri ng. (For now, vi sitors to Stor m Ki ng see the piec e from behi nd fenci ng.)




              This " Wavefiel d" is the third in a series of si mil ar wor ks , with s maller versi ons at the Univ ersit y of Michig an i n Ann Arbor and a federal courthous e i n Miami . It c ompris es s even el ong ated mounds or berms , eac h one about 300 feet l ong and 14 feet high, rising li ke fr ozen oc ean swells fr om the bottom of a grass y hollow.




              Lin's ver y si mple pi ec e takes the pleas ures you g et fr om cr ossi ng any pleas ant piec e of ground and gentl y amplifies them. T ha t's partl y becaus e it gives us geogr aphy i n mi niature. It lets us crest a mountai n r ang e and vi ew a vis ta of si x more without l osing our br eath. It has the s ame relations hip to nature as a doll's house does to arc hitecture -- and the s ame fasci nation. Anyone who has struggled with a novelist's descriptions of l ands cape -- the wal ks in "Wuthering Heig hts," the heroic treks in "The Lord of the Rings" -- will appreci ate the way that Lin s hrinks the Earth for us i n her " Wavefiel d."




              The appeal of the piec e als o has s omethi ng to do wi th repetition. Go for a nor mal nature wal k, and a si ngle c heer y s well of land might be overl ooked as you c hat with your compani ons. Put s even s wells acr oss a stroll er's path, and the r eiterati on c ommands attention. Suc h perfect repetition i nvokes a human maker, so that s omethi ng that s eems at first to be an acci dent of nature calls up iss ues of i ntention and meani ng.




              Lin's ber ms begin to rec all intenti ons behind the other man-made s wells we' ve s een. They bec ome barrows, s uch as the ones that hide the bodi es of Anglo-Saxon ki ngs i n Kent. And they evoke the r emnants of a battlefi eld: H umans have often made their biggest i mpacts on the l and by fighti ng for it. Abstract thoug h it is, her pi ece gets c aug ht up in a web of r eferenc es and meani ngs that c ome in from outsi de.




              Ther e's a downside to this. If at first the piec e l ooks refres hingl y ancient and un- arty, li ke a l andsc ape you' ve enc ountered by chance, it can s oon start to call up fuss y human artific e. The c arefull y calc ula ted vi ew from the trough of one wave to the cres t of the next is the direct descendant of the made- up lands capes in Ol d M aster pai ntings , with their immac ulatel y pl anned r ec ession i nto depth. Realize that, and the whole pi ece c an start to have a kind of pr ecious g olf-cours e cl assicis m. Its effects are too si mpl e to compel long-ter m attention. They come c loser to the "op" art of Victor Vas arel y than to the complex, weighty abstr acti on of a Bar nett N ewman.




              That c omparison to abstr acti on, bad or good, is cruci al. Lin's wor k may evoke things outsi de its elf, but thos e refer ences don't s eem built i nto it. Instead, li ke all abstrac tion, it acts as a bl ank c anvas for us to proj ect onto. T hat makes it eas y to li ve with -- too eas y, especiall y given i ts buc olic s etti ng. Out for a wal k acros s the lovel y Stor m Ki ng grounds, we're not likel y to sc an the pi ece for associ ati ons that might mess up our day.




              For all i ts sc al e and its ver y pl easant effects , Li n's " Wavefiel d" feels tasteful to a fault.




              So where di d Lin g o wrong in the dec ades sinc e her Vi etnam memorial, so widel y prais ed for its power and such a favorite of so many different kinds of peopl e?




              The ans wer is n't in any decline in the quality of the art itself. By the ti me s he s ubmitted her design for the memorial, abstr acti on had alr eady been i nfected with the gentility bug. J udg ed purel y as sc ulpture, her design for the memori al was sl eepy and deri vati ve -- an eas yg oing hybrid of mi ni malis m ( the plai n blac k s olids of the wall) and earth art (their plac ement in the ground) that wea kened both earlier art for ms by cr ossi ng them.




              But the memorial was n't just s cul pture. It was sc ulptur e on a mis sion, wi th a subject. It was about war vi cti ms whom most Americ ans c ared about, one way or another. And it s eemed to do justic e to all the conflic ting vi ews about them.




              Lin's first wor k wasn't abstr acti on at all; bec ause of the c ommission, i t bec ame a portr ait -- an unusuall y s ensiti ve, effec ti ve one. And, li ke all portr aits, it s tood to profit fr om our feelings for i ts s ubjects. After all, s ubjec t matter affects what we make of art: A pai nting of the fiel d of Gettysburg i s a ver y different thi ng from a painting of any other rural land. Any kind of monument to Li ncol n means more to us than one t o H ardi ng.




              Even the best s ubjec t c an't sal vage abs olutel y lous y art. (In writing this r eview, I took another l ook at the World War II Me morial on the Mall, and c onfirmed that it would take a bulldoz er to i mprove it.) But i t c an add greatness to art that star ts out onl y good.




              It wasn't the artis tic exc ellence of Lin's memorial that honor ed the noble dead. It was the dead who lent their weight to Lin's art. They g ave c ontent to a type of wor k that, wi thout it, c an bec ome char ming decor ation for a par k.




              Storm Ki ng Art Center is off Ol d Pleas ant Hill Road near Mountainvill e, N .Y., about an hour's dri ve north of N ew Yor k City. T he center is open 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednes day through Sunday thr ough Nov. 1, then to 5 p.m. through N ov. 15, when it clos es for the wi nter. C all 845-534-3115 or visi t www.s tor mki ng.org[http://www.s tor mki ng.org].



     CT       http://www.was hingtonpost.com[http://www.washi ngtonpos t.c om]



     RF       WP20080930MAYALIN 30



     NS       gent : Arts/Enter tai nment | gcat : Politic al/Gener al News



     RE       usa : U nited States | namz : North Americ an Countries /Regi ons



    IPD       AE



   PUB        Washi ngton Post



     AN       Document WP00000020080930e49u00029

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             © 2008 F ac ti va, Inc. All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 7668
Date: 9/27/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Washi ngton Post
Head lin e: Investors Fl ee From Banki ng Stoc ks; N ati onal City, Wachovi a Plummet
OTS: 635087
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: Ami yatos h Pur nanandam, a financ e professor at the Uni versity of Michig an's R oss Sc hool of Business , s aid b anks are refusi ng to lend to one another bec ause they ar e no longer s ure that the money is mer el y needed to balance the books. They are now plag ued by the fear that the borrowing banks si mpl y lac k money." Are you borrowing money bec aus e you are i n tro ubl e or bec ause you are s moothing thi ngs? Banks c annot tell," Purnanandam sai d. " And right now, they do not want to take the risk."
Bod y:




Factiv a                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Dow J ones

     SE       Financi al


     HD       Investor s F lee F rom Ban king Sto cks; N ation al C it y, W achovia Plum met


     BY       Binyamin Appel baum


     CR       Washi ngton Post Staff Writer


    WC        1118 words


     PD       27 September 2008


     SN       The Was hington Pos t


     SC       WP


   NGC        The Was hington Pos t - Print and Online


     GC       CTGWP


     ED       FINAL


     PG       D01


     LA       English


     CY       Copyright 2008, T he Was hi ngton Post C o. All Rights R eser ved


     LP       A day after the coll aps e of the nati on's l argest thrift, Was hington Mutual, i nvestors sc urried yesterday from the stoc ks of Wac hovia, N ational City and other banks with large portfolios of tr oubled l oans , as c oncer ns were reki ndl ed that those banks have yet to ac knowl edge the full extent of their pr obable loss es .




              The stoc k mar ket's major i ndic ators cli mbed modestl y on hopes that Congress will appr ove a big-dollar bailout for the financial s ystem. T he D ow J ones i ndus trial average gained 121.07 points, or 1.1 perc ent, to cl ose at 11,143.13, rec oupi ng about a third of i ts l oss es fr om earlier in the week.


     TD       But that broader c onfidence di d not extend to Wac hovia, whos e s hares los t 27 percent of their val ue yesterday, or to N ati onal City, whic h was down nearl y 26 perc ent. T he c ombi ned declines erased about $10 billion i n s har ehol der val ue.




              Investors also s old off Wachovi a's bonds and bought ins uranc e against the possibility of a default on those bonds. T he cos t of i ns uring a Wac hovia bond agai nst default s oared as high as one-third of the val ue of the bond its elf. At these pric es, buyers wer e payi ng mor e for the i nsuranc e than they would earn from the bond.




              Donn Vic krey, c o-founder of Gr adi ent Anal ytics , an i ndependent res earch firm, s aid investors are punis hi ng compani es that hold high-ris k mortgage loans.




              "The ones that are the mos t vulnerable ar e the ones that have engag ed in the most creati ve l ending," Vic kr ey sai d.




              Washi ngton M utual was s eized by the gover nment Thursday after depositors wi thdrew billions of dollars, leavi ng the Seattle mortg age l ender shor t on c as h. M uc h of the c ompany was i mmedi atel y s ol d to J .P. Morgan C hase, but the ter ms of the s ale have frightened investors i n other troubl ed banks.




              Commerci al banks were pr eviousl y regar ded as unlikel y to fail during the c urrent crisis bec aus e their ampl e deposits offer a s ource of fundi ng even if they cannot borrow from investors.




              Now it is clear that a r un on thos e deposits can destabilize even a l arge bank and that the government will act s wiftl y to sh utter suc h an institution, putting c oncer ns about the s tability of the financial s ystem and the s ec urity of deposits above th e inter ests of inves tors .




              In the c as e of Was hington Mutual, s harehol ders and bondholders are likel y to be l eft empty- handed.




              "Now it's cl ear that you could get wiped out if you inves t in the wrong bank," sai d Ed Frederic ks , a fi nanc e profess or at Pep perdine U ni versity. "That's what r eall y r attled the mar ket today. It's the understanding that if Wachovi a does g o into fi nancial dis tress , the FDIC might do the s ame thing they did with Was hington M utual."




              Also, J.P. Morgan i mmedi atel y mar ked down the value of Was hington M utual's mortgage-rel ated inves tments by $31 billion, s uggesti ng that si milar ass ets at other banks ar e bei ng held at highl y i nflated val ues .




              Investors are conc erned about Wachovia, the l argest bank in the Was hington ar ea, becaus e the c ompany owns large numbers of the same ki nd of l oans that crus hed Was hington Mutual. T hes e "opti on" mortg ages allowed borr owers to pay l ess than the outstandi ng balanc e eac h month, as on a credit c ard. It was a disas trous i dea. Many borrowers c oul d not afford to make the full payment when they were finall y req uired to do so, and they are now defaulti ng in dr oves.




              Wachovi a bought its way i nto troubl e with the 2006 acquisiti on of Gol den West Fi nanci al, whic h had been one of Was hington Mutual's larg est ri vals. T he C harl otte c ompany posted a loss of $8.9 billion i n the s econd quarter, l argel y bec ause of the decli ning value of the Golden West mortgag e portfoli o, and anal ysts say that further l oss es are likel y.
               Wachovi a is a muc h larger and mor e di vers e c ompany than Washi ngton M utual , and its exec uti ves have emphasiz ed that it remains str ong. But the c ompany r ec entl y di scus sed a possibl e merger with Morg an Stanley.




               Wachovi a c hief exec uti ve R obert Steel s ent an e- mail to empl oyees yester day s aying that the company was "aggressi vel y addr essi ng our c hall enges" and express ed hope that C ong res s woul d approve some version of a pl an to buy mortg age-rel ated sec urities fr om Wachovi a and other banks. A spokes woman s ai d c ustomers ar e c ontinuing to open bank accounts.




               The conc ern over N ati onal City, bas ed i n Clevel and, centers on its for mer rol e as one of the nati on's l argest subprime l enders, thr ough its subsi diar y First Franklin. N ati onal City has sol d off the business and s huttered its lendi ng operati ons i n hig h-risk states s uc h as Fl orida, where real estate prices ar e tumbli ng, but the c ompany retai ns l arge quantiti es of mortgag e-related i nvestments.




               National City sai d i n April that it would revi ew its opti ons, whic h is what c ompanies s ay when they're putti ng thems el ves up for s ale. But no buyers emerged. Whil e Washi ngton M utual was prized for its large networ k of branc hes in growing areas, National City oper ates mainl y i n the Rus t Belt , and s o even its cor e banking business is c onsidered l ess desirable.




               The unc ertai nty s urrounding banks conti nues to fr eez e the flow of loans between banks.




               A meas ure of the c ost of borrowi ng money fr om another bank remained at historic highs overnight Thurs day. T he London inter bank offer ed rate ( LIBOR) s howed that banks c ontinue to pay about 3 perc entage poi nts mor e than the fe deral gover nment to borrow money.




               The prici ng is prohibiti ve, forci ng banks to cur tail l ending to customers, experts say.




               Banks borrow from one another to meet r egulator y requirements that dic tate how muc h money they must keep on hand. T he r equirement is b as ed on the volume of outs tanding loans; banks that c annot reliabl y borrow fr om one another at day's end are forc ed to li mit their lendi ng bas ed on the money they alr eady have in hand.




               Ami yatos h Pur nanandam, a fi nanc e professor at the Universit y of M ich igan's Ros s School of Busi ness, sai d banks ar e refusi ng to l end to one another becaus e they are no l onger sur e that the money is mer el y needed to balanc e the books . T hey ar e now pl agued by the fear that the borr owing banks si mpl y lac k money.




               "Are you borrowi ng money becaus e you ar e i n tr ouble or bec aus e you are s moothing thi ngs? Banks c annot tell," Purnanandam s aid . " And right now, they do not want to take the ris k."




               In an attempt to keep loans fl owing to cus tomers, the F eder al R eser ve has opened its vaults to banks that c an't borrow from o ne another, l endi ng out mor e than $200 billion last week, a r ecor d s um.




               The Fed als o has tried to make money available to banks in Europe through arrangements with other c entral banks. Early yesterday morni ng the Fed s ai d it would i ncr eas e the amount of money avail abl e to European banks to $290 billion.



     CT        http://www.was hingtonpost.com[http://www.washi ngtonpos t.c om]



     RF        WP20080927CREDIT27



     CO        funcp : Wac hovi a C orp | natcor : N ati onal City Cor p | wshmut : Was hington Mutual Inc | c nyc : J PMorgan C hase & Co.



      IN       i814 : Banking | i81402 : Commercial Banki ng | i81501 : Cr edit T ypes /Ser vic es | i8150103 : Mortg ages/Real Estate Credit | ibn k : Banki ng/Credit



     NS        ccat : C orporate/Industri al News



     RE        usa : U nited States | namz : North Americ an Countries /Regi ons



     IPD       BIZ



   PUB         Washi ngton Post



     AN        Document WP00000020080927e49r0001f

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        © 2008 F ac ti va, Inc. All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 7669
Date: 9/20/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: Washi ngton Post
Head lin e: A Part of the Group; Seeki ng a Bargain in a Shar ed Hous e And Fi ndi ng a Li ttle Bit of C ommunity
OTS: 635087
Subject: Expert Commentar y
Summ ar y: Adulthood not onl y comes l ater but als o is no l ong er a steady marc h toward famil y and a home, s aid Toni Antonucci, a ps ychologist with the Uni versity of Michigan's Ins titute for Soci al Research. J ust 6 percent of Americ an famili es are made up of a husband and wife on their firs t marriag e with two of their own c hildren. Many people, s he s aid, ar e s earchi ng for a new famil y uni t, and some fi nd it i n r oommates." People seem to thri ve i n group settings , but the family unit as we knew i t no l ong er exists ," Antonuc ci s aid. "Peopl e are cr eating s ynthetic families, and i t s eems to wor k well."
Bod y:




Factiv a                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Dow J ones

     SE        Real Estate


     HD        A Part of th e Group; Seeking a B arg ain in a Shared Hou se And Finding a Little Bit of Co mmun it y


     BY        Jordan Weiss mann


     CR        Washi ngton Post Staff Writer


     WC        1358 words


     PD        20 September 2008


     SN        The Was hington Pos t


     SC        WP


   NGC         The Was hington Pos t - Print and Online


     GC        CTGWP


     ED        FINAL


     PG        F01


     LA        English


     CY        Copyright 2008, T he Was hi ngton Post C o. All Rights R eser ved


     LP        In the eveni ng, when they're home from wor k and need to unwind, Anita R andall, 59, and Lois Mag ee, 51, sit tog ether i n their kitc hen to do a cr oss word puzzle. T he two roommates, who li ve in Friends hi p Heig hts, fill in what they can, then take wil d gu ess es, laughi ng as they scri bbl e i n whatever word will fit.




               Someti mes their younger roommates will dr op in to forag e in the fridge. When one of the two 25- year-ol d women meanders by, s he'll stop and chat, then head bac k to her room.


     TD        "In s ome ways, it's li ke a famil y," R andall sai d. " It's li ke havi ng kids ther e. They have a sens e of what's goi ng on."




               Group houses ar e knitted into Was hington's fabric li ke pinstripes i nto a s uit. But while multi ple roommates have l ong been part of life for the young and underpaid, peopl e li ke R andall and Mag ee ar e also finding appeal in thes e s etups -- and not j ust as a way to s ave rent. They c an als o cr eate community, partic ularl y at a ti me when adult life is becomi ng less stable.




               Over all, group houses make up a rel ati vel y s mall sli ver of U.S. homes. T he last Americ an Housi ng Sur vey, r eleas ed i n 2005, found that out of 108 million hous ehol ds, there wer e j ust 711,000 c ompos ed of three to eight unrel ated peopl e. Mos t of thos e were r enter-occupi ed, and a littl e l ess than half wer e made up of peopl e who had moved i n the past year. T he sur vey doesn't br eak down these households by ag e, exc ept to note t hat 32,000 include peopl e 65 and ol der.




               In Was hington, it is n't hard to find mi ddl e-ag ed adul ts s hari ng a home. On Roommates .c om, a s earch for housemates 40 and up returns doz ens of hits . Craigslist has plenty of ads li ke this one, from early September: " $495 M ale to Shar e 5 bedroom 2 bath Si ngle F amil y H ouse: The curr ent tenants ar e 4 guys , ages 30-50. One wor ks at Bullis School, one has his own busi nes s, one wor ks at radio stati ons and takes cl ass es and one wor ks at Starbuc ks."




               Angelique Shofar, who r ents two extr a bedrooms in her Capitol Hill home, is in her 40s . H er son, 10, splits ti me between her hous e and his father's, s o when i t c omes ti me to pic k r oommates, she tries to incl ude the boy in the pr oc ess. In s ome ways , he's better at it than s he is, s he sai d.




               Children " are not in a position to intellectualiz e and r ationalize ever ything," she s ai d. "T hey respond from their instincti veness."




               Then there is Mi ke Smi th, 45, who owns a s even- bedroom Victorian off 14th Street N W but c hoos es to li ve i n the one-room bas ement. H e rents the res t to fi ve young men, mos t of whom ar e just out of graduate sc hool. It is n't a big moneymaker, he s aid, but he sees it as a ki nd of ser vic e to the housing -strapped c ommunity.




               "It was built to hous e peopl e, and that's what I' m doi ng," he sai d.




               For many, li ving i n a group house is si mpl y a matter of economics, sai d J ac k D emic k, a ps yc hol ogist who studi es adult development at Brown U ni versity. But people are als o taki ng longer to reach the traditi onal milestones of adul thood, he sai d, and it s houl dn't be s urprising to s ee peopl e li ving with r oommates l ater in life.




               In the 1970s, Demic k sai d, about three-quarters of women and two-thirds of men under 30 had fini shed sc hool, moved fr om home, g otten married, started a car eer and had c hildren. Now, just 45 perc ent of women and 31 perc ent of men hit those benc hmar ks that earl y.




               "Sigmund Fr eud s ai d that a healthy, adapti ve adult is s omeone who c an l ove well and wor k well," D emic k sai d. " And it turns out peopl e today c an make a c ommitment to a c areer and a r elati onshi p around 33."




               Adulthood not onl y comes l ater but als o is no l ong er a steady marc h toward famil y and a ho me, s aid Toni Antonucci, a ps yc hologist wi th the Univer sit y of M ich igan's Institute for Soci al R es earc h. Jus t 6 perc ent of Americ an families are made up of a hus band and wife on their fi rst marriage with two of their own chil dren. M any people, s he sai d, are s earc hing for a new famil y unit, and s ome fi nd it i n roommates.




               "Peopl e s eem to thri ve in group s ettings, but the famil y unit as we knew it no l ong er exi sts," Antonucci sai d. " People ar e cr eating s ynthetic families , and it s eems to work well."




               For Mag ee, the 51- year-ol d i n Friends hip H eights, the group house was an unexpected turn. F or 14 years, home had been a fi ve- bedr oom house i n Tr enton, N.J. She li ved alone with her cat. She was ac ti ve in the neighborhood, wor king on the communi ty board and mentoring l ocal teens, but at 48, she als o valued her pri vac y.




               Li ke so many new arrivals to Was hington, s he c ame for a job s he wasn't sur e woul d l ast, a post runni ng the foreign- exc hange program at the American Immigration Law F oundati on. She would gi ve the plac e si x months, she thought, then decide whether to stay.




               She expec ted to live alone. But when a r eal es tate br oker br oug ht her to the red bric k hous e on Ingomar Str eet, s he c hanged h er mind. One of the roommates descri bed life i n the four- pers on house as friendl y but not overi nvol ved. M aybe, Mag ee thought, it wo uld be a g ood way to start. Besides, s he could al ways move.




               Randall had been in that house since 1982, renting for a few years before buying it with her l ong -term boyfri end. She had li ved i n group hous es most of her adult life and had earlier boug ht one so on after c ollege wi th her now- ex-hus band. T he roommates had been li ke "an alternati ve famil y," s he s aid. T hey ate meals together, hung around the tel evisi on a nd went to antiwar r allies.




               In time, her marriage ended, and the hous e was s ol d. She and her boyfriend boug ht the hous e on Ingomar, wher e they r ented out rooms to help pay the mortgag e.




               When the boyfriend left, R andall, who dir ects ac counts payabl e for NBC, kept the hous e and conti nued renti ng out rooms s o s he c oul d make the mortg age. As ti me went on, the r elationshi ps bec ame l ess personal, more li ke war m acquaintanc es.




               "A friend but not -- as you get ol der, I guess you don't have as muc h fr ee ti me and your soci al life and your free time becomes mor e pr eci ous ," s he sai d.




               The change R andall has experienced is n't uncommon, s aid Sus an Charles , an as soci ate profess or at the U ni versity of Californi a at Ir vine who res earc hes adult emoti onal experienc es. Studies have found that as peopl e age, they tend to become l ess extroverted. But they als o experi ence fewer neg ati ve emoti ons and become l ess neur otic, s he sai d.




               In many ways, Charles sai d, mi ddle-ag ed and older adults may be better adapted for roommates than younger people.
               "We're emoti onall y l ess equi pped when we're young," she s ai d. " We're sl ower to react when you g et old. Which is good."




               As M agee made a part-ti me life i n Washi ngton -- s he tr avels bac k to Trenton on weekends -- s he found that sharing a home was helpi ng her tr ansi tion. Si x months str etc hed i nto a year, and a year into two. She bought s eason tic kets to the Shakes peare Theatre Company. And, of c ourse, ther e were the cross word puzzl es.




               "The house in Was hington perhaps wor ked too well," s he s aid, " bec ause I' m still her e."




               As for R andall, s he s aid s he will keep r enting out the hous e as l ong as s he ne eds the extra inc ome. T he c amar aderie is still nic e, s he s aid, but ther e are ti mes she would like to have a plac e of her own.




               "I think someti mes I woul d love to have my own r efrigerator," she s ai d. "I woul d love to wake up one morni ng and put my food in any c abinet I want, or maybe not was h the dishes tonight bec ause I'm exhausted, but thos e are the rul es of the hous e."



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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           © 2008 F ac ti va, Inc. All rights res er ved.
ARTIC LEID: 16321
Date: 9/17/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U PI Onli ne (upi.c om)
Head lin e: Marc os Garcia
OTS: 606805
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: T he Uni versity of Mic higan study uses a genetic tr ans fer vec tor i njected i nto the s ki n to deli ver a pain-reli eving g ene to the nervous s ystem. T he inves tigators will use a vector created from herpes simpl ex vir us -- the virus that c auses col d s ores -- to deli ver the gene for enkephalin, one of the body's own natural pain relievers. 'After al most two dec ades of development and mor e than eight years of studies in ani mal models of pai n, we have reached the poi nt where we are re ady to fi nd out whether this approac h will be effecti ve in treati ng pati ents,' sai d Dr. D avi d Fi nk, a profes sor of neurolog y.
Bod y:

BALTIM ORE, Sept. 17 (U PI) -- U.S. medical s cientists s ay a new mini mally invasi ve s urgical proc edur e tes ted i n pigs has yi elded results as good as those from bariatric surger y for obesity. J ohns H opkins Uni versity res earchers s aid they ac hi eved sig nificant success i n s uppress ing levels of the 'hunger hor mone' ghr elin i n pigs by c hemic all y vaporizing the main vessel carr ying bl ood to the s tomac h. The proc edur e invol ves thr eading a tube through a l arge blood vess el near the pigs' groi ns and i nto gas tric arteri es s uppl yi ng bl ood to their s tomac hs. T hen one-ti me inj ecti ons of s aline were made in the l eft gas tric arteries of fi ve contr ol pigs, whil e in the other fi ve, one- time i njec tions of sodi um morr huate, a c hemical that destr oys the bl ood vess els, was deli ver ed. T he team found levels of the hor mone in the treated pigs were s uppressed up to 60 percent from bas eline. Bari atric s ur ger y, i nvol ving r emoval, r ec ons truc tion or bypass of part of the stomach, is effec ti ve but als o c arries s ubstantial surgical ris ks and c omplicati ons. 'Obesity is the bigges t
biomedic al problem in the c ountr y, and a mi ni mall y i nvasi ve alter nati ve would make an enor mous differ enc e i n c hoices and outcomes for obes e people,' sai d Dr. Ar avind Arepally, who led the research. T he findi ngs appear in the online edition of the j our nal Radiol og y. N ew ancient ant s pecies found in Amaz on AU STIN, T exas , Sept. 17 (U PI) -- U.S. res earc hers s ay they' ve dis covered a new ant s peci es li vi ng in the Amazon that is li kel y the world's ol des t li ving li neage of ants. T he blind, s ubterranean, predator y ants wer e dis cover ed by Uni versity of Texas at Austi n evoluti onar y bi ologist C hristi an Rabeli ng and are probabl y desc endants of the ver y first ants to evol ve. T he res earchers s ai d they named the ant is Mar tialis heureka, which transl ates roughl y to 'ant from M ars' bec ause the ant has a c ombination of char acteristics never befor e re cor ded. It is adapted for dwelling in the soil, is 2- to 3-milli meters-long, pale, has no eyes but does have large mandi bles that R abeling and coll eagues suspect it us es to c apture prey. R abeli ng sai d his discover y
mar ks the first ti me a new s ubfamily of ants with li vi ng speci es has been dis covered sinc e 1923. H e s ai d the dis cover y will hel p biol ogists better unders tand the bi odi versity and evoluti on of ants, whic h are abundant and ec ol ogicall y i mportant i nsects. The r es earc h that i ncluded graduate student J eremy Br own, M anfred Ver haagh of the Staatlic hes Mus eum in Karlsruhe, Ger many, and Brazili an ec ologist appears i n the Pr oc eedings of the National Ac ademy of Scienc e. Study looks at c hronic pai n gene ther apy ANN ARBOR, Mic h., Sept. 17 (UPI) -- U.S. s cientists are starting a phas e-1 clinic al tri al that i nvol ves usi ng gene ther apy to tr eat c ancer-rel ated intr actable pain. The U ni versity of Michigan s tudy us es a g enetic transfer vector i njec ted i nto the s ki n to deli ver a pai n-relievi ng gene to the ner vous s ys tem. T he investigators will use a vector created fr om herpes si mpl ex vir us -- the virus that c auses c old s or es -- to deli ver the gene for enkephalin, one of the body's own natur al pain relievers . 'After al most two dec ades of development an d mor e than eight
years of studies in ani mal models of pai n, we have reached the poi nt where we are ready to fi nd out whether this approac h will be effecti ve in treati ng pati ents,' s aid Dr. D avid Fink, a profess or of neur olog y. Fink developed the vec tor wi th coll aborators a nd will dir ect the s tudy. Fi nk s aid the trial r epr es ents two firsts: It is the first human trial of g ene therapy for pain, and the first study to test a non-replic ati ng HSV-bas ed vector to deli ver a ther apeutic g ene to humans. If successful, Fi nk s ays the technique may hol d promis e for treating other types of c hroni c pain. But, he cauti oned, a treatment is at l east several years away. Small gl aciers caus e most ic e l oss COLUMBU S, Ohio, Sept. 17 (UPI) -- U.S. r esearc hers say they' ve deter mi ned s mall glaci ers, not l arge ones, account for most of Gr eenl and's recent l oss of ice c aus ed by global war ming. Sci entists at Ohio State Uni versity's Byrd Polar R es earc h C enter sai d they' ve found the doz ens of muc h s maller outfl ow glaci ers along Gr eenland's coas t together account for thr ee ti mes mor e l oss from the isl and's
ice s heet than the amount c oming from l arger glaci ers. Assis tant Professor Ian H owat and coll eag ues report nearly 75 percent of the loss of Greenl and's ic e c an be trac ed to the s mall c oas tal gl aciers . Aside fr om Antarctic a, Gr eenland has mor e ic e than anywher e else on Earth, Howat s aid. T he ice cap c overs four -fifths of the isl and's s urfac e, is 1,491 miles l ong and 683 miles wide, and can be nearl y two mil es deep at its thic kest point. T he study that i ncluded Ben Smith and Ian Joughi n of the U ni versi ty of Was hington and T ed Sc ambos of the National Snow and Ic e Data Center at the U ni versity of C ol orado- Boulder is r eported in the j ournal Geophysic al Letters .
ARTIC LEID: 16316
Date: 9/16/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U PI Onli ne (upi.c om)
Head lin e: Mor e s urgical patients in poor ar eas di e
OTS: 606805
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: Lead study author N anc y Birkmeyer of the U ni versity of Mic higan s aid the odds of dying were 17-39 percent higher for pati ents wi th low soci oeconomic status. 'While some prior s tudies have documented soci oeconomic dis parities in the outc omes of i ndi vi dual proc edures , ours is the first to show that the r elations hip is c onsis tent acr oss a wi de range of s urgical pr oc edures,' Bir kmeyer sai d i n a statement. 'Pati ents that li ve i n s ocioec onomic all y disadvantag ed ar eas have higher surgical mortality r ates mainl y bec aus e the q uality of c are i s lower at hos pitals where pati ents of lower s ocioec onomic s tatus tend to be tr eated.'
Bod y:

ANN AR BOR, Mic h., Sept. 16 (UPI) -- El derl y U.S. patients livi ng in impoveris hed ar eas ar e more li kel y to di e after s urger y c ompared to peers fr om hig her-inc ome ZIP c odes , researchers sai d. Lead s tudy author N anc y Bir kmeyer of the U ni versity of Mic higan s aid the odds of dyi ng wer e 17- 39 percent higher for patients with low socioec onomic s tatus . 'While s ome prior studi es have doc umented s ocioec onomic dispariti es in the outc omes of i ndi vidual pr ocedures, ours is the first to show that the r elations hip is c onsis tent acr oss a wi de range of s urgical pr ocedures ,' Bir kmeyer s ai d in a statement. 'Patients that li ve in s ocioec onomic ally dis a dvantaged areas have hig her s urgical mortality r ates mainl y becaus e the quality of c are is lower at hospitals where patients of l ower s oci oeconomic status tend to be treated.' Bir kmeyer and c olleag ues us ed U.S. cens us and Medicar e data to eval uate postoper ati ve death r ates i n mor e than 1 million el derl y pati ents, who had undergone one of si x c ommon, high-risk surgic al pr oc edures between 1999 and 2003. T he
study, publis hed in the j our nal Medical Car e, found all patients -- regar dless of income -- who under went tr eatment at the hos pitals in the poor est ar eas wer e more li kel y to di e, whereas all pati ents undergoing s urger y i n the weal thi est ZIP c odes proved l ess li kel y to die.
ARTIC LEID: 16264
Date: 9/2/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U PI Onli ne (upi.c om)
Head lin e: Downsiz ed wor ker l ess li kel y to vol unteer
OTS: 606805
Subject: R es earc h, Social Sci ences
Summ ar y: R es earc hers at the Uni versity of C alifor nia, Los Angel es, and Uni versity of Michigan i n Ann Arbor s ay even a single layoff has a las ting i mpac t on a wor ker's incli nati on to volunteer and partici pate in a whole range of soci al and community groups and organiz ati ons i mportant for the effec ti ve func tioning of neighbor hoods, s chools , c ommuniti es.
Bod y:

LOS ANGELES, Sept. 2 (UPI) -- D ownsizing extends far beyond l aid off wor kers and the peopl e who depend on their paychec ks, it extends to soci al and c ommunity groups , U.S. r es earc hers s ay. R es earc hers at the U ni versi ty of C alifornia, Los Angel es, and U ni versity of Mic higan in Ann Ar bor s ay even a si ngle layoff has a lasting i mpact on a wor ker's incli nation to vol unteer and par ticipate in a whol e range of s ocial and community groups and organizati ons i mportant for the effecti ve func tioning of neighborhoods , sc hools , c ommuniti es. T he s tudy, published i n the j our nal Soci al Forc es, finds that wor kers who had experienc ed jus t one dis miss al fr om a job were 35 perc ent l ess li kel y to be i nvol ved in their c ommuniti es than their counter parts who had never experienc ed a job l oss. UCLA s oci ologist Jenni e E. Brand and U ni versity of Michigan s oci ologist Sarah A.
ARTIC LEID: 16266
Date: 9/4/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U PI Onli ne (upi.c om)
Head lin e: Mom's depr essi on affects baby's sleep
OTS: 606805
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: R es earc hers at the Uni versity of Mic higan in Ann Ar bor found babi es born to women with depres sion had little or no evi denc e of a 24-hour circadian r hythm s oon after birth -- unli ke the babies born to women who wer en't depress ed. ' We think we' ve identifi ed one of the ris k fac tors that may c ontribute to these infants' goi ng on to develop depr ession l ater in life,' study leader R os eanne Ar mitage s ays in a statement. 'Not ever ybody who has poor sleep or weak circadian rhythms will develop depr essi on, but if sl eep stays c onsistentl y disrupted and circadian r hythms are weak
Bod y:

ANN AR BOR, Mic h., Sept. 4 (U PI) -- U.S. res earc hers s ay babi es bor n to depr ess ed moms ar e more li kel y to have c haotic sleep patter ns. R es earchers at the U ni versi ty of Mic higan in Ann Ar bor found babies born to women with depr ession had little or no evidence of a 24- hour circadi an rhythm soon after birth -- unli ke the babi es bor n to women who weren't depressed. 'We think we've i denti fied one of the ris k factors that may c ontribute to thes e i nfants' going on to devel op depressi on later i n life,' study l eader Ros eanne Armitage says i n a statement. 'N ot ever ybody who has poor sleep or weak circ adi an rhythms will develop depression, but i f sl eep s tays c onsistentl y disr upted and circadian r hythms are weak, the ris k is signi ficantl y el evated.' Whether a mother is depress ed or not, Ar mitage says, it is cr ucial to hel p all babi es -- and new par ents -- to get the sl eep they need.
ARTIC LEID: 16271
Date: 9/10/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U PI Onli ne (upi.c om)
Head lin e: Uni versity of Mic higan under cri me warni ng
OTS: 606805
Subject: C ampus Life
Summ ar y: Polic e i n Ann Arbor, Mic h., say resi dents in and around the U ni versi ty of Mic higan c ampus should be c autious due to two r ecent robberies in the area. While ar ea polic e haven't offici ally c onnected the r obber y of a 21-year-old earl y Wednesday morni ng to one r eported Sunday, they have advised r esidents not to wal k al one as a precauti on, the D etroi t Free Press repor ted. ' Ann Arbor is a wal king c ommunity,' Sgt. Br ad Hill told the Fr ee Pr ess, als o advising r esidents to loc k the doors of their homes. ' We have thi ngs li ke this occur perio dicall y.'
Bod y:

ANN AR BOR, Mic h., Sept. 10 (UPI) -- Police in Ann Ar bor, Mich., s ay resi dents in and ar ound the Uni versity of Mic higan campus s houl d be cauti ous due to two rec ent r obberies i n the area. While area police haven't officiall y connec ted the r obber y of a 21- year- old early Wednes day mor ning to one reported Sunday, they have advised r esidents not to wal k al one as a pr ecauti on, the D etroit Free Pres s reported. 'Ann Arbor is a wal king community,' Sgt. Brad Hill told the Free Pr ess , al so advising r esidents to loc k the doors of their homes. ' We have thi ngs like this occ ur peri odic all y.' In Wednesday's i ncident, the mal e vi cti m handed over his wallet to a white mal e who pr ess ed an unidentified objec t into his bac k. T he uni versi ty student robbed Sunday tol d police he was forc ed to give his wallet to a white male after having a gun pointed at hi m. Whil e the victi m in Sunday's inci dent was abl e to gi ve polic e a descri pti on of the robber, Hill tol d the Free Press that Wednesday's vic ti m didn't get a good lo ok at the thi ef.
ARTIC LEID: 16272
Date: 9/10/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U PI Onli ne (upi.c om)
Head lin e: F orests: A c arbon storag e s olution?
OTS: 606805
Subject: R es earc h, Earth Sci ences
Summ ar y: T he res earch that incl uded sci entists from Virginia Commonwealth U ni versity, the U ni versity of Mic higan and Ger many's Institute of M eteor olog y and Climate R es earc h at the Karlsruhe Ins titute of T ec hnolog y appeared i n a rec ent iss ue of the j our nal Bi oSci ence.
Bod y:

COLUM BUS, Ohio, Sept. 10 (U PI) -- U.S. scientis ts s tudyi ng how muc h c arbon is stor ed i n Mi dwest for ests say their findings s ugges t fores ts might be us ed t o offset greenhous e gas emis sions. The Ohi o State U ni versity res earchers argue fores ts hel p s tabilize the climate and ar e abundant s ourc es of other ec ological g oods and s ervic es . Quantifying the amount of car bon for ests c an keep out of the atmosphere is one way of s howing for ests' value to energy polic ymakers, the res earc hers s uggest. 'Demons trati ng that forests have economic value bec aus e they offer c arbon offs ets might als o hel p citiz ens have an appropriatel y br oad appr eciation for the things that f ores ts do for them beyond provi ding r ecreati on or wood us ed for c onstruction or paper pulp,' sai d Profess or Peter C urtis , s eni or aut hor of the study. The s tudy found c arbon storage in Midwestern for ests c oul d offs et the greenhous e gas emissi ons of nearl y two-thirds of nearby popul ati ons, and, with pr oper management s ustai n or even increas e the fores ts' storage c apacity for future
generati ons. T he res earch that incl uded s cientists from Virgini a C ommonwealth U ni versity, the U ni versi ty of Mic higan and Ger many's Institute of M eteorolog y and Climate R es earc h at the Karlsruhe Institute of T ec hnolog y appeared i n a rec ent is sue of the j our nal Bi oSci ence.
ARTIC LEID: 16273
Date: 9/10/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U PI Onli ne (upi.c om)
Head lin e: Calci um during pr egnanc y drops l ead l evel s
OTS: 606805
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: Senior author H oward H u of the Uni versity of Michigan Sc hool of Public Health s aid the study is the first known randomiz ed st udy examining calci um s uppl ementati on on l ead l evels in pr egnant wo men. ' We and others have pr eviousl y shown that duri ng pr egnanc y, mothers can transfer lead fr om their bones to their unborn -- wi th signific ant adverse c ons equences -- maki ng mater nal bone lead stores a thr eat even if c urrent environmental lead expos ures ar e l ow,' H u s aid i n a s tatement.
Bod y:

ANN AR BOR, Mic h., Sept. 10 (UPI) -- Pr egnant women who take high levels of calci um s uppl ements -- 1,200 milligrams dail y -- had up to 31 percent les s lead in their blood, U .S. res earchers s aid. T he fi ndi ngs, publis hed onli ne in Environmental H ealth Perspecti ves, s uggests calcium c oul d play a critical r ole in r educi ng fetal and i nfant expos ure to lead. T he study found the aver age r educ tion of blood l ead l evels at about 11 perc ent. Senior author Howard Hu of the Uni versity of Michig an Sc hool of Public Health s aid the study is the first known r andomiz ed study examini ng calci um s uppl ementati on on l ead l evels in pr egnant women. ' We and others have pr evi ousl y shown that during pr egnanc y, mothers c an transfer l ead fr om their bones to their unborn -- with signific ant advers e c onseq uenc es -- making maternal bone lead stores a thr eat even i f c urrent envir onmental lead expos ures ar e l ow,' Hu s aid i n a s tatement. 'T he bottom li ne is that obstetricians and pedi atrici ans should consi der addi ng cal cium s uppl ementati on to the prenatal vi tami ns nor mall y
recommended in preg nant women, partic ul arly if their pati ents have a signific ant history of envir onmental or occ upational lead expos ure.'
ARTIC LEID: 16375
Date: 9/9/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U PI Onli ne (upi.c om)
Head lin e: Remi nders i ncr eas e c ol on screenings
OTS: 606805
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: T he remi nder s ys tem, c alled ClinfoTr ac ker, was devel oped by famil y medicine doc tors at U ni versity of Mic higan Health System to help trac k and manage pri mar y c are. The s ystem enc ourages doc tors and pati ents to foll ow gui deli nes for managing c hronic diseas es or for prevention screeni ngs. T he study, publis hed in the j our nal Medical Car e, Cli nfoTrac ker was i ntegrated into 12 primar y c are pr actic es participati ng in the Great Lakes R esearc h into Pr actic e N etwor k, a s tatewi de pr actic e-bas ed res earch networ k in Michig an. T he study followed the pr actic es for nine months.
Bod y:

ANN AR BOR, Mic h., Sept. 9 (U PI) -- A c omputerized s ystem that printed remi nders for patients for c olor ectal c ancer s creeni ng incr eased s ceeni ngs by 9 perc ent, U.S. researchers sai d. T he remi nder s ystem, c alled Cli nfoTrac ker, was developed by famil y medicine doctors at U niversity of Michigan H eal th Sys tem to hel p tr ac k and manag e primar y c are. T he s ystem encourag es doctors and patients to follow guidelines for managing c hr onic dis eases or for pr eventi on screenings. The s tudy, published in the journal Medic al C are, ClinfoTrac ker was integrated into 12 primar y c are pr actic es par ticipati ng in the Great Lakes R esearc h into Pr actic e N etwor k, a s tatewi de pr actic e-bas ed res earch networ k in Michigan. The study followed the practic es for nine months. T he res earchers found that averag e scr eening r ates at the beginni ng of the s tudy wer e 41.7 percent. By the end of the s tudy, that had j umped to 66.5 percent.
ARTIC LEID: 16377
Date: 9/9/2008 12:00:00 AM
Outlet: U PI Onli ne (upi.c om)
Head lin e: Endanger ed vul tur e cl oser to extinc tion
OTS: 606805
Subject: R es earc h, Life Scienc es
Summ ar y: A U ni versity of Mic higan study l ed by Jeff J ohnson deter mi ned the decli ne was c aused by an anti-i nflammator y drug, diclofenac, us ed to allevi ate arthritis-li ke s ymptoms i n li vestoc k. The drug is fatally toxic to vultures. Although Indi a, N epal and Pakistan outl awed i ts manufacture in 2006, dicl ofenac is still available and birds are s till dyi ng. T he sci entists sai d the abs ence of vultures pos es a threat to public health, sinc e uneaten lives toc k c arcas ses pr ovide breeding grounds for bacteria. 'We know t he problem, and we know the sol uti on,' sai d J ohns on, now an assistant professor at the Uni versity of North Texas-D enton.
Bod y:

ANN AR BOR, Mic h., Sept. 9 (U PI) -- U.S. scientis ts s ay capti ve breeding c olonies of a critic all y endanger ed vultur e are too s mall t o protect the bird s pecies fr om extinction. With a seven-foot wings pan, the ori ental white-bac ked vultur e (Gyps beng alensis) was an awes ome pr es enc e i n s outh Asia until the mid- 1990s, when popul ati ons in the tens of millions began to coll aps e. A Uni versity of Michig an study led by J eff J ohns on deter mined the decli ne was caus ed by an anti-infl ammator y dr ug, diclofenac, us ed to all eviate arthritis-li ke s ymptoms in li ves toc k. T he dr ug is fatall y toxic to vul tur es. Although Indi a, N epal and Pakistan outlawed its manufac tur e in 2006, diclofenac is s till available and bir ds are still dying. The sci entists s aid the absenc e of vultures p os es a thr eat to public health, sinc e uneaten li vestoc k c arc asses provi de breedi ng grounds for bacteria. 'We know the pr obl em, and we know the s olution,' s aid J ohns on, now an assistant profes sor at the Uni vers