ASBESTOS IN SCHOOLS (DOC download) by gegeshandong

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									ASBESTOS IN SCHOOLS

The use of asbestos for lagging boilers and pipework in building was common
practice before 1974. The practice has now been discontinued and asbestos free
materials are now used.

There are, of course, many schools with asbestos used as an insulant in boiler
houses and fume cupboards, as indeed in other situations. Asbestlux ceiling panels,
asbestos cement products for fire protection and sprayed asbestos on certain
ceilings for insulation.

The Health and Safety Executive issued advice on health hazards from asbestos
containing materials. Danger from asbestos incorporated in a building is only likely
to arise where material becomes worn or damaged and is exposed to air. Good
maintenance is therefore a key factor in preventing a damage and exposure as well
as other controls:

Materials in good condition

               Monitor the condition at regular intervals;
               Label the material where it is practical to do so;
               Inform the contractor and any other worker likely to work on or disturb
                the material

Material has minor damage

              The material should be repaired and/or encapsulated;
              Monitor the condition at regular intervals;
              Label the material where it is practical to do so;
              Inform the contractor and any other worker likely to work on or disturb the
               material.

Poor condition or where it is likely to be disturbed

              The material should be removed by a competent, approved company.

Where it is considered, by risk assessment, that asbestos containing materials
should be removed, eg. If any lagging in boiler houses or any pipework should
become damaged, or you are concerned regarding asbestos problems, then these
should be reported to the Director of Children’s Services, Asset Management, who
will arrange immediate action. Only licensed Asbestos Removal Contractors can do
this. In the first instance you should contact Asset Management to arrange this.

In an emergency, please contact Security and Response.

The Authority is undertaking surveys of all its properties to identify where asbestos
has historically been used. This information has/will be provided to you within your
Buildings Operation Manual from CPS. If you are unsure whether any material
contains asbestos or not, you must assume that it does, unless there is strong
evidence to suggest that it does not. Further advice can be obtained from the Asset
Management, or OSAHSS.
          Asbestos Insulation Boards in Fume Cupboards
I enclose a recent excerpt from a Croner’s School Safety Update regarding a local
authority that was fined for exposing people to asbestos following the refurbishment of a
science laboratory. The exposure followed the removal of old fume cupboards that
contained amosite asbestos.

I am sure that many schools within Bolton have old fume cupboards containing similar
asbestos insulation board. The school and the local authority have a responsibility to
ensure that:

   Asbestos containing materials are identified and an assumption is made that
    asbestos is present, unless there is strong evidence that it is not;
   The condition of these materials is checked;
   If any maintenance or refurbishment is planned, or if the material is in poor condition,
    it may be necessary to arrange for the material to be sampled and identified by a
    specialist;
   The location and the condition of the material is recorded;
   An assessment is made as to whether the condition or the location means that the
    material is likely to be disturbed;
   There is a plan to manage any risks – based on a suitable and sufficient risk
    assessment;
   Any training need is identified and provided.

The following guidelines (issued by the Health and Safety Executive) should be followed
as a general rule:

Material in good condition

   Monitor the condition at regular intervals;
   Label the material where it is practical to do so;
   Inform the contractor and any other worker likely to work on or disturb the material.

Material has minor damage

   The material should be repaired and/or encapsulated;
   Monitor the condition at regular intervals;
   Label the material where it is practical to do so;
   Inform the contractor and any other worker likely to work on or disturb the material.

Poor condition or where it is likely to be disturbed

   The material should be removed by a competent, approved company.

Although there is a duty to undertake these simple steps now, they will be made even
more explicit in the Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations 2002.

I would welcome the opportunity to provide schools with any additional help or
information.

Chris Ashton, Head of Occupational Safety and Health Specialist Service.
Ref: NE062/04                                                             3 February 2004


                        SAFE MANAGEMENT OF ASBESTOS

The Health and Safety Executive has issued advice about the management of
asbestos in buildings following publicity resulting from an article in the British
Medical Journal warning of the growing number of deaths from mesothelioma
in future years as a result of past exposure to asbestos.

Bill Macdonald, Head of asbestos policy at HSE, said "The expected rise in
deaths from asbestos-related disease clearly represents a tragedy for the
many victims and their families. Sadly, we are powerless to prevent these
deaths, caused by exposure many years ago, but it is possible to minimise the
risk of future exposure.

“Duty holders should take action now – to actively manage the risk,
particularly from asbestos in buildings, ahead of May this year when it will
become their legal duty to do so."

Recognition of the risks of asbestos has in the last 20 years led the
Government, on the advice of the Health and Safety Commission, to ban the
import of asbestos and place stringent controls on most work activities
involving asbestos.

The new regulations are a further major step and will place a duty on those
responsible for workplaces and common areas of residential properties to
manage any asbestos in those premises to protect people carrying-out
maintenance.

The new duty, part of the Control of Asbestos At Work Regulations 2002
(CAWR), will require those with responsibilities for the repair and maintenance
of non-domestic premises to find out if there are, or may be, asbestos-
containing materials within them. It also requires them to record the location
and condition of such materials, and then assess and manage any risk from
them, including passing on information about their location and condition to
anyone liable to disturb them.

The duty to manage means only working on materials once they have been
checked for any asbestos. If asbestos is in good condition, it should not be
removed, providing that steps are taken to warn anyone likely to disturb it. If
the asbestos is in bad condition, it should be safely removed by companies
licensed to do so.


       more….


There could be as many as 500,000 non-domestic premises in the UK that
contain asbestos materials. Assessing the risks from those materials and
putting in place systems to manage that risk will therefore take time, so there
has been an eighteen-month lead in period for the duty.

Notes to editors:
1) There is no medical intervention for those already exposed. But much can
be done to prevent exposures today and prevent painful and prolonged illness
and death in the future.

2) To raise awareness of the duty to manage, and to promote effective
compliance, HSE has published the following guidance material:
A new Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) has been produced to support regulation 4
of CAWR. ‘The management of asbestos in non-domestic premises’ (L127) gives
advice on how to comply with the new legal requirements and explains the duties of
building owners, tenants and anyone else with legal responsibilities for non-domestic
premises.

It highlights the flexibility of the new regulations to cover a range of situations and to
allow a proportionate approach to be taken to managing the risks from asbestos. For
example, it stresses that asbestos in good condition, which is unlikely to be
disturbed, should be left in place and managed.

The free leaflet ‘Managing asbestos in premises’ (INDG223) has been updated and
re-titled ‘A short guide to managing asbestos in premises’. Aimed at those with
smaller, less complex premises, it provides background information on why asbestos
can be a risk to health, and where it is found, and gives basic, practical advice on
managing the risks from asbestos in premises.

The new guidance booklet ‘A comprehensive guide to managing asbestos’ (HSG227)
is aimed at those duty holders in more complex organisations and expands on the
guidance given in the free leaflet. The guidance helps duty holders decide what
immediate steps they need to take to manage asbestos on their premises as well as
giving advice on developing a management strategy to ensure full compliance with
the new duty. The guidance is illustrated by the use of case studies and worked
examples.

The guidance will ensure that every duty holder can access information about what
the new duty to manage will mean to them – and what they must do to comply. This
advance notice will give them sufficient time to do so. All those affected are urged to
make sure they fulfil their legal and moral responsibilities.

3) The new regulations will provide a new level of protection for those working in the
building-related trades and others at risk from asbestos in buildings and will
contribute to the saving of almost 5,000 lives through eliminating risks from asbestos
in the non-domestic sector.
Copies of The management of asbestos in non-domestic premises Regulation 4 of
the Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations 2002 L127, ISBN 0-7176-2382-3, price
£9.50; A short guide to managing asbestos in premises, INDG223, free of charge; A
comprehensive guide to managing asbestos in premises HSG227, ISBN 0-7176-
2381-5, price £12.50; Work with asbestos insulation, asbestos coating and asbestos
insulating board (fourth edition) L28, ISBN 0-7176-2563-X, price £9.50; Work with
asbestos which does not normally require a licence (fourth edition) L27, ISBN 0-
7176-2562-1, price £9.50; are available from HSE Books, PO Box 1999, Sudbury,
Suffolk, CO10 2WA, Tel: 01787-881165 or fax: 01787-313995. Priced publications
are also available from good booksellers.

								
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