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					Sophomore English
Mrs. Fairman / Frankenstein 2011 / period 6



Frankenstein
Introduction: For our study of Frankenstein, we will approach this                               book in a
different manner; we will be discussing the novel in small and large group                     settings. We
will read together in small groups and then come together and discuss as a large group. Reading groups
will enable you to discuss and teach each other the material in the novel. You have an additional setting
to ask questions and discuss the novel. Each group will fill out a contract schedule that allows everyone
to know who is responsible for each area for every chapter.

Reading groups: On reading group days, each of you will be in a small reading group. This group
will meet for a significant part of a class period for the purpose of discussing the assignment and helping
to clarify important points. Instead of having to worry about all of the characters, archetypes, etc. while
reading, each member will focus on 1 - 2 areas with assigned notes. Then, when the small group meets,
each member will teach the other members about his or her area (s) through a small group discussion.

Notes: The notes you take will be specifically for the members of your group. Each person will be
required to share his/her notes with the other members of his group during the small group discussion
time. These notes (notebook entry) must be ready for all group members and myself before class begins,
or they are considered late (1/2 off) .You may be creative with your notes but they must be legible,
detailed (include required amount of quotes / citations), and cover your assigned note-taking
responsibility. (You may choose to type or write directly in your notebook.) These notes must be your
own work, without the assistance of any outside or on-line sources (if you are struggling to understand the
text, you may ask myself or the WERCS for guidance - - but please let me know if you are struggling so
we can arrange for help.) You must have notes prepared to share with each member of your group
on the day the small groups meets and show them to me when class begins. Twice during the study
of Frankenstein, you will be required to type up your notes (you may want to add to your notes
after discussion in class) and turn them in. Details to follow! It is also your responsibility to see that
each member of your group understands the area that you covered. You will keep these Frankenstein
entries in your notebook that will consist of your notes and notes completed in class from your group.
You will also use your notebook often in our large group discussions and to help your planning for
various writing assignments. Of the six sets of individual notes that are assigned, there will be two sets of
notes that you will type and turn in for a separate grade; one set of notes from chapters 1 - 16, and one set
of notes from chapters 17 - 24. The other four notes assignments are part of your 2nd quarter notebook
grade.

Discussion: After each reading group has met, one member will represent the group in a discussion.
The rest of the members will listen as the representative from their group presents ideas and comments
from their group. Those on the outer circle will actively listen and take notes, while those in the inner
group (FISHBOWL) discuss the readings. I will select a different representative each day of small group
discussion to form the inner circle or fishbowl. Discussion will be assessed / graded. The following class
period, we will meet again as a large group; therefore, every member of the class may participate using
notes, questions, and ideas generated in the small groups or while listening to the representative

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discussion. So, small reading group days will alternate with large group discussions and other in class
activities / writing so that you will most likely not have back-to-back small group discussion / preparation
days.

Your responsibility: For each reading assignment, you will create your own detailed notes that cover
your assigned area(s). You will write notes and include quotes with citation / analysis that focus on one
or two of these areas each time that notes are due:

       The Golden Mean Archetype (or the violation of the golden mean)
       The Creation/Pygmalion Archetype (creator, creation, relationship between the two)
       The Hero’s Quest Archetype (identity in doubt, departure, testing, etc.) or a deviation of the
       hero’s quest / journey – an “anti-hero’s journey”
       Symbols and repeated images or ideas
       The way the narrator tells a story and how he is different from other narrators
       Characters (other than narrator): new characters introduced and old characters changing
       New Vocabulary (words, definitions, sentences with page #, context clues)
       Questions answered for each chapter (see list at end of study guide; type the question and
       complete sentence answers for your group members.)

Expectations for ALL notes:

      Any archetypes – includes 3 quotes (minimum) from the reading with detailed analysis
      Symbols – includes 3 quotes (minimum) that demonstrate symbolic ideas, either 3 different quotes
       about the same symbol, or three separate quotes representing different symbols in the reading
      Narrator / other characters: includes 3 quotes / text references (minimum) that demonstrate how
       the narrator’s perspective impacts the story; also includes 3 quotes / text references that provide
       information about character introduction or character change in the reading
      Vocabulary – 10 (minimum) new words with required information (see above)
      Questions – answer the study guide questions in this packet for the chapters assigned. Use text
       (direct and indirect quotes) support for your answers.
   
Chapter Notes that will be typed up and turned in should demonstrate both greater
QUALITY and QUANTITY than the notes in your notebook. Tentatively, the notes from
Chapters 9 – 12 and the notes from Chapter 20 – 22 will be the two assignments that are
typed up and turned in to me for a separate grade.


Resources: If you are having difficulty completing your notes or understanding the text, please come
see me with your questions and/or visit the WERCS. This may be helpful if you are struggling with a
certain “note-taking” area. No outside sources / on-line sources may be used. This will result in a
zero for the assignment.


Quizzes / Reading checks: There may be short reading checks/quizzes during our study. Stay on
top of the assigned reading and your note-taking. If I feel that your class is not staying current with the
reading and assigned small group work, this will result in more “pop” quizzes.

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Reading: The following is the reading schedule for our study of Frankenstein. Please refer to this
agenda and follow the due dates. You should expect approximately fifteen – twenty pages a night. (This
may be 30 – 40 pages spread over two nights, plus you need to complete your required notes that will be c
you and each other member of your group.) Remember to read actively and annotate your books. In
addition to your “assigned” areas, you should be marking the margins of your texts with notes and
questions, along with significant characters, plot events, emerging/established themes, and other things
you think are significant or important. You could also use “?” to mark your questions or “!” to highlight
shocking or surprising turning points. Annotations will help you (greatly!) with your note-taking and
preparing in-class essays. (You will be writing one mini essay and one full in-class essay during our
study of Frankenstein.)
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           2011 READING SCHEDULE FOR FRANKENSTEIN – period 6
Note: you may find it useful to write this schedule in your planners. Although it is unlikely, these
dates may change slightly due to school schedules, the pace of our discussion, or the availability of
computer labs, media and equipment, etc. Therefore, make any changes to dates as needed.

Read the introductory material and the Letters (pages 1-16) for Friday, 11/4

Read Chapters 1-4 for Monday 11/7

Note-taking now begins for small groups for all of the following chapters.
Read & Notes Chapters 5-8 for Thursday, November 10

Read & Notes Chapters 9-12 for Wednesday, November 16

Read & Notes Chapters 13-16 for Friday, November 18

In-class (mini) essay #1 on first half of Frankenstein** Chapters 1 – 16, Tuesday, November 22
(note that essay will be assigned on Thursday, November 17, and reviewed on Monday 11/21)

                                           (Have a nice Thanksgiving!!)

Read & Notes Chapters 17-19 for Monday, November 28

Read & Notes Chapters 20-22 for Thursday, December 1

Read & Notes Chapters 23-24 for Monday, December 5

In-class (full) essay #2 on all of Frankenstein** Friday, December 9




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                                  READING GROUP RESPONSIBILITY SCHEDULE
Please fill out the following chart that identifies the responsibilities of each small group member. Each member of the group
should have the same amount of responsibilities. Each member of the group should take notes in each area at least once and
will represent the group in discussion at least once. (The discussion representative will be selected the day of small groups.)
Notice that some jobs will need to be doubled up; consider this when you divide up the note taking responsibilities. Fill out an
extra copy of this schedule to give to me please. You may decide within your group which jobs to “double up;” ask me
if you’d like guidance.

CHAPTERS 5-8                                 {Notetaker – each section}          Date due: _____________________
         {Area of search}
Golden Mean Archetype                        _______________________________________

Hero’s Quest Archetype                       _______________________________________

Creation/Pygmalion Archetype                 _______________________________________

Symbols, repeated images/ideas               ______________________________________

Narrator & other characters                  _______________________________________

Vocabulary                                   _______________________________________

Study Questions for these chapters           ___________________________________
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CHAPTERS 9-12                                {Notetaker – each section}          Date due: _____________________
         {Area of search}
Golden Mean Archetype                        _______________________________________

Hero’s Quest Archetype                       _______________________________________

Creation/Pygmalion Archetype                 _______________________________________

Symbols, repeated images/ideas               ______________________________________

Narrator & other characters                  _______________________________________

Vocabulary                                   _______________________________________

Study Questions for these chapters           ___________________________________
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CHAPTERS 13-16                               {Notetaker – each section}          Date due: _____________________
         {Area of search}
Golden Mean Archetype                        _______________________________________

Hero’s Quest Archetype                       _______________________________________

Creation/Pygmalion Archetype                 _______________________________________

Symbols, repeated images/ideas               ______________________________________

Narrator & other characters                  _______________________________________
Vocabulary                                   ______________________________________
Study Questions for these chapters           ___________________________________

                                                                                                                               4
CHAPTERS 17-19                                                 Date due: _____________________________
{Area of search}                     { Notetaker – each section}

Golden Mean Archetype                        _______________________________________

Hero’s Quest Archetype                       _______________________________________

Creation/Pygmalion Archetype                 _______________________________________

Symbols, repeated images/ideas               ______________________________________

Narrator & other characters                  _______________________________________

Vocabulary                                   _______________________________________

Study Questions for these chapters           ___________________________________


CHAPTERS 20-22                                                 Date due: _____________________________
{Area of search}                     { Notetaker – each section}

Golden Mean Archetype                        _______________________________________

Hero’s Quest Archetype                       _______________________________________

Creation/Pygmalion Archetype                 _______________________________________

Symbols, repeated images/ideas               ______________________________________

Narrator & other characters                  _______________________________________

Vocabulary                                   _______________________________________

Study Questions for these chapters           ___________________________________
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CHAPTER 23-24                                                  Date due: _____________________________
{Area of search}                     { Notetaker – each section}

Golden Mean Archetype                        _______________________________________

Hero’s Quest Archetype                       _______________________________________

Creation/Pygmalion Archetype                 _______________________________________

Symbols, repeated images/ideas               ______________________________________

Narrator & other characters                  _______________________________________

Vocabulary                                   _______________________________________

Study Questions for these chapters           ___________________________________
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                        Frankenstein Study Guide Questions
These study guide questions are to be completed by the member of the group
assigned that job. Answers should be thorough and written in complete
sentences. Please include the full question above your answer so that each
group number understands your response better. Other group members may
want to use these questions as a reading guide to help your understanding of the
chapters you are reading. Also, stronger answers will virtually always incorporate
the use of cited text (quotes); at a minimum include text / evidence when the
question requires it. You may choose to take the questions off my website and
then just write your answers and text support rather than retyping the question.

Letter 1

1. Explain the connotations of these two phrases in the very first paragraph: "evil
foreboding"; "my undertakings."

2. Where does Walton seem to be heading? Evidence?

3. Why does he seem to be going there? Evidence?

4. How has Walton prepared himself for his adventure?

5. In what ways does Walton doubt himself?

Letter 2

1. Why does Walton desire a friend so badly?

2. What are Walton's feelings as he waits for the weather to allow him to depart?

3. Why would Walton be called "a romantic"?

Letter 3

1. Describe the territory Walton now travels.

2. How would you describe his feelings now? Do you see any changes?

Letter 4

1. What strange thing did Walton and his crew see one afternoon in the clearing of
mist on the great sheets of ice?

2. The sighting was followed by an even stranger occurrence. What does Walton
report?


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3. Describe "the stranger."

4. What seemed to bring him to life?


5. When Walton shares his dreams with the stranger, how does the stranger respond?
What advice has he for Walton?

6. What causes the stranger to share his tale of "unparalleled misfortunes" with
Walton?

7. Explain the metaphor with which the letter closes: "Strange and harrowing must be
his story, frightful the storm which embroiled the gallant vessel on its course and
wrecked it -- thus." (p.16)


Chapter 1

1. Briefly describe Victor's (the narrator at this point) background.

2. In the initial characterization of Elizabeth (pg 20), how is she described?

3. How does Victor explain his relationship with Elizabeth? What is striking about his
word choice? What might this suggest or foreshadow?

Chapter 2

1. Who is Henry Clerval?

2. The narrator describes Henry as "...occupied...with the moral relations of things."
(pg 23) What does this say about Henry's character?

3. Look at the image of the "utterly destroyed" oak tree (pg 26). What is significant or
powerful there?

4. In the last two paragraphs of the chapter, Victor refers to his "guardian angel." How
does his use this metaphor to comment on the course of his fate?

Chapter 3

1. In the beginning of the chapter, Victor refers to a first omen or misfortune. What
does he believe this to be?

2. Take a close look at the paragraph on page 33 that begins “such were the
professor’s words…” What does Victor say in regard to "the soul of Frankenstein?"
What sparks him to want to "unfold to the world the deepest mysteries of creation”?

3. What is Professor Waldman's role?
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Chapter 4

1. Why does Victor become fascinated with death?

2. Victor states, on page 38, "Remember, I am not recording the vision of a madman."
Why might he say this? What is his tone here?

3. In the passage that begins "Learn from me..." what kernel of wisdom does Victor
offer?

4. What does Victor reveal to be his long-term goal with regard to his experiment?

5. How does Victor seem excessive or obsessive in any parts of this chapter? Where?
What does this say about his character?

Chapter 5

1. What are Victor's reactions when his creation comes to life? How is this ironic?

2. As he flees his laboratory to sleep, what is his dream?

3. Clerval's arrival at Ingolstadt coincides with Frankenstein's need for him. How does
Clerval help Frankenstein?

Chapter 6

1. Elizabeth's letter brings Frankenstein news of his family. Who was Justine Moritz?
How did she become part of the Frankenstein family?

2. Describe Frankenstein's feelings as he introduces Clerval to his teachers.

Chapter 7

1. When Frankenstein returned from his trip with Clerval, what sad news did he get
from his father's letter?

2. As Frankenstein neared his home in Geneva, he said "...I foresaw obscurely that I
was destined to become the most wretched of human beings.” What does this imply
about Frankenstein's future? What do you imagine will make him so "wretched"?

3. What convinced Frankenstein that "the witch" was the one who had done the
horrible deed described in his father's letter?

4. Why does Frankenstein decide not to confess his beliefs about his monster and the
horrible event?

5. Why is Justine suspected to be the murderer?
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Chapter 8

1. What is Justine's account of her actions on the night of the murder?

2. What witness does Elizabeth offer in Justine's defense?

3. Why did Justine say that she ultimately had to confess to the murder?

4. Reread the final sentence of chapter 8, page 76. What is foreshadowed?

Chapter 9

1. What kind of feelings does Victor begin to experience? How does he choose to deal
with his emotions?

2. On the top of page 81, Victor compares himself to a wounded deer. Explain his
metaphor.

Chapter 10

1. What gives Victor his momentary feeling of peace?

2. What is striking or surprising about Victor's exchange with the monster?

3. In what ways does the end of the chapter echo the end of Walton's section?

Chapter 11

1. In this section, the monster begins to tell his story. In what ways do his actions
sound like those of an infant or a child?

2. How would you describe the monster's intelligence, character and personality? Is
anything ironic or surprising about this?

Chapter 12

1. How does the monster perceive/view "the cottagers"?

2. What discoveries/revelations does the monster have with regard to language? Why
is this an important discovery for him?

Chapter 13

1. How does the monster begin to gain knowledge?

2. What kind of morals and values does the monster begin to adopt?
3. What is the nature of the QUESTIONS that the monster begins to ask himself? To
what answers do his questions lead?
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Chapter 14

1. Write a one paragraph SUMMARY of the "history of the cottagers."

Chapter 15

1. What is the significance of books and reading for the monster?

2. On page 121, the monster states "...this was the hour and moment of trial, which
would decide my hopes or realize my fears." To what is he referring? What happens?
3. What is the significance of Old De Lacey being blind? What is the common bond
that he and the monster share (pg 123?

Chapter 16

1. In what ways does the monster blame Victor?

2. What "pieces of the puzzle" does the monster's narrative fill in with regard to Justine
and William's story? How does his point of view affect your understanding of those
events?

3. As the monster's narrative comes to a close, what final request does he ask of
Victor?

4. Does the monster's narrative impact the way you feel about him or Victor?

Chapter 17

1. What does the monster want from Frankenstein? Why?

2. The monster uses several tactics to persuade Frankenstein to meet his needs. What
are his several arguments?

Chapter 18

1. What promise does Frankenstein's father want from him?

2. Describe Frankenstein's reunion with Clerval. What is Frankenstein's attitude
toward his friend? What might be foreshadowed?

Chapter 19

1. When Frankenstein travels with Clerval, what feeling does he have regarding the
promise he made to the monster?

2. Find and list several phrases from this chapter which reveal Frankenstein's feelings
listed above.
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Chapter 20

1. How do Frankenstein's actions antagonize the monster?

2. With what threat does the monster leave Frankenstein?

3. What "odious task" must Frankenstein perform before he could leave Scotland? How
does he do it?

4. What thoughts was Frankenstein having on the lake that night?

5. Who/what confronts Frankenstein when he finally makes it ashore?

Chapter 21

1. Of what crime was Frankenstein accused? What news makes the accusation even
more unbearable?

2. Describe Frankenstein's reactions when he learns all of the above mentioned news?

3. Reread the final paragraph of Chapter 21. What is revealed about Frankenstein's
state of mind?

Chapter 22

1. What confessions does Frankenstein try to make to his father? Why?

2. Summarize the content of Elizabeth's letter to Frankenstein?

3. In readying himself for his marriage to Elizabeth, how does Frankenstein prepare to
meet the monster's threat?

Chapter 23

1. After the monster carries out his threat, what does Frankenstein do in response?

2. From whom did Frankenstein seek help? What response did he get? What course
did he therefore pursue?

Chapter 24

1. What is Frankenstein's plan?

2. What is the significance of the words, "My reign is not yet over"?

3. What seems to be Frankenstein's only source of joy? What will be his reward for his
terrible task?


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4. Ultimately, how did Frankenstein become separated from his monster and choose to
abandon his pursuit?

5. How is Frankenstein able to convince the mutinous sailors to continue on in their
journey?

6. Describe Walton's meeting with the monster.
7. Interpret the monster's words on page 210, "...I was the slave, not the master, of an
impulse which I detested but could not disobey."

8. Why do you think Walton decides not to carry out Frankenstein's last wish?




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