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					              Student Housing Strategy 2009 – 2011. ‘Living and Learning in Newcastle’




      ‘Living and Learning in Newcastle’
                 The Future of Student Housing
                                                                2009 - 2011




                                                            September 2009



                                                    Draft Final Report
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                Student Housing Strategy 2009 – 2011. ‘Living and Learning in Newcastle’

Contents
Foreword .................................................................................................................... 4

Executive Summary………………………………………………………………………….5

1      About this Strategy ........................................................................................... 7

    1.1      Introduction .................................................................................................. 7

    1.2      Scope of the Strategy ................................................................................... 8

    1.3. A Collaborative Approach ............................................................................... 8

    1.4 Structure of the document ................................................................................ 9

    1.5 Key Contacts .................................................................................................... 9

2      The City’s Position .......................................................................................... 10

    2.1 Recognising the Importance of the Student Population .................................. 10

    2.2 The National, Regional, Sub-regional and Local Context................................ 10

    2.3 Growth in Student Numbers ............................................................................ 10

    2.4 The positives and negatives of a Large Student Population ........................... 11

    2.5 Key Findings ................................................................................................... 13

3     Our Commitment ……………………………………………………………………..14

    3.1 Our Intentions for the Student Housing Strategy ............................................. 14

    3.2 Key Outcomes................................................................................................. 14

    3.3 Delivering the Strategy .................................................................................... 30

4      Action Plan ....................................................................................................... 31

Appendix A.            Policy Context................................................................................... III

Appendix B.            Evidence for Increased Demand for Student Housing ..................... VII

Appendix C.            Student Housing Strategy Visioning Exercise Feedback ................ XVI

Appendix D.            Sites with Planning Consent (September 2009) ............................. XIX

Appendix E.            Lettings Boards Voluntary Code of Practice .................................... XX

Appendix F.            Incidences of Anti-Social Behaviour by Ward ................................ XXII

Appendix G.            Noise Related’ Complaints ........................................................... XXIII

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Appendix H.         Comparison with Other Core Cities -………….......……………….XXIV

Appendix I.         References ................................................................................... XXV



Figure 1 : Growth in full time student numbers 2000/01 – 2008/09 ........................ 11

Figure 2 : New purpose built accommodation........................................................ VIII

Figure 3 : Total number of University provided or leased bed spaces – 2008/09 .... IX

Figure 4 : Full time students by tenure academic year 2007/08 ............................... X

Figure 5 : Percentage of full time students by tenure in 2007/08 .............................. X

Figure 6 : Student Only Household Numbers and Percent by Ward ....................... XII

Figure 7 : Estimated schedule of units required up to 2010 ................................... XIII

Figure 8 : Results of the CUBO Enhancing the Student Experience Research ...... XV




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              Student Housing Strategy 2009 – 2011. ‘Living and Learning in Newcastle’

Foreword
Newcastle is a renowned centre for higher and further education
hosting two universities as well as Newcastle College. All three
institutions have enjoyed sustained growth over recent years
and this has benefited the city in many ways. In addition to
having excellent reputations at a national and international level
they make a valuable contribution to the City’s, as well as the
region’s, economy, social vibrancy and cultural diversity. Their
presence helps support local services and is valuable in helping
to regenerate the housing market in some areas. For this
reason it is important that the City Council, the Universities and
other student housing providers work together to: ensure a good
range and choice within the City’s student housing market; manage the present
student housing stock; as well as, facilitate the required growth in purpose built
accommodation.

The purpose of the strategy and the accompanying Action Plan is to facilitate and
focus the joint working required to ensure a balanced student housing offer. We are
looking to ensure that students feel welcome in Newcastle; are encouraged to see
the city as a long term prospect; and a place where they want to put down roots after
graduation.

This strategy sets out the shared vision and strategic framework the City Council has
put in place for the provision of housing to meet the needs of the City’s student
population. The strategy does not in itself introduce any new legal or planning
powers, programmes or actions. Instead it draws together our existing strategies and
initiatives in terms of planning, neighbourhood management, housing investment and
improvement schemes to present them comprehensively in one document.
Ultimately, we are aiming to ensure that students studying in Newcastle have access
to safe, well managed and decent accommodation, while balancing the needs and
welfare of all residents in the communities where many students choose to locate.

We are committed to continually reviewing and updating the evidence base and
indeed the strategy itself: to ensure that it remains current and relevant; that actions
and programmes remain targeted; and that it is delivered.

In Newcastle we are committed to ensuring that our city continues to be seen as the
city of choice for students. We recognise the need to ensure that we offer the range
and quality of accommodation today’s student expects and ensure that their time in
Newcastle is an enjoyable one, our strategy sets out how we will achieve this.



                                                             Councillor Bill Shepherd
                                                                     Portfolio Holder
                                                           Regeneration and Housing




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                                           Executive Summary
Background:

National targets to increase the number and proportion of people entering higher and
further education have led to a large-scale expansion in the numbers of students
seeking accommodation. Newcastle has proved a popular destination for students
and as a consequence has a significant student population, with just over 37,000 full
time students in full-time higher education. When compared with the other English
Core Cities, Newcastle has the highest proportion of full time students to population,
and the second highest proportion of student only households occupying the private
housing sector.

A key issue that needs to be addressed is that the growth in student numbers has not
been supported by an increase in the availability of purpose built student
accommodation, with this shortfall being taken up by the private rented sector (PRS)
in a few neighbourhoods in the City.

In 2008/09 there is an additional 12,110 (+48%) full-time higher education students
residing in the city compared with the academic year 2000/01. Within the same
period there has been an additional 1,728 net purpose built student bed spaces
provided; hence the remaining 10,000 or so students are either studying from home
or finding accommodation in the private rented sector.

An analysis of Council Tax data shows a significant rise in student only households
occupying the private housing sector (Class N Council Tax exemptions). The years
2001 to 2009 has seen an additional +3,223 (+121%) increase in the number of
private sector properties occupied by student only households.

The Interim Planning Guidance (IPG) on Purpose Built Student Housing (October
2007) recognised this shortfall in the housing choices of students and consequently
estimates a need for up to 5,000 (net) additional bed spaces between 2007 and the
academic year 2009/10. However, to ensure the continuing supply of the right type of
student accommodation it may be necessary to build beyond the estimated 5,000
additional bed spaces to provide a full choice of offer to students.

Student Housing Strategy: ‘Living and Learning in Newcastle’:

This Student Housing Strategy has been drawn up in consultation with the Council ,
the Universities and students’ unions that helps to map and deliver student related
work ongoing across the City. The strategy does not introduce any new legal or
planning powers, programs or actions. Instead it draws together our existing
strategies, and initiatives in terms of planning, neighbourhood management, housing
investment and improvement schemes to present them comprehensively in one
document.

The Strategy is structured around five key outcomes that highlight existing policy and
approaches relating to: the provision of additional purpose built student housing,
improving standards in existing student residences, improving community relation, as
well as student safety.


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The five key Outcomes presented in the Strategy are:

            Key Outcome 1: We will seek to ensure that students see the benefit of
             additional purpose-built student bed spaces
            Key Outcome 2:Students living in the private rented sector can expect to
             see improved standards, using an approach combining accreditation,
             enforcement of relevant legislation with information to landlords and
             students
            Key Outcome 3: Students feel safer in their home and community
            Key Outcome 4: Improving relations between students and the rest of the
             community
            Key Outcome 5: Identify and manage the impacts of new student housing
             on the rest of the housing market

In presenting these key outcomes the strategy outlines under each what we know the
issues to be, progress so far, what the Council’s and that of our partners’ next
priorities are, as well as how these will be delivered.
Priorities to be actioned are presented in a detailed Action Plan at the end of the
document.

The Strategy will not remain static. It needs to be capable of incorporating new
evidence and data, and for this reason it will be updated on an annual basis to
include new actions and to delete/amend current actions

Progress will be monitored six monthly and progress reported via the Council’s
Shared Housing Working Group, open to University officers, private sector landlords
and the public, that meets on a regular basis to help shape policy around shared
housing in the City.

An annual statement of progress will be produced and made publicly available via the
Shared Housing Working group.




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1 About this Strategy
1.1 Introduction
The student housing strategy will tie together and help deliver work already
undertaken specifically in relation to student housing, namely:

            The work of the Shared Housing Working Group;

            The Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) on Shared Housing;

            The Voluntary Code of Practice on Lettings Boards;

            Interim Planning Guidance (IPG) on Purpose Built Student Housing

            Shared Housing Accreditation;

            Promoting better management of the communities in which students live;

            The Safe Newcastle Students Project that aims to improve safety and
             security measures for the City’s student population; and

            Align work and initiatives already underway or planned by the Universities
             and Students’ Unions.

It will also monitor any impacts that increased purpose built student housing has on
the housing market, i.e. the impact of student migration out of identifiable areas

Jointly, these initiatives, policies and programmes are already addressing and
achieving many key outcomes. This strategy will build on these, as well as identify
any gaps in our thinking in order to introduce new initiatives to ensure a
comprehensive and rounded approach to student housing provision.

The purpose of this Strategy is to:

            communicate a vision for the provision of housing for students coming to
             Newcastle;

            develop a strategic framework for coordinating activities associated with
             student housing;

            accommodate changes in student numbers and the impact this will have
             on the housing market;

            highlight areas of high student housing concentrations and assist with
             creating dialogue between students and long-standing residents;

            assist students to feel safer in their home and neighbourhood;

            achieve a balance in provision for students within neighbourhoods and
             effective management of neighbourhoods containing student populations;

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            maintain a diverse housing offer to attract students to Newcastle; and

            enhance students’ stay so that they will see Newcastle as a long-term
             prospect to set down roots after graduation in order to harness their skills
             and to add to the continuing economic growth of the Cityi.

1.2 Scope of the Strategy
This strategy is limited in its scope and function. The capacity of all stakeholders to
effectively manage students and housing within the neighbourhoods of established
residential communities is affected by national policies and economic trends over
which local authorities, student unions and further and higher education institutions
have little or no controlii. For example, the increase in the number of students is a
result of national policy, beneficial for the UK society and economy and for
individuals, whereas the growth in the private rented sector is a result of the buoyant
housing market conditions which prevailed since early 2000iii. This strategy,
therefore, concentrates on the practical short to medium-term gains that may be
achieved by further and higher education institutions and the City Council, giving
greater priority to implementing innovative practice.

It is the intention that the strategy is focussed on the provision and standards of
student housing and the impacts of the student housing market. For this reason the
strategy will not address issues relating to how the universities market and allocate
housing managed or owned by them, nor will it attempt to address issues relating to
student housing costs.

It should be noted that the aim of this strategy is not to bring about the ‘de-
studentification’iv of areas already experiencing a higher than average concentration
of students. It merely wishes to introduce actions to accommodate a greater choice
of good quality accommodation, improve the management of private rented student
housing that falls below an acceptable standard, as well as enhance the areas where
students currently live.

1.3. A Collaborative Approach
This strategy has been developed in consultation with accommodation officers and
Students’ Union representatives of Newcastle and Northumbria Universities. Key
officers in the Council who are responsible for activities that are associated with, or
have an impact on student housing have also been instrumental in drawing up
actions and key priorities for student housing, the surrounding environment, student
safety and community relations. Additionally a visioning session was held in the Civic
Centre in March 2008 with key officers from the Council, the Universities and Student
Unions to identify current initiatives as well as any overlaps or gaps in the way we
aim to bring about an improvement in student housing and related themes.

The strategy also takes advice from research undertaken by the Department of
Communities and Local Government (DCLG) and published in its September 2008
publication ‘Evidence Gathering – Housing in Multiple Occupation and possible
planning responses’. Recommendations on good practice made within the DCLG
document have been considered and incorporated, as far as possible, into the
attached Action Plan in Section 4.

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The Strategy’s delivery will be overseen by the City Council’s Shared Housing
Working Group that meets on a regular basis to help shape policy around shared
housing in the City.

1.4 Structure of the document
This document is structured as follows:

Section 1        Sets out the background to this strategy and what it does and doesn’t
                 aim to achieve

Section 2        Sets out why students are important to the City and the importance of
                 a balanced student housing market that offers choice

Section 3        Sets out our commitment to dealing with issues associated with
                 providing a good offer to the student housing market and highlighting
                 the 5 Key Outcomes that this strategy is committed to achieving. This
                 section also sets out the next steps for the process, monitoring
                 commitments and governance arrangements
Section 4        Presents the Action Plan

There then follows a series of Appendices that set the context for, support and inform
this strategy document.

1.5 Key Contacts
The following key contacts can provide further information pertinent to this strategy.

       For more information on the IPG on Purpose Built Student Housing contact:
        Emma Warneford.
        emma.warneford@newcastle.gov.uk
       For more information on landlord accreditation contact:
        Claire Mcmullen, Private Rented Project Manager
        claire.mcmullen@newcastle.gov.uk
       For more information on environmental health related issues contact:
        Kim Samuelson, Team Manager Environmental Health.
        kim.samuelson@newcastle.gov.uk
       For more information on community safety contact:
        Joanna Ward, Community Safety Officer.
        joanna.ward@newcastle.gov.uk,
       For more information on licensing on houses in multi-occupancy and
        accreditation contact:
        Kim Samuelson, Team Manger Environmental Health.
        kim.samuelson@newcastle.ov.uk
       For more information on the Night Time Watch Team contact:
        Edwin Foster Team Manager (Environment)
        edwin.foster@newcastle.gov.uk


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2 The City’s Position
2.1 Recognising the Importance of the Student Population
The Universities and College play an important role in the City’s economy and social
vibrancy. It is vitally important that there is a coordinated approach to all activities
associated with student housing to ensure Newcastle remains the City of choice for
many students. This strategy has therefore been developed to help ensure that
student accommodation in Newcastle is developed and managed in a balanced way
and does not create negative impacts for long-standing residents and residential
areas.

2.2 The National, Regional, Sub-regional and Local Context
There are a number of national, regional, sub-regional and local drivers that help to
shape the student housing market. Each must be taken into consideration when
developing a student housing strategy, so that the strategy itself is well informed and
relevant to the City.

National targets to increase the number and proportion of people entering higher and
further education have led to a large-scale expansion in the numbers of students
attending university, and as a consequence, a rise in those seeking student
accommodation.

A full account of these policy drivers can be found in Appendix A.

2.3 Growth in Student Numbers
Newcastle has proved a popular destination for students and as a consequence has
a significant student population, with just over 37,000 full time students in higher
education – which is approximately 13.5% of the City’s population in term time, up
from approximately 9.5% in 2000/01v. Figures provided by the Universities
demonstrate that in 2008/09 there was an additional 12,110 (+48%) full time students
compared with the academic year 2000/01

We have the fourth highest proportion of student households to head of population in
England and the highestvi of all eight English Core Citiesvii. The most recently
available figures for full time students studying in Newcastle are given in Figure1. It is
estimated that 75% of these students live in the city.

A key relation to the expansion in those attending higher education institutions is that
the growth in student numbers has not been met by an adequate increase in the
availability of purpose built student accommodation, with this shortfall partly being
taken up by the private rented sector (PRS) in a few identifiable neighbourhoods in
the City. A comparison with the other English Core Cities shows Newcastle second
only to Nottingham in the proportion of private sector stock occupied by student only
households in the private sector (see Appendix H).

Similarly a key characteristic during this period of growth is the nature of the student
population, which has become more diverse. The Universities recruit from 100
different countries and the proportion of mature students, some with families, has
also increased.
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Figure 1 : Growth in full time student numbers 2000/01 – 2008/09


                    Growth in University full-time student numbers since 2000/01
 40000
 35000                                                                                             Northumbria
 30000                                                                                             Newcastle
 25000                                                                                             Combined

 20000
 15000
 10000
  5000
        0
             01


                       02


                                 03


                                           04


                                                     05


                                                                06


                                                                          07


                                                                                    08


                                                                                              09
           /


                       /


                                /


                                          /


                                                    /


                                                                /


                                                                         /


                                                                                   /


                                                                                             /
        00


                    01


                             02


                                       03


                                                 04


                                                             05


                                                                      06


                                                                                07


                                                                                          08
     20


                  20


                            20


                                      20


                                                20


                                                           20


                                                                     20


                                                                               20


                                                                                         20
[Source: University Accommodation Offices. Updated March 2009]

The student housing market is an important component of the private rented sector
(PRS) in Newcastle. Popular areas include, Sandyford, Jesmond, Heaton, and parts
of the West End. A survey of private sector landlords carried out on behalf of Bridging
NewcastleGateshead (our Housing Market Renewal Pathfinder) found that 41% of
respondents in the Newcastle area catered primarily for studentsviii.

2.4 The positives and negatives of a Large Student Population
Having a large student population brings with it mixed fortunes:

On one hand, there are huge benefits for the city:

           They help raise Newcastle’s profile at home and abroad
           They create a pool of skilled local labour
           They bring a joint budget and the combined spending power of over 37,000
            people into the local economy
           They attract more jobs to help service the needs of the increased student
            population
           They have gained distinction in research and teaching excellence
           They build strong international, community and industry links
           They attract students from across the world, increasing the diversity of the
            student population and the cultural mix of the city
           They help, by attracting a wide range and large number of people, to make the
            city centre a vibrant and culturally dynamic place, and stimulate the retail,
            social and leisure sectors.

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       They contribute to a wide selection of voluntary and community activities and
        often enable local services to be enhanced.
       A large student population can help to maintain the sustainability of
        neighbourhoods and local amenities which would otherwise struggle for
        survival.
       The demand for student accommodation can help regenerate declining and
        ex-industrial areas
On the other hand, there could be some negative impacts:

       The student population has risen by nearly 50% in Newcastle over the last
        decade, a significant percentage of which require accommodation to be nearer
        their place of study.
       This has meant an increasing number of students have sought
        accommodation in the private rented sector.
       Landlords have responded by converting high numbers of conventional family
        houses and upper Tyneside flats into multi-occupancy rented accommodation
        within existing residential neighbourhoods.
       This has led to a significant increase in property values and an acceleration in
        the movement of families and other non-student households out of some
        areas. With this comes an impact on local and often long-standing
        communities
       Over-concentration of students creates an age profile imbalance in some local
        neighbourhoods, with a high occupation by students in some streets – a
        transition sometimes described as ‘over studentification.’
       Fluctuating (seasonal) demand for private rented housing often creating a
        feeling of abandonment during non-term time
       A negative impact on the environment, e.g. parking congestions and an
        increase in litter and general untidiness of gardens etc.
While the benefits should not be forgotten it is dealing with the disadvantages that
must be a priority.

It is clear from this listing that many of the disadvantages are the product of wider
forces and not within the legal powers of higher and further education institutions and
local authorities to address directly or alone. Many of these disadvantages are not
confined solely to students as a group – they could equally apply to concentrations of
young people, or to tenants, generally. However, as this strategy will show, there are
actions that educational institutions and local authorities can take to help prevent or
ameliorate problems.

Many of the listed disadvantages are linked and it is often their combined impact
which can cause concern and resentment in local communities. Whereas certain
problems can be tackled individually, this strategy also suggests ways partners can
take a more comprehensive approach.



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2.5 Key Findings
In conclusion we can surmise that:

       National targets since 2000 to increase the number of people entering higher
        and further education has led to a large-scale expansion in the number of full-
        time students seeking accommodation in Newcastle.
       Newcastle has proved a popular destination for students and as a
        consequence has a significant student population, with just over 37,000 full
        time students in higher education – which equates to approximately 13.6% of
        the City’s population in term time, up from approximately 9.5% in 2000/01.

       In addition to having excellent reputations at a national and international level
        Newcastle’s higher and further education institutions make a valuable
        contribution to the City’s, as well as the region’s, economy, social vibrancy and
        cultural diversity. Their presence helps support job creation and local services,
        and is valuable in helping to regenerate the housing market in some areas.
       A comparison with Council Tax data and the stock profiles of the other English
        Core Cities shows that in Newcastle, 7.3% of the private sector housing stock
        is occupied by student only households, this is second only to Nottingham.
       Consultation has highlighted concerns in relation to the impact of students
        living in shared houses amongst existing communities and the impact of
        growth and encroachment of those student dominated properties have on the
        environment and local economy.
       If there is a ‘tipping point’ (that is a point at which a neighbourhood becomes
        adversely affected by there being too many student households within it) it is
        very likely to be different in different neighbourhoods, and will be dependent
        on the house type and make up of other residents in the neighbourhood
       More support is needed to students living in our communities. Residents,
        students and stakeholders alike, including elected members, also expressed
        concern about the absence of anyone supporting students in the community
        and a general lack of coordination in addressing student issues.
       “Studentification” is also considered an issue in some other towns and cities,
        but initiatives to address it are in their early stages.
       Student numbers in Newcastle are forecast to grow at significantly slower
        rates than in recent years, and growth is forecast to be mainly made up of
        overseas students.
       Many students have pre-conceived ideas of where they want to live and a
        strong preference for living in certain parts of Newcastle.
Taking these issues into account the following sections of the report set out how we
intend to work together to ensure that students coming to Newcastle have access to
safe, well managed and decent accommodation, while at the same time achieving a
balance between the needs and welfare of both students and residents of
established communities.



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3     Our Commitment

3.1 Our Intentions for the Student Housing Strategy
By 2011 there will be a range of housing choices that will be attractive to students to
encourage them to study and as well as encourage them to stay in Newcastle

The accommodation offered to students in Newcastle will have kept pace with the
growth plans of the City’s higher education and further education institutions

Student housing will be part of safe and sustainable communities throughout the City

Management and standards of the stock in the private rented sector will have
improved

3.2 Key Outcomes
The following 5 Key Outcomes are the desired themed outputs this strategy hopes to
achieve over its lifetime. In order to articulate our commitment we have for each of
the 5 Key Outcomes set out our: {a} Background Knowledge; {b} the key issues to be
addressed; {c} the progress made to date; {d} the next steps to be taken; {e} the
delivery arrangements; {f} monitoring arrangements; and finally, {g} a link to the
relevant actions (SH1 to SH23) in the Action Plan set out in Section 4 of this report.

These 5 key outcomes are:

Key Outcome 1
Students see the benefit of additional purpose-built student bed spaces

Key Outcome 2
Students living in the private rented sector see improved standards

Key Outcome 3
Students feel safe in their homes and their community

Key Outcome 4
Improved relations between students and the communities in which they live

Key Outcome 5
Identify and manage the impacts of new student housing on the rest of the housing
market

It is recognised that each of the agencies involved, both internal and external to the
Council, has a role to play in delivering on these expected key outcomes.




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Key Outcome 1

We will seek to ensure that students see the benefit of additional purpose-built
student bed spaces

a} Background
       The growth in student numbers in recent years has resulted in a
        corresponding increase in the demand for accommodation, with much of the
        shortfall in provision having been met by the private rented sector.
       From 2001 to 2009 there has been an additional +3,223 (+121%) increase in
        private sector properties (minus halls of residences) catering for student only
        households.
       Not only is there a quantitative shortfall in suitable student accommodation but
        the nature of demand has also changed. There is a need to increase the
        provision and mix of good quality purpose built accommodation with amenities
        to meet student needs and aspirations for good quality modern facilities, such
        as en-suite rooms and internet packages.
       The provision of purpose built student accommodation has fallen behind
        demand, with projections made in Interim Planning Guidance on Purpose Built
        Student Housing for up to an additional 5000 student bed spaces to keep pace
        with the historic growth in student numbers as well as accommodation
        replacement programmes

b} Key issues to be addressed:
       In order to facilitate the building of purpose built student accommodation there
        needs to be a coordinated approach to identifying appropriate sites so that the
        development of student accommodation does not lose out to other
        development priorities. For this reason it is important that the Council’s
        Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) takes account of
        additional purpose built student housing requirement when determining the
        availability of sites.
       The potential impact a large volume of new purpose built student
        accommodation must be monitored (see also Key Outcome 5) so that new
        provision does not create over concentrations of voids in the private rented
        sector as well as to ensure new provision does not become under-occupied
       Ensure large university owned or managed purpose built student
        accommodation complies with the Universities UK (UUK) Code of Practice for
        University Managed Student Accommodationix www.UUKCode
       Encourage providers of large purpose built student accommodation to follow
        the ANUK code of standards. www.anuk.org.ukx

c} Progress to date:
       Interim Planning Guidance (IPG) on Purpose Built Student Housing was
        adopted by the Council in November 2007 that identifies potential sites across
        the city that can accommodate purpose built student housing and ranks these
        in terms of suitability.
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       The aim of this Interim Planning Guidance (IPG) is to promote and enable the
        development of a range of purpose built student housing schemes in suitable
        and sustainable locations. In achieving the aim the objectives are:
             o To develop a robust basis upon which to progress, monitor and
               manage the delivery of purpose built student housing
             o To inform development of policies in the council’s Local Development
               Framework (the Council’s main planning document that spells out
               development priorities in the City)
             o Provide a range and choice of sites which are suitable and available for
               student housing in order to support the growth of the city’s universities;
               and
             o To underpin the process of planning for student housing to help deliver
               the Government’s objective of ensuring everyone has the opportunity of
               a decent home
             o Since the adoption of the IPG 694 bed spaces have been completed
               with a further 1,000 under construction. On top of this, 3,932 additional
               bed spaces have also received planning consent (as of Sept 2009).

d} What are our next priorities:
       To continue to promote and consider proposals for student bedspaces in
        suitable and sustainable locations
       The medium term priority is to ensure that sites that are included within the
        ongoing work of compiling a Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessmentxi
        (SHLAA) take account of the work of the Interim Planning Guidance (IPG) on
        Purpose Student Housing.
       Any potential sites that become available (wind fall sites) are assessed on
        their merits and ability to contribute meeting student housing needs and
        requirements.

e} Delivery:
       Purpose built accommodation will be delivered by the Universities or private
        developers.

f} Monitoring:
       Success will be measured not only on the number of purpose built student bed
        spaces that are delivered, the quality and range of accommodation on offer.
        The uptake of bed spaces will be closely monitored.
       g} Action Plan Link:
       SH1 – SH2
        (see Section 4 of this report)




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Key Outcome 2

Students living in the private rented sector can expect to see improved
standards using an approach combining accreditation, enforcement of relevant
legislation with information to students and landlords

a} Background
       The Housing Act 2004 came into force in April 2006. The act introduced the
        Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS), a new method for
        assessing the standard of all housing (whatever the occupation type). The act
        also brought in a new definition of a House in Multiple Occupation (HMO) and
        introduced licensing of certain HMOs.
       Before licensing was introduced Council Tax records showed there were
        approximately 5,000 student exemptions, the majority of which would fall
        within the new definition of a HMO. These, however, were not all licensable
        HMOs – with varying types of occupation (student, professionals, hostel type
        etc) the majority house students either exclusively or sharing with non-
        students.
       Accreditation is a valuable method of improving standards of non-licensable
        HMOs and other private rented sector housing and is fully promoted in
        Newcastle.

b} Key issues to be addressed:
       It is several years since the last private sector stock condition survey (2003),
        therefore, a new stock condition assessment is required to update our
        evidence base relating to the current standards of private sector housing in the
        city.
       Standards of licensed HMOs will be assessed during compliance visits (these
        are required in the Housing Act within the 5 years from the date of
        application).
       We will pursue the implementation of Management Orders to safeguard the
        safety of tenants.
       The continued promotion of the accreditation scheme, one strand of which
        deals with shared housing and the other for single household family
        accommodation, to help boost management and physical standards in the
        private rented sector

c} Progress to date:
       Over 1500 HMO licence applications received, and of that figure, over 93%
        have been granted licences up to March 2009, therefore meeting the target
        set within the Housing Strategy 2006.
       Between April 2008 and March 2009, 9 landlords have had legal action taken
        against them for failing to apply for a HMO license, 5 of which were for student
        properties. Similarly, 760 complaints have been received pertaining to HMO or
        shared housing. These are varied, relating to complaints from tenants, queries

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        about standards of property, complaints from neighbours about the external
        appearance of a property etc.
       We will seek to encourage improvements in standards. This will be achieved
        by the active promotion of the accreditation scheme and requirements for
        licensable and non-licensable HMOs, through the local press and landlords’
        forum and the City Council’s website. To date (March 2009) 64 shared
        houses have been accredited
       The introduction in April 2008 of the ‘Good Landlord Code of Practice For
        Private Rented Sector Management’ will encourage the best possible
        standards of property management amongst private landlords, letting agents
        and managers of private rented property.
       We have looked at our coding of complaints so that we can differentiate
        between HMO and non-HMO complaints and target action accordingly.
       A number of training and information sessions for private sector landlords
        have been staged to help raise awareness of best practice in management
        and property standards. We will continue to liaise with landlords to ensure
        that good practice is disseminated.

d} Next Steps
We will:-

       Continue to identify non-compliant private sector landlords who have yet to
        comply with legislation under the Housing Act 2004 (housing health and safety
        rating system, licensing of houses in multiple occupation and the Management
        of HMO Regulations 2006).
       Enforce the licence condition which requires a landlord to undertake a training
        programme to improve management skills.
       Carry out an annual satisfaction survey of tenants to determine whether there
        are perceived benefits from living in accredited property.
       Continue to promote accreditation to increase the supply of accredited shared
        and family accommodation.
       Further improve management standards in the private rented sector through
        the introduction of the Voluntary Management Code of Practice that will
        compliment the Accreditation Scheme to further improve management
        standards
       A new assessment of private sector stock condition will be undertaken to
        provide up to date evidence of the condition of the private sector and where
        resources may need to be targeted to help improve standards.
       Continue to lobby central Government to introduce changes to Use Classes
        Orders to make it a requirement for landlords to apply for planning permission
        to change a residential family property to a house of multi-occupancy – similar
        to the system introduced in Northern Ireland.
       Assess the case for additional licensing requirements to HMOs in Jesmond
        wards to properties where more than two households share amenities.

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e} Delivery:
       This will be achieved by increased landlord and property accreditation, Good
        Landlord Code of Practice as well as training and information sessions with
        landlords to update their knowledge of good management practices.
       Continuing with regular meetings of the Landlords’ Forum that brings together
        in partnership, private sector landlords, councillors, council officers and
        university representatives to share good practice
       Hold the next Annual Landlords’ Conference in March 2009 to further
        strengthen the message of partnership working as well as to show case
        achievements so far – ACHIEVED
       Provide students with information on the property and management standards
        they can expect and how to complain if standards are not met
       Regular housing information drop in sessions for students run by the
        Universities.
       Dialogue with the Department for Communities and Local Government
        pertaining to changes to Use Classes Orders and Additional Licensing.

f} Monitoring:
       The number of non-decent homes will decrease which will be evidenced
        through future Private Sector Stock Condition assessment
       More landlords enlisting onto the accreditation scheme
       More landlords signing up to the Management Code of Practice
       Reduced complaints from students regarding property and management
        standards
       A change to planning policy to include a requirement to seek planning consent
        to convert residential family housing into multi-occupancy housing.

g} Action Plan Link:
       SH3 – SH7
        (see Section 4 of this report)




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Key Outcome 3

Students feel safer in their home and community

a} What do we know:
       Student households are often targeted by burglars due to the higher number
        of desirable items such as laptops, music equipment etc. and a general lack of
        security surrounding properties. A 2008 Good University Guide by the Home
        Office ranked Newcastle as the 9th least safe city for students out of a possible
        20.xii
       In 2007/8 65% of all student burglaries occurred in Jesmond and Heaton. This
        percentage is a reduction from 2004 when this figure stood at 79%. In contrast
        in 2007/08, 18% of burglaries occurred in Benwell, Elswick and Arthurs Hill.
       In addition cars and bicycles are also targeted in areas associated with a large
        student population
       Although relatively low levels of violent crime and crimes against the person
        are committed against students, or any other individual in the areas
        associated with a large student population, community tensions between
        students and landlords who let to students can often run high.

b} Key issues to be addressed:
       Poor physical security standards in privately rented properties usually
        tenanted by students
       Properties tenanted by students often stand out from those with a permanent
        resident, often making them more susceptible targets. This also causes
        tensions within the community between students, landlords and the permanent
        residents of the community
       Low understanding of home security within the student community, in addition
        to a certain level of ambivalence where home security is a low priority for
        individuals
       Recent research titled ‘Designing Out Crime’ (May 2008), by Safe Newcastle
        (the statutory Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership) with prolific burglars
        residing in HMP Durham confirmed that student properties are targeted due to
        the amount of removable and desirable items and the ease at which they can
        overcome window and door locks.
       Reduce the number and length of time lettings board can be displayed. This
        will help minimise the identification of student residences and the chances of
        being burgled.

c} Progress to date:
       Between 2004 and up to March 2008 Safe Newcastle (the statutory Crime and
        Disorder Reduction Partnership) has secured £444,000 to fund community
        safety initiatives. This funding has provided:-
             o The Student Liaison Officer post up to September 2008

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             o A dedicated web site providing advice and contact information under
               the brand name of www.knowurstuff.co.uk covering ASB, burglary and
               personal safety
             o Information to new students before they arrive in the City
             o Targeted burglary reduction campaigns at key times of the year
             o A graded response to student anti social behaviour that incorporates
               co-ordinated actions from the police, the local authority, student unions
               and the universities.
             o Marketing and communication campaigns to student communities at
               key times of the year.
             o Work with landlords to improve security standards via a dedicated
               Environmental Health Officer using the Housing Health Safety Rating
               System (HHSRS)xiii.
             o Development of an intelligent intruder alarm system that has been
               installed to the most victimised student properties in Heaton (none of
               these properties have been subsequently burgled).
       There has been merit in the work of the Students Project, a project to target
        reducing burglaries and ASB in student areas. According to student burglary
        data spanning the last three years:-
             o There has been a marked decrease in the number of student burglaries
               which have occurred in Newcastle
             o A 46% decrease in the number of student burglaries over the previous
               twelve months when compared to the period prior to the appointment of
               a Student Liaison Officer based in Marker Street Police Station
               (appointed November 2005)
             o The number of ASB incidents which have been reported to the police
               has decreased by 19% over the last three years
             o The number of properties which suffer from repeat victimisation has
               reduced significantly
             o Fewer properties are identified as having suffered from 3 or more
               burglaries in a three year period
             o The frequency to which certain properties or streets have been targeted
               has reduced substantially – previously as many as 10-17 burglaries
               could happen in certain ‘hotspot’ streets within a 12 month period.
               However, more recent figures have shown that as many as 6 crimes
               are concentrated in a particular street which shows a reduction;
             o The targeted work that was undertaken in Jesmond area around
               Queens Terrace has been successful in reducing the number of
               burglaries which have occurred;
             o The have been no attempted or successful burglaries in the properties
               which have had an approved alarm installed (Source: Community
               Safety Unit, Newcastle CC). See Appendix F for ASB incidences by
               Ward in 2008.

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       Further funding of £90k was secured for the Student Liaison Officer post in
        January 2009 to continue with this post for the next two years.
       Adoption of the Voluntary Code of Practice on Lettings Boards in August 2008,
        with the first two monitoring surveys undertaken in February and July 2009.
        From this active dialogue has been set up with landlords and lettings agents
        around shaping a workable voluntary code for the management of lettings
        boards.
       Regular events held at both Universities and attended by the Student Liaison
        Officer to help raise awareness of issues of community safety, property
        standards, tenants’ rights etc.
       Joint funding between the Police, the Ward Committees of North & South
        Jesmond and the Universities titled Operation Oak to increase police patrols
        from the hours of 10pm to 4am on Monday, Friday and Saturday nights during
        term time in areas of high student concentrations, namely, North and South
        Jesmondxiv. This was reviewed in June 09 via a residents’ survey and found to
        be an overwhelming success. On the back of this success further funding has
        been obtained for the 09/10 academic year.
       A crime and community safety DVD has been produced by a group of
        students from Newcastle College to deliver a clear message to students. The
        DVD contains real life scenarios of crimes such as bicycle theft, laptop theft
        and burglary which particularly affect students. The idea came from the
        Jesmond Safe Neighbourhoods Action Problem Solving group (SNAPS) to
        help tackle crime and community issues affecting students living in the area.
        The DVD is planned to be shown at student venues in the Jesmond area and
        at fresher’s fairs.
       Various environmental initiatives such as garden tidy project and litter
        reminder letters to encourage better external maintenance of gardens and
        yards to prevent student residences standing out from surrounding properties.
       Focus on student safety and student burglary at regular special ‘Safe
        Newcastle Action Planning’ (SNAPs) meetings attended by students,
        landlords, ward councillors, and university and council officers, resulting in
        targeted work to raise awareness as well as to add SmartWater to property
        etc.
       Good Neighbour leaflet sent to each and every student residence by both
        Universities to help raise awareness of what it means to be a good neighbour
       Training by the Safe Newcastle Team to university and student union officers
        on crime prevention.
       Crime prevention surveys carried out with advice given to landlords and
        students on how to improve their properties and to raise awareness of security
        issues
       Continuous updates and joint working with local resident groups in student
        areas to foster better community relations between students and permanent
        residents
       Regular attendance by student union representatives, Safe Newcastle Officer
        at ward committees across the City giving updates and receiving local
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        information on the issues around student accommodation, student behaviour
        and issues with landlords and agents.
       Introduction of basic security measures into the Accreditation Scheme and
        Licence conditions.
       Continued enforcement of the Housing Act 2004 to deal with the hazard ‘entry
        by intruders’ when carrying out targeted compliance inspections of licensed
        HMOs.

d} Next Steps

    City Council:
       Develop a range of affordable domestic security systems that are appropriate
        to student houses which are accredited to a security industries standard and
        can be leased by landlords, thereby providing a tax incentive to them.
       In conjunction with the students’ unions continue to implement crime
        prevention and improved security campaign and work closely with the Police
        on issues of crime
       Extend the voluntary Lettings Board Code (Board Code) for another year and
        undertake further surveys in January and July 2010

    Universities:
       Attendance at meetings on and off campus which provide a forum where
        community concerns can be identified and pursued
       Work proactively with the City Council and Students Union to promote crime
        prevention and improved security campaign.

    Students’ Union:
       Work with the City Council to implement a Crime Prevention Campaign, and
        work closely with the Police on issues of crime
       Continue to raise awareness among students of their rights and
        responsibilities as a private sector tenant

e} Delivery:
       Achieving actions within this Key Outcome will rely upon the initiatives
        highlighted in the attached Action Plan.

f} Monitoring Targets:
       Reduction in the number of student properties being burgled
       An increase in awareness among students as to their rights as private sector
        tenants

g} Action Plan Link:
       SH8 – SH11
        (see Section 4 of this report)

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Key Outcome 4

Improving relations between students and the rest of the community

a} Background
       Over the last 10 years there has been a successive rise in incidents of noise
        nuisance complaints. In response to this rising tide of all complaints a
        proactive approach for dealing with noise problems has been developed. (See
        Appendix G for incidences of noise related complaints across wards.). It
        should be noted that areas suffering the highest incidence noise related
        complaints do not similarly suffer from the highest incidences of recorded anti-
        social, which includes noise (see Appendix F).
       A range of legislative tools have been given to local authorities by Central
        Government to deal with antisocial behaviour. Newcastle City Council has
        used the flexibilities of the new legislation to enforce the provisions of the
        Noise Act 1996 to issue fixed penalties for the ‘Night time Noise’ offences
        which are very effective in dealing with one off instances of noise such as
        parties. Newcastle City Council’s Night Watch Service provides a quick instant
        intervention to noise and has been facilitated by the provision of officers
        working 7 nights a week from 8pm until 4am.
       On a national scale Newcastle City Council issues over 60 % of all the Noise
        Act fixed penalty notices for night time noise.

b} Key issues to be addressed:
       More understanding and linkages needed between students and permanent
        residents
       The wider problems of anti-social behaviour, noise nuisance and
        environmental blight, with the minority caused by students, needs to be
        addressed and the recent rise in incidences reversed.

c} Progress to date:
       The ‘Silent Students Happy Homes’ (SSHH) initiative run by both student
        unions to encourage students to make their way home late at night in a
        manner that does not cause late night noise and disturbance to other
        residents.
       Wall planners displaying key crime and community safety and environmental
        information will be installed in student properties prior to their return for the
        09/10 academic year. This project is being piloted by the North and South
        Jesmond, Ouseburn and South Heaton SNAPS groups in partnership with
        Safe Newcastle. Streets have been identified for the planners to be distributed
        to in the four wards based on police crime statistics in those areas.
       The adoption of a Community Strategy by Northumbria University and the
        appointment of Community Representatives to assist with relations between
        students and long- standing residents.
       Northumbria Student Community Action, a student led volunteering network
        with funding through Time Bankxv has made positive contributions to the
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        community. Examples of community projects include, painting the underpass
        in Exhibition Park and tree planting in Brandling Park.
       The adoption by Newcastle University of a five year Community Strategy that
        sets a vision of Community and Engagement. Within it are six core themes
        that have been identified as areas that effect students and in which students
        and our Union have an impact on the local community and critical areas.
       Newcastle University’s ‘Student Community Action Network’ (SCAN)
        undertakes a range of volunteering with over 1500 students taking part.
        Activities include: tree planting, building a boardwalk, bridge, and other access
        projects and developing children's activity packs and information boards
        around a nature trail; working with children, providing a creative arts after
        school facility; and entertaining children living at a women's refugeand working
        with community groups.
       Working with other partners to resolve noise issues is key and a dedicated
        Environmental Health Officer has been employed to improve liaison with
        agencies such as the University Accommodation Offices and Safe Newcastle
        to foster early intervention in student noise nuisance/antisocial behaviour
        cases.
       Northumbria SUBus, a bus service contracted by the Students’ Union which
        operate on a Saturday night to ensure students get home directly and safely at
        a minimum cost.
       Newcastle University Night Bus Service which runs Monday to Thursday 7pm
        to 11.30pm and up to 2am on Friday, again to ensure students get home
        directly and safely.
       Safe Newcastle have through a mixture of programmes including innovative
        web based campaigns giving students practical advice on to how to have a
        party without annoying neighbours and also used games, campaigns and
        competitions to promote the message throughout the academic year.
       Incorporating into the licence conditions requirements for landlords to deal
        with the anti-social behaviour of their tenants based on an agreed policy.

d} Next Steps

    Students’ Union:
       Continue to promote the SSHH campaign
       Organise voluntary neighbourhood ‘spring cleans’ in conjunction with the local
        communities
       Northumbria University Community Representatives to attend regularly Ward
        Committee meetings and residents meetings to foster better community
        relations and to feed into the SNAPS meetings on student related crime and
        anti-social behaviour.

    City Council:
       To respond to all complaints and requests for service in a timely manner.
       Maintain a seven night per week night time noise service
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       To continue to make a significant impact on anti-social behaviour through the
        continued funding of a dedicated member of the team working in close
        partnership with other stakeholders including the Police, Universities and Your
        Homes Newcastle (YHN).

    Universities:
       To promote good social behaviour within the University’s student population,
        within and outside the University, in conjunction with recognised student
        representative bodies and other agencies
       To ensure that the University’s regulatory framework for student discipline and
        behaviour is regularly updated and relevant
       Take appropriate action against any enrolled student of the University whose
        proven behaviour contravenes the University’s own Codes of Discipline and
        behaviour.
       To respond to legitimate complaints, concerns and allegations within and
        outside the University in relation to student behaviour in a timely, fair and
         proper manner, in accordance with best practice

e} Delivery:
       Achieving actions within this Key Outcome will rely upon the initiatives
        highlighted in the Action Plan under agreed actions. Generally this will develop
        and promote positive community relations whilst reminding students of the
        need to show respect and consideration to other members of their
        neighbourhoods
       It is recognised that each of the agencies involved has a part to play in
        delivering these aims. For this reason delivery of Outcome 4 will draw upon
        the strength of systems and initiatives already in place to help foster better
        relations between students and long-standing established communities.
       The governance arrangements set out later in this Section of the report will
        monitor and challenge targets and initiatives to ensure they remain ‘fit-for-
        purpose’.

f} Monitoring Targets:
       A reduction in the % of anti-social behaviour and nuisance cases attributed to
        students
       Increased awareness of new arrangements regarding provision of a 7 nights
        per week night time noise service
       90% of requests for night time noise team responding within 2 hours between
        the hours of 10pm and 2am
       An increase in student representatives attending ward committees and
        neighbourhood meetings

g} Action Plan Link:
       SH12 –SH14
        (see Section 4 of this report)
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Key Outcome 5

Identify and manage the impacts of student housing on the rest of the housing
market

a} Background
       The expansion of higher education has had the effect of increasing
        concentrations of students in residential areas in many university towns and
        cities. This phenomenon, sometimes called ‘studentification’, has, in many
        places, led to profound cultural, social, physical and economic
        transformations.
       It is recognised that the right balance and number of students in an area bring
        with them major economic and social benefits, and by diversifying the areas
        that students are located will both ease pressures on the communities and
        spread the benefit of the ‘student pound’ to other areas while providing
        students with a better mix and choice of housing options.
       The term ‘studentification’ was established by Smith (2002) to describe the
        growth of high concentrations of students within the localities of higher
        education institutions (HEIs), often accommodated within houses of multiple
        occupancy (HMOs). There are four dimensions to the process with the social
        tier being the primary factor:
             o Social: the replacement and/or displacement of established residents
               with a transient, generally young and single, social grouping
             o Cultural: the growth of concentrations of young people with shared
               cultures and lifestyles, and consumption practices, which in turn results
               in the increase of certain types of retail and service infrastructure
             o Physical: the downgrading or upgrading of the physical environment,
               depending on the local context;
             o Economic: the inflation of property prices and a change in the balance
               of the housing stock resulting in neighbourhoods becoming dominated
               by private rented accommodation and houses in multiple occupation,
               and decreasing levels of owner-occupationxvi.
       Over many years students have tended to be concentrated in the areas of: the
        Inner West, Jesmond, Heaton & Sandyford where older terraced houses and
        Tyneside flats make up the majority of the housing stock.
       The council recognises and understands the local concerns over the impact of
        high concentrations of shared housing in some parts of Newcastle and sought
        to reduce the risk that some areas may not be able to sustain mixed and
        balanced communities in the future.
       A large number of lettings boards left up for a significant length of time even
        when let can have a negative impact on the visual aesthetics of
        neighbourhoods.




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b} Key issues to be addressed:
       The impact of a large purpose built student housing programme on the private
        sector housing market needs to be monitored and planned for. Possible
        consequences could be a change to the demand for private rented sector
        accommodation. If demand were to reduce as a result of increased choice
        provided by the development of purpose built accommodation or other
        changes to the housing market, there are possibilities for positive outcomes.
        For example properties could become available which may be suitable for
        conversion back to family accommodation therefore allowing others in housing
        need access to the stock. However, there could also be a need for targeted
        intervention to influence the future use of such properties.
       Achieving a consensual view of the issues and a common vision requires
        transparency between the stakeholder organisations, namely, HEIs, local
        authorities, community groups, students’ unions, and private rented sector.
       Creating a more diversified student housing market is a long-term aim which
        could be achieved by providing more choice, including purpose built
        accommodation.
       Obtain agreement from landlords and letting agents to reduce the number and
        length of time lettings board can be displayed. This will help minimise the
        negative impact that these can have on a neighbourhood.
       If voluntary letting board arrangements are not adhered to then the Council will
        explore the option to apply for a Direction under planning legislation.
       Address the environmental impact of fly tipping in back lanes of unwanted
        items, especially at the end of the academic year.
       Reduce car parking congestion caused by houses of multiple occupancy.

c} Progress to date:

    Existing housing provision:
       A Supplementary Planning Document on Shared Housing (SPD) was
        approved at the Council’s Planning and Transport Strategy Committee in
        February 2008. This SPD aims to restrain the growth of shared housing in
        specific localities to maintain sustainable communities.
       The SPD states that in a defined Area of Housing Mix (AHM) there will be
        restrictions on conversions to existing properties. The AHM as a whole has
        five sub areas. These five sub-areas are:
             o Spital Tongues,
             o three in East Gosforth, and
             o a larger one taking in parts of Jesmond, Shieldfield, Sandyford and
               Heaton.
       In the AHM planning permission will not be given for the creation of bedrooms
        in the loft space of upper Tyneside flats. In addition it would be more difficult to
        obtain planning permission to convert what had been family houses into
        houses in multiple occupation.

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       Adoption by the Council in August 2008 of a Voluntary Code of Practice on
        Lettings Boards as a guideline to work with landlords and lettings agents to
        reduce the proliferation of lettings boards and the length of time on show.
       The adoption of a parking permit scheme in April 2009 to limit parking
        congestion caused by houses of multi-occupancy.

    New purpose built housing provision:
       The production of an Interim Planning Guidance on Purpose Built Student
        Housing has been adopted by the Council after consultation with the
        universities that identifies potential sites across the city that can accommodate
        purpose built student housing and ranks these in terms of suitability (see also
        key outcome 1).
       The delivery of just over 1,260 purpose built units (as of March 2009) since the
        adoption of the IPG, with a further 4,136 plus with planning approval.

d} Next Steps
       Monitor the student housing market and any potential impacts on the wider
        housing market.

e} Delivery:

    Existing housing provision:
       Identification of any shift in housing preferences of students
       Assess the trends in empty property data

    New purpose built housing provision:
       Surveying of students taking up new purpose built accommodation including
        any vacancies
       The research will be commissioned through the Shared Housing Working
        group and the standing research coordination group established to review
        research and intelligence gathering and report findings.

f} Monitoring:
       Purpose built student accommodation makes a positive contribution to student
        housing provision in the City
       Existing student provision is well managed with any disruption to the housing
        market minimised.

g} Action Plan Link:
       SH15 – SH21
        (see Section 4 of this report)




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3.3 Delivering the Strategy
In the first instance the Strategy will need to demonstrate what positive differences it
will make to student housing in the City.

The Action Plan that accompanies this strategy sets deliverable actions relevant to
student housing up to 2011. All actions listed in the Action Plan have been
developed, and will be delivered in partnership, with key agents, both internal and
external to the Council.

To demonstrate that the Strategy is making a difference success measures have
been included in the Action Plan. We will:

       Agree with partners key outcomes, milestones and timescales by when
        actions will be delivered
       Set out a regular monitoring process to ensure actions are being delivered,
        and if necessary, review and amend targets
       Share successes with relevant stakeholders, including students and
        communities where students reside.
The Strategy will not remain static. It needs to be capable of incorporating new
evidence and data, and for this reason it will be updated on an annual basis to
include new actions and to delete/amend current actions.

Progress will be monitored six monthly and progress reported via the Shared
Housing Working Group, comprising Council and University officers and open to
private sector landlords and the public, that meets on a regular basis to help shape
policy around shared housing in the City.

An annual statement of progress will be produced and made publicly available via the
Shared Housing Working group.




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         4 Action Plan

Action            Action                   Key                    Output                Responsibility               Timescale               Key Milestones              Resources
 Plan                                    Outcome
 No.




                                                                                                             08/09


                                                                                                                        09/10


                                                                                                                                 10/11
SH1.      Facilitate the delivery     Key Outcome 1   additional quality purpose        Head of Housing                                  IPG fed into SHLAA –          Staff time
          of up to 5000 purpose                       built student bed spaces          Development and                                  August 2009                   Within existing




                                                                                                                                 10/11
                                                                                                             08/09


                                                                                                                        09/10
          built student bed                           available in the City             Partnership                                      Additional sites assessed     resources
          spaces                                                                        Management                                       for suitability for student
                                                                                                                                         housing - Ongoing


SH2       Carry out review of         Key Outcome 1   Keep the IPG relevant             Emma Warneford                                   Review requirement of         Within existing
          IPG on Purpose Built                                                          (Planning Officer)                               purpose built students        resources
                                                                                                                                         bed spaces and sites –




                                                                                                                                 10/11
          Student Housing
                                                                                                                                         April 2011
                                                                                                                                         Carry out EINA on IPG
                                                                                                                                         April 2011

SH3       Undertake an annual         Key Outcome 2   To ensure tenants of              Claire McMullen                                  Share findings with           Within existing
          satisfaction survey of a                    accredited properties have a      (Private Rented                                  Students’ Unions /            resources
          representative sample                       greater perceived benefit         Project Manager)                                 Universities– Nov 09




                                                                                                             08/09


                                                                                                                        09/10


                                                                                                                                 10/11
          of tenants of                               from those not living in          Kim Samuelson                                    Carry out survey by Nov
          accredited landlords                        accredited properties.            (Team Manager                                    09
                                                                                        Environmental                                    Investigate good practice
                                                                                        Health)                                          – Sept 09

SH4       Introduce & promote         Key Outcome 2   Improved standards in the         Claire McMullen                                  300 landlords signed up –     Within existing
          the Good Landlord                           private rented sector             (Private Rented                                  Sept 09                       resources
          Code of Practice to                                                           Project Manager)                                 Liaise with the national
          further improve                                                                                                                landlords’ association to
          management                                                                                                                     further facilitate
                                                                                                             08/09


                                                                                                                        09/10


                                                                                                                                 10/11
          standards in the                                                                                                               promotion – Sept 09
          private rented sector
                                                                                                                                         Launch code at landlords
                                                                                                                                         forum – April 08 –
                                                                                                                                         Achieved 



SH5       Update evidence base        Key Outcome 2   To provide evidence of the        Colin White                                      Project management            Corporate
          on condition of private                     condition of the private sector   (Private Sector                                  established - April 2010      resource pool
                                                                                                                        09/10


                                                                                                                                 10/11

          sector housing stock                        and to ascertain where            Housing Renewal                                  Evidence updated to help
                                                      resources may need to be          Officer)                                         inform the next housing
                                                      targeted to help improve                                                           strategy - Sept 2010
                                                      standards

SH6       Progress a risk based       Key Outcome 2   Improved standards of             Kim Samuelson                                    Proportion of properties      Within existing
          programme of                                houses of multi-occupancy,        Team Manager                                     to be inspected over          resources
          inspections of licensed                     including student housing         (HMOs & Shared                                   financial year 2009/10 =
                                                                                                             08/09


                                                                                                                        09/10




          HMOs’                                                                         Housing)                                         300:
                                                                                                                                           st        nd
                                                                                                                                         1 Q=75 - 2 Q=75
                                                                                                                                           rd         th
                                                                                                                                         3 Q=75 4 Q=75


SH7       Review and raise the        Key Outcome 2   Improved standards in the         Kim Samuelson                                    Number of properties          Within existing
          standards and                               private rented sector             Team Manager                                     accredited over financial     resources
          effectiveness of                                                              (HMOs & Shared                                   year 2009/10: 1st Q=10,
          student and private                                                           Housing)                                         2nd Q= 20, 3rd Q=30,
          landlord accreditation                                                                                                         4th Q=50
          schemes to ensure
          that the condition and
          management of
          privately rented
          properties meet
          required standards
                                                                                                                        09/10




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 Action              Action              Key Outcome                Output                Responsibility           Timescale                Key Milestones              Resources
Plan No.

SH8         Develop the availability    Key Outcome 3   A reduction in the number of    Joanna Ward                                    Seek research &               £25k – Research
            for lease to landlords a                    student houses burgled          (Community                                     development funding –         & Development
            range of affordable                                                         Safety Officer)                                May 09 - Delayed              Funding
            domestic security                                                                                                          Identify landlords as part    As yet no funding
            system                                                                                                                     of pilot (hot spot burglary   has been
                                                                                                                                       areas) – Jan 09 Achieved      secured for this




                                                                                                           08/09


                                                                                                                      09/10
                                                                                                                                                                    action
                                                                                                                                       Commission domestic
                                                                                                                                       CCTV company – May 09
                                                                                                                                       Install systems – October
                                                                                                                                       -09
                                                                                                                                       Evaluate pilot project –
                                                                                                                                       October 2010
                                                                                                                                                               st
SH9         Secure funding for the      Key Outcome 3   Maintain a link between the     Joanna Ward                                    Funding secured by 31         Area based grant
            post of Student Liaison                     Police, the City Council,       (Community                                     March 09 – Achieved. 
            Officer beyond Sept                         student unions and the          Safety Officer)                                (£90k secured Jan ’09 for




                                                                                                           08/09


                                                                                                                      09/10


                                                                                                                               10/11
            2008                                        Universities pertaining to                                                     post up to 2011)
                                                        community safety and                                                           Recruit to post – June ’09
                                                        nuisance issues, including                                                     Achieved. 
                                                        that of students

SH10        Hold a number of            Key Outcome 3   To help raise awareness of      Joanna Ward                                    Welcome week –                Marketing &
            crime prevention                            security and personal safety    (Community                                     September (All activity for   communication
            sessions in                                 issues                          Safety Officer)                                start of 2009 term            funding
            conjunction with the                                                                                                       planned and resources




                                                                                                                               10/11
                                                                                                           08/09


                                                                                                                      09/10
            Police and Student                                                                                                         secured). 
            Unions                                                                                                                     Returns Faye - Sept
                                                                                                                                       Safe drinking campaign –
                                                                                                                                       Dec / May

SH11        Assess the success of       Key Outcome 3   Maintain extra police patrols   Amy Redpath                                    Undertake review – end        £36k
            Operation Oak with                          in North and South Jesmond      (North & South                                 of June 09. Achieved         Financial
            the view to securing                                                        Jesmond Ward                                   Secure funding for            contributions


                                                                                                                      09/10


                                                                                                                               10/11
            funding beyond June                                                         Coordinator)                                   academic year 09/10 -         from: North &
            09                                                                                                                         Achieved                     South Jesmond
                                                                                                                                       Undertake review – end        wards, the
                                                                                                                                       of June 10                    Universities & the
                                                                                                                                                                     Police
SH12        Students                    Key Outcome 4   Foster good relations           Northumbria                                    Launch Community              Within existing
            representatives to                          between students and the        University                                     Strategy – March 09 –         resources
            become actively                             community                       Students’ Union                                Achieved 
            involved in ward                                                            Welfare and                                    Secure funding for
            meetings (Northumbria                                                       Equality Officer                               support staff post to
            University)                                                                                                                specifically cover
                                                                                                                                       representation – April 09
                                                                                                                                       Achieved 
                                                                                                                                       Recruit 5 Community
                                                                                                                                       reps to work within
                                                                                                           08/09


                                                                                                                      09/10


                                                                                                                               10/11




                                                                                                                                       designated areas of
                                                                                                                                       Newcastle (Jesmond,
                                                                                                                                       Heaton, Ousburn,
                                                                                                                                       Central, Fenham) – Oct
                                                                                                                                       09
                                                                                                                                       Increased attendance by
                                                                                                                                       reps at community
                                                                                                                                       meetings, including
                                                                                                                                       council based meetings
                                                                                                                                       and residents groups –
                                                                                                                                       July 10




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Action            Action                   Key                    Output                Responsibility              Timescale                  Key Milestones              Resources
 Plan                                    Outcome
 No.
SH13      Students                    Key Outcome 4   Foster good relations             Student Support                                     Launch Community             Within existing
          representatives to                          between students and the          Officer Newcastle                                   Strategy – August 09         resources
          become actively                             community                         University Union                                    At least 550 student
          involved in ward                                                              Society                                             volunteers signed up with
          meetings (Newcastle                                                                                                               SCAN – Review date
          University)                                                                                                                       June ‘10
                                                                                                                                            Liaise closely with the
                                                                                                                                            University on incidents of




                                                                                                            08/09


                                                                                                                       09/10


                                                                                                                                10/11
                                                                                                                                            student anti-social
                                                                                                                                            behaviour - ongoing
                                                                                                                                            With the assistance of the
                                                                                                                                            part-time Community
                                                                                                                                            Officer, regularly attend
                                                                                                                                            meetings with the police,
                                                                                                                                            Community Support
                                                                                                                                            Officers and Councillors-
                                                                                                                                            Reviewed June ‘10

SH14      90% of requests for         Key Outcome 4   Protecting the City’s residents   Edwin Foster                                        Increase awareness of        Within existing
          night time noise team                       from exposure to intrusive        Team Manager                                        new arrangements             resources




                                                                                                            08/09
          responding within 2                         noise                             (Environment)                                       regarding provision of 7
          hours between the                                                                                                                 nights per week service –
          hours of 10pm and                                                                                                                 March 2009 - Achieved 
          2am                                                                                                                               (publicised via the BBC)

SH15      Reduce the                  Key Outcome 5   Reduce the negative impact        Dianne Perry                                        Background work on a         Within existing
          proliferation of student                    of lettings boards by reducing    (Planning Policy                                    case for a Direction, in     resources
          letting boards with the                     the number and length of time     Officer)                                            the event that
          introduction of a                           displayed                                                                             Development Control
          Voluntary Code of                                                                                                                 Committee judge it
          compliance to Lettings                                                                                                            necessary (Autumn 2010)
          Boards                                                                                                                            Monthly surveys of
                                                                                                                                            selected streets to
                                                                                                                                            monitor compliance to the
                                                                                                                                            Code for formal
                                                                                                                                            enforcement against
                                                                                                                                            breaches of the Town
                                                                                                                                            and Country Planning
                                                                                                                                            (Control of
                                                                                                                                            Advertisements)
                                                                                                            08/09


                                                                                                                       09/10



                                                                                                                                    10/11


                                                                                                                                            (England) Regulations
                                                                                                                                            2007 (ongoing);
                                                                                                                                            Twice yearly surveys to
                                                                                                                                            allow for possible use in
                                                                                                                                            request to the Secretary
                                                                                                                                            of State for a Direction
                                                                                                                                            (January / July)
                                                                                                                                            -January 09.Achieved 
                                                                                                                                            -July 09.Achieved 
                                                                                                                                            - January 10
                                                                                                                                            - July 10
                                                                                                                                            Industry led voluntary
                                                                                                                                            code ratified by
                                                                                                                                            Development
                                                                                                                                            Management - Oct 09

SH16      Introduce policy on         Key Outcome 5   Limit parking to two cars per                                                         Review success of permit     NLTP Funding
          parking permits to limit                    households in areas of with       Craig Mordue                                        scheme in both areas on      Section 106
          the number of vehicles                      high numbers of HMOs                                                                  number parking               agreements
                                                                                        (Team Manager
          per household in areas                                                                                                            enforcement issues and
          with high                                                                     Parking Services                                    complaints – April 2010
          concentrations of                                                             Infrastructure)
                                                                                                                                            Introduce parking permit
                                                                                                            08/09


                                                                                                                       09/10




          HMOs                                                                                                                              scheme in Jesmond
                                                                                                                                            (Holly Ave/Osbourne
                                                                                                                                            Rd/Jesmond Dene Rd) –
                                                                                                                                            April 09 Achieved 
                                                                                                                                            Introduce parking permit
                                                                                                                                            scheme in Sandyford
                                                                                                                                            (Warwick St area) – April
                                                                                                                                            09. Achieved 




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Action            Action                   Key                    Output               Responsibility               Timescale              Key Milestones              Resources
 Plan                                    Outcome
 No.
SH18      Monitor levels of           Key Outcome 5   To maintain market stability &   Colin White                                      Monitor private sector       Within existing
          private sector vacant                       prevent deterioration within     (Private Sector                                  voids in students areas -    resources
          student properties                          neighbourhoods                   Housing Renewal                                  six monthly - October /
                                                                                       Officer)                                         April




                                                                                                            08/09


                                                                                                                       09/10


                                                                                                                                10/11
                                                                                                                                        Carry out audit of impact
                                                                                                                                        of new purpose built
                                                                                                                                        schemes on the existing
                                                                                                                                        student private rented
                                                                                                                                        housing - Oct / April

SH19      Undertake a sample of       Key Outcome 5   Monitor and measure the          Claire McMullen                                  Annually - Oct               Within existing
          rents in the private                        impacts of purpose built         (Private Rented                                                               resources
          rented sector to                            student housing the private      Project Manager)




                                                                                                            08/09


                                                                                                                       09/10


                                                                                                                                10/11
          consider if there are                       rented student housing
          any impacts pertaining                      market
          to purpose built
          accommodation

SH20      Introduce a                 Key Outcome 5   Limit the number of              Dianne Perry,                                    Review use of SPD &          Within existing
          Supplementary                               conversion of upper Tyneside     (Planning Policy                                 relevance to                 resources
          Planning Document                           Flats in areas of the City       Officer)                                         neighbourhoods as part
          (SPD) on Shared                             experiencing a high volume of                                                     of AMR – December
          Housing                                     student lets.                                                                     2009
                                                                                                                                        Monitor number of




                                                                                                            08/09


                                                                                                                       09/10


                                                                                                                                10/11
                                                                                                                                        planning applications /
                                                                                                                                        permissions for
                                                                                                                                        conversions in AHM of
                                                                                                                                        upper Tyneside flats –
                                                                                                                                        July 2009 & then annually
                                                                                                                                        Achieved for 09
                                                                                                                                        Adopt SPD February
                                                                                                                                        2008 – Achieved 

SH21      Bring about initiatives     Key Outcome 5   Lessen the likelihood of fly-    Jan Shimmin                                      Pilot a permit scheme for    Within existing
          to facilitate the                           tipping in back lanes            (Community                                       landlords to dispose of      resources
          removal of unwanted                                                          Engagement                                       unwanted items from
          items and rubbish from                                                       Officer)                                         students accommodation
          student properties at                                                                                                         at Byker Civic Amenity
          the end of each                                                                                                               Site without charge – July
                                                                                                            08/09


                                                                                                                       09/10


                                                                                                                                10/11

          academic year.                                                                                                                09 Achieved 
                                                                                                                                        Implement programme of
                                                                                                                                        engagement with
                                                                                                                                        students and landlords to
                                                                                                                                        raise awareness of waste
                                                                                                                                        management issues and
                                                                                                                                        responsibilities – Sept 09
                                                                                                                                        and May 10

SH22      Carry out an annual         Key Outcomes    Keep the Strategy relevant       Emma Warneford                                   Review the number of         Within existing
          review and update of        1 to 5                                           (Planning Officer)                               purpose built bed spaces     resources
          the requirement for                                                                                                           provided over the year –
                                                                                                            08/09


                                                                                                                       09/10


                                                                                                                                10/11




          additional purpose                                                                                                            April 09 & then annually
          built bed spaces                                                                                                              Update student intake
                                                                                                                                        figures based on HEFCE
                                                                                                                                        data– March 09 Achieved
                                                                                                                                        
SH23      Carry out an annual         Key Outcomes    Keep the Strategy relevant                                                        Review delivery of action    Within existing
                                                                                                            08/09


                                                                                                                       09/10


                                                                                                                                10/11




          review and update of        1 to 5                                           Mark Ellis                                       plan and amend               resources
          the Action Plan                                                              (Housing Policy &                                accordingly – July 09
                                                                                       Strategy Officer)




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                                                       Appendices




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Glossary of Terms

   AAP               Area Action Plan

   AHM               Area of Housing Mix

   BNG               Bridging Newcastle/Gateshead – the housing market renewal
                     pathfinder

   DCLG              Department of Communities and Local Government

   SPD               Supplementary Planning Document

   LDF               Local Development Framework

   HA 2004           Housing Act 2004 which introduced such measures as, regulating
                     houses in multiple occupation & the implementation of the housing
                     health and safety rating system, selective licensing etc.

   HEIs              Higher Education Institutions

   HMO               Houses in Multi Occupancy

   HHSRS             Housing Health and Safety Rating System

   IPG               Interim Planning Guidance

   NNIS              Newcastle Neighbourhood Information System

   PRS               Private Rented Sector

   RES               Regional Economic Strategy

   RSS               Regional Spatial Strategy

   SHWG              Shared Housing Working Group, comprising Council and University
                     officers and open to private sector landlords and the public, that
                     meets on a regular basis to help shape policy around shared
                     housing in the City.

   SSHH              Silent Students Happy Homes

   YHN               Your Homes Newcastle




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              Student Housing Strategy 2009 – 2011. ‘Living and Learning in Newcastle’

Appendix A.
Policy Context
There are a number of national, regional, sub-regional and local drivers that help to
shape the need, development and management of the student housing market. Each
must be taken into consideration when developing a student housing strategy so that
the strategy itself is well informed and relevant to the City.

National Policy Drivers
Higher Education Targets: The Government has set ambitious targets for at least
50% of young people to gain access to higher education as part of its drive to
improve skills levels amongst the UK workforce, provide high levels of skilled
graduates for private and public sector enterprises and thus improve economic
competitiveness. The Government has also introduced tuition fees to help pay for
expansion. It is not yet clear what impact this may have for the numbers of students
entering higher education and on where they may live.

Regional and Sub-regional Policy Drivers
The Regional Spatial Strategy (RSS): RSS emphasises the importance of the
region’s universities and further and higher education establishments. They are
described as making a major contribution to innovation and enterprise. There is to be
continued support for the influential economic role of the universities, enabling better
links between universities and business, and campus expansions where appropriate.
The RSS, however, does not address the issue of student housing directly.

The Regional Economic Strategy (RES): This sets the continued attraction of people
to the region’s universities to study, increase the number of graduates able to
contribute to economic growth and in particular the retention of graduates within the
region as a key priority in meeting the demands of a competitive economy. The
education sector is a key employer in the North East, accounting for around 10% of
regional employment. The Regional Economic Strategy clearly recognises of the
central role of the universities and colleges in delivering its’ aims and objectives. The
universities bring many benefits including ensuring a pool of qualified labour and
making a considerable contribution to GVA. Newcastle Science City, an initiative in
partnership with the city’s universities, is identified as being the growth hub for the
region’s structural change agenda.

The Regional Housing Strategy: This strategy places the creation and maintenance
of ‘better places’ as a key priority, striving to ensure the sustainability of
neighbourhoods, ensuring fair access to housing for all those in need, the creation
and maintenance of community cohesion and the linkage of housing provision to
support economic growth

Local Policy Drivers
Newcastle Housing Strategy, Homes for a Sustainable Future. Newcastle’s Housing
Strategy, identifies, as a key priority, the need to address the housing requirements
of students. Underpinning this priority is the vision that by 2021, there will be a range
of housing choices that will be attractive to students to encourage them to study and
stay in Newcastle; the accommodation offered to students in Newcastle will have
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              Student Housing Strategy 2009 – 2011. ‘Living and Learning in Newcastle’

kept pace with the institutions’ growth plans and the requirements of the Science City
project; and student housing will be part of safe and sustainable communities
throughout the city. The Housing Strategy sets three key outcomes by 2021:

We will have built (facilitated) 5,000 units of student housing, as much as possible in
purpose-built and managed accommodation

We will put in place planning policies for new housing which set out the mix required
for balanced communities, starting in areas where student housing is concentrated

We will have improved standards in student private rented housing using an
approach combining licensing and accreditation

Importantly the Housing Strategy highlights the importance of working through the
planning system to support a sustainable mix of housing throughout the city and to
improve standards in student accommodation.

Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) on Shared Housing. Many students and
other young people live in the private rented sector in parts of the city. Their
presence benefits those areas by keeping the housing market buoyant and
supporting local services. However, in some neighbourhoods there is a possibility
that the balance of communities will be upset and some forms of valued housing
resources lost. For this reason Newcastle City Council has introduced new measures
to tackle concerns over the impact of shared housing and student accommodation on
the private rented sector in certain parts of the city.

The Supplementary Planning Document on Shared Housing (SPD) was adopted at
the Council’s Planning and Transport Strategy Committee on the 28th of February
2008. The document aims to restrain the growth of shared housing and protect
valuable resources in order to maintain sustainable communities. The SPD states
that in a defined Area of Housing Mix (AHM) there will be restrictions on conversions
to existing properties. The AHM as a whole has five sub areas.

These five sub-areas are:

   Spital Tongues,

   three in East Gosforth, and

   a larger one taking in parts of Jesmond, Shieldfield, Sandyford and Heaton.

In the AHM the presumption would be that planning permission would not be given
for the creation of bedrooms in the loft space of upper Tyneside flats. In addition it
would be more difficult to obtain planning permission to convert what had been family
houses into houses in multiple occupation.

Voluntary Code of Practice on Lettings Boards (adopted August 2008). The City
Council recognises the value of the private rented sector in Newcastle. It is
acknowledged that without it there would be great difficulty in maintaining current
student numbers in the city and in retaining young people moving on to employment
but who cannot yet afford to buy. However, this market sector brings with it particular
requirements, including that for advertising the availability of property. New methods
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such as the internet play a very important part now, but ‘traditional’ means such as
the letting board still play a very prominent role - but perhaps in some ways too
prominent. The sheer number of letting boards that must reappear each year for the
dominant student sub market is causing concern to residents.

The City Council is therefore seeking cooperation from landowners, landlords and
most particularly letting agents in reducing the visual and other impacts of shared
and student housing letting boards in some parts of the city. All those with an
influence over letting boards have been asked to commit themselves to a Voluntary
Code of Practice.

The Draft Code sets out suggestions on the number of lettings boards, length of time
boards are displayed, size and shape of boards and location of boards in relation to
buildings. The key aspects to be addressed via the code are:

   number of boards

   length of time boards are displayed

   size and shape of boards

   location of boards in relation to building, garden, etc

   area to be covered by the Code

Interim Planning Guidance (IPG) on Purpose Built Student Housing 2007. The IPG
on Purpose Built Student Housing has been prepared as part of an overall strategy to
address student housing needs in Newcastle. It is one mechanism to ensure that a
choice of housing is available for the city's student population. The aim of this Interim
Planning Guidance (IPG) is to promote and enable the development of a range
purpose built student housing schemes in suitable, sustainable locations.

In achieving the aim the objectives are:

To develop a robust basis upon which to progress, monitor and manage the delivery
of purpose built student housing

To inform development of policies in the council’s Local Development Framework
(the Council’s main planning document that spells out development priorities in the
City)

Provide a range and choice of sites which are suitable and available for student
housing in order to support the growth of the city’s universities; and

To underpin the process of planning for student housing to help deliver the
Government’s objective of ensuring everyone has the opportunity of a decent home

In looking at potential sites across the city the IPG ranks suitability of each by using a
scoring framework based upon:

   Location / accessibility

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   Site size / capacity

   Planning merits

   Regeneration merits

   Availability / timescales

Each factor was scored out of ten up to a maximum of 50 points; with sites scoring
the highest deemed to be the most suitable sites for the location of new purpose built
student accommodation. From this scoring framework ten top sites were identified:

 Location                                                      Points     Estimated
                                                                          Capacity
 Manors car park                                               46         300 - 500
 Portland Road                                                 44         300 - 400
 TA centre & St George’s Car Park                              44         200 - 300
 Westgate Community College                                    40         600
 East Pilgrim Street Master Plan area: Including sub sites     42         500 - 700
 Former Newcastle Brewery                                      40         460
 New Bridge Street                                             40         300 - 400
 Newcastle Campus                                              40         500 - 600
 Northumbria Campus                                            40         1500
 Hill Court                                                    38         350


To view the full IPG contact: emma.warneford@newcastle.gov.uk




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Appendix B.
Evidence for Increased Demand for Student Housing
Historical Growth in Students Numbers
National targets to increase the number and proportion of people entering higher
education linked to a desire to improve economic competitiveness, have led to a
large-scale expansion in the numbers of people seeking higher education.
Newcastle-Upon-Tyne has proved a popular location for students and currently hosts
just over 37,300 full-time higher education students – up by 12,110 between the two
Universities on the 2001/02 academic year; which represents an average increase of
+48%.

Newcastle College has a high proportion of students on part time courses. In the
context of examining student housing needs, the number of full time students is most
relevant. In the 2008/09 academic year Newcastle College recorded 6,795 full time
students, an increase of 584 on the previous year xvii.

It is not yet possible for the Universities or the College to provide forecasts for how
many students they may expect in 2009/10 or beyond. The national picture suggests
that student numbers will increase further, potentially over and above normal growth.
Student numbers can rise during recession as graduates who cannot find work may
return to postgraduate courses and those who have been made redundant may opt
to go back into higher education. The weakness of sterling also means that it is much
cheaper for overseas students to study in the UK.

Figure 1: Growth in full time student numbers 2000/01 – 2008/09

                  Growth in University full-time student numbers since 2000/01
 40000
 35000                                                                                           Northumbria
 30000                                                                                           Newcastle
 25000                                                                                           Combined

 20000
 15000
 10000
  5000
       0
           01


                     02


                               03


                                         04


                                                   05


                                                              06


                                                                        07


                                                                                  08


                                                                                            09
          /


                     /


                              /


                                        /


                                                  /


                                                              /


                                                                       /


                                                                                 /


                                                                                           /
       00


                  01


                           02


                                     03


                                               04


                                                           05


                                                                    06


                                                                              07


                                                                                        08
     20


                20


                          20


                                    20


                                              20


                                                         20


                                                                   20


                                                                             20


                                                                                       20




 (Source: University Accommodation Offices. Updated March 2009)

What Figure 1 shows, is that since the 2000/01 academic year an additional 12,110
full time students, or +48%, now attend university in Newcastle. This growth is made

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up of around 6,984 additional students at Northumbria University and over 5,126 at
Newcastle University.

Though there has been a significant growth in student numbers over the past nine
years or so, with the majority of this growth from the 18 to 21 age group, a recent
report from Universities UK (UUK)xviii suggests that the higher education sector faces
a significant demographic change over the next 20 years amongst the age groups
from which it traditionally recruits full-time and part – time undergraduates. In
particular, the number of 18 to 21 year olds, who make up 70 per cent of entrants to
full-time undergraduate programmes, is projected to fall sharply between 2009–2019
before rising again in 2027. In contrast, the older age groups (25 – 50 year olds),
from which part-time undergraduates are mainly drawn, will experience a modest
growth over the same period. There is also likely to be a stabilisation in numbers of
international students studying in the UK.

Growth in student housing provision
This growth in student numbers has resulted in a corresponding increase in the
demand for accommodation to cater for full-time undergraduate students living away
from home. To cater for this need many higher education institutions (HEIs) and
private companies have developed halls of residence, with private sector landlords
further adding to the supply of student accommodation.

The following table shows a schedule of gross additional purpose built student bed
spaces that have been completed between 2001 and 2008, which in total amounts to
2655 (gross). Of this total 694 have been completed since the adoption in November
2007 of the Council’s Interim Planning Guidance (IPG) on Purpose Built Student
Housing; which concluded that there is an estimated need for up to 5,030 (net) bed
spaces between 2007 and the academic year 2009/10.
Figure 2 : New purpose built accommodation

 Year               Bed spaces completed
 2001                                 63
 2002                                524
 2003                                 48
 2004                                109
 2005                               1001
 2006                                216
 2007                                 19
 2008                              675xix
 Gross                             2655*
 Total
NB: *This is the gross figure and does not account for stock losses

University Provided or leased bed spaces
Figures provided in Table 1 shows the gross schedule of additional purpose built bed
spaces. However, over the same period there have been losses to the stock provided
directly by the Universities as well as private providers (either physically or
contractually), which are difficult to calculate. The best way to overcome this is to

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view the number of bed spaces provided or leased by the Universities. What this
shows is a combined figure of 8,341 bed spaces in the academic year 2008/09, an
increase of 1,728 since the academic year 2000/01xx.
Figure 3 : Total number of University provided or leased bed spaces – 2008/09


                          University provided or leased bed spaces



     Combined                                                       8341



   Northumbria                             3762



     Newcastle                                    4579



                   0             2000         4000           6000    8000       10000


NB: It should be noted that the newly provided accommodation is not necessarily
provided directly by the universities, but may instead be contracted nomination
agreements with private providers. Newcastle College does not own any purpose
built student accommodation however it does signpost students to around 168
purpose built bedspaces which it reserves. The vast majority of the College’s full
time students (82%) have addresses in Tyne and Wear and it is likely that a high
proportion of those reside at their parental address.

Students by tenure
It is notoriously difficult to record where students live. Students do not always update
their university with their term time addresses and it is not always possible to
differentiate between students in private rented accommodation, owned
accommodation or their parental home. Based on previous trends of the proportion of
students living at home and the number known to be living in university leased or
owned halls of residence, the following tables provide estimates for the tenure of
students at the two Universities in recent years. What is known, however, is that
universities tend to concentrate on housing first year undergraduates in purpose built
accommodation, with the rest either studying from home or accessing private rented
accommodation. Newcastle University and Northumbria University both offer
accommodation to first year undergraduates and international post-graduates with
most others finding accommodation in the private rented sector. There is also some
purpose built accommodation available for overseas students, students with special
needs and family accommodation.

Figures supplied by both Universities for 2007/08 provides an estimate of the
proportion of full time students in student halls of residence, at home and renting
privately.

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Figure 4 : Full time students by tenure academic year 2007/08


                          Total Full       FT students     FT students       FT students in
                            time             in halls        at home             private
                          students                                          accommodation

 University
                         No.               No.     %       No.    %       No.       %

 Northumbria             18761             3556    19%     8154   43%     7051      37.5%

 Newcastle               16877             4143    24.5% 1525     9%      11209*    66.4%

 Combined                35622             7699    21.6% 9679     27%     18244     51.2%

 NB:* Includes students where tenure is not known



Figure 5 : Percentage of full time students by tenure in 2007/08


                             % FT Stude nts by te nur e




                                                                         In halls
       51.20%                                    21.60%
                                                                         At home
                                                                         Rent privatley

                                                             27%




Areas of student concentrations
The best indicator available at present relating to concentrations of students in the
private rented sector is provided by summary statistics from Council Tax records.
Households made up entirely of students can seek exemption from Council Tax and
the address of each exemption is held (Class N only). As mentioned earlier in the
strategy Council Tax records show that since the academic years 2000 to 2007
(2007 saw the adoption if the City’s IPG on purpose built student bed spaces) there
was a +113% increase across the City in the number of private sector occupied by
student only households. This represents an increase of +3,015 ; up from 2,668 in
the academic year 2000 to 5,683 by April 2007. A comparison with the other English
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Core Cities using 2008 data shows Newcastle second only to Nottingham in the
proportion of private sector stock occupied by student only households in the private
sector (see Appendix H).

Aggregating this data has allowed the presentation of figures for student households
as a percentage of all households liable for Council Tax. The information produced
has been brought down to local level, using the boundaries created for the Newcastle
Neighbourhood Information System (NNIS). There are 142 NNIS neighbourhoods in
the city. The results of the analysis are shown in Map 1 below, which shows the
situation as at 31 March 2007.This shows that students have tended to be
concentrated in the areas of the Inner West, Jesmond, Heaton & Sandyford, which
has had a significant impact on the residential communities of those areas.

Map 1: Student household concentrations by ward




(Households with student household exemption from Council Tax as % of all
households liable for Council Tax - excluding from purpose built student
accommodation - as at 31 March 2007 by NNIS areas)

Map 1 above highlights very significant concentrations of student households in
limited parts of the City. What this shows is that there are 6 NNIS neighbourhoods
with greater than 20% of student households. When compared with Table 3 (Census
Data 2001) it is evident that these are well established student preference areas, with
no change in top preference areas over the past seven to eight yearsxxi. Indeed mid-
year Census estimates shows a marked increase in the proportion of the population
in the 16 to 29 age group in areas regarded as popular student areas. For example,
North Jesmond, with a total population in 2008 of 9,603, has seen a sizeable
demographic shift since the 2001Census. This shows a +46% increase of those aged
16 – 29 (age bracket likely to represents full time students) with a fall off in other age
bands. This pattern is typical of other popular student areas.

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Figure 6 : Student Only Household Numbers and Percent by Ward


 Ward Name                  Post 2004 ward               Numbers    %
                            boundaries*
 (2004
 Boundaries)

 Jesmond                    North & South Jesmond        594        12.1%

 Heaton                     North & South Heaton         454        9.9%

 Sandyford                  South Jesmond &              525        9.7%
                            Ouseburn

 Moorside                   Wingrove & Wesgate           282        6.7%

 Wingrove                   -                            162        4.2%

 West City                  Wesgate & Elswick            130        3.7%

(Source: Census 2001)

* For illustrative purposes to show how wards were re-organised in 2004.

Student only households – Council Tax data 2009
An analysis of 2009 Council Tax data shows that the number of student only
households (minus halls) is still rising. In 2007 there were 5,683 student only
households in the private sector (Class N). By 2009 this had risen to 5891; an
increase of 208. This is on top of the additional (gross) figure of 694 purpose
built bed spaces provided since the introduction of the IPG in October 2007. The
majority of the increase in Class N exemptions from 2007 to 2009 were in the
Jesmond wards (+126)xxii.

Summary of evidence of increased demand for student housing:
Figures provided by the Universities demonstrate that in 2008/09 there was an
additional 12,110 (+48%) full time students compared with the academic year
2000/01. Over the same period there has been a net additional 1,728 University
provided or leased bed spaces, with 502 of this amount being provided since the
adoption of the IPG in November 2007 (inclusive of losses); hence the remaining
10,000 or so additional students since 2000/01 are either studying from home or
finding accommodation in the private rented sector.

Indeed, when Council Tax records are compared over the previous eight years its
shows a marked increase in the number of students living in the private rented
sector. In the financial year 2000/01 there were over 2,600 houses/flats occupied
only by students (excluding purpose built student accommodation). By the financial
year 2009/10 this had risen to 5,891, thus over this period there are an additional

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+3,223 (+121%) increase in the number of private sector properties occupied by
student only households). This figure equates to 32% of the private rented sector as
a whole, and 7.3% of total private sector housing (private rented plus owner
occupied) in the City. As a result, the age profile of some neighbourhoods has
changed (namely, Jesmond, Heaton and Sandyford), and become characterised by a
population which is predominantly ‘young (late teens/early twenties), seasonal (here
for only two thirds of the year) and transient (moving every year, leaving after three).
The issues, from the perspective of some local communities, ‘arise precisely when
students cease to be in the community because their numbers increase so much that
they outnumber the resident population. It is important to note, however, that in other
places, the changing nature of the student body in higher education, and coming to
fruition of widening access policies, means that the students are the community’xxiii.

Requirement of new purpose built bed spaces
To accommodate the increase in student numbers and the subsequent demand for
suitable sustainable student housing the City’s Interim Planning Guidance (IPG) on
Purpose Built Student Housing (adopted November 2007) provides analysis of the
estimated number of bed spaces needed based upon discussions with the
Universities and Newcastle College. The Fact Sheet – ‘Student Growth and
Estimated Need for Purpose Built Student Bed Spaces’ that accompanied the IPG
concluded that there is an estimated need for up to 5,000 (net) bed spaces between
2007 and the academic year 2009/10.

Table 1 shows that since this projection was made in 2007 a total of 694 bed spaces
have now been completed and that there are currently (Sept ’09) a further 1000
under constructionxxiv (totalling 1,694). On top of this figure there are currently (as of
Sept‘09) some 3,932 bed spaces with planning consent (see Appendix D). It is not
possible to determine if all or any of the bed spaces with planning consent will be
developed but it is reasonable to assume that some will, and if so will go a
considerable way to meeting projected need.
Figure 7 : Estimated schedule of units required up to 2010


 Estimated net need for additional bed spaces in ‘07            Up to 5,000

 Number constructed since November ‘07                          694

 Number of bed spaces under construction                        1000

  (as of Sept ‘09)

 Estimated net need for additional bed spaces in March 3,306
 ‘09

 Current number of bed spaces with planning consent (as
                                                        3,932
 of Sept ‘09 )




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Beyond this estimated shortfall up to 2010 there is expected to be a continuing need
to provide new accommodation. To ensure the continuing supply of the right type of
student accommodation is provided to meet demand it may be necessary to build
beyond the estimated 5,000 additional bed spaces, as identified in the IPG on
Purpose Built Student Housing (2007), until demand in this area of the housing
market has been satisfied. The supply of accommodation will be carefully analysed
and factors including quality and choice of new accommodation together with uptake
will be monitored to establish future demand.

Factors determining student housing preferences
Research carried out by the College and University Business Offices (CUBO) in 2007
indicates that accommodation is a key factor determining students’ selection of a
university. The ‘Enhancing the Student Experience Report’ attracted over 66,000
responses and indicates that accommodation is a major factor influencing the student
living experience. www.CUBO.org.uk. When ranked against all learning and living
elements, accommodation cost is ranked as more important than learning support
and employability. Similarly, accommodation quality is ranked above careers advice
and financial support (see Figure 8 below). Accommodation elements had the largest
gap between importance and satisfaction and therefore action in this area is vital for
universities looking to improve the student living experience. These findings echo
those of the BNG Private Landlord Survey (February 2007). This found that some
student landlords feel that student expectations for accommodation are changing.
‘Features’ such as internet access, en-suite bathrooms and city-centre locations are
now of more importance to students, while living in a shared house appears to be
less appealing’. In line with the findings of the students and graduate study, landlords
also report that ‘students now expect better accommodation standards than they did
in the past’.xxv

It is clear that Newcastle needs to improve its accommodation offer for students,
providing more bedspaces in purpose built accommodation in accessible locations
and offering greater choice for students. There is a risk therefore, that lack of good
quality accommodation, whether this is purpose built or within the more ‘traditional’
private rented sector, could prejudice the Universities’ draw to prospective students,
and in turn the City’s vibrancy and economic prosperity.




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Figure 8 : Results of the CUBO Enhancing the Student Experience Research




(Source: Enhancing the Student Experience. CUBO. 2007)

What people have told us
An analysis of Northumbria University applications for Academic Year 07/08 showed
applicant preferences for accommodation type and location:

68.2 % of UK student applicants requested an en-suite room as their first preference
choice (reduced to 60.6% of all student applicants.),

94.75% of first choice preferences were for City centre accommodation

Heart of the Campus residences were the most popular choices, where demand
exceeded supply and the most popular accommodation could have been filled three
times over.

It is important for the Universities, and the City as a whole, to try and accommodate,
as far as possible without upsetting established neighbourhoods, potential students’
accommodation preferences so that Newcastle remains a City of choice for those
going on to and continuing higher and further education.




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Appendix C.
Student Housing Strategy Visioning Exercise Feedback
The following sets out feedback given by university representatives (Northumbria &
Newcastle) at the visioning session in the Civic Centre on the 20th of March 2008.
This session was held to set out current initiatives in relation to student housing and
asked for thinking around gap analysis and other joint initiatives we need to take
forward as part of developing a Student Housing Strategy.

Question                    Answers              Gaps / Further           Possible Actions
                                                 Comments
1) What else is             Encourage            No proactive work        Work with
being done by the           students to become that allows                Newcastle’s
universities?               involved in          students to become       Tenants’
                            residents groups – involved in                Federation & the
                            especially in the    community groups         SU to provide wider
                            Ouseburn area        in their area            opportunities for
                            Respond to                                    students to become
                            complaints from                               actively involved in
                            residents and try to                          their communities.
                            come a resolution
                            (both universities)
                            Good
                            neighbourhood
                            leaflet sent to each
                            know student
                            property (both
                            universities)
                            Silent Student
                            Happy Homes
                            (SSHH) initiative to
                            cut down on late
                            night noise (both
                            universities)
                            Northumbria
                            ensuring students
                            know their rights

2) What is your             Weakness:              The IPG does not       Work with Planning
view of the                 View expressed         go far enough in       & Development
current initiatives         that the IPG’s aim     specifying build       Control to covers
mentioned above             of dispersing          standards,             these gaps
what are their              students               especially related
strengths and               throughout the city    to noise.
weaknesses?                 is not necessarily a   Large purpose built
                            good thing;            accommodation
                            Strengths:             aimed at students
                            Though family          with families should
                            student                take account of
                            accommodation          requirements
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                            may benefit from        around green
                            being further out of    space and schools
                            the City centre
                            The IPG is a useful
                            list of development
                            sites – but needs to
                            be updated
                            regularly

3) What, if any, do         Positives:                                   Identify & agree a
you consider will           An increase in well                          set of indicators
be the likely               managed housing                              that measure & try
positive and                offer for students                           to manage the
negative impacts            Less students                                impacts of student
on the housing              concentrated in the                          housing - either
market due to an            ‘traditional’ student                        established or
increase in supply          areas.                                       purpose built
of purpose built            Assist with                                  student housing
student housing?            attracting students
                            to the City.
                            Negatives:
                            A possible increase
                            in voids in the
                            ‘traditional’ areas.
4) Were can we              Work together to        NRF funding for      Secure possible
work together to            reinstate that          these 2 posts has    funding to reinstate
help us both                student liaison         come to an end       either or both of
achieve our                 officer post &          with no future       these posts
objectives?                 Student Safety          funding identified   Identify & agree a
                            Security Officer                             set of indicators
                            posts                                        that measure & try
                            An agreed set of                             to manage the
                            indicators needs to                          impacts of student
                            be developed to                              housing - either
                            help assess                                  established or
                            impacts of student                           purpose built
                            housing – either                             student housing (as
                            established or                               per question 3)
                            purpose built                                Arrange joint
                            student housing                              session with big
                            Joint meetings with                          developers,
                            the big developers                           universities and
                            to ascertain shared                          council officers to
                            aims for the future                          work up a shared
                            of student housing.                          vision.
                            Need to join up the                          Audit of various
                            various community                            community
                            relations initiatives                        relations initiatives
                            into one big                                 needs to be
                            initiative.                                  undertaken
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                                                                        (community
                                                                        coordinators &
                                                                        Brian Beverley) to
                                                                        create one big
                                                                        initiative with
                                                                        SMART outcomes.
5) What other               Lettings agents                             Arrange joint
agencies need to            Large developers                            session with big
be involved in              (UNITE etc.)                                developers (as per
achieving a                 A more                                      Q4.)
comprehensive               representative                              Arrange briefing
co-ordinated                landlords’ forum                            with lettings agents
approach to                                                             (student lets)
addressing                                                              Examine findings of
student housing                                                         the CUBO report
needs?                                                                  on student living
                                                                        experiences due
                                                                        out 22/04/08
6) Are there                Needs of             International          Link with work
issues which you            international        students may /         carried out by the
consider are not            students needs to    often by-pass the      private rented
currently                   be built into the    student                project and
addressed by the            strategy.            accommodation          accreditation to
current council             Raising awareness    services and           raise awareness
student housing             among PRS            instead be directed    and standards
initiatives? i.e.           landlords on         to the lower end of
what are the                standards and        the private rented
current gaps?               among students on    sector by friends or
How might we                their rights as      relatives.
address any such            tenants.
gaps?
7) What can we              Encourage                                   Work with
(council &                  students to become                          Newcastle’s
universities) do to         involved in                                 Tenants’
integrate students          residents groups                            Federation & the
into                                                                    SU to provide wider
neighbourhoods                                                          opportunities for
and to lessen the                                                       students to become
risk of late night                                                      actively involved in
disturbances?                                                           their communities
                                                                        (as per Q1).




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Appendix D.
Sites with Planning Consent (September 2009)
Student Purpose Built Bed spaces with planning permission – where construction
has not started

          Bedspaces with                      23 at Bolam House               2004/1707/01/
          planning                                                            DET
                                    3932
          permission or
          minded to grant                     15 at Gallowgate (15 units      2005/2021/01/
                                              therefore more bedspaces)       DET

                                              117 at Ince Building            2007/1311/01/
                                                                              DET

                                              24 at North House               2007/0140/01/
                                                                              DET

                                              541 at Newcastle University,    2007/2229/01/
                                              Percy Street (INTO)             DET

                                              462 at former bottling plant    2007/0830/01/
                                                                              DET

                                              7 at Stowell Street             2008/0388/01/
                                                                              DET

                                              417 at New Bridge Street        2008/1849/01/
                                                                              DET

                                              153 at Half Moon Yard           2008/1976/01/
                                                                              DET

                                              62 at Falconer Street phase 2   2008/0745/01/
                                                                              DET

                                              1933 at Land at Stoddart        2009/0046/01/
                                              Street/Portland Road            DET

                                              142 at Tyneside Minimix         2009/0264/01/
                                                                              DET




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Appendix E.               Lettings Boards Voluntary Code of Practice
What is the Code?

The Code states:

1. Only one board (or two joined boards) per property will be permitted (As per the current
   Town and Country Planning Act regulations).

2. Each board will have a surface area not exceeding 0.5 square. (As per the current Town
   and Country Planning Act regulations).

3. ‘To Let’ or ‘For Sale’ boards shall be removed not later than 14 days of the granting of a
   tenancy* or sale**. (As per the current Town and Country Planning Act regulations).

4. Slips with ‘Let’, or ‘Sold’ or similar wording may be used but must be removed along with
   the main board as under item 3. (As per the current Town and Country Planning Act
   regulations).

5. Boards should be mounted on buildings where feasible, and should not be placed on
   posts in the gardens.

6. Where it is believed that points 1 – 4 have been breached, the letting agent will be
   required to provide evidence that they are in compliance with the Code and they be
   considered for the interventions list.
* For the purposes of the Code the granting of a tenancy agreement is considered as the
date when the last tenant signs the actual agreement.

** For the purposes of the Code the sale of property is considered as 14 days after the
completion of the sale of the property.

Guidance Notes…

The Code applies citywide, however the area defined as the Area of Housing Mix (AHM) will
be closely monitored.

Boards placed on posts at the end of gardens should not overhang the curtilage of the
property.

At blocks of flats, only one board per agent will be permitted at any one time. For example, if
an agent is marketing 6 flats within the same block only board will be permitted.

The boards shall be removed not later than 14 days of the granting of a tenancy (or
completion of the sale) for the room, house or flat in question, as required by the Town and
Country Planning (Control of Advertisements) Regulations 2007.

Enforcement action will be taken against the unauthorised display of advertisements. The
offence is liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding £2,500 for each
advertisement and in the case of continuing offence, £250 for each day during which the
offence continues after conviction.




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Website …

A working group comprising agents, landlords, Council Officers and the ‘New Student’ has
formed to address the issue of letting boards. ’The Board Code’, an industry led website is
being developed to ‘police’ the Code and provide a mechanism for agents, landlords and
residents to report potentially unauthorised boards. Further information on ‘The Board Code’
will follow in due course.

Further advice…

For further advice, please call:

Dianne Perry on (0191) 277 7187; or email:

dianne.perry@newcastle.gov.uk; or write to:

Planning & Housing Strategy, Civic Centre, Barras Bridge, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8PH




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              Student Housing Strategy 2009 – 2011. ‘Living and Learning in Newcastle’

Appendix F.               Incidences of Anti-Social Behaviour by Ward
 ASB incidents (2008)                      Rank          %
 Westgate Ward                             1 (high)      18.3*      In terms of ranking, South
 Byker Ward                                2             6.5        Jesmond is ranked 19th and
 Elswick Ward                              3             6.2        North Jesmond is ranked 21st
 Benwell and Scotswood Ward                4             5.4        and in the City for levels of
 Walker Ward                               5             4.6        ASB (where 1 is highest, and
 Denton Ward                               6             4.5        26 is lowest).
 Kenton Ward                               7             4.3        The Wards in bold indicate
 Wingrove Ward                             8             3.8        high     concentrations      of
 Fawdon Ward                               9             3.8        students living within them.
 Blakelaw Ward                             10            3.7        *It should be noted that
                                                                    Westgate ward includes the
 Woolsington Ward                          11            3.4
                                                                    City Centre which hosts a
 Ouseburn Ward                             12            3.5
                                                                    number of ‘night life’ related
 South Heaton Ward                         13            3.2
                                                                    businesses which facilitate the
 Fenham Ward                               14            3.2
                                                                    incidences of ASB.
 Lemington Ward                            15            3.2
 Newburn Ward                              16            2.6        (Source: Northumbria Police)
 Castle Ward                               17            2.2
 Walkergate Ward                           18            2.3
 South Jesmond Ward                        19            1.8
 North Heaton Ward                         20            1.6
 North Jesmond Ward                        21            1.7
 East Gosforth Ward                        22            1.6
 Westerhope Ward                           23            4.2
 Dene Ward                                 24            1.4
 West Gosforth Ward                        25            1.4
 Parklands Ward                            26 (low)      1.3

ASB incidents covers the following categories:
   Substance Misuse                                         Rowdy and/or Nuisance -
                                                              Fireworks
       Street Drinking
                                                             Rowdy and/or Nuisance -
       Begging / vagrancy
                                                              Neighbours
       Prostitution Related Activity
                                                             Rowdy and/or Nuisance -
                                                              Rowdy or Inconsiderate
       Abandoned Vehicles
                                                             Hoax Calls to Emergency
       Nuisance & Inappropriate Use                          Service
        of Vehicles
                                                             Malicious Communications
       Noise
                                                             Animal Problems
      Rowdy and/or Nuisance -
                                                   Trespass
       Environmental Damage/Littering
Those highlighted in bold are the most common types of ASB reported to the police.
There is no incident category which relates specifically to ‘students’ or student related
issues

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              Student Housing Strategy 2009 – 2011. ‘Living and Learning in Newcastle’

Appendix G.               Noise Related’ Complaints
March ’08 – February ‘09




The map shows locations of where noise complaints have been received in a 12
month period (Mar 08- Feb 09). The incidents listed relate to noise issues coming
from a private property or HMO (and not a council owned property).

These incidents are mainly concentrated in North Jesmond, South Heaton and South
Jesmond.




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      Appendix H.               Comparison with Other Core Cities on the Proportion of Students -
                                Academic Year – 2008/09
 1. City                       2. University                   3. City      4. No. of F/T    5. % of FT       6. No. of     7. Total Number of   8. % of Class N
                                                             Population     & equivalent    students to    private sector      private sector    exemptions to
                                                              (mid-year       students      population        student            dwellings        private sector
                                                             estimates                                        exempt                                dwellings
                                                                2008)                                       Households
                                                                                                             (Class N)
Newcastle         University of Northumbria                  273,600          19953
                                                                                               13.6            5891              80,092               7.3
                  Newcastle University                                        17428
Manchester        University of Manchester                   464,200          31870
                                                                                                                                                      6.6
                  Manchester Metropolitan                                     26460            12.5            9456             141,433
                  University
Nottingham        Nottingham Trent University                292,400          13607
                                                                                               13.5            5257              68,617               7.6
                  University of Nottingham                                    26000
  Leeds           University of Leeds                                         27082
                                                             770,800                            6              6317             245,454               2.5
                  Leeds Metropolitan University                               19338
 Liverpool        Liverpool John Moores University           434,900          16910
                  University of Liverpool                                     15325            8.6             6081             154,416               3.9
                  Liverpool Hope University                                    5168
 Sheffield        Sheffield Hallam University                534,500          20987
                                                                                               7.7             7771             171,635               4.5
                  University of Sheffield                                     20494
  Bristol         University of the West of England          421,300          21223
                                                                                               8.6             3173             121,000               2.6
                  Bristol University                                          15240
Birmingham        Aston University                            1,016m            7934
                  University of Birmingham                                    20179
                                                                                               4.5             5007             263,396               1.9
                  Birmingham City University                                  15366
                  Newham University College                                     2965
                                                         Source:           Source:                         Source:          Source: Key
                                                         ONS 2008          Ringing each                    DCLG, HTB1       statistics from
                                                         mid-year          University.                     form             website of each
                                                         estimates         Aug 09                                           authority

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               Student Housing Strategy 2009 – 2011. ‘Living and Learning in Newcastle’

Appendix I.
References




i
 Fits with the aspiration of the Regional Economic Strategy to develop ‘the right mix
of housing that meets the needs of residents and attracts talented people currently
outside the region to live here’. RES Action Plan, May 2007. Reference E11.
ii
 The Nature and Impact of Student Demand on Housing, Rugg, Rhodes and Jones,
Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2000
iii
  Evidence gathering – Housing in Multiple Occupation & possible planning
responses. CLG. September 2008
iv
      A term coined by Smith (2002) to describe areas with high student concentrations
v
 Mid-year estimates in 2008 puts the City’s population at 271,600, including
students, compared with 266,200 in 2001
vi
 See Appendix H: Comparison with Core Cities (plus Sunderland) of full time student
numbers and population
vii
  CORE Cities comprise: Newcastle, Liverpool, Nottingham, Leeds, Manchester,
Bristol, Sheffield, & Birmingham
viii
  Out of 305 respondents who operate in Newcastle. BNG Private Landlord Survey,
February 2007.
ix
 By agreeing to abide by this Code, educational establishments may be exempt from
HMO Licensing under the Housing Act 2004, subject to Regulations made under
paragraph 4 of Schedule 14 of the Housing Act 2004
x
  The National Code is voluntary and aimed at both educational establishments and
private sector suppliers.
xi
   Government guidance Planning Policy Statement 3 (PPS3) requires councils to
compile a Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) that shows sites
available for housing and the housing capacity of each site. At the latest each
council must complete this by March 2010. Newcastle City Council aim to conclude
its SHLAA by Autumn 2009.
xii
  The research looked at the incidences of Burglary, violence & robbery. Newcastle’s
aggregate score stood at 10.7. Nottingham topped the table as least safest city for
students with an aggregate score of 27.4. www.thegooduniversityguide.org.uk




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                Student Housing Strategy 2009 – 2011. ‘Living and Learning in Newcastle’




xiii
  The Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS) introduced by the
Housing Act 2004 replaces the housing fitness standard and requires housing
associations, councils, and the like, to assess hazards and risks in their housing
stock.
xiv
   The universities were originally asked to fund off campus wardens to assist with
student issues. They, however, expressed concerns on the grounds of health and
safety of such a role, and therefore opted instead to make a financial contribution to
Operation OAK.
xv
  TimeBank is a national charity inspiring and connecting a new generation of people
to volunteer in their communities, and enabling charitable organisations and
businesses to develop innovative and effective volunteer recruitment programmes.
xvi
  ‘Studentification’: a guide to opportunities, challenges & practice. Universities UK,
January 2006
xvii
        Complete data sets for previous academic years are not available
xviii
  The Future Size and Shape of the Higher Education Sector in the UK: threats and
opportunities, UUK, July 2008
xix
  Figure for 2008 includes: Camden Street (495), Falconer Street (58), Stepney
Lane (122)
xx
  In 2001 there were 6,613 bed spaces provided/contracted by the Universities. This
had increased to 8341by 2009, hence an additional 1,728.
xxi
       2001 Census data based upon 2004 ward boundaries
xxii
        In 2007 there were 1478 class N exemptions. In 2009 this had risen to 1604
xxiii
   ‘Studentification’: a guide to opportunities, challenges & practice. Universities UK,
January 2006
xxiv
   Those under construction as of September ’09 are: 98 at Castle Leazes; 6 at
Leazes Arcade, 514 at land North of Generator Studios and 382 on the former Winn
Products site .
xxv
  Private Landlord Survey, Final Report. Bridging Newcastle/Gateshead. February
2007




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