AP English Literature and Composition - DOC 10 by h1w8D5

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									  AP English Literature and Composition
Brief Description of Course
The 12th grade AP English IV curriculum, Literature and Composition, is based on a
thorough study of representative works from various genres and periods concentrating on
works of recognized literary merit. Works from all genres will be read, discussed, and
analyzed. This course will involve the students in the following elements: the experience
of literature, the interpretation of literature, and the evaluation of literature. Students will
learn how to make careful observations of textual detail, establish connections among
their observations, and draw from those connections a series of inferences leading to an
interpretive conclusion. Writing assignments will focus on the critical analysis of
literature and include expository, analytical, and argumentative as well as creative essays.
Students will begin to develop stylistic maturity in their writing and as well as reinforce
their reading through writing.

New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards:
3.1 (READING) All students will understand and apply the knowledge of sounds, letters,
and words in written English to become independent and fluent readers, and will read a
variety of materials and texts with fluency and comprehension.
3.2 (WRITING) All students will write in clear, concise, organized language that varies
in content and form for different audiences and purposes.
3.3 (SPEAKING) All students will speak in a clear, concise, organized language that
varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.
3.4 (LISTENING) All students will listen actively to information from a variety of
sources in a variety of situations.
3.5 (VIEWING AND MEDIA LITERACY) All students will access, view, evaluate, and
respond to print, non-print, and electronic texts and resources.
8.1 (COMPUTER AND INFORMATION LITERACY) All students will use computer
applications to gather and organize information.
9.1 (CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION) All students will develop career
awareness and planning, employability skills, and foundational knowledge necessary for
success in the workplace.

Course Requirements:
The students will be able to:
1. Draw upon personal experiences, readings, and observations by demonstrating an
understanding of the differences between personal and objective responses to text and
investigating connections between life and literature.
2. Respond to a variety of texts and media by defending, qualifying, or refuting the
author's position to create a variety of formal and informal responses projecting his/her
voice in reflective writing.
3. Research and synthesize information by investigating a variety of sources and
evaluating validity and significance of information.
4. Respond to various literary works in writing by assessing the language, culture,
structure, and historical perspective of the text to explain insights into language.
5. Explain significant connections among the speaker's/author's purpose, tone, biases, and
the message for the intended audience in various works of literature.
6. Evaluate print and electronic research materials to determine effectiveness and
validity.
7. Produce expository and argumentative compositions that introduce, defend, qualify or
refute a complex central idea based on literature.
8. Develop compositions with appropriate, specific evidence and cogent explanations.
9. Identify an author's use of rhetorical strategies and devices and the extent to which
they impact the development of the theme (e.g., selection of detail, tone, mood, style,
attitude, point-of-view, syntax, organization, diction, voice).
10. Synthesize connections between text and historical and cultural context.
11. Critique the use of literary devices (e.g., figurative language, irony, imagery) in
various literary forms.
12. Make connections and extend comparisons between features of different pieces of
print and non-print text (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, film).
13. Employ appropriate grammar and mechanics and revise writing to enhance voice and
style, sentence variety, subtlety of meaning, and tone in consideration of questions being
addressed, purpose, audience, and genres.
14. Exhibit stylistic maturity by using an effective writing process that utilizes a variety
of sentence structures, incorporates clear transitions, and uses a wide-range vocabulary.
15. Write, critique, and revise their writing for content and grammar as well as their peers
using feedback.

Topics to be covered:
A. College Preparation and Essay Writing
B. Novels: Students will be reading many different literary selections such as but not
limited to: The Stranger, The Catcher in the Rye, Night, and The Heart of Darkness.
C. Drama: Students will be reading many different plays such as but not limited to:
Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, Hamlet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Antigone, Oedipus
D. Non-Fictions Selections
E. Essays/Speeches
F. Writing- Students will be writing narrative, expository, analytical, argumentative, and
creative essays.
G. Poetry-Students will be reading, interpreting, and writing various poetic forms.
Students will be responsible analyze different poetic forms and write a detailed analysis
of various poems.
H. Short Stories: Students will read and interpret various selections from different
authors.
I. Mythology: Selections from Edith Hamilton’s Introduction to Mythology.
Literature can be substituted for any of the following:
Hamlet
Midsummer Night’s Dream                                 Edith Hamilton’s Mythology
Julius Caesar                                           The Bell Jar
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde                                 Death of a Salesman
Siddhartha                                              The Odyssey
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest                         The Catcher in the Rye
Slaughterhouse Five                                     Night
Angela’s Ashes                                          Long Day’s Journal Into Night
Antigone                                                Hiroshima
The Stranger                                            Oedipus the King
Angela’s Ashes                                          Heart of Darkness

Reading and Writing Assignments
The most important requirement for this course is that students read each assignment on
time and with care. This course will require more independent reading than most other
courses. Students will write a number of critical papers as well as respond in writing
based on the literature in various essays that are analytical, argumentative, expository,
informal, and exploratory; including two that are research-based. In addition, students
will be given frequent opportunities to write and rewrite formal and timed in-class
responses to the literature using peer editing as well as teacher feedback.

Tests, Quizzes, and Exams
Students should expect reading quizzes frequently to test their knowledge and
interpretation of various literary works. After each unit students will receive a formal
assessment in the form of a test that may be multiple-choice, open-ended, and/or in essay
form. The students will have a minimum of four quarterly exams (one each marking
period) that will be in essay form and require students to synthesize their understanding
of the literature. The essay questions may be aligned and similar to practice questions
found on the AP exam.

Grading Policy
Tests, Projects, and Essays -------------------------------------70%
Homework, Class work, and Quizzes-------------------------10%
Quarterly Exams--------------------------------------------------20%
Unit Information
Unit Name or Timeframe:
College Preparation and Essay Writing
Weeks 1 and 2 for introduction and initial preparation and throughout the length of the
course. The students will be utilizing and demonstrating the skills taught throughout the
length of the course in all of their writing assignments such as timed writing/essay tests,
statements, paragraphs, and written responses/essay on the literature.
Content and/or Skills Taught:
Students will be given information and instruction on topics such as:
-Tips for College writing
-The Exemplary College Essay
-Sample College Essays
-Admissions Criteria
-Essay topics from college applications
-Various sample college applications
-Instruction and review of general grammar skills and vocabulary
Skills Taught:
1. Discussion and practice test taking skills and responses to question samples for the AP
Exam and identify and understand the expectations for class.
2. Discussion and identification of different graphic organizers for organizing writing and
the importance of the audience of their essays.
3. Analysis of college admission standards for expectations in order to demonstrate these
in their writing.
4. Instruct and provide students with information and feedback on their writing to
enhance voice, style, sentence variety, and tone.
5. Instruct students and provide feedback on how to highlight accomplishments and write
from the self.
6. Instruct and provide students with information to employ appropriate grammar and
mechanics in their writing. The students will be exposed to various new vocabulary and
basic grammar techniques throughout the course which they must use in all their writing.
7. Write and review peer essays and content.
8. Read sample college essays and tips for writing college application essays.
9. Engage in the full writing process and utilize strategies such as graphic organizers to
plan and write drafts according to the intended message, audience, and purpose for
writing.
10. Analyze and revise writing to improve style, focus, organization, coherence, clarity,
and sophisticated word choice.
11. Draft a thesis statement and support/defend it.
12. Improve their writing and find their own voice.
13. Utilize teacher and peer feedback to revise, edit, and improve all writing.

Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
The students will be required to write various college essays weekly as well as re-write
and revise previous written essays. The students will be evaluating essays from their
peers. Students will be expected to use every writing assignment to practice and improve
their writing skills. They must begin to exhibit stylistic maturity by using a variety of
sentence structures, incorporating clear transitions, and using a wide range vocabulary.
The different essays will cover a wide range of topics and will include timed essays
which may be argumentative, expository, and creative in manner. All essays at the end of
the unit will be utilized in order to establish a writing portfolio for each student.
Unit Name or Timeframe:
Existentialism and the power of choice. The Stranger by Albert Camus
Approximately 3 weeks
Content and/or Skills Taught:
The students will be reading, analyzing, interpreting, and writing various responses to
the novel The Stranger by Albert Camus.
During and after reading this novel the students will be provided with instruction and
will be able to:
1. Understand Existentialism and discuss the power of choice.
2. Identify, discuss, and analyze the influence of 19th and 20th century writers and the
moral choice.
3. Discuss the meaning of life.
4. Identify the author Camus and his influence and philosophies of life in relation to his
works.
5. Read and interpret the novel The Stranger.
6. Identify and analyze the “Absurd” things in the novel and analyze the major characters
reactions to things that are “difficult to know.”
7. Demonstrate an understanding of how existentialism is found in the novel and the
themes that are apparent throughout the characters absurd way of thinking.
8. Read and analyze poetry that examines the topic of Existentialism in relation to the
novel.
9. Discuss Meursault’s absurd crime and identify aspects of his character.
10. Read “A Tale of a Political Prisoner and relate to the novel.
11. Write an analysis of Meursault’s attitude and demonstrate the advantages and
disadvantages of his flaws.
12. Debate resolutions about Meursault’s character.
13. Respond to questions that model the AP exam based on The Stranger.
14. Identify aspects of prison life that Meursault finds difficult.

Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
1. The students will be given frequent opportunities to respond and show an
understanding of the novel through short in-class writing assignments.
2. The students will draw upon textual details to make and explain judgments based on
the character of Meursault and his existential attitude in the novel.
3. They will be required to write an essay on their own meaning of life and purpose here
on earth. Their essay must relate to themes of Existentialism such as moral individualism,
subjectivity, choice and commitment, dread and anxiety.
4. The students will engage in group discussions and reader-response questions based on
topics such as:
-What is the meaning of human life?
-Why are people on earth?
-What is mankind’s ultimate purpose?
-Why do some people exist without notice?
5. Read and analyze poems on life and compare and contrast to themes in existentialism.
6. Participate in discussion and respond in various writing forms on Meursault’s absurd
crime and the accusations of callousness.
7. Describe Meursault’s methods for dealing with boredom.
8. Read “A Tale of a Political Prisoner,” and debate resolutions while
comparing/contrasting both works of literature.
9. Write an essay exploring attitudes of proper feelings in connection with traumatic
events.

Unit Name or Timeframe:
The students will be doing an intensive study of autobiographical literature of literary
merit such as “Black Boy” by Richard Wright and Night by Elie Weisel. Theme: A
Man’s Search for Meaning.
Approximately 3 weeks

Content and/or Skills Taught:
During and after a thorough reading of both "Black Boy," a short story by Richard
Wright, and the novel Night, by Elie Weisel, the students will be provided with instruction
on and will be able to:
1. Read both stories thoroughly interpreting and analyzing each work's literary artistry as
well as reflecting on the personal, social, and historical values of both works.
2. Identify and define terms such as prejudice, stereotype, racism, and anti-Semitism.
3. Discuss real life situations relative to the novel.
4. Read, analyze, and discuss the novel at an independent level with accuracy.
5. Understand the history and hardship of those during slavery and the holocaust.
6. Compare/contrast Richard Wright and Elie Weisel.
7. Analyze how an author’s use of words creates tone and mood.
8. Read excerpt from “The Nature of Prejudice,” and discuss how the blame is justified
through scapegoats.

Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
1. Independent reading of novel and excerpt from “Black Boy.”
2. Participate in class discussions on novel and analyze emotions relative to the real life
situations/characters.
3. Compare/Contrast slavery to Holocaust in an essay.
4. Complete various reader-response/open-ended questions based on the novel
responding subjectively and emotionally to the tragic events of each character.
5. Analyze Existentialism used by the character from The Stranger in relation to Night
and make connections which evaluate the purpose for Elie going through such a tragic
event in history.
6. Write poetry that reflects on themselves and characters in the novel.
7. Write responses to the literature in the form of paragraphs, open-ended essays,
analytical, personal and expository, which discuss the topics of an absent or blind God,
the importance of faith, and the strength of the family. The students will engage in formal
writing, peer review and editing to organize, write, and revise their work.
8. The students will create a project that requires them to design their own monument for
the Holocaust which exemplifies the major themes present in the novel and the
underlying message found within the text. The students will be responsible for designing
the actual monument in an artistic and descriptive form as well as writing a clear analysis
of their intent and purpose for the design.
9. The students will also keep a reading journal in which they respond to various sections
of the reading and its historical, emotional, and cultural connections to family and human
suffering.
Unit Name or Timeframe:
The students will be reading, analyzing, interpreting, and writing various responses to
the novel The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger. Theme- Struggling to find your place
in the world.
About 3 weeks
Content and/or Skills Taught:
During and after reading the novel The Catcher in the Rye the students will be provided
with instruction and will be able to:
1. Identify, define, and use vocabulary words from context.
2. Read and understand the novel Catcher while recognizing and identifying themes and
attitudes in a colloquial writing style.
3. Write a variety of responses to questions pertaining to the novel.
4. Compare and contrast characters in the novel with other characters from previous
experiences with literature such as the interpretation and similarity of the existential
attitude of Meursault from The Stranger with that of the suicidal Holden Caulfield.
5. Create an attribute web about Holden and consider how he acts, feels, where he lives,
and how others perceive him.
6. Participate in discussions involving characters and events in the novel.
7. Read and write a parody of “Catch Her in the Oatmeal.”
8. Analyze symbols and motifs present in the novel.
9. Respond in writing to various questions pertaining to the novel.
10. Write, respond, and read poetry that pertains to Allie’s Glove and write poetry that is
symbolic of him.
11. Write a variety of responses to questions pertaining to themes and symbolism present
in the novel.
12. Identify and recognize characterization techniques employed by Salinger.
13. Understand, identify, and analyze the psychological aspects of Holden.
14. Identify, recognize, and analyze themes and attitudes towards society present in the
novel.
15. Make connections to characters and attitudes towards the adult world and society
present in the novel.
16. Predict future outcomes and events in the novel.
17. Relate situations in the novel to personal experiences.
18. Compare and contrast what is authentic vs. phony is to Holden’s view and their own
personal beliefs.

Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
1. The students will be writing a series of analytical and expository essays examining the
role and attitude of the main character Holden, the attitude towards society that the novel
as well as main character portrays, the use of inappropriate and colloquial language,
teenage angst, and suicide.
2. The students will be engaged in various informal exploratory writing assignments
where they will use details from the time period and the text to develop an interpretation
of various symbols, motifs, and themes present throughout the novel.
3. The students will write a parody of The Catcher in the Rye where they must utilize and
parody the style of the author and language of the main character Holden after reading a
similar parody entitled "Catch Her in the Oatmeal."
4. The students will engage in formal and informal discussions based on major events and
respond in writing to various questions pertaining to the novel.
5. All students will be given opportunities to write, evaluate, and rewrite all writing
assignments.
Unit Name or Timeframe:
Poetry Unit
2 to 3 weeks

Content and/or Skills Taught:
All poetry will be read, interpreted, and analyzed for content, purpose, and author's
literary style as well as all poetic devices such as figurative language, imagery, and
meter. After reading various poems which may include but are not limited to “Lesson of
the Moth,” “Lose Yourself,” "Amulet," and various selections by Robert Frost, Emily
Dickinson, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Browning, William Blake, Sara Teasdale, William
Wordsworth, Donne, Yeats, Williams, Walt Whitman, and William Shakespeare the
students will be required and able to:
1. Analyze poetry and song lyrics while identifying various devices and symbols found
within the poem.
2. Understand rhyme scheme and identify meter and structure in poetry.
3. Recognize use of tone and imagery.
4. Participate in poetry analysis and discussion with their peers where they must interpret,
analyze, and come to an understanding of the historical, structural, and cultural values
found within.
5. Identify and relate ideals and morals of main characters previously read to morality
discussed in certain poems.
6. Point out poetic devices used in the poems and be able to identify, define, and use the
devices appropriately in their own writing.
7. Relate personal experiences to poetry.
8. Analyze a poem and write a poetry analysis essay that requires doing some research on
criticism of the author and poem.
9. Select appropriate electronic material for research and evaluate the quality of the
information received.
10. Read and critically analyze a variety of works.
11. Apply information gained from several sources in citations and writing pieces.
12. Foster an argument, draw conclusions, and provide examples from poetry to support
paper.
13. Research and find a poem relating to themes discussed and write an analysis essay of
the poem.
14. Respond to timed AP practice questions on poetry interpretation and analysis.
15. The students will be engaged in peer evaluation and editing of each other's poetry
analysis papers and be provided with feedback from the teacher before writing their
formal piece.

Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
1. The students will be required to write a Poetry Analysis paper utilizing research and
criticism on both the author and poem.
2. The students will be required to read critically and interpret various poems for style,
content, structure, and poetic devices.
3. The students will be given a series of tests on various poetry terms that they must
identify and their ability to effectively respond to questions pertaining to specific
elements in poetry and poems they read.
4. The students will be given timed essays/tests in which they must respond in an
argumentative or analytical essay to a specific poem.
5. The students will be required to read a poem to the class effectively and lead a
discussion in which they present their poetry analysis to their peers.
6. The students will be required to write various poetry and poetry forms on different
topics and themes incorporating figurative language similar to those in literature we read
in class.
Unit Name or Timeframe:
Shakespeare and the 16th Century
The students will be reading Shakespeare's Comedy "A Midsummer Night's Dream,"
which can be substituted for "Hamlet," or "Julius Caesar."
Approximately 3 weeks
Content and/or Skills Taught:
During and after a thorough reading of the Shakespearean play A Midsummer Night's
Dream, the students will be provided with instruction and will be able to:
1. Identify elements of Shakespeare and the life of William Shakespeare.
2. Identify elements of a Shakespearean tragedy or comedy and discuss.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of Shakespeare’s language and major themes found in
all literary works from a Shakespearean influence.
4. Evaluate and establish an understanding of Shakespeare’s life, career, and education.
5. Complete a Web Quest/internet activity on Shakespeare and prepare a short
presentation to teach the class certain aspects of Shakespeare’s life and career.
6. Read the play and discuss events as they arise.
7. Read and interpret Aristotle’s definition of a tragedy.
8. Analyze and identify important literary elements found within the play.
9. Identify characters and themes throughout the play
10. Identify and evaluate character relationships within the play.
11. Recognize major themes in the play and the influence of the supernatural.
12. Identify and define character motives in the play.
13. Analyze various writing styles and how Shakespeare shifts his stylistic form.
14. Identify and evaluate the role of women in the play in comparison to other
Shakespearean plays.
15. Compare/Contrast societal differences found in the play.
16. Identify, recognize, and define poetic devices throughout the work.
17. Identify different types of comedy and compare them in relation to other genres.

Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
1. The students will be required to read aloud and on their own various Acts of the play.
2. The student will be responding to thought-provoking questions that may be open-
ended or in essay form pertaining to major events, themes, motifs, and characters in the
play.
3. The students will be required to complete various tasks such as poetry writing and
analysis, a character analysis, and essays that are expository, argumentative, and
analytical on various topics such as the use of magic, the role of fate, love, the role of
women, superstitions, and the shift in language in the play.

Unit Name or Timeframe:
Mythology and Greek Drama- Oedipus the King and Antigone
Approx. 4 weeks
Content and/or Skills Taught:
During and after a thorough reading of the Edith Hamilton’s Mythology, the students
will be provided with instruction on the following:
“How the World and Mankind Were Created,” “Pandora’s Box,
 “12 Great Olympian Gods,” “Lesser Gods of the Earth,” “Cupid and Psyche,” “The
Earliest Heroes,” “Hercules,” “Theseus,” “Perseus,” “The Trojan War,” and “The Fall
of Troy.” Oedipus the King and Antigone.

The students will be able to:
1. Gain an understanding of ancient Greek and Roman concepts of creation and early
development of mankind.
2. Understand how the Greeks believed the World and Mankind were created.
3. Relate previous knowledge about mythology to the stories in the novel.
4. Identify the earliest heroes in Greek mythology.
5. Do a careful, deliberate reading that yields multiple meanings related to myths of
mankind and the creation of the world.
6. Use knowledge of word origins, relationships, as well as historical and literary context
clues to determine the meanings of words.
7. Analyze how works of a given period reflect historical, social events, and conditions.
8. The students will be given frequent opportunities to write and rewrite informal and
exploratory writing activities to discuss what they think about the different myths and
stories they read.
9. Differentiate between fact and opinion based on readings within the text.
10. Recognize literary concepts, such as rhetorical device, logical fallacy, and jargon and
their effect on meaning.
11. Understand the studies of literature and the theories of literary criticism.
12. Read developmentally at an independent level with accuracy and speed.
13. Read a variety of genres and types of text with fluency and comprehension.
14. Understand and apply myths of creation and stories of Gods to myths of today.
15. Create a timeline for the creation myths and the stories of the Gods.
16. Understand the concept that mythology shows the way the human race thought and
felt ages ago.
18. Analyze a work of literature, showing how it reflects the heritage, traditions,
attitudes, and beliefs of its authors.
19. Read, evaluate, and discuss events of each piece of literature.
20. Understand and identify important causes and results of the wars.
21. Understand that distinct literary traditions and contemporary writing mark our
literary heritage.
22. Analyze how works of a given period reflect historical and social events and
conditions.
23. Demonstrate an understanding of Greek drama for style and content.
24. Compose and assess various writing assignments based on topics that connect the
literature and historical/social conventions.

Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
1. The students will be required to read independently various myths and stories of Gods
and Goddesses.
2. The student will be responding to thought-provoking questions that may be open-
ended, timed, or in essay form drawing upon textual details and their interpretation of
various stories of the Gods and Goddesses in Greek Mythology.
3. The students will be required to participate in discussions in order to build an
understanding and make connections to the reading.
4. The students will be required to write their own explanatory myth to answer
exploratory questions related to myths of modern day and the text with illustrative detail.
They will be given opportunities to discuss their myths in connection to the modern
world and develop an extended interpretation in connection with the literary text.
5. The students will be required to write several formal analytical and argumentative
essays about the social and cultural values surrounding Greek Mythology.
6. The students will be given a series of tests to check their understanding of the reading
that are timed, in essay/multiple-choice and open-ended form.
7. The students will be required to create their own God/Goddess and symbols using
illustrative details that are relevant in relation to the myths in the text.
8. Participate in discussions and writing assignments based on reflection of the Trojan
War and how wars begin today.
9. Discuss and analyze how mythology has influenced historical and social events.

Unit Name or Timeframe:
The Research Paper
Approximately 1 week for instruction and implementation; the information will be
reinforced throughout the course in all major writing assignments.

Content and/or Skills Taught:
The students will be provided with instruction on the implementation of a college-level
research paper on topics such as literary criticism of an independent reading as well as on
a controversial issue.
The students will be able to:
1. Select appropriate electronic media for research and evaluate the quality of the
information received.
2. Develop increased ability to critically select works to support a research topic.
3. Read and critically analyze a variety of works, including books and other materials
about one issue or topic.
4. Apply information gained from several sources or books on a single topic or by a
single author to foster an argument, draw conclusions, or advance a position.
5. Critique the validity and logic of arguments advanced in public documents, their
appeal to various audiences, and the extent to which they anticipate and address reader
concerns.
6. Understand how to write a works cited and cite information correctly using
parenthetical documentation.
7. Use a wide range of vocabulary effectively and write with sentence variety.
8. Develop a logical organization of ideas while establishing tone and maintaining a
balance of generalization and specific details using research as support.
9. Write, revise, and rewrite both the informal and formal parts of their research paper.
10. Engage in peer editing and understand strategies to improve their writing skills using
coherence, transitions, sentence variety, and vocabulary.

Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
1. Participate in discussions and peer evaluations based on research paper topics dealing
with issues that are cause/effect, comparison/contrast, controversial and argumentative.
2. Complete a works cited page using appropriate parenthetical documentation and
paraphrasing from research.
3. Conduct and gather research and write evaluations based on their research for literary
analysis.
4. Engage in the writing process for evaluation and peer editing.
5. Write, revise, and rewrite a 3-5, and 5-10 page research paper on topics surrounding
the criticism of a major literary work as well as controversial issues of today.

Unit Name or Timeframe:
Feminism
“The Yellow Wallpaper.”
Poetry- various selections by Emily Dickinson, Sara Teasdale and other feminist poets.
“I Want A Wife.”
“A Doll’s House

Content and/or Skills Taught:
During and after a thorough reading of “The Yellow Wallpaper,” various selections of
feminist poetry, “I Want A Wife,” and “A Doll’s House” the students will be instructed
and able to do the following:
1. Read, interpret, analyze, and discuss the various readings related to the topic of
feminism for literary merit, and style.
2. Read and discuss Emily Dickenson poems such as: “Much Madness is Divinest
Sense,” and “She Rose to his Requirement,” and relate it to the story.
3. Engage in different writing activities and poetry writing that reinforces elements of
figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone in relation to the text.
4. Make careful observations of textual details while reading.
5. Identify the social and historical values that each work reflects in discussion and in
response to various writing assignments that are expository and analytical.
6. Write to evaluate and draw upon details from the different texts to make comparisons
and explain judgments about each works quality, artistry, and literary message.
7. Identify and discuss chivalry as opposed to a male chauvinist.
8. Read “I Want a Wife,” and discuss feminist point of view.
9. Review and demonstrate how “The Yellow Wallpaper,” “A Doll’s House,” and “I
Want A Wife,” all relate to themes of feminism in various writing assignments.
10. Identify and demonstrate aspects of writing and giving a speech such as
professionalism, audience perspective, pronunciation, etc.


Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
The students will be required to:
1. Read and discuss stories and analyze themes of feminism found in each through
writing and discussion.
2. Complete a descriptive writing activity on a piece of furniture and object poetry on an
emblem.
3. Identify how the ripping of the wallpaper relates to how the main character feels
trapped and is tearing away the fabric or pieces of her as she tears the yellow wallpaper in
an exploratory or analytical essay.
4. Read, discuss and analyze Emily Dickinson poems in relation to ideals in “The
Yellow Wallpaper” in various writing assignments and timed responses to questions.
5. Review feminist themes and read the play “A Doll’s House.”
6. Analyze characters in the novel and discuss feminist angle of the play in a written
formal analysis that incorporates illustrative detail and makes connections to other
readings.
7. Identify and discuss chivalry as opposed to a male chauvinist.
8. Read “I Want a Wife,” and discuss feminist point of view.
9. Review themes of feminism in all previous literary works in a major writing
assignment.
10. Write a parody of “I Want A Wife.”
11. Write and give a speech on an aspect of feminism
12. Review and demonstrate how “The Yellow Wallpaper,” “A Doll’s House,” and “I
Want A Wife,” all relate to themes of feminism in an comparison/contrast essay.

Unit Name or Timeframe:
Short Stories
“The A & P,” “Rape Fantasies,” “The Lottery,” “A Rose for Emily.”

Content and/or Skills Taught:
1. Read and interpret a collection of short stories.
2. Analyze characters and relate attitudes between narrator in “A & P” and “Rape
Fantasies.”
3. Discuss and interpret views of the south in comparison to more modern literature.
4. Read and interpret symbolism found in the stories.

Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
1. Reading and discussion of characters emotions and attitudes.
2. Interpreting symbols found in stories.
3. Respond in writing to various questions surrounding character and plot analysis.
4. Identify and recognize difference in style of writing and author’s tone in various
reading selections.
5. Write critically to evaluate the social and historical values discussed in each story.

Unit Name or Timeframe:
Angela’s Ashes
“A Modest Proposal”
“Famine”
3 weeks

Content and/or Skills Taught:
1. Evaluate use of an autobiography as a memoir or personal record of events, people,
and situations that have shaped one’s life.
2. Read interpretatively at an independent level with comprehension and clarity.
3. Identify tense, mood, setting, and all literary elements.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of the conflicts that arise throughout the novel as well
as themes, motifs, and symbols.
5. Evaluate the role of women throughout the novel and the lack of censure which affects
the moral tone of the book.
6. Identify and evaluate Frank’s relationship with Catholicism and Ireland.

Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
1. Read, interpret, and evaluate character relationships, conflicts, and literary elements
found within the novel.
2. Participate in discussions based on characters, events, themes, symbols, and motifs
found in the novel.
3. Answer a variety of questions posed on various topics throughout the reading.
4. Write responses to various questions as well as essays based on questions pertaining to
the characters, conflicts, and events in the novel.
5. Recognize and interpret related readings such as “A Modest Proposal,” and “Famine,”
in relation to events and discussions based on the novel in writing.

Unit Name or Timeframe:
The American Dream
“Death of a Salesman”
Content and/or Skills Taught:
1. Identify characteristics of American ideals and philosophies.
2. Compare/contrast differences between materialistic and idealistic values associated
with the American Dream.
3. Read, evaluate, and analyze elements of drama found in the play.
4. Identify characteristics of American ideals and philosophies.
5. Compare/contrast differences between materialistic and idealistic values associated
with the American Dream.
6. Read, evaluate, and analyze elements of drama found in the play.
7. Write an essay identifying literary elements and influence of characters in need of
finding their American Dream

Major Assignments and/or Assessments:
1. Read and interpret the play “Death of a Salesman.”
2. Discuss differences between materialistic and idealistic values associated with the
American Dream.
3. Review elements of drama found in the play.
4. Discuss and analyze character emotions and relationships throughout the play.
5. Discuss and analyze character emotions and relationships throughout the play.
6. View video and compare and contrast play version and video.
7. Write, revise, and rewrite an essay focusing on the idea of the American Dream and
evaluate previous characters read in literature for their own concepts of the American
Dream.

								
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