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20110421-5411

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 1

									Functional recovery in acute traumatic spinal cord injury after transplantation
of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells
Sheng-Li Hu, MD; Hai-Shui Luo, MD; Jiang-Tao Li, MM; Yong-Zhi Xia, MD; Lan Li, MM; Li-Jun Zhang, MD;
Hui Meng, MD; Gao-Yu Cui, MD; Zhi Chen, MD; Nan Wu, MD; Jiang-Kai Lin, MD; Gang Zhu, MD; Hua Feng,
MD

Objective: Spinal cord injury results in loss of neurons, degen-glial scar were also explored by using
immunohistochemistry and eration of axons, formation of glial scar, and severe functional immunofl uorescence.
impairment. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells can Main Results: Recovery of hindlimb locomotor function
was be induced to form neural cells in vitro. Thus, these cells have a signifi cantly enhanced in the human umbilical cord
mesenchymal potential therapeutic role for treating spinal cord injury. stem cells grafted animals at 5 wks after
transplantation. This

Design and Setting: Rats were randomly divided into three recovery was accompanied by increased length of neurofi
lamentgroups: sham operation group, control group, and human umbilical positive fi bers and increased numbers of
growth cone-like struccord mesenchymal stem cell group. All groups were subjected to tures around the lesion site.
Transplanted human umbilical cord-spinal cord injury by weight drop device except for sham group. mesenchymal stem
cells survived, migrated over short distances,

Subjects: Thirty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats. and produced large amounts of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic
Interventions: The control group received Dulbecco’s modifi ed factor and neurotrophin-3 in the host spinal cord. There
were essential media/nutrient mixture F-12 injections, whereas the fewer reactive astrocytes in both the rostral and
caudal stumps of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell group undertook the spinal cord in the human umbilical
cord-mesenchymal stem cells transplantation at the dorsal spinal cord 2 mm rostrally and cell group than in the control
group. 2 mm caudally to the injury site at 24 hrs after spinal cord injury. Conclusions: Treatment with human umbilical
cord mesenchy-

Measurements: Rats from each group were examined for neu-mal stem cells can facilitate functional recovery after
traumatic rologic function and contents of brain-derived neurotrophic fac-spinal cord injury and may prove to be a useful
therapeutic strategy tor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotrophin-3. to repair the injured spinal cord.
(Crit Care Med 2010; 38:2181–2189) Survival, migration, and differentiation of human umbilical cord KEY WORDS:
functional recovery; mesenchymal stem cells; spimesenchymal stem cells, regeneration of axons, and formation of nal
cord injury; transplantation; umbilical cord lial scar were also explored by using immunohistochemistry and
immunofluorescence.

Main Results: Recovery of hindlimb locomotor function was significantly enhanced in the human umbilical cord
mesenchymal stem cells grafted animals at 5 wks after transplantation. This recovery was accompanied by increased
length of neurofilamentpositive fibers and increased numbers of growth cone-like structures around the lesion site.
Transplanted human umbilical cordmesenchymal stem cells survived, migrated over short distances, and produced large
amounts of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic g factor and neurotrophin-3 in the host spinal cord. There were fewer
reactive astrocytes in both the rostral and caudal stumps of the spinal cord in the human umbilical cord-mesenchymal
stem cell group than in the control group.
Conclusions: Treatment with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells can facilitate functional recovery after
traumatic spinal cord injury and may prove to be a useful therapeutic strategy to repair the injured spinal cord. (Crit Care
Med 2010; 38:2181–2189)
KEY WORDS: functional recovery; mesenchymal stem cells; spinal cord injury; transplantation; umbilical cord

								
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