Benthic Organisms As Water Quality Indicators by HC120224224537

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									Benthic Organisms As Water
     Quality Indicators
       Mr. Christensen
        Objectives for Today
• Understand the use of biological indicators
  for assessing water quality
• Learn to capture, handle and identify
  macroinvertebrates
• Learn to associate macroinvertebrate
  presence or absence with levels of water
  quality
     The Concept Of Biological
            Indicators
• The presence, condition, and numbers of the types
  of fish, insects, algae, and plants can provide
  accurate information about the health of a specific
  river, stream, lake, wetland, or estuary.

• Used to characterize current water quality status
  and to track and predict significant change.
        Biological Indicators
• Evaluating the health of a body of water
  through the use of biological indicators is
  called biological assessment.

• Water quality can include: dissolved
  oxygen, pollutants, algal growth and ph
  levels.
From Managing Michigan Ponds for Sport Fishing MSU Extension Bulletin E-1554
Why Use Biological Indicators?
• By observing directly the plants and
  animals that live in bodies of water—we
  can---.

• Set protection or restoration goals.

• Determine what to monitor and how to
  interpret.
 Why Use Biological Indicators
• Prioritize stressors and choose control
  measures.

• Assess and report the effectiveness of
  management actions.
    What Are Benthic
    Macroinvertebrates
• Benthic = bottom.

• Macro = large.

• Invertebrate = animal without a
  backbone.
   Benthic Macroinvertebrates
• Aquatic invertebrates that live in the bottom
  parts of our waters and make good
  indicators of watershed health.

• Live in water all or part of its life cycle
  usually the nymph or larval stage (complete
  or partial metamorphosis).
 Why Benthic Macroinvertebrates Are
  Good Indicators of Water Quality

• Live in the water for all or most of their life

• Stay in areas suitable for their survival

• Are easy to collect

• Are easy to identify in a laboratory
Why Good Indicators-continued
• Often live for more than one year

• Have limited mobility

• Are good indicators of local environmental
  conditions
          Levels of Sensitivity
• Sensitive—stoneflies, water penny beetles,

mayflies, dobsonflies, alderflies, snipe flies,

mussels, riffle beetles, (trout)
         Levels of Sensitivity
• Moderate—damselflies, dragonflies,

crayfish, amphipods, blackflies, caddisflies

isopods, craneflies, (catfish)
         Levels of Sensitivity
• Pollution tolerant--midge flies (blood-

worms), worms, leeches, pouch snails, (carp)
                                  ISOPOD (SOWBUG)




MAYFLIES
                                                        LEECH




                                         CRAYFISH

  From: www.epa.gov/indicators/html/benthosclean.html
Found at --
http://www.epa.gov/owow/watershed/wacademy/acad2000/rbp/s19a.jpg
                       Lets Get to Work




From www.cpawscalgary.org/education/pdf/pond-study-lesson-plan.pdf

								
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