Third Grade Overview by ZF8NVW00

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									Michigan Studies                                                                               SS0306
Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens


                      Third Grade Social Studies: Michigan Studies

                  Unit 6: Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens

                                                Big Picture Graphic

Overarching Question:

          How do state and national governments work to solve problems citizens face?

Previous Unit:                   This Unit:                                  Next Unit:

   The Government of               Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens       Fourth Grade United
       Michigan                                                                   States Studies




Questions To Focus Assessment and Instruction:                        Types of Thinking

    1. How do responsible citizens resolve statewide problems?        Compare/Contrast
    2. How do people learn about public issue in our state?           Evaluation
    3. Why do people disagree about the ways to solve problems        Perspectives
       facing people in Michigan?


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www.micitizenshipcurriculum.org                                                           April 21, 2010
Michigan Studies                                                         SS0306
Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens

                                                Graphic Organizer




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www.micitizenshipcurriculum.org                                     April 21, 2010
Michigan Studies                                                                             SS0306
Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens

Unit Abstract:
In this unit students examine a public issues relating to Michigan. The unit begins with a review of
some responsibilities of citizenship as students learn that one key civic responsibility is being
informed about matters of public concern and participating in government, and working together to
solve problems using the book, City Green. Students explore the difference between private or
family issues and public issues in the local community or state. After learning the differences
between renewable and non-renewable resources (a science integration), students examine the
public issue of wind farms in the Great Lakes. Students identify various points of view and
applying core democratic values to support several positions on the issue.. Meeting in small
groups, students discuss various viewpoints on the issue and ultimately express a reasoned
position on it by writing a short persuasive paragraph. The unit concludes with an optional lesson
integrating the ELA expectation dealing with research projects. Students apply the steps of
responsible citizenship by choosing a public issue in Michigan to investigate, research, and write a
persuasive piece that supports their position on the issue that is supported by their research.

Focus Questions
   1. How do responsible citizens resolve statewide problems?
   2. How do people learn about public issue in our state?
   3. Why do people disagree about the ways to solve problems facing people in Michigan?

Content Expectations
2 - P3.1.1: Identify public issues in the local community that influence the daily lives of its
            citizens.
3 - P3.1.1: Identify public issues in Michigan that influence the daily lives of its citizens.
3 - P3.1.2: Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in
            Michigan and evaluate alternative resolutions.
3 - P3.1.3: Give examples of how conflicts over core democratic values lead people to differ on
            resolutions to a public policy issue in Michigan.
3 - P3.3.1: Compose a paragraph expressing a position on a public policy issue in Michigan and
            justify the position with a reasoned argument.
3 - C5.0.1: Identify rights (e.g., freedom of speech, freedom of religion, right to own property)
            and responsibilities of citizenship (e.g., respecting the rights of others, voting,
            obeying laws).
3 - G5.0.1: Locate natural resources in Michigan and explain the consequences of their use.
3 - G5.0.2: Describe how people adapt to, use, and modify the natural resources of Michigan.

Integrated GLCE’s
R.NT.03.03 Identify and describe characters’ thoughts and motivations, story level themes (good
            vs. evil), main idea, and lesson/moral (fable). (English Language Arts)

R.CM.03.02 Retell in sequence the story elements of grade-level narrative text and major idea(s)
           and relevant details of grade-level informational text. (English Language Arts)

W.GN.03.04 use the writing process to produce and present a research project; initiate
           research questions from content area text from a teacher-selected topic; and use a
           variety of resources to gather and organize information. (English Language Arts)

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www.micitizenshipcurriculum.org                                                         April 21, 2010
Michigan Studies                                                                              SS0306
Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens



W.PR.03.05 proofread and edit writing using appropriate resources (e.g., dictionary,
           spell check, writing references) and grade-level checklists, both individually and in
           groups (English Language Arts)

D.RE.03.01 Read and interpret bar graphs in both horizontal and vertical forms. (Math)

E.ES.03.42 Classify renewable (fresh water, farmland, forests) and non-renewable (fuels, metals)
           resources. (Science)

E.ES.03.52 Describe helpful or harmful effects of humans on the environment (garbage, habitat
           destruction, land management, renewable and non-renewable resources). (Science)


Key Concepts
core democratic values
informed decision
point of view
public issue
responsibilities of citizenship


Duration
6 weeks


Lesson Sequence
Lesson 1: What are Public Issues?
Lesson 2: Why do People Disagree about Public Issues?
Lesson 3: Exploring a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens
Lesson 4: Evaluating Possible Resolutions of a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens
Lesson 5: Composing a Short Essay on a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens
Lesson 6: Taking a Stand on a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens (Optional)


Assessment
Selected Response Items

Extended Response Items
Write a persuasive essay taking a position in a public issue facing Michigan residents. Support the
position with data and a core democratic value. (3 - P3.1.2; 3 - P3.1.3; 3 - P3.3.1)

Performance Assessments
Make an oral or visual presentation that informs classmates on public issue facing Michigan
residents. In the presentation identify the issue and describe two viewpoints. (3 - P3.1.1; 3 -
P3.1.2)



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www.micitizenshipcurriculum.org                                                          April 21, 2010
Michigan Studies                                                                              SS0306
Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens

Resources
Equipment/Manipulative
Overhead Projector or Document Camera and Projector

Student Resource
DiSalvo-Ryan, DyAnne. City Green. New York: Morrow Junior Books, 1994.

McConnell, David. Meet Michigan. Hillsdale, MI: Hillsdale Educational Publishers, 2009.

Teacher Resource
*Create Your Own Notebook on Core Democratic Values. 18 April 2010
      <http://www.michiganepic.org/coredemocratic/indexb.html>.

Egbo, Carol. Supplemental Materials (Unit 6). Teacher-made material. Michigan Citizenship
      Collaborative Curriculum, 2010

Example of a Water-based Wind Farm. 18 April 2010.
      <http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/sep/17/worlds-largest-offshore-wind-farm-
      dong>.

Harvest Wind Farm Map and Photo. 18 April 2010.
       <http://www.wpsci.com/HarvestWindFarm.aspx>.

Lake Michigan Power Coalition. 18 April 2010. <http://www.protectwithpower.org/>.

Michigan Gold: Offshore Winds. 18 April 2010. <http://blogcritics.org/politics/article/michigan-gold-
       offshore-wind/>.

Offshore Potential. 18 April 2010. <www.landpolicy.msu.edu>.

Radial Wind Farm in Lake Michigan. 18 April 2010.
       <http://www.radialwind.info/offshoreWindFarms.html>.

The Role of Renewable Energy Data. Energy Kids Website. 18 April 2010.
     <http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/kids/>.

West Michigan Residents Give Thumbs Down. 18 April 2010.
      <http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2610413/offshore_wind_turbine_farm_in_lake.ht
      ml?cat=9>.

Wind Power Map. 18 April 2010. <http://www.aesmichigan.com/mich_wind_map.html>.


Resources for Further Professional Knowledge
National Alliance for Civic Education. 18 April 2010 <http://www.cived.net/>.

Teaching Students To Discuss Controversial Public Issues. ERIC Digest. 18 April 2010
      <http://www.ericdigests.org/2002-2/issues.htm>.

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www.micitizenshipcurriculum.org                                                          April 21, 2010
Michigan Studies                                                                            SS0306
Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens


                                    Instructional Organization

Lesson 1: What are Public Issues?

Content Expectations
2 - P3.1.1 Identify public issues in the local community that influence the daily lives of its
           citizens.
3 - C5.0.1 Identify rights (e.g., freedom of speech, freedom of religion, right to own property)
           and responsibilities of citizenship (e.g., respecting the rights of others, voting,
           obeying laws).

Integrated Content Expectations
R.NT.03.03 Identify and describe characters’ thoughts and motivations, story level themes (good
            vs. evil), main idea, and lesson/moral (fable). (English Language Arts)
R.CM.03.02 Retell in sequence the story elements of grade-level narrative text and major idea(s)
            and relevant details of grade-level informational text. (English Language Arts).

Key Concepts: public issues, responsibilities of citizenship

Abstract: This lesson begins with a review of what students have learned about the
responsibilities of citizenship in the previous unit on Michigan government. Next, students discuss
some of the ways citizens can participate in their government. Using the book City Green or a
substitute book, students explore how citizens can work together to solve a problem. They are
introduced to public issues by first discussing issues using examples of family issues. Students
then discuss public issues and how people can work together to resolve them. Working in groups,
students explore a community-related public issue and identify public issues from their own local
community.


Lesson 2: Why Do People Disagree on Public Issues?

Content Expectations:
3- P3.1.3  Give examples of how conflicts over core democratic values lead people to differ on
           resolutions to a public policy issue in Michigan.

Key Concepts: core democratic values, point of view, public issues

Abstract: In this lesson, students explore reasons people disagree about public issues. They
begin by exploring an issue some communities may have. Students consider various points of
view on the issue. They then examine how people may use core democratic values to support and
justify the positions they take. Finally, students complete an individual activity requiring them to
take a position on the public issue they have been exploring.




Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum                                            Page 6 of 9
www.micitizenshipcurriculum.org                                                        April 21, 2010
Michigan Studies                                                                                SS0306
Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens

Lesson 3: Exploring a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens

Content Expectations:
3- P3.1.1  Identify public issues in Michigan that influence the daily lives of its citizens.
3- P3.1.2      Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in
               Michigan and evaluate alternative resolutions.
3 - G5.0.1     Locate natural resources in Michigan and explain the consequences of their use.
3 - G5.0.2     Describe how people adapt to, use, and modify the natural resources of Michigan.
.
Integrated GLCE’s:
D.RE.03.01 Read and interpret bar graphs in both horizontal and vertical forms. (Math)
E.ES.03.42 Classify renewable (fresh water, farmland, forests) and non-renewable (fuels, metals)
           resources. (Science)
E.ES.03.52 Describe helpful or harmful effects of humans on the environment (garbage, habitat
           destruction, land management, renewable and non-renewable resources). (Science)


Key Concepts: public issues

Abstract: In this lesson, students examine a specific public issue relating to Michigan using skills
introduced and applied in earlier lessons. In a connection back to Unit 2 on the Economy of
Michigan, they review the potential of wind farms in creating clean, renewable energy. Then, they
consider the public issue of whether or not to locate wind farms along Michigan shorelines of the
Great Lakes.


Lesson 4: Evaluating Possible Resolutions of a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens

Content Expectations:
3- P3.1.2  Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in
           Michigan and evaluate alternative resolutions.

Integrated GLCE’s:
E.ES.03.42 Classify renewable (fresh water, farmland, forests) and non-renewable (fuels, metals)
            resources. (Science)

E.ES.03.52 Describe helpful or harmful effects of humans on the environment (garbage, habitat
           destruction, land management, renewable and non-renewable resources). (Science)

Key Concepts: informed decision, public issues

Abstract: In this lesson, students expand their knowledge of public issues by evaluating
alternative resolutions about whether or not to place wind farms in the Great Lakes off Michigan
coastlines. They examine different points of view on the issue and core democratic values related

Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum                                               Page 7 of 9
www.micitizenshipcurriculum.org                                                           April 21, 2010
Michigan Studies                                                                             SS0306
Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens

to the differing views. This lesson serves as a precursor to students taking their own, informed,
position on this issue in the next lesson.


Lesson 5: Composing a Short Essay on a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens

Content Expectations:
3 - P3.3.1 Compose a paragraph expressing a position on a public policy issue in Michigan and
           justify the position with a reasoned argument.
3 - P3.1.3 Give examples of how conflicts over core democratic values lead people to differ on
           resolutions to a public policy issue in Michigan.

Integrated GLCE’s
W.GN.03.04 Use the writing process to produce and present a research project; initiate, research
            questions from content area text from a teacher-selected topic; and use a variety of
            resources to gather and organize information. (English Language Arts).
W.PR.03.05 Proofread and edit writing using appropriate resources (e.g., dictionary, spell check,
           writing references) and grade-level checklists, both individually and in groups
           (English Language Arts).

Key Concepts: core democratic values, informed decision, point of view, public issues, and
responsibilities of citizenship

Abstract: In previous lessons, students examined offshore wind farms as an example of a
Michigan public issue. In this lesson, they make an informed decision on the issue and express
their position in writing. Students apply a decision-making process as they consider both sides of
the public issue question including core democratic values that support each position. They use a
writing plan to design and write a short paragraph expressing their position on the public policy
question. Finally, students use a peer editing process to edit and revise their persuasive
arguments.


Lesson 6: Taking a Stand on a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens (Optional)

Content Expectations:
3- P3.1.1  Identify public issues in Michigan that influence the daily lives of its citizens.
3- P3.1.2  Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in
           Michigan and evaluate alternative resolutions.
3- P3.3.1  Compose a paragraph expressing a position on a public policy issue in Michigan and
           justify the position with a reasoned argument.

Integrated GLCE’s:
W.GN.03.04 Use the writing process to produce and present a research project; initiate, research
            questions from content area text from a teacher-selected topic; and use a variety of
            resources to gather and organize information. (English Language Arts).

Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum                                             Page 8 of 9
www.micitizenshipcurriculum.org                                                         April 21, 2010
Michigan Studies                                                                            SS0306
Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens

W.PR.03.05 Proofread and edit writing using appropriate resources (e.g., dictionary,,spell check,
           writing references) and grade-level checklists, both individually and in groups
           (English Language Arts).


Key Concepts: core democratic values, informed decision, point of view, public issues, and
responsibilities of citizenship

Abstract: In this optional lesson, students apply what they have learned about public issues to a
new public issue facing Michigan citizens. Applying the steps of responsible citizenship, students
choose a public issue in Michigan to investigate and write a persuasive essay that supports their
position on the issue. The lesson integrates research as students use a variety of traditional
sources and electronic technology in their investigations.




Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum                                            Page 9 of 9
www.micitizenshipcurriculum.org                                                        April 21, 2010

								
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