RMP-FINAL

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RMP-FINAL Powered By Docstoc
					2010
Capilano University

Jase Wilson &
Christopher Lay




[LAYMAN’S FLY FISHING ADVENTURES]
A Risk Management Plan: Prepared for Don Webster in accordance to the
required curriculum for Tour 208, Risk Management.
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                                                                Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                                                             15 December 2010

Contents
1.        Business Description ............................................................................................................................. 1
2.        Statement of Rationale ......................................................................................................................... 2
3.        Risk Management Principles ................................................................................................................. 3
     A.          Risk Identification.............................................................................................................................. 3
          i.        Bodily ............................................................................................................................................ 3
          ii.       Emotional ...................................................................................................................................... 4
          iii.      Material ......................................................................................................................................... 4
          iv.       Financial ........................................................................................................................................ 5
     B.          Risk Analysis ...................................................................................................................................... 6
          i.        Bodily ............................................................................................................................................ 6
          ii.       Emotional ...................................................................................................................................... 7
          iii.      Material ......................................................................................................................................... 8
          iv.       Financial ........................................................................................................................................ 9
     C.          Risk Control ..................................................................................................................................... 10
          i.        Exposure Avoidance .................................................................................................................... 10
          ii.       Loss Reduction ............................................................................................................................ 10
     D.          Risk Treatment ................................................................................................................................ 12
          i.        Insurance ..................................................................................................................................... 12
          ii.       Risk Retention ............................................................................................................................. 13
          iii.      Waiver ......................................................................................................................................... 13
4.        Risk Documentation & Standard Practices ......................................................................................... 14
     A.          Standard Operating Procedures ..................................................................................................... 14
          i.        Staff Expectations ....................................................................................................................... 14
          ii.       Safety Talk ................................................................................................................................... 15
          iii.      Guide Training Logs ..................................................................................................................... 16
          iv.       Incident Logs ............................................................................................................................... 16
          v.        Emergency Response Plans......................................................................................................... 16
          vi.       Trip Description ........................................................................................................................... 17
     B.          Legal Forms ..................................................................................................................................... 18
          i.        Waiver Forms .............................................................................................................................. 18
          ii.       Client Documentation ................................................................................................................. 19

Risk Management Plan                                                                                                                                          Page ii
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                                                             Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                                                          15 December 2010

   C.          Media Plan ...................................................................................................................................... 20
   D.          Insurance ......................................................................................................................................... 21
        i.        Commercial General Liability Insurance ..................................................................................... 21
        ii.       Commercial Vehicle Insurance .................................................................................................... 21
        iii.      Business Interruption Insurance ................................................................................................. 21
        iv.       Property Insurance...................................................................................................................... 21
Appendix #1 .................................................................................................................................................. 0
Appendix #2 .................................................................................................................................................. 0
Appendix #3 .................................................................................................................................................. 1
Appendix #4 .................................................................................................................................................. 2
Appendix #5 .................................................................................................................................................. 4
Appendix #6 .................................................................................................................................................. 5
References .................................................................................................................................................... 6




Risk Management Plan                                                                                                                                     Page iii
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                      Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                   15 December 2010


    1. Business Description
Layman’s Fly Fishing Adventures (LFFA) will be the leading fly fishing excursions provider in the
Squamish region with trips encompassing the Mamquam River, Squamish River, Ashlu River, Cheakamus
River, Elaho River and other tributaries.

The business will be setup as a corporation so as to protect the sole share holder Christopher Lay. There
will still be the possibility of director’s liability because Christopher Lay will also be conducting tours. To
help avoid this there will be insurance policies and this risk management plan to help mitigate this fact.

The first summer of operations will be the summer of 2011. We will begin providing tours in early March
and continue conducting them through the winter months until middle of January. This will ensure that
we make the most of the best fishing seasons in the region and are able to have more guests leave
satisfied with their experience. LFFA will operate according to all provincial fishing and safety regulations
and although there are areas where fish can be removed from the river we will be a catch and release
only operation, unless the fish is in a state of disarray and it would be inhumane to release it back into
the wild only to have it die.

We will provide fishing equipment where necessary and ensure it is maintained to the highest possible
standards. If guests would like to use their own equipment (rods and tackle) a form stating that they are
doing so at their own risk will be required. All safety equipment for guides and clients will be provided;
pre and post trip inspections will be conducted by guides and equipment will be maintained according to
Canadian Safety Association (CSA) standards.

(See Appendix #1 for Business Organization Chart)




Risk Management Plan                                                                                    Page 1
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                    Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                 15 December 2010

    2. Statement of Rationale
This document is required in order to help reduce and transfer risks associated with our fly fishing tour
business. With this document we aim to create a safe, fun and user friendly atmosphere as well as
reduce the liability associated with running these tours. This plan contains documents pertaining to but
not limited to: emergency procedures, standard operating procedures, staff training documents and
legal documentation.

Here at LFFA we not only strive to ensure guest safety, but we also strive to ensure all of our guides are
trained to the highest industry standards in order to provide safe excursions for all involved. Our
ultimate goal is that all those involved remain unscathed during every trip so as to return to their loved
ones safely at night.

In an industry where it pays to be as close to where the fish are in order to catch them there are
inevitably going to be varying degrees of risks associated with trip activities. With this in mind we must
take all possible steps to ensure safety of everyone.




Risk Management Plan                                                                                 Page 2
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                     Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                  15 December 2010

    3. Risk Management Principles

        A. Risk Identification
There are many risks involved with fly fishing most of which will not be totally obvious to our potential
clients. Depending on the level of experience LFFA may have to adjust our trips accordingly. There may
be a gap between client and even operator perception of risks that may be involved with this operation.
In order to bridge this gap LFFA must do its due diligence to fully research the risks involved and to
present these risks to all clients regardless of experience. In the section below is a list of potential
inherent risks of fly fishing.

        i.       Bodily
For the bodily risk section we have a number of items. For example according to Bolton of the
Startribune.com fishing accounts for 9% of all sports eye related injuries per year. Bodily risk can happen
to both our clients and our guides, a comprehensive list will follow.

                 a) Customer Injury due to:
       Falling while on rough trails or loose river beds, tripping hazards
       Drowning, risk of being pulled under while wearing hip waders
       Hypothermia, while in remote areas
       Motor vehicle accident, during transport to fishing locations
       Minor cuts and bruises, sprains, while fishing or hiking
       Encounters with animals/ insects
       Bone fracture
       Eye injuries due to casting

                 b) Employee Injury due to:
       Falling while hiking
       Drowning
       Hypothermia, while in remote areas
       Motor vehicle accident, during transport
       Minor cuts and bruises, sprains
       Encounter with animals/ insects
       Chronic shoulder Elbow and wrist injuries due to prolonged casting

“A team of researchers is studying the biomechanics of fly-casting at Montana State University.
Questionnaire studies and fly-fishing labs at the University are being used to prepare a database of
fishing injury patterns. In one survey of 812 fly-fishing instructors by the researchers at MSU, 49.8%
reported shoulder pain, 39% reported elbow pain and 36% reported wrist pain. 5% claimed to have pain
all the time in their casting arms. 74% reported pain in at least one of these locations.”
(The University of Montana, Missoula, MT. 2006)




Risk Management Plan                                                                                Page 3
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                   Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                15 December 2010

LFFA believes that our employees are resources. We want to retain our employees year after year
season after season. Because of this we will provide medical benefits for our guides and encourage
regular access to physiotherapy and education upon alternative grip techniques and casting styles.

         ii.      Emotional
The emotional risk section deals with our perception of what risks may be in the result of an accident.
The list to follow exemplifies the extent to which trauma may arise from serious accidents or injuries
while on the river.

Customers may experience trauma in numerous ways: the loss of a loved one while on the trip, the loss
of sight due to a hook in the eye, serious injury resulting from a motor vehicle accident. Spouses,
families and dependants may experience trauma as a result of a client drowning while on a trip.

Employees may experience trauma from losing a client or from getting into an accident. They may also
experience trauma due to loss of sight from a hook in the eye or trauma due to accidents that happen to
clients they are responsible for. Employees may experience stress should a group get unruly while on
the trip or out in the wilderness.

There is always a chance of emotional risk in high consequence scenarios. Fly fishing not a sport where
clients book to have high adrenaline they are usually looking for a calm and peaceful afternoon of sport
fishing. To have a serious accident happen while participating in ‘seemingly’ relaxed and casual
atmosphere can be quite emotionally disturbing. LFFA’s goal is to keep accidents from happening at the
source and avoid circumstances where our clients are unaware of risks that are involved. Clients have to
be given educational material well in advance to ensure that they are aware that fly fishing does in fact
have serious risks involved and that each participant needs to do their job to protect themselves from
and recognize these risks.



        iii.     Material
Material risks are not inherent to fly fishing but may be inherent to performing our tours. These risks
may include the following:

       Damage to equipment such as fishing gear or safety equipment
       Damage to vehicle from MVA
       Damage or loss of client possessions
       Damage to property from hazards and objective risks such as a fire or flood
       Damage or loss due to third parties, theft

LFFA will operate with minimal assets, most of which will be rods, reels, pfd’s, waders, and other fly
fishing equipment. Our biggest risk concerning materials is a motor vehicle accident. There is a risk of
fires or flood for our property which would likely be in Brackendale or Paradise Valley.




Risk Management Plan                                                                                Page 4
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                    Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                 15 December 2010



         iv.    Financial
There are considerable ways that LFFA may be exposed to financial loss. A bulleted list will follow of the
specific areas we are concerned about, they are:

       Financial loss due to litigation
       Financial loss due to material damage
       Financial loss due to economic conditions
       Financial loss due to theft
       Financial loss due to potential objective risk conditions such as a flood

Again the majority of these rely on an accident occurring first. It is important for LFFA to stop accidents
at the source.




Risk Management Plan                                                                                 Page 5
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                    Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                 15 December 2010

        B. Risk Analysis
Following will be a series of Probability vs. Consequence assessments of the above listed bodily,
emotional, material and financial risks.

         i.        Bodily
For the bodily risk section it is clear to see the risks that LFFA believes are the most important for us to
pay attention to. Although the chart is seemingly in statistical format we are not saying that 50% of our
trips will involve a motor vehicle accident for example. We are simply saying ‘if’ an accident happens the
statistical likelihood of it being an MVA is higher than say hypothermia or drowning.




 C
                                   Bodily Risk Assesment
   10
 o
    9
 n 8
 s 7                                                                                   Hypothermia
 e 6                                                                                   Drowning
 q 5                                                                                   Injury from MVA
    4
 u
    3                                                                                  Sprain, cuts, bruises
 e 2
 n 1                                                                                   Bone fracture
 c 0                                                                                   Animal Attacks
 e    0                2              4                 6           8             10
                                                                                       Eye injury
                                          Probability




Risk Management Plan                                                                                   Page 6
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                   Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                15 December 2010

         ii.      Emotional
It has proved difficult to make assumptions regarding emotional risks for this RMP. LFFA has done its
due diligence to gather data concerning this field and consider all points necessary. The list below is a
mix of foreseeable circumstances that may arise from serious incidents while on the fishing trip. It is
likely that a serious incident will involve client trauma, dependant, spouse and family trauma and even
employee trauma.

As it can be seen by the graph we consider the majority of the emotional risks to be high consequence.
The only viable way that we can mitigate these risks is to keep accidents from happening in the first
place. It is expected that any serious incidents will cause a considerable amount of stress on our
organization, our clients and their families and our employees.




                             Emotional Risk Assessment
 C
 o 10
                                                                                     client trauma due to
 n 9                                                                                 injury
 s 8
 e 7                                                                                 spouse, family
 q 6                                                                                 trauma due to
 u 5                                                                                 injury
 e 4                                                                                 Dependant trauma
 n 3                                                                                 due to injury
 c 2
                                                                                     Employee trauma
 e 1
    0                                                                                due to injury
        0              2             4                 6          8             10
                                         Probability




Risk Management Plan                                                                                Page 7
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                   Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                15 December 2010

         iii.    Material
It is important for LFFA to consider our assets and the possibility of damage and theft occurring to assets
that are required to continue our business operations. We also must be aware of the possibility that our
clients’ materials may become damaged during our excursions and we must take steps to minimize the
occurrence of such events.




                                Material Risk Assessment
 C
 o 10
                                                                                       Damage to
 n 9
                                                                                       Equipment
 s 8
                                                                                       Damage to Vehicle
 e 7
    6
 q                                                                                     Damage to client
    5
 u                                                                                     material
    4
 e                                                                                     Damage to property
    3
 n                                                                                     due to hazards
    2
 c                                                                                     Theft
    1
 e 0
        0              2              4                 6          8             10
                                          Probability




Risk Management Plan                                                                                Page 8
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                      Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                   15 December 2010

         iv.       Financial
Financial loss may occur as a result of bodily, emotional or material risk items arising. Financial risk is not
limited to these items however circumstances such as poor economic conditions can drastically impact
our business operations. Theft and objective risk conditions may impact our businesses financial
stability. It is important for us to protect against these items as much as is foreseeable.




                                 Financial Risk Assessment
 C
                                                                                         Financial loss due to
 o 10
                                                                                         litigation
 n 9
    8
 s                                                                                       Financial loss due to
    7
 e                                                                                       material damage
    6
 q
    5                                                                                    financial loss due to
 u 4                                                                                     economic conditions
 e 3
 n 2                                                                                     financial loss due to
 c 1                                                                                     theft
 e 0                                                                                     financial loss due to
         0              2              4                 6            8             10   objective risk
                                           Probability                                   conditions




Risk Management Plan                                                                                    Page 9
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                    Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                 15 December 2010

        C. Risk Control
This section deals with the risks that we have identified, the probability vs. consequence analysis and
what steps we will take to control risks that are involved. The two sections below will describe what
steps will be taken to either avoid exposure to risks or to reduce loss by way of policies and procedures.

        i.       Exposure Avoidance
There are few risks that LFFA can completely avoid. Most risks are acceptable by our organization and
we realize that they are inherent to the activity. Below is a list of methods that we will apply to avoid
potential risks.

       Proper spacing of casters while at the river will avoid the risk of participant eye injury.
       Knowing and monitoring weather conditions will allow us to avoid days on the river where
        extreme conditions exist.
       We will avoid high water conditions river side. Judging by the group some currents may be
        deemed as unacceptable while other groups may be fine. Having highly trained guides will allow
        us to avoid the risk of having clients get in over their heads.
       We will purchase and operate with Dodge Sprinter van rather than a 16 passenger GMC van as
        the GMC van is the most statistically accident prone vehicle on the road we will avoid this risk.
       We will avoid higher guides with poor work history.
       We will avoid having poorly trained guides. Many guides may be already trained and seasoned
        experts. We are open to learning from their experience as well as our own. Guides who do not
        comply to our standards will be warned and even terminated in serious cases.
       We will avoid falling behind in industry standards. Should the industry adapt and create more
        rigid standards than we currently apply we will expose ourselves to risk by operating below this
        standard.
       Where possible we will create our own standard that is a shining example of risk management in
        the industry.
       Trip selection will help us avoid guides being alone with inexperienced clients far into the
        wilderness.

The above points are ways that LFFA can avoid problems from happening in the first place. The risks
listed are ones that we deem as unreasonable and will attempt where possible to completely avoid.

        ii.     Loss Reduction
The following are steps that we will take in each section in order to mitigate the loss that may occur if
any of the identified risks were to occur.

                a) Bodily
       All guests and guides will be required to wear protective glasses in the form of either sunglasses
        or workplace protective eye wear this will help to ensure that eye injuries are less likely to
        happen to customers and guides.




Risk Management Plan                                                                               Page 10
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                    Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                 15 December 2010

       All guests will be informed upon the risk of hypothermia and encouraged to bring an extra
        change of warm clothing. Guides will also carry space blankets and towels to warm and dry
        guests. Guides will be trained to recognize the potential for hypothermia and how to treat it.
       All participants will be required to wear CSA certified pfd’s while at the river. Pfd’s will be
        supplied by LFFA in order to ensure that the equipment meets company standards. Should
        clients insist they use their own equipment they will be required to have the equipment
        inspected by the lead guide and sign an extended assumption of risks agreement on the waiver
        form.
       All staff drivers will be required to have a clean drivers abstract and class 4 drivers license. LFFA
        will minimize the time spent driving needlessly with customers in the vehicle.
       To protect our guests from bruises, cuts, sprains and bone fractures our guides will move at
        reasonable paces as compared to the group while walking on rough terrain. Guides will also,
        where necessary, provide an educational component to ensure that guests are performing
        activities in a safe manner. In response to the likeliness of these events occurring, all guides will
        carry a fully equipped first aid kit and have at least an 80 hour first aid certificate.
       All guides will carry bear bangers and bear mace to protect against the possibility of encroaching
        wild life.
       Guides will carry satellite phones with emergency contact numbers and radios as many of the
        access roads have regular radio activity. Guides will carry GPS locators and be prepared for
        possible evacuation in response to extreme conditions.

                 b) Emotional
In order to protect ourselves from future litigation in the case of an accident LFFA will aim to support
families that have been affected by accidents. We will employ a high standard of care over our clients
and follow up in the case of accidents either minor or major. We will not admit guilt however we will
show empathy and apologize for any losses that may occur.

Being organized and highly responsive to incidents will show the participants of our dedication to safety.
All witness accounts and client accounts will be recorded in the result of an incident either minor or
major. This will provide us with an unbiased account of what happened. The CEO Christopher Lay will be
personally involved in all major incidents by visiting clients and family or showing support in any way
possible. The goal will be to show our guests that we are honestly concerned for their well being.

We will show support to our employees as well. In the event of an accident happening we will provide
the necessary support to our guides to ensure they get therapy for any physical or emotional conditions
that exist post accident. Our employees are our greatest resource, in order to ensure their capacity to
lead groups safely we will monitor their emotional stability.

                 c) Material
In order to protect ourselves from the listed material risks LFFA will carry the insurance that applies to
each category (see insurance section). We accept that damage to equipment will be a regular
occurrence. All equipment will be inspected by guides before and after every trip to ensure that
problems are recognized early. All safety equipment damages will be treated with the utmost of

Risk Management Plan                                                                                Page 11
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                     Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                  15 December 2010

seriousness. First aid and safety equipment will be replaced or taken out of operation should their
condition be deemed as unacceptable.

It is a statutory requirement of the Province of British Columbia to carry insurance for our vehicle. All
drivers will perform regular pre and post trip inspections as required by the BC standards for class 4
commercial drivers. All issues with the vehicle will be taken care of in advance to ensure that the vehicle
is always in top operating condition.

To attempt to protect guests from losing their personal materials we will have a locker system in place
at our base, all clients wishing to use this will be able to select a locker and hold the lock themselves
until the trip is over. Our ‘home base’ property will be inspected for possible perils such as poor
electrical wiring.

                d) Financial
A lean business model will help us to adapt to economic changes that can affect the market. Having a
contingency fund will allow us to make it through a tighter market conditions as well. Economic
conditions are hard to protect against as the market can change unexpectedly. By continuing to operate
at a high standard we may gain customer preference due to a safe history.

Replacing equipment and capitol assets like our vehicle as the result of a motor vehicle accident could
affect our financial situation considerably. Again here it is important that LFFA operates with commercial
vehicle insurance with collision to replace our assets in case of loss.

It is important for LFFA to have a good relationship with a law firm that understands our business. We
will develop a good relationship with one lawyer who deals predominantly with outdoor tourism and
recreation. By having this relationship we will be able to contact and deal with this person throughout
our operating season as situations arise. This lawyer may guide us through potential dealings with our
insurance providers and clients who are seeking post accident litigation.

We again will have property insurance under which will be covered theft. We will photograph and keep
all receipts of equipment that we use in our company. Our vehicle will also be covered for theft by our
commercial vehicle insurance. Client property will be included in both over arching levels of insurance.

        D. Risk Treatment
There are certain steps that LFFA can take to treat the risks that our organization may be exposed to.
These may include across all circumstances things like waivers, insurance or risk retention.

        i.        Insurance
Insurance is utilized in order to mitigate the possibilities of litigation. There are many different types of
insurance which will be looked at later on in the document. We will employ three different types of
insurance to help transfer costs in the event that something does happen. Commercial General Liability
Insurance will be used to ensure that if any litigation takes place we will be able to continue running the
business. Business Interruption Insurance will be acquired in order to keep money coming into the
business until we are able to get our revenue streams back to normal if something catastrophic were to


Risk Management Plan                                                                                 Page 12
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                      Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                   15 December 2010

happen to our equipment or base location. Finally Property Insurance will be used to mitigate
circumstances like fire, theft from the property, vandalism and acts of God.

Insurance will help to protect LFFA from bankruptcy in the event of post accident litigation. Many of the
financial risks may be mitigated by a customized insurance policy. It is important for our organization to
have a relationship with our underwriter to ensure that they understand the nature of our business and
what types of hazards we may need to be covered for. Insurance will not keep accidents from
happening and it will not make our operations safer. It will however potentially cover our business from
many of the above listed risks in the risk assessment section most significantly post accident litigation
where families and dependants have been impacted drastically by an extremely traumatic accident. It is
LFFA’s goal to stop these accidents at the source and keep them from ever happening however it is
essential to be prepared for unfortunate circumstances that may arise.

        ii.      Risk Retention
There are certain risks that we will retain as an organization. These risks are the minor cuts and bruises
that inherent to working with hooks and hiking through broken terrain. We accept that these activities
are inherent to fly fishing and will educate guests as to our expectations that most trips will have slight
incidents where a client or guide sticks themselves with a hook or trips and rolls an ankle. LFFA is
prepared for the arrival of such circumstances.

We accept that in order to fly fish clients will be in the water and in some cases in currents in order to
fish. This is part of fly fishing and this is a risk that we must retain in order to do business. The sections
above on risk control can show how LFFA can protect against these risks that we have decided to retain.

        iii.     Waiver
A waiver form is an important part of a LFFA risk management plan. The waiver is used so that the client
acknowledges all of the dangers associated with participating in the tours and accepts these risks. The
waiver will serve as protection from litigation due to any injury that occurs while in transit to a tour as
well as while on that tour. By signing the waiver the individual accepts all risk and assumes the
responsibilities associated with these risks.

A waiver form will effectively cover LFFA from litigation in any jurisdiction other than that of British
Columbia by use of an Exclusive Jurisdiction Clause. Also included is an exclusion of liability clause which
will release LFFA and its affiliates from any liability associated with incidents which occur while on our
premises or participating in a tour.

(See Appendix #4)




Risk Management Plan                                                                                  Page 13
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                        Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                     15 December 2010

    4. Risk Documentation & Standard Practices

        A. Standard Operating Procedures
All of our guides will be required to have a Wilderness First Aid certification before being hired. This
certification will need to be minimum 80 hours and they will need to provide proof at time of interview.
Guides will also be required to be certified in Swift Water Rescue in the event that someone slips in the
water while fishing.

         i.      Staff Expectations
Staff will be required to have a physical done once a year by a certified physician. This will then be put
into the employee file and kept there for a minimum of 7 years even if they have moved on from the
company. They will also be expected to keep mandatory certifications up to date and renewed as
necessary. The initial certifications will be paid for by the staff member, any recertification will be
covered by the company with the signing of a contract for a period of time usually between 6 months
and one year.

Our guides will also perform daily vehicle inspections as per the province of British Columbia commercial
vehicle regulations. This is to be a thorough vehicle inspection although it is not performed by a certified
mechanic. We recognize that situations may arise where something does go wrong with a vehicle while
on a trip but if the driver completed their pre-trip inspection there is a higher likelihood that possible
investigations will find that due diligence was had and therefore find LFFA less liable.

(See Appendix #2 Vehicle Pre Trip Inspection )

Further than certification our guides will be expected to have excellent interpersonal skills, they must be
able to maintain composure even when everything that could go wrong has gone wrong. They must be
leaders and demonstrate this on a daily basis in their conduct with our guests. They will make tough
decisions when any concern for their or our guests’ safety is in question. Fishing in the rain in Squamish
is a fact of life, but if the rain begins to put people’s safety at risk the guide will have to be the one to call
it quits or take a break from being in the river for a period of time.




Risk Management Plan                                                                                     Page 14
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                     Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                  15 December 2010

        ii.      Safety Talk
Below is an example of a safety talk delivered by our guides before anyone is allowed to enter the water
and begin fishing. Our guides will be required to have this memorized and be able to fluently deliver it to
our guests. This will take approximately 10 minutes to deliver and will draw the attention of our guests
to the most important yet sometimes overlooked issues with fly fishing.

“Ok, so here we are riverside, and I can understand that everyone is excited to start fishing. We are
aware that some of you are seasoned experts and that others are beginners. We require as part of our
operational procedures that a safety talk ensues before any trip regardless of client experience. This
helps us to reiterate what our expectations are of all participants today. It also helps us to do our due
diligence as fly fishing operators to inform all participants of potential risks that we may see on the river
today. This will be relatively quick and painless and I promise you we will be fishing in no time.

So every fisherman knows, the most common danger of fly fishing is hooking yourself or your partner
with your hook while casting. We will space ourselves out accordingly today and also we require you to
wear the provided safety glasses. Fishing in rivers and streams can be quite dangerous at times and
caution should always be taken. Any time you enter a stream be on the lookout for sudden drop offs or
deep pockets of water. During spring fishing and when the water is muddy often these hazards are hard
to locate. Underwater structure, slippery rocks, submerged logs and many other types of hidden trip
hazards can ruin every ones day in a hurry. We require that all participants wear our provided pfd jackets
and that those jackets are checked by a guide.

High water conditions and stream currents are often very deceiving. When first entering a stream you
should pick an area where you can see the bottom and the water level is not above the knees. If another
person falls into the river no one should be standing around laughing we should all be attentive and
listening to guide instructions. Fatigue is another safety concern that needs to be kept in mind when
fishing streams and rivers. It is amazing how much force a rivers current puts on your legs over the
course of a day's fishing. Anytime you feel fatigued take a few minutes and head to shore. Accidents
happen much more often when your muscles are sore and tired.

Hypothermia is another nasty hazard that can creep up on you, especially if you have a leak in your
waders. It doesn’t take long in early spring or late fall, depending on the climate in your area, for your
body temperature to start dropping drastically. Always bring a dry set of clothes, blanket and extra
towels when fishing during these periods of time when the water is colder.

If any one feels uncomfortable with what they have just heard that is ok we have some spin cast rods as
well and we can all just enjoy fishing from the shore. If at any time as well one of us is feeling that the
river current or conditions are worse than they expected tell the guide immediately and we can adjust
the location or do whatever we can to fix the problem. Most importantly if everyone communicates with
me your guide and listens to my instructions we should all have a great day on the river and hopefully
catch some fish!




Risk Management Plan                                                                                 Page 15
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                      Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                   15 December 2010

Also if there are any medications such as an EpiPen, inhaler or any other types that are going to be a
necessity within the next few hours please let your guides know so we are able to assist you in the event
of anything happening.”


         iii.    Guide Training Logs
Training logs will be kept in two forms, one paper and one digital. These will be signed by the member as
well as the supervisor or manager. A copy of the certification will be placed in the file. There will also be
a database setup which will notify the management of upcoming certification expiry for the staff
members. This database will be set to give a 3 month warning so as to provide time to the guide to
renew their certification. Any lapse in certification will mean an immediate suspension for the staff
member until the certifications are renewed.

         iv.      Incident Logs
All guides will have incident logs in the vehicles used to get to the destination. These log books are
required to be filled out after immediate medical attention has been administered. Pictures of the area
where the incident occurred, the individual involved and any other pictures the guide deems pertinent
will be taken and used as evidence for any ensuing investigations.

(See Appendix #6 Incident Log)

         v.      Emergency Response Plans
An emergency response plan is required in the event that any of the possible risks which have been
identified previously in this plan occur. There will be back boards in all company vehicles and all staff will
be properly trained in the use of them. A first aid kit will be with the guides at all times during the trip
and will never be more than 50 feet from where the party is located. Guides will be equipped with
satellite phones as well as all individuals on the trip wearing fully functioning GPS locator beacons.

Guide procedures will vary depending on the severity of the incident. All incidents will be reported in an
incident log and the guest will be required to make comments and sign regarding they care which was
administered.

If an incident is minor such as a cut the secondary guide will administer first aid to the victim, fill in an
incident report form, take pictures for documentation and have guests and the person involved give a
written account of the incident. If the incident is minor the guest will be given the opportunity to
continue on with the trip. If only one guide is needed for the guests care then the other guests can
remain in the river under the supervision of the lead guide.

For moderate incidents such as a sprain or broken bone the secondary guide will be required to call into
headquarters and make a verbal report of the incident when the time permits. The lead guide will begin
administering first aid to the victim involved. All guests will be asked to leave the river until the situation
is under control.

For major incidents the secondary guide will be tasked with calling headquarters and explaining the
situation. Once this has been completed the lodge will contact pertinent emergency services and will

Risk Management Plan                                                                                   Page 16
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                     Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                  15 December 2010

have them dispatched to the exact GPS coordinates. The guides will be tasked with giving medical
attention to the guest and will need to be able to devote their utmost attention to the situation at hand.
Documentation of the incident will occurs when the party involved is stabilized. The secondary guide on
the trip, if able to, can take pictures of the location where the incident occurred while his assistance is
not necessary. All other participants on the trip will be required to exit the river while the incident is
being subdued.



               a) Emergency Contact List
Emergency: 911                Base :(604)-555-1234                         Owner (604)-555-5555
Search & Rescue: 604-898-1563                                              Manager (604)-555 5566



All above listed phone numbers will be programmed into satellite phones which accompany guides on
each trip.

        vi.      Trip Description
We will have standard trip descriptions for each different river that we take guests fishing on. These will
have put in locations, lunch locations, and take out locations. Prior to departure guides will assess guest
capabilities and determine which river to fish based on current conditions (water levels and weather
conditions and patterns). All trips will be led through the river based on onsite guide assessment of daily
conditions.

(See Appendix #5)

                 a) Pre-trip Checklist
A pre trip checklist will be a required component of every trip. This will have the necessary items that
are needed to be on each trip. These will be kept in trip files labelled with the date of the trip and will
remain on file for at least 7 years in hardcopy and also in digital format.

(See Appendix #3)

                  b) Post Trip Reflection
Each guide will be required to keep a journal as to how the trip went. Once the trip has been completed,
the guide will be required as part of his/ her duties to create a document for filing regarding all aspects
of the trip. Any issues with customers including but not limited to injuries, equipment failure, fishing
spots of interest etc will be included information. This document will be reviewable by any guides going
on a similar trip so as to ascertain points on the river where potential fishing spots are located.




Risk Management Plan                                                                                 Page 17
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                    Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                 15 December 2010

        B. Legal Forms
        i.       Waiver Forms
The waiver will be distributed to guests who are booking in advance in a PDF file for them to print, read,
sign and return before the scheduled trip. Upon arrival at our base we also require that all guests read
and sign a waiver form in the presence of one of our trained staff who will ensure that the guests have
had their attention drawn to the importance of the waiver and what it means to them by signing it.

The waiver form will be kept on file for a minimum of 7 years. All minors will be required to sign a
voluntary assumption of risk form which will be kept in a separate file until they are of legal age in the
province of British Columbia at which point it will be transferred to another file and kept there for a
minimum of 5 years. All waiver forms will be scanned and a digital copy will be kept in a folder labelled
with the date of the excursion. These will be kept in storage on a minimum of two different platforms
(memory card, external hard drive etc.) indefinitely.

Participants under the age of majority will be required to sign a waiver with the As a company LFFA will
not be responsible for helping guests to purchase BC Fishing licenses They will be forwarded a list of the
locations in the town of Squamish where they can purchase them before arriving at our facilities.
attending parent or guardian signing as well. We understand the legal limitations of allowing minors to
sign the waiver form, however imbedded in the waiver is an assumption of risks agreement that can be
used to prove the clients acknowledgement of the risks involved. Having the guardian sign will back up
the assumption of risk agreement showing that a guardian has approved and attended the same fishing
trip.

(See Appendix #4 )




Risk Management Plan                                                                               Page 18
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                    Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                 15 December 2010



        ii.     Client Documentation

                 a) Fishing License
All guests are required to have a valid fishing license as per British Columbia regulations. Guests will be
required to have this prior to arriving at our base and as per the laws must have this in their possession
at all times during any fishing excursion. Photocopies of the license will be taken by guest services
employees and these will be kept on file with the trip plan, waiver forms, medical forms (if applicable)
and pre/ post trip checklists. All of the above will be filed in monthly folders and kept on hand for
minimum seven years in the event that there is necessity for anyone to see them.

                  b) Medicals and Guest Insurance
It is important that we know all guests have the capacity to perform under the conditions that they may
experience while on one of our excursions, with this in mind it may become necessary to require
medicals for some of the participants on our trips. For trips lasting longer than one day we will require
that all guests have a certified physician perform a medical examination and that they possess a copy of
it for retention in our files in the event of an incident.

We will require all guests to have proof of medical insurance so that in the event of an injury they will be
covered for immediate medical services rendered.




Risk Management Plan                                                                                Page 19
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                    Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                 15 December 2010

        C. Media Plan
The media is a major influence on the way society perceives businesses and how they operate. This
makes it important to deal with the media in a timely fashion and give them only the details about the
incident until a thorough investigation can be conducted. That being said it is important to avoid the
classic ‘no comment’ statement, with this in mind anyone who is not the media liaison will direct any
media questions to that individual. When making statements to the media everyone involved should
only give the facts. They should avoid speculating about what may have caused the incident and tell the
media that an investigation is underway.

Before the investigation has been completed the media liaison will be the only person to comment on
the incident being sure to give only exact facts pertaining to the incident at hand. This information will
include:

       Who was involved while not mentioning names of the individuals to protect their interests’ e.g.
        middle aged male, young female etc
       What happened
       Background of the company in the industry e.g. when the business was started, the proven
        track record of the business
       Standards adhered to by the business
       Empathy for the individual involved and an apology to them and their family for the incident
        while not admitting fault

In the event that a guide or other staff member does speak to the media regarding the situation
punishment may be as severe as immediate termination for violation of the media policy.




Risk Management Plan                                                                               Page 20
Tour 208; Risk Management                                                      Jase Wilson & Christopher Lay
Instructor: Don Webster                                                                   15 December 2010

        D. Insurance
        i.       Commercial General Liability Insurance

We will have a commercial general liability insurance plan to help reduce the financial risks associated
with any litigation which may occur because of an incident involving a guest on one of our trips.

         ii.      Commercial Vehicle Insurance
The vehicle will be insured as per British Columbia statutory regulations for commercial vehicle
insurance. This will include liability insurance and comprehensive insurance. The liability insurance will
be in the amount of $4,000,000 in order to cover a number of people in the vehicle at once. The
comprehensive insurance will cover replacement value of the vehicle in the event that there is a serious
collision. This insurance will also cover the vehicle from theft while out on the river or when the vehicle
is not in use at the base. There will also be insurance on the contents of the vehicle so if it is broken into
and equipment is stolen from inside of it we will be able to have it replaced.

         iii.     Business Interruption Insurance
Business Interruption insurance will be used to protect the business in the event that an incident occurs
where operations will have to be ceased for a period of time. This insurance policy will cover Layman’s
Fly Fishing until operations return to their previous levels so as to mitigate the financial loss that could
occur.

        iv.     Property Insurance
Property insurance will cover replacement value of all equipment safety and fishing gear that the
company has. There will also be coverage for the base lodge as well as the vehicle in the event that any
major incident occurs such as fire, theft or acts of God.




Risk Management Plan                                                                                  Page 21
Appendix


Appendix #1




                     CEO-
                Christopher Lay


           General
           Manager-
           Jase Wilson


   Guest              Lead        Lead
  Relations           Guide       Guide


                      Secondary   Secondary
                        Guide       Guide
Appendix


Appendix #2
                                          Layman Fly Fishing Adventures
                                            Vehicle Pre-trip Inspection
Driver Name:                        Location:                          Date:

Park Brake Set?           Vehicle #:        License Plate:            Km Start:   Km finish:

Under Hood (please check items listed)
Engine Oil
Coolant
Battery
Belts
Hoses
Leaks
Other Fluids

In Cab
Defroster/Heater
Fuel Gauge
Horn
Interior Lights/Instrument Lights
Mirrors
Seats, Seatbelts
Windows & Windshield Condition
Windshield Wipers & Washer

Outside Vehicle (please mark on vehicle)
Body/Structural Damage
Doors
Exhaust
Fuel Cap
License Plates — Front Rear
Trunk

Lights
Low/High Beam Headlights
4 Way Emergency Flashers (in cab)
Turn Signals
Tail Lights
Brake Lights
License Plate Light(s)

Wheels
Tire Condition
Lug Nuts
Brake Response
Parking Brake                                             Comments
Appendix
Appendix #3
The Essentials

Fly Rods                          Fly Reels                          Fishing Vests

Spare Spools (Min 1 Extra Each)   Waders                             Wading Boots

Fanny Pack                        Fishing Vest                       Chest Pack

Dry Pack (Large one with Guide)   Polarized Sunglasses               Net (Minimum 2 per party)
                                  (recommended) Regular
                                  otherwise

Lucky Hat                         Fishing License (All required to   Extra Fleece Sweat Pants (1
                                  have prior to trip)                Each)

Gore-Tex Socks (2 Extra Each      Wading Belt (1 Each)               Food- Energy Bars (3 Each)
minimum)
CSA approved Personal Flotation   First Aid Kit                      Emergency Flares
Devices (1 Each)
The Vest/ Fanny Pack Chest Pack

Dry Fly Box                       Nymph Box                          Streamer Box

Terrestrial Box                   Midge Box                          Tippet(s)

Leader(s)                         Scissors                           Leader Straightener

Dry Fly Floatant (Guide)          Weights                            Hook Sharpener

Flashlight                        Thermometer                        Knife

Knot Tool                         Measuring Tape/ Scale              Digital Camera (Guide)

Satellite Phone (Guide)           GPS Locator Beacons (1 Each)       Whistles (1 Each)

Rod Repair Materials              Sunscreen                          Bug Spray
            Appendix
            Appendix #4

                                                LAYMAN FLY FISHING ADVENTURES
                                               COMMERCIAL FLY FISHING EXCURSION
                                            RELEASE OF LIABILITY, WAIVER OF CLAIMS,
                                       ASSUMPTION OF RISKS AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENT
                                      BY SIGNING THIS DOCUMENT YOU WILL WAIVE CERTAIN
                                           LEGAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO SUE
                                                   PLEASE READ CAREFULLY!
     Full Name:                         Age:        Telephone:                        Email Address:

     Home Address:                               City:                       Province/State:                  Postal Code/Zip Code:
     To: LAYMAN FLY FISHING ADVENTURES
     DEFENITION:
     In this agreement the term “Fly Fishing” shall include all activities in any way related to the fly fishing trip, but not limited to,
     instruction sessions, transportation or travel to and from the river, loading and unloading of vehicles, and all activities while at
     riverside or in the river.
     ACKNOWLEDGEMENT- Fly Fishing Safety
     I acknowledge that I have been advised upon the foreseeable conditions expected on a fly fishing trip and that a minimum
     standard of physical capability exists to participate. I acknowledge that I have been advised to follow guide instructions over the
     duration of the trip and in the case of an emergency. I also acknowledge that I have been advised to encourage all parties
     involved to follow guide instructions so far as they are deemed reasonable.
     ASSUMPTION OF RISKS
     I acknowledge that fishing has inherent risks, hazards, and dangers for anyone that cannot be eliminated, particularly in a
     wilderness environment. I UNDERSTAND THAT THESE RISKS, HAZARDS, AND DANGERS INCLUDE WITHOUT
     LIMITATION:
1.   Water hazards while boating and wading in rivers such as: fast moving currents, drowning or loss of amenities
2.   Hiking in rugged country (trails, riverbed)
3.   Injuries from fishing equipment and other participants
4.   Encounters with wildlife, animals, and insects
5.   Temperature extremes, hypothermia
6.   Inclement weather conditions, unavailability of immediate medical attention in the wilderness should injury occur
7.   Motor vehicle accident on-route to destination
     I understand that there are risks, hazards, and dangers inherent to fly fishing and am prepared physically for conditions that may
     arise over the duration of the trip. I am aware that the trip may take place in a remote wilderness setting and am aware of the
     hazards that may exist under such conditions. I accept that this setting may give birth to unforeseeable events outside of the
     control of Layman Fly Fishing. I understand that these activities may require a degree of skill and knowledge in order to
     participate safely. I understand that I have responsibilities and that my participation in this activity is purely voluntary. No one is
     forcing me to participate and I elect to participate in spite of the risks. I VOLUNTARILY ASSUME ALL OF THE RISKS
     ASSOCIATED WITH THIS FLY FISHING TRIP AND ACCEPT ANY AND ALL RISKS OF INJURY, PARALYSIS,
     HYPOTHERMIA OR DEATH.
     RELEASE OF LIABILITY, WAIVER OF CLAIMS AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENT
     Lastly, I, for myself, my heirs, successors, executors, and subrogates, hereby KNOWINGLY AND INTENTIONALLY WAIVE
     AND RELEASE, INDEMNIFY AND HOLD HARMLESS Layman Fly Fishing, their directors, officers, agents, employees, and
     volunteers from and against any and all claims, actions, causes of action, liabilities, suits, expenses which are related to, arise out
     of, or are in any way connected with my participation in this activity including, but not limited to, NEGLIGENCE of any kind or
     nature, whether foreseen or unforeseen, arising directly or indirectly out of any damage, loss, injury, paralysis, or death to me or
     my property as a result of my engaging in these activities or the use of these services or equipment.
     EXCLUSIVE JURISDICTION CLAUSE
       Appendix
This agreement is governed and interpreted solely by the laws which apply in the Province of British Columbia and no other
jurisdiction. Any litigation involving the parties to this Agreement shall be brought solely within the Province of British
Columbia and shall be within the exclusive jurisdiction of the Courts of the Province of British Columbia.
I HAVE READ THIS AGREEMENT AND FULLY UNDERSTAND AND ACCEPT ITS ENTIRETY AND THAT IN
SIGNING THIS AGREEMENT I, AND MY HEIRS, ARE EXHONORATING LAYMAN FLY FISHING FROM ANY
AND ALL LIABILITIES THAT MAY ARISE FROM MY PARTICIPATION IN THIS FLY FISHING TRIP.
Signed this      day of         , 20 .                   Signature of Participant:

Signature of Witness:                                    Participant’s printed name:

*Please Initial all boxes                                Signature of Parent or Guardian:
Appendix
Appendix #5
                        Layman’s Fly Fishing Adventures
                                  Trip Report
Guide Names:

Date:

Trip Location:

# of Guests:

Prevailing
Conditions:
Water Level:

# of Fish on line:
(comments)
Vehicle Used:
Attached pre-trip:
Noted river
changes or trail
conditions:
Post trip
Comments:



Incidents list and
attach incident
report:


Guide Signature:                                          Date:



Guide Signature:                                          Date:



Management Signature:                                     Date:
Appendix
Appendix #6
Incident Information Report

Date & Time of Incident:

Location:

Guide(s) Name:

Name of Parties Involved:

Name of Witnesses:

Nature of Event (circle       Near Miss / First Aid / Medical Treatment Needed / Evacuation /
one)                          Fatal
Guide Comments:




Client Comments (if any):



Witness Accounts:




Hazard that caused
accident:
Hazard removed?

Photographs of incident
Location/ Filename
Guide(s) signature:

Client(s) signature:

Witnesses signature:

Date:
Appendix
References
http://www.troutfishingsupplies.com/page/checklist

http://www.azod.com/Fishing/FlyFishing/Archives/2001/Fly%20Fishing%20Checklist.htm

http://ctcsquamish.com/fordean.pdf

Healthy Fishing. Research View, Summer 2006. The University of Montana, Missoula, MT.
http://www.umt.edu/urelations/rview/summer06/fishing.html

				
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