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					Class Project
    MGT 725
    Dr. Basu
    Fall 2004

                Patrick Becker
            Concept
 Background
 About Academic Journals

 Choosing a Journal to Submit to

 Journal Listings and Directories

 Internet-Based Directories?

 Market Opportunity
                            Background
   Professors are required to publish papers from time to
    time.
            Accreditations i.e.: AACSB
            Tenure
            Status/Prestige
       Department heads are evaluated on their department’s
        publishing efforts
            Accreditations
            Status/Prestige, etc...
       College Deans, etc... also have a stake in published works.
                    Academic Journals
   The best place for professors to publish their work is
    academic journals.
       There are thousands of journals to choose from
       Journals are commonly focused on research in one field, and
        specific areas of study
       Ethically, one may submit only to one Journal at a time
       Quality and reputation of journal is important
            ‘Acceptance Rate’ of journal is important
            Accrediting organizations, etc.., use journal attributes, such as
             acceptance rate, to evaluate the quality of a published work
            How to choose a journal
   Personal experience?
   Ask fellow professors
   Departments commonly maintain lists of
    recommended journals
       ‘A’ list, ‘B’ list
   Books, such as Cabell’s directories of academic
    journals, list many journals.
   Search the Internet
       Similar articles
       Journal home pages
             Journal Requirements
   To be eligible for publication, papers/articles
    must meet a journals requirements
     Field of study
     Publication style

     Submission guidelines

   Every journal is different
       Journals compete primarily by publishing high
        quality works in closely related areas of study
         Journal Acceptance Rates
   Journal reviewers review submitted works, not all are
    published.
   Ration of published works to submitted works is
    “Acceptance Rate”
       70% acceptance rate = Journal receives few submissions,
        therefore should be of lower quality.
       30% acceptance rate = many submissions, therefore should
        be of higher quality.
   Acceptance rate has become a quality standard
    (i.e.: AACSB uses Cabell’s published acceptance rate to
    evaluate journal quality)
     Cabell’s Directories of Academic
                 Journals
   Printed sets of books.
   Books sets primarily involve the Business and Education fields
    of study.
   Each set of books covers a general field of study, such as
    “Economics & Finance”, or “Marketing”.
   Each set of books is a simple list of academic journals
   Journal listing information is self reported:
       Topics
       Circulation Data
       Publication Guidelines
       Review Information, including “Acceptance Rate”
       etc…
         Other Journal Directories
   Collegiate areas of study use differing ways to list their
    journals.
   Business = Cabell’s sets of printed books.
   Psychology = APA.org. Note – very expensive yearly
    membership. Fee based on years of practice, and
    amount of information accessible. (i.e: $700)
   Shared attribute: High cost
       Cabell’s is $90-$190 per set of books,
        or $500 for the complete collection.
                Where to publish p. 2
   Deciding which journal to publish in is a daunting task
       Decision commonly takes weeks.
       Submit to a higher prestige journal?
            If published, higher prestige for work.
            Less likely to be published (Lower acceptance rate)
       Requires learning about journals from multiple sources
            Other professors, journal listings, journal publications, etc...
       Department head is commonly involved
            Experience of others in department
            Recommended journal lists
            Shared status/prestige
                  Use the Internet?
   For most fields of study, a internet-based journal listing
    resource has not yet achieved market acceptance, or
    dominance.
   Specialization in one particular field of study common.
   Most are associated with a particular educational
    institution, or small group of institutions.
   Access is usually restricted to members of the
    associated institution(s).
   Market dominance by printed and bound publications.
       Probable defensive work by these market leaders.
       Maintenance of the status quo.
                  Market Opportunity
   Lack of a established leader in internet-based journal
    listings.
   Frustration of many with the ‘Printed and bound’ status
    quo.
       No search ability
            Time commitment to sort through the listings
       High cost
            Reduced availability
       Information in printed books is at least 1 year old
            Journals come and go constantly
            Important variables, such as acceptance rate, vary constantly
    Concept Review

 Background
 About Academic Journals

 Choosing a Journal to Submit to

 Journal Listings and Directories

 Internet-Based Directories?

 Market Opportunity

				
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