Parents Handbook 05

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					                  PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006

Table of Contents
General
  Rule of Conduct ..................................................................................6
  Diversity Statement .............................................................................6
  History of the College .........................................................................7
Academics
  Preamble to the Curriculum ................................................................8
  Curriculum ..........................................................................................9
  Grading System .................................................................................10
  Honors, Dean’s List, Phi Beta Kappa................................................11
  Class Schedule.............................................................................12, 13
      Records, Course Load, Continuance in College
  Off-Campus Study.............................................................................14
  Student Services ................................................................................14
      Academic, Advising, Counseling, Career Services
Student Life
  Room and Board, Living Units .........................................................15
      Bedding, Laundry, Student cars .................................................16
      ID cards, Bookstore, Mail ..........................................................16
      Money and Banking ...................................................................17
  Health ................................................................................................18
  Directory Information .......................................................................18
Financial Aid
  Payment of Expenses ........................................................................19
  Sources of Financial Aid ...................................................................20
Crawfordsville
  Churches and Synagogues...........................................................21, 22
  Travel, Motels....................................................................................23
  Restaurants ........................................................................................24
College Administration
  Board of Trustees ........................................................................25, 26
College Directories
  Faculty.........................................................................................27, 28
  In Case of Emergency .......................................................................29
  Miscellaneous College Numbers.......................................................30
Mission Statement...............................................................................33

                                                          1
             PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006

                  2005-2006 Academic Calendar
Fall Semester
  August 21-24             New Student Orientation
  August 25                Classes begin
  September 24             Homecoming
  October 13-16            Midsemester break
  October 17               Classes resume
  November 5               Family Day
  November 10-17           Registration for Spring Semester
  November 12              Monon Bell Classic
  November 19-27           Thanksgiving recess
  November 28              Classes resume
  December 12-17           Final exams
  December 18-Jan. 8       Christmas recess


Spring Semester
  January 9-10             Written Comprehensive Exams for seniors
  January 11               Classes begin
  January 30-February 10   Oral Comprehensive Exams for seniors
  March 4-12               Spring break
  March 13                 Classes resume
  March 23-30              Registration for Fall Semester
  April 28                 Classes end
  May 1-6                  Final exams
  May 14, 2006             Commencement


Future Dates
  Homecoming               Family Day             Commencement
  2005—September 24        2005—Nov. 5            2006—May 14
  2006—October 7                                  2007—May 13
  2007—September 29                               2008—May 11

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            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006




A Message from the Coordinator of Alumni and Parent
Communication
I am pleased to welcome you to the Wabash College community. We are hon-
ored that you and your son have chosen to join us. As your son embarks on this
exciting journey, he will be afforded endless opportunities for intellectual and
personal growth, both inside and outside the classroom.

We realize that this handbook may not answer all your questions and concerns,
so we encourage you to please contact us. You are now part of the Wabash fam-
ily and community.

I am the on-campus liaison for parents of current students and alumni. If you
have any questions or concerns or are interested in the Parents' Program, please
contact me at parents@wabash.edu, tatarm@wabash.edu or 765-361-6369.

If you would like to receive the montly e-newsletter, The Parents Post, just send
me your email address. You can find me in the Bill and Ginny Hays Alumni
Center on West Wabash Avenue. I look forward to meeting you here on campus.


                                             Michele Tatar
                                             Coordinator of Alumni and
                                             Parent Communications




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         PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006



          National Association of Wabash Men

                             Board of Directors


Jim Davlin’85                            Board Members
President
                                         Term Expires May 2006
Jay Fisher ’66                           Joe Collings ’73
Vice President                           Mark Dewart ’74
                                         Cory Colson ’85
Jim Dimos ’83                            Jon Pactor ’71
Recorder                                 Jim Twomey ’54

Greg Miller ’83                          Term Expires May 2007
Peter A. Pactor ’65                      Brian Flanigan ’96
Class Agent Representative               Duane Hile ’67
                                         Eric Rowland ’86
Greg Castanias ’87                       John Yanko ’57
Ray LaDriere ’78
Regional Association                     Term Expires May 2008
Representatives                          Charlie Bell ’66
                                         Dick Glover ’65
Steve Webb ’83                           Kelley House ’90
Faculty Representative                   Greg Jania ’93
                                         Don Wagner ’82
Tom Topper ’70
Past President

Tom Runge ’71
Director of Alumni Affairs




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            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006



A Message from the Dean of Students

Two characteristics that make Wabash a truly distinctive college are the level of
trust we place in our students and the responsibility we give them. The single
College rule, the Gentleman’s Rule, symbolizes this trust, while the small Stu-
dent Life staff requires that students assume responsibility for managing much
of their daily lives.

We expect our students to act as gentlemen and responsible citizens and to par-
ticipate daily in defining what our community means by these terms. We expect
them also to make many important decisions about their academic, residential,
and social lives at Wabash. Most students make good decisions most of the time.
Occasionally a few students make poor ones. Our students learn from both kinds
of decisions.

We believe that students learn best when given freedom and responsibility for
making their own decisions. The consequences of those decisions should be
the students’. Therefore, for the most part, Wabash will work directly with your
son regarding the decisions he makes, unless the matter requires notification of
parents.

If you have questions or concerns about your son, please call me at (765-361-
6310). Otherwise, the College’s correspondence with you is likely to be limited
to semiannual tuition bills, annual invitations to Parents’ Weekend, and that
final, glorious invitation to Commencement.

All of us at Wabash look forward to working with your son in the coming year.

                                             Tom Bambrey ’68
                                             Dean of Students




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             PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Rule of Conduct: The Gentleman’s Rule

Perhaps the most striking aspect of           This simple, yet all-encompassing,
student life at Wabash is personal            rule allows the Wabash student excep-
freedom. Believing that students ought        tional personal freedom and requires
to develop self-reliance and personal         of him commensurate personal respon-
responsibility, the College has long          sibility, which together we believe are
prescribed only one rule of conduct:          essential parts of his education and
                                              development.

                                              Since Wabash is fundamentally an
                                              intellectual community, the faculty
  The student is expected to                  has defined the operation of the rule in
  conduct himself, at all times,              instances of plagiarism and cheating.
  both on and off the campus, as              The first offense results in a penalty
                                              determined by the course instructor;
  a gentleman and a responsible               the penalty for the second offense is
  citizen.                                    expulsion from the College.




Faculty Statement of Principle Concerning Diversity

We, the Faculty of Wabash College, affirm that our community should embrace
both diversity and freedom of speech. While in no way wishing to abridge the
free exchange of ideas, we believe that comments, written or spoken, and actions
that threaten or embarrass people because of their race, gender, religion, occupa-
tion, sexual orientation, national origin, physical disability, or ethnic group hurt
all of us. Such insensitivity to any individual or group betrays the spirit of the
liberal arts. We invite students, staff, and administration to join us in fostering an
environment of mutual respect.




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             PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


A History of Wabash College

Wabash College has educated young               Elihu Baldwin, the first President of
men since its founding in 1832, just            the College, was installed in 1835,
11 years after the first settlers arrived       three years after instruction began. He
in what is now Montgomery County,               believed in and championed the liberal
Indiana. The nine clergymen and lay-            arts education which continues to
men who founded Wabash College                  guide the Wabash curriculum.
recognized the need for teachers and
for ministers in the wilderness.                Speaking of the College in his In-
                                                augural Address, January 29, 1994,
Asking God to bless their venture,              President Andrew T. Ford said,
the founders constructed a building             “Wabash is not simply a four-year
and hired a teacher. Crawfordsville             college for men; Wabash is a lifetime
English and Classical High School               experience for men and their families.
thus opened its doors to the first class        It is not simply a four-year liberal arts
of 12 students taught by Caleb Mills            program; Wabash is the beginning of
on December 3, 1833, in Forest Hall.            one’s independent life. It is not merely
Today, Caleb Mills’s bell is rung to            preparation for the real world; Wabash
welcome each class to Wabash and to             is participation in the real world. It is
mark its Commencement. The original             not rules, regulations, and judicial pro-
building, Forest Hall, relocated to the         cedures; Wabash is trust, responsibili-
north part of campus, is home to the            ty, and caring. It is not unique because
offices of Teacher Education.                   it is a college for men; Wabash is
                                                unique in the candor, rigor, and caring
A few months after that first class, the        of the classroom experience. Wabash
young institution became the Wabash             is above all about making men better.”
Manual Labor College and Teacher’s
Seminary and received a charter                 Today, 172 years after our founding,
from the State of Indiana. Although             Wabash continues to educate young
the school was commonly known as                men in the liberal arts tradition. Our
Wabash College, it was not until 1851           graduates leave this campus even bet-
that the original charter was amended           ter men than when they arrived and go
and the name officially changed to              into the world to make it better for all
Wabash College.                                 of us.




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            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Preamble to the Curriculum

We, the Faculty of Wabash College, believe in a liberal arts education. We be-
lieve that it leads people to freedom, helps them choose worthy goals and shows
them the way to an enduring life of the mind. With its ideals in view, we have
designed our curriculum according to the following principles:

The graduate in the liberal arts has pondered ideas as they come to him out of
the ages of human thought. He has watched their myriad forms in the great
works of philosophy, history, theology, mathematics, arts, and literature. He has
seen how the natural sciences try to answer the crucial questions of man, and he
has himself taken part in their meticulous labor.

He has shared the endeavor of social science to probe the nature of man and the
world he builds, and he has practiced its methods of coping with human conflicts
and social needs.

In the study of foreign civilizations and people, he has found himself not only
the creature of his time and place but a citizen of the world-wide human com-
munity.

He has learned to read, to write and to speak clearly and creatively, and he has
begun to acquire the skills that will qualify him for increasing leadership in his
vocation.

We, the Faculty, believe that these principles are indispensable to the teaching
to which we devote our careers. And we believe that to follow them will enable
the graduates of Wabash College to judge thoughtfully, act effectively, and live
humanely in a difficult world.




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            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


The following requirements must be met for graduation:

Freshman Requirement
  Freshman Tutorial, one course.

Sophomore Requirement
  Cultures and Traditions, both semesters.

Language Studies
  Proficiency in English.
  Proficiency in a foreign language.
  One additional credit in language studies.

Distribution Courses
  Three courses in literature and fine arts.
  Three courses in behavioral science (economics, political science,
  psychology).
  Three courses in natural science and mathematics.
  One additional credit in quantitative skills.
  Two courses in history, philosophy, or religion in addition to the two
        Cultures and Traditions courses.

Departmental Major, Minor, or Area of Concentration
  Normally, a student declares a major area or field of study by the end of the
  sophomore year and will complete nine to eleven courses in that department.
  A departmental minor consists of five courses in one department or discipline.
  Instead of a departmental minor, a student may elect to pursue an interdepart-
  mental area of concentration. Five to eight related courses from two or more
  disciplines are required for this option.

Minimum Requirements
 For graduation students must pass a minimum of 34 semester courses and
 have at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average in all approved courses
 taken for grade at Wabash, with the exception of physical education. At least
 24 of these courses must be successfully completed at Wabash.




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            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006



Written Comprehensive Examinations
 Every student must pass a written examination in his major field.

Oral Comprehensive Examinations
  Every student must pass a senior oral comprehensive examination.


Academics
Division I
  Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics & Computer Science, and
  Physics.

Division II
  Departments of Art, Classical Languages and Literatures, English, Modern
  Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, Religion, Speech, and Theater.

Division III
  Departments of Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, and the
  Teacher Education Program.




   Grading System

   A       A-      B+ B      B-        C+     C    C-        D       F
   4.00    3.67    3.33 3.00 2.67      2.33   2.00 1.67      1.00    0.00

   Semester grades are mailed to the student’s home address as soon as
   possible after the end of each term. In the fall semester only, mid-
   semester grades are mailed home for all freshmen and new transfter
   students as an indication of the student’s progress.




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             PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006



Honors                                          Distinction and two of High Pass) in
The faculty has provided for the award          Comprehensive Examinations.
of Final Honors to accompany the
Bachelor of Arts degree, according              A student’s final grade point average is
to the following requirements (in the           used as the basis for conferring Final
graduated four-point grading system):           Honors.

A.B. Cum Laude: Awarded to students             Dean’s List
who have attained a cumulative aver-
age of 3.40 to 3.59 or a cumulative             To honor students for outstanding aca-
average of 3.17 to 3.32 and Distinction         demic achievement, the Dean of the
rating (for double majors, two rat-             College each semester names to the
ings of Distinction or one rating of            Dean’s List those students who attain
Distinction and one of High Pass; for           a semester average of at least 3.5.
triple major a minimum rating of two
Distinctions and one of Pass or one of
Distinction and two of High Pass) in            Phi Beta Kappa
Comprehensive Examinations.                     The requirements for election to Phi
                                                Beta Kappa at Wabash College are
A.B. Magna Cum Laude: Awarded to                determined by the by-laws of the
students who have attained a cumu-              Wabash Chapter, which consists of Phi
lative average of at least 3.60 or a            Beta Kappa members of the College
cumulative average of 3.33 to 3.59              faculty and staff.
and Distinction rating (for a double
major two ratings of Distinction or             Since 1948 they have permitted the
one rating of Distinction and one of            election of not more than one-eighth
High Pass: for triple major a minimum           of the graduating class. The Wabash
rating of two Distinctions and one of           Chapter, one of the oldest, is not
Pass or one of Distinction and two of           bound by the rule of the United Chap-
High Pass) in Comprehensive Exami-              ters which permits the election of no
nations.                                        more than 10 percent.
A.B. Summa Cum Laude: Awarded to                It is the normal practice of the Chap-
students who have attained a cumula-            ter, but not a requirement, to elect the
tive average of at least 3.60 and a Dis-        one-eighth of the senior class whose
tinction rating (for a double major two         grade averages are highest. The by-
ratings of Distinction or one rating of         laws permit the election of no more
Distinction and one of High Pass; for           than three juniors.
triple major a minimum rating of two
Distinctions and one of Pass or one of




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            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006



Class Schedule                                Availability of Records
Monday/Wednesday/Friday                       The Registrar’s Office will not release
                                              academic information (transcripts,
                                              grade averages, class rank, etc.) elec-
          8:00 - 9:50 A.M.                    tronically (telephone, fax, or e-mail) to
           9:00 - 9:50 A.M.                   any individual, including the student.
          10:20 - 11:10 A.M.                  Requests for such information must
                                              be submitted in writing bearing the
          11:20 - 12:10 P.M.                  student’s signature. Faxed requests
                                              are acceptable provided they bear the
           1:10 - 2:00 P.M.                   student’s signature. E-mail requests
           2:10 - 3:00 P.M.                   are not acceptable.
           3:10 - 4:00 P.M.                   Please allow two working days for
                                              processing of information and tran-
                                              script requests.
Tuesday/Thursday
                                              Replacement diplomas will NOT be
           8:00   -   9:15 A.M.               issued in any name other than that
           9:45   -   11:00 A.M.              certified (on record) at the time of
           1:10   -   2:25 P.M.               graduation.
           2:40   -   3:55 P.M.               In compliance with Public law 93-
                                              380 (Family Educational Rights and
                                              Privacy Act), enrolled students may
Science laboratories are held from 1:         inspect their records in the Registrar’s
10 to 4:00 p.m. weekday afternoons.           Office upon written request.


                                              Normal Course Loads
Travel Plans
                                              A full-time student carries four, four
Before you make travel plans for your         and one-half, or five subjects each se-
son for midsemester breaks or the end         mester. Freshmen require the approval
of the semester, have your student            of the Dean of Students to drop to a
check his course and exam schedules.          three-course load. If the number of
Students need to be on campus when            courses is less than three, the student
classes are in session and are excused        is considered part-time, and he may
only in case of an emergency.                 lose his financial aid. Additionally,
                                              part-time students are ineligible to
                                              participate in intercollegiate athletics
                                              and to enroll in the student health and
                                              accident plan.

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            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006



Continuance in College
For students entering in August, 2000, or thereafter, the requirements are as
specified below:

                  Freshman to sophomore
                           6 courses and a 1.50 average
                  Sophomore to junior
                           14 courses and a 1.70 average
                  Junior to senior
                           24 courses and a 1.85 average
                  To graduate
                           34 courses and a 2.00 average

A student also must earn three credits toward the degree each semester to contin-
ue in the College. A freshman, however, may be retained for his second semester
if he earns two credits. The Dean of Students is authorized to grant exceptions to
this standard based on judgments of a student’s performance.




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            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Off-Campus Study                               In selecting their program and plan-
                                               ning their schedule, students may want
Off-campus experiences provide                 to consider pursuing the interdisci-
opportunities for learning and adapt-          plinary International Studies Area of
ing to new environments. Students              Concentration. This area of concentra-
may spend an academic semester or              tion requires five courses drawn from
summer away, or participate in one of          a variety of disciplines.
the many faculty-led immersion trips.
In addition, Wabash has now created            For more details, please check our web
two summer programs, also led by               site at www.wabash.edu/international
faculty, that take place in early sum-
mer. Quito, Ecuador is the site of an          Student Services
intensive Spanish language program in
which students have opportunities to           Academic Advising
learn experience the language, culture,
literature, environment, and other             Each new student is assigned to a faculty
aspects of the area. The other program         advisor to assist him in the selection of
emphasizes individual research in              courses, with his class schedule, with other
Chiapas, Mexico.                               academic matters, and to aid in his adjust-
                                               ment to the College. The Writing Center is
Through the member institutions of             helpful to all students in expanding their
the Great Lakes Colleges Association           knowledge and skills. For those who need
(GLCA) and the Associated Colleges             aid in the natural sciences and mathe-
of the Midwest (ACM), a number of              matics, the Quantitative Skills Center
domestic and foreign programs are              provides tutorial assistance.
available. In addition, students may
also apply to a wide range of indepen-         Counseling
dent programs or directly to foreign           Counseling services are provided without
universities. In recent years Wabash           additional fee to all Wabash students and
students have successfully com-                their spouses.
pleted work in the United States and
such countries as Australia, Austria,,         Career Center
Belgium, Chile, China, Colombia,
                                               The Schroeder Career Center provides stu-
England, Ecuador, Finland, France,
                                               dents with information about internships,
Germany, Greece, Holland, Hungary,
                                               graduate schools, employment opportun-
Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Peru,
                                               ities, part-time employment, summer em-
Russia, Scotland, Senegal, Spain,
                                               ployment, and volunteer opportunities. An
Sweden, and Switzerland.
                                               extensive program of counseling, work-
                                               shops, and written communication, helps
                                               prepare students for life after Wabash. The
                                               Career Center can be found online at
                                               www.wabash.edu/service/career



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            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Room and Board
Students are required to live in College housing (residence halls or fraternities)
during their freshman and sophomore years. Approximately two-thirds of the
student body live in fraternity houses. Each fraternity manages its own internal
affairs. Meals are served in house dining rooms.

Independent students live in one of five residence halls or in College-owned
houses. They choose one meal plan: 19 or 15 meals per week (or 10 meals per
week for houses with kitchens), served in the dining hall in the Sparks Center.

Wabash assumes no responsibility for loss of or damage to the student’s personal
property. Each student is encouraged to take appropriate steps to safeguard and
insure his property including vehicles or other modes of transportation. We
strongly encourage students to confirm that their property is covered by
their families’ homeowner’s insurance or to carry personal property insur-
ance.



Student Living Units
Fraternities (Area code 765)

Beta Theta Pi               361-6001
         513 W. Wabash                       Phi Gamma Delta          361-6006
Delta Tau Delta             361-6002                 213 W. Jefferson
         603 W. Wabash                       Phi Kappa Psi            361-6007
Kappa Sigma                 361-6003                 602 W. Wabash
         200 W. College                      Sigma Chi                361-6008
Lambda Chi Alpha            361-6004                 701 W. Wabash
         515 Jennison                        Tau Kappa Epsilon        361-6009
Phi Delta Theta             361-6005                 607 S. Grant
         114 W. College                      Theta Delta Chi          364-8105
                                                     407 S. Washington




            For a complete, searchable campus directory go to
                    http://web2.wabash.edu/directory



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             PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Bedding and Linens                              Bookstore
Students must provide their own                 The Wabash College Bookstore sells
sheets, blankets, pillows, towels, and          office supplies and clothing in addition
other personal items. The typical bed           to course materials.
in a residence hall is a twin size long,
36” x 80”. Bed sizes vary in fraternity         Visit their web site at:
houses.                                         http://store.yahoo.com/
                                                wabashbookstore/
Laundry
All residence halls, and most fraterni-         Mail
ties, have washers and dryers. There
are also several laundromats and dry            The U.S. Post Office delivers mail
cleaning establishments in Crawfords-           directly to the fraternity houses and
ville.                                          residence halls. Mail should be ad-
                                                dressed to the student in his living
Students’ Cars                                  unit. Do not include Wabash College
                                                in the address.
Wabash students may have cars on
campus. Parking spaces, however, are            Address mail as shown:
limited.
                                                  JOE SMITH
ID Cards                                          ROOM 101, MORRIS HALL
ID cards are issued to all entering stu-          CRAWFORDSVILLE, IN 47933
dents during orientation. The card is
valid for all four years. The ID serves
as a library card, may be used to
charge photocopies in the library, and
is used for admission into the dining
hall and athletic events.




                                           16
            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Money and Banking
The College Business Office will cash checks up to $25. Larger checks may be
cashed at local banks for a fee unless you have an account at that bank. Students
wishing to open accounts may choose from the following banks:

  Bank One, Crawfordsville                  National City Bank
  200 South Washington Street               101 W. Main Street
  765-362-1100                              765-362-3400

  Farmer’s State Bank                       Union Federal Savings & Loan
  1661 US 231 S                             Assn.
  765-364-0784                              221 East Main Street
                                            765-362-2400
  Lincoln Bank
  134 South Washington                      Fountain Trust Company
  765-362-0200                              Englewood Branch
                                            1700 E. Main Street
  Linden State Bank                         765-361-0305
  1408 Darlington Avenue
  765-364-6666

  Western Union (for wire transfer)
  1660 Crawfordsville Square
  (Kroger Store)
  765-362-1084




                           ATM Machine on Campus

                   Located in Lower Level—Sparks Center

                         Fountain Trust Company Bank
            There will be an ATM fee unless you have an account
                               with Fountain Trust




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            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Student Health
A registered nurse is on duty at the Student Health Center (2nd floor Allen
Center) weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. (phone # 361-6265). Students may
consult the College physicians, Dr. Scott Douglas ’84 or Dr. John Roberts ’83,
weekdays from 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. in the Student Health Center. Students
who need to speak with a nurse or doctor when the Student Health Center is
closed should call Dr. Roberts’ and Douglas’ private office at 362-5789.

In the event of an emergency, students should go to the St. Clare Medical Center
Emergency Department. Call 911 for life or limb-threatening emergencies. For
medical problems in the evenings and on weekends, students can be seen at the
Athens Medical Group After Hours Clinic, 1660 Lafayette Road (across from
the Sunshine Cafe), phone 359-2088. The After Hours Clinic is open from
5:20 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. on weekdays and 11:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on weekends.
Student health insurance is accepted at the After Hours Clinic but you must pres-
ent your student health insurance card. Those without student health insurance
will be expected to pay at the time of service or have the visit billed to private
insurance.

The College provides health and accident insurance at a reasonable premium.
All students are charged for the health plan unless a waiver of the coverage
has been filed with the College. The waiver card from the insurance bro-
chure must be received by the Business Office by August 26, 2004.




                           Directory Information
 The Family Educational Rights               and height of members of athletic
 and Property Act (FERPA) permits            teams, honors, awards, and scholar-
 Wabash to release, without consent,         ships earned, dates of attendance,
 certain directory information, which        post-graduate plans, and most recent
 includes the Wabash student's name,         previous educational agency or in-
 local and home address, local and           stitution attended. A Wabash student
 home phone number, e-mail ad-               may request that directory informa-
 dress, date and place of birth, age,        tion not be release without prior
 major field of study, participation         written consent by filling a written
 in officially recognized activities         statement with the Wabash Registrar
 and sports, class standing, weight          two weeks prior to enrollment.




                                        18
            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Payment of Educational Expenses
The Wabash College Business Office              Families with difficulty paying fees
will mail a statement of your son’s             in one lump sum each semester may
account to you by August 1 for the              consider paying fees in monthly
fall semester and by December 15 for            installments. The College recommends
the spring semester. Payment is due             that families investigate the payment
by August 15 and January 2, respec-             plans administered by Key Education
tively. A $25 fee will be added for late        Resources.
payments, and a student will not be
allowed to register for classes if his          Instead of paying lump sums to the
bill has not been paid.                         College, a family applies to Key for a
                                                payment plan with features chosen by
Wabash College accepts credit cards             the family. A monthly installment to
for the payment of tuition and fees.*           pay for the selected plan will be made,
                                                and the company in turn pays the
Each semester’s bill will include one-          College. Each family chooses the total
half of the year’s tuition, one-half of         amount of money, number of years for
the activities fee, and one-half of the         payment, and the insurance protection
residence hall room and board charg-            desired. Some are loan plans while
es. (Fraternity members make their              others let a family budget the year’s
room and board payments directly                expenses over 10 or 12 months with-
to the fraternity.) The fall bill also          out charging interest.
includes a health insurance fee which
may be removed if the waiver card               Brochures and applications for these
in the insurance brochure is returned.          plans may be obtained from the Ad-
Credit will be given each semester for          missions Office, the Business Office,
one-half of the year’s financial aid as         the Financial Aid Office, or by writing
reported by the Wabash Financial Aid            or calling the following:
Office. For incoming students, a first
semester admissions deposit of $150                Key Education Resources
will be credited.                                  745 Atlantic Avenue
                                                   Boston, MA 02111
*To pay by credit card, call AMS at                (800) KEY-LEND
(800) 762-8370. A teleprocessing fee
is assessed.                                    Apply for the plan as earl as possible.

In addition to these basic charges,
a student will spend approximately
$1500 per year for books, supplies,
and personal expenses.




                                           19
             PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Financial Aid
The financial aid process measures              credited to his account in equal
a family’s ability to contribute to the         amounts each semester.
cost of their son’s education from
the financial resources available to            Each student should make an ef-
them at the time that the financial aid         fort to seek outside awards to meet
applications are completed. Wabash              his college expenses. All sources of
requires families to file two forms: the        assistance should be reported by the
Free Application for Federal Student            student or the awarding organization
Aid (FAFSA) and the CSS/PROFILE                 soon after notification of the award is
Application. The expected family                received.
contribution subtracted from the cost
of education determines the student’s           Since financial aid is awarded annu-
financial need.                                 ally, students are responsible for filing
                                                financial aid forms each year to deter-
Below are listed some sources of fi-            mine financial aid eligibility.
nancial assistance available to Wabash
students. To receive these forms of
assistance, a student must be enrolled
full-time at Wabash. Aid will be




  Sources of Financial Aid

       Wabash grant and merit based scholarships

       Indiana resident grants
          Frank O'Bannon Grant Program (Must file FAFSA each year by
          March 1)
          21st Century Scholarship (Must file FAFSA each year by March 1)
       Federal Pell Grants

       Loans—All loans require a separate application/promissory note
          Federal Stafford Loan (subsidized & unsubsidized)
          Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS)
          Wabash College Signature Select Loan
          ESH—Students receive bi-weekly direct deposit payments as
       they work an on-campus job. ESH does not appear as a credit on
       the student’s statement of account unless arrangements are made with the
       Business Office

       Outside awards—local, national, corporate, and private agencies

        For information, contact the Financial Aid Office: (800) 718-9746



                                           20
             PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Churches and Synagogues
Most denominations are represented in Crawfordsville. Among the local
churches and synagogues are:

Apostolic                                Woodland Heights
One Way Pentecostal                      468 N Woodland Heights Drive
Apostolic Church                         362-5284
308 S. Green St.
364-1421                                 Church of God
                                         First Church of God
Assembly of God                          711 Curtis St.
First Assembly of God                    362-3482
2070 Lebanon Road
362-8147                                 Church of Christ
                                         Church of Christ
Baptist                                  419 Englewood Drive
East Side Baptist                        362-7128
2000 Traction Road
362-1785                                 Episcopal
                                         St. John’s
First Baptist                            212 S. Green St.
1905 Lebanon Road                        362-2331
362-6504
                                         Jehovah’s Witnesses
Fremont Street Baptist                   Kingdom Hall of
1908 Fremont St.                         Jehovah’s Witnesses
362-2998                                 702 Shady Lane
                                         364-9529
Friendship Baptist
US 136 W @ Old SR 55                     Latter Day Saints (Mormon)
362-2483                                 Church of Jesus Christ
                                         of Latter Day Saints
Second Baptist                           125 W. Road
1509 E. Main St.                         362-8006
362-0375
                                         Lutheran
Christian                                Christ Lutheran-ELCA
First Christian                          300 W. South Boulevard
(Disciples of Christ)                    362-6434
211 S. Walnut St.
362-4812                                 Holy Cross Lutheran
                                         (Missouri Synod)
New Hope Christian                       1414 E. Wabash Ave.
2746 U.S. 231 South                      362-5599
362-0098


                                    21
            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006



Mosques                                 Synagogues
Islamic Society of North America        Sons of Abraham
P.O. Box 38                             661 N. Seventh St.
Plainfield, IN 46168                    Lafayette, Ind.
317-839-8157                            317-742-2113

Muslim Students Assoc. Mosque           Temple Israel
Martindale Hall, Basement               620 Cumberland
Wabash College                          West Lafayette, Ind.
765-361-7289                            317-463-3455

Nazarene                                United Methodist
First Nazarene                          Christ United Methodist
213 W. Wabash Ave.                      909 E. Main St.
362-1795                                362-2383

Non-Denominational                      First United Methodist
Crawfordsville Community Church         212 E. Wabash Ave.
1705 Lebanon Road                       362-4817
362-5004
                                        Trinity United Methodist
Pentecostal                             110 S. Blair St.
First United Pentecostal                362-0511
116 S. Walnut St.
362-3046

Presbyterian
Milligan Memorial Presbyterian
802 Mill St.
362-1847

Wabash Avenue Presbyterian
307 S. Washington St.
362-5812
                                           Every Wednesday morning
Roman Catholic
St. Bernard’s                              when the College is in session,
1306 E. Main St.                           an ecumenical worship service
362-6121                                   is held in Tuttle Chapel, Center
Sat. 5:30 p.m.
Sun. 8:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m.                 Hall, at 10:00 a.m.

Newman Center
310 S. Grant Ave.
361-8105

                                   22
             PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006

Motels                                       The Burlington Trailways bus lines
                                             stops in Crawfordsville two times daily
Comfort Inn                                  on their trips to and from Indianapolis.
I-74 and U.S. 231 (Ext. 34)                  Phone:
361-0665                                     1-800-992-4618.

Days Inn                                     An Amtrak train from Indianapolis to
I-74 and U.S. 231                            Chicago stops in town once in the morn-
362-0300                                     ing and again in the evening on its return
                                             to Indianapolis. Phone: 1-800-872-7245
General Lew Wallace Inn                      or www.amtrak.com
309 W. Pike St.
362-8400                                     Private planes, including small jet
                                             aircraft, can be accommodated at the
Holiday Inn                                  Crawfordsville Airport 765-362-0707.
I-74 and U.S. 231                            It is located south of town on Road 400
362-8700                                     South between U.S. 231 and Ind. 47.
                                             Commercial airlines operate out of the
Ramada Limited                               Lafayette and Indianapolis airports.
I-74 and U.S. 231
364-9999                                     Lincolnland Express (217-352-6682 or
                                             www.lincolnlandexpress.com) runs a
Riviera Motel                                shuttle service between the Indianapolis
1510 S. Washington St.                       Airport and Crawfordsville leaving the
362-9925                                     airport every three hours starting at 6
                                             a.m.; the last shuttle goes out at 1 a.m.
Super 8 Motel                                Similar service runs from Crawfords-
I-74 and U.S. 231 (Ext. 34)                  ville to the airport every three hours
361-8800                                     beginning at 4:30 a.m. Fare is $49 one
                                             way and $89 round trip. A reservation is
Vernon Watch Bed & Breakfast                 needed days in advance or they will not
101 East Main Street                         stop at Crawfordsville.
366-0335
                                             Helping Hand Chauffeur Service
Thelma's Bed & Breakfast                     765-723-2227 (office) or 765-366-7375.
2710 East State Road 32
362-0880                                     Restaurants

                                             In addition to the restaurants listed, the
                                             Scarlet Inn in the lower level of the
Travel                                       Sparks Center serves snacks and light
                                             meals. There are the usual pizza and fast
Crawfordsville may be reached by bus,        food establishments in town as well.
rail, air, or automobile.
                                             A Country-A-Fair
                                             S.R. 32 West
                                             234-2885




                                        23
             PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006

Applebee’s                            Old Town Buffet
1516 S. Washington St.                1672 U.S. 231 South
361-8711                              359-3388

Arni’s                                Pizza Hut
114 W. Wabash Ave.                    1501 S. Grant Avenue
362-2764                              362-3390

Arthur’s                              Pizza King
111 E. Main St.                       205 E. Market St.
364-9938                              362-5554

The Bungalow Restaurant               Rancho Bravo
210 E. Pike St.                       1313 Darlington Ave.
362-2596                              361-8890

Campbell’s on Main Street             Spring Garden Restaurant
101 E. Main St.                       1570 U.S. 231 S.
364-9273                              359-1209

China Inn                             Sunshine Cafe
121 S. Green St.                      1605 Lafayette Rd.
362-1252                              362-6808

College Street Deli                   Super China Buffet
301 E. College St.                    1624 S. Washington St.
364-1088                              361-8982

Elaine's on Main                      Terrace Restaurant
209 E. Main St.                       Holiday Inn
361-5860                              I-74 and U.S. 231
                                      362-8700
The Forum
1410 Darlington Ave.                  Uncle Smiley’s
361-8751                              205 Waynetown Road
                                      362-0432
Johnny Provolone's Pizza
116 S. Washington St.                 Woody's Landing
361-6840                              1450 Darlington Ave.
                                      364-9064
The Lew
at the General Lew Wallace Inn
309 W. Pike St.
362-8403

Little Mexico
211 E. Main St.
361-104



                                 24
             PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006

Wabash College Board of Trustees
As of August 1, 2005
                                         James R. Cumming ’61†
Andrew T. Ford H’03*                     Physician
President
Wabash College                           Victor A. DeRose ’74
                                         Principal, DeRose and Associates
Jay Allen ’79                            President, Catalyst, Inc.
Managing Director
Bank of America                          G. Michael Dill ’71†
                                         Senior Vice President
John W. Bachmann ’60                     American Funds Distributors, Inc.
Senior Partner
Edward Jones                             Walter Y. Elisha ’54
                                         Retired Chairman and Chief
Joseph D. Barnette, Jr. ’61*             Executive Officer
Retired Chairman                         Springs Industries, Inc.
Bank One, Indiana, N.A.
                                         Thomas L. Emmick ’62
Roger D. Billings, Jr. ’59†              Retired Vice President
Professor of Law                         Lilly Research Laboratories
Chase College of Law
Northern Kentucky University             John N. Fox, Jr. ’64
                                         Retired, Deloitte Consulting
Stephen S. Bowen ’68*
Senior Partner                           David W. Givens ’56*
Latham & Watkins                         Retired Vice Chairman
                                         NBD Indiana, Inc.
Dudley A. Burgess ’64†
Retired Vice President of                Thomas A. Hays ’55
Government Affairs                       Retired Deputy Chairman
AT&T                                     The May Department Stores Co.

Richard A. Calacci ’91                   Larry K. Hutchison ’63
Vice President, Prime Time Sales         Retired controller of Manufacturing
CBS Television Network                   Eli Lilly and Company

Kevin G. Clifford ’77                    Daryl Johnson ’82
President and CEO                        President
American Funds Distributors, Inc.        Manufacturers Transport, Inc.




                                    25
             PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Peter Kennedy ’68                            Joseph E. Turk H’00
President and Chairman                       Retired Executive Vice President
Eighteen Seventy Corporation                 Inland Paperboard & Packaging

Rade R. Kljajic ’78                          William J. Wheeler ’83
Managing Director, Public Finance            Executive Vice President & CEO
Department, Muncipal Securities Divi-        MetLife Group
sion
Citigroup Global Markets, Inc.               Frederick W. Wilson, Jr. ’69
                                             Chairman and CEO
Harry F. McNaught, Jr. ’76                   Saks Fifth Avenue Enterprises
President
Denison Properties, Inc.                     Faculty Representative
                                             David E. Maharry
J. Lee McNeely ’62                           Professor of Computer Science
Senior Partner                               Wabash College
McNeely Stephenson Thopy & Har-
rold                                         Student Representative
                                             Gregory Mahoney ’06
David W. Pancost ’69†
Professor of English                         *Member of the Executive Committee
Gallaudent University                        †Alumni Representative

Gary D. Reamey ’77
Principal                                    Emeritus Trustees
Edward Jones                                 Robert E. Allen ’57
                                             Ross N. Faires ’58
Fred W. Ruebeck ’61*
Retired Director, Investments                Charles W. Goering ’51
Administration                               Mitsuya Goto ’55
Eli Lilly and Company                        William J. Haines ’40
                                             Thomas A. Klingaman ’52
John C. Schroeder ’69
President                                    David S. Orr ’57
Wabash Plastics, Inc.                        Bruce A. Polizotto ’63
                                             Richard O. Ristine ’41
Walt Snodell ’68                             John H. Schroeder ’42
Chairman and CEO
                                             Donald E. Smith ’59
Peerless Industries, Inc.
                                             Robert Wedgeworth, Jr. ’59
Thomas E. Stanberry ’76
Chairman, President & CEO
West Bancorporation, Inc.

                                        26
            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006
Wabash College Faculty
DIVISION I, The Sciences: David Polley, chair

Department of Biology
   David Krohne (chair), Amanda Ingram, John Munford, Richard Nelson,
   David Polley, Shivi Selvaratnam, Eric Wetzel

Department of Chemistry
   Robert Olsen (chair), Richard Dallinger, Scott Feller, Paul LePlae, Aaron
   Wyman, Lon Porter, Ann Taylor (sabbatical, year)

Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences
   J. D. Phillips (chair), Michael Axtell, Robert Foote, David Maharry,
   Esteban Poffald, Peter Thompson, William Turner, Chad Westphal

Department of Physics
   Dennis Krause (chair), James Brown, Rasmus Hansen

DIVISION II, The Humanities and Fine Arts: Dwight Watson, chair

Department of Art
   Gregory Huebner (chair), Douglas Calisch, Elizabeth Lee

Department of Classical Languages and Literatures
   David Kubiak (chair), Leslie Day (sabbatical, year), Joseph Day (sabbati
   cal, year), Jeremy Hartnett, Patrick Myers

Department of English
   Marcus Hudson (chair), Deborah Butler, Thomas Campbell, Joy Castro,
   P. Donald Herring, Tobey Herzog, Karolyn Kinane, Timothy Lake, Warren
   Rosenberg

Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
   Greg Redding (chair), Luis Agular-Monsalve, Matthew Bentley, John By
   rnes, Gilberto Gómez, V. Daniel Rogers (sabbatical, fall), Thomas Stokes,
   Brian Tucker, Veronique Zara

Department of Music
   Lawrence Bennett (chair), Peter Hulen, James Makubya

Department of Philosophy and Religion
   Glen Helman (chair), Jonathan Baer (leave), David Blix, Mark Brower,
   Cheryl Hughes, Kenneth Ngwa, William Placher, Robert Royalty (sab
   batical, year), Stephen Webb
                                     27
            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006
Department of Speech
   David Timmerman (chair), Jennifer Young Abbott, Todd McDorman, All
   wyn Tellis

Department of Theater
   Michael Abbott (chair), James Fisher, James Gross, Dwight Watson

DIVISION III, The Social Sciences
Melissa Butler, chair

Department of Economics
   Kealoha Widdows (chair), Humberto Barreto (sabb., fall), Joyce Bur
   nette, Frank Howland, Peter Mikek, John Naylor, Todd Nesbit, Susan
   Richardson

Department of History
   James Barnes (chair, fall), Stephen Morillo (McLain McTurnan Arnold
   Research, fall, chair, spring), John Aden, Ynonne Pitts, Diane Korngiebel,
   Michelle Rhoades, Richard Warner

Department of Political Science
   David Hadley (chair), Melissa Butler, Stephen Dyson, Phillip Mikesell,
   Scott Himsel

Department of Psychology
   Brenda Bankart (chair), C. Peter Bankart, Preston Bost, Robert Horton, Carl
   Thompson

Teacher Education Program
   Deborah Butler (chair, fall, sabbatical, spring), Michele Pittard (chair,
   spring), Robert Burgess, Tammy Turner-Vorbeck

NON-DIVISIONAL
Accounting

Physical Education
Jack Mansfield (Director of Physical Education), Vern Mummert (Athletic
Director), Peter Casares, Mark Colston, Chris Creighton, Thomas Flynn, Mark
Jozwiak, Robert Johnson, Jason Mulligan, Neal Neathery, George Perry, Mal-
colm Petty, Eric Reed, Brian Ward




                                        28
            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006

Whom Should I Call About... ?
Academic concerns:
  Call your son’s faculty advisor or Tom Bambrey, Dean of Students
  (765) 361-6310.

Financial aid:
  Call the Financial Aid Office (765) 361-6370.

Health concerns:
  Call Dr. John Roberts, Dr. Scott Douglas, or Carol Lamb R.N. (765) 361-
  6265.
  The Health Center is open from 8:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. on weekdays.

Housing and residential matters:
  Call the Associate Dean of Students’ office (765) 361-6289.

Personal concerns:
  Call Tom Bambrey, Dean of Students (765) 361-6310, or call the Student
  Counseling Service (765) 361-6252.

Tuition and fees:
  Call Assistant Comptroller Cathy VanArsdall (765) 361-6421.

Events on campus:
  Visit the web site: www.wabash.edu/calendar/
  or call Karen Handley, Public Affairs Office (765) 361-6396.

Accommodations for students with disabilities;
  Call the Director of Academic Support Services Julia Rosenberg (765) 361-
  6024.


Emergencies
If a family emergency arises and you cannot contact your son at his campus
residence, phone the Dean’s Office (765) 361-6310, and we will assist you in
locating him. Evenings and weekends, call Campus Security (765) 361-6000.

If a student becomes ill at home and will miss classes, please call the Dean’s
Office so that his professors may be informed. If a student becomes seri-
ously ill or is seriously injured while at school, you will be notified.




                                     29
            PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006

College Telephone Numbers (area code 765)
Switchboard .......................................................................... 361-6100
Admissions ........................................................................... 361-6225
Advancement Office ............................................................. 361-6367
Alumni Office ....................................................................... 361-6369
Athletic Department ............................................................. 361-6220
The Bachelor......................................................................... 361-6213
Bookstore.............................................................................. 361-6271
Business Office ..................................................................... 361-6228
Campus Security................................................................... 361-6000
Career Center........................................................................ 361-6355
Counseling Service ............................................................... 361-6252
Dean of the College’s Office ................................................ 361-6224
Dean of Students’ Office....................................................... 361-6310
Financial Aid Office.............................................................. 361-6370
Glee Club, Bands, Orchestra ................................................ 361-6473
Housing................................................................................. 361-6289
Infirmary ............................................................................... 361-6265
Library .................................................................................. 361-6161
Malcolm X Institute.............................................................. 361-6384
Off Campus Study Program ................................................. 361-6078
President’s Office.................................................................. 361-6221
Public Affairs Office ............................................................. 361-6364
Publications Office ............................................................... 361-6368
Registrar’s Office.................................................................. 361-6245
Sports Information................................................................ 361-6165
Student Activities.................................................................. 361-6299
Theater Box Office ................................................................361-6411
Writing Center ...................................................................... 361-6258
Wabash on the Web...............................................................www.wabash.edu

              Most College offices are open from 8 a.m. to 12 noon
                       and 1 to 4:30 p.m. on weekdays.




                                              30
        PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Notes




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        PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Notes




                    32
        PARENTSʼ HANDBOOK 2005-2006


Notes




                    33

				
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