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					                              CLB Executive Board Application
                                        2011-2012

Attached is the application for the Criminal Law Brief’s Executive Board 2011-2012.
Individuals are being hired for the following positions:

              Editor-in-Chief
              Executive Editor
              Articles Editor
              Managing Editor
              Publications Editor
              Associate Publications Editor

Brief descriptions for each position are included below.

Applications are due Monday, February 25th by 5 PM. A complete application consists of the
following:

              A statement of interest
              A resume
              A completed editing assignment

Your statement of interest should briefly address why you’re interested in working with the Brief
next year. If you apply for more than one position, please rank each position you’re applying for
in order of preference; you need only write one general statement of interest (not one for each
position). Please also include a list of other responsibilities you’ve taken on for the 2011-2012
academic year thus far.

Starting on page 4 of this application is a brief writing sample. Please make editorial changes to
the piece; this includes changes for grammar and style, Bluebook requirements, and changes to
footnotes (according to Bluebook, including parentheticals where appropriate, and for accuracy
of sources). Be sure to track all changes.

Upon submitting your application, please sign up for an interview with the current E-
Board. Interviews will be held the weekend of February 26-27. A sign-up sheet will be
posted on the Brief’s office door at Room 615.

Complete applications should be combined into one Word document and emailed to
crimlawbrief@gmail.com.

Any questions can be directed to Kate Kovarovic at katekovarovic@gmail.com. Good luck!




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                                 CLB Executive Board Duties

Editor-in-Chief
  Overall management and supervision of the Brief
  Creating the agenda and moderating weekly Executive Board meetings
  Supervising general staff trainings and meetings
  Coordinating the publication schedule/timeline
  Ensuring that Executive Board members complete their duties
  Overseeing general staff participation and completion of assignments, in conjunction with the
   Publications Editor and Executive Editor
  Liaising with professors and administrators as needed
  Working closely with the Publications Editor to create the final version of the Brief
  Selecting new Staff Members, Line Editors, and future Executive Board members
  Reviewing incoming article submissions with the Executive Board
  Office hours each week (1.5 hours)
  Executive Board meetings each week (1 hours)

Executive Editor
  Maintaining communication with all the staff and all students interested in the Brief
  Maintaining all staff schedules in order to appropriately make staff spading assignments
  Creating and organizing all spading assignments
  Coordinating the publication schedule/timeline
  Organizing and conducting Staff events
  Maintaining communication with Line Editors in the spading process
  Organizing staff social activities
  Helping with spading at final stage of articles
  Selecting new Staff Members, Line Editors, and future Executive Board members
  Reviewing incoming article submissions with the Executive Board
  Office hours each week (1.5 hours)
  Executive Board meetings each week (1 hours)

Articles Editor
  Soliciting submissions
  Reviewing the submissions once they come in for content and writing quality
  Article/author communication and facilitation throughout the process, even after the articles
   are finished
  Creating and implementing author contracts
  Helping as needed with final review process
  Selecting new Staff Members, Line Editors, and future Executive Board members
  Reviewing incoming article submissions with the Executive Board
  Office hours each week (1.5 hours)
  Executive Board meetings each week (1 hours)




                                                2
Managing Editor
  Checking e-mail and regular mail and maintaining communication with people interested in
   the Brief
  Updating and maintaining distribution list
  Article Databases – working with databases to have CLB articles available online (Hein
   Online, Westlaw, Lexis). Communicating with finance department to get contracts approved.
  Purchasing all supplies
  Assisting with the organization of the annual symposium
  Communicate with printer
  Creating and submitting budget to the SBA
  Planning events for the Brief (Spring CLB Symposium)
  Helping as needed with the final review process
  Selecting new Staff Members, Line Editors, and future Executive Board members
  Reviewing incoming article submissions with the Executive Board
  Office hours each week (1.5 hours)
  Executive Board meetings each week (1 hours)

Publications Editor / Associate Publications Editor
  Ensuring the integrity of each article published in the Brief
  Updating CLB Spading manual each year
  Conducting staff training sessions (at least one per semester)
           o Creating mock spading assignments
           o Explaining spading/editing process to staff
           o Explaining most often used Bluebook rules to staff
           o Collecting and grading mock spading assignments
                    Providing individual feedback for each staff member
                    Holding more office hours for those who need extra assistance
  Responsible for the spading/editing process:
           o Overall responsibility for ensuring that each piece is properly footnoted according
               to the Bluebook, that all footnotes are responsive to the text and other technical
               writing requirements are met
           o Managing spading teams
           o Ensuring all articles are fully spaded and properly edited in final publishable
               quality
           o Working with Editor-in-Chief in creating final layout of the Brief
  Working with the Executive Board in establishing all editing timelines
           o Dividing each article by footnote with Executive Editor and Editor in Chief
           o Creating deadlines for each phase of the spading/editing process
           o Monitoring the progress of each article
           o Assisting staff with any problems during the process
  Helping with spading at final stage of articles
  Selecting new Staff Members, Line Editors, and future Executive Board members
  Reviewing incoming article submissions with the Executive Board
  Office hours each week (1.5 hours)
  Executive Board meetings each week (1 hours)


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                               CLB Executive Board Application
                              Editing Assignment - Writing Sample

    I.      Introduction


         As the leader of a militia group supported by Uganda, Thomas Lubanga committed mass

war crimes and crimes against humanity in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).1

During the civil war, Lubanga conscripted child soldiers into his militia, using young girls as

sexual slaves.2 Carine Bapita represents five of these victims in the case against Lubanga at the

International Criminal Court (ICC) and described how “rape began as soon as they were

abducted,” and “[s]ome were tortured.”3 In addition to crimes committed against these children,

Lubanga ordered and committed systematic rapes, sexual torture, and mass murder.4

         International law has been slow to take up the fight against sex-based crimes.5

International legal instruments that targeted gendered crimes were encompassed in international

human rights law.6 For instance, in 1981, the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of

All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) was the first to recognize the equality

of women in an international agreement.7 International humanitarian law complemented human

rights law, as it applied during armed conflict. Despite the progress made by the Geneva



1
  Nick Grono, The Role of the International Criminal Court in Peace Processes: Mutually
Reinforcing or Mutually Exclusive?, International Crisis Group 2006
http://www.crisisgroup.org/home/index.cfm?id=4552&l=1.
2
  Id….
3
  Rachel Irwin, Prosecutor Says Girls Used as Sex Slaves, The Lubanga Trial
http://www.lubangatrial.org/2009/01/26/prosecutor-says-girls-used-as-sex-slaves/.
4
  Nick Grono, ICC's Prosecutorial Strategy for 2007-2009, International Crisis Group
http://www.crisisgroup.org/home/index.cfm?id=4411&l=1.
5
   See Suzan M. Pritchett, Entrenched Hegemony, Efficient Procedure, or Selective Justice?: An
Inquiry into Charges for Gender-Based Violence at the International Criminal Court, 17
Transnational Law & Contemporary Probs. 265, 271-72 (2008)
6
  Id. at 257889
7
  Id.


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Conventions that forbade sexual violence as a tool or result of conflict, there was little to no

criminal prosecution of these crimes.8 International criminal law is the primary mechanism to

prosecute individuals and to hold such individuals accountable for their most serious crimes,

including sexual violence.9 Prosecutors at the ICC are charged with the responsibility to

investigate and charge alleged criminals of the most serious crimes.10

       Sexual abuse against women, such as rape, sexual slavery, and mutilation, is often used

during armed conflict both as a tool to humiliate and eradicate the opponent and to demonstrate

feelings of power and control that are heightened during unrest.11 Although sexual violence may

be regarded as an inherent characteristic of war, the ICC holds individuals culpable for these

gendered crimes.12 At the ICC, rape is defined as:

       (1) The perpetrator invaded the body of a person by conduct resulting in penetration,

           however slight, of any part of the body of the victim . . . (2) The invasion was

           committed by force, or by threat of force or coercion, such as that caused by fear of

           violence, duress, detention, psychological oppression or abuse of power, against such

           person or another person . . . .”13


This definition can also be found as a crime against humanity (art. 7(1)(g)-1) if the conduct was

part of a widespread or systematic attack against a civilian population, and if the perpetrator




8
  Id. at 25678
9
  See id. at 273-74 (suggesting that international law has lagged in).
10
   See infra Part II.
11
   See Stop Violence Against Women, Sexual Assault during Armed Conflict (2006),
http://www.stopvaw.org/Sexual_Assault_During_Armed_Conflict.html (quoting).
12
   See id.
13
   Jonathan M.H. Short, Sexual Violence as Genocide: The Developing Law of the International
Criminal Tribunals and the International Criminal Court, 8 Michigan Journal of Race & Law 503
(2003).


                                                  5
knew the conduct was part of the widespread or systematic attack against a civilian population.14

Additionally, sexual slavery and rape can be considered a war crime if it was “committed with

the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group.”15 While

it is true that the ICC is currently investigating sexual abuses,16 the ICC’s commitment to

rigorously investigating, prosecuting, and convicting sexual violence offenders is questionable.

       This Editorial will first discuss ICC cases, in which the Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) or

Pre-Trial Chamber failed to bring or dropped charges of sexual violence crimes against women.

Then, it provides the rationales proffered by ICC prosecutors and judges for their failure to

pursue these violent crimes, as well as critiques of those rationales by international human rights

organizations. Finally, it compares the ICC’s passive approach to crimes of sexual violence to

the aggressive nature of anti-sexual violence criminal laws in the United States. The ICC should

continue the recent trend of increasing the investigation and prosecution of crimes of sexual

violence as in the U.S.




14
   Finalized Draft Text of the Elements of Crimes, Preparatory Comm’n for the Int’l Crim. Ct.,
U.N. Doc. PCNICC/2000/1/Add.2,), available at
http://www.iccnow.org/documents/ElementsofCrimeEng.pdf.
15
   See Short, supra note 667689, at 522 (citing).
16
   Victims’ Rights Working Group, ICC Victims’ Rights Legal Update: 29 May to 30 June 2009
(2009), http://www.redress.org/reports/June%202009%20Legal%20update.pdf.


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