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					                                      Board of Governors
                                California Community Colleges
                                       March 5-6, 2007


  2007-08 CAREER TECHNICAL                                                            6.1
  EDUCATION AND ECONOMIC
  DEVELOPMENT PATHWAYS
  INITIATIVE EXPENDITURE PLAN
  ACTION SCHEDULED
  Presentation:       José Millan, Vice Chancellor
                      Economic Development and Workforce Preparation




Issue
This item presents Fiscal Year 2007-08 Expenditure Plan for the Governor’s Initiative for Career
Technical Education and Economic Development Pathways, which is part of the Governor’s
larger program of revitalization of career and technical education. As required by Education
Code 88321(d), the Economic and Workforce Development Program Advisory Committee
(EDPAC) and the Board of Governors must approve the expenditure plan for the Initiative. The
item also includes a five year roll out plan for 2007-08 through 2011-12 as information. The item
provides a brief history of the concepts and recent developments. There are ongoing funds
through fiscal year 2013-14. To develop an initial plan with the Department of Finance, state-
level partners negotiate how the funds will be spent. The Economic and Workforce
Development Program Advisory Committee (EDPAC) has reviewed the 2007-08 Expenditure
plan and it is now before the Board for approval. Appendix A-2 contains an at-a-glance review
of the 2007-08 budget for the Initiative.


Background
The majority of high school students do not go to four years of college. However, high schools
are geared to transfer requirements. Many colleges start from scratch with students who do not
have a career aspiration. In 2005-06 the emphasis of the funds was on quick pilot projects that
would demonstrate how to move high school students into exciting career pathways. Soon after,
a more comprehensive approach to address many systemic barriers was incorporated into the
funding plans.

Information on the spending plans for 2005-06 and 2006-07 have been brought before the
EDPAC. The 2007-08 plan is now formally before the Board for action, in compliance with
Education Code section 88532(d).
The Career Technical Education Initiative began when Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger issued
his Fiscal Year 2005-06 State Budget in January 2005, he included $20 million in one-time
Proposition 98 Reversion Account funds to provide “greater coordination of community colleges
with K-12 schools in career technical courses through the expansion of the community college
Economic Development Program.” According to the Governor’s Budget Summary, the purpose
of the $20 million was:

     to create courses that are articulated between K-12 and community colleges building
     on the Economic Development Program’s successful integration with business and
     emerging industries, and the effective Tech-Prep Model (also known as the 2+2
     Model).

The budget language also provided some guiding principles for the initiative:

     By increasing the capacity of the Economic Development Program and other
     reforms, the Administration proposes to improve the coordination and articulation of
     curriculum between K-12 and community college career technical education
     programs to create a more seamless and effective system, as well as to increase
     relevant course availability for K-12 students.

Ultimately, the initiative was removed from the Fiscal Year (FY) 2005-06 State Budget, but was
established through the enactment of SB 70 (Scott) and funding became available January 1,
2006. Fifty-seven projects in five categories have been funded and are underway. A list of these
projects is contained in Appendix C.

In 2006, another $20 million was included in the State Budget to continue this initiative in FY
2006-07. The FY 2006-07 Expenditure Plan was approved by DOF in October 2006, and
projects proposed in the plan are in various stages of development. A list of these projects and
their status is contained in Appendix C.

As enacted in SB 1133, the Initiative will be funded at $52 million in FY 2007-08, and at $58
million for FY 2008-09 through FY 2013-14. The System Office is in discussions with the
Department of Education and the Department of Finance to develop a Five-Year Expenditure
Plan for FY 2007-08 through FY 2011-12. A description of the first five years of the Plan is
contained in Appendix B.

The FY 2007-08 Expenditure Plan, which includes the Strategic Summary, the Plan “At A
Glance” and an in-depth narrative description of the proposed projects by funding category is
contained in Appendix A.
Recommendation
As required by Education Code section 88321(d), the Economic and Workforce Development
Program Advisory Committee (EDPAC) and the Board of Governor’s must approve the
expenditure plan for the Initiative. At its January 25, 2007, meeting, the EDPAC supported the
FY 2007-08 Plan. The Plan was discussed at the February Consultation Council meeting, no
recommendation was forwarded. It is recommended that the Board of Governors approve the
Plan.


Staff:   Kay Ferrier, Dean                            Ron Selge, Dean
         Economic and Workforce Development           Career and Technical Education

         Diane Brady, Specialist                      Kathy Pulse, Specialist
         Economic and Workforce Development           Economic and Workforce Development




CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                       Page 3
                                   APPENDIX A-1

                        Strategic Summary of the
             Governor’s Career Technical Education Initiative
The ultimate strategic goal of the Governor’s Career Technical Education Initiative is clear: the
cultivation of California’s economic vitality through a robust preparation of the workforce for
today’s and tomorrow’s economic opportunities. That strategic goal will support vital and
healthy communities and, simultaneously, reduce the number of Californians who struggle on the
margins of economic self-sufficiency due to a lack or mismatch of skills and knowledge.

To achieve that strategic goal, a multiple year expenditure plan has been crafted with thoughtful
input from many stakeholders and interested parties including, but not limited to, the California
Community Colleges, the California Department of Education, the Office of the Secretary of
Education, the Department of Finance, the Governor’s Office, representatives from Legislative
bodies, and public and private entities.

The multiple year expenditure plan encompasses many critical elements, which must be
orchestrated because a well-functioning systematic approach is essential to realizing the
strategic goal. The system is composed of several fundamental building blocks:

    Increasing the actual number and choices of enrollment opportunities in varied career
     technical education areas as well as increasing accomplishment outcomes, as measured
     by “work-ready” certificates, degrees and diplomas, or transition to more advanced
     training in even higher-skill occupation.

    Creating and sustaining indispensable partnerships between education and business and
     industry. These partnerships keep career technical education programs current and
     relevant to the needs of the state’s workforce, create multiple learning venues for
     students, and support a climate of mutual benefit.

    Crafting up-to-date career technical education curriculum that expertly equips enrollees
     with the skills and knowledge needed for current occupations and/or occupations
     occurring in emerging industries.

    Ensuring sufficient competent faculty, counselors, and instructional support services to
     meet the challenge of preparing California’s workforce. This element includes updating
     the skills of current professionals in education as well as increasing the number of
     educational professionals through recruitment and training.

The expenditure plan, as portrayed in the attached summary and detail, attempts to balance
resources dedicated to each of the constituent elements to maximize the return on investment.
That was accomplished in several ways:

    Estimates of need and alternatives were considered.
    Opportunities to leverage existing resources and ongoing investments were utilized.

    Emphasis was given to proven strategies.

    Potential redundancies were eliminated and transportable statewide and regional
     standards were stressed.

However, before turning to the individual components that comprise the system, several
elements, which transform the system into an organic whole, must be considered. The
constituent parts of the system are envisioned to operate in alignment and relate to each other.
Two important perspectives need to be understood. First, the expenditure plan includes several
elements that bind and link the system together. Second, the expenditure plan includes elements
that anticipate the sequencing of events and students’ progress through a developmental agenda,
from middle school through four-year institutions and on to entry into the workforce.
Additionally, the expenditure plan addresses many different enrollee constituencies, from regular
students to re-entry students who have abandoned public education opportunities.

The system building elements include:

    Technical Assistance Center. This entity serves the state and gathers in local program
     resources and best practices for dissemination and replication. Plainly stated this entity
     minimizes “re-inventing the wheel” and, instead, ensures that every expenditure
     contributes to a “value-added” return on investment. Moreover, this entity draws together
     national resources and models and provides options for local solutions to implementation
     challenges. By centralizing a comprehensive research effort, significant efficiencies and
     efficacies are realized.

    Infrastructure to connect business and industry to Economic and Workforce
     Development Program (EWD) Initiatives. A significant theme in this initiative is
     system building for tomorrow’s occupations, and leveraging off the California
     Community Colleges touted Economic and Workforce Development Program. As such,
     this element supports this new mission of the EWD, bolstering Career Technical
     Education, and provides an efficient platform for the EWD’s continued involvement with
     this work.

    Independent Evaluation and Analysis. The independent evaluation to be conducted, by
     contract to skilled researchers, will provide an important feedback loop for formative
     purposes. Beneath this system building will be changes in organizations’ structure and
     performance, and this independent evaluation will provide a compass for continued
     development.

The second perspective mentioned above, which includes the sequencing of program events,
anticipating students’ progress through an educational system, and building opportunities for a
wide variety of students, is self-evident throughout the constituent parts, as summarized below:
     Fifty-Two ($52) million in funding for career technical education instruction and
      programs as follows:

          Curriculum

             Reform high school career technical education coursework through partnerships
              with community colleges. Reforms include coordinating career technical
              education courses so that students moving on to community college do not need to
              repeat classes; broadening curricula to include technical programs in emerging
              and traditional career paths; and expanding courses to ensure more students gain
              the skills needed for gainful employment.

             Design courses for growth industries by raising the quality and quantity of classes
              in high-growth sectors and emerging industries, like construction and medical
              technology.

          Business Partnerships

             Expand student exposure to career options by building public-private partnerships
              between key industries and career technical education programs to expand
              apprenticeships, internships, and training.

          Capacity Building

             Increase professional development opportunities for educators by providing
              teachers and counselors more access to career technical education instruction and
              career counseling training.

          Enrollments

             Enhance academic relevance by increasing the number of career technical
              education courses that match the required classes that prospective UC and CSU
              students must complete while in high school.

Additionally, funding for the Governor’s Career Technical Education Initiative will increase to
$58 million in 2008-09, and continuing each year thereafter through fiscal year 2013-14. This
increase results from the provisions of Senate Bill 1133 (stats 2006, Ch. 751), and will allow for
the continuation of this important work.




CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                        Page 7
                                              APPENDIX A-2
                                          CTE Pathways Initiative
                                   FY2007-08 Expenditure Plan At A Glance
                                                                                                   Max Award
                                                                                         No. of       (in
                                                                                        Projects   Thousands)         Total
                                                            Enrollments
 Career Technical Institutes (CDE) -- Expansion of Partnership Academy to
 establish pilot Academies to accelerate the career preparation of high school
 students within a five year program that includes high school graduation,
 industry-based certification, job entry, and associate of arts or science degrees,       28           100.0
 drawing on best practices from CTE distinguished schools, ROCPs, community               14            19.0
 colleges, business and industry training programs, and national research.                14            50.0         3,766,000
 Career Advancement Academies -- model projects in major population centers
 to help most in need 18 - 30 years olds return to school and combine learning
 with career opportunities in partnership with industry.                                   3            1.7          5,000,000
 Workforce Innovation Partnerships --2 + 2 projects creating career pathways
 in areas such as advanced transportation and biotechnologies to prepare the future
 workforce of California with the skills needed for emerging high skill, high
 opportunity industry areas and adds alternatives for those not immediately
 pursuing a four year degree.                                                              8           500.0         4,000,000
 Quickstarts -- funds for existing projects                                               25            40.0         1,000,000
 Career Technical Education Sectors -- to strengthen or reestablish Career
 Technical Education by developing model programs, articulating course work,
 aligning curriculum with Model Curriculum Standards, planning and                                      to be
 implementing new Partnership Academies, providing leadership, and developing                      distributed by
 links to labor, business and industry.                                                   72         allocation     19,000,000
 Career Exploration and Model Program Development for 7th and 8th
 Graders -- to reach young people to acquaint them with possible career
 opportunities.                                                                           10           150.0         1,500,000
                                                                           Subtotal                                 34,266,000
                                                      Business Partnerships
 Business and Industry Advisory Committee (CDE)-- Annually convene
 statewide business and industry advisory committees for each of the 15 industry
 sectors involving high school, ROCP, community college CTE and economic
 development to improve business/education partnership efforts resulting in better
 trained workers that meet the needs of industry.                                          1           200.0          200,000
 Connection to Economic and Workforce Development Program Initiatives --
 To build a statewide system to link businesses and economic development work
 with career technical education efforts. One center in eight of the ten initiatives
 will connect on going work on new certificates, enrollments and enhancements to
 career technical education. This creates on-going cross-pollination and
 enhancements at the network to network level. Eight EWD regional initiative
 centers will be receiving funding on an on-going basis                                    8           187.5         1,500,000
 CTE Student Organizations (CDE) -- Subject-based extracurricular activities
 for secondary/postsecondary CTE students to reinforce leadership and technical
 skills, deepen understanding of related industries, and facilitate internships and
 subsequent employment. *Funds will be used to support a variety of activities
 that will strengthen and expand leadership, participation levels, etc.                    *             *           3,000,000
                                                                             Subtotal                                4,700,000
                                                            Curriculum
 Entrepreneurship Career Pathway Project -- EWD Small Business
 Development and International Trade Development Centers (approx. 40 centers)
 will provide statewide information/education to high school and community
 college young adults to help them understand entrepreneurship in the global
 environment as a viable career pathway. Models in other states have been assessed
 for the success of this California effort.                                                40         50.0           2,000,000




CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                                                    Page 9
                                             APPENDIX A-2
                                         CTE Pathways Initiative
                                  FY2007-08 Expenditure Plan At A Glance
                                                                                                   Max Award
                                                                                         No. of       (in
                                                                                        Projects   Thousands)     Total
Curriculum Planning for Emerging Industries -- This project builds on four
recent future-looking studies. It will map out what is needed from education and
provide a proposed delivery plan to support a transforming economy. It will result
in curriculum in nanotechnologies, biotechnologies, digital manufacturing and
intelligent transportation. The project will create new alliances between traditional
education and Economic Development practitioners.                                          1        559.0         559,000
Distance Learning Pilot (CDE) -- Identify rural areas where this strategy could
be beneficial for CTE courses, develop and implement curriculum linking
secondary and community college resources.                                                 5        100.0         500,000
Inservice Workshops (A-G) (CDE)- Develops industry specific model courses
for statewide use that meet A-G requirements for all 15 sectors and 58 pathways.           1        500.0         500,000
Regional Articulation -- This project will engage multiple high school, ROCP
and community college faculty and instructors to develop articulated career
pathway methods and standards, addressing all facets of comprehensive career
pathway articulation, including information dissemination, technical assistance
and any needed infrastructure.                                                             10       150.0        1,500,000
CTE Online (CDE) -- Expand the computerized, web-based system for CTE
teachers in all 15 sectors to improve course content and lesson plan information,
including integrating academic and CTE curriculum, into the menu-driven system.            1        1,000.0      1,000,000
                                                                            Subtotal                             6,059,000
                                                        Capacity Building
                                                            Counselors
Faculty/Counselor In-service (Work Experience) -- These projects will pair
high school and college faculty to work in industry or with industry and
professional organizations to gain knowledge of the education needs of the high
growth, high demand industry sector.                                                       28        50.0        1,400,000
Technical Assistance Center -- Technical assistance statewide through a variety
of resources and dissemination approaches                                                  1        125.0          125,000
                                                                            Subtotal                             1,525,000
                                                             Teachers
Teacher Preparation Pipeline -- This project addresses the need to increase the
number of students (both from high school/community colleges and from
business/industry/labor/military) in teacher preparation programs that will lead to
a greater number of CTE teachers who are prepared to be successful in the
classroom.                                                                                6-20     100-300       2,000,000
New Teacher Workshop (CDE) -- Provide sector specific instruction,
particularly for those secondary and community college teachers without formal
teacher training, on classroom management, instructional strategies, etc.                  1        1,150.0      1,150,000
Professional Development (CDE) -- Provide secondary and community college
experienced CTE Teachers with grants for internships with business and industry
in the relevant industry sector and for organized summer professional
development seminars on teaching strategies and other relevant pedagogical
topics.                                                                                    1        1,150.0      1,500,000
Leadership Development (CDE) -- Conduct 10 regional week long institutes to
develop future CTE leaders and the community college and secondary systems.                1        300.0          300,000
                                                                            Subtotal                             4,950,000
                                                 Research and Evaluation
CTE Longitudinal Study (CDE) -- Conduct research on high school students
related to impact CTE/ROCP courses had on grade point averages, high school
exit exam, graduation, postsecondary enrollment, employment, salaries,
promotion rates, etc. compared to control group of non-CTE students.                       1        500.0          500,000
                                                                       Subtotal                                    500,000
                                                                   Grand Total          213-207                 52,000,000
                                                     APPENDIX A-3

                        Description of Projects by Funding Category

I.        Enrollments
          California Career Technical Institutes (CTI)

          Drawing on best practices from the CTE distinguished schools, ROCPs, 2+2 K-12-
          community college programs, business and industry training programs, and national
          research, the proposed CTIs will utilize a more intensive career preparation version of the
          California Partnership Academy (CPA) model. These will be five year programs
          beginning in the 9th grade and extending through community college degree or certificate
          completion. This approach will prepare more students to go from high school directly to
          work in skilled, in-demand jobs or to continue in postsecondary courses of study leading
          to advanced occupational skills. Funding will be used to 1) establish new CTIs, 2)
          supplement existing CPAs* to strengthen the career preparation aspect of the program,
          and 3) strengthen school district funded career academies that are not currently receiving
          CPA funds. Strategies that will be used in the CTI model include:

          1. Intensive or increased involvement of business and industry in the planning and
             development of curricula, work-based learning, and pathways to employment and
             advanced training;

          2. Integration of academic curricula into CTI courses and/or intensive coordination
             between academic course teachers and CTI teachers to encourage contextual learning
             experiences;
          3. Fully articulated secondary and community college course sequences, pathways, and
             programs that incorporate work-based learning and lead to occupational certification
             and/or degrees;

          4. New or improved competency-based student assessment methods including industry-
             based or validated certificates, portfolios, etc.

          5. Support of the small learning communities approach including team teaching,
             alternative scheduling, forming CTI Teams of secondary teachers, community college
             faculty, counselors (secondary and community college), business and labor
             representatives, and key administrators, etc.

          6. Full support of concurrent enrollment opportunities coordinated with participating
             community colleges. These concurrent enrollment opportunities maximize students’
             progress through programs to graduation and employment. Instructional delivery and

*There are approximately 282 Career Partnership Academies (CPAs) in California. These CPAs exist as a “school within a school” where high
school students, grades 10-12, enroll in multiyear course sequences combining academic and occupational training.



CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                                                              Page 11
    ancillary services will be among the activities supported.

Funding will be provided, on a competitive basis, for three years, with an option for an
additional two years for new CTIs. Applicants will consist of school districts and the
principle partners, including community colleges, which will make up the partnership
group. After the funding period, school district and community colleges would pick up
the costs of their Institutes through enrollment and other funding streams. First year
funding will be used to 1) establish 28 new Career Technical Institutes, 2) supplement 14
existing Career Partnership Academies, and 3) strengthen school district funded career
academies that are not currently receiving CPA funds. This roll-out strategy will provide
the widest coverage of all California communities over time.

Annual funding for additional grants will increase each year over the five year plan’s
duration, from a base of $3,766,000 for 07-08 to $15,921,000 in 2011. At the end of the
plan period, 160 new Career Technical Institutes will have been established; 79 Career
Partnership Academies will have been upgraded, and 78 independent Academies will
have received funding support to become full fledged Career Partnership Academies or
Career Technical Institutes.

This component of the plan relates most directly to the “Enrollment” Building Block, and
also to “Curriculum” and “Business Partnerships.” The enrollment capacity in these
programs will significantly increase CTE options available to students and prospective
students. Curricula will be developed with the participation of business partners and will
reflect the progress that is being made on a host of fronts for improved CTE programs.

Career Advancement Academies

There are barriers that exist which prevent certain segments of the population (young
adults 18 - 30 years old) from developing or achieving career goals. These people do not
have the opportunity to achieve their full potential as wage earners, or in pursuing any
postsecondary education or training due to a lack of basic skills, the lack of a high school
diploma or General Education Diploma (GED), or both. This population group includes
high school dropouts, immigrants, and people who have been working at minimum wage
jobs for some years. This category would fund three model projects in major population
centers around the state to help establish a pipeline for individuals to obtain either
additional training or enhanced skills leading to enhanced wage earning power. The pilot
projects would involve regional collaborations among community college districts, adult
education centers, Regional Occupational Centers and Programs (ROCPs), and local
workforce investment boards, and will involve a significant work-based learning model,
with the goal of having individuals complete their training cycle with enhanced basic
skills and, where appropriate, a GED. These projects would be funded in part with state
monies, and in part with federal workforce investment dollars, private foundation grants,
and employers.

The regional Career Advancement Academy funds will be awarded through a competitive
process to applicant partnerships to ensure the full complement of required elements to
        support student success. Funds will be awarded for three pilot or model projects in major
        population centers, which will each be funded for one year, with the possibility of annual
        renewals for up to three years, based on funding availability and satisfactory completion
        of project objectives.

        The three model academies are expected to operate for three years, and then no additional
        funds are devoted to them after the 2009-2010 year. The Career Advancement
        Academies component comes under the category of Enrollments, in this case enrollment
        of unemployed, out of school young adults, into programs that provide basic skills, a
        GED, and pathways to further occupational training.

        Workforce Innovation Partnerships

        These projects are modeled after the “Quick Start” Partnership projects that align high
        schools to community colleges by transitioning career tech majors and courses (2+2) with
        selected California Community College Economic and Workforce Development Program
        (EWD) Strategic Priority Initiatives (see below). However, the Workforce Innovation
        Partnerships would be different in two aspects: (1) additional industry sectors are now
        represented; and (2) grantees can use the funds to develop new pathways (as opposed to
        expanding existing). In addition to student enrollment and piloting coursework, activities
        include outreach, curriculum modification and articulation. New certificates and
        enrollments are key outcomes in this category.

        Funded projects shall be in Advanced Manufacturing and Product Development;
        Advanced Transportation; Autonomous Technologies; Biotechnologies; Global supply
        chain and professional export services careers; Energy, Energy Production and Utilities;
        Engineering and Design; Environmental Hazardous Materials Technology; Finance and
        Business; Geographic Information Systems/Geospatial Positioning Systems; Homeland
        Security; Information Technologies; Multimedia and Entertainment; Nanotechnologies;
        Professional, Scientific, Technical and Management Services; Specialty Healthcare;
        Telecommunications; and Wholesale Trade.

        Grants would be awarded competitively. At currently anticipated levels of funding,
        approximately 8 grants would be funded in the amount of $500,000 each, and the term of
        each grant would be two years. Grant recipients would be partnerships of secondary and
        postsecondary education, with substantial involvement of business and industry.

        These grants are listed under the category of Enrollments because they will directly create
        pathways and programs for students; however, they could be listed under Business
        Partnerships as well, because the partnership with industry is critical to making the
        pathways meaningful for those hoping to enter the industry. Funding is devoted to this
        category every year, increasing as soon as possible as other projects are phased out. The
        current plan anticipates an increase from $4 million per year to $8 million in the year
        2010-2011. This roll-out strategy will provide the widest coverage of all California
        communities over time.




CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                        Page 13
“Quick Start” Partnerships

“Quick Start” projects were the first projects funded under the Career Technical
Education Pathways initiative. They were intended to be exemplars and align with one or
more of the following EWD Program Strategic Priority Initiatives:

   Advanced Transportation Technologies;
   Applied Competitive Technologies/Manufacturing;
   Biotechnologies;
   Environmental Technologies;
   Geographic Information Systems (GIS)/Geographic Positioning Systems (GPS);
   Health; and
   Multimedia/Entertainment.

Projects use economic development strategies and build on regional economic trends,
targeting high wage, high skill jobs of the future for students. High school students
benefit by having clear pathways to exciting career fields and a better understanding of
future high wage, high skill jobs. High schools in the projects work with middle and
junior high schools to bring them information about these pathway programs. Community
colleges’ strengths in economic and workforce development will aid in providing applied
academics.

In their implementation, “Quick Start” projects include:

   Technical assistance and leadership from the EWD Program in the community
    colleges to the 2+2 curriculum pathway projects;

   Strong business and industry involvement for technical expertise and labor market
    requirements;

   Regional faculty collaboratives among high school and community college faculty to
    redesign or align curriculum and foster its portability;

   Worksite learning opportunities for students (i.e., internships, job shadowing,
    cooperative work experience education, community classroom, etc.);

   Professional development for high school instructors, ROC/P and community college
    faculty;

   Outreach activities regarding high wage/high skill career opportunities as well as the
    availability of the 2+2 curriculum pathway;

   Professional development for counselors and student support personnel to ensure
    program viability and student access;

   Program model documented for dissemination and transferability.
        Quick Start projects were funded through a competitive process using 2005-06 money
        allocated by Senate Bill 70. There were 25 projects funded, representing various
        geographical areas of the state and all seven industry sectors listed above. The projects
        were funded for two years. The remaining funding in the 2007-08 budget will provide a
        small amount of funding for each Quick Start project to disseminate its results statewide
        and provide technical assistance to others wishing to implement similar projects.

        Quick Start projects will no longer be funded after the 07-08 fiscal year. They will be
        replaced by the Workforce Innovation Partnerships detailed above. Both of these types of
        projects increase enrollments for students in emerging industry career pathways, as well
        as substantially increasing and strengthening business partnerships.

        Career and Technical Education Sectors

        These projects would support the development of comprehensive programs to strengthen
        or reestablish Career Technical Education (CTE) and Regional Occupational Centers and
        Programs (ROCP) in sectors identified by the California Department of Education by
        developing model projects, articulation course work, aligning curriculum with Model
        Curriculum Standards, planning and implementing new Partnership Academies,
        providing leadership, and developing advisory councils to link education with labor,
        business and industry. These projects differ from the Workforce Innovation Partnerships
        in that the sectors follow the traditional CTE model, and that they are targeted primarily
        to K-12 programs.

        CDE-Identified Industry Sectors include Agriculture and Natural Resources; Arts, Media
        and Entertainment; Building Trades and Construction; Energy and Utilities; Engineering
        and Design; Fashion and Interiors; Finance and Business; Health and Human Services;
        Hospitality, Tourism and Recreation; Information Technology; Manufacturing and
        Product Development; Public and Private Education Services; Public Services; Retail and
        Wholesale Trade; Transportation.

        This program is the backbone of this CTE reform effort, and provides each community in
        California critical funding for program renovation and improvement. These grants would
        go out by allocation based on an approved local program proposal, so as to ensure that
        every college district and their regional partners in every area of the state receives some
        funding for these projects. Some applicants are at a disadvantage in the competitive
        process, particularly those in rural areas, and an allocation to all ensures that even the
        smallest and most rural districts receive some funding. The allocation will limit fundable
        activities to certain ranges and rubrics for performance will be required before approval
        of local program proposals. The distribution formula will be based on CTE enrollments,
        with a guaranteed minimum base.

        Funding for these grants is anticipated to start at the level of $19 million for 2007-08, and
        continue at that level each year through 2011-12. These projects will not only provide




CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                          Page 15
      enrollment opportunities for students, but will have substantial impact on the creation and
      alignment of CTE curriculum.

      Career Exploration and Model Program Development for 7th and 8th Graders

      It is crucial to reach young people before the high school years to begin acquainting them
      with the career opportunities that await them. These projects create opportunities for 7 th
      and 8th grade students to explore career and technical education pathways. Colleges and
      the EWD Centers, working with their affiliate K-12 districts, will develop and implement
      model projects providing career exploration relating to career and technical education as
      well as future employment opportunities.           Exposure to career opportunities in
      entrepreneurship and international business will be included. Features of the projects
      include: (1) Motivational and self-esteem building activities that will provide the
      students with a clear understanding of themselves, their aptitudes, abilities, interests,
      ambitions, resources, limitations, and values; (2) Development of course curriculum
      and/or lesson plans for career awareness and exploration courses. (Students must be
      exposed to occupational choices and careers that represent all 15 industry sectors, as
      defined by the California Department of Education); (3) Information to students –
      providing them with knowledge of the requirements and potential opportunities in careers
      in various high wage, high growth career clusters as well as conditions of success,
      advantages and disadvantages, and compensation; and (4) Regular individual counseling
      sessions to connect career planning to personal and educational development.

      These grants are awarded competitively to applicant partnerships consisting of at least
      one college with high school and middle school partners. The grant term is for two years,
      which allows the middle school to develop a career exploration program and deliver it to
      multiple students, as well as providing time for counselors to meet individually with
      students. This roll-out strategy will provide the widest coverage of all California
      communities over time. As models mature and their efficacy is better known, subsequent
      funding may be more proscriptive or targeted.

      Funding for this component is anticipated to continue at approximately the same level
      through the fiscal year 2013-14, with a slight drop after the year 2007-08. This
      component results in direct enrollments in CTE as students begin their career exploration
      in middle school and move on to CTE programs in high schools and/or Regional
      Occupational Programs/ Centers.


II.   Business Partnerships

      Business and Industry Advisory Committee

      The goal of this component is to increase the breadth and depth of business and labor
      involvement into the CTE system by annually convening statewide business and industry
      advisory committee for each in the 15 industry sectors involving high school, ROCP,
      community college CTE and economic development entities. Although there are
        Business Industry Advisory committees that operate locally, as well as business
        involvement in specific CTE activities, there is no state wide entity organized to or
        charged with advising the system as a whole regarding the current and future workforce
        needs for workers across the spectrum of 15 sectors.

        These statewide committees will consist of representatives from each sector and will
        provide guidance in the implementation of the five year plan. Membership will be drawn
        from businesses active in the P-16 Councils, the Community Colleges' Economic and
        Workforce Development Program, local Workforce Investment Boards, and local
        Economic Development Agencies. The overarching goal is to develop a closer
        collaboration between the education and business/industry community resulting in better
        trained workers that meet the needs of industry. Additionally, these committees will
        provide information to employers about the CTE system and its benefits, and will be
        helpful in recruitment of new teachers, support of student organizations, and business
        involvement in other programs funded out of this five year plan.

        The California Department of Education and Chancellor’s Office of the California
        Community Colleges will select a contractor and work together to convene and operate
        these groups, and develop a contract that will be renewable annually based on adequate
        performance. This component will coordinate business input and communication into the
        Career Technical Education Initiative. Currently there is very limited coordination of
        business groups that advise K-12, ROCPs, and community colleges. Formation of the
        Business Advisory Committees addresses the “Business Partnership” Building Block.

        Connection to Economic and Workforce Development Program Initiatives

        The purpose of this component is to build a statewide system to link businesses and
        economic development work with career technical education efforts. Eight EWD
        regional initiative centers will be augmented on an on-going basis to improve linkages
        and career technical education pathways between high schools and community colleges.
        One center in eight of the ten initiatives will connect on-going work on new certificates,
        enrollments and enhancements to career technical education. This creates on-going
        cross-pollination and enhancements at the network-to-network level.

        Central in this effort will be expanding certificates in identified EWD strategic initiative
        priority areas and aligning existing technical preparation program areas and curriculum
        between high schools and community colleges to targeted industry-driven initiatives
        through the EWD model. Sharing of both traditional pathways and approaches which give
        students agile and flexible alternatives to exploring career pathways will result. The goal
        of the project is to promote the EWD model of integrating business and emerging
        industries with career technical programs and courses provided in high schools.

        Primarily the EWD centers will assist colleges with career technical education programs
        as well as helping them to learn more about issues in career technical education, to
        improve their knowledge of traditional career pathways to the EWD initiatives. As
        knowledge grows, the systemic network-to-network liaison work will assist with creating



CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                         Page 17
partnerships and alliances between high schools and community colleges and, where
appropriate, four-year institutions, and will accelerate education and training for those
students who choose to be prepared for career and technical employment opportunities
using less traditional, more expeditious methods. At the same time, student competencies
will be maintained or improved. Grantees will also be able to explore new and more
relevant career and technical practicum models that integrate coursework and student
internships that improve the quality of career exploration and career outreach materials.

Grants will be awarded to one existing Economic and Workforce Development Program
regional center in each of 8 strategic priority initiatives, such as Biotechnology or
Multimedia. In aggregate, these regional programs will cover the state. Each of the
centers originally received its designation through a competitive process, and must re-
compete every 5 years to maintain its grant to operate the regional business assistance
center.

These projects, which are based on the existing EWD program model, will have
substantial business involvement. They are also intended to provide capacity-building
assistance to colleges that do not have existing, effective business partnerships. Funding
is anticipated to remain level from 2007-08 through 2011-12 so as to maintain the effort
of establishing a network for the benefit of all colleges and secondary school entities.

California Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs)

The goal of this component is to increase the strength and visibility of CTSOs, which will
result in increased student participation, increased student learning and achievement,
increased peer marketing of CTE, and greater awareness among policymakers and the
public of CTE activities, student participation, and outcomes.

CTSOs develop citizenship and academic, technical, leadership, and teamwork skills
essential for students who are preparing for the workforce and further education. They
enhance students' civic awareness and provide opportunities for developing social and
workplace competencies. They also play critical roles in recruiting new students into
CTE. CTSOs provide a unique instructional method for attaining the standards,
competencies and objectives identified in the rigorous Career Technical Education (CTE)
and Academic Curriculum Standards.

Each organization provides:

1.   Standards-based education
2.   Leadership and professional development
3.   Job and career-related training
4.   Employability skills
5.   Citizenship and communication skills
6.   Opportunities to set and achieve education and career goals
        7. Opportunities to compete at the local, state and national levels to demonstrate
           knowledge and skill in career technical and academic education, leadership, critical
           thinking and problem solving.

        CTSOs eligible for funding include, but are not limited to:

             DECA, formerly Distributive Education Clubs of America – The Organization for
             Marketing, Management and Entrepreneurial Education Students (47 CA Chapters)

             FBLA, Future Business Leaders of America (146 CA Chapters)

             FFA, formerly Future Farmers of America -- The Organization for Agricultural
             Education Students (319 CA Chapters)

             FHA-HERO, Future Homemakers              of   America-Home     Economics        Related
             Occupations (102 CA Chapters)

             HOSA, Health Occupations Students of America (66 CA Chapters)

             SkillsUSA – The Organization for Trade, Industrial, and Technical Education
             Students (125 CA Chapters)

        Additionally, the Statewide Student Senate of the California Community Colleges, along
        with local Student Senates, will be funded to augment their support of Career Technical
        Education extracurricular engagement of community college students, who range from
        transfers from secondary schools to adults. A critical element in this CTE engagement
        will be promoting student memberships in bona fide professional and industry
        associations, which is an important portal to careers. This work will be complemented by
        the CTSO activities to increase community college student participation, as included
        below.

        Based on an Application for Funding submitted by the CTSO, funds will be distributed to
        the state CTSO Boards for implementing the following:

             Advisor Stipends: To cover a fixed amount per year to be used as advisor(s)
             stipend(s), plus additional funds to allow for new chapter growth.

             California Leadership Summit: The objective of this project is to promote an
             enlightened and responsible citizenry committed to democratic principles and
             actively engaged in the practice of democracy. Students participating in this
             event will be responsible for leading civic service and engagement activities
             within their respective CTSOs. CTSOs will collaborate and coordinate to
             design and develop this summit. The Leadership Summit would involve 3-5
             days of instruction, activities, and legislative meetings in Sacramento for
             approximately 60 CTSO student leaders (ten from each California CTSO).




CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                         Page 19
           CTSO Advisor Summer Institute: Provide CTSO advisors with 3-5 days of
           training on CTSO leadership, chapter planning, implementation and
           development. The institute will be open to local advisors from middle grades,
           high school, and postsecondary chapters, with an emphasis on recruitment
           and development of community college chapters. Funds may cover travel,
           lodging, per diem, instructional materials and supplies, trainers and
           facilitators, project coordinator, meeting facilities, and indirect costs.

           Community College, Middle Grades, and Industry Participation: Each
           organization will develop strategies and implement processes for increasing
           community college, middle grades, and industry participation in the CTSO.
           The strategies will include chapter, programs, activities, and curriculum
           development and the development of creative industry-education partnerships
           based on the goals and needs of each career sector and its corresponding
           CTSO. These activities will be focused on the following:

           1.   Career Exploration and Development
           2.   Leadership and Citizenship Development
           3.   Community Service and Outreach
           4.   Professional Growth and Development
           5.   Expanding the number of students interested in becoming CTE teachers

           Multimedia Campaign for all CTSOs: CTSOs will develop print materials,
           public service announcements, media products, DVD development and other
           forms of information dissemination about CTSOs. Materials will be
           developed to reach the target audiences: students (college, high school, and
           middle school), parents, teachers, counselors and administrators, industry,
           and community members and organizations. These materials will be used to
           market both student and business involvement to expand CTSOs.

       Funding will continue at a consistent rate through the length of the plan, with allocations
       continuing to be made as described above. A reporting system will be established to
       track the effects of these efforts on students and their experiences. This component
       relates directly to the building block “business partnerships” as business participation is
       part of the core foundation for these organizations. We also expect enrollment to increase
       significantly as the CTOs achieve greater organizational strength. A goal of the funding
       of CTOs will be to help them increase their capacity to pursue other sources of funding
       for ongoing support after the plan period.


III.   Curriculum
       Entrepreneurship Career Pathway Project

       According to the California Economic Strategy Panel, new business formation, i.e.,
       entrepreneurial pursuits, are responsible for the majority of new jobs in California.
        Entrepreneurs are characterized by innovative behavior, use of strategic management
        practices, and focus on the goals of profit and growth. In start-up and growth ventures,
        the problems that tend to arise are complex, integrated and multidimensional. These
        issues require skills in problem identification, root cause analysis, synthesis and creative
        problem solving. An additional necessary skill is the ability to adopt a holistic view to
        manage and problem solve across the boundaries and intricacies of diversified functions
        successfully. For most of modern business history, entrepreneurial ventures were
        inherently local during their early years. Most start up companies today, however,
        consider overseas expansion from their inception. Conventional forms of business
        training and education do not sufficiently address this unique set of needs and challenges.
        These projects will focus on fostering small business ownership and formation with a
        global perspective.

        In keeping with the state’s interest in business and industry involvement in career
        technical education, as well as articulation between high schools and community colleges,
        the entrepreneurship component will be regionally based and inclusive. A regional
        coordinator from the EWD Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) and the
        International Trade Development Centers (CITDs) will oversee locally-based
        collaborations between 40 existing CITDs and SBDCs, selected high schools, ROCPs,
        community colleges and business. Both online learning and weekend institutes will be
        utilized for service delivery.

        This component will focus on providing entrepreneurial and international understanding
        to the high school and community college young adult. Tasks will include:

            Provide training and counseling about the skills needed to be self-employed and the
             value of those skills. This training may take place in the classroom, at weekend
             institutes, on-site at businesses, evening seminars, on-line or other venues.

            Inform students about the global business environment and how it affects one’s life
             and work.

            Train high school and community college faculty about the need to integrate
             entrepreneurship and global business into career technical education course work.

            Articulate the self-employment training between feeder high schools and their
             community colleges.

            Facilitate the expansion of college certificates in entrepreneurship and small business
             and global trade.

            Initiate or expand student internships where appropriate.

            Create and disseminate materials in the field of entrepreneurship.




CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                         Page 21
Funding will be provided to the existing Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs)
and Centers for International Trade (CITDs) established under the Economic and
Workforce Development program for regional coverage. This regional strategy will
provide the widest coverage for all California communities. These centers originally
earned their designation through a competitive process, and must re-compete every 5
years to maintain their grants to serve as the regional business assistance centers in their
areas. Funding proposed here will be allocated equally to each center.

This funding is anticipated to continue at the same level from 2007-08 through 2011-12.
The grantees are already fully immersed in business partnerships, as assisting business is
their primary function. With these projects, they will also create new curriculum for
secondary and postsecondary students who are interested in pursuing entrepreneurship as
a career path.

Curriculum Planning for Emerging Industries

Four future-looking studies were recently completed for the EWD Program. California
has the opportunity to create a 21st Century multi-ethnic workforce to meet the evolving
and complex challenges of converging technologies, such as nanotechnology, Micro-
Electro-Mechanical Systems or “MEMS,” and advanced manufacturing technology, as
well as the growth of biotechnologies and transportation and energy solutions and trends.
The core of California’s competitive manufacturing advantage in the future is rooted, in
part, in the use of these technologies to produce innovative products that are moved
across the globe using electronic and surface logistics – just-in-time – to customers
anywhere in the world. Science, mathematics, specialized technical knowledge and
information technology penetrates and ties together every element of this process. An
innovative, highly trained workforce working with these technologies invents and applies
the proprietary knowledge that generates a firm’s competitive advantage. California’s
challenge is to cultivate the competitive advantage of its various growth sectors and its
current and future workforce.

The state already has multiple high technology supply chains that extend across the
border. The owners and employees of the firms could also serve as mentors to encourage
Latinos and Hispanics to consider a technical occupation. This model could apply to
other ethnic groups as well, particularly Chinese and South Asian immigrant owned
firms.

The location and growth of industries, among other elements, is dependent on an able and
trained workforce. This pilot would place California at the forefront of anticipating
workforce needs for emerging industries, and strengthen the state’s competitive edge in
encouraging existing businesses in California to expand as well as attracting companies
from other states. The objective of this grant is to bring together faculty and industry
expertise to develop plans with high schools for 2+2 projects in new economic
development areas such as, but not limited to:

   Nanotechnologies;
            Alternative fuels and the hydrogen economy;
            Biotechnologies;
            Digital Manufacturing; and
            Information technology of the future.

        In addition to the creation of a feasibility study, curriculum and an implementation plan,
        this project would create new alliances between Education and Economic Development,
        and is an investment for future economic growth. Curriculum planning will include a
        careful crafting of transferable skill sets so that graduates would have multiple
        employment options, including the anticipated emerging industries. Significant industry
        and research lab involvement is anticipated in this project.

        One statewide grant would be competitively awarded to continue the study of the skills
        that will be needed by the workforce in these emerging industries, and to determine the
        issues surrounding them. The grantee would also begin developing curriculum in
        collaboration with business and education partners, and an implementation plan to
        disseminate the information statewide.

        This project is expected to begin in 2007-08 and continue through 2008-09. It will create
        substantial new business partnerships, as well as developing curriculum for the emerging
        industries. This capacity building will eventually lead to enrollments in these new career
        pathways.

        Distance Learning Pilot

        The goal of this component is to deliver CTE curriculum linking secondary and
        community college resources to rural areas of the state. Currently, due to a limited
        employer base and geographic distances, rural areas often struggle to establish multi-
        sector CTE strategies and partnerships with businesses. Furthermore, due to limited
        number of schools and community colleges, they may not be able to easily achieve local
        and regional partnerships that are effective in developing cross system CTE strategies.
        Rural populations also are faced with unique barriers in CTE teacher recruitment.
        Through web-based learning systems and using best practices, accessible, articulated
        courses and programs will be developed and implement curriculum linking secondary and
        community college resources.

        This component will leverage the capacity of CTE Online and the Technical Assistance
        Center for curricula development and web-based distribution.

        This component will be funded through competitive grants submitted by regions. First
        year grants will be awarded for planning and development, with implementation grants
        funded for preceding years. This component addresses both the “Enrollment” and
        “Curriculum” Building Blocks.

        In-service Workshops (A-G)




CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                       Page 23
      This one statewide project will provide funding to continue and expand the success of the
      cooperative a-g course approval project. The University of California Office of the
      President (UCOP) and CDE will cooperate in developing new secondary CTE courses
      meeting a-g course approval and program approval status, expanding the number of
      course curricula available on the UCOP website, and training secondary administrators
      and teachers on improving CTE course curricula to meet a-g standards.

      Funding will be allocated on an annual, ongoing basis to continue to increase the number
      of CTE courses meeting a-g requirements. This addresses the “Curriculum” Building
      Block.

      Regional Articulation

      A precursor step in establishing new seamless career paths based on economic
      development trends is to ensure that current programs and courses are aligned as well as
      possible, and to develop systemic solutions to difficulties in student transition. This
      project will engage multiple high schools, ROCPs and community colleges, along with
      faculty and instructor representatives, to devise solutions and systems. The goals of this
      project include:

      1. Review Tech Prep Career Pathway data to determine which of the 15 pathways
         established by the California Department of Education are represented most
         frequently regionally in order to target the most relevant industry sectors for
         workforce development programs and courses for seamless alignment and
         articulation. Representatives will also review pathways included in the Partnership
         Academies High Schools, Career High Schools and other specialized secondary
         schools within their region and analyze and tabulate existing articulation agreements.
         From a synthesis of this information, the region will determine which pathways and
         courses shall be the target of regionalized articulation. As time permits, other
         regionalized articulation may also be included.

      2. Organize and convene regional secondary/post-secondary work groups to develop
         articulation interactions and career pathways.

      3. Determine the nature of articulation most appropriate for each individual targeted
         pathway and course(s):
4.
         Alignment
         Advanced placement
         Credit for work completed (credit by examination)
         Baccalaureate Transfer eligible

and build a common standard for accepting courses for articulation and course content that is
      accepted regionally.
        5. Obtain participant college approval of regionalized articulation agreements as
           appropriate.

        6. Review CalPass (Cal-Pass.org), and research methods for a regional online
           technology system for successful articulation and student completion information
           from the high school to community college. Implement as feasible.

        7. Develop an outreach component to be used regionally to increase student and parent
            understanding of the process and benefits of articulation, increase the number of
            students taking advantage of articulation agreements, and increase 2+2+2
            opportunities.
        8.
        9. Ensure that all participating colleges’ Admissions/Records personnel are familiar
            with processing students who may present articulation certificates or other
            documentation.
        10.
        11. Develop a system of maintaining regional articulation agreements over time.

        This project will operate in each of the state’s 10 regions, with one central entity
        coordinating the work of the regions. Each region may address a different industry
        sector, with the intent that all articulation enhancements will eventually be replicable
        statewide.

        This project is anticipated to be on-going for multiple years, with the funding staying
        level from the year 2007-08 through 2011-12. It will not only develop, enhance, and
        streamline CTE curriculum and articulation between secondary and postsecondary
        education, but will also serve to build capacity for those colleges and high schools that
        wouldn’t be able to develop such articulated CTE pathway programs on their own.

        CTE Online

        This funding will expand the successful CTE Online pilot project. The new funding will
        be used in all 15 sectors to expand CTE Online - a web-based system for CTE teachers to
        use in improving course content and lesson plan development to meet academic and CTE
        standards. One of the primary components of CTE Online is the capability to identify the
        academic standards which are being reinforced in that lesson, including an emphasis on
        the standards used in the CAHSEE and STAR statewide testing programs. This proposal
        will fund regional workshops for teachers and will fund 12 academic master teacher-
        mentors (mathematics, Science, English language arts) to assist CTE teachers’
        understanding and ability to demonstrate how academic standards are integrated into their
        curriculum. They will learn with the CTE teacher to facilitate an understanding of how
        academic and technical standards are complimentary.

        Funding will be provided through expanding the current CTE Online contract, and will be
        renewable pending performance monitoring through the Plan's duration. This component
        relates to the “Capacity Building” and “Curriculum” Building Blocks.



CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                      Page 25
IV.   Capacity Building – Counselors
      Faculty/Counselor In-service (Work Experience)

      These projects will provide funds for pairs or teams of high school and college faculty
      and counselors to work in industry or with industry associations and professional
      organizations to gain knowledge of the education needs of high growth, high demand
      industry sectors and to ascertain future employment opportunities. This strategy is
      intended to revitalize curriculum and initiate critical partnerships among educators and
      industry.

      These grants are competitively awarded and geographically dispersed throughout the
      state. They generally have a term of 18 months, to allow faculty and counselors some
      flexibility as to when they are engaged in worksite experiences outside the school,
      followed by sufficient time to bring those experiences back to the classroom and
      implement new curriculum and advising policies.

      These grants are anticipated to be funded at the same level from the fiscal year 2007-08
      thorough 2011-12. Besides the obvious capacity-building that will occur for faculty and
      counselors, other benefits will be the creation and expansion of industry partnerships.
      These projects should ultimately lead to more enrollments in career technical education
      pathways as well, as students are exposed to the real-world experiences gained by their
      teachers and counselors.

      Technical Assistance Center

      For some locations in California, building career pathways and work-based curriculum to
      achieve the goals of career technical education reform may present a significant
      challenge. This project is designed to provide technical assistance statewide through a
      variety of resources and dissemination approaches. This assistance may address, but not
      be limited to:

         Conformance to the applicable California Department of Education Career Technical
          Education standards and/or industry standards, as appropriate;

         Performance goals and outcomes, including student enrollment levels and flexible
          “Career Ladders” pathways which maximize students’ options for employment or
          continuing education;

         Local investment through matching or “in-kind” resources;

         Project design that can be sustained and institutionalized after the funding is gone;
            Aligned career-technical education curriculum between K-12, ROCP and community
             colleges to provide more targeted industry-driven programs and courses through the
             existing federal Tech-Prep 2+2 model and outreach to high school students;

            New articulation agreements created between high schools, ROCP and community
             colleges, and perhaps four year institutions (2+2+2);

            Certificate Programs in Economic and Workforce Development Program Strategic
             Priority Initiative Areas and new industry partnerships created with high schools;

            Identification of existing and needed data sources for longitudinal evaluation and
             project outcomes assessment;

            Identification of the courses high school students should take as pre-requisites

            Agreement on what students would learn in the high school courses to avoid
             repeating the courses in community college;

            A process for providing high school students with college credit for demonstrated
             learning outcomes from advanced courses taken in high school;

            Research reports of career pathways and resources present as well as potential, based
             on environmental scans; or

            Results of in-service experiences.

        One statewide grant will be competitively awarded. It will be renewable each year, based
        on the grantee’s performance. The grantee will provide technical assistance to faculty
        and counselors statewide, both at the secondary and postsecondary level, and also make
        its resources available to other career technical education providers and workforce
        development organizations.

        This grant will be funded at the same level each year from 2007-08 through 2011-12. It
        is primarily intended as a capacity-building tool available to all CTE practitioners. It will
        also be a repository for best practices, and provide information on available curriculum.


V.      Capacity Building – Teachers
        Teacher Preparation Pipeline

        These projects provide the foundation for students matriculating through K-12 and those
        who have work experience and are interested in becoming career technical education
        instructors. The role of the community colleges would be to facilitate the attainment of a
        credential in a shortened period of time. The projects have several components:



CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                            Page 27
1. Linking high school/community college/baccalaureate degree/teaching credential
   pathways, in recognition of the importance of early outreach and assisting students
   through professional preparation. The pathways would be developed in conjunction
   with middle and high schools, community colleges, and public and private
   baccalaureate and credential granting institutions. Extensive work would be required
   with both the UC and CSU systems to establish transfer support mechanisms and
   guaranteed admissions into teaching. Targeted curriculum and student interest
   organizations can contribute to allegiance to the preparation pathway.

2. Focusing on engendering and sustaining interest in the CTE teaching profession by
   informing students of course and professional requirements and assisting transitions
   between institutions. This could be done by:

    a) Offering introductory Math and Science education courses in the community
       colleges designed to interest potential CTE instructors that would be fully
       transferable to other educational institutions and include a field experience
       component.

    b) Implementing a blended model that focuses on Math and Science subject matter
       and pedagogy simultaneously.

    c) Exposing high school and community college students to the CTE teaching
       profession, to assist them to explore and solidify their career aspirations. By
       doing this, some students will opt out of the pathway if they decide not to teach,
       thereby lessening high attrition rates in the first few professional working years,
       and ensuring that enrollments in credential programs will have a higher success
       rate and return on investment.

3. Boosting the absolute number of students building CTE-related math, science, and
   English language arts competencies. Methods such as, but not limited to, contextual
   learning, high end instructional technology, culturally appropriate motivational
   techniques, and project-based instruction all can promote greater numbers of students
   achieving math and/or science proficiency.

The project will also include a component where Community College faculty and transfer
center professionals, working in partnership with the targeted businesses, labor
organizations and institutions, can ease the transition of students into public and private
universities and colleges offering baccalaureate degrees, particularly those offering the
teaching credential.

These grants would be awarded competitively, and geographically dispersed throughout
the state. The number of grants will depend upon the amount requested by each grantee,
which in turn will be dependent on the input of partners such as UC and CSU.

These grants are anticipated to be funded at the same level from 2007-08 through 2011-
12. The capacity-building aspect of increasing the number of CTE teachers in the
        pipeline is vital to the continuation and improvement of career-focused education for
        students. Since there has been a shortage of CTE teachers statewide, increasing the
        numbers of qualified teachers should also increase the enrollments in years to come.

        New Teacher Workshop

        The purpose of this component is to insure that all new CTE teachers are adept at the
        following:

            Using the CTE Standards and CTE Framework for teaching courses which result in
             student academic and technical proficiency,

            Ensuring that all secondary and community college instructors are proficient in
             classroom management, instructional strategies, and

            Understanding the importance of course and program articulation, career pathways,
             and close coordination between secondary and postsecondary CTE. Instruction will
             be sector specific, with particular emphasis on those secondary and community
             college teachers without formal teacher training on classroom management,
             instructional strategies, career pathways, and secondary and postsecondary
             coordination.

        Funding will be through a competitive renewable two year contract for the length of the
        five year plan. This component relates to the “Capacity Building” Building Block.

        Professional Development

        Provide secondary and community college experienced CTE Teachers with grants for
        internships with business and industry in the relevant industry sector and for organized
        summer professional development seminars or courses on teaching strategies, and other
        relevant pedagogical or industry-related topics.

        Leadership Development

        The goal of this statewide component is to invest in the development of future CTE
        leaders through the creation of Leadership Institutes. These will be based on an expanded
        version of the ROCP model institute to include secondary and community system
        teachers, faculty, counselors, and administrators. It will be coordinated with the New
        Teacher Training, A-G Workshops, and Professional Development components of this
        plan. Annually, ten week-long intensive regional Leadership Institutes will be conducted
        over the summer, with follow up communications throughout the year. Professional
        “learning communities” will be formed at the Leadership Workshops which will be
        supported by web-based technology. Learning community members will have orientation
        and instruction in accessing and applying other resources supported by this plan including
        CTE Online, Technical Assistance Center, Business Advisory Committee, etc.




CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                       Page 29
      A competitive contract renewable every two years, based on adequate performance, for
      the life of the plan, will be awarded to develop and conduct these Institutes. This
      component relates to the “Capacity Building” Building Block.


VI.   Research and Evaluation
      Evaluation

      The Community College System Office, in consultation with the California Department
      of Education, will fund the independent evaluation of the Career Technical and Economic
      Development Pathways Initiative created by SB 70 through a Request for Proposals
      process. The evaluation will include the requirements of SB 70 (Scott) as well as other
      elements as determined to be necessary.

      This one statewide grant will be competitively awarded to a college that either has the
      capacity to undertake the evaluation or will contract with a partner that can do so. It will
      start as a two-year contract using 2006-07 funding to capture everything that has occurred
      since the inception of the CTE Pathways initiative.

      Funding for this component is not provided in 2007-08 because the 06-07 funding will
      cover both years. Funding will begin again on the 2008-09 fiscal year, and continue at a
      level of $300,000 per year through 2011-12.

      CTE Longitudinal Study

      The goal of this statewide funding component is to conduct research on high school
      seniors/graduates in order to examine the impact CTE courses had on grade point
      averages, high school exit exam, postsecondary enrollment, employment, salaries,
      promotion rates, etc., compared to a control group of non CTE takers. Although various
      research studies have cited the value of CTE courses of study, there is no system in place
      to track students who participate in CTE courses and to compare their educational
      outcomes with non-CTE students. A data collection system will be developed for tracking
      and analyzing data on all CTE students.

      A contract will be developed, through competitive bids, and funded for two year periods
      renewable based on adequate performance, throughout the five year plan period.

      The data collection and analysis addressed through this component will be critical for
      answering questions regarding outcomes and the value of CTE. This study will also
      allow us to track student trends related to system performance. It relates directly to the
      “Research and Evaluation” Building Block.
                                              APPENDIX B
                       Career Technical Education Pathways Initiative
                                 Five-Year Spending Plan

                                              2007-08     2008-09         2009-10      2010-11      2011-12
                                                    Enrollments
CTE Institutes                                 3,766,000      5,480,000   10,860,000   12,474,000   15,921,000
Career Advancement Academies Pilot             5,000,000      5,000,000    5,000,000          -            -
Workforce Innovation                           4,000,000      4,000,000    4,000,000    8,000,000    4,000,000
Quickstarts                                    1,000,000            -            -            -            -
CTE Sectors                                   19,000,000     20,000,000   20,000,000   20,000,000   20,000,000
Middle School Exploration                      1,500,000      1,100,000    1,200,000    1,200,000    1,200,000
                  Subtotal -- Enrollments     34,266,000     35,580,000   41,060,000   41,674,000   41,121,000
                                               Business Partnerships
Business/Industry Advisory Committee             200,000        200,000      200,000      200,000      200,000
EWD Initiative                                 1,500,000      1,500,000    1,500,000    1,500,000    1,500,000
CTE Student Organizations                      3,000,000      2,000,000    2,000,000    2,000,000    2,000,000
          Subtotal -- Business Partnerships    4,700,000      3,700,000    3,700,000    3,700,000    3,700,000
                                                     Curriculum
21st Century Skills                            2,000,000      2,000,000    2,000,000    2,000,000    2,000,000
Emerging Industry Curriculum Review              559,000        300,000          -            -            -
Distance Learning Pilot                          500,000        500,000      500,000      500,000      500,000
Inservice Workshops (a-g)                        500,000        550,000      600,000      600,000      600,000
Regional Articulation                          1,500,000      1,500,000    1,500,000    1,500,000    1,500,000
CTE Online                                     1,000,000      1,000,000    1,000,000    1,000,000    1,000,000
                     Subtotal -- Curriculum    6,059,000      5,850,000    5,600,000    5,600,000    5,600,000
                                                 Capacity Building
Faculty/Counselor Inservice                    1,400,000      1,400,000    1,400,000    1,400,000    1,400,000
Technical Assistance Center                      125,000        125,000      125,000      125,000      125,000
Pipeline                                       2,000,000      2,000,000    2,000,000    2,000,000    2,000,000
New Teacher Workshop                           1,150,000      1,150,000    1,250,000    1,250,000    1,250,000
Professional Development                       1,500,000      1,595,000    1,765,000    1,651,000    1,704,000
Leadership Development                           300,000        300,000      300,000      300,000      300,000
              Subtotal -- Capacity Building    6,475,000      6,570,000    6,840,000    6,726,000    6,779,000
                                                Research and Evaluation
CTE Longitudinal Study                           500,000            -        500,000          -        500,000
Evaluation                                           -          300,000      300,000      300,000      300,000
      Subtotal -- Research and Evaluation        500,000        300,000      800,000      300,000      800,000
                             Grand Total      52,000,000     52,000,000   58,000,000   58,000,000   58,000,000




CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                                   Page 31
                                             APPENDIX C
Career Technical Education/Economic and Workforce Development
      Career Pathways Initiative Expenditure Plan (Actual)
                           FY 2005-06
                                                                                      Maximum
                                                                       Number          Funding         Actual Funds
                          Project Types                               of projects     per project       Requested
I. “Quick Start” Partnerships: Comprehensive 2+2 programs to aligned career pathways. In addition to student
enrollment and piloting coursework, activities include outreach, curriculum modification and articulation.
   Advanced Transportation                                                  4              $450,000         $2,098,445
   Biotechnologies                                                          5              $450,000         $1,150,294
   Applied Competitive Technologies                                         3              $450,000         $2,232,521
   Health Occupations                                                       2              $450,000           $849,266
   GIS/GPS                                                                  2              $450,000           $899,962
   Multimedia                                                               5              $450,000         $2,228,885
   Environmental Technology                                                 3              $450,000         $1,340,627
                                Subtotal -- Quick Start Projects           24                              $10,800,000
II. Capacity Building-
A. Program Development Needs. Development/dissemination of expertise, resource centers, templates and
professional development events/activities for statewide utilization. Special emphasis will be on dissemination and
technical assistance to economic d
Regional secondary/postsecondary curriculum alignment
articulation                                                               1              $4,000,000        $4,000,000
Building Career Pathways (Technical Assistance Center)                     1               $500,000           $500,000
Career Exploration & Model Program Development - 7th &
8th Grade                                                                 10               $150,000         $1,499,167
Faculty and counselor in-service projects. Funds for pairs or
teams of high school faculty and college faculty to work in
industry or with industry associations and professional
organizations to bring back high growth, high demand industry
sector knowled                                                            10          $      50,000           $499,652
B. Emerging Industries

Strengthen Existing Career & Technical Education Sectors.
Funds to develop comprehensive programs to strengthen existing
identified sectors by developing model programs, articulating
course work, aligning curriculum, providing leadership developing
advis                                                                     10               $250,000        $2,485,204
                                   Subtotal -- Capacity Building                                           $8,984,023
                                                     Grand Total                                          $19,784,023




CTE Career Pathways Expenditure Plan                                                                           Page 33
                                           APPENDIX C

Career Technical Education/Economic and Workforce Development
          Career Pathways Initiative Expenditure Plan
                       FY 2006-07 Actual

                                                                         Number
                                                                            of       Max
                              Project Types                              Projects   Award        Total
Faculty and Counselor In-service. Funding for pairs or teams of
college faculty and counselors to work in industry or with industry
associations and professional organizations to bring back high growth,
high demand industry sector knowledge regarding education and
program needs.                                                             28        500,000    1,400,000
Evaluation                                                                 1         300,000      300,000
Teacher Preparation Pipeline. This project proposes to support K-16
projects to meet anticipated CTE teacher shortages. Curriculum will
require components to strengthen Math and Science disciplines within                100,000-
the CTE competencies.                                                     6-21       300,000    4,100,000
Career Exploration & Model Program Development - 7th & 8th
grade                                                                      18        150,000    2,700,000
Four year institution articulation -- Supports career ladders for
upward career mobility and higher skill attainment                         10        200,000    2,000,000
Career Advancement Academy Planning Grants --                              5          50,000      150,000
Strengthen Career & Technical Education Sectors. Identified
Industry Sectors: Agriculture and Natural Resources; Arts, Media and
Entertainment; Building Trades and Construction; Energy and
Utilities; Engineering and Design; Fashion and Interiors; Finance and
Business; Health and Human Services; Hospitality, Tourism and
Recreation; Information Technology; Manufacturing and Product
Development; Public and Private Education Services; Public Services;
Retail and Wholesale Trade; Transportation.
      These grants include two set-asides:
       At least six grants will be awarded for Health Workforce
          Pathways grants for the enhancement and development of
          health-related career pathway programs in grades 7-12 and
          the articulation and alignment of health-related curriculum
          between k-12 and the colleges.
       At least 8 grants will be awarded for Pre- apprentice ship
          projects - Through integrated coursework and work based
          learning, prepare students to enter apprenticeship programs      34        250,000    8,500,000
                                                                    Grand Total                19,150,000

				
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