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TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

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					TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY
         Houston, Texas




      Distance Education Plan

             May 1, 2006
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Texas Southern University recognizes that the development of a Distance Learning
(e-Learning) Program that enhances access to higher education is necessary to remain
competitive in a global society. To this end, Texas Southern University, through the use
of current emerging computer and communication technologies, is committed to the
following:
           • offering expanded educational opportunities
           • providing local and global access to information
           • forming electronic communication and information links with other public
               and private agencies and community groups
           • supporting the administrative functions of the university in ways that are
               flexible in terms of time, place, and pace.
The flexibility and convenience associated with e-Learning course offerings are
important to students in an urban environment. Most importantly, the e-Learning
programs (electronically delivered) make it possible to better serve the constituencies of
the University and meet the state’s critical agenda for “Closing the Gaps.” Finally,
e-Learning courses make it possible to accommodate the growing needs of professionals
to enhance knowledge and skills needed in their expanded roles in a competitive global
economy.




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                            Texas Southern University

                   Institutional Plan for Distance Education

INTRODUCTION

Background

Since 2000, the University has been in the planning process of an Institutional e-Learning
Plan for approval according to the provisions provided in the standards adopted by the
Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. In this regard, an ad-hoc Technology
Committee with representatives from faculty, staff, and administration from the various
colleges and schools was organized to consider and formulate an e-Learning plan. As a
result, the following University entities and issues have been considered: enrollment
management, student services, library services financial issues, faculty development, and
intellectual property.

Institutional academic and administrative policies reflect a commitment by Texas
Southern University (TSU) to maintain the quality of its e-Learning and off-campus
programs in accordance with provisions provided in Subchapter H, with the standards
adopted by accreditation agencies, and with the Principles of Good Practice for
Electronically Offered Academic Degree and Certificate Programs, Appendix I. The
Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board distance education guidelines require that
Texas Southern University (TSU) address the following areas: (1) current distance
education and off-campus program offerings and developments, (2) institutional issues,
(3) educational programs, (4) faculty and student support services, and (5) distance
education facilities and support services.

Current Distance Education and Off-Campus Program Offerings and Developments

Program Offerings Approved as of May 2006:
None

Program Offerings in Development:
None




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Section 1                            Institutional Issues

   0. IP2-2004.1—Institutional Plan Guideline
1. The institution documents compliance with The Principles of Good Practice for
   Electronically Offered Academic Degree and Certificate Programs (PPG). Does
   our institution use the PPG Course Guide (an example of compliance
   documentation) when developing new courses or evaluating existing courses?
   (http://www.thecb.state.tx.us//AAR/DistanceEd/PPGCourseGuide.pdf). If not,
   Please attach an example of the course evaluation form that you use and explain
   how it allows you to confirm compliance with the PPG.

   Yes, Texas Southern University Distance Learning Plan complies with The Principles
   of Good Practice for Electronically Offered Academic Degree and Certificate
   Programs, Appendix I. In fact, e-Learning faculty members are required to adhere to
   these principles in written format before engaging in the teaching of e-Learning
   course offerings, Appendix II. Moreover, TSU adheres to these principles through its
   observance of the following elements contained in the document: basic assumptions,
   curriculum and instruction policies, institutional context and commitment, and
   evaluation. The adherence process is overseen through the Office of e-Learning
   (OEL) that oversees e-Learning course offerings. The organizational chart for this
   office is shown in Appendix III. This office receives assistance in the review and
   oversight policies for all educational courses that it provides electronically from a
   committee that is composed of administrators, faculty, staff, and student members
   This committee, the Academic Information Technology Committee (AIT) is charged
   with the following assignments: (1) approving any initial course offerings, (2)
   overseeing the implementation of course offerings, and (3) assessing and updating
   distance education policies and procedures. The e-Learning course requirements used
   by the AIT committee in the approval process of new e-Learning course offerings are
   shown in Appendix IV. The market assessment survey that departments and faculty
   members may utilize to evaluate the success of e-Learning course offerings is shown
   in Appendix V. The OEL offers a student pre-assessment survey where students are
   able to assess their abilities to be successful in e-Learning courses.

2. The institution evaluates the overall effectiveness of its distance and/or
   off-campus education efforts by assessing progress toward meeting its
   institutional goals. The evaluation outcomes are incorporated into the
   institution’s overall institutional effectiveness efforts. Please summarize the
   process and any remedial actions taken.

   Yes, TSU maintains high academic standards for its distance course offerings by
   adhering to the criteria of various accrediting associations, the academic guidelines of
   federal and state agencies, as well as the standards established by professional
   organizations and academic societies. The University is also committed to the use of
   outcome assessments for determining the extent to which its institutional goals are
   achieved and the degree to which its students have acquired professional
   competencies and career accessibility.


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Moreover, the Office of e-Learning aligns distance learning evaluation outcomes
achieved from various other methods of evaluation with the overall University’s
goals. These methods include: (1) student opinion surveys collected through the
Office of Institutional Effectiveness, (2) e-Learning course evaluation surveys (show
link), (3) data collected from Blackboard Release 7—the course management system
that provides on-line course access for students, and (4) various committees that are
charged with oversight of the e-Learning offerings.

Student Opinion Surveys
The Office of Institutional Effectiveness regularly collects various student opinion
surveys. The data are stratified samples that are generalized to the entire University
student population. The data obtained from these surveys are used to assess the
University’s effectiveness in accomplishing its institutional goals and objectives.

e-Learning Course Evaluation Surveys
The various colleges and schools at the University have the responsibility for
monitoring the effectiveness of its e-Learning offerings. Faculty members teaching
e-Learning courses incorporate surveys as an end-of course requirement which allows
assessment of delivery effectiveness. A pilot evaluation survey being used in the
Jesse Jones School of Business is being considered by the Office of e-Learning as a
requirement of all its e-Learning courses. This model utilizes an e-Learning
evaluation model that tracks the e-Learning success rate. This pilot model requires a
student survey before a grade is given; the Office of e-Learning plans to assess this
model before requiring that it be used in all e-Learning course offerings.

Blackboard Release 7 Data
Through data collected from Blackboard Release 7—the course management system
that provides on-line course access for students—the Office of e-Learning regularly
evaluates the student usage, including occurrences of use, retention, and completion,
of the e-Learning course offerings. These data are employed for improvement and
growth as well as tools for assessing institutional goals achievement.

Oversight Committees
The Office of e-Learning has various oversight committees that it uses to assist in the
management of its e-Learning course offerings. TSU utilizes an Information
Technology Governance Committee to address leadership and/or governance issues
such as managing the direction and prioritization of technology goals. This committee
is composed of representatives from the following groups: central administration,
various academic areas, institutional effectiveness, faculty, and the Office of
Information Technology. This oversight committee currently monitors information
technology services and projects. Additionally, this committee directs the long-term
strategic planning and policy formation for information technology at the University.

In addition, the University has another academic committee, the Academic
Technology Committee that meets regularly on matters related to compliance
guidelines. This committee has a broad campus membership that includes
representation from Information Technology (IT), faculty, staff, and student


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   populations. Proposed on-line course offerings are presented to the Academic
   Technology Committee for approval in the on-line format that appears on Blackboard
   Release 7, the course management system that provides on-line course access for
   students. The committee evaluates the effectiveness of the presentation, approving or
   disapproving the application of the course being presented.


3. The institution has a position responsible for distance learning and off-campus
   instruction that is appropriate for the institution and the size of the distance
   and/or off-campus education program. Describe the placement of the position in
   the institution's organization; attach an organization chart; and explain how this
   provides the appropriate oversight of programs, and of faculty and student
   support. Also identify the contact person or office at the institution where
   questions are answered for distance learners and for others. Note changes and
   improvements in organizational structure to accommodate new modes of
   delivery and/or the blending of electronic technologies into traditional courses.

   Yes, the Office of the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs is responsible for all
   e-Learning activities, including coordination, direction, staffing, and support. The
   Associate Provost for Academic Affairs is Dr. Richard Pitre who also heads the
   Office of e-Learning (OEL). Presently, questions related to e-Learning are directed to
   this office. Also, Dr. Pitre has assistance with the approval and direction of
   e-Learning activities from an oversight committee, the Academic Information
   Technology Committee. This committee is composed of representatives from the
   following groups: Information Technology, faculty, staff, and student. An
   organizational chart of the OEL is shown in Appendix III.

4. The institution has a process for evaluating the rationale behind the proposal of
   complete degree and certificate programs for delivery via distance and/or
   off-campus education. What are the factors that cause your institution to engage
   in distant certificate or program delivery (examples of relevant factors include
   partnership opportunities, market analyses, local needs, state incentives, faculty
   readiness)? Describe the process and any improvements or adjustments made
   since your previous Institutional Plan.

   Texas Southern University (TSU) does not have complete degree and certification
   programs for delivery via distance and or off campus education, but the University
   has begun to develop resources in instructional technology. The transformation from
   course offerings to entire programs has not yet occurred at TSU. However, TSU has
   used the following factors as guides into its distance learning engagement:
   (1) distance learning literature, (2) projected occupational needs, (3) scientific
   observations of increased student enrollment, (4) faculty and student interest, (5) the
   growth and success of surrounding colleges and universities involved in distance
   education, and (6) the results of a recent University study. This information is
   itemized as follows:

       Growth in E-Learning


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          a. Distance learning was pioneered at Stanford University more than 30 years
             ago to meet the increasing demand for computer scientists and high-tech
             engineers in the Silicon Valley. By 2000, this need had accelerated into
             more than 150 accredited academic institutions in the US offering non-
             traditional degrees via distance learning programs. 1
          b. During 1994-1995, approximately 50,000 students participated in just over
             800 courses offered through instructional telecommunications by 70 of the
             state's public higher education institutions. 2
          c. In 2001, the National Center for Education Statistics showed that 52 % of
             institutions of higher education had distance education, specifically 89 % of
             public 4-year institutions of higher education. This same publication shows
             that there were an estimated 3, 077,000 enrollments in e-Learning courses.
          d. According to the “2002 Progress Report on the Long-Range Plan for
             Technology, 1996-2010” prepared by the Texas Education Agency,
             providing all Texas students with quality education through the use of
             technology is a priority. This plan clearly establishes technology as a critical
             role in addressing economic and other disparities among students.

        Projected Occupational Needs
           When generalized to distance education courses, the most recent Federal
           Bureau of Labor Statistics data reflect the growing needs for education to be
           offered in a flexible and convenient format that is linked to off-site, video-
           conference, and cable television courses.

        Increase in Student Enrollment
            TSU has experienced an increase of approximately 49 % in first time students
            for the 2003-2004 and approximately a 2% increase for 2005-2006. Thus,
            viable distance education programs allow the University to maximize its
            resources to accommodate its growing student enrollment.

        Increased Faculty and Student Interest
            The increase in the interest of faculty and students who have utilized
            Blackboard with traditional teaching interactions and the increase in the
            student and faculty members who are interested in being trained in e-Learning
            activities have allowed the University to confirm that an e-Learning format
            would be successful.

        Growth-Distance Education at Surrounding Institutions of Higher Education
           Most universities and colleges in the surrounding area successfully offer
           distance education and have experienced a tremendous growth in enrollment.
           For example, in 2004, the University of Houston had over 300,000 students
           enrolled in distance education courses; 3 Houston Community College System

1
  Lau, L. K., 2000. Distance Learning Technologies: Issues, Trends and Opportunities. London: Idea
  Group Publishing, Salomon Smith Barney, Inc.
2
  Texas Education Agency
3
  http://www.uh.edu


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              had 18,000 students and has experienced a growth factor of approximately
              2,000 students per year 4 , and Dallas County Community College District had
              an increase of approximately 100,000 students per year. 5

          Results: e-Learning at Texas Southern University 2005+
          TSU has performed an analysis of the student population to determine access to
          technology and to ascertain which e-Learning courses would be best suited for the
          University. The following are the results of the study. At TSU in the
          undergraduate curriculum, the hybrid course—a combination of classroom
          meetings with e-Learning activities—is considered the best model for effective
          distance education. The study reveals that the variety in preparation and the
          diversity in background of today’s typical University student necessitate a multi-
          faceted approach to higher education, one that combines the best in face-to-face
          and computer-mediated instruction. Of the 260 undergraduate courses reviewed,
          the study finds that 21% of courses currently offered at TSU can easily be
          converted to e-Learning courses without any undue hardship to the faculty and
          students. Other courses are suitable for e-Learning with some form of requisite
          components.

      In sum, these afore-mentioned factors when aligned with the added benefits of
      effective space utilization and decreased power consumption point progressively to
      the need and market for distance education offerings. Finally, the Digital Learning
      Assessment Survey, shown in Appendix VI, allows each department to assess the
      market before submitting distance education courses for approval.

5. The institution’s admission and recruitment policies and decisions take into
   account the capability of students to succeed in distance education and
   off-campus courses and programs.      Please describe any improvements in the
   admission and recruitment policies based on analyses of student success.

      Yes, TSU’s admission and recruitment policies and decisions take into account the
      capability of students to succeed in distance education and off-campus courses and
      programs. To this end, TSU has performed an analysis of the student population to
      determine access to technology and to ascertain which e-Learning courses would be
      best suited for the University. This study, E-Learning at Texas Southern University
      2005+, was undertaken at the request of the Associate Provost, Dr. Richard Pitre, to
      research and identify the subjects, topics, and methods most suitable for electronic
      delivery at TSU. The e-Learning Research Team structured this study to include the
      following components: (1) the creation of an e-Learning Research Organization on
      the Blackboard course management system to compile e-Learning and online
      materials (guidelines, principles, and best-practice models) from both within and
      outside the University; (2) the development of a Faculty Survey of e-Learning at
      Texas Southern University in 2005 to assess the extent and perception of e-Learning
      activity at the University; and (3) an e-Learning Forum/Focus Group Meeting on July
4
    Amassed from HCCS’s Growth Chart
5
    http:/www.dcccd.edu


                                              8
19, 2005. The faculty members surveyed—in focus groups, through questionnaires,
and discussion forum—expressed great enthusiasm for the potential of computer-
mediated instruction in both online courses and hybrid courses at TSU. Resident
experts agree that instructional technology can benefit most courses at TSU. The
courses designated especially suitable for increased use of e-Learning technology
span various levels of study and formats that include the following:
       o Large lecture courses in the core curriculum, in the major fields, and in
           professional degree programs
       o Service courses in which one department teaches for the benefit of majors
           in other areas
       o Test-preparation courses that benefit from archived test banks and easily
           deployable practice materials
       o Journalism, media, and web design courses
       o Senior level capstone courses that result in a project or a portfolio
       o Thesis, research, and dissertation courses

At TSU in the undergraduate curriculum, the hybrid course—a combination of
classroom meetings with e-Learning activities—is considered the best model for
effective distance education. The study reveals that the variety in preparation and the
diversity in background of today’s typical University student necessitate a
multi-faceted approach to higher education, one that combines the best in face-to-face
and computer-mediated instruction.

Of the 260 undergraduate courses reviewed, the study finds that 21% of courses
currently offered at TSU can easily be converted to e-Learning courses without any
undue hardship to the faculty and students. Other courses are suitable for e-Learning
with some form of requisite components.

Of the 266 graduate classes studied, results show that unlike the undergraduate
courses, 93% of graduate classes are suitable for e-Learning. Furthermore, from the
study, it is ascertained that although TSU has a special purpose designation to meet
the educational needs of an urban, emerging, diverse population and has only begun
to develop resources in instructional technology, the University is well poised to
make an important contribution to academia and to the enhancement of the economic
workforce.

TSU’s admission and recruitment policies and decisions evolve from its strategic
plans. To assist in the formation of its strategic plans, the University—the department
of Institutional Effectiveness—routinely collects satisfaction information from
students and faculty members. In the student opinion survey, an eighty-one item
standardized instrument designed by ACT is utilized. The following factors point to
the need for e-Learning course offerings: (1) evaluative measures, (2) enrollment
growth, (3) the market assessment, (4) the recent internal study, e-Learning at Texas
Southern University 2005+, and (5) other internal needs. A competitive e-Learning
plan serves as an effective admission and recruitment strategy for attracting students


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   who do well in the e-Learning environment. Subsequently, the Office of e-Learning
   plans to assess the results from the various surveys to improve the delivery format of
   the e-Learning course offerings and to determine improvement in its recruitment and
   admission policies and decisions.

6. The institution has established requirements for satisfactory progress and
   graduation for distance education students. Please summarize requirements.
   Please explain in more detail and attach relevant policies if these requirements
   differ from those of traditional students.

   Yes, TSU has established requirements for its distance education offerings in the
   areas of admissions, satisfactory student progress, and graduation requirements.
   Requirements are identical for both e-Learning and on-campus students in the
   admission requirements, advisement, progress monitoring, and graduation. Students
   who wish to enroll in distance education courses must be admitted to TSU before they
   may register. Admission requirements for all students who wish to enroll in
   e-Learning or traditional on-campus courses are the same and may be accessed on
   line at www.tsu.edu. All e-Learning courses have the same requirements and grading
   standards as on-campus courses; graduation requirements are the same.

7. Policies relevant to transcripting, grading, and transfer credentials are in place.
   Please explain and attach relevant policies if they are different from on-campus
   classes.

   Yes, policies relevant to transcription, grading, and transfer credentials are in place at
   TSU for e-Learning students. Policies for e-Learning students relevant to
   transcription, grading, and transfer credentials are identical to those as for on-campus
   classes. Additionally, when transformation to complete programs occurs, the Office
   of e-Learning plans to have an individual dedicated to e-Learning work in the Office
   of the Registrar; this individual will have responsibilities specific to the effective
   success of the e-Learning student. A student enrolled in a distance education class is a
   regularly enrolled student and has undergone all the relevant requirements of an
   on-campus student. Students are included on the appropriate class roster, which must
   be verified by the instructor who is teaching the class. Grades are electronically
   submitted to the University Registrar for all courses. The Office of the Registrar
   handles transcripts and or official records in the same manner for all courses. The
   University Bulletin is available on-line at www.tsu.edu.

8. The institution has a process in place to address the needs of distance learners
   who fall under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Please explain how
   ADA compliance for distance education is handled at your institution. Describe
   the process and any improvements or adjustments made since your previous
   Institutional Plan. (The CB has accessibility documents and standards on its
   website at: http://www.thecb.state.tx.us).

   All TSU students have access to special services and equipment to assist students
   who have qualified chronic or temporary disabling conditions; these services are


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   made available through the Office for Students with Disabilities. Students are made
   aware of the University’s policy through the following information that appears in the
   University Bulletin and on the TSU website at the shown Internet link:
   http://www.tsu.edu/student/services/disability/ada.asp.

   The purpose of this operating policy/procedure is to ensure understanding of the
   University's responsibilities regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
   and Section 504. The Provost and the Vice President of Student Affairs will review
   this policy annually and forward any recommendations for revisions to the Human
   Resources Department.

   The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 mandates equal opportunities for
   persons with disabilities in all public facilities, programs, activities, services and
   benefits derived from them. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973—as
   amended—mandates equal opportunity for qualified persons with disabilities in all
   programs, activities, and services for recipients of federal financial assistance. Both
   ADA and Section 504 are civil rights statutes that prohibit discrimination on the basis
   of disability, obligate colleges and universities to make certain adjustments and
   accommodations, as well as offer to persons with disabilities the opportunity to
   participate fully in all institutional programs and activities.

   Section 504 states that: "a handicapped person is anyone with a physical or mental
   impairment that substantially impairs or restricts one or more major life activities,
   such as caring for one's self, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing,
   speaking, breathing, learning and working."

   TSU provides all educational and other university-sponsored programs and activities
   to persons with disabilities in the most integrated setting appropriate. Students,
   employees, applicants and other individuals with disabilities served by TSU are not
   segregated, separated, or treated differently. This stated policy applies to all students
   enrolled at TSU, traditional or e-Learning; however, the University does not require
   persons with disabilities to take advantage of all adjustments, accommodations or
   special services. Finally, a specific policy regarding ADA-qualified e-Learning
   students is under legal review.


9. SACS and other professional credentialing agencies are notified, as appropriate.
   Please explain any pending communications with SACS or credentialing
   agencies.

   Yes, SACS and other professional credentialing agencies are notified, as appropriate
   by Texas Southern University (TSU). After e-Learning offerings have been approved
   by the various departments and committees at TSU, these offerings are submitted to
   the TSU Board of Regents for approval. When approved by the Board of Regents, the
   plan is submitted to Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). After
   acceptance of TSU’s Institutional Plan by THECB and prior to the commencement,



                                            11
   of course offerings as indicated by this plan, all necessary notifications will be made
   to other appropriate agencies.

10. The institution has sufficient financial resources to initiate and sustain quality
    distance learning and off-campus courses and programs; the facilities, staffing,
    equipment and other resources essential for them; and a process by which
    funding is distributed to support distance education and off-campus instruction.
    Please describe how the capital and operating budgets for distance education
    and off-campus instruction and supporting services are set and sufficient funds
    distributed.

   Yes, TSU has sufficient financial resources to initiate and maintain quality e-Learning
   programs. The Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of Information Technology
   (OIT) have provided resources needed for the initiation and maintenance of quality
   e-Learning at TSU. OIT has supported the installation of wiring, networking, data
   integrity, and other issues relative to the technology. In addition, OIT has
   incorporated into its existing faculty training program a component to address both
   the technological and instructional issues involved in e-Learning. Recently, this unit
   received a grant to upgrade and incorporate facilities for distance classes in its
   infrastructure.
   The Office of e-Learning has a $400,000 budget dedicated to the operation of
   e-Learning course offerings; personnel salaries are not included in this amount as they
   are funded from other resources.

11. The institution complies with CB Rules in Chapter 4, Subchapter E and with
    Notification and Approval Procedures concerning prior notification of peer
    institutions before offering off-campus courses and programs and the Higher
    Education Regional Council procedures. If your institution has received protests
    from other institutions because of lack of prior notification, please describe
    procedural changes in effect to prevent such occurrences in the future.

   No protest from any other institutions has been received.




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12. A procedure for calculating the cost of offering distance education courses to
    out-of-state students and a process for determining that fees “sufficient to cover
    the cost of instruction” are charged to those students are in place. Please
    describe them.

   Yes, a procedure for calculating the cost of offering distance education courses to
   out-of-state students and a process for determining that fees “sufficient to cover the
   cost of instruction” are charged to those students are in place. In all colleges and
   schools of the University, except the Thurgood Marshall School of Law, each student
   who is a resident of the State of Texas is required to pay tuition at a rate of not less
   than $100.00 per semester and $50.00 for each summer term. A non-resident or
   foreign student is required to pay tuition per semester hour as set by the Texas Higher
   Education Coordinating Board at http://www.thecb.state.tx.us. In addition to
   designated tuition, a building use fee of a prorated amount per semester hour is
   charged to all students. Distance learning is included as a component of the
   University Strategic Plan and is funded as an operating unit within the Office of the
   Provost. This unit is eligible to participate in the distribution from the Higher
   Education Assistance Fund in the same manner as an academic department. A
   schedule        of      out-of-state      fees      may        be       obtained      at
   http://em.tsu.edu/comptroller/fees.htm. An e-Learning fee of $50.00 per semester
   hour is planned when the transformation to complete programs occurs. All students
   enrolled in e-Learning courses must undergo the regular admission and enrollment
   process as all other University students, shown at http://em.tsu.edu.




                                            13
Section 2: Educational Programs




               14
Section 2                            Educational Programs


1. The institution has procedures in place for planning, development, approval and
   review of distance and/or off-campus education programs to ensure quality and
   currency; and for meeting external accrediting bodies’ standards. Please explain
   the process for programs (not for individual courses). Describe any
   improvements to these procedures based on program reviews.

   N/A

2. The institution has plans/procedures for assessing student learning outcomes.
   The institution also evaluates student retention and student satisfaction in its
   distance and/or off-campus education programs and courses and uses the results
   of the assessment to improve courses and programs. You are encouraged to
   submit existing summaries of meaningful conclusions drawn from data on
   student retention and student satisfaction, as you would provide to SACS.

   Yes, procedures are in place to ensure student-learning outcomes and student
   retention as well as student satisfaction are comparable between the distance delivery
   mode and the traditional on-campus format. The Office of Institutional Effectiveness
   has the responsibility for determining student outcomes through its assessment
   activities; some of these are included in the University’s Fact Book
   http://em.tsu.edu/ie/fact_book.htm. The process for e-Learning is the same as for
   on-campus students. The assessment surveys are administered to both graduate and
   undergraduate students, including e-Learning students. In addition, the assessment
   outcomes are used to plan and improve the delivery process, with the method of
   administration being the major difference between the traditional on-campus course
   delivery and the on-line delivery modality.

   TSU plans to utilize the student learning outcome data assessed—administered
   through Institutional Effectiveness—as to such variables as mode of delivery, student
   demographic information, course selection, retention rate and analyze them as to the
   distance education success factors. The Office of e-Learning intends to examine the
   characteristics of the results in order to ascertain if they may be generalized as to the
   prediction of what e-Learning offerings are successful. This analysis and the
   e-Learning course surveys required by e-Learning faculty members assist the Office
   of e-Learning, the various colleges and schools, and the e-Learning faculty members
   identify the success characteristics of e-Learning courses.

   A pilot evaluation survey at the completion of the e-Learning courses taken in the
   School of Business has been started. The success of this project will determine the
   integration of this survey universally in other schools and colleges at the University.
   Finally, each department has the responsibility for developing course-level learning
   objectives, retention, and research assessments methods.




                                            15
3. The institution evaluates the effectiveness of the electronic delivery modes it uses
   in the context of student learning. How are delivery technologies chosen for
   specific courses and programs? Please summarize how particular technology
   strategies are aligned with the type of content to be delivered and the learning
   goals.

   Yes, TSU evaluates the effectiveness of the electronic delivery modes it uses in the
   context of student learning and aligns delivery technologies chosen for specific
   courses and programs. A summary of how particular technology strategies are aligned
   with the type of content to be delivered and the learning goals follows:

   The initial process of adopting e-Learning courses involves the following stages.
   After departmental approval of course offering, the development and design of the
   e-Learning course occurs. The faculty members who wish to develop e-Learning
   courses for inclusion in the e-Learning course offerings have many instructional tools
   to aid in course development and design from the Office of e-Learning. These
   instructional design tools include: (1) Blackboard, Release 7; (2) interactive types of
   software—Study-Mate, Respondus, Respondus-Lockdown, and Turnitin—that
   provide engaging and secure modes of delivery, Appendix VIII; (3) delivery
   alternatives such as the ability to provide prerecorded or live courses through the
   Tegrity system, Appendix VIII; (4) use of the e-Learning Recording Studio,
   Appendix VII; (5) the availability of having the recorded course offering shown on
   iCONTROL through Warner Cable Company; and (6) the assistance of the
   technological experts in the OEL. The e-Learning course faculty member has the final
   decision as to the design of the e-Learning course. However, the final product must
   comply with the established e-Learning course development guidelines in the Office
   of e-Learning (OEL), and the Academic Information Technology Committee (AIT).

   Next, the TSU AIT, comprised of University personnel from network IT
   administrators, staff, faculty, and student representations, led by the Associate
   Provost for Academic Affairs evaluates all course offerings in Blackboard before
   e-Learning courses are incorporated into the class schedule bulletin. The potential
   course offerings are either approved or disapproved by the OEL and the AIT
   committee. The e-Learning course requirements are shown in Appendix IV. Finally,
   the University has developed a policy to evaluate instructional materials based upon
   the requirements of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board as part of the
   approval process.

4. Programs and courses provide for timely and appropriate interaction between
   students and faculty, and among students. Please explain how these interactions
   occur and any improvements or new techniques for interaction that have been
   implemented.

   TSU has purchased the Enterprise version of The Blackboard Learning System™,
   Release 7, a Web-based server software platform that offers industry-leading course
   management, an open architecture for customization and interoperability as well as a



                                           16
   scalable design that allows for integration with student information systems and
   authentication protocols. This web-based management system together with the
   current enterprise resource planning system facilitates the student information system.
   All e-Learning courses are required to be on Blackboard, Release 7. This
   management system allows effective interactions between e-Learning students and
   faculty members either as prescribed times for chat room, discussion board, or
   through email exchanges. These learning management systems provide many tools
   for faculty-to-student and student-to-student interactions.       In addition, students
   enrolling in e-Learning courses must have email accounts, which enable appropriate
   interactions between the student and the faculty member teaching the e-Learning
   course. The University has planned a student email accounting system which
   automatically creates individual student email accounts upon completed enrollment.

5. Appropriate security measures are in place to assure the integrity of student
   work and testing. Please explain these measures and any improvements that
   have been made.

   Yes, TSU has appropriate security measures in place to assure the integrity of student
   work and testing. These security measures include the following:
   TSU has purchased the Respondus LockDown Browser. According to Respondus’s
   website, “Respondus LockDown Browser is a custom browser that locks down the
   testing environment within Blackboard. Students are locked into the assessment and
   are unable to print, copy, go to another URL, or access other applications”
   (http://www.respondus.com).

   Also, the University has purchased a Turnitin Campus License. This ensures that
   “submitted documents are automatically checked for plagiarism by Turnitin's
   comprehensive databases: a constantly updated 4.5 billion-page Internet database,
   which includes both current and archived Web content; the vast ProQuest database of
   published works and other proprietary databases; and our database of over 10 million
   students papers already submitted to Turnitin” (http://www.turnitin.com).

6. All electronically delivered courses and programs are listed on Texas Distance
   Education.com. If not, please explain why.

   Yes, all electronically delivered courses at TSU are listed on this web-site.




                                            17
Section 3: Faculty




          18
Section 3                             Faculty

1. The qualifications for distance and/or off-campus education faculty are the same
   as faculty teaching the same courses in a traditional on-campus format. Please
   describe the rationale applied for making exceptions.

   Yes, the qualifications for distance education faculty are the same as for faculty
   teaching the same courses in a traditional on-campus format. No special category
   exists for distance learning faculty. Thus, any faculty member who desires to teach
   e-Learning courses must meet normal faculty requirements.

2. The institution provides orientation, training, and support services for faculty
   involved in distance education and off-campus programs. Please describe any
   improvements that have been made.

   Yes, TSU provides orientation and training for faculty involved in distance education
   programs. Prior to offering e-Learning courses, faculty members are required to
   receive prescribed training for e-Learning modality. Formal training is provided in the
   areas of use of facility and equipment, teaching styles, intellectual property, and
   course material development and delivery. The University’s Center for e-Learning
   has developed a process that provides training to upgrade and improve technological
   skills, with the overall goal being to motivate faculty to investigate, create, and utilize
   alternative instructional methods.

   As faculty members learn to leverage the use of technology in instruction, they are
   supported in redesigning their courses to provide new options. These options include:
   electronic access to the faculty for students during non-class hours, on-going access
   to course materials, tutorials, simulations, and online secure testing as appropriate.
   Finally, faculty members are being led to assume new roles in designing, developing,
   and delivering instruction in this new educational e-Learning environment.

3. Procedures are in place for appropriate evaluation of faculty involved in the
   distance and/or off-campus education program (such as procedures that
   evaluate faculty-student interaction). Please describe these procedures and any
   changes that have been made to the evaluation process.

   Yes, TSU has procedures in place for evaluation of faculty involved in the distance
   education program. The evaluation for faculty teaching in e-Learning is the same as
   for traditional on-campus courses. The Office of Institution Effectiveness, Student
   Affairs Council, the Distance Learning Committee and the University Relations
   Office evaluate information on a continual basis and make adjustments in promotion
   and delivery of information to potential students as well as review the quality of
   services provided to students to ensure that the University is meeting the needs and
   demands of the student body. To this end, the Student Opinion Survey is administered
   during the spring semester of each academic year.



                                             19
   In the collection of that information, a roster of all classes, along with their class size,
   are obtained from the Registrar’s office. From this listing a sample is selected to
   ensure adequate representation of all student groups (i.e., undergraduate, graduate,
   professional) in addition to all relevant academic departments (i.e., arts and sciences,
   education, etc.). Then the results of this analysis are then disseminated to all academic
   areas and upper level management.

4. Faculty members have a role in development and evaluation of courses. Please
   describe this role and their role in affirming adherence to the Principles of Good
   Practice.

   Yes, faculty members have a role in development and evaluation of courses and in
   affirming adherence to the Principles of Good Practice for Electronically Offered
   Academic Degree and Certificate Programs.

   Faculty members are the propelling force in the development of both only on-campus
   courses offerings and e-Learning offerings at the University. They are responsible for
   the development of the course content in their classes, Appendix VI. However, to
   support the relatively new venture of e-Learning at TSU, various technological
   workshops and or professional development sessions are offered by the University to
   stimulate and broaden the faculty in the development of e-Learning
   programs/courses. In addition, other University support initiatives are instituted to
   stimulate faculty interest. For example, faculty members are supported by University
   incentive grants of $5,000 to develop e-Learning courses. Over $150,000 has been
   made available for this purpose. The Request for Proposals is shown in Appendix
   VII.

   Each faculty member who delivers e-Learning offerings must comply with the
   Principles of Good Practices for Electronically Offered Academic Degree and
   Certificate Programs as prescribed by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating
   Board by certifying adherence to these guidelines in written format, Appendix II.
   Each faculty member must affirm that he or she certifies compliance with the
   principles of good practices and the copyright laws.

5. A policy exists that addresses faculty teaching load for those involved in distance
   and/or off-campus education. Please attach the policy and explain rationale.

   Yes, Texas Southern University (TSU) has a policy in place that addresses faculty
   teaching load for those involved in distance education. The normal faculty workload
   encompasses teaching, scholarly activity, service to the department, school,
   university, and other professional activities. A normal teaching load at TSU for a
   teacher assigned to only undergraduate classes is no more than twenty-four credit
   hours of classroom and/or laboratory service during the nine-month academic year.
   The normal teaching load for a faculty teaching graduate classes is eighteen credit
   hours per academic year. This policy is also true for faculty members who are
   involved in distance education.



                                             20
6. A process exists for evaluating the credentials of faculty employed by other
   institutions who are teaching courses for which your institution is awarding
   credit.

   Yes, TSU has a process for evaluating the credentials of faculty employed by other
   institutions that are teaching courses for which this institution is awarding credit. Any
   faculty member teaching a course for credit at Texas Southern University must be
   approved by the policies, procedures, and mandates of the University with the Office
   of e-Learning being responsible for verifying this process. The university does not
   contract for the services of an individual employed by another institution. However,
   the contract for services is to be authorized by the head of the academic unit that
   would be granting credit for the course. In sum, both the course and the faculty
   member teaching a respective course must undergo the approval process that is
   dictated by TSU policies and procedures.

7. The institution has policies on intellectual property, faculty compensation,
   copyright guidelines, and the distribution of revenue (if applicable) that are
   appropriate for distance and/or off-campus education. Summarize policies that
   address issues raised by distance and/or off-campus education.

   Yes, TSU has policies on intellectual property, faculty compensation, copyright
   guidelines, and the distribution of revenue. Research at TSU often results in the
   invention of new scientific and technological developments, trade secrets and
   computer software, and the creation of new copyright material and patentable
   processes, which may have commercial value. While the production of commercially
   valuable intellectual property is not necessarily the primary mission of TSU, research
   or the duty of anyone engaged in research, the TSU Board of Regents desires that
   both society and each school of discipline under the governance of the Board of
   Regents use all knowledge to the greatest benefit.

   Accordingly, when appropriate, TSU protects all intellectual property rights in
   technology and copyright material and uses diligent efforts to make productive use of
   such rights for the good of the public, the creator, and the University. When this result
   is achieved by the attraction of private risk capital or by the transfer or licensing of
   rights in technology or copyrighted material, income may be realized, which the
   Board of Regents seeks to distribute in a manner both fair to the creator and to the
   University. Financial return, however, always remains secondary and incidental to the
   public service aspect of developing and disseminating knowledge for public use. The
   Board of Regents hereby delegates management of intellectual property to the
   University.

   The Intellectual Property Policy shall apply to all persons employed by TSU, to
   anyone using University facilities under the supervision of the University personnel,
   to undergraduates, to candidates for masters and doctoral degrees, and to pre-doctoral
   and postdoctoral fellows. The Board of Regents may assert ownership in intellectual



                                            21
property of all types (including, but not limited to, any invention, discovery, trade
secret, technology, scientific or technological development, and computer software)
regardless of protection under patent, trademark, copyright, or other laws. The Board
of Regents shall have sole ownership of all intellectual property created by an
employee who is hired specifically or required to produce it or commissioned by the
University except as may be provided otherwise in a written agreement approved by
the President.

The University provides review of the management services for patentable
inventions, as well as other intellectual property either by its own staff, through a
related foundation, or by other means. Intellectual property resulting from research
supported by a grant or contract with the Federal Government, or an agency thereof,
with a nonprofit or for profit nongovernmental entity, or by a private gift or grant to
the University shall be subject to the ownership by the Board of Regents.

Detailed information is available in the “Polices and Procedures Applicable to Texas
Southern University Employees” at:
http://www.tsu.edu/about/administration/general/POLICIES/index.asp.




                                        22
Section 4: Student Support Services




                23
Section 4                    Student Support Services

1. The institution provides distance and off-campus learners’ access to appropriate
   student services. Please describe the support services to distance and/or
   off-campus students in each of the following areas (as applicable) and how they
   are evaluated: admissions, registration, academic advising, remedial services,
   placement services, testing and assessment, orientation, computing departments,
   financial aid offices, and help desk/hot line. Include the URLs of examples.
   (Note: attachment of descriptive documents is encouraged.) How have these
   services been updated or improved?
   Yes, Texas Southern University provides distance learners access to appropriate
   student services, such as admissions, registration, academic advising, remedial
   services, placement services, testing and assessment, orientation, computing
   departments, financial aid offices, counseling, and a twenty-four hour help desk hot
   line.
   The challenges of providing support services to distant learners are considerable;
   meeting these challenges requires careful and thorough planning by TSU. Although
   the management and academic responsibility for e-Learning rests administratively
   within the academic structures of the University, the provision of adequate
   instructional and support services to distant learners requires the cooperation and
   broad support of institutional segments outside the academic affairs area. These areas
   include: admissions, registration, financial aid, counseling, telecommunications
   management, computing resources, and other areas. Because such support should be
   made available to distant learners, the persons responsible for those and other relevant
   services within institutions must be involved in the initial planning for e-Learning
   support, not consulted as an afterthought.
   Student support services that are necessary or appropriate for distant learners may be
   grouped in five broad categories: Administrative Services, Communications Services,
   Instructional Support, Student Activities, and Student Personnel Services. First,
   Administrative Services includes admissions, financial aid, registration, records
   management (transcripts, grade reports), graduation, and bookstore services.
   Communications Services contains the means of student-faculty contact (phone, fax,
   video, Internet, etc.), interaction with other students, and technology-based resource
   access. Instructional Support includes academic assessment and testing, remediation,
   access to—and training in the use of—library and other learning resources, tutoring,
   academic testing, and computer services. Student Activities may consist of honor
   societies, journal clubs, discipline interest groups and recreation opportunities.
   Student Personnel Services includes diagnostic testing and assessment, counseling,
   placement services and health services. The University plans to hire e-Learning
   specialists in the area of student support when it commences the offering of complete
   e-Learning degree programs.
   Examples of URLs to student support services:
   Admissions:     http://em.tsu.edu/admissions/freshmanadmission.php
   Registration:   http://em.tsu.edu/registrar/index.php


                                            24
   Financial aid:      http://em.tsu.edu/financialaid/index.php
   Student Activities: http://www.tsu.edu/student/services/organizations/list/index.asp

2. Distance and off-campus learners have access to library resources of an
   appropriate breadth and quality for the distance and/or off-campus education
   program(s) offered. Please provide an on-line address and describe resources,
   including any difference in service for off-campus and for instructional
   telecommunications students. Are electronic resources given priority on your
   campus?

   Yes, TSU’s distance learners have access to library resources of an appropriate
   breadth and quality for the distance education courses offered. TSU has purchased the
   Endeavor Information System, an integrated library management system. This system
   has developed a complete line of products to ensure that the library is the center of the
   campus information network. The Endeavor Information System is compatible with
   Blackboard, the nerve center of the e-Learning delivery system. In addition, the
   University is affiliated with Houston Academy of Medicine, Texas Medical Center
   Library which has assess to over 60,000 periodicals and journals, as well as
   TexShare, the innovative program which makes resources of many of the state’s
   university libraries accessible through remote computer networks. Other web-based
   resources are available. In addition, library resource sharing programs of the Texas
   Education Agency (Texas Library Connection) and the State Library and Archives
   Commission (Texas State Electronic Library) are available via the Internet. The
   University is in the process of upgrading its library systems which will significantly
   improve remote access. More information may be obtained at the off Campus Access
   to the RJT Library Electronic Resources, which is available at:
   http://tsuendweb1.tsu.edu/other_databases.htm .




                                            25
Section 5: Distance Education Facilities and Support Services




                              26
Section 5             Distance Education Facilities and Support Services

1. The institution has available the facilities and equipment necessary to deliver its
   distance learning program. Please describe, in brief, current infrastructure and
   procedures for evaluating its effectiveness. Describe major changes in facilities and
   equipment.

   Yes, Texas Southern University (TSU) has the necessary facilities and equipment available
   to deliver its distance learning program. The following is a brief description of the current
   infrastructure, the major changes in TSU’s facilities and equipment, and the procedures for
   evaluating their effectiveness. Through the Office of e-Learning, the following items are
   included in the improvements: (1) upgrades in the web-based server software platform—
   Blackboard Learning System Release 7—that offers many features of enhancement, (2)
   instructional software that enlivens and stimulates the delivery process, (3) incentive grants
   to motivate faculty development of e-Learning offerings, (4) instructional, design, and
   delivery assistance, and (5) an e-Learning Recording Studio.

   Infrastructure Upgrades
   Since 2000, TSU has undergone dramatic changes that have facilitated an effective
   e-Learning engagement. For example, the Office of Information Technology (OIT) has
   provided the installation of wiring, networking, Data Integrity, and other technological
   issues. OIT has also provided upgrades in its infrastructure as well as faculty and staff
   training to address the technological and instructional issues and has provided a twenty-four
   hours help desk for students, faculty, and staff.

   Blackboard, Release 7
   This course management system is the latest version of Blackboard. Release 7.0 of the
   Blackboard Academic SuiteTM brings educational innovation to a new level of advancement
   and provides the platform upon which future Blackboard innovation will follow. This release
   adds powerful multi-language and mobile capabilities to the Blackboard Academic Suite
   which now includes multi-byte languages as well as many European languages as part of its
   standard offering. A new Language Pack Editor enables clients to create and customize
   additional languages. The new capabilities of this version include the following:
      •     Run multiple languages including multi-byte ones, on the same system, supporting
            cross-border education and foreign language instruction
      •     Create and customize additional languages for the Blackboard Academic Suite, using
            the Language Pack Editor
      •     Provide offline access to Blackboard content through the Blackboard Backpack, a
            powerful learning tool for student and faculty productivity
      •     Improve student instruction through features such as advanced assessment tools
      •     Develop distinct brands and identities for different departments to create custom
            learning paths for campus students using the same Blackboard system

   Instructional Software Tools
   The OEL has instructional software to enliven and engage the e-Learning course offering that
   may be used by the e-Learning course designer. The software tools include the following:
   Respondus, Respondus-Lockdown, Study-Mate, Tegrity, and Turnitin. Respondus 3.0 is a
   powerful tool for creating and managing exams that can be printed to paper or published

                                               27
   directly to Blackboard. Respondus LockDown Browser is a custom browser that locks down
   the testing environment within Blackboard. Students are locked into the assessment and are
   unable to print, copy, go to another URL, or access other applications. StudyMate, another
   authoring tool from Respondus, allows the creation of flash-based activities and games using
   three simple templates; these activities may be published directly to Blackboard, imported
   from MS Word files and publisher test banks, making it easy to create interesting, interactive
   activities from existing content.

   Tegrity makes it easy for faculty to click a button and record a lecture; another click allows
   the lecture to be posted on Blackboard. Tegrity makes class available all the time by
   automatically capturing, storing, and indexing every class on campus for replay by any
   student. With Tegrity, students quickly recall key moments, replay entire classes online, on
   their iPods, and on cell phones.

   Turnitin Blackboard Building Block is an integration that ensures that “submitted documents
   are automatically checked for plagiarism by Turnitin's comprehensive databases: a constantly
   updated 4.5 billion-page Internet database, which includes both current and archived Web
   content, the vast ProQuest database of published works and other proprietary databases, and
   a database of over 10 million students papers already submitted to Turnitin”
   (http://www.blackboard.com/corp/objects/inc/B2Details.asp?ExtensionID=10015).

   Incentive Grants & Instructional, Design and Delivery Assistance
   To support the relatively new venture of distance learning at TSU, various technological
   workshops and or professional development sessions are offered by the University to
   stimulate and support the faculty in the development of distance learning programs/courses.
   In addition, other University support initiatives are instituted to stimulate faculty interest.

   e-Learning Studio
   Approved in 2005, the e-Learning Recording Studio at Texas Southern University (TSU) is a
   state of the art e-Learning recording studio—Appendix VII—a one of a kind facility which
   gives the University the ability to add substantially to its e-Learning initiative. This studio
   has the capability to capture all aspects of a presentation. Five streams of video are utilized to
   ensure that all parts of a presentation are captured as well as the media edit capabilities to
   produce a TV quality product. The system has a smart podium that controls the functionality
   of the equipment and provides the presenter with access to a document camera, DVD/VCR
   player, and PC connection. The presenter is given the option of being mobile in the studio
   with the utilization of a wireless microphone system. Another very important component of
   the studio is the capability to incorporate another state of the art AVID video editing system.
   Finally, this process gathers digital media that is edited into a high quality video product that
   can be used to create a digital library collection of lectures, to download to Blackboard, and
   to distribute to TV stations for broadcasting.
2. Arrangements have been made for off-campus delivery of required laboratories,
   clinical placement sites, workshops, seminars, etc. associated with distance learning
   activities. Please describe these arrangements and any improvements that have been
   made.

   There are no e-Learning course offerings that require these features.




                                                 28
                                    APPENDIX ITEMS

   I. Principles of Good Practice for Academic Degree and Certificate Programs and Credit
      Courses Offered Electronically

  II. Written Certification: e-Learning Faculty

 III. Office of e-Learning Organizational Chart

 IV. Academic Information Technology Committee e-Learning Approval Form

  V. Digital Learning Assessment Survey

 VI. Request for Proposal (RFP) for e-Learning Courses

VII. e-Learning Recording Studio

VIII. Software Tools Description




                                             29
                                                   Appendix I
   Principles of Good Practice for Academic Degree and Certificate Programs and Credit
                               Courses Offered Electronically


BASIC ASSUMPTIONS
Several assumptions are central to these principles:
    4. The program or course offered electronically is provided by or through an institution that is accredited by
         an accrediting agency recognized by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and authorized to
         operate in the state where the program or course originates.
    5. The institution's programs and courses holding specialized accreditation meet the same requirements when
         offered electronically.
    6. The "institution" may be a single institution or a consortium of such institutions.
    7. These principles are generally applicable to degree or certificate programs and to courses offered for
         academic credit.
    8. It is the institution's responsibility to review educational programs and courses it provides electronically
         and certify continued compliance with these principles.
    9. Institutions offering programs or for-credit courses are responsible for satisfying all in-state approval and
         accreditation requirements before students are enrolled.

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION
     • Each program or course results in learning outcomes appropriate to the rigor and breadth of the degree
        or certificate awarded.
     • A degree or certificate program or course offered electronically is coherent and complete.
     • The program or course provides for appropriate interaction between faculty and students and among
        students.
     • Qualified faculty provides appropriate oversight of the program or course that is offered electronically.
     • Programs or courses offered electronically are offered on the campus of the institution where the
        programs or courses originate.
     • Academic standards for all programs or courses offered electronically will be the same as those for
        programs or courses delivered by other means at the institution where the program or course originates.
     • Student learning in programs or courses delivered electronically should be comparable to student
        learning in programs offered at the campus where the programs or courses originate.

INSTITUTIONAL CONTEXT AND COMMITMENT
Role and Mission
         • The program or course is consistent with the institution's role and mission.
         • Review and approval processes ensure the appropriateness of the technology being used to meet the
             objectives of the program or course.
Students and Student Services
         • Program or course announcements and electronic catalog entries provide appropriate information.
         • The program or course provides students with clear, complete, and timely information on the
             curriculum, course and degree requirements, nature of faculty/student interaction, assumptions about
             technological competence and skills, technical equipment requirements, availability of academic
             support services and financial aid resources, and costs and payment policies.
         • Enrolled students have reasonable and adequate access to the range of student services and student
             rights appropriate to support their learning.
         • The institution has admission/acceptance criteria in place to assess the extent to which a student has the
             background, knowledge and technical skills required to undertake the program or course.
         • Advertising, recruiting, and admissions materials clearly and accurately represent the program or
             course and the services available.
Faculty Support
         • The program or course provides faculty support services specifically related to teaching via an
             electronic system.
         • The institution assures appropriate training for faculty who teach via the use of technology.



                                                         30
        •    The institution provides adequate equipment, software, and communications access to faculty to
             support interaction with students, institutions, and other faculty.
Resources for Learning
        • The institution ensures that appropriate learning resources are available to students.
        • The institution evaluates the adequacy of and the cost to students for, access to learning resources and
             documents the use of electronic resources.
Commitment to Support
        • Policies for faculty evaluation include appropriate recognition of teaching and scholarly activities
             related to programs or courses offered electronically.
        • The institution demonstrates a commitment to ongoing support, both financial and technical, and to
             continuation of the program or course for a period of time reasonable and sufficient for students to
             complete the course or program.

EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT
     • The institution evaluates the programs or courses educational effectiveness, including assessments of
        student learning outcomes, student retention, and student and faculty satisfaction.
     • At the completion of the program or course, the institution provides for assessment and documentation
        of student achievement in each course.




                                                       31
                                                  Appendix II
         Degree and Certificate Programs and Credit Courses Offered Electronically
                                     Adopted July 1997
                              *Written Certification: e-Learning Faculty

BASIC ASSUMPTIONS
Several assumptions are central to these principles:
    10. The program or course offered electronically is provided by or through an institution that is accredited by
         an accrediting agency recognized by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and authorized to
         operate in the state where the program or course originates.
    11. The institution's programs and courses holding specialized accreditation meet the same requirements when
         offered electronically.
    12. The "institution" may be a single institution or a consortium of such institutions.
    13. These principles are generally applicable to degree or certificate programs and to courses offered for
         academic credit.
    14. It is the institution's responsibility to review educational programs and courses it provides electronically
         and certify continued compliance with these principles.
    15. Institutions offering programs or for-credit courses are responsible for satisfying all in-state approval and
         accreditation requirements before students are enrolled.

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION
     • Each program or course results in learning outcomes appropriate to the rigor and breadth of the degree
        or certificate awarded.
     • A degree or certificate program or course offered electronically is coherent and complete.
     • The program or course provides for appropriate interaction between faculty and students and among
        students.
     • Qualified faculty provides appropriate oversight of the program or course that is offered electronically.
     • Programs or courses offered electronically are offered on the campus of the institution where the
        programs or courses originate.
     • Academic standards for all programs or courses offered electronically will be the same as those for
        programs or courses delivered by other means at the institution where the program or course originates.
     • Student learning in programs or courses delivered electronically should be comparable to student
        learning in programs offered at the campus where the programs or courses originate.

INSTITUTIONAL CONTEXT AND COMMITMENT
Role and Mission
         • The program or course is consistent with the institution's role and mission.
         • Review and approval processes ensure the appropriateness of the technology being used to meet the
             objectives of the program or course.
Students and Student Services
         • Program or course announcements and electronic catalog entries provide appropriate information.
         • The program or course provides students with clear, complete, and timely information on the
             curriculum, course and degree requirements, nature of faculty/student interaction, assumptions about
             technological competence and skills, technical equipment requirements, availability of academic
             support services and financial aid resources, and costs and payment policies.
         • Enrolled students have reasonable and adequate access to the range of student services and student
             rights appropriate to support their learning.
         • The institution has admission/acceptance criteria in place to assess the extent to which a student has the
             background, knowledge and technical skills required to undertake the program or course.
         • Advertising, recruiting, and admissions materials clearly and accurately represent the program or
             course and the services available.
Faculty Support
         • The program or course provides faculty support services specifically related to teaching via an
             electronic system.
         • The institution assures appropriate training for faculty who teach via the use of technology.


                                                         32
         •   The institution provides adequate equipment, software, and communications access to faculty to
             support interaction with students, institutions, and other faculty.
Resources for Learning
        • The institution ensures that appropriate learning resources are available to students.
        • The institution evaluates the adequacy of and the cost to students for, access to learning resources and
             documents the use of electronic resources.
Commitment to Support
        • Policies for faculty evaluation include appropriate recognition of teaching and scholarly activities
             related to programs or courses offered electronically.
        • The institution demonstrates a commitment to ongoing support, both financial and technical, and to
             continuation of the program or course for a period of time reasonable and sufficient for students to
             complete the course or program.

EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT
     • The institution evaluates the programs or courses educational effectiveness, including assessments of
        student learning outcomes, student retention, and student and faculty satisfaction.
     • At the completion of the program or course, the institution provides for assessment and documentation
        of student achievement in each course.



*I hereby certify adherence to the above policy:

Name:_________________________________________               Title:____________________________________

e-Learning Course:_____________________________              Semester:_________________________________

Date: _________________________________________              Witness: _________________________________


         *This form must be signed before teaching an e-Learning course at Texas Southern University (TSU).




                                                       33
                               Appendix III
                Office of e-Learning Organizational Chart




                      CENTER FOR     e-Learning

                                Director




e-Learning Resource       Academic Technology            Instructional
     Specialist                 Group                  Technology Group




                                34
       Appendix IV

                                 Texas Southern University
                           Distance Education Plan Requirements

     Planning, Development, Approval, and Review of e-Learning Education Courses


When at least fifty-one percent (51%) of the content of a course is delivered via distance means,
it is a requirement of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) that such a
course be subject to a formal review process. A critical part of the process occurs with the
certification by the Provost that the course was prepared and will be presented in accordance
with the Principles of Good Practice. The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to
both the developers and the reviewers of instructional materials to be used in a distance-Learning
course so that the Provost may provide the appropriate certification.

General Provisions:

   1. No course is to be delivered in a manner that meets the definition of a distance course
      until the course, including the delivery mode, has been approved by the Provost.

   2. The course must be listed in the inventory of courses approved by the THECB to be
      offered by the University.

   3. Each distance course is to be prepared and presented by an individual who has been
      previously certified by the Office of e-Learning as being competent in distance learning
      techniques.

   4. An appropriate course development agreement must be reduced to writing before formal
      development work commences.

   5. The course must be developed and administered in accordance with the Principles of
      Good Practice.

Specific Provisions:

    1. Before a course is developed, a proposal demonstrating the relationship of the proposed
       course to other courses within the pre-approved program must be submitted to the Office
       of e-Learning. A favorable recommendation is needed before the University will support
       development of the course.




                                               35
                                     Appendix V

                          Distance Learning Assessment Survey

1. When I think about how I learn, I think:
     • I learn best independently. I am self-motivated and like to work at my own pace.
         I do not need a lot of handholding.
     • I like to work independently, but I like to get some feedback once in a while on
         how I am doing. I don’t need a lot of support, just a little help once in awhile.
     • I can work independently, but I want to know where I stand. I like to be in an
         interactive situation with regular feedback on how I am doing.
     • I need lots of interaction with my teachers and peers. I like the give and take of
         the classroom setting that keeps me engaged in my class.

2. When I think about learning through different media, such as the Internet or video
   conferencing:
      • It would be exciting to be able to do my work through a different medium. The
          idea of sitting in a classroom does nothing for me.
      • I am open to the idea of trying something different, like an Internet class. I would
          want to see how it would work for me.
      • I am not sure that I would be ready to work that independently. When I think of
          furthering my education, I see myself in a more traditional setting.
      • I absolutely want a traditional learning experience. I want to be in a classroom
          setting and experience what school has to offer.

3. When I think about interacting with my teachers, I think:
     • I do not really care whether or not I have any face-to-face contact with my
         teachers. As long as I’m getting the kind of information I need to be successful in
         my classes, I can be satisfied as a student.
     • I do not need a great deal of direct contact with my teachers. I’m a good,
         independent worker. I do well if I’m able to ask for help and direction when
         needed.
     • I do not need to be in a situation where I am having a daily conversation my
         teachers, but I do need to know that they are there if I need them. I find a good
         teacher really helps me get excited about a topic.
     • I really value my contacts with my teachers. I like to be able to engage in dialog
         in the classroom and the teacher helps me connect to the subject.

4. When I think about trying to do schoolwork at home, I think:
     • I have a great setup at home, which is very conducive to studying. I like the idea
         of being able to work in my own “space” and at my own pace.
     • I can work fairly well at home, I just have to make sure that I do not get too
         distracted by what is going on around me.
     • I could work at home, but I really don’t see that as an ideal situation. There is too
         much going on and I would be able to concentrate better in a classroom setting.
     • There is no way I want to learn from home. I want to get out of the house and be
         in a classroom with other students.



                                           36
5. When it comes to setting my schedule for learning and studying, I think:
    • I need as much flexibility as I can get. I have a lot of other things going on in my
       life and I’d really like to be able to work at my own pace.
    • I would like to have some flexibility in scheduling my classes, but I don’t want to
       drag it out either. I get through my education as quickly as possible.
    • I like the idea of having my time fairly structured. If I do not have someone
       pushing me along, it may take longer than I want to get through school.
    • I need to have a structured schedule to keep me on task.

6. When I think about the traditional education experience, I think:
    • Campus or classroom life doesn’t really appeal to me at this stage in my life. I do
       not need or want the experience of, for example, living in a dorm or sitting in a
       classroom. I want to find an alternative when earning my degree or certificate.
    • I am not sure if I want to commit to the classroom experience. It may work for me,
       but I am willing to try other ways of earning a degree.
    • I think I would be happier if I were on a campus somewhere. I think I have
       probably regretted missing out on the learning experience. I would not rule out the
       notion of being a commuter though.
    • I really want a traditional learning experience where I can get away from home.
    • I am at a point in my life where that seems to be the logical next step for me.




                                          37
                                         Appendix VI
                                  Request for Proposals (RFP)

The office of Academic Affairs is soliciting proposals for $5,000.00 grants, per course, for the
development of twenty on-line courses for delivery Spring Semester 2007. Guidelines for proposals are
as follows:
1. To submit a proposal, investigators must be full-time members of Texas Southern
    University’s faculty. Group proposals are acceptable. Proposals must be approved by the
    academic dean.
2. Investigators must be experienced users of Blackboard Course Management System.
3. Investigators must provide proof of Blackboard training.
4. A textbook with publisher’s technology support (PowerPoint slides, test bank, teaching notes,
    etc.) is suggested.
5. Investigators must have experience with Microsoft Office Suite (Word, PowerPoint, Excel,
    etc).
6. Projects must be focused on delivering instruction (graduate and/or undergraduate) via
    distributed learning technologies utilizing the Blackboard-Tegrity framework.
7. Investigators must have completed a minimum of four semesters of experience teaching the
    proposed course in a classroom setting as evidenced by course outlines/syllabus.
8. At least fifty-one percent of the course materials must be in an on-line format.
9. Proposals must be submitted by April 08, 2006. Notification of awards will be made by May
    1, 2006. Funds will be allocated: 50% upon award and 50% after an acceptable presentation
    to the Academic Information Technology Committee.
10. Progress reports on each funded project must be submitted to the Associate Provost for
    Academic Affairs. Interim reports should indicate the percentage of the project’s completion.
    Biweekly reports will be required.
Instructional design and media consultants will be available for technical project support.

SUBMISSION FORMAT
  1. Name of Investigator(s)
  2. School/College and Department
  3. Proposed Course
  4. A Brief Statement of the Course Objective
  5. Faculty Status:
       Rank
       Degree
       Area of Specialization
  6. Blackboard Experience
  7. Blackboard Training
  8. Name of Text Book
  9. Publisher and Author(s)
  10. Publisher/Text Book Web Site
  11. Support Material
  12. Experience Teaching Proposed Course
  13. Brief Outline and Scope of Course Proposed
  14. Outline of Course Taught Face-to-Face

   PROPOSALS MUST FOLLOW THE ABOVE FORMAT



                                                 38
The completed course should contain as a minimum:
1. How course objectives will be met.
2. Methods for quality control.
3. Methods for student assessment/testing.
4. Plans for student-professor contact.
5. Access to support services such as library, labs, etc. that would be available to students
    on campus.
6. Method of meeting research expectations for graduate courses.
7. Titles and publication dates of suggested texts and required reading list.




                                           39
                                          Appendix VII


                                  e-Learning Recording Studio

Approved in 2005, the e-Learning Recording Studio at Texas Southern University (TSU) is a
state of the art e-Learning recording studio that is a one of a kind facility which gives the
University the ability to add substantially to its e-Learning initiative. The e-Learning recording
studio is a laboratory that provides TSU with an opportunity to record live lectures. This studio is
designed to accommodate up to thirty students and an instructor and gives the instructor a one-
touch solution for recording lectures.

This studio has the capability to capture all aspects of a presentation. Five streams of video are
utilized to ensure that all parts of a presentation are captured as well as the media edit
capabilities to produce a TV quality product. The system has a smart podium that controls the
functionality of the equipment and provides the presenter with access to a document camera,
DVD/VCR player, and PC connection. The presenter is given the option of being mobile in the
studio with the utilization of a wireless microphone system.

Another very important component of the studio is the capability to incorporate another state of
the art AVID video editing system. This process gathers digital media that is edited into a high
quality video product that can be used to create a digital library collection of lectures, to
download to Blackboard, and to distribute to TV stations for broadcasting.




                                                40
                                        Appendix VIII

                                  Software Tools Description

Respondus 3.0 is a powerful tool for creating and managing exams that can be printed to paper
or published directly to Blackboard www.respondus.com/products.

Respondus LockDown Browser is a custom browser that locks down the testing environment
within Blackboard. Students are locked into the assessment and are unable to print, copy, go to
another URL, or access other applications www.respondus.com/products.

StudyMate, another authoring tool from Respondus, allows the creation of Flash-based activities
and games using three simple templates; these activities may be published directly to a
Blackboard, imported from MS Word files and publisher test banks, making it easy to create
interesting, interactive activities from existing content.

Tegrity makes it so easy for faculty to click a button and record a lecture; another click allows
the lecture to be posted on Blackboard. Tegrity makes class time available all the time by
automatically capturing, storing and indexing every class on campus for replay by every student.
With Tegrity, students quickly recall key moments, replay entire classes online, on their iPods,
and cell phones; the Internet address is: http://www.tegrity.com.

Turnitin Campus License is a tool that ensures that “submitted documents are automatically
checked for plagiarism by Turnitin's comprehensive databases: a constantly updated 4.5 billion-
page Internet database that includes both current and archived Web content, the vast ProQuest
database of published works, and other proprietary databases; and a database of over 10 million
students papers already submitted to Turnitin” (http://www.turnitin.com).




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