Committee on B accalaureate Expansion _COBE_ - Program

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					               Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion
                              Program Showcase & Video-cast
                                             February 18, 2010

Program Purpose:
The COBE Showcase event provides potential COBE applicants with an opportunity to learn about and discuss
ideas and strategies that may lead to a successful COBE grant proposal. The event features examples of
established program models and promising practices that address COBE Strategies highlighted in the RFP.
Facilitated discussions give participants the opportunity to field questions relating to specific proposal ideas.
COBE strategies addressed in the showcase include initiatives pertaining to:

              Developing dual credit opportunities for high school students.
              Developing developmental/remedial courses and/or programs.
              Developing a process to assess and award credit for non-traditional and prior learning
               experiences.
              Developing new baccalaureate degree programs targeted to adult learners.

COBE Grant RFP materials may be found at http://www.uwsa.edu/acss/cobe/ .


Program Locations:
Live Broadcast Site:      The Pyle Center – Room 335, UW-Madison Campus

Receiving Video-cast Sites:
  UW-Stout – Millennium Hall Room 207                         UW-Milwaukee – Lubar S250
  UW-Green Bay – Instructional Sciences Rm 1034               UW-La Crosse – Wing Technology Building Room 31

Mediasite viewing:
An archived video recording of the broadcast will be available after February 19, 2010. Cut and past the
following URL into your browser:
http://mediasite.ics.uwex.edu/mediasite5/Catalog/pages/catalog.aspx?catalogId=4e8617fd-eb7b-4e88-bfa2-
98f1e33198d7

Event contact: Diane Treis Rusk – dtreisrusk@uwsa.edu - 608.261.1115.
COBE 2010-11 RFP contact: Cynthia Graham – cgraham@uwsa.edu – 608.263.4398.
             Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion - Program Showcase & Video-cast Agenda
                                           February 18, 2010

                                           Program Agenda
8:00 a.m.        Registration and coffee
8:30 a.m.        Connecting COBE to Educational Attainment
                 Rebecca Martin, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, UW System
                  RFP Overview and Strategies
                 Larry Rubin, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Academic Support Services, UW System


Session presentations will be preceded by a brief overview of each program area. A facilitated question and
answer session will follow each set of presentation.
8:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
Improving Student Preparation through Dual Credit Programming
    Effective Collaborations to Expand Transcripted Credit
    Gregory Kleinheinz, Director, UW-Oshkosh CAPP Program
    Expanding Advanced Placement to Rural Areas
    Jim Bokern, Chair, Wisconsin Advanced Placement Advisory Council

10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Strategies in Developmental and Remedial Math Education
    Improving Student Success: UW-Stout Math Teaching and Learning Center
    Jeanne Foley, Director, UW-Stout Math Teaching and Learning Center
      Associate Professor, Dept. of Math, Statistics, and Computer Science

    Lab-based Learning and Adaptive Testing
    Eric Key, Professor, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

12:00 noon       Break (Lunch provided for participants attending the program at the Pyle Center)

12:45 p.m.        Connecting COBE to Educational Attainment and RFP Overview and Strategies
                 Larry Rubin, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Academic Support Services, UW System

1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Processes and Practices for Prior Learning Assessment
     Definitions and Outcomes in Prior Learning Assessment: A National Perspective
    Judith Wertheim, Vice President Higher Education Services, Council for Adult & Experiential Learning
    Credit for Prior Learning Portfolios: Assessment Standards and Student Preparation
    Stephen Kleisath, Chair, Dept. of Business and Accounting, UW-Platteville
    Superior Access to Prior Learning Assessment
    Peter Nordgren, Associate Dean of Distance Learning and Continuing Education, UW-Superior
2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Degree Programs for the Returning Adult Learner and Place Bound Student
    Bachelor of Applied Studies: UW-Oshkosh Center for New Learning
    Charles Hill, Director UWO Center for New Learning
    Bachelor of Applied Studies: UW-Green Bay Adult Degree Program
    Eric Craver, Director of Marketing & Recruitment, UW-Green Bay Office of Adult Degree Programs

    UW-Madison College of Engineering Transfer Blueprint
    Manuela Romero, Assistant Dean of Student Diversity and Academic Services, UW-Madison College of Engineering



                                                                                                              Page 2
Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion
Program Showcase & Video-cast
February 18, 2010



8:30 a.m. (RFP Overview Repeated at 12:45)

Connecting COBE to Educational Attainment
Rebecca Martin, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, UW System



RFP Overview and Strategies
Larry Rubin, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Academic Support Services, UW System




                                                                                         Page 3
              Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion (COBE) Grants
                                  2010-2011

Request for Proposals
Due March 15, 2010

The University of Wisconsin System Administration is seeking proposals to support the
development and implementation of new programs or projects to implement one or more
of the following COBE strategies outlined below. Those strategies are as follows:

   •   Develop or expand student mentoring programs.
   •   Develop dual credit opportunities for high school students.
   •   Develop developmental/remedial courses and/or programs.
   •   Develop a process to assess and award credit for non-traditional learning
       experiences (Credit for Prior Learning).
   •   Develop or expand graduation completion projects.
   •   Develop accelerated degree programs.
   •   Develop new baccalaureate degree programs targeted to adult learners.

A more detailed description of these strategies is included in Appendix A.

University of Wisconsin baccalaureate institutions and Colleges are eligible to receive
funding during this competitive phase. Collaborative projects between UW institutions
and between UW and WTCS institutions and UW and private higher education
institutions are encouraged and are eligible for funding. Institutions may submit more
than one proposal. Multiple submissions should be ranked in priority order.

Applicants may request up to $75,000 per project. Funds will be available starting July 1,
2010, and will be awarded for one year. Second year funding may be considered
contingent upon measurable progress made in the first year. Since the UW System
budget for COBE grants does not include FTE positions, institutions requiring additional
positions to develop or implement their projects will need to provide the FTE.

Requirements for Application

To be considered for funding, a proposal must:

   1. Articulate well-defined, measurable outcomes that relate to increased production
      of baccalaureate degree holders.
   2. Impact at least one of the target populations identified by COBE (working adults,
      low income students, students of color).
   3. Have the potential to be replicated at other institutions.
   4. Employ sound evaluation measures.
   5. Detail specific strategies for sustaining the initiative beyond the funding period,
      including exploration of extramural funding.
   6. Include a concrete plan for dissemination of project results.



                                                                                          Page 4
Proposal Components

Cover Page. All proposals should be signed by the institution Provost. Collaborative
proposals should include signatures of the Provost or Vice President of each collaborating
institution. Please note: If you are submitting the proposal electronically and are unable
to send the signed cover page via e-mail, mail or fax the original cover page with
signatures to: Larry Rubin, Office of Academic and Student Services, 1604 Van Hise
Hall, 1220 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706            Fax: 608-263-2046

Project Narrative. The length of the narrative should be up to five double-spaced pages
in 12 point font. The narrative should include the following sections:

   •   Intended project outcomes: Describe the overall purpose and intended
       measurable outcomes of the project and how they would impact one or more of
       the target populations. Indicate how the project could be replicated at other
       institutions.
   •   Describe the project: Describe how you will carry out the project including major
       features and activities. Explain how those address the project’s intended
       outcomes. Describe strategies for sustaining the project after grant funds have
       expired.
   •   Assessment: Outline a specific plan for evaluating the project outcomes.
   •   Schedule: Include a timetable of the project activities.
   •   Dissemination: Outline a concrete plan for dissemination of project results to
       other institutions.

Budget and Narrative. Place the attached budget form and a budget narrative
immediately following the body of the proposal. Specify how you arrived at the dollar
figures included in the budget and how the money is to be used.

Proposals may request support for the types of expenses listed below:

   •   Replacement costs for faculty or academic staff release time (Please note that for
       FY 2010-11, in order to maximize grant funds, fringe benefits will not be funded
       though the COBE Grant Program)
   •   Student and/or clerical help
   •   Supplies and expenses (e.g., travel, meetings)
   •   Consultant fees




                                                                                          Page 5
DEADLINE

Proposals must be postmarked or submitted electronically to UW System no later
than March 15, 2010. Submit electronically via email to acss@uwsa.edu. If you are
submitting the proposal electronically and are unable to send the signed cover page via
e-mail, mail or fax the original cover page with signatures to: Larry Rubin, Office of
Academic and Student Services, 1604 Van Hise Hall, 1220 Linden Drive, Madison, WI
53706 Fax: 608-263-2046

QUESTIONS

If you have questions regarding this RFP, contact Cindy Graham, by phone
(608-263-4398) or e-mail (cgraham@uwsa.edu).




                                                                                          Page 6
                                            Committee on Baccelaureate Education
                                                                 COBE
                                             2010-11 BUDGET FORM
PROJECT
CATEGOR
INSTITUTIO
PERSONNEL SALARY                                                                                                      Funds         Cost to
*Identify Personnel in Budget Narrative                                                                              Requested    Institution
1 Faculty and Academic Staff:
2 Classified Staff:
3 Limited Term Employee:
4 Research and Grad Assistants:
5 Student Workers:           Hours:              Hourly Rate:                                Total:       $0.00
6 Other (i.e., Guest speakers, Consultants, etc):

                                                                                   Personnel Salary Sub Total:                            $0.00
EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES & EXPENSES * Refer to http://wwwuwsaedu/fadmin/travelht
Briefly identify items. Justify each in Budget Narrative detailing travel (i.e., mileage, meals, lodging, software
1 Equipmen
2 Supplies &
3 Other (de

                                                                              Supplies & Expenses Sub Total:             $0.00            $0.00
                                                                         PROJECT FUNDING TOTALS:                         $0.00         $0.00

Note: In order to maximize grant funds, fringe benefits will not
be funded through the Growth Agenda Grant Program.




                                                                                                                                 Page 7
                                     COBE Priority Descriptions

                                           Appendix A


The following topics and strategies will be given priority as we consider proposals:

Topic                                Strategy
Mentoring Programs              Develop mentoring programs to provide Wisconsin students
                                with education outreach to increase understanding of IHE post-
                                secondary options, admission procedures and financial aid
                                opportunities. Provide social outreach to improve precollege
                                student confidence in pursuing post-secondary education.
Dual Credit Opportunities       Increase enrollment and completion of college level coursework
                                or equivalent by Wisconsin high school students. Particularly
                                support program development in districts that currently provide
                                few dual credit program options and/or serve student populations
                                underrepresented in our colleges and universities.
Remedial/Developmental          Reduce student time to degree and improve first-time student
Programming                     remedial completion rates. Provide faculty and staff with
                                opportunities to establish or replicate successful college
                                developmental and remedial programs.

Credit for Non-traditional      Credit for Prior Learning: Increase CPL assessment and award
Learning Experiences            by building institutional and statewide capacity to provide CPL
                                assessment. Support development and coordination of replicable
                                models across departments and institutions.
Graduation Completion           Degree Completion Programs:
Projects                        Develop graduation project initiatives that target adults who
                                dropped out of a college program after completing a substantial
                                portion of their degree requirements, and facilitate their return to
                                complete their degree.
Accelerated Degree              Develop programs that encourage traditional and/or adult
Programs                        students to finish their degrees in less than 4 years.
Baccalaureate of Applied        Develop degree completion programs targeted to working adult
Science or General Studies      students who hold an associate degree and who are in need of a
for Career Advancement          baccalaureate degree to assist in their career progression.
Baccalaureate Degree            Develop new baccalaureate degree completion programs in areas
Completion Programs in          of high student or labor market demand (e.g., Business, Nursing,
Fields with High Student and    Early Childhood, and Special Education).
Labor Market Demand
Baccalaureate Degree            Offer baccalaureate degree programs at WTCS institutions and
Programs Available at           the UW Colleges taught by faculty from UW four-year
WTCS Institutions and UW        institutions
Colleges



                                                                                              Page 8
Career-focused Pre-major      Develop career-focused pre-major associate of science degree
Associate of Science Degree   programs at WTCS liberal arts colleges.
Programs
Collaborative Degree          Develop collaborative WTCS associate of applied science
Programs                      degree programs with UWS two-year (1+1) and four-year
                              institutions (1+3).




                                                                                        Page 9
                        Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion
                           Educational Attainment Grants
                                       2010

Request for Proposals
Due March 15, 2010

Through funding from the Lumina Foundation for Education, the Wisconsin Technical
College System (WTCS), Wisconsin Association for Independent Colleges and
Universities (WAICU), the Department of Public Instruction, and the University of
Wisconsin System are seeking proposals to support the development and implementation
of new programs or projects to implement one or more of the following strategies
advanced by the Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion. Those strategies are as
follows:

       Developing or expanding student mentoring programs.
       Developing dual credit opportunities for high school students.
       Developing developmental/remedial courses and/or programs.
       Developing a process to assess and award credit for non-traditional learning
       experiences (Credit for Prior Learning).
       Developing or expand graduation completion projects.
       Developing accelerated degree programs.
       Developing new baccalaureate degree programs targeted to adult learners.

A more detailed description of these strategies is included in Appendix A.

Any Wisconsin post-secondary institution is eligible to receive funding during this
competitive phase. Funding priority will be given to WTCS and WAICU institutions.
Collaborative projects between higher education sectors or institutions are encouraged.

Approximately $70,000 will be available to fund one initiative, or up to $35,000 will be
available to fund two initiatives.

Requirements for Application

To be considered for funding, a proposal must:

   1. Articulate well-defined, measurable outcomes that relate to increased production
      of baccalaureate degree holders.
   2. Impact at least one of the target populations identified by COBE (working adults,
      low income students, students of color).
   3. Have the potential to be replicated at other institutions.
   4. Employ sound evaluation measures.
   5. Detail specific strategies for sustaining the initiative beyond the funding period,
      including exploration of extramural funding.
   6. Include a concrete plan for dissemination of project results.



                                                                                          Page 10
Proposal Components

Cover Page. All proposals should be approved by the institution’s chief academic
officer. Collaborative proposals should be approved by the chief academic officer of
each collaborating institution. Please note: If you are submitting the proposal
electronically and are unable to send the signed cover page via e-mail, mail or fax the
original cover page with signatures to: Cynthia Graham , Office of Academic and
Student Services, 1610 Van Hise Hall, 1220 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706;
phone: 608.263.4398.

Project Narrative. The length of the narrative should be up to five double-spaced pages
in 12 point font. The narrative should include the following sections:

       Intended project outcomes: Describe the overall purpose and intended
       measurable outcomes of the project and how they would impact one or more of
       the target populations. Indicate how the project could be replicated at other
       institutions.
       Describe the project: Describe how you will carry out the project including major
       features and activities. Explain how those address the project’s intended
       outcomes. Describe strategies for sustaining the project after grant funds have
       expired.
       Assessment: Outline a specific plan for evaluating the project outcomes.
       Schedule: Include a timetable of the project activities.
       Dissemination: Outline a concrete plan for dissemination of project results to
       other institutions.

Budget and Narrative. Place the attached budget form and a budget narrative
immediately following the body of the proposal. Specify how you arrived at the dollar
figures included in the budget and how the money is to be used.

Proposals may request support for the types of expenses listed below:

       Replacement costs for faculty or academic staff release time (Please note that for
       FY 2010-11, in order to maximize grant funds, fringe benefits will not be funded
       though the COBE Grant Program)
       Student and/or clerical help
       Supplies and expenses (e.g., travel, meetings)
       Consultant fees




                                                                                          Page 11
DEADLINE

Proposals must be postmarked or submitted electronically to the COBE in care of the UW
System no later than March 15, 2010. Submit electronically via email to
acss@uwsa.edu. If you are submitting the proposal electronically and are unable to send
the signed cover page via e-mail, mail or fax the original cover page with signatures to:
Cynthia Graham , Office of Academic and Student Services, 1610 Van Hise Hall, 1220
Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706; phone: 608.263.4398.

QUESTIONS

If you have questions regarding this RFP, contact Cindy Graham, by phone
(608-263-4398) or e-mail (cgraham@uwsa.edu).




                                                                                      Page 12
                                      COBE Priority Descriptions
                                            Appendix A


     The following topics and strategies will be given priority as we consider proposals:

    Topic                                        Strategy
Mentoring Programs               Develop mentoring programs to provide Wisconsin students with education outreach
                                 to increase understanding of IHE post-secondary options, admission procedures and
                                 financial aid opportunities. Provide social outreach to improve precollege student
                                 confidence in pursuing post-secondary education.
Dual Credit Opportunities        Increase enrollment and completion of college level coursework or equivalent by
                                 Wisconsin high school students. Particularly support program development in districts
                                 that currently provide few dual credit program options and/or serve student
                                 populations underrepresented in our colleges and universities.
Remedial/Developmental           Reduce student time to degree and improve first-time student remedial completion
Programming                      rates. Provide faculty and staff with opportunities to establish or replicate successful
                                 college developmental and remedial programs.

Credit for Non-traditional       Credit for Prior Learning: Increase CPL assessment and award by building institutional
Learning Experiences             and statewide capacity to provide CPL assessment. Support development and
                                 coordination of replicable models across departments and institutions.
Graduation Completion Projects   Degree Completion Programs:
                                 Develop graduation project initiatives that target adults who dropped out of a college
                                 program after completing a substantial portion of their degree requirements, and
                                 facilitate their return to complete their degree.
Accelerated Degree Programs      Develop programs that encourage traditional and/or adult students to finish their
                                 degrees in less than 4 years.
Baccalaureate of Applied         Develop degree completion programs targeted to working adult students who hold an
Science or General Studies for   associate degree and who are in need of a baccalaureate degree to assist in their
Career Advancement               career progression.
Baccalaureate Degree             Develop new baccalaureate degree completion programs in areas of high student or
Completion Programs in Fields    labor market demand (e.g., Business, Nursing, Early Childhood, and Special
with High Student and Labor      Education).
Market Demand
Baccalaureate Degree Programs    Offer baccalaureate degree programs at WTCS institutions and the UW Colleges
Available at WTCS Institutions   taught by faculty from UW four-year institutions
and UW Colleges

Career-focused Pre-major         Develop career-focused pre-major associate of science degree programs at WTCS
Associate of Science Degree      liberal arts colleges.
Programs
Collaborative Degree Programs    Develop collaborative WTCS associate of applied science degree programs with UWS
                                 two-year (1+1) and four-year institutions (1+3).




                                                                                                             Page 13
                                                                        Committee on Baccelaureate Education
                                                                          Educational Attainment Grant
                                                                           2010 BUDGET FORM
PROJECT TITLE:
CATEGORY:
INSTITUTION:
PERSONNEL SALARY                                                                                                                                                         Funds        Cost to
*Identify Personnel in Budget Narrative                                                                                                                                 Requested    Institution
1 Faculty and Academic Staff:
2 Classified Staff:
3 Limited Term Employee:
4 Research and Grad Assistants:
5 Student Workers:                    Hours:                       Hourly Rate:                       Total:                                                   $0.00
6 Other (i.e., Guest speakers, Consultants, etc):

                                                                                                                                          Personnel Salary Sub Total:                     $0.00
EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES & EXPENSES * Refer to http://wwwuwsaedu/fadmin/travelhtm

Briefly identify items. Justify each in Budget Narrative detailing travel (i.e., mileage, meals, lodging, software, computers, server time costs)
1 Equipment:
2 Supplies & Expens
3 Other (describe):

                                                                                                                                     Supplies & Expenses Sub Total:         $0.00         $0.00
                                                                                                                                PROJECT FUNDING TOTALS:                     $0.00         $0.00

Note: In order to maximize grant funds, fringe benefits will not
be funded through the Growth Agenda Grant Program.




                                                                                                                                                                                    Page 14
Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion
Program Showcase & Video-cast
February 18, 2010



8:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
Improving Student Preparation through Dual Credit Programming
  Topic Overview and Introduction

  Effective Collaborations to Expand Transcripted Credit
  Gregory Kleinheinz, Director, UW-Oshkosh CAPP Program
      The University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh Cooperative Academic Partnership Program is a
      nationally accredited program that provides high school students an opportunity to
      dually enroll in high school and college coursework. The program serves hundreds of
      Wisconsin students each semester. Learn about the program’s structure and success.
      Consider how CAPP partners with local high schools and examine the factors campuses
      must consider when designing a transcripted credit program.

  Expanding Advanced Placement to Rural Areas
  Jim Bokern, Chair, Wisconsin Advanced Placement Advisory Council
      The Wisconsin Advanced Placement Advisory Council works to improve access to
      Advanced Placement. Consider methods to expand AP coursework in rural districts and
      to students who are underrepresented in the AP classroom and our colleges and
      universities. Examine how participation in AP coursework may improve student
      readiness. Consider ways university precollege programs can collaborate with middle
      and high schools to prepare students for advanced coursework. Explore how high
      schools and universities/colleges can partner to develop quality AP programming.


  Questions, Ideas, and Discussion
     Participants are invited to pose questions regarding the RFP and/or their specific
     proposal ideas.




                                                                                          Page 15
                                                                  Concurrent Enrollment Program
                                                                  Not AP
                                                                  College credit given for course taken at the
                    Gregory T. Kleinheinz, R.S., Ph.D.
             Associate Dean, College of Letters and Science
                       Dean                                          g School,        g School students
                                                                   High Sc oo , by High Sc oo stude ts
          Director, Cooperative Academic Partnership Program
                                                                  Taught by staff from High School
                  University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh
                   College of Letters and Science
                                                                  Collaboration with University staff/faculty
                         Oshkosh, WI 54901
                             920-424-3302                         Alternative to AP and Youth Options
                        kleinhei@uwosh.edu
                                                                  Benefits beyond just the ‘college credit’




The Cooperative Academic Partnership Program
                                                                  Started in 1974 via Chancellor Birnbaum and
(CAPP) at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh has                  Superintendent Pellegrin
provided academically able high school students an
                                                                  1975 the Accelerated Placement Program was approved by
opportunity to earn college credits while still in high            the Oshkosh School District
school since 1975. Qualified students may enroll in
            g             g    y          y pp
select college courses taught by university approved              11 Courses started the program with 23 students from two
                                                                   Oshkosh High Schools (Tuition was $21.75/credit)
                                                                                                       $21 75/credit)
high school instructors. These adjunct faculty work
with UW Oshkosh department faculty liaisons to                    1977 added Lourdes and Omro. Courses offered grew to 15
                                                                   and enrollment was 106.
ensure that their CAPP courses give students a chance
to experiment with the academic rigor of university               CAPP Acronym Started in 1977 – Cooperative Academic
                                                                   Placement Program
course work while remaining with high school peers.
CAPP helps to set these students apart from other                 1977 – Meeting of cooperative programs at UW-Oshkosh
college applicants and gives them a jump start on a                took place. Syracuse, St. Louis University, Matteo Ricci
                                                                   College, and Seattle University.
college career.




                                                                                                               Page 16
                                                                                                    = CAPP School District

                                                                                                    = UW 2-Year Campus



   1981 – Expansion planned to 10+.
   1982 – Number of schools reached 10.
   1984 – Number of schools reached 19 with 28 adjunct
    instructors.
   1986 – UW Administrative Policy GAPP 36 went into effect.
                                                            p
    Stated students must be seniors, no more than 6 credits per
    semester, and fee was ½ the resident tuition.
   1993 – Name was changed to Cooperative Academic                                                          UW-Oshkosh
    Partnership program (Same CAPP acronym).
   1993 – First program review conducted by faculty from
    Syracuse.
   1995 – 20th Anniversary of CAPP. CAPP was in 26 schools
    and an enrollment of 1,406 students.
   Current – 33 Schools, 28 courses, 73 Adjuncts, 23 Liaisons,
    and ~1,400 students.




   Adjunct = High School Teacher                                    Ability to teach the course being offered.
   Must possess an Masters Degree                                   Can be faculty or academic staff.
   Department sets specific requirements and is                     Interest in concurrent enrollment program.
     a ed
    varied by depa t e t.
              department.
                                                                     Enthusiasm and willingness to work with the
                                                                      E h i           d illi               k ih h
   Must be approved by Department offering                           high schools.
    course.
   Generally, must possess qualifications that
    would allow them to be hired on campus for
    teaching on-campus courses.




                                                                                                                 Page 17
                                                               Liaison and adjunct work together to develop identical or
   A student can be eligible for CAPP if:                      very similar syllabus and course structure.
                                                               Student at the high school (HS) enroll through the HS office.
                                                               HS works with CAPP office on registration and payment
                                                                issues.
    1. they are ranked in the upper 25% of their class OR
                                                               Course costs ½ UW-Oshkosh tuition and almost no fees!
          y                         g
    2. they have a GPA of 3.25 or higher on a 4.0 g
                                                  grade                                                staff
                                                                Course is taught using HS facility and staff.
       scale OR                                                One site visit/semester from the liaison.
    3. they are ranked in the upper 50% AND they have          Visit by HS class to UWO whenever works.
       an ACT of 24 or higher.                                 Class taught ‘as usual’ by the HS adjunct.
                                                               Adjunct records grades and places them on-line through
                                                                UWO.
   Sign-in option of adjunct, liaison, and Director           Adjunct and students get UWO IDs and access to resources
                                                               UWO transcript generated as usual when a student requires
    approve.                                                    one.




                                                               For the high school, CAPP offers:
                                                                •   Collegial connections between high school and university instructors.
                                                                •   Program articulation between high school and college.
   Contact the CAPP Office at UW-Oshkosh!                      •   The opportunity to collaborate with university faculty in regard to student
                                                                    preparation for college courses.
                                                                •   Response to community concerns for gifted education.
                                                                •   Reduced curricular redundancy.
                                                                •   Save on YOP costs.

                                                               For students the advantages are numerous. Besides providing
                                                                dual credit, cost savings on college credits and the opportunity
                                                                to test the rigors of college course work, CAPP offers:
                                                                •   A transition and gradual introduction to university study while remaining
                                                                    with high school peers.
                                                                •   More scheduling flexibility when enrolling at a university.
                                                                •   Earlier completion of general education requirements.
                                                                •   Demonstration of academic seriousness to university admissions officials.
                                                                •   Possible early completion of a college degree program.




                                                                                                                              Page 18
   NACEP = National Alliance of Concurrent
    Enrollment Partnerships                          AP (does not have to compete in all cases)
   One of the charter members.                      Non-UW institutions
   First review was 10 years p o to actual
       st e e      as 0 yea s prior actua            Youth Options Programs
    accreditation.                                   On-line courses
   UW-Oshkosh is the only NACEP accredited
    program in Wisconsin.




                                                                                      = CAPP School District

                                                                                      = UW 2-Year Campus




   Would like to expand CAPP offerings
   Interested in partnering with UW-Colleges
   Use UW-Oshkosh experience and
    administrative structure.
   Use UW Colleges reach into new areas of the                                                UW-Oshkosh

   Provide collaboration between 2 and 4-year
    institutions.
   Allow UW College faculty to gain new
    professional opportunities.




                                                                                                   Page 19
   Offer courses via Distance Education
   “Share” instructors
                                                                  More Information:
   Offer more opportunities for High School
    Instructors to get their M
    I                             ’ Degree
                        h i Master’s D                     http://www.uwosh.edu/CAPP/
                                                           htt //         h d /CAPP/

    •   Course offerings in discipline
    •   Novel programs with College of Education                         CONTACT:
                                                             Gregory T. Kleinheinz, R.S., Ph.D.
                                                      Associate Dean, College of Letters and Science
                                                   Director, Cooperative Academic Partnership Program
                                                             University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh
                                                                    Oshkosh, WI 54901
                                                                        920-424-3302
                                                                   kleinhei@uwosh.edu




                                                                                                        Page 20
                                                             2009 Wisconsin AP Updates
                                                        • 27,269 Wisconsin students took 43,830 AP 
                                                          exams at 442 high schools.
                                                        • AP students are prepared by high school 
             COBE Showcase                                teachers or on line courses for national exams.
                                                        • In July, universities, students and high schools 
                                                               l                    d       dh h h l
         Expanding Advanced Placement                     receive AP exam scores ranked 1‐5.
           Opportunities for Rural and                  • Credit is typically awarded for grades of 3‐5.
           Underrepresented  Students                   • 68.5% of exams completed by Wisconsin 
                                                          students earned grades of 3‐5.




   Recent AP Developments                                        Washburn High School
                  The AP Ledger

• All AP teachers must electronically submit a 
  syllabus, resources requirements and lab 
  requirements for science courses to be approve 
  by the College Board.  College faculty are 
  by the College Board College faculty are
  employed to review the syllabi, resources and 
  labs. 
• Once AP courses are approved anyone can view  
  high school AP course offerings on the AP Ledger.  

• https://apcourseaudit.epiconline.org/ledger/




                                                                                                    Page 21
          Tomahawk High School                                             Juda High School




 Rural schools teach 44% of Wisconsin 
                                                                          Access and Equity
                students
• Reviewing the on line AP Ledger reveals that many           • AP is no longer for just the Valedictorian, but 
  rural schools have emerging AP programs.                      should include all serious college bound 
• Rural schools are often challenged to offer access to AP      students.  This movement to expand access to 
  due to funding and logistics.
                                                                AP is referred to as “Equity” by the College 
• Wisconsin’s high school seniors had an AP participation
  Wisconsin s high school seniors had an AP participation       Board.
  rate of 25.3 %, lagging behind the national average of 
  26.5%  high school seniors participating in AP.             • Wisconsin state statute further supports 
• Wisconsin’s strong performance on AP test suggest             Equity by requiring all free and reduced lunch 
  that many able high school student chose not to               students to have their exam fees paid by the 
  participate in AP or lack access to these opportunities.      school district. This is an unfunded mandate.




                                                                                                         Page 22
                                                                                              AP and Traditionally Underserved Students
                 Closing Equity Gaps
                                                                                •   African American and Hispanic students who took AP courses and exams earned 
                                                                                    higher grades in college than other African American and Hispanic students from the 
                                                                                    same SAT® range and the same socioeconomic background who had taken only regular 
From 2002 to 2007:                                                                  high school courses or dual enrollment courses.

    – 96 percent increase in the number of low‐income 
      students scoring 3 or higher on AP Exams                                                                                                 “College Outcomes Comparison by AP and Non‐AP 
                                                                                                                                               High School Experiences.” Barbara G. Dodd, Linda 
    – 72 percent increase in the number of African                                                                                             Hargrove, Donn Godin (2008). Full study can be 
                                                                                                                                               found at: www.collegeboard.com/research
      American students scoring 3 or higher on AP 
      Exams
    – 52 percent increase in the number of Latino 
      students scoring 3 or higher on AP Exams                                  •   African American, Latino, and low‐income students scoring 3+ experience much higher 
                                                                                    college graduation rates than comparable non‐AP students. 
                                                                                    See: Chrys Dougherty, Lynn Mellor, and Shuling Jian, “The Relationship Between Advanced Placement and College Graduation” 
                                                                                    (2005), National Center for Educational Accountability.




                                                                                          Impact of AP on 5-Year College Graduation Rates
         AP Helps Students Graduate on Time
Students who take AP courses and exams are much more likely than their              Student Group                 AP Exam Grade                 AP Exam Grade                 Took AP course,
peers to complete a college degree on time in 4 years.                                                            of 3, 4, 5                    of 1, 2                       but not exam
• Only 1 in 4 students who enter college will complete their bachelor’s 
                                                                                    African-American              28% higher                    22% higher                    16% higher
   degree on schedule in 4 years.
• Research consistently shows that students taking AP courses and exams 
   have a much higher likelihood of earning their college degree on schedule        Hispanic                      28% higher                    12% higher                    10% higher
   in 4 years. Example: 
    – A 2008 study conducted by researchers from the Texas Higher                   White                         33% higher                    22% higher                    20% higher
       Education Coordinating Board found that AP English Literature 
       students had 4‐year college graduation rates that were 62% higher            Low-Income                    26% higher                    17% higher                    12% higher
       than students who had not taken AP English Literature.
• Students who take 5 years or more typically spend $18,000‐$29,000 more 
   each year to complete their degree.                                              Not Low-Income                34% higher                    23% higher                    19% higher
• Full study can be found at: www.collegeboard.com/research
                                                                                       Source: Dougherty, C., Mellor, L., & Jian, S., (2006). The Relationship
                                                                                       Between Advanced Placement and College Graduation. Austin, TX:
                                                                                       National Center for Educational Accountability.




                                                                                                                                                                                           Page 23
                                                                                 Wisconsin Graduates Performance on 
                                                                                 AP test (using the Excellence metric)
                                                                                 • The Excellence Metric of the College Board 
                                                                                   divides the number of graduating seniors by 
                                                                                   the number of seniors who scored 3 or higher 
                                                                                   on at least one AP exam
                                                                                   on at least one AP exam.
                                                                                 • 25.3% of Wisconsin seniors took an AP exam 
                                                                                   during their tenure in high school.
                                                                                 • 17.3 % of Wisconsin seniors scored a 3 or 
                                                                                   higher on at least one AP exam.




                                                                                 AP courses prepare students majoring in engineering, 
                    Research on AP                                                 biochemistry and other STEM majors in college.
Keng, Dodd study conducted by University of Texas found: 
   – AP students earn higher GPAs in the advanced college courses into 
     which their AP credit allowed them to place, compared to students       • 27 prestigious colleges and universities participated in a study 
     with the same high school class rank and SAT scores who did not earn      comparing the degree to which AP science, math and technology 
     AP credit and who did not skip the entry‐level college course.            students chose to pursue STEM majors, in comparison to students 
                                                                               who did not receive exposure to these disciplines via AP. 
                                                                             • The sort of student who participates in AP science, math and 
                                                                               technology coursework in high school is far more likely than other 
                                                                               technology coursework in high school is far more likely than other
                                                                               students to proceed to major in a related STEM discipline.
                                                                             • This relationship between the AP course and the choice of a STEM 
                                                                               major holds true across several groups of students most under‐
                                                                               represented in STEM majors today: women and minorities.
                                                                             •    Full study can be found at: www.collegeboard.com/research. Rick Morgan and John Klaric, “AP 
                                                                                  Students in College: An Analysis of Five‐Year Academic Careers.”




                                                                                                                                                                Page 24
 AP students perform well when placed ahead in                       Why does AP have such a significant 
                    college.                                           impact on student learning?
• AP students are performing better in their intermediate‐level    • Rigor, rigor, rigor which is required for 
  STEM coursework than students with the same SAT score who          students to score 3 or higher on AP exams.  
  had taken the college’s own introductory course. 
                                                                   • AP educators are building Vertical Teams 
                                                                                                      g
                                                                     between middle school and high school to 
                                                                     improve student learning and advanced skills.
                                                                   • AP teachers are analyzing student 
                                                                     performance data, adjusting instruction, and 
                                                                     actively seeking best practices to improve 
                                                                     student learning.




       University Pre‐College Programs                                 University Pre‐College Programs 
                Collaboration                                                   Collaboration
• Summer and other collegiate outreach                             • Many high schools run summer school programs 
  programs share the common mission of                               on site that could be linked via web or video for 
  academic rigor and building student familiarity                    collaboration with UW faculty.
  with collegiate expectations.                                    • Rural areas use CESA service a great deal and 
• Problem: Rural middle school and high school                       could communicate and coordinate collaboration 
  students have less access to higher education                      efforts between rural schools and the UW 
                                                                     System.
  sites. 
                                                                   • Wisconsin Virtual School operated by CESA 9 
• Solution: Create online, video conference,                         needs some instructors and would welcome UW 
  webinars to reach rural community students.                        support.




                                                                                                               Page 25
       WVS is looking for qualified AP                AP Partnership between High Schools 
       Teachers in the following areas                      and Universities/colleges
•   AP Art History                                   • Assisting AP teachers with labs, syllabus ideas 
•   AP Computer Science                                for the AP Audit for Ledger, and best 
•   AP Environmental Science                           instructional practice.
•   AP French Language
    AP French Language                               • C ti
                                                       Creating online outreach with webinars to 
                                                                   li     t    h ith bi         t
•   AP Macroeconomics AP Microeconomics                encourage student participation in rigorous 
•   AP Spanish Language                                course work or clarifying academic standards.
•   AP US Gov't & Politics                           • Working with CESA’s and DPI to help with 
•   AP World History                                   outreach to rural schools. 




    2009 Wisconsin won $2.2 million grant to 
                                                     College Board sponsored opportunities 
      expand Advanced Placement to low‐
               income students                                for university faculty
                                                     • Participating in College Board/ETS programs of AP 
• The Wisconsin Department of Public                   Reading, professional development consulting, 
  Instruction’s grant, “Blended Learning               test development, etc. 
  Innovations: Building a Pipeline for Equity and    • The College Board has required training and 
  Access”.                                             protocols for AP professional development.
• Chrys Mursky the DPI consultant for Gifted         • College Board partnerships with the UW System 
  and Talented and Advanced Placement is the           includes the UW Madison AP Summer Institute, 
                                                       Robert Zeide ( UW Stout) and Kurt Leichtle (UW 
  contact person for this 3 year grant.                River Falls) moderating AP US History Listserv and 
                                                       are Table Leaders at the AP Reading.




                                                                                                  Page 26
Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion
Program Showcase & Video-cast
February 18, 2010


10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Strategies in Developmental and Remedial Math Education
  Topic Overview and Introduction

  Improving Student Success: UW-Stout Math Teaching and Learning Center
  Jeanne Foley, Director, UW-Stout Math Teaching and Learning Center
    Associate Professor, Dept. of Math, Statistics, and Computer Science
      The UW-Stout Math Teaching and Learning Center was created in 2004 to tackle the
      problem of declining first –to-second year undergraduate retention stemming from low
      success rates in remedial and introductory mathematics courses. Learn how a
      comprehensive redesign of two introductory algebra courses that combine daily online
      work, classroom sessions, and tutoring significantly reduced failure and withdrawal
      rates in remedial algebra and narrowed the achievement gap between student groups.


  Lab-based Learning and Adaptive Testing
  Eric Key, Professor, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin -
  Milwaukee
      The UW-Milwaukee Department of Mathematical Sciences offers lab based versions of
      standard remedial math courses using adaptive testing. This lab classroom model
      offers students the opportunity to complete two or three pre-college level mathematics
      courses in one semester. Learn how computer adaptive testing accelerates remedial
      math course completion. Consider how modularization of lab based remedial math
      coursework may support earlier student entry into degree coursework with math
      prerequisites.


   Questions, Ideas, and Discussion
     Participants are invited to pose questions regarding the RFP and/or their specific
     proposal ideas.




                                                                                          Page 27
                                             Rationale and Mission:
   •   National and local studies show that in many cases the single strongest predictor of retention from the first
       year of college to the second year is taking and passing a math class in the first year.
   •   5-10% of students entering UW-Stout typically place into Beginning Algebra or Math 010, a Placement Level 0
       (remedial) course. Another 30-35% place into Intermediate Algebra or Math 110, a credit-earning, Placement
       Level 1 course that serves as a prerequisite to courses satisfying the general math requirement.
   •   Failure/withdrawal rates in these two classes have historically averaged about 30% at UW-Stout. Our
       placement statistics approximate U.S. collegiate averages, while national failure/withdrawal rates in similar
       courses average about 40% (U.S. Department of Education, 2004 report).
   •   In 2003, a UW-Stout Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science Department task force determined that the
       three biggest barriers to students’ success in these introductory algebra course were (1) failure to do
       homework, (2) skipping class, and (3) not using available free tutoring services or instructors’ office hours.
   •   To address these problems, the Math Teaching and Learning Center was inaugurated in the fall semester of
       2004. The three primary strategic changes in course delivery are (1) daily computer-graded homework
       assignments using software with algorithmically generated questions and problem-by-problem online help;
       (2) small class sections that meet daily with a classroom instructor for short lectures followed by in-class
       homework help, with attendance taken daily; and (3) pooling of instructors’ office hours to staff a dedicated
       help lab for 40 hours per week in a room adjacent to the Math TLC classroom, augmented by a specially
       trained staff of undergraduate peer tutors from many majors and representing diverse student populations.

5-Year Results and Highlights:
   • The Math TLC program has served nearly 4000 students since the fall of 2004.
   • F/W rates have been reduced by 52% in Math 010 and by 39% in Math 110.
   • An estimated 400 more students passed introductory algebra courses than would
     have passed without the Math TLC program. This number translates to nearly 4%
     of the entire Stout undergraduate student population over those five years.
                              • The fall-to-spring retention rate for first-year students
                                who took remedial math (Math 010) in 2008-2009
                                exceeded the rate for all first-year students in the four
                                higher math placement levels combined.
                              • The Math TLC program has cut the minority student
                                achievement gap by 80%.
                              • The Math TLC program has received four external grant awards, including a 4-year,
                                $450,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Education FIPSE program, funding
                                from the UW System Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion for a two-year
                                minority achievement gap reduction project, and a small projects grant from the
                                NSF-funded Wisconsin Alliance for Minority Participation (WiscAMP) program.
                              • FIPSE grant-funded course redesign workshops developed by the Math TLC teaching
                                team have been attended by 45 educators from 30 institutions in 12 states.
         For more information visit http://mathtlc.uwstout.edu
       This work is supported by U.S. Department of Education FIPSE grant number P116B06011.
                                                                                                              28
                                                                                                         Page 27
                                         MORE RESULTS AND HIGHLIGHTS:

 •   Homework: 96% of all homework assignments are turned in; the average homework score is 93%. Students are
     spending an average of 95 minutes on each daily homework assignment.
 •   Tutor lab visits for Math 010/110 now average 150-200 a week or 2500-3000 per semester vs. 80 total visits to
     the campus tutoring office for these two classes in the fall semester of 2003, before the Math TLC program.
 •   Class attendance now averages over 90% in both Math 110 (Intermediate Algebra) and Math 010 (Beginning
     Algebra).
 •   Student comments from end of semester survey:
       o The class is better than I expected. I’m learning more this way than I ever did in high school.
       o I REALLY like the way this class operates thus far, and let it be known that I can’t even remember “not
          minding” a math class since Jr. high school!
       o I loved the online homework and tests/quizzes. I believe that helped me a lot!

                                   Closing the Minority Achievement Gap:
       The proportion of underrepresented minorities
 among first-year Stout undergraduates has increased
 over 50% in the past six years. The average math ACT
 score of minority students in the most recent entering
 class was nearly 3 points lower than other students.
 The proportion of minority students placing into
 remedial math (Math 010) was more than twice the
 rate for all others. Prior to the Math TLC program,
 failure/withdrawal rates for minority students in
 remedial math averaged 60%, compared to 20% for all
 other students. This 40-point gap was reduced by more
 than half in the first year of the Math TLC program, and
 has continued to decline to an all-time low of less than
 8 percentage points in the fall semester of 2008.

                                          COURSE REDESIGN WORKSHOP Materials and Resources:
                                        A U.S. Department of Education FIPSE grant funded three annual summer
                                        course redesign workshops at UW-Stout. Attendees at the 2007, 2008 and
                                        2009 workshops included teaching teams from five UW System universities
                                        and six Wisconsin technical colleges, as well as participants from 2-year and 4-
                                        year colleges and universities in Michigan, Texas, West Virginia, Missouri,
                                        Illinois, North Dakota, Minnesota, Kansas, South Carolina, and Iowa.
                                           All presentation slides and other resources and materials
                                         developed for these workshops are available to the public at:
                 http://mathtlc.uwstout.edu/2009%20Workshop%20Materials%20and%20Resources.html

Questions? Contact Dr. Jeanne Foley, Math TLC Director, at foleyj@uwstout.edu or (715)232-5001
               or visit our web site at http://mathtlc.uwstout.edu/.
       This work is supported by U.S. Department of Education FIPSE grant number P116B06011.
                                                                                                              29
                                                                                                         Page 28
                                                     Background on UW-Milwaukee
                                                    • Freshman class is about 4000 students.
   A Computer Adaptive Testing                      • 75-80% of these students test below the
      Strategy for Pre-College                        level of algebra, geometry and pre-algebra
                   UW-Milwaukee
   Mathematics at UW Milwaukee                                     admission.
                                                      required for admission
       COBE: Productive Strategies in               • 3 levels of coursework to address these
         Developmental Education                      deficiencies.
            February 18, 2010                       • We wanted strategies that leveraged the
                                                      mathematics students had mastered.




    Math 90: Seventh and Eighth
                                                     Math 95: Ninth grade algebra.
        Grade Pre-algebra

• Fall Enrollment: 500 students.                    • Fall Enrollment: 1100 students.
• Spring Enrollment: 250 students.                  • Spring Enrollment: 700 students.
• Arithmetic operations involving whole                                       equations,
                                                    • Number systems; linear equations
  numbers, integers, positive and negative            inequalities; exponent notation, radicals;
  rational numbers; decimals, percents;               polynomials, operations, factoring, rational
  ratio, proportion; radicals; descriptive            expressions; coordinate geometry; linear
  statistics; units of measure; geometry;             systems; quadratic equations.
  introduction to algebra.




 Math 105: Part of Eleventh Grade
                                                                    Problems
             Algebra
                                                    • Students know fragments of the material
• Fall Enrollment: 2200 students.                     from each of these courses, but the
• Spring Enrollment: 1100 students.                   fragments differ from student to student.
                            polynomials,
• Algebraic techniques with polynomials rational       One           all
                                                    • “One size fits all” approach ignores what
  expressions, equations and inequalities,
  exponential and logarithmic functions, rational
                                                      students already bring to the course.
  exponents, conic sections, systems of linear      • Time is wasted on topics students have
  equations.                                          mastered leaving less time for what needs
                                                      to be mastered.




                                                                                            Page 31
    Solution: Computer Adaptive
                                                          Implementation
               Testing
• UW-System placement test is used to          • Classes meet M-F, 75 minutes AM, 50
  roughly place students into either Math 90     minutes PM = 625 minutes/week.
  or Math 95.
                                               • Classes of about 20 students.
• Adaptive testing software is used to
      p          g
  determine more precisely which elements        Individual d       ll       instruction.
                                               • I di id l and small group i t ti
  of Math 90, 95 and 105 a student has         • Grading basis is both written work and
  mastered.                                      repeatable computer generated adaptive
• Students work from what they know to           final exam.
  what they need to learn.




        Benefits to Students                              Benefits to Staff
• Most students complete the equivalent of     • Smaller class sizes with more contact time
  two courses in one semester. Some              with individual students.
  complete the entire suite of 90, 95, 105.    • Class size decreases as semester passes
                                    answer.
• Instant feedback on right/wrong answer         allowing more time with struggling
• Lower stress as exams are repeatable.          students.
• One purchase covers all the courses.         • No time spent checking routine problems.
• Feedback on written work.                    • More time to evaluate student written work
                                                 for correct strategies for problem solving.




     Benefits to the Institution                        Grade Distributions
• Increased student success (as measured       • Math 090: Average Grade 3.75/4 (125
  by grades) improves retention.                 students).
• Provides a way to more accurately gauge      • Math 095 with 090 in the same term:
          preparedness.
  student preparedness                                           3.04/4      students).
                                                 Average Grade 3 04/4 (125 students)
• Provides the information needed to place     • Math 095 with 105 in the same term:
  students into courses requiring                3.76/4 (273 students).
  quantitative skills before they have         • Math 105 with 095 in the same term:
  completed all pre-college math courses.        3.16/4 (273 students).




                                                                                      Page 32
    A new approach: Math 94
• Math 94 combines Math 90 and Math 95.
• Grade is based entirely on mastery of
  Math 95 material.
     hours of i di id l and small group
• 10 h        f individual d   ll
  instruction per week.
• 86 students to date, 41% earned grades of
  A- or higher, 72% earned grades B- or
  higher, 84% earned grades of C or higher.




                                              Page 33
Page 34
Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion
Program Showcase & Video-cast
February 18, 2010


1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Processes and Practices for Prior Learning Assessment
  Topic Overview and Introduction

   Definitions and Outcomes in Prior Learning Assessment: A National Perspective
  Judith Wertheim, Vice President Higher Education Service., Council for Adult &
  Experiential Learning
      Review models used to assess prior learning and how these models are applied across
  the nation. Examine 10 standards essential to ensuring quality of assessment. Learn what
  national data tells us about academic outcomes of students awarded credit for prior
  learning.


  Credit for Prior Learning Portfolios: Assessment Standards and Student Preparation
  Stephen Kleisath, Chair, Dept. of Business and Accounting, UW-Platteville
     Learn strategies for developing a successful credit for prior learning portfolio
  assessment program. Review the essential features that comprise a quality student
  portfolio assessment design. Discuss how to engage campus faculty and staff in program
  development and implementation.

   Superior Access to Prior Learning Assessment
  Peter Nordgren, Associate Dean of Distance Learning and Continuing Education, UW-
  Superior
      UW-Superior’s comprehensive prior learning assessment program offers students a
  variety of opportunities to apply and obtain credit for prior learning, including portfolio
  assessment. Learn how the campus maintains program vitality through campus faculty and
  staff engagement, student advising and training, and policy development.


  Questions, Ideas, and Discussion
     Participants are invited to pose questions regarding the RFP and/or their specific
     proposal ideas.




                                                                                          Page 35
                                                               PLA: A National Perspective



                                                                        Judy Wertheim
Prior Learning Assessment (PLA):                         Vice President for Higher Education Services
      A National Perspective
                     p                                  The Council for Adult and Experiential Learning
                University of Wisconsin System                               (CAEL)
             Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion
                       February 18, 2010                             jwertheim@cael.org

                                                                        www.cael.org


                                                                                                          2




                  What Is PLA?                                        Ensuring Quality


        Prior Learning Assessment is --                 Five Approaches to PLA Ensure Academic
                                                                        Quality:
  The evaluation for college credit of the
  knowledge and skills one gains from life              • Nationally standardized exams in
  experiences (or from non-college instructional          specified disciplines
  programs) including employment, travel,               • Evaluated non-college programs
  hobbies, civic activities and volunteer service.
                                                        • ‘Challenge’ exams for local courses
                                                        • Individualized assessments
                                                        • Evaluation of local training
                                                    3                                                     4




                                                                                                 Page 36
                             National Trends                                                     Ensuring Quality: 10 Standards

                              PLA Methods Accepted

                                                                         87%
                                                                                           1. Credit or its equivalent should be awarded only for
       CLEP Exams                                                          89%
                                                                          88%                 learning, and not for experience.
                                                                       84%
          AP Exams                                                         92%
                                                                          90%

        ACE Guides
                                                              70%
                                                                   78%
                                                                 75%
                                                                                           2. Assessment should be based on standards and
                                                  55%
                                                          66%                       2006
                                                                                                it i for the l  l f       t bl learning th t are
                                                                                              criteria f th level of acceptable l   i that
Experiential Learning                           50%
                                                                                    1996      both agreed upon and made public.
                                                    57%
   Challenge Exams                                             72%                  1991
                                                               72%
                                                48%
       DSST Exams
                                                  52%
                                                        62%
                                                                                           3. Assessment should be treated as an integral part of
       Local Training
                                          38%                                                 learning, not separate from it, and should be based
                                   28%                                                        on an understanding of learning processes.
   Excelsior Exams                        37%
                                         35%

                        0%   20%         40%       60%           80%         100%

                                                                                      5                                                             6




           Ensuring Quality: 10 Standards                                                        Ensuring Quality: 10 Standards


 4. The determination of credit awards and competence
    levels must be made by appropriate subject matter                                      7. Policies, procedures, and criteria applied to
    and academic or credentialing experts.                                                    assessment, including provision for appeal, should be
                                                                                              fully disclosed and prominently available for all parties
                                                                                              involved in the assessment process.
 5 C dit or other credentialing should b appropriate t
 5. Credit     th      d ti li      h ld be           i t to
    the context in which it is awarded and accepted.                                       8. Fees charged for assessment should be based on the
                           ********                                                           services performed in the process and not
 6. If awards are for credit, transcript entries should                                       determined by the amount of credit awarded.
    clearly describe what learning is being recognized
    and should be monitored to avoid giving credit twice                                   9. All personnel involved in the assessment of learning
    for the same learning.                                                                    should pursue and receive adequate training and
                                                                                              continued professional development for the functions
                                                                                              they perform.
                                                                                      7                                                             8




                                                                                                                                            Page 37
     Ensuring Quality: 10 Standards                             National Study of PLA


10. Assessment programs should be regularly          Funded by Lumina Foundation for
 monitored, reviewed, evaluated, and revised as      Education, CAEL completed a national
 needed to reflect changes in the needs being        study of PLA in 2009 (publication in
 served, the purposes being met, and the state
 of the assessment arts.
                                                     February 2010)
                                                     February,

                                                     Data from 48 institutions (46 in the U.S. and
                                                     2 in Canada)


                                                9                                                  10




                National Study                                       National Study


            Preliminary Findings:                                Preliminary Findings:
                  Graduation                                          Persistence
PLA students in the study had much higher            Among students who did not earn degrees within
degree-earning rates than non-PLA students over                                            study
                                                     the seven year period examined in the study, the
a seven-year time period.                            PLA students had accumulated more credits
                                                     towards their degree, compared to non-PLA
                                                     students.
(This was true regardless of institutional size,
level or control, and regardless of age, gender or   In addition, non-degree-earning PLA students re-
race/ethnicity. This was also true when comparing     enrolled more consistently than non-PLA students
students with similar academic abilities.)            without degrees.
                                               11                                                  12




                                                                                              Page 38
               National Study                             Lifelong Learning Is Essential



          Preliminary Findings:
             Time to Degree                       Learning and credentials – both of which
                                                  are supported by the assessment of prior
                                                  learning -- are key to success in the new
                                                         g          y
      t d t        i b h l ’ degrees
PLA students earning bachelor’s d                 economy:
save an average of between 2.5 and 10.1
months of time in earning their degree,
depending upon the number of PLA credits            States with more postsecondary
earned, compared to non-PLA students                   degree holders have more
earning degrees.                                       competitive and innovative
                                                               economies.
                                             13                                                 14




               Benefits of PLA




PLA contributes significantly to “success in
the new economy.” It benefits the
individual, the institution, the state, and our
country.



                                             15




                                                                                           Page 39
   Revitalizing Prior Learning                         Some history….
                  UW-
  Assessment at UW-Superior                           UW-
                                             • 1977 - UW-Superior adopts Prior Learning
                                               Assessment policies as part of creating
             Peter D. Nordgren                 the Center for Continuing Education/
              COBE Showcase                    Extension and Extended Degree Program
             February 18th, 2010




Some successful students who earned          Some successful students who earned
                             UW-
credit for prior learning at UW-Superior                                  UW-
                                             credit for prior learning at UW-Superior

                 Shippar,
             Don Shippar, B.S. 1988                        Larry Anderson, B.S. 1990

             Then: Labor Relations Manager                 Then: Welder

             Now: CEO & Chairman of                        Now: President, Fond du Lac
             Minnesota Power/ALLETE                        Tribal & Community College




                                                                                   Page 40
Some successful students who earned
                             UW-
credit for prior learning at UW-Superior
                                              PLA is an alternate way colleges and
                                              universities grant credit – different, but
              Arnold Schwarzenegger,
                                              equivalent to traditional instruction and
              B.S. 1979
                                              examination. In either system, students
              Then: B d b ild
              Th    Bodybuilder               earn credit by demonstrating knowledge
                                              and mastery of a subject.
              Now: Governor of California




                                             • PLA credit by portfolio is not well known
    UW-
 At UW-Superior, students may receive up       among incoming faculty, most of whom
 to 30 credits through prior learning          went through a traditional education path
                                      6-
 assessment by portfolio. Typically, 6-8
 students per year take advantage of this
 program,
 program earning 12 credits on average
                                  average.            q      y             program
                                             • Consequently, an effective p g
                                               requires continuing education of faculty in
                                               PLA principles and maintenance of PLA
                                               portfolio evaluation skills




                                                                                    Page 41
     Goals for Revitalizing PLA                         Implement CAEL Best Practices
• Implement CAEL Best Practices                         Through university governance processes:

• Build PLA knowledge and capacity within               • Changed fee process so students pay for credits
  academic departments                                    evaluated rather than credits awarded
  Improve student awareness of PLA as an
• I        t d t             f
  option                                                • Recommend multiple evaluators for portfolios

• Mainstream PLA program into university                • Accept portfolio credit awarded by other accredited
  academic program                                        institutions




       Build PLA Knowledge in                                  Build PLA Knowledge in
       Academic Departments                                    Academic Departments
Through direct work with departments:                   • Provided resource guides and CAEL published materials
                                                          to faculty and staff advisors across campus
• All academic departments updated department PLA
  policies                                              • PLA information session as part of campuswide
                                                          Faculty/Staff Enhancement Day program
• Provided training workshops for faculty, both in
                   UW-
  partnership with UW-Extension project and on campus   • Provided opportunity for academic administrators to
                                                          learn more about practices, attend CAEL conference




                                                                                                            Page 42
 Improve student awareness of                                   Mainstream PLA Program into
  PLA as an academic option                                     university academic program
• Developed an expanded website explaining PLA options      •    Advocated placement of program within the portfolio of
                                                                the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
• Produced and distributed brochures and flyers
                                                            • Advocated establishment of an 0.25 appointment for
• Carefully focused on informing students                     PLA coordinator




 Mainstream PLA Program into
                                                                Next Steps from CAEL Review
 university academic program
                                                            • Create a clearly identified place for potential adult
UW-Superior’s student population of adults age 25 and
UW-                                                           learners to get information and help about available
 older is 29% of enrollments. Of these, about half are        options and degree completion
 enrolled through the Distance Learning Center, the other
 half on campus. However, nearly all PLA portfolios         • Review organization of all p
                                                                        g                             g         p
                                                                                         prior learning credit options.
 come from Distance Learning Center students.                 Currently, CLEP/DANTES, ACE, and portfolio credit
                                                              programs are separately administered
We believe there is the potential to double the credits
 awarded by portfolio through effective engagement of       • Make clear relationship with Continuing Education &
 adult learners on campus.                                    Extension programs




                                                                                                                Page 43
              Additional Goals                                    What we learned (so far)
                                                                                         re-
                                                            • PLA needs to be an ongoing re-education program for
• Approval to record PLA by portfolio as resident credit
                                                              faculty and departments.

• Transcript PLA by portfolio in a more appropriate way –
                                                            • Effective professional development can create
  currently is recorded as transfer credit
                                                              passionate advocates among faculty

                                                            • Not every academic program will adopt PLA practices,
                                                              usually due to accreditation concerns.

                                                            • Involvement of key administrators as advocates is critical




                     Contacts
            Christina Kline, Project Coordinator
                    ckline@uwsuper.edu
                        715-394-
                        715-394-8055

                    Peter Nordgren
       Associate Dean for Distance Learning & CE
                pnordgre@uwsuper.edu
                    715-394-
                    715-394-8475




                                                                                                               Page 44
Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion
Program Showcase & Video-cast
February 18, 2010


2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Degree Programs for the Returning Adult Learner and Place Bound
Student
  Topic Overview and Introduction

  Bachelor of Applied Studies: UW-Oshkosh Center for New Learning
  Charles Hill, Director UWO Center for New Learning
      UW-Oshkosh’s Bachelor of Applied Studies program works in collaboration with two-
  year campuses within both the UW and Wisconsin Technical College Systems. Now in
  operation for three-years, learn how the program was established, its scope, and important
  factors campuses should consider when designing a BAS program.


  Bachelor of Applied Studies: UW-Green Bay Adult Degree Program
  Eric Craver, Director of Marketing & Recruitment, UW-Green Bay Office of Adult Degree
  Programs
      The Bachelor of Applied Studies Degree Program is designed to facilitate transfer and
  bachelor degree completion for those students with an applied associate degree from a
  Wisconsin Technical College or other regionally-accredited schools. Learn about the
  program structure. Examine student data and consider how the program design supports
  student success and completion.

  UW-Madison College of Engineering Transfer Blueprint
  Manuela Romero, Assistant Dean of Student Diversity and Academic Services, UW-Madison
  College of Engineering
      The UW-Madison COE and Madison Area Technical College Transfer Blueprint enhances
  transition and transfer of MATC students. The program serves students who are often
  underrepresented in our colleges and universities. Examine the program’s scope and
  features. Learn about its design and organization. Consider student data and experiences
  and important factors that have impacted the program’s success.

  Questions, Ideas, and Discussion
     Participants are invited to pose questions regarding the RFP and/or their specific
     proposal ideas.




                                                                                          Page 45
Bachelor of Applied Studies (BAS)
                                                       Purpose of the BAS Program

COBE Grant awarded to                                  To provide an alternative pathway to a
                                                       baccalaureate degree for people holding an AAS
UW Oshkosh and UW Green Bay                            degree from a Wisconsin technical college.


2006-2008




Purpose of Grant Funds                                 Developing the
 • Staff time to develop procedures for the transfer   Program at UW
   of technical college credits.
 • Launch a major promotional campaign with            Oshkosh
   brochures, mailings t t h i l college alumni,
   b h            ili   to technical ll     l i
   advertising, news releases and information
   sessions.
 • First year’s salary for
   coordinator/recruiter/advisor.
 • Instructional costs for first year’s classes.




                                                                                                 Page 46
  Fall, 2005                                          Spring, 2006
  Campus-wide ad hoc faculty                          College of Letters and Science
  committee:                                          Department Chairs:
                                                      Rejection of faculty committee proposal.
  • Cross-disciplinary liberal arts and sciences        • Lack of “sequencing” and prerequisites.
    courses.
                                                        • Need for a recognizable disciplinary core.
  • “Upside-down” degree.
                                                        • Department ownership of disciplinary
                                                          courses.




Fall, 2006
                                                      Entrance Requirements:
Back to campuswide adhoc faculty
                                                        • AAS Degree from Wisconsin technical college,
committee:                                                2.5 GPA
  • major: Leadership & Organizational Studies
                                                      Same requirements as all other UW Oshkosh
  • 39 upper-division credits: 4 sequenced “blocks”
                                                       Bachelor s
                                                       Bachelor’s degrees
     f
    of courses.
                                                        • (120 credits, 36 upper-division credits, 42
                                                          gen. ed. credits, etc.)




                                                                                                  Page 47
Block 1: organizational theories and strategic      Sample Courses
 planning;
Block 2: communication and leadership theories      • Creating Presentations in the Virtual Workplace
 and skills;                                        • Introduction to Organizational Administration
      3 p       g         g         projects
Block 3: planning and management of p j             • Collaborative Leadership Dynamics
 and programs;
                                                    • Conflict Resolution
Block 4: capstone course and individual research
 project.                                           • Project Planning & Implementation
                                                    • Applied Research Project




2006-2007                                           April, 2007
Back to College of Letters and Science Department   • UW System and Board of Regents Approval
 Chairs:
                                                    • Second (previous) major added:
            p
     • Acceptance
                                                      i
                                                    Fire & Emergency Response Management
Faculty Senate:
     • Blessing from College of Business Needed
After negotiation, blessing given:
      • Program approved.




                                                                                              Page 48
             1st                     Total #
         Semester                   Students
          Offered
                          L&OS              105
 L&OS   Fall, 2007
                          FERM                 71
 FERM   Fall, 2006




           # of                  # Discontinued
        Graduates                     Since
                                   Beginning
L&OS                 2    L&OS           (4.8%)
                                        5(    )
                          FERM          5 (7.0%)
FERM                 14




                                           Page 49
                   # “stopped out”                                  Average Age
                     Spring 2010                     L&OS                     37
                                                     FERM                     32
L&OS                              18 (18.4%)
                                                     BLS Programs             36
FERM                              16 (28.1%)




Current Situation
• Each BAS major self-supporting after first year.
• Steady growth.
• Strong support from technical colleges.
       g pp                          g
• Well-suited to a manufacturing economy.
• Potential revenue growth for comprehensives
  and UW Colleges.
• Alternative pathway to 4-year degree for adult
  learners.




                                                                           Page 50
                                                                                                                UW-
                                                                                         HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF UW-GREEN BAY’S
                                                                                                 ADULT DEGREE PROGRAM
  COBE GRANT OVERVIEW FOR
                                                                                         One of four UW “Extended Degree” pilots started in 1978.
 UW-
 UW-GREEN BAY & UW OSHKOSH                                                               Adult Degree combined with Outreach and Extension and the
                                                                                           Small Business Development Center in 2004 to form the
                                                                                           newly established Division of Outreach and Adult Access.
              UW-
THE FUTURE OF UW-GREEN BAY’S
                                                                                         Three degree options available – B.A., B.A.S., and B.B.A.
   ADULT DEGREE PROGRAM                                                                  B.A. and B.A.S. students to identify or create a Self-Directed
                                                                                           Area of Emphasis.
      COBE Program Showcase and
                                                                                         Courses / programs available fully online, weekends – one
              Video Cast                                                                   Saturday per month, and evenings – one night per week.
          Thursday, February 18, 2010                                                    Weekend courses and on-site academic advising available in
                                                                                          Green Bay, Appleton, and Rhinelander.




THE CHANGING NEEDS OF ADULT LEARNERS                                                     THE CHANGING NEEDS OF ADULT LEARNERS
       IN NORTHEAST WISCONSIN                                                                   IN NORTHEAST WISCONSIN


Wisconsin population has increased by 254,000 (2000-2008)                                Wisconsin unemployment rate has risen from 4.2% in Sept.
 with projection of additional 377,000 (2008-2020.)                                       2008 to 9% in Sept. 2009.
       (U.S. Census Bureau - http://www.census.gov/)                                            (D.W.D Wisconsin Economic Indicators - http://dwd.wisconsin.gov/oea/wi_econ_indicators.htm)




26% (21% in the “New North” Region) of Wisconsin residents                               Wisconsin lost 130,000 jobs lost as of May, 2009.
  aged 25 and older hold a bachelor’s degree or higher. 29%                                     (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, May 23, 2009 - http://www.jsonline.com/business/45879657.html)


  have some college or an associate’s degree completed.
       (U.S.C.B American Community Survey, 2006-2008 - http://www.census.gov/acs/www/)




                                                                                                                                                                                     Page 51
THE CHANGING NEEDS OF ADULT LEARNERS                           BACHELOR OF APPLIED STUDIES DEGREE FOR
       IN NORTHEAST WISCONSIN                                      TECHNICAL COLLEGE GRADUATES

                                                               Approved by the U.W. BOR in May 2007, the B.A.S. degree
                                                                 had an enrollment of 80 students in Fall, 2007 and now
                           g
  Adult learners are looking for                                 has 263 students enrolled.

   degree programs available in                                This degree guarantees any student with an earned applied
                                                                 associate degree from an accredited technical, community,
  online, weekend, evening, and                                  or junior college a minimum of 60 transferable credits.

          hybrid formats.                                      No restrictions on the degree earned, age of the degree, or
                                                                 courses taken.




BACHELOR OF APPLIED STUDIES DEGREE FOR                                          UW-
                                                                  THE FUTURE OF UW-GREEN BAY’S
    TECHNICAL COLLEGE GRADUATES                                 ADULT DEGREE PROGRAM - ENROLLMENT
Major is Interdisciplinary Studies
                                                               Enrollments in the Adult Degree Program have increased
Students choose from six Areas of Emphasis, including:
                                                                 dramatically from 154 students enrolled in Fall, 2004 to
  Emergency Management                                           550 enrolled for Fall, 2009 and over 600 students enrolled
                                                                                      ,
  Organizational Communication                                   today.
  Corporate Communication
                                                               Significant increase in the number of courses and sections
  Human Development                                              offered to students from fewer than 20 available with only
  Environmental Policy Analysis                                  one online course in Fall, 2004 to 60 available today – 45
  Self-Directed Emphasis                                         of which are offered fully online.
Several Emphases in development, including: Audio/Visual
  Design, First Nations Studies, Health Care Administration,
  and Municipal Government.




                                                                                                                   Page 52
                   UW-
     THE FUTURE OF UW-GREEN BAY’S                                                  UW-
                                                                     THE FUTURE OF UW-GREEN BAY’S
ADULT DEGREE PROGRAM – DEGREES/SERVICES                          ADULT DEGREE PROGRAM – NEW INITIATIVES
 Addition of the Bachelor of Applied Studies degree along with
   the Bachelor of Business Administration degree offered in     Now able to offer not only courses, but complete degree
   our adult-accessible formats.                                   programs fully online.
 Several other major options i d
 S     l th      j     ti           l     t
                             in development.                     Development of new partnerships with Fox Valley Technical
                                                                   College, Nicolet College, and Northcentral Technical
 Moved from no specific Area’s of Emphasis available in 2004
                                                                   College as well as several UW-Colleges campuses.
  to six different options today with others in development.
                                                                 Partnership with UW-Superior to promote our online courses
 Designated tech support by e-mail and phone with two full-
                                                                   and degree programs in Northern Wisconsin Communities:
   time staff to assist students and Adult Degree faculty.
                                                                    www.UWWhereYouNeedIt.com
 Support services for adult learners through the Library,
   University Writing Center, and Assessment Services.




 UW-
 UW-GREEN BAY’S ADULT DEGREE PROGRAM




                                                                                                                    Page 53
                                                                                   Outline
   The Madison College – University of
Wisconsin Madison, College of Engineering                       • What is the Madison College - CoE
     Engineering Transfer Blueprint                               Engineering Transfer Blueprint?
                                                                • What are the essential mechanisms?
                    COBE Showcase
                                                                • Where are we?
              Manuela Romero, Assistant Dean
 Bonnie Schmidt, Coordinator, Engineering Transfer Admissions   • Can it be duplicated?
                                                                • What have we learned?
February 18, 2010




                                                                      What is the Madison College -CoE ETB?

                                                                 The Engineering Transfer Blueprint
                                                                 (ETB) provides Madison College
                                                                 students with a clear pathway for
  WHAT IS THE MADISON                                            guaranteed admission to University of
  COLLEGE – COE ENGINEERING                                      Wisconsin-Madison College of
  TRANSFER BLUEPRINT?                                            Engineering (CoE).




                                                                                                       Page 54
                                                                      Requirements
        Eligibility & Qualifications              • Consult regularly with Madison College and CoE
                                                    academic advisors
• Students enroll at Madison College as first-    • Fulfill UW-Madison minimum transfer requirements
  year college students and sign a                • Fulfill CoE minimum transfer requirements
  participation form prior to the completion of   • Take additional Madison College courses as required by
  twenty-four (24) college credits                  specific engineering degree program (recommended)
                                                  • Achieve an overall Madison College GPA of at least a 3.0
• Student specify degree program at CoE
                                                    in all college-transfer courses
  they wish to enter
                                                  • Fulfill the ETB requirements within no more than five
                                                    academic years after matriculating at Madison College




                                                                      Mechanisms
                                                  • Begin with end in mind
                                                  • Committed individuals
                                                     – faculty, staff and students
                                                  • Goals and Defined Outcomes
                                                  • Funding is crucial – COBE Grant
  WHAT ARE THE ESSENTIAL                             – Course development; Faculty buy-out; Staff
  MECHANISMS?                                          support; Academic support; Meetings
                                                  • Assessment




                                                                                                  Page 55
                        Individuals                      CoE
                                         •   Deans

                                                                                                    Goals & Outcomes
       Madison College                        – Paul Peercy, Dean
 •   Center for Agrisc & Tech                 – Steve Cramer, Associate Dean
      – David Shonkwiler, Dean           •   Engineering General Resources
      – John Stranskly, Assoc. Dean           – Don Woolson, Assistant Dean
                                              – Bonnie Schmidt & Ann Morris
                                                                                       • Increase Access
 •   Center for Arts & Science
                                                 Coordinators, Engineering Transfer
      – Veronica Delcourt, Dean
      – Shawna Carter, Assoc. Dean
                                                 Admissions                            • Increase Diversity
                                              – Jia-Ling Lin, Academic Support
      – Todd Stebbins, Assoc. Dean
                                         •   Faculty & Instructors                       – Age
 •   Advising & Career Res. Ctr.              – Civil Eng: Marc Anderson
      – Claudia Griesbach, Advisor            – Electr & Comp Eng: Mark Allie, Mikko     – Ethnicity
 •   Faculty                                     Lipasti, Giri Venkatarmann
      – Chemistry, Kenneth W alz              – Eng Physics, John Murphy                 – Gender
      – Math, Al Lehnen & Kevin Mirus         – Mech Eng: Kim Manner, Robert
      – Electronic Technolgoy, Alberto
        Rodriguez
                                                 Rowlands, Jeff Roessler, Ryan
                                                 Kershner                              • Create a process that others could emulate
      – Mechanical Technology, Ron       •   Evaluation
        Olson                                 – WiscAMP, Manuela Romero &
                                                 Richard Donohue




                               COBE Proposal
                              ETB – Four Prongs
1. Enhanced advising and transfer coordination
2. Engineering course development at Madison
   College
3. Enhanced collaboration between CoE and
   Madison College faculty
                                                                                         WHERE ARE WE?
4. Enhanced academic support for students




                                                                                                                             Page 56
                                      First Prong:                                                 First Prong, cont:
                     Enhanced advising and transfer coordination                                  Expanded Advising
•   Development of Blueprint goals and requirements                 • In Person
    –   Madison College and CoE administrators, advisors, faculty     – Visits to Madison College by engineering advisors
    –   UW-Madison Admissions                                         – CoE Open House for Madison College students
•   Extensive collaboration to produce quality documentation          – Engineering project assistants
    –   Madison and CoE advisors                                         •   former Madison College student as a peer mentor, Keegan Karl
    –   Media and technical support                                      •   Industrial engineering graduate student, Holly Banaszak

•    Clarification of standard transfer admission                   • By Distance
                                                                      – “Live-Help” (Velaro) distance advising tool




                        Second Prong:                                                                Third Prong:
                                                                                               Enhanced collaboration between
         Engineering course development at Madison College
                                                                                               CoE and Madison College faculty

    • Introduction to Engineering Design
                                                                    • Faculty small-group meetings
    • Statistics for Engineers
                                                                    • Course equivalency reviews
    • Introduction to Engineering Graphics
                                                                    • Faculty retreats
    • Differential Equations
                                                                      – Discussion of students’ academic preparation
    • Introduction to Computer Engineering                              and institutional expectations
    • Circuit Analysis Methods                                        – Short- and long-range course development
                                                                      – Education & engineering trends




                                                                                                                                 Page 57
                          Fourth Prong:
                         Enhanced academic support                                         Student Demographics
                                                                               Other Madison College Transfers           EBT Students
• At Madison College
                                                                               • Transfers per year              • First year signed 14
  – Math Tutoring Center                                                         ranged 4 – 7                      students
    •              p       pp            ,               g
             Anticipated support for math, science and engineering
                                                                 g             • Age range 17 – 39
                                                                                 Age,                                       p               per
                                                                                                                    – Anticipated transfers p
                                                                                                                      year, 6 – 9
     C
• AT oE                                                                            –   4%, 17 – 19
                                                                                   –   53%, 20 – 25
                                                                                                                 • Age, range 20 – 35
  – Tutor by Request                                                                                                – 65%, 20 – 25
                                                                                   –   24%, 26 – 30
        • Free                                                                                                      – 30%, 26 – 30
                                                                                   –   14% 30 – 35
        • First two semesters after transfer                                                                        – 5%, 31-35
                                                                               • Gender, 11% female
        • One-to-one tutoring if a tutor is available                                                            • Gender, 15% female




        Departments Students                Intended COE Department of
        Transferred into from               Current Blueprint Candidates
          Madison College                MS&E
    NE

   MSE
                                           ME
    ME

    IE
                                          EMA
   GLE

    EM
                                          ECE
   EGR

    EE

  CMPE                                    CHE
                                                                                 CAN IT BE DUPLICATED?
   CHE

   CEE                                    CEE
   BME

         0      5   10   15     20              0    2      4      6       8




                                                                                                                                       Page 58
                       Yes, But….
• Continuous interaction is crucial at all levels
• Administrative logistics are important and time
  consuming in the start-up phase
• Designate point person on each campus
• Program success ultimately depends upon
  resources that support students’ pre- to post-
  transfer experience                                      WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
• Assessment must be integral
• Program will always be a work in progress




                   Lessons Learned                                      Next Steps
• Enhancing access and support is good for all          • Interview Blueprint Students
• Documenting the process, clarified the                • Focus groups with existing Madison College
  p
  process for all                                         transfer students
   – Pathway is there for all to follow                 • Match our student information
• While focusing on the group in the program,           • Open House for transfer students
  think about how it will affect others                 • Retreat
   – Rethinking the “first-year college student” rule   • Renew our COBE grant
• Sustainability




                                                                                              Page 59
       Contact Information
• Bonnie Schmidt, CoE Transfer
  Coordinator; schmidt@engr.wisc.edu
  Manuela R
• M                Assistant Dean;
        l Romero, A i t t D
  romero@engr.wisc.edu

  http://matcmadison.edu/engineering-
         transfer-blueprint-program




                                        Page 60

				
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