ANAT R100L CO

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					                                                  COURSE OUTLINE

                                                    OXNARD COLLEGE

I.   COURSE IDENTIFICATION AND JUSTIFICATION:
     (The Banner title may not exceed 30 characters in length. The descriptive [full] title may not exceed 68 characters in length.
     Space and punctuation characters count toward these limits.)

     A. PROPOSED COURSE ID:                ANAT R100L         BANNER TITLE: General Human Anatomy Lab
        DESCRIPTIVE TITLE:                 General Human Anatomy Laboratory
         (Please complete the next two lines only if modifying the identification and/or title(s) of an existing course.)

         PREVIOUS COURSE ID:               None                     BANNER TITLE: None
         DESCRIPTIVE TITLE:                None
     B. REASON(S) COURSE IS OFFERED:
         (Specify how the course fulfills degree, certificate, transfer, job or career training, community, or other needs.
         Distinguish the course’s purpose from that of similar courses. Clearly state the course’s goals to allow evaluation of
         objectives.)

         This course fulfills requirements of introductory human anatomy for students anticipating transfer to
         medical school, dental school or other health care university and certificate programs. This includes
         nursing, physician assistant, physical therapy, kinesiology, radiology, holistic medicines, and EMT training,
         as well as basic biology programs. Course material includes the gross anatomy, organization and histology
         of human organ systems.
     C. REASON(S) FOR CURRENT OUTLINE REVISION:
         (For a new course, state “New course.” For a revision to an existing course, summarize the changes.)

         Five-year course review, catalog description, course objectives, and methods of instruction.

II. CATALOG INFORMATION:
     (For revisions, please line through the deletions [strikeout type] and type new or updated text in italics or boldface. Use a
     normal typeface for new courses. In either case, please answer all items in this section.)

     A. UNITS:                       2
     B. MEETING HOURS:               LECTURE            0    / LAB        6     / OTHER           0    / HOURS PER WEEK
                                     (State the full-semester equivalent, even if the course is never offered that way.)

     C. PREREQUISITES, COREQUISITES, ADVISORIES, AND LIMITATIONS ON ENROLLMENT:
         (Please complete and attach a separate prerequisite appendix form to this outline for each requisite course, advisory
         course, or enrollment limitation listed. For any limitation on enrollment, please specify the authorizing statute or
         regulation.)

         1.   PREREQUISITES:                            BIOL R101 OR BIOL 120
         2.   COREQUISITES:                             ANAT R100
         3.   ADVISORIES:                               None
         4.   LIMITATIONS ON ENROLLMENT:                None
     D. CATALOG DESCRIPTION:
         (Use complete sentences in this description. Write a well-developed overview of the course topics covered. Also
         identify the target audience; for example, indicate whether the course satisfies general education or transfer
         requirements, is required for a major, degree or certificate, licensing or certification exams, etc. Not all of this
         information may apply to all courses. Catalog descriptions that provide the necessary level of detail typically occupy no
         more than six lines of text, and so are comparable in length to this instruction set.)

         This is a laboratory course to accompany ANAT R100. Laboratory experiments and demonstrations will be
         used to illustrate the principles and concepts of anatomy. Experiments include but are not limited to
         laboratory dissection of the cat and demonstration of the dissected human cadaver.
   E. SCHEDULE DESCRIPTION:
        (Provide a distillation of the catalog description for publication in the course schedule.)

        Gross anatomy and histology of human organ systems based on examination of prepared slides,
        laboratory dissection of the cat, and demonstration of the dissected human cadaver.
   F. FEES:                         $      None
                                    (Students must receive material goods of value at least equal to the fee charged.)

   G. FIELD TRIPS:                  WILL             / MAY          x    / WILL NOT               / BE REQUIRED.
                                    (Check “will be required” only if transportation & insurance funding is available.)

   H. REPEATABILITY:                MAY BE TAKEN: 1             x       / 2         / 3           / 4          / TIME(S).
                                    (Most degree-applicable courses with a lecture component may be taken only once.)

   I.   CREDIT BASIS:               LTR              / CR-NC                  / STUDENT OPT           x   / NON-CRD               /
   J. CREDIT BY EXAM:               PETITIONS: MAY BE GRANTED                         / WILL NOT BE GRANTED               x   /
   K. CO-LISTED AS:                 (See cover sheet for this information.)


III. COURSE OBJECTIVES:
   (State, in measurable terms, what students should be able to do after completing the course. Each item should begin with a
   word such as “define,” “explain,” “analyze,” “synthesize”, “solve,” “argue,” etc. A more extensive list of sample verbs is
   available online at http://www.oxnardcc.org/committees/curriculum/bloomtax.htm. Verbs selected from the more complex
   competencies of Bloom’s taxonomy are preferable to those from less complex competencies. Objectives should broadly
   relate to the catalog description, meet the stated needs of the course as presented in section I.B. of this outline, and not be
   too advanced or specific. Be concise but complete; typically, ten items are too many, whereas one item is not enough.)

   UPON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THIS COURSE, THE STUDENT SHOULD BE ABLE TO:
   A. Discuss both the gross and macro-anatomical structures and basic functions of the human system using
      accepted anatomical terms, planes, and points of reference.
   B. Distinguish the major cell and tissue types based on their morphology and functional characteristics.
   C. Predict, explain and analyze which cell or tissue type would be located in a given region based on known
      characteristics of cells and tissues.
   D. Understand histological processes undertaken in producing prepared slides.
   E. Know and recognize the parts of the human organ systems focusing most intently on the integument,
      skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, digestive, circulatory, respiratory and uro-genital systems.
   F. Use a light microscope competently and report accurately the observation made while using prepared
      slides and the light microscope.
   G. Use the tools and techniques required to complete a detailed dissection of the muscular and internal
      anatomy of the cat.
   H. Compare cat anatomy to the human examples.
IV. COURSE CONTENT:
   (Compile a complete list of topics taught in the course. Arrange the list by topic with sub-headings. This list must be in
   concordance with the topics presented in the catalog description, but should provide a greater level of detail. Some portion
   of the content should relate clearly and directly to each one of the course objectives, although there need not be a one-to-
   one correspondence between objectives and major topics. For a typical course, the level of detail should be such that the
   list is between half a page and two pages in length.)

   TOPICS TO BE COVERED INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:
   A. Levels of organization
      1. The human condition
      2. Microscopy
      3. Histology
   B. The animal cell, cell types and tissues
      1. Cellular organelles and functions
      2. Overview of cell types
      3. The four major tissue types
   C. Epithelial tissue
      1. Functional definitions of epithelial tissue
      2. Types of epithelial tissue
      3. Locations of the different types of epithelial tissue
      4. Gland types
   D. Connective tissue types
      1. Functional definitions of connective tissue
      2. Types of connective tissue
      3. Locations of the different types of connective tissue
   E. Integument
      1. Epidermis, dermis, hypodermis
      2. Functions of the integument
      3. Components of the integument (i.e. sensory organs, glands…)
   F. Bone and cartilage tissue
      1. Organization of bone
      2. Compact vs. spongy bone
      3. Functions of bone tissue
      4. Hyaline cartilage
      5. Bone growth
   G. Skeletal system
      1. Functions of the skeletal system
      2. Types of bones
      3. Skull, axial, appendicular skeleton
      4. Joints and articulations
   H. Nervous tissue
      1. Neurons
      2. Glial cells
      3. Organization of nerves
   I. Central and peripheral nervous system
      1. Organization of the brain
      2. Functional regions of the brain
      3. Organization of the spinal cord
      4. The meninges
      5. Sensory vs. motor nerves
      6. Cranial nerves
      7. Autonomic nervous system
      8. Endocrine system
J. Sensory organs
   1. Eye
   2. Olfactory
   3. Gustatory
   4. Ear
   5. Cutaneous receptors
K. Muscle types and organization
   1. Skeletal, smooth, cardiac muscle characteristics, general functions and locations
   2. Organization of skeletal muscle
   3. Muscle actions, antagonistic vs. synergistic groups
L. Skeletal muscles
M. Cat dissection techniques
N. Uro-genital system
   1. Parts of the urinary system
   2. Functional parts of the kidney
   3. Male and female reproductive systems
   4. Fertilization and early embryology
O. Circulatory system
   1. Heart
   2. Organization of vessels
   3. Components of blood tissue
   4. Functions of the circulatory system
P. Respiratory system
   1. Upper respiratory system
   2. Organization of the lungs
   3. Functions of the respiratory system
Q. Digestive system
   1. Organs of the digestive system
   2. Functions of the digestive organs
R. Comparison of cat model to human cadaver
V. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:
  (Stating “lecture” as a method does not provide sufficient detail; instead, please provide instances of the types of activities
  that may take place during lecture. An example of this would be: “In-class reading of dramatic texts by the instructor and
  students, followed by instructor-guided interpretation and analysis.” In addition to specifying each activity, indicate how it
  relates to one or more of the course objectives. Instructors have the academic freedom to choose how they will achieve
  course objectives. If different instructors use different methods, each option should be described fully, including, if used,
  distance learning methods. Please complete and attach a distance learning appendix form to this outline if part or all of any
  offered section is taught using distance learning methods; this applies, for example, to television or Internet courses.)

  METHODS MAY INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:
  A. Demonstration of techniques such as: use of the microscope or muscle separation during a cat dissection.
  B. Short lectures to explain procedures.
  C. Use of photographic slides, overhead projection illustrations and other media to show examples of
     material.
  D. One-on-one interaction with students to support, monitor, and evaluate progress in use of microscopes,
     models, bones, dissections, and other samples and tools.
  E. Use of instructor generated laboratory report assignments to focus student attention and help student
     create a study guide for efficient examination preparation.
  F. Use of instructor generated lists of terms, for each section of study, for which the student is responsible.
     (For example, a list of all the skeletal bones and landmarks on each bone that the student must be familiar
     with.)
  G. Pre-examination practice lab practical to familiarize student with the manner of questioning that should be
     prepared for.
  H. Oral quizzing and group discussion.
  I.   Detailed review of material after students have been allowed adequate time to learn in a self-directed
       manner.
VI. METHODS OF EVALUATION AND ASSIGNMENTS:
   A. METHODS OF EVALUATION FOR DEGREE-APPLICABLE COURSES:
      (Check any methods used to evaluate students in this course. At least one of these methods must be checked if
      part 2, item TITLE 5, on the cover sheet is answered “ASSOCIATE DEGREE CREDIT (D).”)

      WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS            (Examples: Short essays, term papers)                                           x       /
      PROBLEM-SOLVING ASSIGNMENTS    (Examples: Math-like problems, diagnosis & repair)                                      /
      PHYSICAL SKILLS DEMONSTRATIONS (Examples: Performance art, equipment operation)                                x       /
      FOR ANY COURSE, IF “WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS” ABOVE IS NOT CHECKED, EXPLAIN WHY.
      Not applicable
   B. TYPICAL GRADED ASSIGNMENTS (METHODS OF EVALUATION):
      (Describe typical assignments. Not all assignments need be listed. “Term paper” alone is insufficient; indicate how the
      selected assignments relate to the course objectives, and state the basis on which they will be graded or evaluated.
      Make the list long enough so that at least one assignment addresses each course objective; some assignments may
      simultaneously address more than one objective. The information presented here should make it clear that
      demonstrated knowledge of required material constitutes a significant portion of the course grade.)

      1. Evaluation includes student demonstration of proficiency in the use and care of the compound
         microscope. Competency is monitored through the instructor’s personal observation of a student’s
         hands-on ability to operate and identify the parts, functions of the parts of the microscope and of the
         student’s success in finding and focusing on studied structures. Histological studies are drawn and
         labeled by the student and reviewed by the instructor for accuracy.
      2. Recognition of the microscopic elements of organ structure, tissue and cell types and functions is
         evaluated through completion of study guides, which demand labeled drawings and response to short
         answer questions. Comprehension of this material is also required for success on the practical
         laboratory examinations. Practical laboratory examinations involve students in hands-on interaction
         with samples and specimens.
      3. Practical laboratory examinations are used to evaluate the student’s knowledge of the gross anatomy,
         organ systems and the relationships between cell types, tissue types, organs, and organ systems.
         Practical examinations require the student to answer short answer questions about tagged three-
         dimensional structures. A student’s ability to perform an accurate dissection is also evaluated at this
         time.
      4. Student participation is monitored through the instructor’s personal observation and interaction with
         students during lab sessions. Students are directed to work closely with each other. Cooperative,
         careful, conscientious and invested lab comportment is evaluated for.
      5. Oral quizzing is frequently utilized to monitor the student’s preparation and focus on task.
      6. Proficiency in performing is dependent on consistent attendance. Student attendance is recorded and
         incorporated with a point value into the final course grade.
   C. TYPICAL OUTSIDE OF CLASSROOM ASSIGNMENTS:
      (Provide evidence that the intensity of the course requires students to engage in independent study outside of class
      hours. Give specifics of typical assignments, including titles of readings and topics of writing assignments.
      Assignments must clearly relate to course objectives and content.)

      1. READING:
          Appropriate chapters from the course text are assigned as the outside reading responsibility of the
          student. This reading demands intensive study of anatomical illustrations, photomicrographs and
          labeled figures describing functional and organizational characteristics of the human systems. The
          ability to identify Latin roots and work patterns is an essential skill demanded of students learning the
          correct anatomical vocabulary. Pathologies and embryonic development of the human systems are
          also discussed. Current medical and forensic events and investigations as presented in the popular
          media, newspapers and scientific journals are also frequently assigned as course reading for group
          discussion in class.
      2. WRITING:
          Students are required to compete sets of study guides outlining the functional and organizational
          characteristics of the human systems. Study guides frequently direct students to compose written
          descriptions of complex aspects of the human system and to discuss relationships between cell types,
  tissues, and organ systems. Descriptions may include drawings, diagrams, and tables relating
  structural details and functionality.
3. OTHER:
  A CD-ROM titled “Essential Study Partner for Human Anatomy” accompanies the Van De Graaff text
  chosen for this course. Students are directed to utilize the CD-ROM as a supplemental study aid.
  Chapter examinations and quizzes are available on the CD-ROM and may be required as practice pre-
  examination assignments. A database of Internet links has been compiled which support course
  objectives. Students are asked to access and utilize a broad range of Internet available programs
  appropriate for their study.
VII. TEXTBOOKS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS:
   (Please provide author, title, publisher, and, if appropriate, publication date for all materials listed. Ensure that texts are
   current and written at college level.)

   A. TEXTBOOK(S); LATEST EDITION OF:
       1. Human Anatomy, Van De Graaff, Kent M., Publisher: McGraw Hill, New York 2002
       2. An Atlas to Human Anatomy, Strete, Dennis and Creek, Christopher H., Publisher: McGraw Hill, 2000
   B. OTHER INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS:
       1.    Models
       2.    Preserved cats
       3.    Human cadaver
       4.    Photo slides
       5.    Prepared microscope slides
       6.    Sheep heart
       7.    Sheep eyes
       8.    Sheep kidneys
       9.    Reference atlases
       10.   Pictorial charts


VIII. DISCIPLINE ASSIGNMENT:
    (Select from State Disciplines List; see http://www.oxnardcc.org/committees/curriculum/disciplines.htm.)

    Biological Sciences




                                                                                                         Version/Date: DOC/8 May 2002

				
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