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EVALUATION of WEBQUESTS

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EVALUATION of WEBQUESTS Powered By Docstoc
					  IT’S TIME TO DESIGN YOUR
          WEBQUEST




                  UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX
Master of Arts in Education/Curriculum and Instruction—Computer Education
      Marianna Kiva, Ecole 7 Oaks Middle School, Canada
       Domenic Kleine, Paulding Middle School, U.S.A
         Timothy Brye, University Of Phoenix, U.S.A




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                                   Introduction
       This WebQuest was developed by graduate students from University of
Phoenix as part of their Master Degree in Curriculum and Instruction with
Computers in the Classroom. The goal of this project is to encourage teachers to use
technology in the classroom and to build their own WebQuest using classroom
created materials. The focus of this project is to create a comprehensive guide that
would help teachers generate their own WebQuest and use this project as a resource
to teach others about the benefits of a WebQuest-based model. We hope that this
project will become a springboard for the creation of many interesting units by
teachers interested in this cutting-edge teaching method.

                                      What is it?
   WebQuest is a multi-disciplinary, multi-media approach to learning. The purpose
of this approach is to broaden students’ horizons in acquisition of knowledge and
develop communication and critical thinking skills. This type of learning fosters
the independence of a learner within a group setting. As educators, we see the
benefits of this kind of a unit as exponential.
                                    Who is this for?

These workshops are designed for teachers interested in using technology in the
classroom as part of their daily teaching methods. They are also for teachers that
share their accomplishments with other educators to benefit student’s learning
outcomes. Teachers that are prepared to contribute, share, and learn from one
another are welcome to participate in these workshops.
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                      Index
1    Introduction
2    Index
3    Two Seminar WebQuests
4    Tutorial WebQuest with link
5    Learning Team Project Development WebQuest Log In
10   Benefits of WebQuest Learning
12   International Standards
13   Teacher Resources
16   Assessments and Evaluations
21   Fine Points of Web-Page Development
31   WebQuest Template
35   Teachers Guides
40   Rubric for WebQuest Evaluations
45   Conclusion
48   References
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                       Two Seminar WebQuests
       Tutorial WebQuest:
                This site will provide instructions, examples, and tasks for the first section of
                our seminar. We hope this overview will help open your eyes to the
                capabilities of this powerful teaching tool. We will spend a good amount of
                time initially on this site. (Once open, we invite you to hold “ALT” down
                then tap “TAB” on your computer to toggle between the PowerPoint and the
                WebQuest or any other applications you have open.)
       Learning Team Project Development WebQuest:
                Once we are familiar with the Tutorial WebQuest, we will come to this
                Learning Team site where we will work in the second part of our seminar.
                You must log in as a member of WebQuest to access the editing
                (development) portion of this site. (Easy instructions for access are on the
                subsequent pages of this PowerPoint presentation.) In this part of the project,
                participants develop and publish their own team WebQuest based on
                information presented in the Tutorial WebQuest.
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                                 Tutorial WebQuest
                As we travel through this seminar, ask questions of your team-mates,
                other teams, as well as your seminar facilitators.
                The idea is to leave today with an increased understanding of how to
                develop a WebQuest; not to have a perfect product!
                The purpose of these workshops is to give every participant time to
                learn, share, and practice then to come back with some part of the
                project completed.
                Enjoy yourself and learn from one another as you make the very best of
                team learning.

                Please click on the following link to take you to our
                Seminar Tutorial WebQuest.
                http://questgarden.com/45/84/0/070123005743/
                We will spend a good deal of time on this site!


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                Student Team WebQuest Log-In


                                                                       Log In




       This is a screenshot of the WebQuest Design Home Page, where student teams will grow
       your WebQuest! Click http://questgarden.com/ to go to the home page to log in. Both
       the user ID and password are studentteame (“student team e” with no spaces!).

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            Student Team WebQuest Log-In Cont.



                            Pencil




                After you log in, you will be taken to this page. Please click on the small pencil
                next to the title of our project “WebQuest Seminar Team E” to enter the project
                editing site. (Once again, Both the user ID and password are studentteame
                (“student team e” with no spaces!). This will take you to the introduction of the
                Tutorial WebQuest.                                                                   7
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                Student Team WebQuest: Editing




       This is the first WebQuest Design page which provides valuable information.
       Look at the column of headings on the left side of the page.
       Click on “Title/Authors” and you will be taken to the appropriate page that has…

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                Student Team WebQuest: Editing cont.




 …the title of your project, “WebQuest Seminar Team E”. Follow the instructions and
 feel free to change the name of your project because it is now yours!
 Continue to look around the site and add information by following the detailed
 instructions provided by WebQuest. You may Copy/Paste from the Tutorial WebQuest,
 a Word document or anywhere. Just be sure you have permission from authors…
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                                              Preview!!



        Preview




                As you progress with designing your WebQuest, you will want to see what the
                real product will look like. At the bottom of the blue selection area on the left
                of the page under “Polish and Publish” is Preview. Click once and you will see
                what your creation will look like! When you are ready to make changes, just close
                this window and you will be back in your editing area. Once again, while editing,
                please remember to “submit” before changing to another editing page.                10
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              The benefits of this style of learning include the following:
               Learning is meaningful and purposeful because all aspects of the curriculum can be tied
                together
               It develops skills: technological, oral, written, and verbal. This prepares students to take
                their rightful place in the global market
               It fosters both interdependence as well as preserving the uniqueness of each learner
               It gives students control over their learning
               It teaches organizational skills and time management in order to meet deadlines
               It teaches students to recognize the strengths of individuals and respect people for what
                they have to offer
               Self-evaluation, peer evaluation and group evaluation using a language of respect
               Promotes critical thinking and problem solving
               The way that the unit is structured permits a natural way to adapt and modify materials to
                meet the needs of all learners
               Assessment and evaluation is done using various strategies
               Promotes inclusion
               Allows for conferencing between teachers and students on a regular basis
               Reduces the ration of teacher/student support
               Teaches thought processes (high order thinking)
               Teaches strategies that students can use in the future
               It brings the outside world in so that individuals can see themselves as members of a
                global community and how people can assist others
               This design of a unit can be adapted to any topic

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          This WebQuest is designed as an instructional tool that will:


               1) Provide a description of the WebQuest concept
               2) Provide examples of quality existing WebQuests
               3) Provide team-based evaluation of various WebQuest designs
                (pros and cons)
               4) Provide team-based opportunity to brainstorm possible new
                WebQuest-based projects
               5) Provide team-based opportunity to design a basic WebQuest
                from provided material options.
               This endeavor will hopefully provide insight into ways of
                educating students in a technology-oriented, fun-to-use package.



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                     Links to National Curriculum Standards


               United States:
               http://www.education-world.com/standards/national/index.shtml
               Canada :
               http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/
               United Kingdom:
               http://sg.dir.yahoo.com/Regional/Countries/United_Kingdom/Education/
                Teaching/Curriculum/
               Australia
               http://www.curriculum.wa.edu.au/
               New Zealand
               http://www.minedu.govt.nz/index.cfm?layout=index&indexid=1005&index
                parentid=1004
               Singapore
               http://www.sonlight.com/singapore.html


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                              Teacher Resources
        The following resources are placed here to assist you the teacher, in the construction of a WebQuest unit.
                                              They include the following:
                                                      Training pages
                                                      Curriculum sites
                                            Instruments for rubric development
                                               Articles related to assessment
                            Articles related to the benefits using technology in the classroom
                                                Testing and Assessment
                                                     Amanda Kendle
                                  http://www.suite101.com/articles.cfm/testing_assessment
                                  Integrating Technology in the Elementary Classroom
                                                    Tammy Payton
                                  http://www.siec.k12.in.us/~west/article/integrate.htm
                               Excellent WebQuest training page from the WebQuest site.
                                          http://webquest.sdsu.edu/materials.htm
                                                    Really Fine Rubrics
                                         http://www.really-fine.com/Rubrics.html
                                                  Rubric Creation Tools
                                                         Rubistar
                                               http://rubistar.4teachers.org/
                                                    UEN Rubric Tool
                                                  http://www.uen.org/rubric/
                                                    Teach-nology.com
                                    http://www.teach-nology.com/web_tools/rubrics/
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                                         WebQuest Collections
       http://www.west.asu.edu/achristie/wqmatrix.html




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                               Samples of WebQuests available on line
                         http://www.west.asu.edu/achristie/wqmatrix.html
                             Dr. Alice Christie's Matrix of 400 WebQuests
                   Written by her Students. These are areas that are available on her site:
                Language Arts Social Studies Science Math Foreign Language The Arts PE
                         Cross Curricular Vocational Professional Development
                           More than 20 NEW WebQuests added June 2006




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                             ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION

                  Valid assessment must be closely matched to the curriculum. Assessment measures
                      not only what has been taught, but also how it has been taught. In order for
                assessment to be valid it has to be done frequently and timely. Assessment needs to be
                   flexible to meet the changing requirements of a modern curriculum and reflect its
                  objectives, methods, and approaches. Teachers need to differentiate instruction to
                             meet the varied learning needs and styles of individual students.


                    Within this model, the assessment of student’s achievement would be:
                                                   Curriculum based
                                           Locally designed and implemented
                      An opportunity for teachers to design assessment measures, to work with
                                 colleagues in marking and considering student work
                   Part of a process of assessment and reporting to parents that would constitute a
                                      Division Assessment Plan in each division.




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                          EVALUATION
                       of WEBQUESTS
                      Determine the Fine Points of the Project
                           Develop an Assessment Rubric
                    Evaluate the WebQuest Before Students use it

                  Provide students with a clear understanding of the
                  grading criteria which will be used to evaluate their
                                         efforts.
                Provide links to online rubrics which will show students
                           what grading criteria will be used.

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                       WebQuest Evaluation Form
                                     Proficient                Competent                        Basic
       Frames the essential    The essential question     The question spans the       The question can be
       question                scaffolds learning,        lower levels of Bloom’s      answered directly; the
                               spanning Bloom’s           Taxonomy—knowledge,          focus of the question is
                               Taxonomy; the learner is   comprehension and            knowledge and
                               encouraged to wonder;      application; the student     comprehension; the
                               the learner is             is able to quickly reach a   question has one
                               encouraged to invent       conclusion in response       obvious answer (i.e., Is
                               his/her own solution;      to the question; does not    slavery good or bad).
                               the essential question     attempt to have students
                               builds on prior            make judgment or
                               knowledge.                 evaluation.
       Connects WebQuest to    WebQuest is                WebQuest is not              WebQuest lists multiple
       Academic Standards at   interdisciplinary with     interdisciplinary; no        items from standards
       developmentally         clearly targeted           effort is made to            that are peripherally
       appropriate             standards; standards are   connect to other             connected to the topic;
       grade level             directly correlated        disciplines; standards       standards listed are not
                               To the task                are related to the           appropriate to the
                                                          WebQuest.                    WebQuest.




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                  WebQuest Evaluation Form Cont.
                                      Proficient                   Competent                        Basic


 Engaging Scenario &          The scenario and task is     The scenario is                The scenario is one-
 Tasks                        engaging for students; the   interesting; the tasks are     dimensional; the task
                              task provides sufficient     not clearly defined;           requires a student to
                              background information       inadequate background          research at the knowledge
                              to excite the interest of    information is supplied for    or comprehension level;
                              students; the procedures     each role; directions are      directions are vague.
                              are clearly outlined.        clear.



 Relevant Internet sources    All information listed is    Information listed             Links to sites and
 at appropriate grade level   relevant information;        includes relevant and          materials are not directly
 for students                 sources are differentiated   irrelevant materials; uses a   connected to the
                              for each role; puts          limited number of              assignment; uses one
                              meaning of the problem       sources; sites do not          source; interprets
                              in personal, social or       encourage reflection; sites    meaning from one source;
                              community perspectives;      may be developmentally         does not provide
                              sources are at an            inappropriate.                 information for students
                              appropriate reading level                                   to analyze or interpret.
                              for students.


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                              WebQuest Evaluation Form
                                         Proficient                   Competent                      Basic

      Roles are interesting    The WebQuest introduces         The characters are          There are no clearly
      and create               characters who would            similar in belief or        defined characters;
      dissonance               interact with the               thought; there is           characters are
                               information in the "real        insufficient background     stereotypical or one-
                               world;" there are several       information; their two or   dimensional;
                               characters; the characters      fewer roles; the            background information
                               are unique; characters have     character is clearly        is the same for all
                               different points of view on     "invented" and would        characters; there is one
                               the subject.                    not be involved in the      role in the WebQuest.
                                                               scenario in the real
                                                               world.


      Produces Product         The description of the          The product does not        Product is not clearly
      Connected to             product is clearly and          encourage students to       connected to the
      Assignment               coherently presented,           reflect and evaluate        question.
                               product is clearly related to   contrasting points of
                               task; product is unique and     view; product is similar
                               would clearly stretch the       to other products that
                               group's thinking                have been produced.
      Creativity               Student would be able to        Student would be able to    Student copies and
                               generate multiple               demonstrate one clear       pastes from the Internet
                               approaches of looking at        approach to                 without discrimination;
                               the problem; Student would      understanding the           product demonstrates
                               be challenge to                 problem; does not ask       little connection to the
                               demonstrate different           students to draw            question; product does
                               approaches                      conclusion.                 not show reflection.     21
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                                       Fine Points
                                  Fine Point #1: Line Length

                Research has shown that reading from the screen is more difficult than
                reading from paper. Because this is so, you need to take extra steps to
                make the best of the situation. One mistake web developers often make
                is to let the length of lines of text fill the screen without constraints,
                something that doesn't happen on paper.

                Readability is best when each line contains 8 to 15 words. There are
                several ways to achieve this.

                Design your pages within frames to create a left margin and thus
                shorten the length of the remaining screen, or use a large type size
                (appropriate for primary grades only), or put all your pages within
                tables.

                The third possibility is the one most generally applicable. The text on
                this page is contained within a table 550 pixels wide, with an empty
                column 50 pixels wide. The line length, then, is constrained to 500
                pixels
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Back to Index                 Fine Point #2: Paragraph Length

         As mentioned in Fine Point #1, reading from the screen is more difficult than reading
         on paper. Another strategy you can use to make reading your web document easier is to shorten
         your paragraphs. This will help the readers' eyes from getting lost in your text. These breaks
         help the eye track.

         A few short and easy tips can make your pages a little more user friendly.
         Limit your paragraphs to 1-3 sentences. This style is is commonly used by journalists in
         newspapers around the world.

         Be as brief as possible. Say what you mean, mean what you say. This will limit the length of the
         your paragraphs and document.

                              Fine Point #3: Use Sans-Serif Fonts
           Another way to make your pages more readable is to use a sans-serif font. The serif fonts
         like Times, Palatino, and New York are good fonts for printing, but on the screen the serifs
         make them more difficult to read, especially in a smaller font size or on a smaller screen.

         Fonts that work well are Verdana, Arial, and Helvetica. You may also review your font listing
         for other more readable fonts. Not all computers have all the same fonts so you may want to
         indicate several two or three fonts so you can make sure others see your pages as you designed
         them.

         See for yourself. The first paragraph below is Times, the second Verdana. They are both the
         same font size. Which would you rather read all day?
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                         Fine Point #4: Using Fonts Consistently

       If you decide to change the font of your document you must stick with it. Now this
       may sound like a no brainer, but in fact, Home Page sometimes will slip right out
       of your changed font and back into Time or whatever the default font is.

       Some things that could cause the font to change back include
               1. hitting return,
               2. changing from a number/bulleted list back to normal text, or
               3. clicking below the paragraph you are working on.

       The fix is quite simple.
                 1. Examine your text closely.
                 2. Change the font again if it slips out of your designated font.
                 3. When finished with your document, Select all and change everything
                    on the page at once.



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                               Fine Point #5: Checking the Reading Level

           You have to consider who is going to be reading your online documents as you
           write and edit them. The teacher page can be as complex as you need it to be, but
           the student pages need to reflect the reading levels of the target grade level.
           Kathy Schrock's Guide for Educators has a look at readability for different grade
           levels complete with a graph.
                   You don't want your students to get stuck on the directions, here are some tips to
                   ensure understanding.
                      1. Be direct and simple.
                      2. Use vocabulary appropriate to the reading level.
                      3. If necessary use an online dictionary to assist your student.

                                           Fine Point #6: Underlining
           There is an easy rule when using underlining in web pages. Don't. Links are automatically
           underlines and when people start underlining regular text, users get confused. Less
           experienced users think the link is broken. How do you get around underlining? Use italics
           or bold. Book titles should be italized.

                  Example:
                  1.Link or book title? Catcher in the Rye or Catcher in the Rye or Catcher in the Rye -
                  None of them are links, but the 1st and 3rd ones might be confused as links.
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                                Fine Point #7: Meaningful Titles
     Nothing says "I was in a hurry!" louder than when the title bar has no title, or one that
     say "Put the Name of Your WebQuest Here".
     The WebQuest template Title needs to be changed and it is up to you! Use a name that
     suits your specific topic. Generic titles like "WebQuest" or "Student Page" should be
     avoided. Specific titles add more character and individuality to your page.
     When you get to the page, it is very apparent whether or not you took the time to
     change the title.
                                Fine Point #8 Using Transparency
        When using GIFs you can make a single color value become transparent. Since
        images can only be rectangular in size, transparency is a way to get around this
        limitation. This only works with GIFs with backgrounds that are a single color value
        (if you notice little color specs in the background it will not work).




        On a white or patterned background, this image would look awkward. With a
        transparent background, the blue disappears and it appears the image is in the shape
        of the light bulb.
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Back to Index              Fine Point #9: Pad the Image Space
            When you place an image into a document and align it left or right, any text
            you have will simply hug itself around the image. This fine point nudges the
            text away from the graphic, giving it more space and reducing the clutter on
            the web page.

            Now this can be easily accomplished by changing what is called the VSPACE
            and HSPACE of an image. Sound familiar? Probably not, Home Page has not
            yet incorporated this option. Despite that, it is easily done.


                           Fine Point #10: Lighten a Background
            Have you ever found the perfect background for the subject of your page, but
            you just couldn't read the text very well? Instead of finding another
            background, using a color, or risking your students not being able to read the
            text, you can easily lighten the background so you can use it.

            Using a shareware program called Graphic Converter from Lemke Software,
            you can easily and quickly lighten a background.

            This program may be downloaded directly from Downloads.com. While you
            can use the trial version without any limitations, the $35.00 dollar shareware fee
            covers all future
            updates.

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                         Fine Point #11: Give Text Some Room
         When using tables you need to keep your text from being right on the borders or
         edges, much like Fine Point #9 did with images. This is especially important when
         using a background or borders.

         This is another easy task to complete. All you need to do is adjust the padding of
         the table and
         you are set.


                Fine Point #12: Put text and graphics next to each other in
                                       Home Page
         Another way to conserve space on your page is to put your graphics next to your
         text in a table, this technique can be particularly helpful with the use of
         photographs and other medium sized images.

         In stead of describing the image or continuing with your text below the image, you
         can simply run the text on either side. This compacts the page in stylish and
         uncluttered fashion.

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                                    Fine Point #12:
                Put text and graphics next to each other in Home Page
    If you have been working down the list of Fine Points, you will have noticed that we are
     trying to make your pages more readable and efficient. Another way to conserve space
                on your page is to put your graphics next to your text in a table,
        This technique can be particularly helpful with the use of photographs and other
      medium sized images. In stead of describing the image or continuing with your text
    below the image, you can simply run the text on either side. This compacts the page in
                                stylish and uncluttered fashion.




                         This image of Crater Lake in Oregon is sitting directly above the text. Notice
                         all of the wasted space on either side of the image?



                                      This method allows you to utilize that space that would otherwise be wasted.
                                      It would be a good idea to adjust the padding to keep the text off the edge
                                      of the table.

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                                Fine Point #13:
                   Removing Borders on Images in Home Page

     When using an image as a link or button, you need to remove the border. Otherwise,
     you will have a blue box around the linked graphic. While this may not seem like
     much, it is one of the many characteristics that separates a good page from a great
     page.

      Unless you change it, the default border for a linked image will be the color of your
      links. After you visit the link, it will turn the color of your visited links. This situation is
      easily remedied by changing the border to zero.




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                Fine Point #14: Making Your Page Accessible

         It's easy to forget that not everyone is able to perceive your web pages the way you
         do. If you're designing your pages with the hope that people you'll never meet will
         be using them (and you should), you'll need to consider the fine points of making
         them accessible.

         You can check your pages for accessibility by calling up the new Bobby page,
         though you might find that to be unduly daunting.

         The IBM Guidelines for Web Accessibility page lists 11 recommendations for web
         page designers. For most WebQuest pages, you'll probably only need to think
         about rules #1, #2 and #10.

         Rule #10 is pretty self-evident. It recommends that you make your hyperlinks self-
         descriptive (like the IBM one in the paragraph above) rather than links that simply
         say click here.

         Rules #1 and #2 are about providing a text alternative to every graphical link. By
         doing so, the visually impaired will be able to have the computer read the page to
         them. When the computer comes to a graphic, it reads the text caption which (if
         written correctly) will communicate at least some of the information provided by
         the graphic.

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                                           WebQuest Template
                                              Put the Title of the WebQuest Here
                                    Developed by (put your name, an email link, and your URL)
                           Overview|Introduction|Quest(ions)|Process|Resources|Evaluation|Conclusion
           1. Overview
             Describe what the lesson is about. Specify content area (mathematics, language arts, etc) and grade
                 level (middle, elementary, early childhood, etc.). Specify strands and objectives from the South
                 Carolina Curriculum Standards that this WebQuest Supports. List by subject area (WebQuests
                should be interdisciplinary projects). List any special resources that a teacher would need in the
                  classroom or in the media center for the students to complete the activity. For example, print
                          resources in the media center, art reproductions, or video and audio materials.
                         Overview|Introduction|Quest(ions)|Process|Resources|Evaluation|Conclusion


           2. Introduction
                 Write an introduction to your WebQuest that will give students some background about your
                                                  topic. Try to interest them.

                If your webquest is about a place, include some general information, a picture, and/or audio files.
                 If it is about a person, describe something about the person that gives general background to the
                                                                 students.
                        If you are creating a scenario with opposing points of view, describe the views briefly.
                               Remember, you want to interest the students in pursuing this WebQuest.
                              Overview|Introduction|Quest(ions)|Process|Resources|Evaluation|Conclusion



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                                               WebQuest Template
       3. Quest(ions) and the Task
       What are the guiding questions that students need to keep in mind in order to accomplish
           their task? What is the task that the student(s) must undertake? Why is the job necessary?
           What are the circumstances surrounding the task or the question that may cause conflict?
           What led up to this circumstance? Is there more than one way of looking at this. Can you
           see conflicting roles for people--such as environmentalist and industrialist.
       You should briefly outline for student(s) what they are expected to learn. For example:
           Despite the known risks of space flight should the elderly be encouraged to make space
           shuttle flights for the sake of gaining potentially beneficial medical knowledge?
       Assign various roles to students. A good WebQuest generates some tension or conflict that
           must be resolved so you should try to develop two to four roles. Remember that you want
           this to be a collaborative activity for students.
          Person 1
          Person 2
          Person 3
          Person 4
          Overview|Introduction|Quest(ions)|Process|Resources|Evaluation|Conclusion

       4 Process
       Explain that students who have similar roles may work together to compare ideas based on the factual
           information they have collected, or that students may continue to pursue their role individually until
           the conflict generated by the original guiding question (s) forces them to resolve the issue with the
           entire group.



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                                                          WebQuest Template
       4a Process

               Once students have understood their roles and investigated the background material necessary to make informed
                decisions, then it is time for them to come together as a group and to discuss the issue(s). Group work should result in
                a consensus document or presentation.
               Give students directions on this group work.
               Be sure that they understand that their role may place them in conflict with another person's role.
                How should they resolve this conflict?
                What overall idea should they keep in mind that will allow them to compromise?
                Is there a greater good?

               Provide options for how students may present their information to the group. Here are some ideas:
               Flowcharts Multimedia Presentations Web Page Summary Tables Concept Maps Venn Diagrams
               Overview|Introduction|Quest(ions)|Process|Resources|Evaluation|Conclusion




       5 Resources


               Identify for the students which other resources they may use to complete their task(s). Other resources may include:
                PowerPoint software to develop an informative slideshow Any URL links provided in this section Classroom
                Encyclopedias Color Printer Periodicals from the Media Center
               Overview|Introduction|Quest(ions)|Process|Resources|Evaluation|Conclusion




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                                                          WebQuest Template
       6. Evaluation

               Provide students with a clear understanding of the grading criteria which will be used to evaluate their efforts.
               Provide links to online rubrics which will allow students to know upfront what grading criteria will be used. Following
                are some examples that could be used for a variety of projects.
               Include a phrase such as, "Please click here to review the criteria on which your individual grade will be based."
               OR
               "You will also receive a collaborative grade. Please click here to review the criteria which will determine you
                collaborative grade."
               Explain how the grades will be counted or averaged.
               Overview|Introduction|Quest(ions)|Process|Resources|Evaluation|Conclusion




       7. Conclusion

       Explain to students how the conclusion will offer the opportunity to engage in further analysis. For example:
       Ask students how their roles could have been interpreted in a different light? Ask students if they had interpreted their roles
           differently, how might the outcome have changed? Ask students if they were flexible enough to compromise with the
           group and attain resolution, or did they yield to group pressures? Ask students what new questions did the issue(s)
           generate? Why would these new questions be important in answering the original question(s)?
          Overview|Introduction|Quest(ions)|Process|Resources|Evaluation|Conclusion
          Return to WebQuests
          Schools | Administration | Information |Academic Program | History | K-12 Standards | Web Resources| |
           Employment | Home |




                                                                                                                                      35
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                     Teacher Guide #1: Evaluating Web Pages
                Just about anyone can create a web page on just about any topic. It is very
                important that students and teachers recognize that not everything out there
                is a viable resource. There are several things to look for when trying to
                determine if a web page is a viable source.
                The following are the items you and your students should consider before
                using a web page as a resource (information here is adapted from the
                Evaluating Internet Information page by Elizabeth E. Kirk).

                1. Author -
                  Who is the person writing on this topic?
                  Is he/she an expert in the field? A professor or teacher? Or just someone
                    with a little interest in the area?
                  Is there biographical information available?
                  Is the information in a reputable online publication?
                  Is there a bibliography? All information from academic or official sources
                    will have a bibliography.
                  Unless the web page is part of a larger site (e.g. an encyclopedia or
                    journal), there must be an author sited.

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                       Teacher Guide #1: Continues
       2. Publisher -
             Has an individual just put up his/her own site? Or is it part of a larger site?
             Does someone evaluate the information prior to being published on the web?
             Does this Web page actually reside in an individual's personal Internet account
               rather than being part of an official Web site? This type of information resource
               should be approached with the greatest caution.
             If you come across a geocities or aol site, you need to remember that anyone can
               (and does) create web pages on these sites.
             If in doubt of the source, try going to the base site (i.e.
               http://www.geocities.com). If this site ends up being just a web page provider,
               think twice about the validity of the information.
           3. Bias -
             Who is providing the information?
             Do they have any self interest in the way they present the information? Watch out
               for information on smoking from a tobacco company!
           4. Age of Information -
             When was the information published?
             There should be a date somewhere on the page, especially if the page contains
               statistics or other time sensitive material.
             The age of some materials is irrelevant (like slave narratives).


                                                                                              37
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            Teacher Guide #2: Using Photographs
                The following is a short list of strategies for using photographs in the
                classroom. This list is by no means complete, so don't be limited by these
                ideas. Use the Looking at Photographs Guide to help your students evaluate
                the content of the images.
                1. QuickWrite Topics
                    Describe everything you see in the photograph.
                    What is/are the person/people thinking in the photograph?
                    What questions does the photo answer? pose?
                    List anything that comes to mind when looking at the photo?
                    Write about what led up to this moment or what happened directly after it.
                2. Creative Activities
                    Write a short story about what is happening in the photo.
                    Write a poem.
                    Write a play and act it out with your classmates.
                    Have Socratic Seminar.



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                Teacher Guide #3: Evaluating Web Pages
     Did you know that anyone can write and publish a web page? Because of this, it is
     important that you and your teacher use web sites that are created by people who are
     are qualified to be writing on the subject matter. For example, would you rather use
     information on the human body written by a doctor, or someone who has just been to
     the doctor?
     The following are a list of questions you need to consider when evaluating at a web
     page along with some tips and things to look for.

     1. Who wrote it?
       Is he/she an expert in the field? A professor or teacher? Or just someone with a
         little interest in the area?
       Is there biographical information available?

       What exactly do we know about the author?

       Unless the web page is part of a larger site (e.g. an encyclopedia or journal), there
         must be an author cited.


                                                                                         39
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                           Teacher Guide #3: Continued
                2. Who is publishing it?
                  Has an individual just put up his/her own site? Or is it part of a university
                    or company site?
                  If you come across a geocities, angelfire, tripod, or aol site, you need
                    to remember that anyone can (and does) create web pages on these sites.
                  If in doubt of the source, try going to the base site (i.e.
                    http://www.geocities.com). If this site ends up being just a web page
                    provider, think twice about using the information.
                3. Is there an opinion being presented?
                  Who is providing the information?
                  Do they have any self interest in the way they present the information?
                    (e.g. Watch out for information on smoking from a tobacco company!)
                4. How old is the web page?
                  When was the information published?
                  There should be a date somewhere on the page, especially if the page
                    contains statistics or other time sensitive material.

                                                                                              40
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          A Rubric for Evaluating WebQuests
                The WebQuest format can be applied to a variety of teaching situations. If
                you take advantage of all the possibilities inherent in the format, your
                students will have a rich and powerful experience. This rubric will help you
                pinpoint the ways in which your WebQuest isn't doing everything it could do.
                If a page seems to fall between categories, feel free to score it with in-between
                point.

      Once you've got a copy of the rubric, here are the three steps to putting your rubric
      together.
                1.Generate a number of potential dimensions to use
                2. Select a reasonable number of the most important dimensions
                3. Identify benchmarks for each level of each dimension




                                                                                               41
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Overall                  Beginning                       Developing                   Accomplished                  Score
Aesthetics                   0 points                        2 points                        4 points


Overall         There are few or no graphic        Graphic elements              Appropriate and thematic
Visual          elements. No variation in          sometimes, but not            graphic elements are used to
                layout or typographic              always, contribute to the     make visual connections that
Appeal
                OR                                                               contribute to the
                                                   understanding of              understanding of concepts,
                Color is garish and/or             concepts, ideas and           ideas and relationships.
                typographic variations             relationships. There is       Differences in type size and/or
                are overused and legibility        some variation in type        color are used well and
                suffers.                                                         consistently..
                                                   size, color, and layout.
                Background interferes
                with the readability.
Navigation      Getting through the lesson is      There are a few places        Navigation is seamless. It is
                confusing and unconventional.      where the learner can get     always clear to the learner what
& Flow          Pages can't be found easily        lost and not know where to    all the pieces are and how to
                and/or the way back isn't clear.   go next.                      get to them.



Mechanical      There are more than 5 broken              1 point                       2 points
Aspects         links, misplaced or missing        There are some broken         No mechanical problems
                images, badly sized tables,        links, misplaced or missing   noted.
                misspellings and/or grammatical    images, badly sized tables,
                errors.                            misspellings and/or
                                                   grammatical errors.                                              42
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Introduction               Beginning                Developing                   Accomplished                 Score

Motivational               0 points                  1 point                      2 points
Effectiveness of       The introduction is       The introduction          The introduction draws
Introduction           purely factual, with no   relates somewhat to the   the reader into the
                       appeal to relevance or    learner's interests       lesson by relating to the
                       social importance
                                                 and/or describes a        learner's interests or
                       OR
                                                 compelling question or    goals and/or
                       The scenario posed is
                       transparently bogus       problem                   engagingly describing a
                       and doesn't respect                                 compelling question or
                       the media literacy of                               problem.
                       today's learners.


Cognitive                   0 points                  1 point                        2 points
Effectiveness of the   The introduction          The introduction          The introduction builds on
Introduction           doesn't prepare the       makes some reference      learner's prior knowledge and
                       reader for what is to     to learner's prior        effectively prepares the learner
                       come, or build on         knowledge and             by foreshadowing what the
                       what the learner          previews to some          lesson is about.
                       already know              extent what the lesson
                                                 is about.


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Task                      Beginning                 Developing                    Accomplished                Score

Connection of Task         0 points                   2 point               4 points
to Standards         The task is not related    The task is referenced      The task is referenced to
                     to standards.              to standards but is not     standards and is clearly
                                                clearly connected to         students must know and be
                                                what students must          able to do to achieve
                                                know and be able to do      proficiency of those standards.
                                                to achieve proficiency
                                                of those standards.
Cognitive Level of        0 points                    3 points                        6 points
the Task             Task requires simply       Task is doable but is       Task is doable and engaging,
                     comprehending or           limited in its              and elicits thinking that goes
                     retelling of information   significance to students'   beyond rote comprehension.
                     found on web pages         lives. The task requires    The task requires synthesis of
                     and answering factual      analysis of information     multiple sources of
                     questions.                 and/or putting              information, and/or taking a
                                                together information        position, and/or going beyond
                                                from several sources.       the data given and making a
                                                                            generalization or creative
                                                                            product.




                                                                                                                44
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Process                   Beginning                   Developing                  Accomplished                Score
                            0 points                    2 points                      4 points
Clarity of Process   Process is not clearly       Some directions are        Every step is clearly stated.
                     stated. Students would       given, but there is        Most students would know
                     not know exactly what        missing information.       exactly where they are at
                     they were supposed to        Students might be          each step of the process and
                     do just from reading         confused.                  know what to do next.
                     this.
Scaffolding of               0 points                   3 points                     6 points
Process              The process lacks            Strategies and             The process provides
                     strategies and               organizational tools       students coming in at
                     organizational tools         embedded in the            different entry levels with
                     needed for students to       process are insufficient   strategies and organizational
                     gain the knowledge           to ensure that all         tools to access and gain the
                     needed to complete the       students will gain the     knowledge needed to
                     task. Activities are of      knowledge needed to        complete the task.
                     little significance to one   complete the task.         Activities are clearly related
                     another and/or to the        Some of the activities     and designed to take the
                     accomplishment of the        do not relate              students from basic
                     task                         specifically to the        knowledge to higher level
                                                  accomplishment of the      thinking. Checks for
                                                  task.                      understanding are built in to
                                                                             assess whether students are
                                                                             getting it.                        45
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   Richness of         0 points                          1 points                2 points
   process       Few steps, no separate           Some separate tasks or   Different roles are assigned to
                 roles assigned.                  roles assigned. More     help students understand
                                                  complex activities       different perspectives and/or
                                                  required                 share responsibility in
                                                                           accomplishing the task.

   Resources     Beginning                        Developing               Accomplished                      Score
   Relevance            0 points                        2 point                    4 points
   & Quantity    Resources provided are           There is some            There is a clear and meaningful
   of            not sufficient for students to   connection between       connection between all the
   Resources     accomplish the task.             the resources and the    resources and the information
                 OR                               information needed for   needed for students to
                 There are too many resources     students to accomplish   accomplish the task. Every
                 for learners                     the task. Some           resource carries its weight.
                 to look at in a                  resources don't add
                 reasonable time.                 anything new.
   Quality of         0 points                         2 points                  4 points
   Resoures      Links are mundane.               Some links carry         Links make excellent use of the
                 They lead to                     information not          Web's timeliness and
                 information that could           ordinarily found in a    colorfulness.
                                                  classroom.               Varied resources provide
                 be found in a classroom
                 encyclopedia.                                             enough
                                                                           Meaningful information for
                                                                                                               46
                                                                           students to think deeply.
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 Evaluation        Beginning              Developing                 Accomplished               Score


 Clarity of          0 points               3 points                      6 points
 Evaluation     Criteria for success   Criteria for success     Criteria for success are
 Criteria       are not described.     are at least partially   clearly stated in the form of
                                       described.               a rubric. Criteria include
                                                                qualitative as well as
                                                                quantitative descriptors.
                                                                The evaluation instrument
                                                                clearly measures what
                                                                students must know and be
                                                                able to do to accomplish the
                                                                task.




 Total
                                                                                                 /50



                                                                                                   47
                                 Conclusion
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        Sums up the activity and encourages students to reflect on the process and
                                         results

       Explain to students how the conclusion will off
        the opportunity to engage in further analysis.
                1. Ask students how their roles could have been
                   interpreted in a different manner.
                2. Ask students if they had interpreted their roles differently,
                   how might the outcome have changed?
                3. Ask students if they were flexible enough to compromise with
                   the group and attain resolution, or did they yield to group
                   pressure?
                4. Ask students what new questions did the project generate?
                   Why would these new questions be important in answering the
                   original question.
                                                                                48
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                                        References
       Process Guides: Teacher guides. Retrieved February 13, 2007, from
          http://webquest.sdsu.edu/processguides/index.htm

       Fine Points: Little things that make a difference. Retrieved February 8, 2007, from
          http://webquest.sdsu.edu/finepoints/index.htm

       A Rubric for Evaluating WebQuests. Retrieved February 13, 2007, from
          http://webquest.sdsu.edu/webquestrubric.html

       WebQuest Evaluation Form. Retrieved February 8, 2007, from
         http://www.spa3.k12.sc.us/webquestrubric.htm

       Dr. Alice Christie's Matrix of 400 WebQuests. Retrieved February 8, 2007, from
          http://www.west.asu.edu/achristie/wqmatrix.html
       Images of group work. Retrieved February 15, 2007, from
          http://ca.search.yahoo.com/search/images?p=group+work%2Cstudents&ei=UTF-
          8&fr=FP-tab-img-t340&x=wrt
                                                                                             49
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                                References (continued)
       International Curriculum Standards. Retrieved February 15, 2007, from
          http://questgarden.com/author/create-standards.php

       United States
       http://www.education-world.com/standards/national/index.shtml
       Canada :
       http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/
       United Kingdom:
       http://sg.dir.yahoo.com/Regional/Countries/United_Kingdom/Education/Teaching/Curriculum/
       Australia
       http://www.curriculum.wa.edu.au/
       New Zealand
       http://www.minedu.govt.nz/index.cfm?layout=index&indexid=1005&indexparentid=1004
       Singapore
       http://www.sonlight.com/singapore.html



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