Docstoc

EarthComm Correlation

Document Sample
EarthComm Correlation Powered By Docstoc
					                                             Correlations
                                           General Instructions

Read and comply with the 2010-2011 Policies and Procedures for the Florida Instructional Materials
Adoption .

Publishers must submit the required Written Correlations to the Instructional Materials Office by May 3, 2010
(hardcopy and e-mail version), and to SIMC members by June 24, 2010. Written correlations must be
completed and submitted using the forms provided. Deadlines, directions, and address for submitting Written
Correlations are found in the 2010-2011 Policies and Procedures for the Florida Instructional Materials
Adoption found here:
                              http://data.fldoe.org/instmat/downloads/2010p&p.pdf

                                                 K-5 Science
Complete a course standards and access points sheet for each grade level, copying and renaming the
worksheet tabs: K, APK, 1, AP1, 2, AP2, 3, AP3, 4, AP4, 5, AP5.
To complete the course standards worksheets, export the Excel format of the K-5 Course Standards from the
following Web links.
            Kindergarten - http://www.floridastandards.org/Courses/PublicPreviewCourse50.aspx
               Grade 1 - http://www.floridastandards.org/Courses/PublicPreviewCourse51.aspx
               Grade 2 - http://www.floridastandards.org/Courses/PublicPreviewCourse52.aspx
               Grade 3 - http://www.floridastandards.org/Courses/PublicPreviewCourse53.aspx
               Grade 4 - http://www.floridastandards.org/Courses/PublicPreviewCourse54.aspx
               Grade 5 - http://www.floridastandards.org/Courses/PublicPreviewCourse55.aspx
OR use the benchmarks listed in the course descriptions found in the Specifications.
                      http://www.fldoe.org/bii/instruct_mat/pdf/ScienceSpecs2009.pdf
Copy the Schemes, Descriptors, and DOK Ratings from the export or copy the Benchmark Code, Benchmark,
and Depth of Knowledge from the Specifications into the Benchmark Code, Benchmark, and Depth of
Knowledge columns of the Course Standards worksheets..
Complete the LESSONS WHERE BENCHMARK IS DIRECTLY ADDRESSED IN-DEPTH IN MAJOR TOOL
column for each benchmark. Separate lessons with commas.

Complete the Identify An Example column for the Overall Instructional Qualities listed on the worksheet.

To complete the access points worksheets, export the Excel formats for each grade level using the following
Web link.
                    http://www.floridastandards.org/Standards/AccesspointSearch.aspx
OR use the access points listed in the course descriptions found in the Specifications.
                      http://www.fldoe.org/bii/instruct_mat/pdf/ScienceSpecs2009.pdf
Copy the Access Point Numbers and Access Point Descriptions from the export into the Access Point Code
and Access Point Descriptions columns of the Access Points worksheets.
Complete the LESSONS WHERE ACCESS POINT IS DIRECTLY ADDRESSED IN-DEPTH IN MAJOR TOOL
column for each access point. Separate lessons with commas.


                                                 6-12 Science
Complete a course standards and access points sheet for each course, renaming the worksheet tabs as
necessary.
To complete the course standards worksheets, export the Excel format of the Course Standards from the
following Web link to browse for the course.
                   http://www.floridastandards.org/Courses/CourseDescriptionSearch.aspx
OR use the benchmarks listed in the course descriptions found in the Specifications.
                     http://www.fldoe.org/bii/instruct_mat/pdf/ScienceSpecs2009.pdf
Copy the Schemes, Descriptors, and DOK Ratings from the export or copy the Benchmark Code, Benchmark,
and Depth of Knowledge from the Specifications into the Benchmark Code, Benchmark, and Depth of
Knowledge columns of the Course Standards worksheets..
Complete the LESSONS WHERE BENCHMARK IS DIRECTLY ADDRESSED IN-DEPTH IN MAJOR TOOL
column for each benchmark. Separate lessons with commas.

Complete the Identify An Example column for the Overall Instructional Qualities listed on the worksheet.

To complete the access points worksheets, use the access points listed in the course descriptions found in the
Specifications.
                       http://www.fldoe.org/bii/instruct_mat/pdf/ScienceSpecs2009.pdf
OR, export the Excel formats for each grade level using the following Web link.
                     http://www.floridastandards.org/Standards/AccesspointSearch.aspx
Copy the Access Point Numbers and Access Point Descriptions from the export that correspond to the
benchmarks found in the course description into the Access Point Code and Access Point Descriptions
columns of the Access Points worksheets.
Complete the LESSONS WHERE ACCESS POINT IS DIRECTLY ADDRESSED IN-DEPTH IN MAJOR TOOL
column for each access point. Separate lessons with commas.


                                     Advanced Placement Science
Complete an AP sheet for each course, renaming the worksheet tabs as necessary.

Copy the topic outline schema and content descriptions from the College Board Course Descriptions to the
corresponding column of the worksheet. The College Board Course Descriptions can be downloaded here:
                         http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/subjects.html
Complete the LESSONS WHERE CONTENT IS DIRECTLY ADDRESSED IN-DEPTH IN MAJOR TOOL
column for each benchmark. Separate lessons with commas.

                                                 General Guidelines
Do not change fonts or font size.
Fields should wrap text. You may change row height to accommodate more text in a cell.
If you wish to start a new line in the same cell, use ALT +ENTER.
To print a sheet, define print area to include the entire area you wish to print. Do a print preview to make sure
it is all there before you print.
If one or more courses are being submitted as part of a series, please include all courses in one Excel
workbook.
When saving the Excel workbook(s) for submission via e-mail, please include your company name and the
title of the submission in the name of the file.


If you have any questions, please contact the Instructional Materials Office.
imstaff@fldoe.org
850-245-0425
                                                                          CORRELATION
                                                                FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
                                                              INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CORRELATION
                                                                       COURSE STANDARDS
           SUBJECT:     Science
       GRADE LEVEL:     9-12
      COURSE TITLE:     Earth/Space Science
      COURSE CODE:       2001310
   SUBMISSION TITLE:    Florida EarthComm: Project-Based Space and Earth System Science Student Edition
            TITLE ID:   1797
         PUBLISHER:     It's About Time, Herff Jones Education Division
       PUBLISHER ID:     35-1637714-01
                                                                                                                                                                      Committee Member Evaluation
                                                                                                                                                                      (Committee Member Use Only)




                                                                                    DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE
                                                                                                             LESSONS WHERE BENCHMARK IS




                                                                                                                                                               Thoroughly




                                                                                                                                                                                     Adequately
                                                                                                            DIRECTLY ADDRESSED IN-DEPTH IN




                                                                                                                                                                                                              Not At All
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Minimally
                                                                                                                                                                            Highly
                                                                                                                        MAJOR TOOL
  BENCHMARK CODE                            BENCHMARK
                                                                                                          (Include page numbers of lesson, a link
                                                                                                            to lesson, or other identifier for easy
                                                                                                               lookup for committee member.)


LA.910.2.2.3            The student will organize information to show                                   The Digging Deeper reading passage of each
                        understanding or relationships among facts, ideas, and                           section provides Earth/space science content to
                        events (e.g., representing key points within text through                        students. Students demonstrate their
                        charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing,                                    comprehension and understanding of the concepts
                        comparing, contrasting, or outlining);                                           introduced in the Digging Deeper text by completing
                                                                                                         questions in the Checking Up part of each section.
                                                                                                         These questions require students to think about the
                                                                                                         major ideas presented in the text by organizing
                                                                                                         information to show understanding or relationships
                                                                                                         among facts, ideas, and events. Examples include
                                                                                                         the following:
                                                                                                         Chapter 1, Section 1, p. 16
                                                                                                         Chapter 2, Section 12, p. 248
                                                                                                         Chapter 3, Section 4, p. 302
                                                                                                         Chapter 4, Section 1, p. 377
                                                                                                         Chapter 5, Section 2, p. 480
                                                                                                         Chapter 6, Section 5, p. 579
                                                                                                         Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 632
LA.910.4.2.2   The student will record information and ideas from                    Chapter 1, Section 5, p. 63; Section 7, p. 88
               primary and/or secondary sources accurately and                        Chapter 2, Section 5, p. 190; Section 8, p. 218
               coherently, noting the validity and reliability of these               Chapter 3, Section 4, p. 304; Section 7, p. 329
               sources and attributing sources of information;                        Chapter 4, Section 3, p. 397
                                                                                      Chapter 5, Section 6, p. 521
                                                                                      Chapter 6, Section 6, p. 592
                                                                                      Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 633; Section 3, p. 654

MA.912.S.1.2   Determine appropriate and consistent standards of           Moderate   Appropriate and consistent measurements of data
               measurement for the data to be collected in a survey or                are collected throughout EarthComm. Examples
               experiment.                                                            include the following:
                                                                                      Chapter 1, Section 6, p. 76
                                                                                      Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 162–163
                                                                                      Chapter 3, Section 2, pp. 278–279
                                                                                      Chapter 4, Section 2, p. 382
                                                                                      Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–499
                                                                                      Chapter 6, Section 5, p. 581
                                                                                      Chapter 7, Section 3, p. 648

MA.912.S.3.2   Collect, organize, and analyze data sets, determine the     High       Examples of visual summaries of data sets appear
               best format for the data and present visual summaries                  throughout EarthComm. Examples include the
               from the following:                                                    following:
                                                                                      Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 52–53; Section 7, pp.
                 bar graphs                                                           78–79, 87; Section 8, pp. 90–92; Section 9, pp.
                 line graphs                                                          101–102
                 stem and leaf plots                                                  Chapter 2, Section 2, pp. 157–158; Section 9, pp.
                 circle graphs                                                        219–221
                 histograms                                                           Chapter 4, Section 4, pp. 400–402; Section 6, pp.
                 box and whisker plots                                                418–422; Section 7, p. 428
                 scatter plots                                                        Chapter 5, Section 6, pp. 515–516
                 cumulative frequency (ogive) graphs                                  Chapter 7, Section 5, pp. 667, 674

SC.912.E.5.1   Cite evidence used to develop and verify the scientific     High
               theory of the Big Bang (also known as the Big Bang
               Theory) of the origin of the universe.                                 Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 29–31, 33–34, 38–39
SC.912.E.5.2   Identify patterns in the organization and distribution of   Moderate   Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 29–39; Section 4, pp.
               matter in the universe and the forces that determine                   42–45, 47–49; Section 5, pp. 50–52, 54–63; Section
               them.                                                                  6, pp. 67–69, 71–76
SC.912.E.5.3   Describe and predict how the initial mass of a star         Moderate
               determines its evolution.                                              Chapter 1, Section 9, pp. 100–108
SC.912.E.5.4   Explain the physical properties of the Sun and its          High
               dynamic nature and connect them to conditions and
               events on Earth.                                                       Chapter 1, Section 7, pp. 77–88
SC.912.E.5.5   Explain the formation of planetary systems based on our     High
               knowledge of our Solar System and apply this
               knowledge to newly discovered planetary systems.                       Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 29, 31–39
SC.912.E.5.6   Develop logical connections through physical principles,    High
               including Kepler's and Newton's Laws about the
               relationships and the effects of Earth, Moon, and Sun on               Chapter 1, Section 4, pp. 41–46, 48–49; Section 5,
               each other.                                                            pp. 50–63
SC.912.E.5.7   Relate the history of and explain the justification for     High
               future space exploration and continuing technology
               development.                                                           Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 109–112, 115–123
SC.912.E.5.8    Connect the concepts of radiation and the                High
                electromagnetic spectrum to the use of historical and
                newly-developed observational tools.                                Chapter 1, Section 8, pp. 89, 92, 94–99
SC.912.E.5.9    Analyze the broad effects of space exploration on the    High
                economy and culture of Florida.                                     Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 110, 112–114, 120–121, 123
SC.912.E.5.11   Distinguish the various methods of measuring             High
                astronomical distances and apply each in appropriate
                situations.                                                         Chapter 1, Section 1, pp. 8–11, 16, 18–19
SC.912.E.6.1    Describe and differentiate the layers of Earth and the   Moderate   Chapter 2, Section 1, pp. 147–153; Section 2, pp.
                interactions among them.                                            159–160; Section 3, pp. 162–170; Section 4, pp.
                                                                                    172–179; Section 5, pp. 180–190
SC.912.E.6.2    Connect surface features to surface processes that are   Moderate   Chapter 2, Section 1, pp. 144–154; Section 7, pp.
                responsible for their formation.                                    204–209; Section 8, pp. 212–217; Section 9, pp.
                                                                                    219–225
                                                                                    Chapter 4, Section 1, pp. 368–378; Section 2, pp.
                                                                                    380–388; Section 3, pp. 389–396; Section 4, pp.
                                                                                    398–407; Section 5, pp. 408–415; Section 6, pp.
                                                                                    418–426; Section 7, pp. 427–434; Section 8, pp.
                                                                                    435–441; Section 9, pp. 446–449, p. 451

SC.912.E.6.3    Analyze the scientific theory of plate tectonics and      High      Chapter 2, Section 2, pp. 157–161; Section 3, pp.
                identify related major processes and features as a result           162–170; Section 4, pp. 171–179; Section 5, pp.
                of moving plates.                                                   180–190; Section 6, pp. 191–200; Section 10, pp.
                                                                                    229–231
SC.912.E.6.4    Analyze how specific geologic processes and features     High       Chapter 3, Section 1, pp. 266–277; Section 2, pp.
                are expressed in Florida and elsewhere.                             278–286; Section 3, pp. 287–296; Section 4, pp.
                                                                                    297–304; Section 5, pp. 305–311; Section 6, pp.
                                                                                    314–321; Section 7, pp. 323–328; Section 8, pp.
                                                                                    330–338; Section 9, pp. 339–353
                                                                                    Chapter 4, Section 3, pp. 389–396

SC.912.E.6.5    Describe the geologic development of the present day     Moderate   Chapter 2, Section 1, pp. 144–147, 150–154;
                oceans and identify commonly found features.                        Section 2, p. 159;
                                                                                    Section 4, pp. 171–179; Section 5, pp. 180–184;
                                                                                    Section 6, pp. 191–198, 200

SC.912.E.7.1    Analyze the movement of matter and energy through the High          Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–500; Section 5, pp.
                different biogeochemical cycles, including water and                507, 509–514; Section 6, pp. 515–521
                carbon.                                                             Chapter 7, Section 1, pp. 623–632; Section 2, pp.
                                                                                    634–643; Section 3, pp. 644–651, 653–654; Section
                                                                                    4, pp. 655–663; Section 5, pp. 666–675; Section 6,
                                                                                    pp. 676–68

SC.912.E.7.2    Analyze the causes of the various kinds of surface and   High
                deep water motion within the oceans and their impacts
                on the transfer of energy between the poles and the                 Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 466–473; Section 2, pp.
                equator.                                                            475–483; Section 3, pp. 484–493
SC.912.E.7.3    Differentiate and describe the various interactions             High       Standard addressed implicitly in each EarthComm
                among Earth systems, including: atmosphere,                                section. Explicit examples of Earth system
                hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.                         interactions include the following:
                                                                                           Nature of Science, pp. NS8–NS10
                                                                                           Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 111–112
                                                                                           Chapter 2, Section 8, p. 212
                                                                                           Chapter 4, Section 9, p. 451
                                                                                           Chapter 5, Section 5, pp. 507, 514
                                                                                           Chapter 6, Section 7, p. 606
                                                                                           Chapter 7, Section 6, p. 677

SC.912.E.7.4    Summarize the conditions that contribute to the climate Moderate           Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–506; Section 5, pp.
                of a geographic area, including the relationships to lakes                 507–514
                and oceans.                                                                Chapter 7, Section 1, pp. 622–623, 628–633;
                                                                                           Section 2, pp. 635–636, 641–643; Section 3, pp.
                                                                                           649–653

SC.912.E.7.5    Predict future weather conditions based on present              High
                observations and conceptual models and recognize                           Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 536–544; Section 2, pp.
                limitations and uncertainties of such predictions.                         545–555; Section 3, pp. 556–561
SC.912.E.7.6    Relate the formation of severe weather to the various           Moderate   Chapter 6, Section 4, pp. 564–572; Section 5, pp.
                physical factors.                                                          573–581; Section 6, pp. 585–592; Section 7, pp.
                                                                                           593–603, 605–606
SC.912.E.7.7    Identify, analyze, and relate the internal (Earth system)       High       Chapter 7, Section 2, p. 643; Section 3, pp.
                and external (astronomical) conditions that contribute to                  644–654; Section 4, pp. 655–663; Section 5, pp.
                global climate change.                                                     666–675
SC.912.E.7.8    Explain how various atmospheric, oceanic, and                   High       Chapter 3, Section 9, pp. 339–353
                hydrologic conditions in Florida have influenced and can                   Chapter 4, Section 3, pp. 389–391, pp. 393–397
                influence human behavior, both individually and                            Chapter 6, Section 7, pp. 593–602, pp. 605–607
                collectively.
SC.912.E.7.9    Cite evidence that the ocean has had a significant              High
                influence on climate change by absorbing, storing, and                     Chapter 7, Section 4, pp. 655–663; Section 5, pp.
                moving heat, carbon, and water.                                            666–668, 670–671; Section 6, pp. 677–682
SC.912.L.15.1   Explain how the scientific theory of evolution is               High
                supported by the fossil record, comparative anatomy,
                comparative embryology, biogeography, molecular
                biology, and observed evolutionary change.                                 Chapter 7, Extending the Connection, pp. 688–688B
SC.912.L.15.8   Describe the scientific explanations of the origin of life on   Moderate
                Earth.                                                                     Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B
SC.912.N.1.1    Define a problem based on a specific body of                   High
                knowledge, for example: biology, chemistry, physics, and
                earth/space science, and do the following:Â
SC.912.N.1.1                                                             High



               1. pose questions about the natural world,                       1. pose questions about the natural world,
                                                                                Each section begins with a Think About It
                                                                                component. The majority of these ask a question(s)
                                                                                about the natural world. Examples include the
                                                                                following:
                                                                                Chapter 1, Section 1, p. 8
                                                                                Chapter 2, Section 7, p. 204
                                                                                Chapter 3, Section 2, p. 278
                                                                                Chapter 4, Section 2, p. 380
                                                                                Chapter 5, Section 1, p. 466
                                                                                Chapter 6, Section 2, p. 545
                                                                                Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 622

               2. conduct systematic observations,                              2. conduct systematic observations,
                                                                                All Investigate components include instructions for
                                                                                conducting systematic observations. Examples
                                                                                include the following:
                                                                                Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 50–53
                                                                                Chapter 2, Section 8, pp. 212–213
                                                                                Chapter 3, Section 2, pp. 278–279
                                                                                Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 381–382
                                                                                Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 466–467
                                                                                Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 536–537
                                                                                Chapter 7, Section 2, pp. 623–628

               3. examine books and other sources of information to
               see what is already known,                                       3. examine books and other sources of information
                                                                                to see what is already known,
                                                                                Each section ends with an Inquiring Further
                                                                                component. Many of these prompt students to
                                                                                examine other sources of information to
                                                                                see what is known. Examples include the following:
                                                                                Chapter 1, Section 3, p. 39
                                                                                Chapter 2, Section 8, p. 218
                                                                                Chapter 3, Section 4, p. 304
                                                                                Chapter 4, Section 3, p. 397
                                                                                Chapter 5, Section 2, p. 483
                                                                                Chapter 6, Section 6, p. 592
                                                                                Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 633

               4. review what is known in light of empirical evidence,          4. review what is known in light of empirical
                                                                                evidence,
                                                                                Reviews of empirical evidence gathered in
                                                                                investigations appear throughout EarthComm in
                                                                                Chapter Challenges and Mini-Challenges. They also
                                                                                appear within certain sections. Examples include the
                                                                                following:
                                                                                Chapter 1, Section 7, pp. 77–79
                                                                                Chapter 2, Section 2, pp. 156–158
                                                                                Chapter 3, Section 2, p. 286
                                                                                Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 381–382
                                                                                Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 466–467
                                                                                Chapter 6, Section 2, p. 547
                                                                                Chapter 7, Section 2, pp. 623–628
5. plan investigations,                                     5. plan investigations,
                                                            Student-planned investigations appear throughout
                                                            EarthComm. Examples include the following:
                                                            Chapter 1, Section 6, p. 76
                                                            Chapter 2, Section 8, pp. 212–214
                                                            Chapter 3, Section 3, pp. 287–288
                                                            Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 381–382
                                                            Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 467–468
                                                            Chapter 6, Section 4, pp. 564–566
                                                            Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 628

6. use tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data (this   6. use tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data,
includes the use of measurement in metric and other         Students use equipment to collect and measure data
systems, and also the generation and interpretation of      throughout EarthComm. They also commonly use
graphical representations of data, including data           tables or graphs to analyze data. Examples include
tables and graphs),                                         the following:
                                                            Chapter 1, Section 4, pp. 41–43
                                                            Chapter 2, Section 8, pp. 213–214
                                                            Chapter 3, Section 2, pp. 279–280
                                                            Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 381–382
                                                            Chapter 5, Section 2, pp. 475–476
                                                            Chapter 6, Section 1, p. 544
                                                            Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 628

7. pose answers, explanations, or descriptions of           7. pose answers, explanations, or other descriptions
events,                                                     of events,
                                                            Students give detailed answers and descriptions of
                                                            investigation results throughout EarthComm.
                                                            Examples include the following:
                                                            Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 51–52
                                                            Chapter 2, Section 11, pp. 234–236
                                                            Chapter 3, Section 2, p. 285
                                                            Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 381–382
                                                            Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 466–467
                                                            Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 537–538
                                                            Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 632

8. generate explanations that explicate or describe         8. generate explanations that explicate or describe
natural phenomena (inferences),                             natural phenomena (inferences),
                                                            Examples appear throughout EarthComm. Examples
                                                            include the following:
                                                            Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 51–52
                                                            Chapter 2, Section 11, p. 234
                                                            Chapter 3, Section 2, pp. 279–280
                                                            Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 381–382
                                                            Chapter 5, Section 1, p. 473
                                                            Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 537–538
                                                            Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 632
9. use appropriate evidence and reasoning to justify    9. use appropriate evidence and reasoning to justify
these explanations to others,                           these explanations to others,
                                                        Evidence and reasoning are used to justify results
                                                        throughout EarthComm. Examples include the
                                                        following:
                                                        Chapter 1, Section 5, p. 52
                                                        Chapter 2, Section 11, p. 234
                                                        Chapter 3, Section 7, p. 324
                                                        Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 381–382
                                                        Chapter 5, Section 1, p. 473
                                                        Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 537–538
                                                        Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 632

10. communicate results of scientific investigations,
and                                                     10. communicate results of scientific investigations,
                                                        Students are asked to share their work with their
                                                        groups or class throughout EarthComm. This
                                                        includes every Mini-Challenge, Chapter Challenge,
                                                        and answers to Think About It (Again) questions.
                                                        Examples include the following:
                                                        Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 30–31
                                                        Chapter 2, Chapter Challenge, pp. 254–255
                                                        Chapter 3, Section 7, p. 324
                                                        Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 381–382
                                                        Chapter 5, Section 6, p. 520
                                                        Chapter 6, Section 2, p. 554
                                                        Chapter 7, Section 2, pp. 635–636

11. evaluate the merits of the explanations produced    11. evaluate the merits of the explanations produced
by others.                                              by others,
                                                        Explanations are presented as part of the learning
                                                        process throughout EarthComm; evaluating them is
                                                        an integral part of each
                                                        chapter’s Mini-Challenge and Chapter Challenge.
                                                        Examples include the following:
                                                        Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 111–112
                                                        Chapter 2, Chapter Challenge, pp. 254–255
                                                        Chapter 3, Section 7, p. 324
                                                        Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 381–382
                                                        Chapter 5, Chapter Challenge, pp. 524–525
                                                        Chapter 6, Chapter Challenge, pp. 610–611
                                                        Chapter 7, Section 3, p. 654
SC.912.N.1.2   Describe and explain what characterizes science and its Moderate    Students apply scientific processes and methods in
               methods.                                                            every section’s Investigate. Through these
                                                                                   experiences, students gain an appreciation for the
                                                                                   characteristics of science and scientific knowledge.
                                                                                   Each section provides an opportunity for students to
                                                                                   describe and explain how the investigations they
                                                                                   conducted and the knowledge they gained is specific
                                                                                   to the practice of science. Examples include the
                                                                                   following:
                                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 50–53
                                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 162–164
                                                                                   Chapter 3, Section 6, pp. 314–316
                                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 380–382
                                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–500
                                                                                   Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 536–538
                                                                                   Chapter 7, Section 5, pp. 666–668
SC.912.N.1.3   Recognize that the strength or usefulness of a scientific Low
               claim is evaluated through scientific argumentation,                In every Chapter Challenge, students are required to
               which depends on critical and logical thinking, and the            support the results of their investigations and/or
               active consideration of alternative scientific explanations         projects with evidence as well as critique the
               to explain the data presented.                                      Chapter Challenge results of other groups and how
                                                                                   well they support their findings with evidence. Each
                                                                                   section contains an Investigate part which requires
                                                                                   students to do the following: observe phenomena,
                                                                                   develop hypotheses, design and plan experiments
                                                                                   and models, isolate variables, record data, organize
                                                                                   their findings, create graphs, interpret results, and
                                                                                   develop conclusions and explanations based on
                                                                                   evidence. In the Digging Deeper sections, students
                                                                                   continue to consider lines of evidence and
                                                                                   explanations. Understanding and Applying
                                                                                   encourages students to thoroughly analyze the
                                                                                   evidence and explanations they have developed or
                                                                                   considered. Through these activities, students apply
                                                                                   critical and logical thinking skills as well as consider
                                                                                   various explanations related to the concepts
                                                                                   introduced in the section. Examples include the
                                                                                   following:
                                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 7, pp. 78–79, 81, 83–87
                                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 6, pp. 191–200
                                                                                   Chapter 3, Section 6, pp. 315–321
                                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 381–387
                                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 3, pp. 484–492
                                                                                   Chapter 6, Section 3, pp. 556–561
                                                                                   Chapter 7, Section 5, pp. 667–672, 674
SC.912.N.1.4   Identify sources of information and assess their reliability High   Nature of Science, pp. TK
               according to the strict standards of scientific                     Chapter 1, Section 5, p. 63; Section 7, p. 88
               investigation.                                                      Chapter 2, Section 5, p. 190; Section 8, p. 218
                                                                                   Chapter 3, Section 4, p. 304; Section 7, p. 329
                                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 3, p. 397; Section 8, p. 442
                                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 6, p. 521
                                                                                   Chapter 6, Section 6, p. 592
                                                                                   Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 633; Section 3, p. 654
SC.912.N.1.5   Describe and provide examples of how similar                  Moderate
               investigations conducted in many parts of the world
               result in the same outcome.                                              Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                                        Chapter 1, Section 9, pp. 103–108
                                                                                        Chapter 3, Extending the Connection, pp. 358–358B
                                                                                        Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B
                                                                                        Chapter 7, Section 3, pp. 649–653

SC.912.N.1.6   Describe how scientific inferences are drawn from             Moderate   Scientific inference is a key component of
               scientific observations and provide examples from the                    EarthComm, and students are required to make
               content being studied.                                                   observations and develop explanations based on
                                                                                        these observations in the Investigate and
                                                                                        Understanding and Applying parts of sections.
                                                                                        Examples include the following:
                                                                                        Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                                        Chapter 1, Section 3, p. 39
                                                                                        Chapter 2, Section 5, pp. 180–181
                                                                                        Chapter 3, Section 4, pp. 298–299
                                                                                        Chapter 4, Section 9, p. 444
                                                                                        Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–499
                                                                                        Chapter 6, Section 3, p. 557
                                                                                        Chapter 7, Section 2, p. 635

SC.912.N.1.7   Recognize the role of creativity in constructing scientific   Low
               questions, methods and explanations.                                     Each Chapter Challenge requires students to use
                                                                                        creativity in solving scientific problems and tasks.
                                                                                        Students apply the knowledge gained within the
                                                                                        chapter in the development of their own solutions for
                                                                                        the Chapter Challenge. Many chapters also contain
                                                                                        open-ended activities in which students must be
                                                                                        creative in coming up with their own scientific
                                                                                        questions and/or methods to answer scientific
                                                                                        questions. Examples include the following:
                                                                                        Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                                        Chapter 1, Section 8, p. 99
                                                                                        Chapter 2, Section 1, p. 155
                                                                                        Chapter 3, Section 2, pp. 278–279
                                                                                        Chapter 4, Section 7, p. 428
                                                                                        Chapter 5, Chapter Challenge, pp. 524–525
                                                                                        Chapter 6, Section 5, p. 581
                                                                                        Chapter 7, Section 5, p. 668
SC.912.N.2.1   Identify what is science, what clearly is not science, and High
               what superficially resembles science (but fails to meet                  Nature of Science, pp. TK
               the criteria for science).                                               Chapter 2, Extending the Connection, pp. 256–256A
SC.912.N.2.2   Identify which questions can be answered through           High
               science and which questions are outside the boundaries
               of scientific investigation, such as questions addressed
               by other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, and                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
               religion.                                                                Chapter 2, Extending the Connection, pp. 256–256A
SC.912.N.2.3   Identify examples of pseudoscience (such as astrology, Low
               phrenology) in society.                                                  Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                                        Chapter 2, Extending the Connection, pp. 256–256A
SC.912.N.2.4   Explain that scientific knowledge is both durable and      High
               robust and open to change. Scientific knowledge can                   In many parts of EarthComm, students consider the
               change because it is often examined and re-examined                   vigor of scientific knowledge through
               by new investigations and scientific argumentation.                   experimentation and the examination of theories
               Because of these frequent examinations, scientific                    supported by evidence. Examples of how scientific
               knowledge becomes stronger, leading to its durability.                knowledge is subject to change and debate can be
                                                                                     found in the following sections:
                                                                                     Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                                     Chapter 1, Section 2, pp. 24–27; Section 7, pp.
                                                                                     83–84; Section 10, pp. 115–122
                                                                                     Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 165–168; Section 4, pp.
                                                                                     176–178; Section 5, pp. 182–188; Section 6, pp.
                                                                                     191–199
                                                                                     Chapter 3, Section 5, pp. 308–309; Section 7, pp.
                                                                                     323–327; Section 8, pp. 335–337; Extending the
                                                                                     Connection, pp. 358–358B
                                                                                     Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B
                                                                                     Chapter 7, Section 3, pp. 649–654; Section 6, pp.
                                                                                     678–681

SC.912.N.2.5   Describe instances in which scientists' varied            High
               backgrounds, talents, interests, and goals influence the
               inferences and thus the explanations that they make                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
               about observations of natural phenomena and describe                  Chapter 1, Section 7, p. 88; Section 8, p. 93
               that competing interpretations (explanations) of                      Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 166–169; Section 4, pp.
               scientists are a strength of science as they are a source             176–178; Section 6, pp. 191–201
               of new, testable ideas that have the potential to add new             Chapter 3, Extending the Connection, pp. 358–358B
               evidence to support one or another of the explanations.               Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B

SC.912.N.3.1   Explain that a scientific theory is the culmination of many High      Nature of Science, pp. TK
               scientific investigations drawing together all the current            Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 54–60; Section 7, p. 86
               evidence concerning a substantial range of phenomena;                 Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 165–169; Section 4, pp.
               thus, a scientific theory represents the most powerful                176–179; Section 6, pp. 191–200
               explanation scientists have to offer.                                 Chapter 3, Section 8, pp. 335–337
                                                                                     Chapter 4, Section 9, pp. 446–449

SC.912.N.3.2   Describe the role consensus plays in the historical        Moderate
               development of a theory in any one of the disciplines of              Nature of Science, pp. TK
               science.                                                              Chapter 1, Section 6, pp. 71–73; Section 7, pp.
                                                                                     79–86
                                                                                     Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 165–168; Section 4, pp.
                                                                                     176–178; Section 6, pp. 194–200
                                                                                     Chapter 3, Extending the Connection, pp. 358–358B
                                                                                     Chapter 5, Section 2, p. 480; Extending the
                                                                                     Connection, pp. 526–526B
                                                                                     Chapter 7, Section 6, pp. 678–681
SC.912.N.3.3   Explain that scientific laws are descriptions of specific  Moderate   Nature of Science, pp. TK
               relationships under given conditions in nature, but do not            Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 32–38; Section 4, pp.
               offer explanations for those relationships.                           43–47; Section 5, pp. 54–60
                                                                                     Chapter 3, Section 7, pp. 323–328
SC.912.N.3.4   Recognize that theories do not become laws, nor do         Moderate
               laws become theories; theories are well supported
               explanations and laws are well supported descriptions.                Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                                     Chapter 1, Section 3, p. 38
SC.912.N.3.5    Describe the function of models in science, and identify   Moderate   Throughout EarthComm, students use a wide range
                the wide range of models used in science.                             of models to represent phenomena and theories.
                                                                                      Examples include the following:
                                                                                      Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                                      Chapter 1, Section 1, p. 9, pp. 12–16
                                                                                      Chapter 2, Section 4, pp. 172–174, 179
                                                                                      Chapter 3, Section 3, p. 288
                                                                                      Chapter 4, Section 4, pp. 398–399
                                                                                      Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 466–468
                                                                                      Chapter 6, Section 2, p. 547
                                                                                      Chapter 7, Section 4, p. 656, 663

SC.912.N.4.1    Explain how scientific knowledge and reasoning provide Moderate       Nature of Science, pp. TK
                an empirically-based perspective to inform society's                  Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 111–112, 115–123
                decision making.                                                      Chapter 2, Section 8, pp. 213–214, 217–218
                                                                                      Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 380–388; Section 3, pp.
                                                                                      389–396; Section 5, pp. 408–415; Section 7, p. 429,
                                                                                      431–433; Section 9, pp. 444, 446–450
                                                                                      Chapter 5, Section 5, pp. 507–510, 512–513;
                                                                                      Section 6, pp. 515–520
                                                                                      Chapter 6, Section 4, pp. 564–571; Section 5, pp.
                                                                                      576–581; Section 6, pp. 585–592
                                                                                      Chapter 7, Section 5, pp. 667–673, 675; Section 6,
                                                                                      pp. 676–682


SC.912.P.8.1    Differentiate among the four states of matter.             Moderate   Nature of Science, pp. NS8–NS10
SC.912.P.8.4    Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as      High
                atomic theory) by describing the structure of atoms in
                terms of protons, neutrons and electrons, and
                differentiate among these particles in terms of their
                mass, electrical charges and locations within the atom.
                                                                                      Chapter 3, Extending the Connection, pp. 358–358B
SC.912.P.10.4   Describe heat as the energy transferred by convection, High           Convection addressed in:
                conduction, and radiation, and explain the connection of              Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 166–168
                heat to change in temperature or states of matter.                    Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 539–542

                                                                                      Radiation addressed in:
                                                                                      Chapter 1, Section 8, pp. 89–91, 94–99

                                                                                      Convection, conduction, radiation, and the transfer
                                                                                      of heat energy addressed in:
                                                                                      Chapter 1, Section 7, pp. 81–83

                                                                                      The effects of heat on gases addressed in:
                                                                                      Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 536–537, 539–542

                                                                                      The effects of heat on liquids addressed in:
                                                                                      Chapter 5, Section 2, pp. 475–478, 480, 482

                                                                                      The effects of heat on solids addressed in:
                                                                                      Chapter 2, Section 3, p. 163, 166–168
SC.912.P.10.10                 Compare the magnitude and range of the four              Moderate
                               fundamental forces (gravitational, electromagnetic, weak
                               nuclear, strong nuclear).                                                Chapter 4, Extending the Connection, pp. 456–456B
SC.912.P.10.11                 Explain and compare nuclear reactions (radioactive       High
                               decay, fission and fusion), the energy changes
                               associated with them and their associated safety issues.
                                                                                                        Chapter 1, Extending the Connection, pp. 134–134B
SC.912.P.10.16                 Explain the relationship between moving charges and        High
                               magnetic fields, as well as changing magnetic fields and
                               electric fields, and their application to modern
                               technologies.                                                            Chapter 6, Extending the Connection, pp. 612–612B
SC.912.P.10.18                 Explore the theory of electromagnetism by comparing        High
                               and contrasting the different parts of the electromagnetic
                               spectrum in terms of wavelength, frequency, and energy,
                               and relate them to phenomena and applications.
                                                                                                        Chapter 1, Section 8, pp. 89–99
SC.912.P.10.19                 Explain that all objects emit and absorb electromagnetic High
                               radiation and distinguish between objects that are
                               blackbody radiators and those that are not.
                                                                                                        Chapter 1, Section 8, p. 90, 92–97
SC.912.P.10.20                 Describe the measurable properties of waves and             High
                               explain the relationships among them and how these
                               properties change when the wave moves from one
                               medium to another.                                                       Chapter 1, Section 8, pp. 90–98
SC.912.P.12.2                  Analyze the motion of an object in terms of its position,   High
                               velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of
                               reference) as functions of time.                                         Chapter 1, Section 4, pp. 41–45
SC.912.P.12.4                  Describe how the gravitational force between two objects    Moderate     Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 55–57
                               depends on their masses and the distance between                         Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 166, 168
                               them.
SC.912.P.12.7                  Recognize that nothing travels faster than the speed of     Low
                               light in vacuum which is the same for all observers no
                               matter how they or the light source are moving.                          Chapter 1, Section 8, p. 94




                                                                                                                                                                                                  Strongly Disagree
                                                                                                          IDENTIFY AN EXAMPLE (WITH PAGE




                                                                                                                                                              Strongly Agree
                                                                                                           NUMBERS OR LOCATION) DEEMED
                                                                                                         TYPICAL OF THE APPROACH TAKEN IN




                                                                                                                                                                                       Disagree
                                                                                                                  THE MAJOR TOOL.




                                                                                                                                                                               Agree
                                                                                                          The Examples can be from Student or
                            OVERALL INSTRUCTIONAL QUALITY                                                    Teacher Instructional Material.
The major tool introduces and builds science concepts as a coherent whole. It provides opportunities to
students to explore why a scientific idea is important and in which contexts that a science idea can be
useful. In other words, the major tool helps students learn the science concepts in depth. Additionally,
students are given opportunities to connect conceptual knowledge with procedural knowledge and
factual knowledge. Overall, there is an appropriate balance of skill development and conceptual
understanding.                                                                                           Student Edition, Chapter 5, Section 2, pp. 475–477


Tasks are engaging and interesting enough that students want to pursue them. Real world problems are
realistic and relevant to students’ lives.                                                           Student Edition, Chapter 4, Section 3, pp. 389–390
Problem solving is encouraged by the tasks presented to students. Tasks require students to make
decisions, determine strategies, and justify solutions.                                                  Student Edition, Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 536–538
Tasks engage students in communicating science by writing, explaining, drawing, using symbols,
talking, listening, and reading for information. Tasks encourage collaboration, discussion, individual   Student Edition, Chapter 2, Chapter Challenge, pp.
accountability, and positive interdependence.                                                            254–255

Students are given opportunities to create and use representations to organize, record, and
communicate their thinking.
Tasks promote use of multiple representations and translations among them. Students use a variety of     Student Edition, Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–499
tools to understand a single concept.                                                                    Student Edition, Chapter 7, Section 3, pp. 644–648

The science connects to other disciplines such as reading, art, mathematics, and history. Tasks
represent scientific ideas as interconnected and building upon each other.                               Student Edition, Chapter 1, Section 4, pp. 41–43

Tasks require students to make hypotheses, justify their thinking, defend their responses by using
scientific arguments, and prove scientific statements.                                                   Student Edition, Chapter 2, Section 8, pp. 212–214

Benchmarks from the Nature of Science standard are both represented explicitly and integrated          Student Edition, Nature of Science, pp. NS1–NS10
throughout the materials.                                                                              Student Edition, Chapter 2, Section 6, pp. 194–198
                                                                                                       Due to the nature of project-based inquiry programs,
                                                                                                       a development of context is necessary in which the
                                                                                                       science content required by the Benchmarks is
                                                                                                       embedded. The Nature of Science Benchmarks are
                                                                                                       addressed in each and every section of the
                                                                                                       materials.
Content provided that is NOT directly associated with NGSSS benchmarks for the course/grade level is Student Edition, Chapter 1, Section 2
less than approximately ten percent (10%). (Publishers must list ALL content here, not just examples.) Student Edition, Chapter 2, Section 11; Section 12
                                                                       CORRELATION
                                                             FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
                                                           INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CORRELATION
                                                                      ACCESS POINTS
             SUBJECT:     Science
         GRADE LEVEL:     9-12
        COURSE TITLE:     Earth/Space Science
        COURSE CODE:       2001310
     SUBMISSION TITLE:    Florida EarthComm: Project-Based Space and Earth System Science Student Edition
              TITLE ID:   1797
           PUBLISHER:     It's About Time, Herff Jones Education Division
         PUBLISHER ID:     35-1637714-01
                                                                                                                                                        Committee Member Evaluation
                                                                                                                                                        (Committee Member Use Only)
                                                                                      LESSONS WHERE ACCESS POINT IS




                                                                                                                                           Thoroughly




                                                                                                                                                                     Adequately
                                                                                      DIRECTLY ADDRESSED IN-DEPTH IN




                                                                                                                                                                                              Not At All
                                                                                                                                                                                  Minimally
                                                                                                                                                            Highly
                                                                                                 MAJOR TOOL
 ACCESS POINT CODE             ACCESS POINT DESCRIPTION
                                                                                   (Include page numbers of lesson, a link to
                                                                                   lesson, or other identifier for easy lookup
                                                                                            for committee member.)
                          Recognize that the Milky Way is part of the
SC.912.E.5.In.a           expanding universe.                                     Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 29–31, 33–34, 38–39
                          Identify stars as giant masses of burning gases
SC.912.E.5.In.b           that are changing.                                      Chapter 1, Section 9, pp. 100–108
                          Describe the Sun as a medium-sized star with
                          sunspots and storms that can affect weather
SC.912.E.5.In.c           and radio transmissions on Earth.                       Chapter 1, Section 7, pp. 77–88
                          Recognize that there are other planetary
                          systems in the universe besides the Solar
SC.912.E.5.In.d           System.                                                 Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 29, 31–39
                          Recognize a lunar eclipse, a solar eclipse, and         Chapter 1, Section 4, pp. 41–46, 48–49; Section 5, pp.
SC.912.E.5.In.e           the effect of the Moon on tides on Earth.               50–63
                          Identify major contributions and research from
                          space exploration that affected Florida’s
SC.912.E.5.In.f           economy and culture.                                    Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 110, 112–114, 120–121, 123
                          Identify tools that use different types of radiation,
                          such as radio waves, ultraviolet radiation, and
SC.912.E.5.In.g           infrared waves.                                         Chapter 1, Section 8, pp. 89, 92, 94–99
                          Recognize that when objects move away from
                          each other, the distance between them
SC.912.E.5.Pa.a           expands.                                                Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 29–31, 33–34, 38–39
SC.912.E.5.Pa.b           Recognize that stars are bright.                        Chapter 1, Section 9, pp. 100–108
                          Observe and recognize effects of the Sun on
SC.912.E.5.Pa.c           Earth, such as temperature changes.                     Chapter 1, Section 7, pp. 77–88
SC.912.E.5.Pa.d           Recognize that Earth is a planet.                       Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 29, 31–39
                  Recognize items, such as freeze-dried food and
                  space blankets, developed because of space
SC.912.E.5.Pa.e   exploration.                                        Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 109–112, 115–123
                  Recognize a tool that uses radiation for personal
SC.912.E.5.Pa.f   reasons, such as x-rays.                            Chapter 1, Section 8, pp. 89, 92, 94–99
                  Recognize that the universe consists of many
SC.912.E.5.Su.a   galaxies, including the Milky Way.                  Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 29–31, 33–34, 38–39
                  Recognize that stars are made of burning
SC.912.E.5.Su.b   gases.                                              Chapter 1, Section 9, pp. 100–108

                  Describe observable effects of the Sun on Earth,
SC.912.E.5.Su.c   such as changes in light and temperature.        Chapter 1, Section 7, pp. 77–88
                  Recognize that there are planetary systems in
SC.912.E.5.Su.d   the Universe.                                    Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 29, 31–39
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 4, pp. 41–46, 48–49; Section 5, pp.
SC.912.E.5.Su.e   Recognize an eclipse.                            50–63
                  Identify major contributions related to space
SC.912.E.5.Su.f   exploration that affected Florida.                  Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 109–112, 115–123
                  Identify major contributions related to space
SC.912.E.5.Su.f   exploration that affected Florida.                  Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 109–112, 115–123
                  Recognize examples of tools that use radiation
                  for observation purposes, such as x-rays and
SC.912.E.5.Su.g   infrared night goggles.                              Chapter 1, Section 8, pp. 89, 92, 94–99
                                                                       Chapter 2, Section 1, pp. 147–153; Section 2, pp.
                  Describe the three layers of Earth (core, mantle, 159–160; Section 3, pp. 162–170; Section 4, pp.
SC.912.E.6.In.a   and crust).                                          172–179; Section 5, pp. 180–190
                                                                       Chapter 2, Section 1, pp. 144–154; Section 7, pp.
                                                                       204–209; Section 8, pp. 212–217; Section 9, pp.
                                                                       219–225
                                                                       Chapter 4, Section 1, pp. 368–378; Section 2, pp.
                                                                       380–388; Section 3, pp. 389–396; Section 4, pp.
                  Describe examples of surface features, such as
                                                                       398–407; Section 5, pp. 408–415; Section 6, pp.
                  glaciers, valleys, canyons, and dried riverbeds, 418–426; Section 7, pp. 427–434; Section 8, pp.
                  which are caused by wind and erosion (surface 435–441; Section 9, pp. 446–449, p. 451
SC.912.E.6.In.b   processes).
                                                                       Chapter 2, Section 2, pp. 157–161; Section 3, pp.
                  Relate a cause and effect of movements in            162–170; Section 4, pp. 171–179; Section 5, pp.
                  Earth’s crust (plate tectonics), such as fault lines 180–190; Section 6, pp. 191–200; Section 10, pp.
SC.912.E.6.In.c   in the plates causing earthquakes.                   229–231
                                                                       Chapter 3, Section 1, pp. 266–277; Section 2, pp.
                                                                       278–286; Section 3, pp. 287–296; Section 4, pp.
                                                                       297–304; Section 5, pp. 305–311; Section 6, pp.
                                                                       314–321; Section 7, pp. 323–328; Section 8, pp.
                  Identify natural geological processes that           330–338; Section 9, pp. 339–353
                  change the land and water in Florida, including Chapter 4, Section 3, pp. 389–396
SC.912.E.6.In.d   beach erosion and sinkholes.
                                                                       Chapter 2, Section 1, pp. 147–153; Section 2, pp.
                                                                       159–160; Section 3, pp. 162–170; Section 4, pp.
SC.912.E.6.Pa.a   Identify a surface feature of Earth, such as a hill. 172–179; Section 5, pp. 180–190
                                                                    Chapter 2, Section 2, pp. 157–161; Section 3, pp.
                                                                    162–170; Section 4, pp. 171–179; Section 5, pp.
                                                                    180–190; Section 6, pp. 191–200; Section 10, pp.
SC.912.E.6.Pa.b   Recognize that the surface of Earth can change. 229–231
                                                                    Chapter 2, Section 1, pp. 147–153; Section 2, pp.
                  Recognize the three layers of Earth (core,        159–160; Section 3, pp. 162–170; Section 4, pp.
SC.912.E.6.Su.a   mantle, and crust).                               172–179; Section 5, pp. 180–190
                                                                    Chapter 2, Section 1, pp. 144–154; Section 7, pp.
                                                                    204–209; Section 8, pp. 212–217; Section 9, pp.
                                                                    219–225
                                                                    Chapter 4, Section 1, pp. 368–378; Section 2, pp.
                                                                    380–388; Section 3, pp. 389–396; Section 4, pp.
                                                                    398–407; Section 5, pp. 408–415; Section 6, pp.
                                                                    418–426; Section 7, pp. 427–434; Section 8, pp.
                  Identify types of surface features, such as hills 435–441; Section 9, pp. 446–449, p. 451
SC.912.E.6.Su.b   and valleys.
                                                                    Chapter 2, Section 2, pp. 157–161; Section 3, pp.
                  Recognize that Earth’s crust is broken into parts 162–170; Section 4, pp. 171–179; Section 5, pp.
                  (plates) that move and cause mountains and        180–190; Section 6, pp. 191–200; Section 10, pp.
SC.912.E.6.Su.c   volcanoes.                                        229–231
                                                                    Chapter 3, Section 1, pp. 266–277; Section 2, pp.
                                                                    278–286; Section 3, pp. 287–296; Section 4, pp.
                                                                    297–304; Section 5, pp. 305–311; Section 6, pp.
                                                                    314–321; Section 7, pp. 323–328; Section 8, pp.
                                                                    330–338; Section 9, pp. 339–353
                  Recognize examples of natural changes to          Chapter 4, Section 3, pp. 389–396
SC.912.E.6.Su.d   Florida’s land and water, such as beach erosion.
                                                                    Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–500; Section 5, pp. 507,
                                                                    509–514; Section 6, pp. 515–521
                                                                    Chapter 7, Section 1, pp. 623–632; Section 2, pp.
                                                                    634–643; Section 3, pp. 644–651, 653–654; Section 4,
                  Identify cycles that occur on Earth, such as the pp. 655–663; Section 5, pp. 666–675; Section 6, pp.
                  water and carbon cycles, and the role energy      676–68
SC.912.E.7.In.a   plays in them.
                  Recognize that there are circular movements of
                  ocean water (surface and deep-water currents)
                  which move cold water from the poles toward       Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 466–473; Section 2, pp.
SC.912.E.7.In.b   the tropics and vice versa.                       475–483; Section 3, pp. 484–493
                                                                    Standard addressed implicitly in each EarthComm
                                                                    section. Explicit examples of Earth system interactions
                                                                    include the following:
                                                                    Nature of Science, pp. NS8–NS10
                                                                    Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 111–112
                  Describe the interactions among the               Chapter 2, Section 8, p. 212
                                                                    Chapter 4, Section 9, p. 451
                  atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere,
                                                                    Chapter 5, Section 5, pp. 507, 514
                  including how air, water, and land support living Chapter 6, Section 7, p. 606
                  things and how air temperature affects water      Chapter 7, Section 6, p. 677
SC.912.E.7.In.c   and land temperatures.
                                                                    Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–506; Section 5, pp.
                                                                    507–514
                  Describe variations in climate due to geological Chapter 7, Section 1, pp. 622–623, 628–633; Section 2,
                  locations, such as on mountains and the           pp. 635–636, 641–643; Section 3, pp. 649–653
SC.912.E.7.In.d   nearness to large bodies of water.
                  Identify weather conditions using weather data     Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 536–544; Section 2, pp.
SC.912.E.7.In.e   and weather maps.                                  545–555; Section 3, pp. 556–561
                  Compare weather conditions in different types of   Chapter 6, Section 4, pp. 564–572; Section 5, pp.
                  severe storms, including hurricanes, tornadoes,    573–581; Section 6, pp. 585–592; Section 7, pp.
SC.912.E.7.In.f   and thunderstorms.                                 593–603, 605–606

                  Recognize that global climate change is related Chapter 7, Section 2, p. 643; Section 3, pp. 644–654;
SC.912.E.7.In.g   to conditions in the atmosphere and oceans.     Section 4, pp. 655–663; Section 5, pp. 666–675

                                                                     Chapter 3, Section 9, pp. 339–353
                  Describe how atmospheric and hydrologic            Chapter 4, Section 3, pp. 389–391, pp. 393–397
                  conditions, such as hurricanes, drought,           Chapter 6, Section 7, pp. 593–602, pp. 605–607
SC.912.E.7.In.h   wildfires, and sinkholes, affect human behavior.
                  Recognize that the ocean absorbs most of the
                  solar energy reaching Earth and loses heat         Chapter 7, Section 4, pp. 655–663; Section 5, pp.
SC.912.E.7.In.i   primarily by evaporation.                          666–668, 670–671; Section 6, pp. 677–682
                                                                     Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–500; Section 5, pp. 507,
                                                                     509–514; Section 6, pp. 515–521
                                                                     Chapter 7, Section 1, pp. 623–632; Section 2, pp.
                                                                     634–643; Section 3, pp. 644–651, 653–654; Section 4,
                                                                     pp. 655–663; Section 5, pp. 666–675; Section 6, pp.
                  Recognize that clouds release rain (part of the    676–68
SC.912.E.7.Pa.a   water cycle).
                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 466–473; Section 2, pp.
SC.912.E.7.Pa.b   Recognize waves in the ocean.                    475–483; Section 3, pp. 484–493
                                                                   Standard addressed implicitly in each EarthComm
                                                                   section. Explicit examples of Earth system interactions
                                                                   include the following:
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. NS8–NS10
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 111–112
                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 8, p. 212
                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 9, p. 451
                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 5, pp. 507, 514
                                                                   Chapter 6, Section 7, p. 606
                  Recognize that humans, plants, and animals live Chapter 7, Section 6, p. 677
SC.912.E.7.Pa.c   on the Earth (biosphere).
                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–506; Section 5, pp.
                                                                   507–514
                                                                   Chapter 7, Section 1, pp. 622–623, 628–633; Section 2,
                  Recognize that weather (climate) is different in pp. 635–636, 641–643; Section 3, pp. 649–653
SC.912.E.7.Pa.d   different locations.
                  Recognize the weather conditions, including      Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 536–544; Section 2, pp.
SC.912.E.7.Pa.e   severe weather, in Florida.                      545–555; Section 3, pp. 556–561
                  Recognize that the Sun heats the water in the      Chapter 7, Section 4, pp. 655–663; Section 5, pp.
SC.912.E.7.Pa.f   ocean.                                             666–668, 670–671; Section 6, pp. 677–682
                                                                     Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–500; Section 5, pp. 507,
                                                                     509–514; Section 6, pp. 515–521
                                                                     Chapter 7, Section 1, pp. 623–632; Section 2, pp.
                                                                     634–643; Section 3, pp. 644–651, 653–654; Section 4,
                  Recognize the phases of the water cycle that       pp. 655–663; Section 5, pp. 666–675; Section 6, pp.
                  occur on Earth and the role energy plays in the    676–68
SC.912.E.7.Su.a   water cycle.
                  Recognize that currents move the ocean water         Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 466–473; Section 2, pp.
SC.912.E.7.Su.b   around Earth.                                        475–483; Section 3, pp. 484–493
                                                                       Standard addressed implicitly in each EarthComm
                                                                       section. Explicit examples of Earth system interactions
                                                                       include the following:
                                                                       Nature of Science, pp. NS8–NS10
                                                                       Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 111–112
                                                                       Chapter 2, Section 8, p. 212
                                                                       Chapter 4, Section 9, p. 451
                                                                       Chapter 5, Section 5, pp. 507, 514
                                                                       Chapter 6, Section 7, p. 606
                  Recognize components of the atmosphere, the          Chapter 7, Section 6, p. 677
SC.912.E.7.Su.c   hydrosphere, and the biosphere.
                                                                       Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–506; Section 5, pp.
                                                                       507–514
                                                                       Chapter 7, Section 1, pp. 622–623, 628–633; Section 2,
                  Identify the climate conditions in different parts   pp. 635–636, 641–643; Section 3, pp. 649–653
SC.912.E.7.Su.d   of the world.
                  Identify weather conditions, including         Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 536–544; Section 2, pp.
SC.912.E.7.Su.e   temperature, wind speed, and humidity.         545–555; Section 3, pp. 556–561
                                                                 Chapter 6, Section 4, pp. 564–572; Section 5, pp.
                  Recognize conditions in severe storms, such as 573–581; Section 6, pp. 585–592; Section 7, pp.
SC.912.E.7.Su.f   hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms.      593–603, 605–606
                  Recognize that global climate change occurs      Chapter 7, Section 2, p. 643; Section 3, pp. 644–654;
SC.912.E.7.Su.g   over a long period of time.                      Section 4, pp. 655–663; Section 5, pp. 666–675
                                                                   Chapter 3, Section 9, pp. 339–353
                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 3, pp. 389–391, pp. 393–397
                  Identify how weather and water conditions affect Chapter 6, Section 7, pp. 593–602, pp. 605–607
SC.912.E.7.Su.h   humans in Florida.
                  Recognize that the ocean absorbs heat from the Chapter 7, Section 4, pp. 655–663; Section 5, pp.
SC.912.E.7.Su.i   Sun and then warms the air.                      666–668, 670–671; Section 6, pp. 677–682

                  Identify a problem based on a specific body of
                  knowledge, including life science, earth and         1. pose questions about the natural world,
                  space science, or physical science, and do the       Each section begins with a Think About It component.
                                                                       The majority of these ask a question(s) about the natural
                  following: 1. Identify a scientific question 2.
                                                                       world. Examples include the following:
                  Examine reliable sources of informtion to identify   Chapter 1, Section 1, p. 8
                  what is already known 3. Develop a possible          Chapter 2, Section 7, p. 204
                  explanation (hypothesis) 4. Plan and carry out       Chapter 3, Section 2, p. 278
                                                                       Chapter 4, Section 2, p. 380
                  an experiment 5. Gather data based on
                                                                       Chapter 5, Section 1, p. 466
                  measurement and observations 6. Evaluate the         Chapter 6, Section 2, p. 545
                  data 7. Use the data to support reasonable           Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 622
SC.912.N.1.In.a   explanations, inferences, and conclusions.
                                                                     Students apply scientific processes and methods in
                                                                     every section’s Investigate. Through these experiences,
                                                                     students gain an appreciation for the characteristics of
                                                                     science and scientific knowledge. Each section provides
                                                                     an opportunity for students to describe and explain how
                                                                     the investigations they conducted and the knowledge
                                                                     they gained is specific to the practice of science.
                                                                     Examples include the following:
                                                                     Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                     Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 50–53
                  Describe the processes used in scientific          Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 162–164
                                                                     Chapter 3, Section 6, pp. 314–316
                  investigations, including posing a research
                                                                     Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 380–382
                  question, forming a hypothesis, reviewing what Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–500
                  is known, collecting evidence, evaluating results, Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 536–538
SC.912.N.1.In.b   and reaching conclusions.                          Chapter 7, Section 5, pp. 666–668
                                                                     Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                     Chapter 1, Section 9, pp. 103–108
                                                                     Chapter 3, Extending the Connection, pp. 358–358B
                                                                     Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B
                  Identify that scientific investigations are        Chapter 7, Section 3, pp. 649–653
SC.912.N.1.In.c   sometimes repeated in different locations.
                                                                     Each Chapter Challenge requires students to use
                                                                     creativity in solving scientific problems and tasks.
                                                                     Students apply the knowledge gained within the chapter
                                                                     in the development of their own solutions for the Chapter
                                                                     Challenge. Many chapters also contain open-ended
                                                                     activities in which students must be creative in coming
                                                                     up with their own scientific questions and/or methods to
                                                                     answer scientific questions. Examples include the
                                                                     following:
                                                                     Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                     Chapter 1, Section 8, p. 99
                                                                     Chapter 2, Section 1, p. 155
                                                                     Chapter 3, Section 2, pp. 278–279
                                                                     Chapter 4, Section 7, p. 428
                                                                     Chapter 5, Chapter Challenge, pp. 524–525
                  Identify that scientists use many different        Chapter 6, Section 5, p. 581
SC.912.N.1.In.d   methods in conducting their research.              Chapter 7, Section 5, p. 668

                                                                    1. pose questions about the natural world,
                                                                    Each section begins with a Think About It component.
                                                                    The majority of these ask a question(s) about the natural
                                                                    world. Examples include the following:
                                                                    Chapter 1, Section 1, p. 8
                  Recognize a problem related to a specific body    Chapter 2, Section 7, p. 204
                  of knowledge, including life science, earth and   Chapter 3, Section 2, p. 278
                                                                    Chapter 4, Section 2, p. 380
                  space science, or physical science, and do the
                                                                    Chapter 5, Section 1, p. 466
                  following: 1. Observe objects and activities 2.   Chapter 6, Section 2, p. 545
                  Follow planned procedures 3. Recognize a          Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 622
SC.912.N.1.Pa.a   solution.
                                                                   Students apply scientific processes and methods in
                                                                   every section’s Investigate. Through these experiences,
                                                                   students gain an appreciation for the characteristics of
                                                                   science and scientific knowledge. Each section provides
                                                                   an opportunity for students to describe and explain how
                                                                   the investigations they conducted and the knowledge
                                                                   they gained is specific to the practice of science.
                                                                   Examples include the following:
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 50–53
                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 162–164
                                                                   Chapter 3, Section 6, pp. 314–316
                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 380–382
                  Recognize a process used in science to solve     Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–500
                  problems, such as observing, following           Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 536–538
SC.912.N.1.Pa.b   procedures, and recognizing results.             Chapter 7, Section 5, pp. 666–668
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 9, pp. 103–108
                                                                   Chapter 3, Extending the Connection, pp. 358–358B
                  Recognize that when a variety of common          Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B
                  activities are repeated the same way, the        Chapter 7, Section 3, pp. 649–653
SC.912.N.1.Pa.c   outcomes are the same.
                                                                   Each Chapter Challenge requires students to use
                                                                   creativity in solving scientific problems and tasks.
                                                                   Students apply the knowledge gained within the chapter
                                                                   in the development of their own solutions for the Chapter
                                                                   Challenge. Many chapters also contain open-ended
                                                                   activities in which students must be creative in coming
                                                                   up with their own scientific questions and/or methods to
                                                                   answer scientific questions. Examples include the
                                                                   following:
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 8, p. 99
                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 1, p. 155
                                                                   Chapter 3, Section 2, pp. 278–279
                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 7, p. 428
                  Recognize that people try different ways to      Chapter 5, Chapter Challenge, pp. 524–525
                  complete a task when the first one does not      Chapter 6, Section 5, p. 581
SC.912.N.1.Pa.d   work.                                            Chapter 7, Section 5, p. 668

                                                                   1. pose questions about the natural world,
                  Recognize a problem based on a specific body Each section begins with a Think About It component.
                                                                   The majority of these ask a question(s) about the natural
                  of knowledge, including life science, earth and
                                                                   world. Examples include the following:
                  space science, or physical science, and do the Chapter 1, Section 1, p. 8
                  following: 1. Recognize a scientific question 2. Chapter 2, Section 7, p. 204
                  Use reliable information and identify what is    Chapter 3, Section 2, p. 278
                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 2, p. 380
                  already known 3. Create possible explanation 4.
                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 1, p. 466
                  Carry out a planned experiment 5. Record         Chapter 6, Section 2, p. 545
                  observations 6. Summarize results 7. Reach a Chapter 7, Section 1, p. 622
SC.912.N.1.Su.a   reasonable conclusion.
                                                                    Students apply scientific processes and methods in
                                                                    every section’s Investigate. Through these experiences,
                                                                    students gain an appreciation for the characteristics of
                                                                    science and scientific knowledge. Each section provides
                                                                    an opportunity for students to describe and explain how
                                                                    the investigations they conducted and the knowledge
                                                                    they gained is specific to the practice of science.
                                                                    Examples include the following:
                                                                    Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                    Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 50–53
                                                                    Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 162–164
                                                                    Chapter 3, Section 6, pp. 314–316
                                                                    Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 380–382
                  Identify the basic process used in scientific     Chapter 5, Section 4, pp. 496–500
                  investigations, including questioning, observing, Chapter 6, Section 1, pp. 536–538
SC.912.N.1.Su.b   recording, determining, and sharing results.      Chapter 7, Section 5, pp. 666–668
                                                                    Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                    Chapter 1, Section 9, pp. 103–108
                                                                    Chapter 3, Extending the Connection, pp. 358–358B
                                                                    Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B
                  Recognize that scientific investigations can be   Chapter 7, Section 3, pp. 649–653
SC.912.N.1.Su.c   repeated in different locations.
                                                                    Each Chapter Challenge requires students to use
                                                                    creativity in solving scientific problems and tasks.
                                                                    Students apply the knowledge gained within the chapter
                                                                    in the development of their own solutions for the Chapter
                                                                    Challenge. Many chapters also contain open-ended
                                                                    activities in which students must be creative in coming
                                                                    up with their own scientific questions and/or methods to
                                                                    answer scientific questions. Examples include the
                                                                    following:
                                                                    Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                    Chapter 1, Section 8, p. 99
                                                                    Chapter 2, Section 1, p. 155
                                                                    Chapter 3, Section 2, pp. 278–279
                                                                    Chapter 4, Section 7, p. 428
                  Recognize that scientists use a variety of        Chapter 5, Chapter Challenge, pp. 524–525
                  methods to get answers to their research          Chapter 6, Section 5, p. 581
SC.912.N.1.Su.d   questions.                                        Chapter 7, Section 5, p. 668
                  Identify examples of investigations that involve   Nature of Science, pp. TK
SC.912.N.2.In.a   science.                                           Chapter 2, Extending the Connection, pp. 256–256A
                  Distinguish between questions that can be
                  answered by science and observable
                  information and questions that can’t be
                  answered by science and observable                 Nature of Science, pp. TK
SC.912.N.2.In.b   information.                                       Chapter 2, Extending the Connection, pp. 256–256A
                                                                   In many parts of EarthComm, students consider the
                                                                   vigor of scientific knowledge through experimentation
                                                                   and the examination of theories supported by evidence.
                                                                   Examples of how scientific knowledge is subject to
                                                                   change and debate can be found in the following
                                                                   sections:
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 2, pp. 24–27; Section 7, pp. 83–84;
                                                                   Section 10, pp. 115–122
                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 165–168; Section 4, pp.
                                                                   176–178; Section 5, pp. 182–188; Section 6, pp.
                                                                   191–199
                                                                   Chapter 3, Section 5, pp. 308–309; Section 7, pp.
                                                                   323–327; Section 8, pp. 335–337; Extending the
                                                                   Connection, pp. 358–358B
                                                                   Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B
                  Recognize that scientific knowledge can be       Chapter 7, Section 3, pp. 649–654; Section 6, pp.
                  challenged or confirmed by new investigations    678–681
SC.912.N.2.In.c   and reexamination.
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 7, p. 88; Section 8, p. 93
                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 166–169; Section 4, pp.
                                                                   176–178; Section 6, pp. 191–201
                                                                   Chapter 3, Extending the Connection, pp. 358–358B
                                                                   Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B
SC.912.N.2.In.d   Identify major contributions of scientists.
                                                                    Nature of Science, pp. TK
SC.912.N.2.Pa.a   Recognize an example of work by scientists.       Chapter 2, Extending the Connection, pp. 256–256A
                                                                    In many parts of EarthComm, students consider the
                                                                    vigor of scientific knowledge through experimentation
                                                                    and the examination of theories supported by evidence.
                                                                    Examples of how scientific knowledge is subject to
                                                                    change and debate can be found in the following
                                                                    sections:
                                                                    Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                    Chapter 1, Section 2, pp. 24–27; Section 7, pp. 83–84;
                                                                    Section 10, pp. 115–122
                                                                    Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 165–168; Section 4, pp.
                                                                    176–178; Section 5, pp. 182–188; Section 6, pp.
                                                                    191–199
                                                                    Chapter 3, Section 5, pp. 308–309; Section 7, pp.
                                                                    323–327; Section 8, pp. 335–337; Extending the
                                                                    Connection, pp. 358–358B
                                                                    Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B
                                                                    Chapter 7, Section 3, pp. 649–654; Section 6, pp.
                  Recognize a variety of cause-effect relationships 678–681
SC.912.N.2.Pa.b   related to science.
                  Identify questions that can be answered by        Nature of Science, pp. TK
SC.912.N.2.Su.a   science.                                          Chapter 2, Extending the Connection, pp. 256–256A
                                                                    In many parts of EarthComm, students consider the
                                                                    vigor of scientific knowledge through experimentation
                                                                    and the examination of theories supported by evidence.
                                                                    Examples of how scientific knowledge is subject to
                                                                    change and debate can be found in the following
                                                                    sections:
                                                                    Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                    Chapter 1, Section 2, pp. 24–27; Section 7, pp. 83–84;
                                                                    Section 10, pp. 115–122
                                                                    Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 165–168; Section 4, pp.
                                                                    176–178; Section 5, pp. 182–188; Section 6, pp.
                                                                    191–199
                                                                    Chapter 3, Section 5, pp. 308–309; Section 7, pp.
                                                                    323–327; Section 8, pp. 335–337; Extending the
                                                                    Connection, pp. 358–358B
                                                                    Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B
                                                                    Chapter 7, Section 3, pp. 649–654; Section 6, pp.
                  Recognize that what is known about science        678–681
SC.912.N.2.Su.b   can change based on new information.
                                                                    Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                    Chapter 1, Section 7, p. 88; Section 8, p. 93
                                                                    Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 166–169; Section 4, pp.
                                                                    176–178; Section 6, pp. 191–201
                                                                    Chapter 3, Extending the Connection, pp. 358–358B
                                                                    Chapter 5, Extending the Connection, pp. 526–526B
SC.912.N.2.Su.c   Recognize major contributions of scientists.
                                                                    Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                    Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 54–60; Section 7, p. 86
                                                                    Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 165–169; Section 4, pp.
                                                                    176–179; Section 6, pp. 191–200
                  Recognize that a scientific theory is developed   Chapter 3, Section 8, pp. 335–337
                  by repeated investigations of many scientists     Chapter 4, Section 9, pp. 446–449
SC.912.N.3.In.a   and agreement on the likely explanation.
                                                                     Nature of Science, pp. TK
                  Identify examples of scientific laws that describe Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 32–38; Section 4, pp. 43–47;
                  relationships in the natural world, such as        Section 5, pp. 54–60
SC.912.N.3.In.b   Newton’s laws.                                     Chapter 3, Section 7, pp. 323–328
                                                                     Throughout EarthComm, students use a wide range of
                                                                     models to represent phenomena and theories. Examples
                                                                     include the following:
                                                                     Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                     Chapter 1, Section 1, p. 9, pp. 12–16
                                                                     Chapter 2, Section 4, pp. 172–174, 179
                                                                     Chapter 3, Section 3, p. 288
                                                                     Chapter 4, Section 4, pp. 398–399
                                                                     Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 466–468
                                                                     Chapter 6, Section 2, p. 547
                  Identify ways models are used in the study of      Chapter 7, Section 4, p. 656, 663
SC.912.N.3.In.c   science.
                                                                     Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                     Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 54–60; Section 7, p. 86
                                                                     Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 165–169; Section 4, pp.
                                                                     176–179; Section 6, pp. 191–200
                                                                     Chapter 3, Section 8, pp. 335–337
                  Recognize examples of cause-effect                 Chapter 4, Section 9, pp. 446–449
SC.912.N.3.Pa.a   descriptions or explanations related to science.
                                                                   Throughout EarthComm, students use a wide range of
                                                                   models to represent phenomena and theories. Examples
                                                                   include the following:
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 1, p. 9, pp. 12–16
                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 4, pp. 172–174, 179
                                                                   Chapter 3, Section 3, p. 288
                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 4, pp. 398–399
                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 466–468
                                                                   Chapter 6, Section 2, p. 547
                  Recognize a model used in the context of one’s Chapter 7, Section 4, p. 656, 663
SC.912.N.3.Pa.b   own study of science.
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 5, pp. 54–60; Section 7, p. 86
                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 3, pp. 165–169; Section 4, pp.
                                                                   176–179; Section 6, pp. 191–200
                                                                   Chapter 3, Section 8, pp. 335–337
                  Recognize that scientific theories are supported Chapter 4, Section 9, pp. 446–449
SC.912.N.3.Su.a   by evidence and agreement of many scientists.
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                  Recognize examples of scientific laws that       Chapter 1, Section 3, pp. 32–38; Section 4, pp. 43–47;
                  describe relationships in nature, such as        Section 5, pp. 54–60
SC.912.N.3.Su.b   Newton’s laws.                                   Chapter 3, Section 7, pp. 323–328
                                                                   Throughout EarthComm, students use a wide range of
                                                                   models to represent phenomena and theories. Examples
                                                                   include the following:
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 1, p. 9, pp. 12–16
                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 4, pp. 172–174, 179
                                                                   Chapter 3, Section 3, p. 288
                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 4, pp. 398–399
                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 1, pp. 466–468
                                                                   Chapter 6, Section 2, p. 547
                  Recognize ways models are used in the study of Chapter 7, Section 4, p. 656, 663
SC.912.N.3.Su.c   science.
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 111–112, 115–123
                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 8, pp. 213–214, 217–218
                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 380–388; Section 3, pp.
                                                                   389–396; Section 5, pp. 408–415; Section 7, p. 429,
                                                                   431–433; Section 9, pp. 444, 446–450
                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 5, pp. 507–510, 512–513; Section 6,
                                                                   pp. 515–520
                                                                   Chapter 6, Section 4, pp. 564–571; Section 5, pp.
                                                                   576–581; Section 6, pp. 585–592
                                                                   Chapter 7, Section 5, pp. 667–673, 675; Section 6, pp.
                                                                   676–682
                  Identify ways scientific knowledge and problem
SC.912.N.4.In.a   solving benefit people.
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 111–112, 115–123
                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 8, pp. 213–214, 217–218
                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 380–388; Section 3, pp.
                                                                   389–396; Section 5, pp. 408–415; Section 7, p. 429,
                                                                   431–433; Section 9, pp. 444, 446–450
                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 5, pp. 507–510, 512–513; Section 6,
                                                                   pp. 515–520
                                                                   Chapter 6, Section 4, pp. 564–571; Section 5, pp.
                                                                   576–581; Section 6, pp. 585–592
                                                                   Chapter 7, Section 5, pp. 667–673, 675; Section 6, pp.
                                                                   676–682
                  Recognize science information that helps
SC.912.N.4.Pa.a   people.
                                                                   Nature of Science, pp. TK
                                                                   Chapter 1, Section 10, pp. 111–112, 115–123
                                                                   Chapter 2, Section 8, pp. 213–214, 217–218
                                                                   Chapter 4, Section 2, pp. 380–388; Section 3, pp.
                                                                   389–396; Section 5, pp. 408–415; Section 7, p. 429,
                                                                   431–433; Section 9, pp. 444, 446–450
                                                                   Chapter 5, Section 5, pp. 507–510, 512–513; Section 6,
                                                                   pp. 515–520
                                                                   Chapter 6, Section 4, pp. 564–571; Section 5, pp.
                                                                   576–581; Section 6, pp. 585–592
                                                                   Chapter 7, Section 5, pp. 667–673, 675; Section 6, pp.
                                                                   676–682
                  Recognize ways scientific knowledge and
SC.912.N.4.Su.a   problem solving benefit people.
                                                      CORRELATION
                                            FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
                                          INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CORRELATION
                                         ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSE DESCRIPTION
SUBJECT:            Science
GRADE LEVEL:
COURSE TITLE:
COURSE CODE:
SUBMISSION TITLE:
TITLE ID:
PUBLISHER:
PUBLISHER ID:
                                                                                                             Committee Member Evaluation
                                                                                                             (Committee Member Use Only)

                                                             LESSONS WHERE CONTENT IS DIRECTLY




                                                                                                             Thoroughly




                                                                                                                                   Adequately




                                                                                                                                                            Not At All
                                                                                                                                                Minimally
                                                              ADDRESSED IN-DEPTH IN MAJOR TOOL




                                                                                                                          Highly
 CONTENT OUTLINE
                              CONTENT DESCRIPTION          (Include first page number of lesson, a link to
      CODE
                                                           lesson, or other identifier for easy lookup for
                                                                        committee member.)

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:14
posted:2/21/2012
language:English
pages:43