Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

Innovation-in-Graduate-Education-Funding-Proposal

VIEWS: 3 PAGES: 12

									              2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 1 of 11




    Arts and Healthcare Management
                            University of Oregon
             Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal

                               Submitted January 2011
                               by Patricia Dewey, Ph.D.
                     Associate Professor, Arts and Administration
               Director, Center for Community Arts and Cultural Policy
               Phone: 541-346-2050         Email: pdewey@uoregon.edu

Summary
Existing data demonstrate the significant and growing demand for professionals in policy and
program leadership in the field of arts and healthcare, but university education for professional
management of the arts in healthcare settings is virtually non-existent at present. The University
of Oregon is uniquely positioned to become the nation’s niche program leader in this specialized
area of interdisciplinary research and education. This funding proposal is submitted to help
support a second stage of ongoing program development in order to successfully design and
establish a strong graduate-level program in arts and healthcare management.

The Arts and Administration Program (School of Architecture and Allied Arts) seeks to establish
a graduate concentration area of study in Arts and Healthcare Management by 2013. We
anticipate that this academic field will continue to evolve into an interdisciplinary Certificate
program by 2016. This academic initiative was initiated in 2008, with a comprehensive
feasibility study and program proposal development process currently underway (to be completed
in spring 2011). We have already identified significant demand in this professionalizing field for
the qualifications and leadership competency such an academic program would provide. We
have also noticed ever-increasing graduate student academic interest at the intersection of arts,
healthcare, and healing. The sections below provide an overview of our approach to graduate
study in Arts and Healthcare Management, and discuss how Graduate School funding of $12,000
would be used to help support key program development initiatives during a crucial transitional
year once the full program proposal is complete and before the new concentration area (and
subsequent certificate program) are launched.


What’s New, Innovative, and Interdisciplinary
about Arts and Healthcare Management?
An initial scan of university-level training programs reveals numerous opportunities for education
as arts therapists or artists as practitioners in healthcare environments, but there appears to be a
significant gap in this field: training programs specifically designed to educate professional
managers of the arts in healthcare settings are virtually non-existent. This gap is striking when
one considers that, according to two recent surveys conducted by the Society for the Arts in
Healthcare, The Joint Commission, and Americans for the Arts (2004, 2007), about half of the
participating healthcare institutions – including hospitals and long-term and hospice/palliative
care organizations – reported having arts in healthcare programming (State of the Field Report
              2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 2 of 11



[SFR; Washington, DC: Society for the Arts in Healthcare, 2009]). These findings suggest an
urgent need for trained specialists to manage organizational policies and practices involving
visual art exhibits, in-hospital performances, bedside art activities, and art activities for staff.
According to a Green Paper titled “Future of the Arts and Healthcare,” circulated by Americans
for the Arts in summer 2010,

        Research demonstrates the benefits of the arts in healthcare in hospitals, nursing homes, senior
        centers, hospice facilities, and other locations within the community. Arts in healthcare programs
        and creative arts therapies have been applied to address a vast array of health issues – including
        post-traumatic stress disorder, autism, mental health, chronic illness, Alzheimer’s and dementia,
        neurological disorders and brain injury, and physical disabilities -- to improve patients’ overall
        health outcomes, treatment compliance, and quality of life.

        . . . [Further], a rich and growing body of research connects arts in healthcare programs to
        improved quality of care for patients, their families, and even medical staff. Studies prove that
        integrating the arts into healthcare settings helps to cultivate a healing environment; support the
        physical, mental, and emotional recovery of patients; communicate health and recovery
        information; and foster a positive environment for caregivers that reduces stress and improves
        workplace satisfaction and employee retention. (p. 1).


In addition, as hospitals and health care centers increasingly become engaged in their
communities as sites devoted to advancing quality of life, arts programming broadens beyond the
immediate institutional walls. It may be inferred that health care environments will continue to
become part of the fabric of community arts and culture engagement. The demand for
professional administrators in arts and healthcare will continue to grow, especially as the aging
baby boomer population increasingly demands high-quality healthcare services. Indeed, as the
Green Paper referenced above states:

        Arts in healthcare is steadily moving forward. Increasingly, healthcare administrators are not only
        welcoming but also financially supporting arts programming in their institutions. Medical and
        nursing schools see the value in incorporating arts in healthcare courses or content to help their
        students develop essential skills such as observation and communication. Arts institutions,
        schools, and colleges are partnering with healthcare organizations to provide arts programming
        and health promotion experiences in community settings. Architects and designers are creating
        healthcare facilities that are not only beautiful but also informed by solid evidence concerning the
        safe delivery of care, seeking to provide the most positive outcomes for patients, their families,
        and healthcare staff.

        . . . With the launch of the Society for the Arts in Healthcare’s journal, Arts & Health: An
        International Journal for Research, Policy and Practice, and other specialized journals relating to
        the field, a true sense of professionalism is settling in. Professionalism is also reflected by the
        development of coursework and training programs in higher-education institutions to prepare
        individuals to provide safe and effective arts in healthcare services. Beginnings of certification
        and accreditation are in the air. (p. 4).

That said, the relatively few studies that have been conducted and training program that have
been established to date have focused almost exclusively on the delivery and outcomes of arts in
healthcare settings. We are not aware of any existing research or educational programs that focus
on developing the necessary organizational policies, procedures, and management of arts and
healthcare programs. We contend that professionalization of the field will not be possible
without professionalization of the future leaders who drive arts in healthcare policy and program
administration. And, we know from anecdotal evidence provided by the leadership of the Society
              2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 3 of 11



for the Arts in Healthcare that this field is entering a significant new phase of professionalization,
and that prospective student interest in this specialized field is strong.

How can an excellent graduate-level program of specialized study in arts and healthcare
management be best designed and established? In 2010-2011, we are spearheading an initiative
to conduct exploratory research to prepare a preliminary needs assessment, feasibility study, and
curricular concept necessary to develop a full program proposal. The University of Oregon’s
Arts and Administration Program is approaching this exploratory research with the vision of
potentially introducing a new concentration area – with a new tenure-related faculty hire and in
close cooperation with PeaceHealth Oregon Region (especially Sacred Heart Medical Center,
Riverbend) – that will be developed parallel to existing Arts and Administration Program
concentration areas in community arts management, media management, museum studies, and
performing arts management.

We anticipate that this new concentration area of graduate study will concern policy and
administration of efforts that focus on how arts in health care contribute to quality of life, patient
healing and wellness, and community health and well-being. As such, we envision research and
teaching in Arts and Healthcare to be a natural partner in holistic approaches of translational
research and interdisciplinary systems science in this field. We expect that a wide range of
campus academic units – including the School of Architecture and Allied Arts, the School of
Music and Dance, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, the Oregon Bach Festival, as well as
Human Physiology (CAS), Counseling Psychology and Human Services (School of Education) –
would become potential collaborators in this initiative. Further, we envision a unique “niche” arts
and healthcare program could evolve as an attractive element of future UO-PeaceHealth
collaboration in research, teaching, service, and professional development. In the long-term, we
envision strong regional cooperation in this educational and research offering within the OUS
system (especially certain programs and research centers at OHSU and PSU), and with major
healthcare providers throughout Oregon. Graduate students to be affected by this new,
interdisciplinary niche program include those with the following academic interest areas: arts
management, health policy, hospital administration, medicine, nursing, gerontology, human
physiology, art, architecture, landscape architecture, art therapy, music therapy, dance/movement
therapy, theatre therapy, and social work (and likely many more areas of study). We anticipate
that significant external funding streams will be targeted and cultivated in support of our Arts and
Healthcare educational collaborations and programs.

The mission of the University of Oregon’s Arts and Administration Program is to educate cultural
sector leaders and participants to make a difference in communities. The program is the largest
of its kind in the western United States, and is renowned internationally for its emphasis on
community engagement and applied research, and its commitment to the integration of research,
teaching, and practice. Preliminary conversations with key personnel with Sacred Heart Medical
Center Riverbend (PeaceHealth Oregon Region) have revealed enthusiastic interest in
collaboration to establish this educational offering. With an excellent core curriculum in arts
management, experience in designing graduate-level concentration areas of study, a strong
research support infrastructure, a partnership with the leading hospital in the area firmly in place,
and our university’s enthusiastic support for exploring this prospective new area of graduate
education, we believe that we are uniquely positioned to design a program in arts and healthcare
management.
             2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 4 of 11




What’s the Timeline and Stage of Development
for Arts and Healthcare Management?
Based on preliminary conversations and exploratory research conducted over the past two years,
we are conducting a major project in 2010-2011 to develop a comprehensive program proposal
and to initiate a multi-phased launch of a new, specialized graduate program in Arts and
Healthcare Management within the next few years. Details on the stage of development of this
initiative and a project timeline follow.

In the 2010-2011 academic year, faculty in the University of Oregon’s Arts and Administration
Program and our research wing, the Center for Community Arts and Cultural Policy, are
exploring the feasibility of developing a new graduate-level course of study and research
trajectory in Arts and Healthcare. In winter and spring 2011, background research, a feasibility
study, and a program proposal are being crafted to educate future leaders in arts and healthcare
policy and administration.

Several specific goals exist for the needs assessment and program proposal to be completed in
2010-2011. We will conduct a thorough review of existing research on arts and health care
program management. With input from Americans for the Arts and The Society for the Arts in
Healthcare, we will conduct field research (utilizing survey instruments, site visits, and in-depth
interviews) to identify current and future administrative needs. We wish to work closely with two
consultants in The Society for Arts in Healthcare’s Consulting Grants and Services Program. By
spring 2011, information that we collect will lead to a comprehensive feasibility study, an
articulated programmatic research agenda, and a detailed curricular proposal for an Arts and
Healthcare concentration area. We will participate in the 2011 Society for the Arts in Healthcare
conference, during which we will solicit comments on our initial findings and draft program
proposal with experts in the field. Our findings will lead to the submission of an academic
journal article for publication in Arts and Health as well as to a detailed program proposal to be
presented to appropriate personnel at the University of Oregon by June 1, 2011. In spring and
summer 2011 we will carefully structure a sequence of presentations and discussions to
encourage collaboration among relevant academic and research units affiliated with the School of
Architecture and Allied Arts, the School of Music and Dance, the College of Arts and Sciences,
the College of Education, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, and the Oregon Bach Festival. A
detailed project timeline for the 2010-2011 academic year is provided as Appendix A.

At the time of submitting this proposal, we anticipate that the process of establishing our unique
national and international expertise in Arts and Healthcare Management will occur in a series of
three steps over the next few years. Step one, which has already begun due to significant interest
in this area of study among our current students, involves encouraging graduate student research
interest and professional development in arts and healthcare policy and management. Step two,
which will begin in the 2011-2012 academic year, involves securing the resources we need to
formally launch a new area of concentration based in the Arts and Administration Program. Step
two, which Graduate School funding would support, is discussed below and in Appendix B. Step
three (to commence in three to five years) will be to design and establish an interdisciplinary
certificate program for arts and healthcare, which we expect will appeal to the wide range of
graduate students – as well as mid-career professionals – with academic interests in this field of
study.
              2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 5 of 11




What Would Graduate School Funding Support?
Graduate School funding in the amount of $12,000 in the 2011-2012 academic year would assist
greatly in support of a crucial secondary phase of program design and implementation. A detailed
timeline and project budget information are provided in Appendix A and Appendix B. With the
comprehensive feasibility study completed by spring 2011, the 2011-2012 academic year will
focus on developing interdisciplinary academic partnerships, community partnerships, regional
networks, prospective program funding, and a potential new faculty hiring process. We are
secure in the allocation of funds from the Arts and Administration Program, the School of
Architecture and Allied Arts, and the Center for Community Arts and Cultural Policy in pursuit
of our 2011-2012 goals. In addition, we will continue to search for other seed grant and in-kind
support from other UO units as well as PeaceHealth Oregon Region to aid in laying the
foundation for a new graduate program in Arts and Healthcare Management.

The second stage of program implementation, which this funding would support, involves
securing strong UO and community partnerships, as well as the resources for a new faculty hire.
We are convinced that the arts and healthcare area field has significant fundraising potential, and
we will work closely with UO and PeaceHealth development personnel to cultivate donors. In
2011-2012 we will coordinate a series of community-building activities with local and regional
stakeholders. Initially we will focus on UO academic units and faculty, RiverBend Hospital and
PeaceHealth Oregon Region, and leadership of local arts organizations. We will then broaden our
state-wide and regional partnerships with health care organizations, research centers, university
faculty with related research and teaching interests, and university programs in hospital
administration (especially in the Eugene-Salem-Portland corridor). We will hold a series of
events and presentations during 2011-2012 to build initial community awareness, interest, and
investment in our Arts and Healthcare Management initiative. For example, we intend to invite
both the current president of the Society for the Arts in Healthcare as well as our lead consultant,
Elaine Sims, to visit us (to give presentations and facilitate meetings) during the academic year.

In order to successfully become “the” school that graduate students attend to study arts and
healthcare management, we require a new tenure-related faculty hire. Details pertaining to this
individual’s qualifications and a prospective job description will be included in the full program
proposal (summer 2011). Our initial thought, however is that only a highly qualified faculty
member would have the ability to further expand our graduate student enrollment (by roughly 15-
18) in a full concentration area and to spearhead development of an interdisciplinary certificate
program that would appeal to graduate students in other programs and mid-career professionals.
In 2011-2012, we expect to secure the resources we need to hire a new tenure-related faculty
member, with a search process in place by fall 2012. The formal concentration area would be
launched in fall 2013.
             2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 6 of 11




Appendix A: Arts and Healthcare Project Timeline and Outcomes
Preliminary Work, 2008-2010
Main Project -- Winter, Spring, and Summer 2011

Early Discussions and Information-Gathering Activities (2008-2010)

      Site visit and meetings with key personnel at RiverBend

      Participation in UO/PeaceHealth Oregon Region (UO/PHOR) meetings and initiatives
       pertaining to establishment of a collaborative research group

      Attendance at spring 2010 Society for Arts in Healthcare annual conference

      Initial document collection and review

      Identification of major national stakeholders and leaders in the field

      Strategize establishment of the Arts and Healthcare concentration area in Arts and
       Administration Program strategic planning retreats and faculty meetings


Preliminary Work (fall 2010)

      Craft detailed research design

      Secure potential consultants through Society for Arts and Healthcare grant program

      Have introductory discussions with relevant research personnel with the Society for Arts
       and Healthcare; Americans for the Arts; National Endowment for the Arts

      Have preliminary meetings and information exchange with key research project
       participants


Winter 2011

Main Project Goals
1) Complete data collection (survey, interviews, site visit)
2) Draft paper for discussion at the Society for Arts in Healthcare conference


      Review of literature and relevant documents
       January – March 2011
       A synthesis paper will be prepared from a collection of existing research, web-based
       documents, and other relevant literature on arts and healthcare. The focus of this
       background research will be on facts, figures, and trends in the field; the needs and
       demands of the field; leadership and professionalization of the field; and competency
       areas involved in arts and healthcare.
         2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 7 of 11




   Conduct general short survey of SAH full membership
    Survey design and testing, January 2011
    Survey conducted and data compiled, February 2011
    This short survey (targeting the full Society for Arts and Healthcare membership) will
    seek to collect ideas and suggestions regarding capacity building needs for professional
    arts and healthcare management. A simple web-based survey tool will be used.


   Conduct long survey of NEA best practices sites
    Survey design and testing, January 2011
    Survey conducted and data compiled, February 2011
    This longer survey of pre-selected sites will be designed to capture ideas for specific
    curricular content and instructional approaches that are particularly useful to emerging
    leaders in arts and healthcare management. Direct email will be used to recruit
    participants, provide the survey form, and follow-up for further information.


   Conduct phone interviews with selected NEA best practices sites
    Late February and early March 2011
    Based on feedback received from the long survey of selected sites, telephone interviews
    will be used to clarify responses and collect additional information as needed.


   Complete site visit at the University of Michigan
    January 31 and February 1, 2011
    Patricia Dewey and Tina Rinaldi will travel to Ann Arbor, Michigan, to meet with key
    personnel involved in the University of Michigan’s Health System’s “Gifts of Art”
    program. Particular focus will be on program leadership, design, and implementation, as
    well as on understanding the dynamics of university (especially faculty and student)
    involvement in the program. This site visit will essentially serve as an in-depth case
    study to inform academic program design at the University of Oregon. Desirable
    meetings and activities during the site visit include the following:

            Several interviews with Elaine Sims
            Conversations, shadowing, tours with Gifts of Art staff
            Focus group meeting with other local arts and healthcare leaders
            Short interviews (20-30 minutes) with the following stakeholders:
                    Key hospital administrators
                             (especially those focused on patient experience)
                    U. Michigan medical school “arts and healthcare” instructors
                    U. Michigan arts programs involved in Gifts of Art (faculty, staff)
                    Artists involved in Gifts of Art programs
                    Other key stakeholders as recommended by Elaine Sims


   Bring SAH consultant to Eugene to meet with key stakeholders
    February 21 and 22, 2011
    Our identified Society for Arts in Healthcare consultant, Jill Sonke, will travel to Eugene
    for two full days of meetings with University of Oregon personnel, faculty in the Arts and
             2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 8 of 11



        Administration Program, leadership of PeaceHealth Oregon Region, and key personnel in
        Sacred Heart Medical Center to help facilitate meetings and discussions pertaining to
        development of an Arts and Healthcare concentration area. During her visit, she will also
        give a presentation on the emerging growth and demand for professional administration
        of arts and healthcare programs. She would also share with us detailed information about
        the Center for the Arts in Healthcare Research and Education (CAHRE, which she co-
        founded and directs) at the University of Florida.


       Data Analysis and Conference Preparation
        March 1-11, 2011
        Although data analysis will be ongoing, a focused effort will take place in early March to
        articulate key findings for inclusion in the SAH discussion paper. This paper will present
        the study and preliminary findings for discussion and feedback at the annual conference
        in April. We intend to set up conversations with the SAH’s board members, as well as
        possibly a few focus groups and opportunities for informal discussions.



Spring 2011

Main Project Goals:
1) Continue research at the Society for the Arts in Healthcare Conference
2) Prepare journal article for submission to Arts and Health
2) Complete full program proposal for presentation in Oregon

Using information collected from January through March 2011, April and May of 2011 will
involve preparing a detailed feasibility study and program proposal to be submitted and presented
to the University of Oregon. Patricia Dewey and Tina Rinaldi will participate in the Society for
the Arts in Healthcare’s 22nd annual international conference, at which they will solicit comments
on initial findings and the draft program proposal from experts in the field. Findings will also
lead to developing a journal article to be submitted for review to Arts and Health.




Summer 2011

The main focus of this project in summer 2011 will be to have a series of presentations and
meetings with relevant UO senior administrators and faculty members, as well as with
community members involved in arts and healthcare. The journal article will be finalized for
submission.

Targeted UO academic units for presentations/discussions include:

       School of Architecture and Allied Arts (Dean, Associate Dean)
        Art, Architecture, Landscape Architecture, PPPM (department heads)

       College of Arts and Sciences (Dean)
        Human Physiology, Theatre Arts (department heads)
              2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 9 of 11




        School of Music and Dance (Dean)

        College of Education (Dean)
         Counseling Psychology and Human Services (department/program heads)

        UO/Peace Health Oregon Region collaborative research group(s)

        Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (director)

        Oregon Bach Festival (director)




Seed Funding Support for Arts and Healthcare Management
Preliminary Work (2008-2010) and 2010-2011 Project
Source                                                               Approximate Amount

Arts and Administration Program                                      $10,000
Center for Community Arts and Cultural Policy                        $3,000
Society for Arts in Healthcare Consulting Grant                      $2,500 (applying February 2011)
             2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 10 of 11




Appendix B: Timeline and Budget
for Arts and Healthcare Management
Graduate Program Implementation

STEP ONE: 2008-2012
Encourage Graduate Student Academic and Professional Interests in Arts and
Healthcare Management

This first step of graduate program implementation has already begun, due to considerable
student interest in professional opportunities and research topics that connect the arts with
healthcare, healing, and quality of life. Our ever-increasing network and familiarity with the field
is already opening up opportunities for our students to pursue this new and interdisciplinary
interest area.

However, Arts and Administration Program faculty recognize that the capacity to establish a
formal concentration area of graduate study, sustainable research and teaching trajectory, and
future interdisciplinary certificate program in Arts and Healthcare Management is contingent
upon the acquisition of resources, multiple collaborators, and a new faculty hire. The objectives
outlined in STEP TWO are designed to ensure the long-term viability and status of this program.


STEP TWO: 2011-2013
Secure Resources to Establish a Graduate Concentration Area

The second stage of program implementation requires considerable resources; namely, strong
UO and community partnerships as well as a new faculty hire. We are convinced that the arts and
healthcare area of education holds significant potential to garner external funds, and we will work
closely with UO and PeaceHealth development personnel to cultivate donors. From fall 2011
through 2013 we will coordinate a series of community-building activities with local and regional
stakeholders. Initially we will focus on UO academic units and faculty, RiverBend Hospital and
PeaceHealth Oregon Region, and leadership of local arts organizations. We will then broaden our
state-wide and regional partnerships with health care organizations, research centers, university
faculty with related research and teaching interests, and university programs in hospital
administration (especially in the Eugene-Salem-Portland corridor). We will hold a series of
events and presentations during 2011-2012 to build initial community awareness, interest, and
investment in our Arts and Healthcare Management initiative. For example, we intend to invite
both the current president of the Society for the Arts in Healthcare as well as our lead consultant,
Elaine Sims, to visit us (to give presentations and facilitate meetings) during the academic year.

In order to successfully become “the” school that graduate students come to study arts and
healthcare management, we will need a new tenure-related faculty hire. Details pertaining to this
individual’s qualifications and prospective job description will be included in the full program
proposal (summer 2011). Our initial thought, however, is that only a highly qualified faculty
member would have the ability to further expand our graduate student enrollment (by roughly 15-
18) in a full concentration area and to spearhead development of an interdisciplinary certificate
               2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 11 of 11



program that would appeal to graduate students in other programs and mid-career professionals.
We expect our goal will be to secure a new faculty line in the Arts and Administration Program
by spring 2012, so that we can begin a faculty search process in summer/fall 2012. This would
allow the formal launch of the new concentration area to begin in fall 2013. It is possible that this
could be a joint hire between several schools, but this requires much more discussion.

A draft budget for Arts and Healthcare Management program development in 2011-2012 is
provided below, demonstrating the allocation of Graduate School funding during the year. A
budget for 2012-2013 is not yet possible to create, as expense categories will be largely
determined by the status of the new faculty position.

2011-2012 Anticipated Project Expense Categories (Budget)

                                                GS           AAD           AAA       CCACP        UO/Other        PHOR
One course buy-out for PI (Dewey)               $6,000
Graduate work-study students to assist                        $1,000
with project management
Site visits and meetings in hospitals/med       $1,500
school programs in Portland and Seattle
Visit/presentations by president of             $1,000        $1,000                     $500
Society for the Arts in Healthcare
Visit/presentations by lead SAH                 $1,000        $1,000         $500        $500
consultant
Participation/presentation in SAH annual        $2,000        $2,000
conference (Dewey and Rinaldi)
Development and fundraising activities            $500        $1,000                   $2,000
Meetings with key stakeholders in                             $1,500                   $1,500
Eugene-Salem-Portland Corridor
Research materials (books, supplies, etc.)                     $500
Miscellaneous project expenses                                $1,000

                                 TOTAL         $12,000        $9,000         $500      $4,500           TBD          TBD



GS – Prospective Graduate School Funding (this application)
AAD – Arts and Administration Program (secured)
AAA – School of Architecture and Allied Arts Dean’s Office (secured)
CCACP – Center for Community Arts and Cultural Policy (secured)
UO/Other – Other administrative and academic/research units at UO (not secured)
PHOR – PeaceHealth Oregon Region, especially RiverBend Hospital (in-kind?)


STEP THREE: 2012/2013 - 2016
Launch the new Graduate Concentration Area
+ Design an Interdisciplinary Certificate Program

With a new faculty hire and basic resources secured, we would be able to immediately launch a
formal graduate concentration area in Arts and Healthcare Management. The new faculty
member would then be responsible for growing student participation in this program, for
deepening interdisciplinary collaborations and partnerships on campus and in the region, and
being actively engaged in external fundraising initiatives focused on arts and healthcare. With
the concentration area of study firmly in place, we expect that it would be relatively easy to
conceptualize, design, and establish a new interdisciplinary graduate certificate program in arts
and healthcare management. We anticipate that this certificate program would appeal to the wide
            2010-2011 Innovation in Graduate Education Funding Proposal | Arts and Healthcare Management | Page 12 of 11



range of graduate students who have arts and healthcare as a strong interest area, as well as to
mid-career professionals as a career development opportunity.

								
To top