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					   Habitat for Humanity
               EPICS
     Progress Report Fall 2002
         October 1, 2002




          Project partner:
        Habitat for Humanity

        420 South First Street
         Lafayette, IN 47901
              423-4590




Timothy Butler     butlertc@purdue.edu
Chris Costanzo     costancj@purdue.edu
Doug Crook         dcrook@purdue.edu
Payam Farazi       farazip@purdue.edu
Ben Hopkins        benhopki@purdue.edu
Kevin James        kjames@purdue.edu
Dean Kales         dean@purdue.edu
Marlana McClain    mmcclain@purdue.edu
Nicole Pater       pater@purdue.edu
Anne Rendaci       rendaci@purdue.edu
Mike Schilz        schilzm@purdue.edu
Shashi Shah        shahs@purdue.edu
Timothy West       twest5@purdue.edu
Brian Wink         wink@purdue.edu
Stacie Woodrum     woodrum@purdue.edu
Executive Summary
Habitat for Humanity International and their local city affiliates work to provide quality,
affordable homes to low-income families. The EPICS program has been working with
local and national Habitat for Humanity affiliates to develop and implement tools to
increase the efficiency and quality of home construction and ownership. The current
EPICS Habitat for Humanity Team functions as five sub-teams: Solar Team, Local
Database Team, National Database Team, Home Evaluation and Analysis Team (HEAT),
and Tutorial Team.

The Solar Team is working to improve the energy efficiency of Habitat for Humanity
houses by evaluating solar powered attic fans. This will be accomplished by analyzing
the energy flow between the attic and living space as well as installing and testing a solar
powered attic fan at the Restore in Lafayette. Basic analyses have been performed, and
the payback period is found to be between 7 and 10 years. More in depth analyses will
be performed by the end of the semester. In addition, a new solar powered attic fan will
be purchased for test and analysis.

The goals of the Local Database Team are to continue the local database project and
expand its useful. This will be accomplished by expanding the functionality of the
inventory/information database interface program, installing the improved version into
the Resale Store, training the management on its use, and aiding the organization of the
actual data entry. The beginning of the semester was spent evaluating the database, how
the local Habitat for Humanity affiliate plans to use it, and how to improve upon the
existing design. By the end of the semester, the team will have a functional database for
the Resale Store to use in their everyday operations.

The purpose of the National Database project is to create a database for the Habitat for
Humanity organization that will hold all of their homeowner survey data. These surveys
are given to new homeowners and every five years after that. These surveys are currently
given to the homeowners on paper, and then inputted into an Excel spreadsheet. The goal
of the National Database Team is to create an Access database and Visual Basic interface
that will simplify the data acquisition and the reporting of the data. This will enable
Habitat for Humanity to generate reports and analyze the data more efficiently. This
project will start out locally and will expand as needed. The two major components of
the project will be the Access database that will store the data. The Visual Basic
interface will be used to input the data. This is needed because the people inputting the
data will be volunteers who may not have Access knowledge. The database will be used
at many different HFH locations across the country.

The HEAT is working with the local Habitat for Humanity affiliate in its efforts to reduce
substandard housing in the Lafayette area. Using Arcview GIS, the team is working to
create a database that will contain information pertaining to home location, rating, and
owner information. By organizing this information, the local organization will have an
effective tool to identify substandard housing in Lafayette. The team has learned about
the Acrview GIS system and improved upon last semester’s database design. By the end
of the semester, the group will deliver an improved database that incorporates the
improved substandard housing rating system and a prospect file database as defined by
Don Bittles of the local organization.

Habitat for Humanity is interested in the creation of a national level construction tutorial
tool to enhance the construction efficiency of volunteers. The Tutorial Team is working
to provide this tool in several forms, including a web page (for high and low speed
connections), CD-Rom, digital video, VHS, and hard copy. A home construction guide
was created and delivered in the spring of 2001. The construction guide was a web tool
that consisted of a combination of text, pictures, and videos providing basic instruction
for a variety of home construction tasks. Upon inspection of the delivered home
construction guide, HFH and the EPICS advisory team determined that the guide required
further work to be considered for national implementation. Work on the home
construction guide ceased after the spring of 2001. Recently, a new interest in the tutorial
tool has been shown, resulting in the resurrection of the Tutorials team and resumption of
work on the home construction tutorial tool. The goal of the team is to develop a robust
template and web-tool by the end of the semester.

As the semester continues, progress is being made in all areas. The sub-teams are
focused on the tasks at hand and are concentrating on reaching the goals set at the
beginning of the semester. All three teams are working towards our main goal of making
a Habitat home more energy efficient, more economical and of better quality.
Table of Contents
Executive Summary ............................................................................................................ 2
Table of Contents ................................................................................................................ 4
Habitat for Humanity Team Progress Report ..................................................................... 5
  Objective ......................................................................................................................... 5
  Team Organization.......................................................................................................... 5
Solar Team Semester Plan .................................................................................................. 6
  Solar Team Project Tasks ............................................................................................... 6
  Numerical Analysis ......................................................................................................... 6
  Installation of Fan ........................................................................................................... 7
  Team Continuity ............................................................................................................. 7
  Roadblocks...................................................................................................................... 7
  Expected semester outcomes .......................................................................................... 7
  Solar Team Timeline....................................................................................................... 8
Local Database Team .......................................................................................................... 9
  Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 9
  Description of Tasks ....................................................................................................... 9
  Outcomes ...................................................................................................................... 10
  New Timeline................................................................................................................ 11
  Project Organization ..................................................................................................... 11
National Database Team ................................................................................................... 12
  Introduction ................................................................................................................... 12
  Project Description........................................................................................................ 12
  Team Continuity ........................................................................................................... 13
  Expected Semester Outcomes ....................................................................................... 13
  Team Organization........................................................................................................ 13
  Resources and needs ..................................................................................................... 13
  Team Background ......................................................................................................... 14
Home Evaluation and Analysis Team Semester Project Plan .......................................... 15
  Introduction ................................................................................................................... 15
  Project Tasks ................................................................................................................. 15
  Project Planning ............................................................................................................ 16
  Team Continuity Plan ................................................................................................... 16
  Project Roadblocks ....................................................................................................... 16
  Expected Semester Outcomes ....................................................................................... 17
  Team Organization Chart .............................................................................................. 17
Tutorial Team Semester Project Plan ............................................................................... 18
  Introduction ................................................................................................................... 18
  Project Tasks ................................................................................................................. 19
  Project Planning ............................................................................................................ 20
  Team Continuity Plan ................................................................................................... 20
  Roadblocks.................................................................................................................... 21
  Expected Semester Outcomes ....................................................................................... 21
  Team Organization........................................................................................................ 21
Appendix A – Solar Powered Attic Ventilation Analysis ................................................ 22
Appendix B - Backup and Restore System ....................................................................... 25
Habitat for Humanity Team Progress Report
Objective
Habitat for Humanity International and their local city affiliates work to provide quality,
affordable homes to low-income families. The EPICS program has worked with Habitat
for Humanity for several years to assist the organization in improving their quality of
service, cutting housing costs, and making them more energy efficient. The current
EPICS Habitat for Humanity Team functions as five main teams: the Solar Team, Local
Database Team, National Database Team, Home Energy and Analysis Team (HEAT),
and the Construction Tutorials Team.

The HFH team has made significant progress on all projects. Each sub-team has a
semester plan which includes of project tasks, a timeline, and team continuity. The
progress report describes the progress that has been made by each sub-team, roadblocks
that have been encountered, and expected semester outcomes.

Team Organization

Team Leader: Doug Crook
ESAC Representative: Tim West
Treasurer: Anne Rendaci
Webmaster: Kevin James
Liaison: Nicole Pater

Sub Team Leaders
    Solar Team                                      Mike Schilz / Brian Wink
    National Database Team                          Chris Constanzo
    Local Database Team                             Kevin James
    Home Evaluation and Analysis Team               Marlana McClain
    Tutorial Team                                   Ben Hopkins
Solar Team Semester Plan

Solar Team Project Tasks
Our team goal for the Fall 2002 semester is to help with the energy efficiency of Habitat
for Humanity homes by evaluating the economics of a solar powered attic fan for Indiana
and other locations. The main task for this semester is to perform a numerical analysis of
the attic space in terms of the heat flow into the living space from the attic and the annual
savings in cooling costs the fan would provide. We also will be installing a solar
powered attic fan in the Habitat for Humanity Re-Sale Store for demonstration and
general evaluation. We plan to either purchase or receive the donation of a solar powered
attic fan, from one of several companies that we have contacted, early in the semester so
that we have time to install the fan and collect some initial data from the Re-Sale Store.
In the initial meeting with the project partner in the beginning of the semester, Al Ritter,
the director of the Lafayette Habitat for Humanity, seemed interested in this project and
was excited about having the solar powered attic fan installed at the Re-Sale Store


Numerical Analysis
To evaluate the fan we will be performing a heat flow analysis across the insulation
between the attic and the living space. From that analysis we will determine the added
cooling costs per year that are due to heat conduction from an unventilated attic. The
added cooling costs due to conduction from the attic can than be compared to the cost of
the solar powered attic fan and the corresponding savings it may provide. The average
cost of a solar powered attic fan is about $400 from the companies we have researched
and contacted. The end result of this evaluation will be a payback period for the attic fan
which will determine whether or not the fan is a feasible solution to lowering cooling
costs. In addition to looking at the feasibility for the fan in this climate we plan to
expand our evaluation to other climates where temperatures may be more extreme.

At this point in the semester we have done an initial numerical analysis by making some
basic assumptions for attic temperatures and how long each day the fan will run. The
complete analysis we have performed is located in the appendix. From the analysis we
found some payback periods, the time it takes for the cooling costs to exceed the initial
cost for the solar powered attic fan. These payback periods for different conditions are
illustrated in the figure also located in the appendix. We believe that an acceptable
payback period for the fan would be between seven and ten years. From the figure it can
be seen that for some conditions the results fall into this window. These are encouraging
results and show that our work is worthwhile and that we need to continue with further
analysis.
Installation of Fan
We will also be installing a solar powered attic fan at the Habitat for Humanity Re-Sale
Store for demonstration and analysis. This semester the Solar Team has chosen to
purchase or receive a donation of a fan rather than to use our prototype since several
companies now manufacture high quality solar powered attic fans. A prototype of a solar
panel equipped with a tracking device to follow the sun’s movement was built last
semester. The prototype needs to be adapted to a new motor that was added late last
semester as well as to be connected to the tracking system and charge controller circuits
before any testing could begin. We have not been able to locate the charge controller and
tracking system circuits that were built in spring of 2002. These circuits will need to be
replaced if the prototype is to be used in the future. It may be possible to order a charge
controller circuit and use the prototype without its sun tracking feature.

It is also beneficial to purchase a solar powered attic fan because if they are found to be a
cost-lowering solution we will need to purchase fans since EPICS is not equipped to
manufacture a high number of our prototype. After receiving the fan, we plan to work
with John Sears, the Habitat for Humanity construction manager, and Habitat for
Humanity volunteers to install the fan at the Re-Sale Store. Once the fan is installed, we
plan to analyze its effectiveness in cooling the Re-Sale Store by monitoring the
temperature inside and outside the attic throughout the day as well as other factors, such
as air flow through the fan and cooling costs with and without the fan.


Team Continuity
Mike Schilz is a returning member to the Solar Team and although Brian Wink is new to
the Habitat team he has EPICS experience with the LNA team. We are working together
to complete the mathematical analysis, deliver and install a solar powered attic fan at the
resale store, and begin evaluation this semester.


Roadblocks
We were unable to locate the charge controller and tracking system circuits for the solar
powered attic fan prototype that was completed last semester. This has not become a
major problem because we have decided to purchase or receive the donation of a solar
powered attic fan rather than use our prototype for instillation at the Re-Sale store.


Expected semester outcomes
Completion of the numerical analysis of the attic with results being whether or not the
solar fan is a feasible solution to lowering cooling costs in habitat homes in this climate
as well as other climates with harsher conditions. Installation of the solar powered attic
fan at the Re-Sale Store and complete some initial testing.
Solar Team Timeline

                Solar Team Time Line
Task                           Start       Finish

Team Formation and
Organization                    Week 1     Week 3
Evaluation of Solar Panel
Mechanism Design                Week 2     Week 4
Order of Solar Powered Attic
Fan                             Week 3     Week 6
Perform mathematical analysis
of solar fan effect on cooling
costs                          Week 3      Week 8
Initial Testing of Solar Fan once
it is received                    Week 6   Week 8

Preparation for Mounting Panel
and Fan at Resale store        Week 5      Week 9

Expanding our mathematical
analysis to other climates      Week 8     Week 10

Installation of Panel and Fan
and Activation                  Week 8 Week 12
On Site Evaluation              Week 11 Week 15
Compilation of Results          Week 12 Week 15
Local Database Team
Introduction
The local database team objectives this semester are to expand the functionality of the
inventory/information database interface program, install the improved version into
Resale Store, train the management on its use, and aid the organization of the actual data
entry. Through communication with the Resale Store management, we have identified the
areas of functional expansion and are developing the data organization. The functional
product will be installed in the Resale Store along with help and training material.

Description of Tasks
This semester’s tasks will be to expand functionality of the inventory/information
management system, develop help information and tutorials on its use, redesign the
architecture of information storage, install the software and train the store management,
and setup as system for bug tracking and support.

The functional expansion of the software will require the addition of the following
elements: 1) data backup and restore capabilities (both manual and automatic), 2)
capabilities for generating access/change reports, as well as, invoice and inventory
reports and the printing of all such information (manual and automatic), 3) expansion of
the donor input section to include requested information, 4) the addition of Volunteer
information to the database and software, 5) the addition of a Requested items section to
the database and to the software; the client as also requested that items added to the
database be cross-referenced with the requested items and the user alerted if there is
match, 6) the addition of a delivery section to the database (to be connected to the donor
information), which will interface with 7) a daily/weekly reminder service that appears at
log on, and lastly 8) barcode printing and customizing capabilities. In addition to these
tasks, the look and feel of the software will be changed/improved as necessary. These
tasks will be completed primarily by Kevin James. Currently the manual backup and
restore capabilities have been completed. This required the addition of file compression
capabilities to the software, accomplished through the use of the Open Source zlib
compression scheme. The creation of a backup file format was also necessary. The focus
now shifts to upgrading the donor entry section and adding volunteer information to the
system. We will be discussing the data organization during the 7th and 8th weeks of the
semester and the database itself will be reorganized and necessary recoding completed by
the end of the 8th week. All other functionality is dependent on this reorganization, but
should be completed by the semester deadline of Nov 22, 2002. Security and
synchronization issues (e.g. automatically executing tasks and accidentally program
termination) may increase the time spent on individual elements, but should not hinder
the overall completion of programming tasks.

The task of creating help and tutorial materials will be completed by Payam Farazi, with
assistance from members of the National Database Team. This part of the design process
is currently in the early design stages but should be functionally completed by the end of
October, with a final version delivered with the completed product by the semester
deadline. The format of general help information will be similar to that of most software
running on the Microsoft Windows operating system. The tutorial portions will presented
as either Microsoft PowerPoint presentations or as HTML pages, or combinations of
both. In either case, a viewer client for the chosen medium would be added to the main
software.

The reorganization of the data in the database was deemed necessary in response to
feedback from the client as well as the other members and advisors of the HFH team. Our
ideas for layout of the information will be discussed with the Resale Store Management
and implementation details ironed out during the 7th and 8th weeks of the semester. The
final design will include several categories and subcategories to aid in inventory
searching, and will address the issues of linking several newly requested functions. The
design of the barcode system to be used by the store, which is dependant on the
organization of the database, will be complete shortly thereafter.

An installation of the product, as is will occur at the end of October regardless of the
status of other tasks. After talking with the client, most functionality was deemed not
immediately essential. After the reorganization and necessary recoding are complete, the
inventory/information software will be deployed into the Resale store and training as well
as the entering of the inventory into the database will begin. At this time, a simple bug
tracking program will be installed onto the machine hosting the software. It will include
contact information for Local Database Team members as well as a URL to a page on the
HFH website where these trouble reports can be submitted. The JDS team,
http://epics.ecn.purdue.edu/jds, has offered to allow us the use of their bug-tracking
template, which we will modify for our needs. Subsequent installations will follow as
functionality is added, and supplemental training and materials will be presented to
Resale Store management. This should be completed by the semester deadline.

Outcomes
The goal for the semester is to complete and deliver the Inventory/information
management software as well as help and training materials. Once that is completed, the
project will shift into a maintenance and troubleshooting mode. Next semester may focus
beyond the software, expanding it into a full sale, inventory, and management system.
New Timeline

                                  Database Team
Task                                           Start Date         End Date
Discuss plan for information reorganization
with client                                              10/01/02        10/08/02
Redesign of database per reorganization plan             10/01/02        10/13/02
Development of help and tutorial information
(continual deployment)                                   10/03/02        10/31/02
Completion of functional additions to software
(continual deployment)                                   10/01/02        12/10/02
Work on Design Review                                    10/13/02        10/20/02
Installation (preliminary)                      Earliest 10/15/02 Latest 10/29/02
Bug tracking system added to HFH website        Earliest 10/16/02 Latest 11/05/02
Epics call out - work on projects                        10/22/02        10/28/02
Design review in lab                                     10/28/02        11/01/02
Completion of all tasks                                                11/22/2002

Project Organization
Kevin James (Project Leader) - Modules programming, Database
     Reorganization, User Interface Upgrades,
     Bug Tracking System

Payam Farazi – User Documents (e.g. Tutorial and Help), Database
   Reorganization, Barcode System, User Interface Upgrades
National Database Team
Introduction
Habitat for Humanity is in need of a database that can store and generate reports for their
survey data. Our partner used the Microsoft Office software package and requested the
database be in Microsoft Access format. The problems we are addressing in this project
include poor data storage and reporting capabilities with our partner’s current system.
This current system consists of Excel spreadsheets that are hard to read and enter data
into. The rest of this proposal will describe the data to be stored as well as how data will
be entered into the database.

Project Description
We will solve the problem of poor data acquisition and reporting by implementing a
database. The database with implemented menu system will allow quick and easy data
recording. It will also allow more clear and concise reporting of the data. The database
will start off small, as do many of the Habitat for Humanity projects. Something we will
need to keep in mind is the expansion capabilities of the database. This could be a tool
used nationally and must be able to adapt to different Habitat for Humanity locations. A
key to the expandability is to make the software customizable so other HFH locations can
easily use the software. To account for lack of knowledge of Access database software,
we will use a very simple menu system that will be easy to follow. We will also include
a user’s manual with the finished software. In the end we hope to have a customizable
piece of software that could be sent out to a local HFH location and set up by the staff.
They will use the database to store survey information they gather from new, and existing
homeowners. This information can be broken down into two main surveys – baseline
and longitudinal. The baseline survey is for new homeowners. This survey consists of
approximately forty four questions. The longitudinal survey is given to homeowners
every five years. This survey consists of approximately forty-four questions as well.
Microsoft Access will be used to store this information. We will use various tables that
are linked together to store the information. Once we are happy with our design on
paper, we will code a prototype in Access. By the end of the semester we hope to have a
working prototype for our database, with all survey information and questions inputted
into the database. We also want to be able to test the database to see how robust it is.
Chris will be in charge of most of the coding, Anne and Nicole will help with the testing.

The main task of the national database team is to design a database prototype for storing
Habitat for Humanity survey information. This task can be broken down into subtasks
such as the design and testing of the database. The entire team will be working together
to complete these tasks. We are in constant contact with our project partner, Stu
Manville, about each task that we have completed.

The design of the database has been mapped out on paper and revised. We are happy
with the design and plan on getting professional opinions. Our design is comprised of
four tables as follows:
Survey              Questions         Answers           User
surveyid            questionid        answerid          Userid
survey name         surveyid          questionid        Answered
active/inactive     question          answer            Name
                    question#         answer#           active/inactive
                    active/inactive   active/inactive

By October break, the design will be coded in Access and the survey data will be entered.
After the design is coded in Access, the design will be tested using queries. These
queries will extract out certain data that Habitat for Humanity is interested in analyzing.
This data includes statistical information about how each homeowner answered certain
survey questions. These queries will help the team to determine how efficient the
database design is, and it will also help in the next phase of our project—the menu
system.

Team Continuity
The National Database Team has held many skill sessions and meetings for the new
members of the team to get acquainted with Microsoft Access and the process of
designing a database. None of the team members will be graduating next semester. We
are happy with the skills we have acquired thus far.

Expected Semester Outcomes
This semester, we are expecting to have completed the database and testing finished.
This will put us in position to start the design of our user interface next semester.

Team Organization

                         Chris Costanzo – leader



                  Anne Rendaci                          Nicole Pater


Resources and needs
      Microsoft Access and Microsoft Visual Basic, already available
Team Background
Chris Costanzo: Senior in electrical engineering. Good programming background.
Anne Rendaci: Industrial engineering. Knowledge of the design process and learning
about Microsoft Access.
Nicole Pater: Industrial engineering. Knowledge of the design process and learning
about Microsoft Access.
Home Evaluation and Analysis Team Semester Project Plan
Introduction
Habitat for Humanity International has enacted the 21st Century Challenge which helps
communities develop a feasible plan to eliminate substandard housing in their area. This
semester, the HEAT team has focused on improving upon the grading system for
substandard housing that was developed last semester. Improvements will be made based
on feedback from Don Biddle from the local Habitat for Humanity organization and field
testing the rating system in a Lafayette neighborhood with HEAT team members and also
with individuals not involved with the project.

This semester we have met with Don Biddle and defined the tasks he would like us to
accomplish for this semester. We have begun working with a program called Arcview
GIS. In this program we have mapped addresses and data for substandard homes in the
Lafayette area. We did this by researching and learning the GIS program and finding
data from previous semesters as well as public sources.

From the plotted data, it can be concluded that most of the substandard housing is in
concentrated areas. The HEAT team has learned a lot about Arcview by attending Skills
Sessions and holding meetings with TA’s that are knowledgeable about the GIS program.
Also to be done this semester, we plan to create a Prospect File Database, which would
be a way for Habitat for Humanity volunteers to input information from the county
records about a house into a computer. The Prospect File information will then be linked
to the data points in Arcview GIS


Project Tasks
The HEAT team project for this semester consists of five tasks. We plan to meet with
Don Biddle and revise last semester’s work accordingly, create a Prospect File Database,
update GIS files, test the rating system, and do a county record search for information on
specific substandard homes.

The first task was to meet with Don Biddle and revise the rating system. All three
members of the HEAT team went to the Lafayette office and gathered ideas. He was
pleased with the work last semester and did not see anything else needed. Marlana
McClain is working on the revisions by making clarifications in the rating system. This
task will be completed by 10/2/02, when the HEAT team is scheduled to begin field
testing.

At the meeting, the HEAT team was given a Prospect File, which is a form that HFH fills
out for prospective purchases of homes in Lafayette. Don Biddle expressed a need for a
computerized version of the Prospect File, so Tim Butler is working on creating a
Prospect File Database. This task will be completed by the end of October, so that the
HEAT team can use the database in the record searches.
Doug Crook is working on updating the Arcview GIS files. All three members attended a
Skills Session to learn the program. Data from previous semesters has been input into a
file. Doug is researching other data from public sources that could also be used with
Arcview. This task will be completed by 11/10/02, when the HEAT team will begin
county record searches.

The HEAT team also plans to test the Rating System that was created last semester. This
includes field testing by the team and by other members of EPICS not involved with the
rating system (to eliminate bias). Addresses will be chosen based on the information
from Arcview GIS and both groups will use the rating system to define the house as
substandard or standard. This task will be completed by 11/10/02, when the HEAT team
will begin county record searches.

After all of these tasks have been completed, the HEAT team will travel to the auditor’s
office and get records from the county building. At the meeting at the Habitat for
Humanity office, Don Biddle gave the team information and processes on how to go
about researching the homes and what the key information he needs is. This task will be
a trial run of what may become a continuing project next semester. The first trial will be
completed by 12/10/02, when the HEAT team will deliver the results from the project to
Don Biddle.


Project Planning

Week 1-2 – Orientation and meeting with Project Partner
Week 3 –4 – Semester Goals and Semester Plan, attend Skills Session, Demo
Week 5 – Work on individual tasks
Week 6 – Progress Report
Week 7-10 – Work on individual tasks
Week 11 – Field test Rating System and evaluate
Week 12-14 – Finish up work from the semester and prepare for final presentation


Team Continuity Plan
Tim Butler was the only new member to the HEAT team this semester. The first week
was spent updating him on what was accomplished last semester. Each team member,
although working on individual tasks is aware of what the other two are doing. This will
help when one member does not return next semester. Complete documentation and
thorough reports will also help in the transition from semester to semester.


Project Roadblocks
This semester, the HEAT team has had one roadblock preventing work on our project.
While trying to back up data from last semester, it was lost. This prevented work for one
week while the data was restored. Also, Arcview GIS is proving to be a difficult program
to adapt to and is taking much time to learn.


Expected Semester Outcomes
The HEAT will deliver a Prospect File Database linked to data in the Arcview GIS
program that has been run through trial testing.



Team Organization Chart

                  HOME EVALUATION AND ANALYSIS TEAM


              Rating System           ArcViewGIS          Prospect File Database



 TEAM LEADE R: Marlana McClain          Doug Crook             Tim Butler
Tutorial Team Semester Project Plan
Introduction
Habitat for Humanity is interested in improving the construction efficiency of volunteers
through the creation of a national level construction tutorial tool. Habitat desires the tool
to take several forms, including a web page (for high and low speed connections), CD-
Rom, digital video, VHS, and hard copy.

The Tutorials team project for this semester involves developing HFH contacts at the
national level, gathering input on the construction tutorials from HFH on the local level,
contacting and developing working relationships with partnering HFH teams from other
participating universities, researching current similar applications and information,
designing a tutorial template, and presenting our results.

The Tutorials team is currently researching current similar applications and acquiring
information to aid in the development of the tutorial specifications, which is the next step
in the process. A business trip to meet with our partnering EPICS HFH tutorial team at
the University of Wisconsin has been scheduled for October 11th, with the objective of
specification finalization and template development.

Along with the creation of a construction tutorial, emphasis has been placed on insuring
smooth transitions for future HFH Tutorial Groups. All members of the current group
intend to return for the Spring ’03 semester, which should alleviate most difficulties
associated with the transitional period.

Difficulties encountered thus far include lack of documentation by prior HFH Tutorial
teams, along with effectiveness in collaborating with partnering University of Wisconsin
– Madison EPICS/HFH Group, as their EPICS team seems fairly new and unstructured.
Another obstacle that we will have to overcome will be the distance between working
groups. It will be a great challenge to keep Wisconsin and Purdue working efficiently
towards the same common goal. The tutorials team plans to avoid this obstacle by
effectively communicating via a weekly teleconference with the Wisconsin Team.

Having completed all of the above tasks and prevented the possible setbacks, the Purdue
University HFH Tutorials Team will present a working, interactive multimedia tool to be
used by the local and national Habitat for Humanity affiliates. The tool will be available
in multiple forms in order to guarantee usefulness on all levels at HFH.

The remainder of this progress report will describe the current project status. In addition,
it will detail future tasks, the overall project schedule, the team continuity plan, project
roadblocks, and expected semester outcomes.
Project Tasks
The Tutorials team project for this semester consists of the following tasks: contact Nevil
Eastwood (Director of HFH International Construction & Environmental Resource
Dept.), meet with Al Ritter and HFH Construction Personnel for input on the construction
tutorials, contact and develop working relationships with partnering HFH teams from
other participating universities, research current similar applications and information,
design a tutorial template, and present our results.

Contact Nevil Eastwood:

A few weeks ago, the tutorials team contacted Nevil Eastwood of International HFH.
Mr. Eastwood was quite pleased to hear that the tutorials team has been started back up.
When it was posed to him that the tutorial team would be revising the current tutorials
and looking to implement them on a national level, he was very interested. He did say
however that any type of tutorial tools would actually be posted on the HFH extranet,
which is typically accessed by volunteers and HFH affiliates, rather than their actual
public website. Once the template is completed, Nevil requested that it be sent to him for
further assessment.

Meet with Al Ritter and HFH Construction Personnel:

The tutorials team recently met with John Sears, Lafayette HFH Construction Supervisor,
and discussed the potential of the new tutorial team. It was John’s intent to begin work
on the projects that volunteers most often participate in. These projects were tasks like
siding, roofing, drywalling, and framing. John also recommended that the tutorials team
actually record himself and his workers during the next home building. If needed, John
suggested that the video equipment be left at the HFH facility and volunteers working for
him could record while he was working.

Contact and Develop a Working Relationship with other Universities:

Last week, the tutorials team conducted a phone conference with the Habitat for
Humanity team from the University of Wisconsin. The teams were able to introduce
each other and define a combined semester plan. The Purdue University tutorials team
will be traveling to Madison on October 11th to meet the team and jointly develop a web
tutorial template.

Research Current Similar Applications:

Currently, the tutorials team is researching various types of home construction guides of
all types. The World Wide Web will prove to be a vital tool in gaining the required
knowledge to include in the tutorial tool.
Create Tutorial Tool Template:

The intent is to provide a tutorial tool template that provides step-by-step construction
task instructions. The tutorial will be designed in such a way to minimize the amount of
time and effort required to incorporate additional data. The template will be a
collaboration of technical instructions via text, pictures, videos, and potentially
demonstrations.

Present Results:

Once the template is completed, the overall goal will be to complete at least one complete
tutorial. Per John Sears request, siding will be the first completed tutorial. The tutorial
will be implemented and on all levels of desired application, including a CD, the website,
VHS, and a hard copy. The final tutorial will be presented to HFH affiliates, both on a
local level and nationally, and to the EPICS advisory committees at the University of
Wisconsin and Purdue University.

Project Planning
Schedule
6 September 2002 – 13 December 2002
        Contact N. Eastwood (Director of Construction and Environmental
          Resources)
9 September 2002 – 13 December 2002
        Contact HFH IT Administrator
12 September 2002 – 13 December 2002
        Collaborate with University of Wisconsin EPICS/HFH Group
12 September 2002
        Meet with HFH Affiliates for Feedback
16 September 2002 – 1 October 2002
        Research Current Applications and Acquire Information
1 October 2002 – 22 October 2002
        Develop Tutorial Specifications
8 October 2002 – 3 December 2002
        Design Tutorial Template/Webspace
19 November 2002 – 6 December 2002
        Finalize Tutorial Delivery Methods
13 December 2002
        Present Results

Team Continuity Plan
The Tutorial Group is completely comprised of members who are new to Tutorials and
the parent EPICS HFH Team. Because little documentation was provided from which to
continue work, a majority of time thus far has been utilized for researching the current
available tools and similar applications. To insure smooth transitions for future HFH
Tutorial Groups, a main focus will be documentation and organization as a means to
record progress. All members of the group intend to return for the Spring ’03 semester,
which should alleviate most difficulties associated with the transitional period. Also, to
develop a robust foundation for growth and feedback, the HFH Tutorial Group has
established a working relationship with the University of Wisconsin – Madison to foster
collaboration between EPICS programs.

Roadblocks
Some difficulties that the HFH Tutorial Group has encountered include lack of prior
documentation and effective collaboration with the University of Wisconsin – Madison
EPICS/HFH Group. During the beginning of the project, a lack of documentation made
it challenging to make much progress without doing research to retrace the steps of the
previous Tutorial Group. Time was utilized to determine the status of the current project
and to locate any information that may be useful. Collaborating with the University of
Wisconsin – Madison EPICS/HFH Group also proved to be challenging due to the
inability to communicate effectively as a team on a regular basis.

Expected Semester Outcomes
The goal of the HFH Tutorial Group for the Fall ’02 semester is to have developed a
robust template and web-tool. To assist in the development of the template/web-tool, a
single complete multimedia tutorial will be utilized to demonstrate the capabilities of the
application. The multimedia application should be incorporated into the Purdue EPICS
website at http://epics.ecn.purdue.edu/hfh, where it would be accessed by HFH
volunteers, with an overall goal of a comprehensive tutorial package for implementation
by HFH on a national level.

Team Organization
Project Leader: Ben Hopkins
Local Liaison: Stacie Woodrum
Project Web Designer: Dean Kales
National Liaison: Tim West (HFH ESAC Rep.)
Appendix A – Solar Powered Attic Ventilation Analysis
Introduction
The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the cost effectiveness of installing a solar
powered attic ventilation fan. The following assumptions will be used in the analysis:
   1. The Attic fan purchase cost is $425 (Including interest payments made over a ten
       year home mortgage)
   2. The area of the floor plan for the house is 1301 ft2.
   3. The living space is maintained at 73 °F at all times by an air conditioner operating
       at 100% efficiency.
   4. The attic insulation is R-38 blown cellulose insulation (12 inches thick)
   5. The cost of electricity is $0.07 per kW/h
   6. The temperature of an unventilated attic is 125°F (Regardless of ambient
       temperature).
   7. The temperature of a ventilated attic is 90°F. (Regardless of ambient
       temperature).
   8. The sun warms the attic to a maximum temperature of 125 °F instantly for the
       given time.
   9. The only heat transfer out of the attic space is heat conduction into the living
       space across an insulated ceiling.


Procedure
There are two separate analyses which can be compared to obtain a cost savings. One
analysis involves an unventilated attic space in which the air in the attic instantaneously
changes to 125°F during the warm hours of the day. The analysis is based on four cases
where the attic temperature is elevated from ambient temperature to its maximum
temperature of 125°F for 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours per day. The other analysis involves a
ventilated attic space in which the sun heats the attic while ventilation allows the attic
temperature to remain at 90 °F. This analysis is also based on four cases where the attic
temperature is elevated from ambient temperature to its maximum temperature of 90°F
for 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours per day.
These two analyses are then compared to obtain a cost savings of the fan per year of
operation. This value can then be related to the initial cost of the attic fan to calculate a
pay back period.


The analyses are based on the balance of heat transfer which occurs in an attic space.
The sun heats the attic space with solar radiation to a given temperature (125°F for
unventilated space and 90°F for a ventilated space). This temperature is maintained
constant for a given number of hours per day through heat transfer from the roof top to
the ambient air and through heat transfer from the attic space to the living space through
an insulated ceiling. The heat conduction through the ceiling is the only heat transfer
calculated in these analyses since it is the only mode of transfer which will affect the
energy cost to cool the living space.


The heat conduction into the living space is calculated form the following equation using
the assumptions listed above:


qconduction  (1/ Rt ) * ( A / L) * (T   TL )


               Where:
                       Rt = Thermal Resistance of the Insualtion = 38 hour*ft/Btu
                       A = Area of Floor Plan = 1301 ft2
                       L = Depth of Blown Insulation = 12 inches
                       T  = Temperature of Attic air
                       TL = Temperature of Living Space = 73 °F


Balancing the units in the equation will obtain a value for qconduction in kW. This value is
then multiplied by the number of hours per day which the attic temperature is elevated,
the number of days per year which the attic temperature is elevated, and the cost of
electricity. This will obtain a yearly cost of removing the heat transferred into the living
space by the hot attic air. Comparing the yearly costs of a ventilated space to an
unventilated space will obtain a cost savings per year for the fan. The initial cost of the
fan can then be divided by the cost savings per year which it supplies and a pay back
period can be determined.


Results

                                           Pay Back Period for Attic Fan with Initial Cost of $425
                     20

                     18

                     16

                     14
 Years to Pay Back




                     12

                     10

                      8

                      6

                      4

                      2

                      0
                          0           50              100        150             200     250              300     350              400

                                                      Number of Days per Year which the Fan is Active
                                    6 hours per day           12 hours per day         18 hours per day         24 hours per day




Conclusion
The pay back period for a fan operating for 12 hours per day for 150 days in a year shows
payback period of about 9 years. Since this rough calculation falls within the acceptable
pay back period range of 7 to 10 years, a more intense analysis with fewer assumptions is
necessary to determine the actual pay back period.


References


                      I. F.P. Incropera and D.P. DeWitt, Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, 5th
                              Edition. New York: Wiley, 2002.
Appendix B - Backup and Restore System
        In order to facilitate the simple, abstracted archiving and restoration of the
database files, the design of a file format based on the compression scheme
provided by zLib was necessary. Constraints due to the Visual BASIC
programming language also played a part in the design process. The file format
is called Simple Compressed Backup or SCB and is described in the following
diagram.
                            10101010101010101
                            01010101010101010
                            10101010
                            Compressed
                            10101010101010101
                            Data
                            01010101010101010
                            10101010
                            10101010101010101
                            01010101010101010             Figure 1: SCB format
                            10101010
                          Compressed manifest
                            10101010101010101
                            01010101010101010
                          Compressed manifest
                            10101010
                          size
                            10101010101010101
                            01010101010101010
                         Uncompressed manifest
                            10101010
                         size

The file format includes a compressed manifest of containing the directory
structure contained within the archive, as well as, the names, extensions,
compressed and uncompressed sizes of the files, as illustrated in figure 2.
In Visual BASIC, all data will be written using BYTE-typed arrays, with the
exception of the manifests compressed and uncompressed sizes which will be
written using variables of type LONG.
TOP DIRECTORY NAME\
SUB FILE NAME 1 $ COMPRESSED_SIZE UNCOMPRESSED_SIZE            EXT
                           . . .
SUB FILE NAME n $ COMPRESSED_SIZE UNCOMPRESSED_SIZE            EXT

SUB DIRECTORY PATH1\
SUB FILE NAME 1 $ COMPRESSED_SIZE UNCOMPRESSED_SIZE            EXT
                           . . .
SUB FILE NAME n $ COMPRESSED_SIZE UNCOMPRESSED_SIZE            EXT
                           . . .
SUB DIRECTORY PATH n\

SUB FILE NAME 1          $ COMPRESSED_SIZE UNCOMPRESSED_SIZE   EXT
                                    . . .
SUB FILE NAME n          $ COMPRESSED_SIZE UNCOMPRESSED_SIZE   EXT



LEGEND

\     a delimeter              Figure 2: Layout of Manifest
      marking the end
      of a folder name

$     a delimeter
      marking the end
      of a file name

EXT   extension of
      the file

				
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