College of Health _ Social Welfare by yangxichun

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									                       PBAC Presentation
               College of Health & Social Welfare
                 Cheryl Easley, Ph.D., R.N., Dean
                           April 2011




INTRODUCTION
Mission Statement: The College of Health and Social Welfare inspires learning and enriches Alaska, the nation
and the world through the disciplines of health and social welfare. This is accomplished through collaborative,
multidisciplinary approaches to education, research, service and community partnerships with a commitment to
equity and justice.

College Description: Prescribing to the World Health Organization’s definition of health as “a state of complete
physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity”1, the College of Health
and Social Welfare (CHSW) offers a variety of certificate, undergraduate, and graduate degree options for
students who are attracted to people-oriented careers. It also provides a special opportunity for cross-disciplinary
studies as they relate to the human aspects of our culture, and helps to prepare graduates for the increasingly
integrated approaches to service delivery demanded by society.
CHSW is an extremely complex and diverse college and comprises two schools, two departments, three centers,
and an institute, with additional centers and units included within these major entities. Virtually all of its students
are prepared for entrance in high-demand jobs.

         School of Nursing – NLNAC accredited. As a partner in shaping health care for Alaska, the School of
Nursing educates students for current and future roles in local, state, national, and worldwide nursing arenas. The
School addresses the diverse and unique health care challenges across the state by sharing expertise in education,
service, policy, and political arenas and through innovative research for the discovery and dissemination of new
knowledge. The vision of the School of Nursing is to become a magnet for highly qualified students, educators
and researchers by transitioning to a doctoral degree to meet 2015 entry level workforce requirements. CORE 
SERVICES: TEACHING & LEARNING, SCHOLARSHIP, STUDENT SUCCESS, PUBLIC SQUARE 
         School of Social Work – Fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The School of
Social Work is a leader in developing and disseminating knowledge related to enhancing human well-being and
promoting social and economic justice for people of all backgrounds, particularly those in Alaska, through the
preparation of social work practitioners, research, and service to the community. CORE  SERVICES:  TEACHING  & 
LEARNING, STUDENT SUCCESS, RESEARCH, PUBLIC SQUARE 
         Department of Human Services – Accredited by the Council for Standards in Human Service
Education. One of the fastest growing career fields in the United States today, a Human Service degree prepares
students to work effectively in any community based human services setting dedicated to the empowerment of
clients through education, paraprofessional counseling, and human service practice. The program offers
specialized areas in alcohol and substance abuse, disabilities, diversity issues, or family and youth. CORE 
SERVICES: TEACHING & LEARNING, STUDENT SUCCESS, PUBLIC SQUARE 
         Justice Center – Paralegal program approved by the ABA. Established by the state legislature in 1975,
the Justice Center at the University of Alaska Anchorage has a mandate to provide justice-related teaching,
research and service to the state, thus inspiring learning and enriching the entire Alaska community. The Justice
Center is an interdisciplinary academic unit that conducts both basic and applied research in the areas of crime,
law and justice, and directly serves government units, justice agencies and community organizations throughout
urban and rural Alaska. CORE SERVICES: TEACHING & LEARNING, RESEARCH, STUDENT SUCCESS, PUBLIC SQUARE 
         Department of Health Sciences – The Master in Public Health is accredited by CEPH. The Department
of Health Sciences advances this professional area by the educational opportunities of academic training, research,
and community service in order to improve the well-being of the diverse peoples of Alaska and the circumpolar
north. This is accomplished through excellence in the education of public health practice leaders, scientific
investigation of public health issues, and engaging communities in an organized effort to identify, assess, prevent,



1
 Preamble to the Constitution of the World Health Organization as adopted by the International Health Conference,
New York, 19-22 June, 1946; signed on 22 July 1946 by the representatives of 61 States (Official Records of the World
Health Organization, no. 2, p. 100) and entered into force on 7 April 1948.



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and mitigate community health challenges. The Physician Assistant program was successfully inaugurated in fall
2009. CORE SERVICES: TEACHING & LEARNING, STUDENT SUCCESS, PUBLIC SQUARE 
          Occupational Therapy – Accredited by ACOTE. The Creighton University -UAA Occupational Therapy
initiative admits up to 10 students each fall term to the three and a half year, professional entry-level occupational
therapy program. In a unique hybrid model, students have classes in both a traditional and distance format with labs
being held on the campus of UAA. After successful completion of the program, students will receive an OTD
(Occupational Therapy Doctorate) from Creighton University and be eligible to sit for the National Board for
Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) examination. CORE  SERVICES:  TEACHING  &  LEARNING,  STUDENT 
SUCCESS, PUBLIC SQUARE 
        Center for Human Development - Commissioned by the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill
of Rights Act of 2000, the Center’s mission is to improve the quality of lives for people and their families who
experience disabilities, through interdisciplinary training, technical assistance, exemplary service development,
applied research and dissemination of information. The goals and activities of the Center for Human
Development are guided by the values of integration and inclusion, self-determination, individual and family
empowerment, cultural sensitivity, diversity, community referencing, independence, and productivity. Consistent
with this philosophy, the Center for Human Development endeavors to bridge resources of the University of
Alaska system and the statewide community to accomplish its mission. CORE  SERVICES:  RESEARCH,  PUBLIC 
SQUARE, UAA COMMUNITY, TEACHING & LEARNING 
         Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies - The ICHS seeks to improve the health of the residents of
Alaska and the circumpolar north by addressing the factors that affect health and inform policy in our region,
through instruction, information services, and basic and applied research in health and medicine. Created by the
Alaska State Legislature in 1988 (AS 14.40.088) to develop new solutions to health problems in Alaska and the
north, the Institute provides support and coordination for health research, information, and training. Working
closely with faculty throughout the University of Alaska system, ICHS provides technical assistance and support
to increase the capacity within the state to address the health needs of all Alaskans. ICHS also encourages student
involvement through academic course work, internships, and research assistantships. CORE SERVICES:  RESEARCH, 
PUBLIC SQUARE, UAA COMMUNITY 
        Center for Alcohol & Addiction Studies – The CAAS was established by the Board of Regents in 1972
to address the problem of substance abuse in Alaska and housed within the Institute for Circumpolar Health
Studies. CAAS research activities center around the stimulation and coordination of interdisciplinary and
collaborative studies and the promotion of scientific interchanges of alcohol- and drug-related information. CORE 
SERVICES:  RESEARCH, PUBLIC SQUARE 
        Aging Studies – Currently a Gerontology Minor and the National Resource Center are the representatives
at UAA. The study of aging combines and/or integrates information from academic and applied areas of study for
health care providers, social workers, counselors, and other social service professionals in this multidisciplinary
research field. Community Partners support a Center for Aging Studies as a successor to the Alaska Geriatric
Education Center. CORE SERVICES:  RESEARCH, PUBLIC SQUARE, UAA COMMUNITY 
          National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Elders – Grant
funded by the U.S. Administration on Aging (AoA) to develop a resource center for elders, the Center’s goals are
to assess the current status of Native Elders in Alaska, develop an understanding of the cultural values that drive
expectations and perceived care needs, document "best, promising and emerging practices" that are in current use,
solicit recommendations for community responses to elder abuse, exploitation and violence that are appropriate to
Alaska Native cultures, and provide education to medical providers. CORE SERVICES:  RESEARCH, PUBLIC SQUARE
        Certificate of Civic Engagement & Learning - Since 2006, UAA has been recognized by the Carnegie
Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as a “Community Engaged Institution.” The Center for Community
Engagement and Learning serves as a central locus for the intersection of student learning, faculty research, and
community engagement, connecting academic programs with community needs to use scholarship and action for
the mutual benefit of the University and the State, its communities, and its diverse peoples. CORE SERVICES:  
TEACHING & LEARNING, PUBLIC SQUARE, UAA COMMUNITY



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Figure 1. CHSW Degrees and Programs

                                                                          CHSW ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE



                                                                                          Dean



                                                       Presidential Professor of Public             Creighton/UAA Occupational
                                                                    Health                               Therapy Doctorate




                                                           CHSW ACADEMIC UNITS                                                                      CHSW CENTERS AND INSTITUTES




  Department of Health         Department of Human
                                                               School of Nursing              School of Social Work                Justice Center            Alaska Geriatric Center
       Sciences                      Services




                                                                                                                                                              Center for Alcohol &
                                                                                                                                                               Addiction Studies
     GRADUATE               GRADUATE               BACHELOR                  ASSOCIATE              OCCUPATIONAL
                                                                                                                             MINOR STUDIES
     PROGRAMS              CERTIFICATES            PROGRAMS                   DEGREES               ENDORSEMENTS


   Masters in Public     Clinical Social Work                                                      Certificate in Conflict                                     Center for Human
                                                BS Health Sciences      AAS Human Services                                   Gerontology Minor
        Health                 Practice                                                                  Resolution
                                                                                                                                                                 Development

                         Clinical Social Work                                                       Civic Engagement         Minor in Addiction
 Master of Social Work                           BS Public Health           AAS Nursing
                             Management                                                                 Certificate               Studies
                                                                                                                                                                   Institute for
   MS Family Nurse          Family Nurse           BS Physician            AAS Licensed            Children’s Behavioral                                       Circumpolar Health
                                                                                                                              Minor in Justice
     Practioner              Practitioner         Assistant (UW)          Practical Nursing               Health                                                     Studies

 MS Psychiatric and        Psychiatric and      Bachelor of Human                                 Federal Direct Service      Minor In Social
 Mental Health Nurse     Mental Health Nurse        Services                                           Specialist             Welfare Studies                  National Resource
                                                                                                                                                              Center for American
                                                                                                  Brain Injury Specialist                                       Indians, Alaska
MS Nursing Education      Nursing Education          BA Justice                                                                                               Natives, and Native
                                                                                                       Certification
                                                                                                                                                                Hawaiian Elders
                                                                                                     Federal Direct
                          Advanced Human        BS Registered Nurse                                Support Apprentice
                          Service Systems

                                                 Bachelor of Social
                                                      Work
CORE SERVICES

TEACHING & LEARNING and STUDENT SUCCESS                                 Figure 2. CHSW Performance Measures
The College of Health and Social Welfare performance measures show
growth trends. The dip in the High Demand Job Graduates may be due
to the closing of the Practical Nursing program.
Student Credit Hour production continues to climb, with associated
revenue increases. Enrollments increased 7.8% across the college, and
student retention was 74.8% for AY2009-10.
Many CHSW programs have limited and monitored enrollments,
dependent on practicum and clinical aptitudes. Students are dropped
from degrees when GPA and requisite accomplishments are not met.
In such cases advising for alternate degree planning is introduced.
Figure 3. CHSW Grant Activity                 RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP & CREATIVE ACTIVITY
                                                                         UAA COMMUNITY and PUBLIC
                                                    SQUARE
                                 Research is a high priority in CHSW. After several years of significant vacancies
                                 (21 in 2008), CHSW is nearly fully staffed. CHSW hires faculty with a research
                                 component, and provides incentives to encourage research by long term faculty.

                                 The College of Health and Social Welfare is heavily dependent on external
                                 funding, primarily from grants and industry contributions. Currently, its units
                                 manage approximately 100 grants, contracts and other external funds from a wide
                                 variety of funding sources.
                                                               Figure 4. CHSW Research Participation
The health programs within                                                           CHSW function in a highly
collaborative manner, interacting                                                    with partners from across the
state, MAUs, colleges, disciplines                                                   and with a variety of
                                                            17% 
stakeholders. Together they work                                                     to develop resources and to
implement,     and      coordinate                                                   university health programs and
research,    addressing    critical                                                  industry needs and educating
Alaskans for high demand careers.                                                    This is presently heavily soft
funded, as are many essential                                                        functions    supporting    the
college and its health program                                                       missions.


FY11 OPERATING BUDGET

Figures 5 & 6. CHSW FY11 Operating Budget
                         The inequity between Tuition and General Funds is directly linked to managed
                         enrollment programs requiring small faculty-to-student ratios dictated by accreditors
                         for Nursing clinical experiences, and Human Services and Social Work practicum
                         assignments. An example is Nursing’s 1-8 instructor to student clinical ratio.
                               The low percentage of grant indirect relates to
                               established 8% – 12% State and agency rates far
                               below the negotiated UAA rate.             This a
                               commentary on agency regulations, rather than the
                               amount of research conducted, as competetive
                               proposals, research, deliverables and reporting are
                               required.



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It must be noted, grant funds have agency specified usage and deliverables, and while these collaborations are in line
with and enhance the college mission and vision, the funds are not available to offset college costs except as written
in the agency contract.

REDUCTION EXERCISE

There are many unfunded or partially funded positions within CHSW that rely on prior year unreserved fund
balance (carry forward) to make up program shortfalls of general fund and tuition revenues. These are mainly
– but not entirely – term and adjunct faculty, administrative and research support positions. If a 5% reduction
in general funds were imposed, it would be absorbed by the CHSW carry forward, forfeiting these positions
and detrimentally affecting academic course production. Additionally, grant operations would immediately be
adversely impacted because administrative infrastructure is a federally unallowable grant expense that must be
paid with unrestricted funds.
Further cuts in FY13 and FY14 would necessitate cutting programs from Nursing.

MAINTAINING CURRENT LEVELS FOR FY12

FY11 level funding has been successful because of high enrollments, summer 2010 tuition returns, carry-
forward from FY10, and a small margin of salary savings. If all these factors are repeated in FY12, current
levels of funding will be sufficient under the current structure of CHSW.
For the purposes of this report, the assumption is that Allied Health Services and WWAMI Biomedical
Program will become part of the current units as a reorganized health college. To accomplish the added
student, faculty and administrative workload, additional support personnel will be required with some level of
increased funding.
Figure 7: Incremental Requests
                             CHSW INCREMENTAL REQUEST SUMMARY

 FIRST PRIORITY
     1. CHD                                Rent                                                          160,000
     2.    Dean’s Office                   Associate Dean, Student Advisor, IT Technician                250,000
     3.    Nursing                         2 half-time Term FNP faculty (1 FTE)                          129,949
     4.    Dean's Office                   Occupational Therapy and Pharmacy Programs                     80,000
     5.    Human Services                  Faculty positions                                             230,300
 SECOND PRIORITY
     6.    Nursing                         Simulation Technician                                          85,077
     7.    ICHS                            Environmental Epidemiologist                                  150,000
     8.    Nursing                         Nursing Workforce Diversity/RRANN                             116,500
     9.    ICHS                            Biostatistics and Epidemiology                                 75,000
     10. Nursing                           Tutor Coordinator                                              85,077
     11. NRC                               Project Assistants                                            125,000
     12. Civic Engagement                  Faculty, Admin, Director                                      159,000
     13. ICHS                              Alcohol and Addiction Studies                                 110,000


CONCLUSION
To quote the NWCCU report on the challenges faced by CHSW:
“Challenges: Difficulty recruiting and retaining faculty, low salaries, limited resources for tuition waivers or
assistantships, limited history of doctoral education at UAA may provide challenges for development of
doctoral programs in CHSW, need for administrative support for faculty research endeavors including

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mentorship and promotion of interdisciplinary work, locating additional space as programs increase in number
or enrollment, and inadequate funding to fully support some distance programs.”




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 PBAC Presentation Attachments
College of Health & Social Welfare
  Cheryl Easley, Ph.D., R.N., Dean
            April 2011




                8
     ATTACHMENT V

University of Alaska Anchorage
 FY12 Incremental Requests

          Narratives




        PBAC Spring 2011




               9
                                        ATTACHMENT V
                                     Incremental Request Form
                                              FY12

Title: Health College Reorganization

      1. Request Description. (Provide a detailed narrative of the request. Include the purpose
      of the request and the market demand the request is intended to meet. If applicable, include
      the number of students affected and specific employer demand met. For research programs,
      include areas of state needs met and external funding source, i.e., National Science
      Foundation.)
          Stating a basic assumption of this request, the health-related programs at UAA will be
      reorganized into a single college, adding to the current units within CHSW the Allied Health
      Sciences and the WWAMI Biomedical program. This will add synergy to collaborations that
      already occur on campus, and facilitate the continued expansion and development of UAA’s
      health education and research in service to Alaska.
          This is an admirable pursuit, and will require additional personnel resources, specifically
      an additional Associate Dean, Advisor and IT technician.

      2. Strategic Purpose. (How does the request address the Cabinet Strategic Guidance in
      Attachment I? How does the request support UAA 2017? How does it strengthen our total
      instructional program? Reinforce and expand our research? Expand educational
      opportunity and increase student success2 Strengthen the quality of campus life and the UAA
      community? Expand and enhance the Public Square?)
      Academic Programs and Research (UAA 2017 Strategic Priories A and B, Accreditation
      Core Themes 1 and 2.) section 4 addressing the strengthening of our health programs.

      3. Operational Focus. (Does the request fill a gap, remedy a problem, or respond to an
      external requirement (e.g. accreditation or professional standard)? In light of the recent
      NWCCU accreditation process, does it address any weakness or suggestion cited by
      NWCCU? Does it reinforce or accelerate institutional or program success? Does it invest
      in a new initiative?)
      The request furthers UAA commitment to respond to Alaska’s urban and rural health
      challenges.

      4. FY12 GF and NGF Request (What GF funds are requested? What NGF revenue is
      anticipated?)
          $250,000 GF
          NGF will be accelerated by the resulting collaborations in research, instruction and
      advising.




2
    Access, retention, persistence, achievement, completion.
                                                   10
5. Department/Program Investment. (What investment, if any, is the department/program
prepared to make in this proposal in addition to the funds requested from outside the present
budget? Will any funds be reallocated internally to support this effort?)
    CHSW is already functioning at or near capacity with current levels of personnel, who
will continue to give their time and expertise to this venture.

6. Operational Expense (How will the funds be spent; i.e., personal services, travel, etc.
Please provide a budget for the funds requested. Include the number of positions requested.)
The funds will be spent entirely on personnel:
    $150,000 – Associate Dean, expanding current structure into academic and administrative
duties.
     $60,000 – Advisor for one-stop health program advising to students seeking health-
related careers.
     $40,000 – IT Technician, .5 FTE to assist current IT oversight for the college.

7. Collaboration. (Demonstrate how the program optimizes existing capacity and expertise
throughout the system. Is the program developed collaboratively across campuses/MAUs in
a manner that emphasizes appropriate roles, strengths, and missions?)
    The focus of the reorganization is collaboration within the health programs. This request
facilitates this agenda, recognizing the benefit of providing the appropriate organization to
support and work in concert with health programs at other universities and campuses in the
UA system.

8. UA SWS Performance Measures. Please provide anticipated impacts to performance
end results of the requested increment. It is not necessary to enter anything for metrics that
will not be impacted by this increment.

   a.    For each performance end result impacted by this request, provide the
        timeframe for realization. (Example: This increment will increase the student
        credit hours by FY13, because FY12 will be used to hire the additional professor.
        University-generated revenue and student credit hours will be impacted in FY13 by
        the additional course offerings provided by the new professor.
        This increment will streamline the instructional, research and advising agendas of the
        reorganization.

   b. What strategy-specific sub-metric will be used to demonstrate return on
      investment? Determine which strategy specific sub-metric will be used to track
      intermediate progress toward moving the End Result metrics. (Example:
      Program major enrollment will be tracked as a preliminary indicator of eventual
      increases in high-demand graduates.)
      Growth will be tracked in the number of health program offerings, enrollments,
      graduates and increase in the number of research awards and expenditures.

   c. What is the current baseline for this sub-metric, the expected change and the
      timeframe for realizing this change? Provide at least one year of historical
      performance on the proposed sub-metric, against which future year

                                            11
       performance can be compared. Provide the anticipated change in the sub-metric
       performance if funding is received. Also indicate which fiscal year this change
       will be fully realized. (Example: In Fall 2010, there were 120 of these program
       majors enrolled. This increment would grow enrollment by 20 majors in FY13.
       All the impacted units already have IR tracked metrics. These will be monitored
       within the new structure of the college.

9. Other Output Measures. (Beyond the UA measures, how will the request affect the
measureable output of teaching, research, engagement, and/or creative expression? Provide
specific estimates.)

10. Productivity and Efficiency. (What empirically demonstrable impact will this request
have on program or institutional productivity and efficiency? Faculty to student ratios and
cost per student are relevant examples. Provide specific estimates.)
   To quote from the Chancellor’s Office September 21, 2010 memo to the UAA 
Community, “In keeping with UAA 2017 and the draft UA Academic Master Plan, 
the overall objectives of this action are to improve operational efficiency 
and effectiveness, to provide the framework for improved collaboration across 
health and health‐related disciplines, to build the foundation for the 
continued expansion and development of UAA’s health education and research in 
service to Alaska, and to provide the appropriate organization to support and 
work in concert with health programs at other universities and campuses in 
the UA system.  It is our intention to create and develop strategic 
opportunities, not to compromise success or to eliminate programs.” 
This request recognizes the value of this agenda, and seeks to take necessary steps to
accomplish them.

11. Effectiveness and Quality. (What empirically demonstrable program or institutional
improvements in quality are expected from the implementation of this request? Identify
specific outcomes.)
Students will receive consistent and comprehensive pathway advising into health programs,
which will impact enrollment and retention efficiencies. This will also build multi-
disciplinary education important to current health practice.
Researchers and impacted programs will have appropriate support at the Dean level to fulfill
their strategic missions to address Alaska’s urban and rural health challenges.

12. Sustainability. (What impact will this request have on institutional, programmatic or
environmental sustainability?)
The goal is to provide an environment for health program outcomes to be optimized for the
university and the state of Alaska.

13. Priority Ranking. (In your major budget unit, what is the priority for this request?
Explain why this request received this ranking.)
Very high ranking; the reorganization will be hampered without a level of support.




                                            12
                                        ATTACHMENT V
                                     Incremental Request Form
                                              FY12

Title: Occupational Therapy and Pharmacy Distance Programs

      1. Request Description. (Provide a detailed narrative of the request. Include the purpose
      of the request and the market demand the request is intended to meet. If applicable, include
      the number of students affected and specific employer demand met. For research programs,
      include areas of state needs met and external funding source, i.e., National Science
      Foundation.)
          Occupational Therapy made the top ten health shortage professions based on estimated
      vacancy rates in the 2009 Alaska Health Workforce Vacancy Study published by ACRH and
      ISER. Pharmacy made the top ten health shortage professions based on estimated positions
      in the same study.
          UAA currently has entered into an affiliate agreement with Creighton University for the
      delivery of both programs at UAA as a distance delivery through Creighton. The
      Occupational Therapy program is in its third successful year, with ten students per year
      enrolled and the first cohort graduating spring 2011. The Pharmacy program will launch fall
      2011 with five students.
          To further these programs, a half time administrative assistant is needed and additional
      equipment for sustained quality in conducting the labs.

      2. Strategic Purpose. (How does the request address the Cabinet Strategic Guidance in
      Attachment I? How does the request support UAA 2017? How does it strengthen our total
      instructional program? Reinforce and expand our research? Expand educational
      opportunity and increase student success3 Strengthen the quality of campus life and the UAA
      community? Expand and enhance the Public Square?)
           Academic Programs and Research (UAA 2017 Strategic Priories A and B,
              Accreditation Core Themes 1 and 2.) section 4 addressing the strengthening of our
              health programs.
           Students Success: Alaska students have access to high demand professional
              programs without leaving the state.
           Public Square: Alaskans reap the benefit of in-state trained occupational therapists
              who will be more likely to retain practice in-state.

      3. Operational Focus. (Does the request fill a gap, remedy a problem, or respond to an
      external requirement (e.g. accreditation or professional standard)? In light of the recent
      NWCCU accreditation process, does it address any weakness or suggestion cited by
      NWCCU? Does it reinforce or accelerate institutional or program success? Does it invest
      in a new initiative?)
          This program has enabled UAA to provide (in conjunction with CU) the first professional
          level occupational therapy program in Alaska. Students who graduate from this program

3
    Access, retention, persistence, achievement, completion.
                                                   13
   will be eligible to take the National Registry Exam in OT, and will be eligible for
   licensure. Graduates of this program will alleviate the severe shortages of occupational
   therapists throughout the state.


4. FY12 GF and NGF Request (What GF funds are requested? What NGF revenue is
anticipated?)
    $80,000 is requested in GF

5. Department/Program Investment. (What investment, if any, is the department/program
prepared to make in this proposal in addition to the funds requested from outside the present
budget? Will any funds be reallocated internally to support this effort?)
    The college currently allocates funds for the half-time Occupational Therapy Liaison, and
administrative oversight to the program, as well as supplies and ad hoc administrative
support from other departments. This has been sufficient initially, but has become
increasingly difficult as Occupational Therapy has added additional cohorts, and will
increase with the inauguration of the Pharmacy program.

6. Operational Expense (How will the funds be spent; i.e., personal services, travel, etc.
Please provide a budget for the funds requested. Include the number of positions requested.)
The funds will be spent on personnel and equipment as follows:
   $40,000. - One administrative assistant, .5 FTE
   $40,000. - Equipment

7. Collaboration. (Demonstrate how the program optimizes existing capacity and expertise
throughout the system. Is the program developed collaboratively across campuses/MAUs in
a manner that emphasizes appropriate roles, strengths, and missions?)
    The Occupational Therapy program has oversight from the training and expertise of the
CHSW Dean’s Office Associate Dean, Susan Kaplan. The Pharmacy program has oversight
from the Allied Health Science Pharmacy Tech faculty. The collaborative nature of the
programs allows UAA and the State of Alaska to reap the benefit of professional level
doctoral programs, without the extensive costs of administering the entire program in-house.

8. UA SWS Performance Measures. Please provide anticipated impacts to performance
end results of the requested increment. It is not necessary to enter anything for metrics that
will not be impacted by this increment.

   d.    For each performance end result impacted by this request, provide the
        timeframe for realization. (Example: This increment will increase the student
        credit hours by FY13, because FY12 will be used to hire the additional professor.
        University-generated revenue and student credit hours will be impacted in FY13 by
        the additional course offerings provided by the new professor.
        This increment will ensure the continued offering of this program in-state, with 15
        students per year entering the Alaska healthcare workforce.




                                            14
   e. What strategy-specific sub-metric will be used to demonstrate return on
      investment? Determine which strategy specific sub-metric will be used to track
      intermediate progress toward moving the End Result metrics. (Example:
      Program major enrollment will be tracked as a preliminary indicator of eventual
      increases in high-demand graduates.)
      The number of graduates from the Occupational Therapy doctoral program will be
      tracked for each cohort, from 2008 – 2012. The first graduating class in December
      2011 will number 5; (two people are now off-track and will graduate in 2012 instead).

   f. What is the current baseline for this sub-metric, the expected change and the
      timeframe for realizing this change? Provide at least one year of historical
      performance on the proposed sub-metric, against which future year
      performance can be compared. Provide the anticipated change in the sub-metric
      performance if funding is received. Also indicate which fiscal year this change
      will be fully realized. (Example: In Fall 2010, there were 120 of these program
      majors enrolled. This increment would grow enrollment by 20 majors in FY13.

      Eight full time students were admitted into the program for 2008-09.
      Seven students successfully completed their coursework during the fall 2008 and
       spring 2009 terms.
      Seven students successfully completed their fieldwork experience during spring 2009.
      Adjunct administered lecture and lab courses were taught as planned.
      We will continue to admit up to 10 students per year in Occupational Therapy, and
       add 5 students per year in Pharmacy beginning fall 2011.

9. Other Output Measures. (Beyond the UA measures, how will the request affect the
measureable output of teaching, research, engagement, and/or creative expression? Provide
specific estimates.)
This program has enabled UAA to provide (in conjunction with CU) the first professional
level occupational therapy program in Alaska. Students who graduate from this program will
be eligible to take the National Registry Exam in OT, and will be eligible for licensure.
Graduates of this program will alleviate the severe shortages of occupational therapists
throughout the state.

10. Productivity and Efficiency. (What empirically demonstrable impact will this request
have on program or institutional productivity and efficiency? Faculty to student ratios and
cost per student are relevant examples. Provide specific estimates.)
Significant savings to students in educational costs are incurred by training in their home
state. Significant savings to the State of Alaska are incurred by keeping these specialists to
practice in-state.

11. Effectiveness and Quality. (What empirically demonstrable program or institutional
improvements in quality are expected from the implementation of this request? Identify
specific outcomes.)
Sustained quality of the program, both in administration and in equipment viability.


                                            15
12. Sustainability. (What impact will this request have on institutional, programmatic or
environmental sustainability?)
The added resources will insure continued availability of the program. Given the size of our
state, and the need for these services, particularly in the rural communities, is will ensure
greater health personnel resources for the state.

13. Priority Ranking. (In your major budget unit, what is the priority for this request?
Explain why this request received this ranking.)
High priority for furtherance of the doctoral programs.




                                           16
                                        ATTACHMENT V
                                     Incremental Request Form
                                              FY12

CHSW Nursing: 1 FTE Family Nurse Practitioner

      1. Request Description. (Provide a detailed narrative of the request. Include the purpose
      of the request and the market demand the request is intended to meet. If applicable, include
      the number of students affected and specific employer demand met. For research programs,
      include areas of state needs met and external funding source, i.e., National Science
      Foundation.)

          The School of Nursing is requesting funding of 2 half-time, 3 year term faculty positions
      to support the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP), Nursing Education (EDUC) and Psychiatric-
      Mental Health Nurse Practitioner track (PMH) specialty tracks for the Masters in Nursing
      program. These are all high-demand job markets in Anchorage, the State and the nation.
      Nursing has doubled course offerings of the required 18 credits of core courses to keep up
      with increased enrollments over the past few years. The students take two years of clinical
      courses, so there are two cohorts of 20-28 going through the program at any given time.
          The FNP program is the most popular curriculum in Nursing, and intends to transition to
      a doctoral degree to meet 2015 entry level workforce requirements. Only 8 students were
      admitted the fall 2010 cohort despite the pool of 25-30 applicants due to limited funding.

      2. Strategic Purpose. (How does the request address the Cabinet Strategic Guidance in
      Attachment I? How does the request support UAA 2017? How does it strengthen our total
      instructional program? Reinforce and expand our research? Expand educational
      opportunity and increase student success4 Strengthen the quality of campus life and the UAA
      community? Expand and enhance the Public Square?)

          Strategic Plan Goal Numbers 4, 5, 9 and 11. The FNP program is the most popular
      curriculum in Nursing, with the largest pool of applicants to date (25-30). Nursing has
      doubled course offerings of the core courses to keep up with increased enrollments over the
      past few years, and will hopefully transition to a doctoral degree to meet 2015 entry level
      workforce requirements. Providing the 1 FTE faculty position for 3 years will allow
      increased student access to the program and a workforce for the state.

      3. Operational Focus. (Does the request fill a gap, remedy a problem, or respond to an
      external requirement (e.g. accreditation or professional standard)? In light of the recent
      NWCCU accreditation process, does it address any weakness or suggestion cited by
      NWCCU? Does it reinforce or accelerate institutional or program success? Does it invest
      in a new initiative?)



4
    Access, retention, persistence, achievement, completion.
                                                   17
     Incentives are necessary to attract FNPs to decrease their work in lucrative private
practices hours to work part time for UAA. A term contract pays more (even though they
would still take a cut in pay); however, factoring in UAA health benefits and tuition waivers
is a big incentive. By making the term contract for 3 years, we will also have some
consistency and some control over the quality of supervision.
     With smaller cohorts (2005-2008) the 1.75 faculty could easily handle the theory and
most of the clinical supervision, although they still utilized 2-3 adjuncts. According to our
credentialing body, FNP faculty can supervise a maximum of 6 students. The 1.75 faculty
cannot teach the courses and supervise 6 students without having huge overloads. As a result
of increased enrollment, we have had to increase our utilization of adjunct faculty. This
spring we are using 8 adjuncts. Since adjuncts are also practicing FNPs, the most any adjunct
agrees to take is 1-3 students. It is extremely time consuming for the 1.75 FNP faculty to
recruit (beg and plead), train and supervise these adjuncts. Each semester the list of adjuncts
change, some return and some are new. By making a term contract for 3 years, Nursing will
have qualified FNP’s providing consistency and control over the quality of supervision.

4. FY11 GF and NGF Request (What GF funds are requested? What NGF revenue is
anticipated?)

$129,949 is request to facilitate the hiring of two half-time, three-year term positions for the
FNP program.

5. Operational Expense (How will the funds be spent; i.e., personal services, travel, etc.
Please provide a budget for the funds requested. Include the number of positions requested.)

$129,949 in personnel will cover the wage and benefits of two half-time Term faculty for
instruction of the FNP courses.

6. Department/Program Investment. (What investment, if any, is the department/program
prepared to make in this proposal in addition to the funds requested from outside the present
budget? Will any funds be reallocated internally to support this effort?)

Nursing will continue to provide the current level of support for the program. The FNP track
has 1.75 faculty dedicated to the program and that has not changed with the increased
enrollment. As a result of increased enrollment, the utilization of adjunct faculty has
increased. This spring Nursing used 8 adjuncts. With the requested 2 half-time terms, this
will be reduced to 3-5 adjuncts per semester for the FNP program; however, adjunct reliance
is further complicated by the absence of dedicated faculty for the Nursing Education and core
FNP courses. This necessitates borrowing faculty from the BSN program – which must in
turn hire adjuncts. To meet regulatory requirements and promote program quality, the
adjuncts will be spread over several programs to keep concentration low in each unit,
alleviating the current large FNP adjunct pool.

7. Collaboration. (Demonstrate how the program optimizes existing capacity and expertise
throughout the system. Is the program developed collaboratively across campuses/MAUs in
a manner that emphasizes appropriate roles, strengths, and missions?)

                                             18
     ATTACHMENT VI

University of Alaska Anchorage
 Project/Initiative Evaluation
              FY11

          Narratives




        PBAC Spring 2011




               19
                                      ATTACHMENT VI

                                 Project/Initiative Evaluation
                                                 FY11

Project/Initiative Title: Simulation Technician - TVEP
Contact: Barbara Berner
E-mail: afbhb@uaa.alaska.edu
Org #: 11158


This document is intended to provide basic assessment information for each special project or
initiative program funded in FY11. This includes priority program funding from the Legislature,
base funding through the UAA internal reallocation process, strategic opportunity fund awards,
Chancellor’s Research awards, and one-time TVEP workforce development funds. This
evaluation will be used to assess the effectiveness of funded projects and programs and as part of
the internal scan for the upcoming accreditation process.

Please provide a brief paragraph on each question, with the total document totaling no more than
two pages.

      What were the original objectives of this initiative? (Include goals, expected
       outcomes, what you hoped to accomplish.)
                The Alaska Simulation Task Force Report, March 2008, made recommendations that the
       UA Health programs spearhead a simulation technology based educational method as a statewide
       effort to increase simulated clinical experiences in postsecondary and continuing education. It is
       increasingly recognized as a teaching resource to reduce pressure on limited access to live clinical
       exposures, increase confidence of trainees, possibly improve patient safety and add rigor to the
       credentialing and precepting process.
                 A Simulation Specialist provides the technological and clinical knowledge needed for
       faculty to embark on needs assessment, curriculum development and delivery of interdisciplinary
       simulation for students in nursing, medicine and allied health and is primarily responsible for
       coordinating with SON faculty, staff and students, as well as external clinical partners in the
       implementation and evaluation of simulation experiences for both basic and high fidelity nursing
       simulation centers for the graduate and undergraduate nursing programs. The Simulation
       Specialist also works with SON faculty, other health sciences program faculty and administration
       to develop strategic direction for the advancement of the simulation center.

      What was accomplished? (What actually happened? Include personnel hiring, status
       of funds spent, and any changes to original plans, goals, or objectives. What goals were
       met? Include specific outcomes of the project or initiative.)
       The Simulation Technician position was filled in April 2010. Funds were also used to provide
       training and development sponsored by the equipment vendors to enable the simulation specialist
       to utilize the newest advancements in scenario development.

      What has been the impact? (How has UAA benefited from this initiative? Were
       additional courses offered or students served? What research was completed, what

                                                   20
    knowledge gained? What are the indicators that point to the impacts? How do the
    results further the strategic objectives of UAA 2017? How has the initiative affected UA
    Performance Measures?)
    The technical and clinical leadership of the Simulation Technician has provided direct and
    essential impact on student learning and faculty productivity, utilized the simulation equipment to
    its full capacity, as well as executing the software programs to make the equipment respond to the
    faculty requested patient scenarios.

   What are the expected future outcomes of this initiative? (Where is this initiative
    going next? How will this initiative continue to benefit UAA and its constituents? What is
    the anticipated future impact on UA Performance Measures?)
    The Simulation Technician position filled the void that existed in the School of Nursing clinical
    simulation operation. It supports the development and successful expansion of enhanced clinical
    simulation for interdisciplinary health programs on this campus as well as across the state.
    School of Nursing is working in partnership with the EAHP (Expanding Access to Health
    Programs) initiative intended to develop a hub/spoke model for clinical simulation education.

   To what extent, if any, was this initiative allocation to your unit offset by
    reductions?
    N/A




                                                21
                                    ATTACHMENT VI

                               Project/Initiative Evaluation
                                              FY11

Project/Initiative Title: Physician Assistant Program

Contact: John Riley
E-mail: afjor@uaa.alaska.edu
Org #: 11086

This document is intended to provide basic assessment information for each special project or
initiative program funded in FY11. This includes priority program funding from the Legislature,
base funding through the UAA internal reallocation process, strategic opportunity fund awards,
Chancellor’s Research awards, and one-time TVEP workforce development funds. This
evaluation will be used to assess the effectiveness of funded projects and programs and as part of
the internal scan for the upcoming accreditation process.

Please provide a brief paragraph on each question, with the total document totaling no more than
two pages.

      What were the original objectives of this initiative?
       Goal: Expand training opportunities for Physician Assistants (PAs) in Alaska to assure
       Alaska’s future health care needs are met and enhance opportunities for Alaskans to
       obtain their PA training without having to leave the state.
       Expected outcome: Medex Physician Assistant Program expansion will provide PA
       training to 20- 24 students on the UAA campus. Twenty students per academic year have
       been admitted to the Program beginning summer 2009.

      What was accomplished?
       Two support staff and three additional faculty were hired in 2009. Twenty students were
       selected as the first Alaska PA class and began their PA training in July 2009 and fifteen
       completed their first didactic year in June 2010. These students began their clinical phase
       in training sites in Anchorage and across Alaska in September 2010. Twenty additional
       students have been admitted and the second class began didactic training in July 2010 at
       UAA.

      What has been the impact?
       As we have begun training students we have experienced a remarkable community
       response with Alaskan community health practitioners who are physicians, PAs and
       nurses stepping forward to help teach our students.

      What are the expected future outcomes of this initiative?
       As described above, this program for primary care providers, in extremely high demand
       in the state, will produce clinicians annually to help fill the primary health care needs of
       Alaska. The first Alaska class will graduate in August 2011. Return on the investment of

                                                22
    the annual state support is exponentially related to the positive impact of MEDEX
    graduates on state access and delivery of health care services.

   To what extent, if any, was this initiative allocation to your unit offset by
    reductions?

    N/A




                                           23
                                    ATTACHMENT VI

                               Project/Initiative Evaluation
                                              FY11

Project/Initiative Title: Center for Human Development Facility Support

Contact: Karen Ward
E-mail: afkmw@uaa.alaska.edu
Org # 17155

This document is intended to provide basic assessment information for each special project or
initiative program funded in FY11. This includes priority program funding from the Legislature,
base funding through the UAA internal reallocation process, strategic opportunity fund awards,
Chancellor’s Research awards, and one-time TVEP workforce development funds. This
evaluation will be used to assess the effectiveness of funded projects and programs and as part of
the internal scan for the upcoming accreditation process.

Please provide a brief paragraph on each question, with the total document totaling no more than
two pages.

      What were the original objectives of this initiative? (Include goals, expected
       outcomes, what you hoped to accomplish.)

       The objective of the funding was to: [1] meet OSP’s indirect budgeting policies (A-21
       rules), [2] continue efficient use of an off-campus facility that does not “displace”
       traditional priorities, and [3] maintain close and vital partnerships with the community in
       a community setting is an effective use of UA resources.


      What was accomplished? (What actually happened? Include personnel hiring, status
       of funds spent, and any changes to original plans, goals, or objectives. What goals were
       met? Include specific outcomes of the project or initiative.)

       All funds were expended for facility rental. The outcome of the project was that CHD
       was able to continue operations and generate almost $6 million in external funding) in
       FY11. FY11 funding includes a significant proportion of external funding which are
       limited in their ability to fund facility rental (i.e., indirect percentage is capped
       significantly below UAA federally negotiated rate). CHD was able to maintain all staff
       and other personnel needed to carry out its mission.

      What has been the impact? (How has UAA benefited from this initiative? Were
       additional courses offered or students served? What research was completed, what
       knowledge gained? What are the indicators that point to the impacts? How do the
       results further the strategic objectives of UAA 2017? How has the initiative affected UA
       Performance Measures?)
    In December 2009, CHD had a federal site review regarding its compliance with the
    federal law that authorizes it as a University Center of Excellence in Developmental
    Disabilities. This review is analogous to accreditation. The facility support was
    highlighted as a demonstration of UAA’s support for the Center.

   What are the expected future outcomes of this initiative? (Where is this initiative
    going next? How will this initiative continue to benefit UAA and its constituents? What is
    the anticipated future impact on UA Performance Measures?)
    CHD expects to continue to deliver programs related to:
    High demand job areas: training and education for workforce development in the high
    demand fields of disability and long-term care. CHD will continue to offer both college-
    credit coursework leading to Occupational Endorsements, Certifications, and Associate
    Degrees in collaboration with UA MAUs; as well as community based workshops and
    continuing education statewide.

    Credit hours and Enrollment management: generating credit hours though disability and
    long term care offerings. Continue recruiting efforts targeting the non-traditional student,
    particularly those who are provider agency staff. Use external funding to provide
    scholarships, and significant individualized student support; which results in retention
    from one academic year to the next.

    Grant-funded Research and University Generated Revenue: Continue applied research
    and evaluation for state and community agencies. Generate federal funding for research
    in self-employment and violence against people with disabilities.

   To what extent, if any, was this initiative allocation to your unit offset by reductions?

    N/A




                                                                                                25
                                            ATTACHMENT VI

                                     Project/Initiative Evaluation
                                                         FY11

Project/Initiative Title: Human Services Practicum Coordinator

Contact: Laura Kelley
E-mail: lkelley101@aol.com
Org #: 11074

This document is intended to provide basic assessment information for each special project or
initiative program funded in FY10. This includes priority program funding from the Legislature,
base funding through the UAA internal reallocation process, strategic opportunity fund awards,
Chancellor’s Research awards, and one-time SB137 workforce development funds. This
evaluation will be used to assess the effectiveness of funded projects and programs and as part of
the internal scan for the upcoming accreditation process.

Please provide a brief paragraph on each question, with the total document totaling no more than
two pages.

      What were the original objectives of this initiative? (Include goals, expected
       outcomes, what you hoped to accomplish.)
       The original objective of this funding was (and continues to be) the provision of a practicum
       coordinator for the Human Services Department. The coordinator’s responsibilities include the
       processing and placemen of approximately 50 Human Service students per semester at
       community based agencies, and the maintenance and development of new placement sites.1
       During FY11 the department continued to expand the scope of the project to include:
           a) Increase by 3% and 5% Human Service enrollments in Fall 2010 and Spring 2011.
              Strategies employed included specific contact by the practicum coordinator focused upon
              community based agencies, career fairs and the Anchorage School District.
           b) Increase student access to practicum by simplifying and strengthening both the AAS and
              BHS practicum application and placement process.
           c) Increase the number of continuing practicum adjunct faculty members through training
              and the simplification and consistency of forms and course materials.
           d) Increase student access to practicum by increasing the number of available practicum
              sites for Human Services AAS and BHS students.

       (1) Human Service accreditation standards require 250 practicum hours per student for an associate degree and 350
       practicum hours for a BHS degree. Without funding supporting the practicum coordinator and support position the
       department would be unable to comply with Council for Standards in Human Service Education accreditation
       guidelines and remain accredited.



       The anticipated outcomes were:


                                                                                                                           26
        a) Increase Human Service enrollments by 10% and increase future practicum enrollments.
        b) Increase student practicum access through a unified streamlined electronic application
        process.
        c) Increase student success by training adjunct practicum faculty to teach specific practicum
        courses on a continuing basis.
        d) Increase student access to practicum by increasing the number of available practicum
        sites for Human Service AAS and BHS students.

   What was accomplished? (What actually happened? Include personnel hiring, status
    of funds spent, and any changes to original plans, goals, or objectives. What goals were
    met? Include specific outcomes of the project or initiative.)
    Objective 1: Increase student enrollments: Human Service enrollments increased 18% for fall
    2009 semester and 16% for spring 2010 semester. Enrollments continued to increase by 3% for
    fall 2010 and 5% for spring 2011 semesters.
    Objective 2: HUMS 185 Introduction to Field Experience is designed to introduce students to a)
    field experience as a learning opportunity, b) distance education, /and blackboard and 3)
    completion of the practicum application electronically. Students enrolled in 185 complete all
    practicum application forms prior to or on the deadline. This approach has proven to streamline
    the process, allowing students to be placed prior to actual practicum enrollment.
    Objective 3: The Human Service Department identified six existing practicum adjunct faculty
    members. The department conducted 4 group training sessions for the faculty. The adjunct
    faculty members were provided uniform forms and course materials as well as e-mail and face-to-
    face support. Four of the six have expressed a desire to continue to teach Practicum for the
    Department into the future.
    Objective 4: Through targeted community agency visits by the Practicum Coordinator, the
    Department has increased the number of Practicum sites by 27%.
        The status of this funding indicates the funds will all be expended by the end of FY11 without
    any over expenditures.

   What has been the impact? (How has UAA benefited from this initiative? Were
    additional courses offered or students served? What research was completed, what
    knowledge gained? What are the indicators that point to the impacts? How do the
    results further the strategic objectives of UAA 2017? How has the initiative affected UA
    Performance Measures?)
    Impact #1: Human Service student enrollments have increased 16% for fall 2009 semester and
    18% for spring 2010 semester. Enrollments continued to increase by 3% for fall 2010 and 5%
    for spring 2011 semesters. (UAA Strategic Plan 2017, Priority C: #1: “Work with school
    districts to increase the UAA share of Alaska’s college-bound students to improve student
    transition to higher education with special attention to Alaska Natives, other under-represented
    populations, and first-generation college students.”)
    Impact #2: The streamlining of the practicum application process accompanied by up-to-date
    student files and the HUMS 185 class has resulted in the placement of students who are


                                                                                                    27
    appropriate for Practicum and the screening-out of students for whom Practicum is not a good
    academic choice based on barrier crime regulations and/or personal issues. This allows the
    department to provide practicum access to appropriate students, and academic advising for
    students for whom Human Services is not a reasonable career path. (UAA Strategic Plan 2017,
    Priority C: #4: “Improve the efficiency with which students navigate our programs and campuses
    from entry to completion.”)

    Impact #3: The identification and training of returning adjunct practicum faculty has resulted in
    overall consistency among all sections of all four required Practica courses. This consistency is
    positively received by students and community based placement agencies as well. The
    Department has experienced a significant decrease in student problems associated with practicum.
    Additionally a spring 2010 survey of practicum field instructors shows 85.4% of the field
    instructors feel the placement of human service students is trouble free and 100% of the field
    instructors would supervise another practicum student in the future. (UAA Strategic Plan 2017,
    Priority C: #4: “Improve the efficiency with which students navigate our programs and campuses
    from entry to completion.” Priority D: #4: “Recruit, develop, and retain the highest quality
    faculty and staff to support our continuing drive for excellence in all dimensions of our
    mission.”)

    Impact #4: The department increased the number of community based practicum placement
    sites by 27%. This resulted in expanded practicum opportunities for students, an overall
    strengthening of the Human Service programs in general and an excellent foundation for the new
    graduate certificate program. (UAA Strategic Plan 2017, Priority A: #2: “Collaborate closely
    with public and private sector partners to maintain and develop our programs supporting
    workforce development and high demand careers.” Priority E: #1: “Expand our commitment to
    make community engagement and service learning a cornerstone of our institutional identity.”
    Priority E: #3: “Become a national model for wide ranging community partnerships in training,
    education, research and service.”)

   What are the expected future outcomes of this initiative? (Where is this initiative
    going next? How will this initiative continue to benefit UAA and its constituents? What is
    the anticipated future impact on UA Performance Measures?)
    The future of this initiative will be to continue all of the above activities and in addition focus
    attention upon a global human service stakeholder communication system to include: practicum
    faculty, students, field instructors and placement agencies. The purpose of the system is to draw
    upon and support our community partners, faculty and to provide quick consistent information to
    our practicum stakeholders. In addition it is intended once the system is developed and tested all
    students and alumni will be included.

   To what extent, if any, was this initiative allocation to your unit offset by
    reductions?

    N/A




                                                                                                     28
                                     ATTACHMENT VI

                                Project/Initiative Evaluation
                                              FY11

Project/Initiative Title: Clinical Simulations Delivery Coordinator
Contact: Susan Kaplan
E-mail: afshk@uaa.alaska.edu
Org #: 11431


This document is intended to provide basic assessment information for each special project or
initiative program funded in FY11. This includes priority program funding from the Legislature,
base funding through the UAA internal reallocation process, strategic opportunity fund awards,
Chancellor’s Research awards, and one-time TVEP workforce development funds. This
evaluation will be used to assess the effectiveness of funded projects and programs and as part of
the internal scan for the upcoming accreditation process.

Please provide a brief paragraph on each question, with the total document totaling no more than
two pages.

       What were the original objectives of this initiative? (Include goals, expected
        outcomes, what you hoped to accomplish.)

           This was a new position funded .5 FTE in FY 11. The Simulation Coordinator
       provides expertise in low, medium, and high fidelity simulation with experience in
       teaching health professionals.

       This position coordinates the School of Nursing (SON) simulation clinic expansion to
       selected community campus/outreach sites starting with Fairbanks. This entailed:
          1) Teleconference faculty training in use of the mannequin located at the outreach site
       nursing labs.
          2) Implementation of simulation scenarios within existing courses.
          3) Promote best practice in student learning through use of simulation.
          4) Partnering with other discipline faculty to provide a broad array of simulation
       experiences.


       What was accomplished? (What actually happened? Include personnel hiring, status
        of funds spent, and any changes to original plans, goals, or objectives. What goals were
        met? Include specific outcomes of the project or initiative.)
       Hired an FNP with clinical simulation expertise to guide the process
       Launched the Inter-professional Clinical Simulation Faculty Steering Committee to
        promote inter-professional education using clinical simulation as a tool
       Established Inter-professional Education as a priority for the new Health Sciences
        Building and for the improved educational opportunities of UA students


                                                                                                29
   Created channels of communication between health disciplines within the University
   Established communication between disciplines through regular meetings
   Evaluated ability of simulation to enhance current curricula in nursing, occupational
    therapy, physician assistant, nurse practitioner, allied health, medicine, speech therapy,
    and social work through symposium attendance and interactions. Disciplines are
    beginning to determine how simulation can be incorporated.
   Examined and documented Inter-professional Educational learning opportunities amongst
    >13 health disciplines within the University
   Development of a standardized patient program is in progress
   Assessment of the learning needs of faculty across disciplines has been completed and is
    being addressed through training and paid travel to symposium opportunities.

   What has been the impact? (How has UAA benefited from this initiative? Were
    additional courses offered or students served? What research was completed, what
    knowledge gained? What are the indicators that point to the impacts? How do the
    results further the strategic objectives of UAA 2017? How has the initiative affected UA
    Performance Measures?)
         Verified the University’s commitment to supporting our Alaskan healthcare
            community by financing and organizing for faculty/staff to attend statewide
            simulation events
         UA demonstrated its commitment to quality education by being among the first
            universities within the nation to establish an Inter-professional Clinical
            Simulation Faculty Steering committee. This committee will guide the
            development and progression forward of Clinical Simulation within the
            University and throughout Alaskan healthcare.
         Additional courses for students are being discussed
         Professional advancement courses both for practicing professionals and for
            faculty are being discussed
         Discussion of alternative educational opportunities, i.e. second life, to promote the
            equalization of educational opportunities across the state
         Established the University of Alaska as an innovative educational University
        
   What are the expected future outcomes of this initiative? (Where is this initiative
    going next? How will this initiative continue to benefit UAA and its constituents? What is
    the anticipated future impact on UA Performance Measures?)

    This program will result in state of the art, advanced inter-professional simulation use in
    health related programs across Alaska.

   To what extent, if any, was this initiative allocation to your unit offset by
    reductions?

    N/A




                                                                                                  30
 PBAC Presentation Attachments
College of Health & Social Welfare
  Cheryl Easley, Ph.D., R.N., Dean
            April 2011




                1
     ATTACHMENT V

University of Alaska Anchorage
 FY12 Incremental Requests

          Narratives




        PBAC Spring 2011




               2
                                        ATTACHMENT V
                                     Incremental Request Form
                                              FY12

Title: Health College Reorganization

      1. Request Description. (Provide a detailed narrative of the request. Include the purpose
      of the request and the market demand the request is intended to meet. If applicable, include
      the number of students affected and specific employer demand met. For research programs,
      include areas of state needs met and external funding source, i.e., National Science
      Foundation.)
          Stating a basic assumption of this request, the health-related programs at UAA will be
      reorganized into a single college, adding to the current units within CHSW the Allied Health
      Sciences and the WWAMI Biomedical program. This will add synergy to collaborations that
      already occur on campus, and facilitate the continued expansion and development of UAA’s
      health education and research in service to Alaska.
          This is an admirable pursuit, and will require additional personnel resources, specifically
      an additional Associate Dean, Advisor and IT technician.

      2. Strategic Purpose. (How does the request address the Cabinet Strategic Guidance in
      Attachment I? How does the request support UAA 2017? How does it strengthen our total
      instructional program? Reinforce and expand our research? Expand educational
      opportunity and increase student success1 Strengthen the quality of campus life and the UAA
      community? Expand and enhance the Public Square?)
      Academic Programs and Research (UAA 2017 Strategic Priories A and B, Accreditation
      Core Themes 1 and 2.) section 4 addressing the strengthening of our health programs.

      3. Operational Focus. (Does the request fill a gap, remedy a problem, or respond to an
      external requirement (e.g. accreditation or professional standard)? In light of the recent
      NWCCU accreditation process, does it address any weakness or suggestion cited by
      NWCCU? Does it reinforce or accelerate institutional or program success? Does it invest
      in a new initiative?)
      The request furthers UAA commitment to respond to Alaska’s urban and rural health
      challenges.

      4. FY12 GF and NGF Request (What GF funds are requested? What NGF revenue is
      anticipated?)
          $250,000 GF
          NGF will be accelerated by the resulting collaborations in research, instruction and
      advising.




1
    Access, retention, persistence, achievement, completion.
                                                    3
5. Department/Program Investment. (What investment, if any, is the department/program
prepared to make in this proposal in addition to the funds requested from outside the present
budget? Will any funds be reallocated internally to support this effort?)
    CHSW is already functioning at or near capacity with current levels of personnel, who
will continue to give their time and expertise to this venture.

6. Operational Expense (How will the funds be spent; i.e., personal services, travel, etc.
Please provide a budget for the funds requested. Include the number of positions requested.)
The funds will be spent entirely on personnel:
    $150,000 – Associate Dean, expanding current structure into academic and administrative
duties.
     $60,000 – Advisor for one-stop health program advising to students seeking health-
related careers.
     $40,000 – IT Technician, .5 FTE to assist current IT oversight for the college.

7. Collaboration. (Demonstrate how the program optimizes existing capacity and expertise
throughout the system. Is the program developed collaboratively across campuses/MAUs in
a manner that emphasizes appropriate roles, strengths, and missions?)
    The focus of the reorganization is collaboration within the health programs. This request
facilitates this agenda, recognizing the benefit of providing the appropriate organization to
support and work in concert with health programs at other universities and campuses in the
UA system.

8. UA SWS Performance Measures. Please provide anticipated impacts to performance
end results of the requested increment. It is not necessary to enter anything for metrics that
will not be impacted by this increment.

   a.    For each performance end result impacted by this request, provide the
        timeframe for realization. (Example: This increment will increase the student
        credit hours by FY13, because FY12 will be used to hire the additional professor.
        University-generated revenue and student credit hours will be impacted in FY13 by
        the additional course offerings provided by the new professor.
        This increment will streamline the instructional, research and advising agendas of the
        reorganization.

   b. What strategy-specific sub-metric will be used to demonstrate return on
      investment? Determine which strategy specific sub-metric will be used to track
      intermediate progress toward moving the End Result metrics. (Example:
      Program major enrollment will be tracked as a preliminary indicator of eventual
      increases in high-demand graduates.)
      Growth will be tracked in the number of health program offerings, enrollments,
      graduates and increase in the number of research awards and expenditures.

   c. What is the current baseline for this sub-metric, the expected change and the
      timeframe for realizing this change? Provide at least one year of historical
      performance on the proposed sub-metric, against which future year

                                             4
       performance can be compared. Provide the anticipated change in the sub-metric
       performance if funding is received. Also indicate which fiscal year this change
       will be fully realized. (Example: In Fall 2010, there were 120 of these program
       majors enrolled. This increment would grow enrollment by 20 majors in FY13.
       All the impacted units already have IR tracked metrics. These will be monitored
       within the new structure of the college.

9. Other Output Measures. (Beyond the UA measures, how will the request affect the
measureable output of teaching, research, engagement, and/or creative expression? Provide
specific estimates.)

10. Productivity and Efficiency. (What empirically demonstrable impact will this request
have on program or institutional productivity and efficiency? Faculty to student ratios and
cost per student are relevant examples. Provide specific estimates.)
   To quote from the Chancellor’s Office September 21, 2010 memo to the UAA 
Community, “In keeping with UAA 2017 and the draft UA Academic Master Plan, 
the overall objectives of this action are to improve operational efficiency 
and effectiveness, to provide the framework for improved collaboration across 
health and health‐related disciplines, to build the foundation for the 
continued expansion and development of UAA’s health education and research in 
service to Alaska, and to provide the appropriate organization to support and 
work in concert with health programs at other universities and campuses in 
the UA system.  It is our intention to create and develop strategic 
opportunities, not to compromise success or to eliminate programs.” 
This request recognizes the value of this agenda, and seeks to take necessary steps to
accomplish them.

11. Effectiveness and Quality. (What empirically demonstrable program or institutional
improvements in quality are expected from the implementation of this request? Identify
specific outcomes.)
Students will receive consistent and comprehensive pathway advising into health programs,
which will impact enrollment and retention efficiencies. This will also build multi-
disciplinary education important to current health practice.
Researchers and impacted programs will have appropriate support at the Dean level to fulfill
their strategic missions to address Alaska’s urban and rural health challenges.

12. Sustainability. (What impact will this request have on institutional, programmatic or
environmental sustainability?)
The goal is to provide an environment for health program outcomes to be optimized for the
university and the state of Alaska.

13. Priority Ranking. (In your major budget unit, what is the priority for this request?
Explain why this request received this ranking.)
Very high ranking; the reorganization will be hampered without a level of support.




                                             5
                                        ATTACHMENT V
                                     Incremental Request Form
                                              FY12

Title: Occupational Therapy and Pharmacy Distance Programs

      1. Request Description. (Provide a detailed narrative of the request. Include the purpose
      of the request and the market demand the request is intended to meet. If applicable, include
      the number of students affected and specific employer demand met. For research programs,
      include areas of state needs met and external funding source, i.e., National Science
      Foundation.)
          Occupational Therapy made the top ten health shortage professions based on estimated
      vacancy rates in the 2009 Alaska Health Workforce Vacancy Study published by ACRH and
      ISER. Pharmacy made the top ten health shortage professions based on estimated positions
      in the same study.
          UAA currently has entered into an affiliate agreement with Creighton University for the
      delivery of both programs at UAA as a distance delivery through Creighton. The
      Occupational Therapy program is in its third successful year, with ten students per year
      enrolled and the first cohort graduating spring 2011. The Pharmacy program will launch fall
      2011 with five students.
          To further these programs, a half time administrative assistant is needed and additional
      equipment for sustained quality in conducting the labs.

      2. Strategic Purpose. (How does the request address the Cabinet Strategic Guidance in
      Attachment I? How does the request support UAA 2017? How does it strengthen our total
      instructional program? Reinforce and expand our research? Expand educational
      opportunity and increase student success2 Strengthen the quality of campus life and the UAA
      community? Expand and enhance the Public Square?)
           Academic Programs and Research (UAA 2017 Strategic Priories A and B,
              Accreditation Core Themes 1 and 2.) section 4 addressing the strengthening of our
              health programs.
           Students Success: Alaska students have access to high demand professional
              programs without leaving the state.
           Public Square: Alaskans reap the benefit of in-state trained occupational therapists
              who will be more likely to retain practice in-state.

      3. Operational Focus. (Does the request fill a gap, remedy a problem, or respond to an
      external requirement (e.g. accreditation or professional standard)? In light of the recent
      NWCCU accreditation process, does it address any weakness or suggestion cited by
      NWCCU? Does it reinforce or accelerate institutional or program success? Does it invest
      in a new initiative?)
          This program has enabled UAA to provide (in conjunction with CU) the first professional
          level occupational therapy program in Alaska. Students who graduate from this program

2
    Access, retention, persistence, achievement, completion.
                                                    6
   will be eligible to take the National Registry Exam in OT, and will be eligible for
   licensure. Graduates of this program will alleviate the severe shortages of occupational
   therapists throughout the state.


4. FY12 GF and NGF Request (What GF funds are requested? What NGF revenue is
anticipated?)
    $80,000 is requested in GF

5. Department/Program Investment. (What investment, if any, is the department/program
prepared to make in this proposal in addition to the funds requested from outside the present
budget? Will any funds be reallocated internally to support this effort?)
    The college currently allocates funds for the half-time Occupational Therapy Liaison, and
administrative oversight to the program, as well as supplies and ad hoc administrative
support from other departments. This has been sufficient initially, but has become
increasingly difficult as Occupational Therapy has added additional cohorts, and will
increase with the inauguration of the Pharmacy program.

6. Operational Expense (How will the funds be spent; i.e., personal services, travel, etc.
Please provide a budget for the funds requested. Include the number of positions requested.)
The funds will be spent on personnel and equipment as follows:
   $40,000. - One administrative assistant, .5 FTE
   $40,000. - Equipment

7. Collaboration. (Demonstrate how the program optimizes existing capacity and expertise
throughout the system. Is the program developed collaboratively across campuses/MAUs in
a manner that emphasizes appropriate roles, strengths, and missions?)
    The Occupational Therapy program has oversight from the training and expertise of the
CHSW Dean’s Office Associate Dean, Susan Kaplan. The Pharmacy program has oversight
from the Allied Health Science Pharmacy Tech faculty. The collaborative nature of the
programs allows UAA and the State of Alaska to reap the benefit of professional level
doctoral programs, without the extensive costs of administering the entire program in-house.

8. UA SWS Performance Measures. Please provide anticipated impacts to performance
end results of the requested increment. It is not necessary to enter anything for metrics that
will not be impacted by this increment.

   d.    For each performance end result impacted by this request, provide the
        timeframe for realization. (Example: This increment will increase the student
        credit hours by FY13, because FY12 will be used to hire the additional professor.
        University-generated revenue and student credit hours will be impacted in FY13 by
        the additional course offerings provided by the new professor.
        This increment will ensure the continued offering of this program in-state, with 15
        students per year entering the Alaska healthcare workforce.




                                             7
   e. What strategy-specific sub-metric will be used to demonstrate return on
      investment? Determine which strategy specific sub-metric will be used to track
      intermediate progress toward moving the End Result metrics. (Example:
      Program major enrollment will be tracked as a preliminary indicator of eventual
      increases in high-demand graduates.)
      The number of graduates from the Occupational Therapy doctoral program will be
      tracked for each cohort, from 2008 – 2012. The first graduating class in December
      2011 will number 5; (two people are now off-track and will graduate in 2012 instead).

   f. What is the current baseline for this sub-metric, the expected change and the
      timeframe for realizing this change? Provide at least one year of historical
      performance on the proposed sub-metric, against which future year
      performance can be compared. Provide the anticipated change in the sub-metric
      performance if funding is received. Also indicate which fiscal year this change
      will be fully realized. (Example: In Fall 2010, there were 120 of these program
      majors enrolled. This increment would grow enrollment by 20 majors in FY13.

      Eight full time students were admitted into the program for 2008-09.
      Seven students successfully completed their coursework during the fall 2008 and
       spring 2009 terms.
      Seven students successfully completed their fieldwork experience during spring 2009.
      Adjunct administered lecture and lab courses were taught as planned.
      We will continue to admit up to 10 students per year in Occupational Therapy, and
       add 5 students per year in Pharmacy beginning fall 2011.

9. Other Output Measures. (Beyond the UA measures, how will the request affect the
measureable output of teaching, research, engagement, and/or creative expression? Provide
specific estimates.)
This program has enabled UAA to provide (in conjunction with CU) the first professional
level occupational therapy program in Alaska. Students who graduate from this program will
be eligible to take the National Registry Exam in OT, and will be eligible for licensure.
Graduates of this program will alleviate the severe shortages of occupational therapists
throughout the state.

10. Productivity and Efficiency. (What empirically demonstrable impact will this request
have on program or institutional productivity and efficiency? Faculty to student ratios and
cost per student are relevant examples. Provide specific estimates.)
Significant savings to students in educational costs are incurred by training in their home
state. Significant savings to the State of Alaska are incurred by keeping these specialists to
practice in-state.

11. Effectiveness and Quality. (What empirically demonstrable program or institutional
improvements in quality are expected from the implementation of this request? Identify
specific outcomes.)
Sustained quality of the program, both in administration and in equipment viability.


                                             8
12. Sustainability. (What impact will this request have on institutional, programmatic or
environmental sustainability?)
The added resources will insure continued availability of the program. Given the size of our
state, and the need for these services, particularly in the rural communities, is will ensure
greater health personnel resources for the state.

13. Priority Ranking. (In your major budget unit, what is the priority for this request?
Explain why this request received this ranking.)
High priority for furtherance of the doctoral programs.




                                            9
                                        ATTACHMENT V
                                     Incremental Request Form
                                              FY12

CHSW Nursing: 1 FTE Family Nurse Practitioner

      1. Request Description. (Provide a detailed narrative of the request. Include the purpose
      of the request and the market demand the request is intended to meet. If applicable, include
      the number of students affected and specific employer demand met. For research programs,
      include areas of state needs met and external funding source, i.e., National Science
      Foundation.)

          The School of Nursing is requesting funding of 2 half-time, 3 year term faculty positions
      to support the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP), Nursing Education (EDUC) and Psychiatric-
      Mental Health Nurse Practitioner track (PMH) specialty tracks for the Masters in Nursing
      program. These are all high-demand job markets in Anchorage, the State and the nation.
      Nursing has doubled course offerings of the required 18 credits of core courses to keep up
      with increased enrollments over the past few years. The students take two years of clinical
      courses, so there are two cohorts of 20-28 going through the program at any given time.
          The FNP program is the most popular curriculum in Nursing, and intends to transition to
      a doctoral degree to meet 2015 entry level workforce requirements. Only 8 students were
      admitted the fall 2010 cohort despite the pool of 25-30 applicants due to limited funding.

      2. Strategic Purpose. (How does the request address the Cabinet Strategic Guidance in
      Attachment I? How does the request support UAA 2017? How does it strengthen our total
      instructional program? Reinforce and expand our research? Expand educational
      opportunity and increase student success3 Strengthen the quality of campus life and the UAA
      community? Expand and enhance the Public Square?)

          Strategic Plan Goal Numbers 4, 5, 9 and 11. The FNP program is the most popular
      curriculum in Nursing, with the largest pool of applicants to date (25-30). Nursing has
      doubled course offerings of the core courses to keep up with increased enrollments over the
      past few years, and will hopefully transition to a doctoral degree to meet 2015 entry level
      workforce requirements. Providing the 1 FTE faculty position for 3 years will allow
      increased student access to the program and a workforce for the state.

      3. Operational Focus. (Does the request fill a gap, remedy a problem, or respond to an
      external requirement (e.g. accreditation or professional standard)? In light of the recent
      NWCCU accreditation process, does it address any weakness or suggestion cited by
      NWCCU? Does it reinforce or accelerate institutional or program success? Does it invest
      in a new initiative?)



3
    Access, retention, persistence, achievement, completion.
                                                   10
     Incentives are necessary to attract FNPs to decrease their work in lucrative private
practices hours to work part time for UAA. A term contract pays more (even though they
would still take a cut in pay); however, factoring in UAA health benefits and tuition waivers
is a big incentive. By making the term contract for 3 years, we will also have some
consistency and some control over the quality of supervision.
     With smaller cohorts (2005-2008) the 1.75 faculty could easily handle the theory and
most of the clinical supervision, although they still utilized 2-3 adjuncts. According to our
credentialing body, FNP faculty can supervise a maximum of 6 students. The 1.75 faculty
cannot teach the courses and supervise 6 students without having huge overloads. As a result
of increased enrollment, we have had to increase our utilization of adjunct faculty. This
spring we are using 8 adjuncts. Since adjuncts are also practicing FNPs, the most any adjunct
agrees to take is 1-3 students. It is extremely time consuming for the 1.75 FNP faculty to
recruit (beg and plead), train and supervise these adjuncts. Each semester the list of adjuncts
change, some return and some are new. By making a term contract for 3 years, Nursing will
have qualified FNP’s providing consistency and control over the quality of supervision.

4. FY11 GF and NGF Request (What GF funds are requested? What NGF revenue is
anticipated?)

$129,949 is request to facilitate the hiring of two half-time, three-year term positions for the
FNP program.

5. Operational Expense (How will the funds be spent; i.e., personal services, travel, etc.
Please provide a budget for the funds requested. Include the number of positions requested.)

$129,949 in personnel will cover the wage and benefits of two half-time Term faculty for
instruction of the FNP courses.

6. Department/Program Investment. (What investment, if any, is the department/program
prepared to make in this proposal in addition to the funds requested from outside the present
budget? Will any funds be reallocated internally to support this effort?)

Nursing will continue to provide the current level of support for the program. The FNP track
has 1.75 faculty dedicated to the program and that has not changed with the increased
enrollment. As a result of increased enrollment, the utilization of adjunct faculty has
increased. This spring Nursing used 8 adjuncts. With the requested 2 half-time terms, this
will be reduced to 3-5 adjuncts per semester for the FNP program; however, adjunct reliance
is further complicated by the absence of dedicated faculty for the Nursing Education and core
FNP courses. This necessitates borrowing faculty from the BSN program – which must in
turn hire adjuncts. To meet regulatory requirements and promote program quality, the
adjuncts will be spread over several programs to keep concentration low in each unit,
alleviating the current large FNP adjunct pool.

7. Collaboration. (Demonstrate how the program optimizes existing capacity and expertise
throughout the system. Is the program developed collaboratively across campuses/MAUs in
a manner that emphasizes appropriate roles, strengths, and missions?)

                                             11
     ATTACHMENT VI

University of Alaska Anchorage
 Project/Initiative Evaluation
              FY11

          Narratives




        PBAC Spring 2011




               12
                                      ATTACHMENT VI

                                 Project/Initiative Evaluation
                                                 FY11

Project/Initiative Title: Simulation Technician - TVEP
Contact: Barbara Berner
E-mail: afbhb@uaa.alaska.edu
Org #: 11158


This document is intended to provide basic assessment information for each special project or
initiative program funded in FY11. This includes priority program funding from the Legislature,
base funding through the UAA internal reallocation process, strategic opportunity fund awards,
Chancellor’s Research awards, and one-time TVEP workforce development funds. This
evaluation will be used to assess the effectiveness of funded projects and programs and as part of
the internal scan for the upcoming accreditation process.

Please provide a brief paragraph on each question, with the total document totaling no more than
two pages.

      What were the original objectives of this initiative? (Include goals, expected
       outcomes, what you hoped to accomplish.)
                The Alaska Simulation Task Force Report, March 2008, made recommendations that the
       UA Health programs spearhead a simulation technology based educational method as a statewide
       effort to increase simulated clinical experiences in postsecondary and continuing education. It is
       increasingly recognized as a teaching resource to reduce pressure on limited access to live clinical
       exposures, increase confidence of trainees, possibly improve patient safety and add rigor to the
       credentialing and precepting process.
                 A Simulation Specialist provides the technological and clinical knowledge needed for
       faculty to embark on needs assessment, curriculum development and delivery of interdisciplinary
       simulation for students in nursing, medicine and allied health and is primarily responsible for
       coordinating with SON faculty, staff and students, as well as external clinical partners in the
       implementation and evaluation of simulation experiences for both basic and high fidelity nursing
       simulation centers for the graduate and undergraduate nursing programs. The Simulation
       Specialist also works with SON faculty, other health sciences program faculty and administration
       to develop strategic direction for the advancement of the simulation center.

      What was accomplished? (What actually happened? Include personnel hiring, status
       of funds spent, and any changes to original plans, goals, or objectives. What goals were
       met? Include specific outcomes of the project or initiative.)
       The Simulation Technician position was filled in April 2010. Funds were also used to provide
       training and development sponsored by the equipment vendors to enable the simulation specialist
       to utilize the newest advancements in scenario development.

      What has been the impact? (How has UAA benefited from this initiative? Were
       additional courses offered or students served? What research was completed, what

                                                   13
    knowledge gained? What are the indicators that point to the impacts? How do the
    results further the strategic objectives of UAA 2017? How has the initiative affected UA
    Performance Measures?)
    The technical and clinical leadership of the Simulation Technician has provided direct and
    essential impact on student learning and faculty productivity, utilized the simulation equipment to
    its full capacity, as well as executing the software programs to make the equipment respond to the
    faculty requested patient scenarios.

   What are the expected future outcomes of this initiative? (Where is this initiative
    going next? How will this initiative continue to benefit UAA and its constituents? What is
    the anticipated future impact on UA Performance Measures?)
    The Simulation Technician position filled the void that existed in the School of Nursing clinical
    simulation operation. It supports the development and successful expansion of enhanced clinical
    simulation for interdisciplinary health programs on this campus as well as across the state.
    School of Nursing is working in partnership with the EAHP (Expanding Access to Health
    Programs) initiative intended to develop a hub/spoke model for clinical simulation education.

   To what extent, if any, was this initiative allocation to your unit offset by
    reductions?
    N/A




                                                14
                                    ATTACHMENT VI

                               Project/Initiative Evaluation
                                              FY11

Project/Initiative Title: Physician Assistant Program

Contact: John Riley
E-mail: afjor@uaa.alaska.edu
Org #: 11086

This document is intended to provide basic assessment information for each special project or
initiative program funded in FY11. This includes priority program funding from the Legislature,
base funding through the UAA internal reallocation process, strategic opportunity fund awards,
Chancellor’s Research awards, and one-time TVEP workforce development funds. This
evaluation will be used to assess the effectiveness of funded projects and programs and as part of
the internal scan for the upcoming accreditation process.

Please provide a brief paragraph on each question, with the total document totaling no more than
two pages.

      What were the original objectives of this initiative?
       Goal: Expand training opportunities for Physician Assistants (PAs) in Alaska to assure
       Alaska’s future health care needs are met and enhance opportunities for Alaskans to
       obtain their PA training without having to leave the state.
       Expected outcome: Medex Physician Assistant Program expansion will provide PA
       training to 20- 24 students on the UAA campus. Twenty students per academic year have
       been admitted to the Program beginning summer 2009.

      What was accomplished?
       Two support staff and three additional faculty were hired in 2009. Twenty students were
       selected as the first Alaska PA class and began their PA training in July 2009 and fifteen
       completed their first didactic year in June 2010. These students began their clinical phase
       in training sites in Anchorage and across Alaska in September 2010. Twenty additional
       students have been admitted and the second class began didactic training in July 2010 at
       UAA.

      What has been the impact?
       As we have begun training students we have experienced a remarkable community
       response with Alaskan community health practitioners who are physicians, PAs and
       nurses stepping forward to help teach our students.

      What are the expected future outcomes of this initiative?
       As described above, this program for primary care providers, in extremely high demand
       in the state, will produce clinicians annually to help fill the primary health care needs of
       Alaska. The first Alaska class will graduate in August 2011. Return on the investment of

                                                15
    the annual state support is exponentially related to the positive impact of MEDEX
    graduates on state access and delivery of health care services.

   To what extent, if any, was this initiative allocation to your unit offset by
    reductions?

    N/A




                                           16
                                    ATTACHMENT VI

                               Project/Initiative Evaluation
                                              FY11

Project/Initiative Title: Center for Human Development Facility Support

Contact: Karen Ward
E-mail: afkmw@uaa.alaska.edu
Org # 17155

This document is intended to provide basic assessment information for each special project or
initiative program funded in FY11. This includes priority program funding from the Legislature,
base funding through the UAA internal reallocation process, strategic opportunity fund awards,
Chancellor’s Research awards, and one-time TVEP workforce development funds. This
evaluation will be used to assess the effectiveness of funded projects and programs and as part of
the internal scan for the upcoming accreditation process.

Please provide a brief paragraph on each question, with the total document totaling no more than
two pages.

      What were the original objectives of this initiative? (Include goals, expected
       outcomes, what you hoped to accomplish.)

       The objective of the funding was to: [1] meet OSP’s indirect budgeting policies (A-21
       rules), [2] continue efficient use of an off-campus facility that does not “displace”
       traditional priorities, and [3] maintain close and vital partnerships with the community in
       a community setting is an effective use of UA resources.


      What was accomplished? (What actually happened? Include personnel hiring, status
       of funds spent, and any changes to original plans, goals, or objectives. What goals were
       met? Include specific outcomes of the project or initiative.)

       All funds were expended for facility rental. The outcome of the project was that CHD
       was able to continue operations and generate almost $6 million in external funding) in
       FY11. FY11 funding includes a significant proportion of external funding which are
       limited in their ability to fund facility rental (i.e., indirect percentage is capped
       significantly below UAA federally negotiated rate). CHD was able to maintain all staff
       and other personnel needed to carry out its mission.

      What has been the impact? (How has UAA benefited from this initiative? Were
       additional courses offered or students served? What research was completed, what
       knowledge gained? What are the indicators that point to the impacts? How do the
       results further the strategic objectives of UAA 2017? How has the initiative affected UA
       Performance Measures?)
    In December 2009, CHD had a federal site review regarding its compliance with the
    federal law that authorizes it as a University Center of Excellence in Developmental
    Disabilities. This review is analogous to accreditation. The facility support was
    highlighted as a demonstration of UAA’s support for the Center.

   What are the expected future outcomes of this initiative? (Where is this initiative
    going next? How will this initiative continue to benefit UAA and its constituents? What is
    the anticipated future impact on UA Performance Measures?)
    CHD expects to continue to deliver programs related to:
    High demand job areas: training and education for workforce development in the high
    demand fields of disability and long-term care. CHD will continue to offer both college-
    credit coursework leading to Occupational Endorsements, Certifications, and Associate
    Degrees in collaboration with UA MAUs; as well as community based workshops and
    continuing education statewide.

    Credit hours and Enrollment management: generating credit hours though disability and
    long term care offerings. Continue recruiting efforts targeting the non-traditional student,
    particularly those who are provider agency staff. Use external funding to provide
    scholarships, and significant individualized student support; which results in retention
    from one academic year to the next.

    Grant-funded Research and University Generated Revenue: Continue applied research
    and evaluation for state and community agencies. Generate federal funding for research
    in self-employment and violence against people with disabilities.

   To what extent, if any, was this initiative allocation to your unit offset by reductions?

    N/A




                                                                                                18
                                            ATTACHMENT VI

                                     Project/Initiative Evaluation
                                                         FY11

Project/Initiative Title: Human Services Practicum Coordinator

Contact: Laura Kelley
E-mail: lkelley101@aol.com
Org #: 11074

This document is intended to provide basic assessment information for each special project or
initiative program funded in FY10. This includes priority program funding from the Legislature,
base funding through the UAA internal reallocation process, strategic opportunity fund awards,
Chancellor’s Research awards, and one-time SB137 workforce development funds. This
evaluation will be used to assess the effectiveness of funded projects and programs and as part of
the internal scan for the upcoming accreditation process.

Please provide a brief paragraph on each question, with the total document totaling no more than
two pages.

      What were the original objectives of this initiative? (Include goals, expected
       outcomes, what you hoped to accomplish.)
       The original objective of this funding was (and continues to be) the provision of a practicum
       coordinator for the Human Services Department. The coordinator’s responsibilities include the
       processing and placemen of approximately 50 Human Service students per semester at
       community based agencies, and the maintenance and development of new placement sites.1
       During FY11 the department continued to expand the scope of the project to include:
           a) Increase by 3% and 5% Human Service enrollments in Fall 2010 and Spring 2011.
              Strategies employed included specific contact by the practicum coordinator focused upon
              community based agencies, career fairs and the Anchorage School District.
           b) Increase student access to practicum by simplifying and strengthening both the AAS and
              BHS practicum application and placement process.
           c) Increase the number of continuing practicum adjunct faculty members through training
              and the simplification and consistency of forms and course materials.
           d) Increase student access to practicum by increasing the number of available practicum
              sites for Human Services AAS and BHS students.

       (1) Human Service accreditation standards require 250 practicum hours per student for an associate degree and 350
       practicum hours for a BHS degree. Without funding supporting the practicum coordinator and support position the
       department would be unable to comply with Council for Standards in Human Service Education accreditation
       guidelines and remain accredited.



       The anticipated outcomes were:


                                                                                                                           19
        a) Increase Human Service enrollments by 10% and increase future practicum enrollments.
        b) Increase student practicum access through a unified streamlined electronic application
        process.
        c) Increase student success by training adjunct practicum faculty to teach specific practicum
        courses on a continuing basis.
        d) Increase student access to practicum by increasing the number of available practicum
        sites for Human Service AAS and BHS students.

   What was accomplished? (What actually happened? Include personnel hiring, status
    of funds spent, and any changes to original plans, goals, or objectives. What goals were
    met? Include specific outcomes of the project or initiative.)
    Objective 1: Increase student enrollments: Human Service enrollments increased 18% for fall
    2009 semester and 16% for spring 2010 semester. Enrollments continued to increase by 3% for
    fall 2010 and 5% for spring 2011 semesters.
    Objective 2: HUMS 185 Introduction to Field Experience is designed to introduce students to a)
    field experience as a learning opportunity, b) distance education, /and blackboard and 3)
    completion of the practicum application electronically. Students enrolled in 185 complete all
    practicum application forms prior to or on the deadline. This approach has proven to streamline
    the process, allowing students to be placed prior to actual practicum enrollment.
    Objective 3: The Human Service Department identified six existing practicum adjunct faculty
    members. The department conducted 4 group training sessions for the faculty. The adjunct
    faculty members were provided uniform forms and course materials as well as e-mail and face-to-
    face support. Four of the six have expressed a desire to continue to teach Practicum for the
    Department into the future.
    Objective 4: Through targeted community agency visits by the Practicum Coordinator, the
    Department has increased the number of Practicum sites by 27%.
        The status of this funding indicates the funds will all be expended by the end of FY11 without
    any over expenditures.

   What has been the impact? (How has UAA benefited from this initiative? Were
    additional courses offered or students served? What research was completed, what
    knowledge gained? What are the indicators that point to the impacts? How do the
    results further the strategic objectives of UAA 2017? How has the initiative affected UA
    Performance Measures?)
    Impact #1: Human Service student enrollments have increased 16% for fall 2009 semester and
    18% for spring 2010 semester. Enrollments continued to increase by 3% for fall 2010 and 5%
    for spring 2011 semesters. (UAA Strategic Plan 2017, Priority C: #1: “Work with school
    districts to increase the UAA share of Alaska’s college-bound students to improve student
    transition to higher education with special attention to Alaska Natives, other under-represented
    populations, and first-generation college students.”)
    Impact #2: The streamlining of the practicum application process accompanied by up-to-date
    student files and the HUMS 185 class has resulted in the placement of students who are


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    appropriate for Practicum and the screening-out of students for whom Practicum is not a good
    academic choice based on barrier crime regulations and/or personal issues. This allows the
    department to provide practicum access to appropriate students, and academic advising for
    students for whom Human Services is not a reasonable career path. (UAA Strategic Plan 2017,
    Priority C: #4: “Improve the efficiency with which students navigate our programs and campuses
    from entry to completion.”)

    Impact #3: The identification and training of returning adjunct practicum faculty has resulted in
    overall consistency among all sections of all four required Practica courses. This consistency is
    positively received by students and community based placement agencies as well. The
    Department has experienced a significant decrease in student problems associated with practicum.
    Additionally a spring 2010 survey of practicum field instructors shows 85.4% of the field
    instructors feel the placement of human service students is trouble free and 100% of the field
    instructors would supervise another practicum student in the future. (UAA Strategic Plan 2017,
    Priority C: #4: “Improve the efficiency with which students navigate our programs and campuses
    from entry to completion.” Priority D: #4: “Recruit, develop, and retain the highest quality
    faculty and staff to support our continuing drive for excellence in all dimensions of our
    mission.”)

    Impact #4: The department increased the number of community based practicum placement
    sites by 27%. This resulted in expanded practicum opportunities for students, an overall
    strengthening of the Human Service programs in general and an excellent foundation for the new
    graduate certificate program. (UAA Strategic Plan 2017, Priority A: #2: “Collaborate closely
    with public and private sector partners to maintain and develop our programs supporting
    workforce development and high demand careers.” Priority E: #1: “Expand our commitment to
    make community engagement and service learning a cornerstone of our institutional identity.”
    Priority E: #3: “Become a national model for wide ranging community partnerships in training,
    education, research and service.”)

   What are the expected future outcomes of this initiative? (Where is this initiative
    going next? How will this initiative continue to benefit UAA and its constituents? What is
    the anticipated future impact on UA Performance Measures?)
    The future of this initiative will be to continue all of the above activities and in addition focus
    attention upon a global human service stakeholder communication system to include: practicum
    faculty, students, field instructors and placement agencies. The purpose of the system is to draw
    upon and support our community partners, faculty and to provide quick consistent information to
    our practicum stakeholders. In addition it is intended once the system is developed and tested all
    students and alumni will be included.

   To what extent, if any, was this initiative allocation to your unit offset by
    reductions?

    N/A




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                                     ATTACHMENT VI

                                Project/Initiative Evaluation
                                              FY11

Project/Initiative Title: Clinical Simulations Delivery Coordinator
Contact: Susan Kaplan
E-mail: afshk@uaa.alaska.edu
Org #: 11431


This document is intended to provide basic assessment information for each special project or
initiative program funded in FY11. This includes priority program funding from the Legislature,
base funding through the UAA internal reallocation process, strategic opportunity fund awards,
Chancellor’s Research awards, and one-time TVEP workforce development funds. This
evaluation will be used to assess the effectiveness of funded projects and programs and as part of
the internal scan for the upcoming accreditation process.

Please provide a brief paragraph on each question, with the total document totaling no more than
two pages.

       What were the original objectives of this initiative? (Include goals, expected
        outcomes, what you hoped to accomplish.)

           This was a new position funded .5 FTE in FY 11. The Simulation Coordinator
       provides expertise in low, medium, and high fidelity simulation with experience in
       teaching health professionals.

       This position coordinates the School of Nursing (SON) simulation clinic expansion to
       selected community campus/outreach sites starting with Fairbanks. This entailed:
          1) Teleconference faculty training in use of the mannequin located at the outreach site
       nursing labs.
          2) Implementation of simulation scenarios within existing courses.
          3) Promote best practice in student learning through use of simulation.
          4) Partnering with other discipline faculty to provide a broad array of simulation
       experiences.


       What was accomplished? (What actually happened? Include personnel hiring, status
        of funds spent, and any changes to original plans, goals, or objectives. What goals were
        met? Include specific outcomes of the project or initiative.)
       Hired an FNP with clinical simulation expertise to guide the process
       Launched the Inter-professional Clinical Simulation Faculty Steering Committee to
        promote inter-professional education using clinical simulation as a tool
       Established Inter-professional Education as a priority for the new Health Sciences
        Building and for the improved educational opportunities of UA students
   Created channels of communication between health disciplines within the University
   Established communication between disciplines through regular meetings
   Evaluated ability of simulation to enhance current curricula in nursing, occupational
    therapy, physician assistant, nurse practitioner, allied health, medicine, speech therapy,
    and social work through symposium attendance and interactions. Disciplines are
    beginning to determine how simulation can be incorporated.
   Examined and documented Inter-professional Educational learning opportunities amongst
    >13 health disciplines within the University
   Development of a standardized patient program is in progress
   Assessment of the learning needs of faculty across disciplines has been completed and is
    being addressed through training and paid travel to symposium opportunities.

   What has been the impact? (How has UAA benefited from this initiative? Were
    additional courses offered or students served? What research was completed, what
    knowledge gained? What are the indicators that point to the impacts? How do the
    results further the strategic objectives of UAA 2017? How has the initiative affected UA
    Performance Measures?)
         Verified the University’s commitment to supporting our Alaskan healthcare
            community by financing and organizing for faculty/staff to attend statewide
            simulation events
         UA demonstrated its commitment to quality education by being among the first
            universities within the nation to establish an Inter-professional Clinical
            Simulation Faculty Steering committee. This committee will guide the
            development and progression forward of Clinical Simulation within the
            University and throughout Alaskan healthcare.
         Additional courses for students are being discussed
         Professional advancement courses both for practicing professionals and for
            faculty are being discussed
         Discussion of alternative educational opportunities, i.e. second life, to promote the
            equalization of educational opportunities across the state
         Established the University of Alaska as an innovative educational University
        
   What are the expected future outcomes of this initiative? (Where is this initiative
    going next? How will this initiative continue to benefit UAA and its constituents? What is
    the anticipated future impact on UA Performance Measures?)

    This program will result in state of the art, advanced inter-professional simulation use in
    health related programs across Alaska.

   To what extent, if any, was this initiative allocation to your unit offset by
    reductions?

    N/A




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