4thAUTOMOTIVE PROGRAM REVIEW OUTLINE2 by xiagong0815

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									                             WESTERN NEW MEXICO UNIVERSITY

                             PROGRAM REVIEW AND EVALUATION




Program: Automotive Technology


Dept/School/College: Applied Technology

                    Western New Mexico University


Date Forwarded:     2006
                    December 4, 2006 revised
                    February 23, 2007 revised


Faculty:   Ignacio (Nacho) Nolasco

Program review document prepared by: Ignacio (Nacho) Nolasco




                                          Date: Submitted to C & I ____________________

                                                Submitted to VPAA ___________________

                                                Discussed with Faculty in _______________

                                                Program _____________________________
                                       PROGRAM REVIEW OUTLINE
                                               1/10/06


OVERVIEW

A. Introduction to the Department and Discipline

The Applied Technology Programs educate and train students to provide an effective work force to support
economic growth and community development and they ease student transition into the work force. The
programs offered strive to keep stride with business and industry. These programs focus on career technical
education with a focus on technology transfer. Certification in each area is available to the students enrolled by
the different area.

Both a one-year certificate and an Associate of Applied Science degree are offered in Automotive Technology.
The Basic Automotive Certificate will prepare the student for employment with basic knowledge in automotive
repair and diagnosis. The two year A.A.S. degree in Automotive Technology offers a complete study of all
components involved in the automobile, plus supportive courses. Preparation for A.S.E. certification will be
stressed and encouraged to each student.

The Automotive Technology program uses the nationally recognized NATEF curricula to meet ASE standards.
Upon passing at least one ASE exam and after providing proof of two years of relevant work experience, the
test taker becomes ASE certified in the areas in which the tests are passed. The Associate degree can
substituted for one year of experience.

B. History of Programs

The Automotive Technology Program has existed for over 21 years with modifications done to the curriculum
to meet the ASE standards and is in the process of applying for ASE certification. The automotive instructor
has been an ASE Master Technician for 24 years, has taught for 20 years in the automotive field and has
worked in the auto and truck repair industry.

C. Recommendations from Previous Reviews

No prior reviews are available. Current changes are made from faculty evaluations, advisory committee
suggestions, administration and industry needs.

D. Procedures and Participants in the Review

Tony Macias, Dean of School of Applied Technology and Nacho Nolasco, Instructor of Automotive
Technology are involved in preparation and submittal of review. Review is prepared by Instructor then
submitted to Dean to submit to Academic Affairs and C & I committee.


CRITERION A: PROGRAM CENTRALITY

A. Educational Goals and Objectives of the Program

The goals of the Automotive Technology program coincide and promote the Department mission which is “The
Applied Technology Programs educate and train students to provide an effective work force to support
economic growth and community development and ease student transition into the work force”. The program
prepares students for employment, at all levels, in the increasingly sophisticated automotive repair industry.
Students gain knowledge of computerized shop equipment, electronic automotive components, mechanical
systems, physics, and diagnostic techniques as well as developing their skills with traditional hand tools.
Program goals:
1. Deliver learning centered education with life-long learning options.
2. Instill competencies which lead to certification in ASE (Automotive Services Excellence certification).
3. Prepare students to readily adapt to new and emerging technologies.
4. Encourage and prepare students to seek opportunities for advancement in the field.
5. In addition to the professional preparation track, this program also supports classes for recreational and
personal enrichment interests.

B. Relationship of the Program to the Institutional Mission

The Automotive Technology program through the School of Applied Technology provides the students with the
opportunity to acquire a two-year degree in the area where jobs are found in practically every industry. The
Automotive Technology enhances WNMU by providing a unique opportunity to a diversity of students
interested in a certificate or associates degree in Automotive Technology. The Automotive Technology
program is a competency-based occupational program, which prepares students for the ASE exams, entry into
the workforce and provides advanced levels of instruction as well.


CRITERION B: PROGRAM CURRICULUM AND STRUCTURE

A. Admission, Retention, Graduation Requirements

   Admission to the University must be completed prior to admission to the program. Admission requirements
   for the program are the same as for the University. The following regulations apply to all students seeking
   Applied Technology degrees and certificates.

      A grade of C or better in English 101 or equivalent is required.
      A maximum of sixteen credit hours may be obtained using any combination of ACT or CLEP
       examinations.
      A maximum of two classes in an Applied Technology associate program may be challenged.
      A maximum of eight credit hours of independent/tutorial course work may be applied toward graduation
       for the associate degree.
      A minimum of sixteen credit hours must be taken at WNMU (twelve of the last sixteen credit hours
       must be at WNMU).
      A minimum of 2.0 grade point average is required for completion.

   It is now possible for students pursuing an AS degree in any field to articulate to a BA/BS degree. Our area
   specifically fits with the BAS in Operations Management or the BAS in Career and Technical Teacher
   Education. During the advising session, students are made aware of the flexibility of their degree options.
   Students are also given the opportunity to articulate the core courses of the AS degree as a minor for any
   BA/BS degree requirement. This is a very powerful retention tool to use in the advisement of students.

B. Program Structure

   1. Degree Options and Objectives

       The Automotive Technology program offers a one-year certificate, and an Associate of Science degree.
       Students may also apply the core courses of the AS degree in Operations Management or Career and
       Technical Education. Since all the courses taken are under the same University, there is no transfer
       problem.
2. Description of Required Courses

   AUTT 103. Principles of Auto Electrical. Basic introduction in general electrical system diagnosis;
   battery diagnosis and service; starting system diagnosis and repair; charging system diagnosis; and
   repair and lighting systems diagnosis and repair. Lecture with lab. (5)

   AUTT 111. Principles of Auto Brakes. Lecture and lab emphasizing diagnosis and repair of brakes,
   including anti-lock brake systems; covers such areas as basic hydraulic principles, drum brakes, parking
   brakes, disc and drum brake service, hydraulic system service, and operation of various brake equipment
   and tools. Lecture with lab. (5)

   AUTT 122. Engine Performance. Lecture and lab dealing in the study of air and fuel supply systems,
   carburetor’s, gasoline fuel injection and diesel fuel systems; in-depth study of electrical principles and
   electronic (computer) devices and systems; covers conventional and electronic ignitions, exhaust system
   components and emission control devices; diagnostic and performance testing procedures are
   emphasized. Prerequisite: AUTT 103. Spring only. (4)

   AUTT 137. Basic Gasoline Repair/Rebuilding. Lecture and lab emphasizing general engine diagnosis
   - removal and reinstallation; cylinder head and valve train diagnosis and repair; engine block assembly
   diagnosis and repair; lubrication and cooling system diagnosis repair. Lecture with lab. (5)

   AUTT 139. Principles of Electronic Analysis. Lecture and lab on gauges, warning devices, and driver
   information systems diagnosis and repair; horn and wiper/washer diagnosis and repair; accessories
   diagnosis and repair. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: AUTT 103. (5)

   AUTT 141. Manual Transmission/Clutch and Axle. Lecture and lab on general drive train diagnosis;
   diagnosis and repair of clutch, transmission/transaxle, drive shaft and half shaft, universal and constant-
   velocity (CV) joint; ring and pinion gears and differential case assembly; limited slip differential; drive
   axle shaft; four-wheel drive/all wheel drive component diagnosis and repair. Lecture with lab. (5)

   AUTT 190. Field Study I. Field work of variable units to provide the student with a variety of
   experiences to complement his/her program of study. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (1-6)

   AUTT 207. Emission and Ignition Control Systems. Lecture and lab on ignition and emission control
   system; emissions control systems diagnosis and repair/early fuel evaporation (intake manifold
   temperature) controls. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: AUTT 103, 139. (4)

   AUTT 242. Principles of Suspension and Steering and Alignment. Lecture and lab on general
   suspension and steering systems diagnosis; steering systems diagnosis and repair; suspension systems
   diagnosis and repair/front suspension; suspension systems diagnosis and repair/rear suspension;
   suspension systems and diagnosis and repair/miscellaneous service; wheel alignment diagnosis,
   adjustment and repair; wheel and tire diagnosis and repair. Lecture with lab. (5)

   AUTT 248. Principles of Auto Transmission and Transaxle. General transmission and transaxle
   diagnosis, maintenance and adjustment in-vehicle transmission and transaxle repair; off-vehicle
   transmission and transaxle repair/oil pump and converter; off-vehicle transmission and transaxle
   repair/gear train, shafts, bushings and case; off vehicle transmission and transaxle repair/friction and
   reaction units. Lecture with lab. (5)

   AUTT 250. Principles of Automotive Computers. Lecture on computerized engine controls diagnosis
   and repair. Lecture with lab. (3)

   AUTT 252. Automotive Air-Conditioning & Heating Systems. Lecture and lab on A/C system
   diagnosis and repair; refrigeration system component diagnosis and repair/compressor and clutch;
   refrigeration system component diagnosis and repair/evaporator, condenser, and related components;
       heating, ventilation, and engine cooling systems diagnosis and repair; operating systems and related
       controls diagnosis and repair; refrigerant recovery, recycling, and handling. Lecture with lab. (5)

       AUTT 254. Principles of Auto Fuel Injection/Fuel Systems. Lecture on fuel, air induction, and
       exhaust systems diagnosis and repair. Lecture with lab. Prerequisite: AUTT 103, 242. (3)

   3. Summary of Course Requirements

Student Name:         ___________________________________________
WOO#:         _________________________________________________
Address:      ____________________________________________________
Email: ___________________________________________________
Telephone:    ____________________________________________________
Advisor:      __________________________________           _______________
ACT examination credits:     ______________________                _______________
CLEP examination credit:     ___________            ____________________________
                                General Education Requirements (10 hours)
Course                                                (Credits)    Sem/Year       Grade
ENGL 101 Comp & Rhetoric I                                         (3)    ____/_______
General Ed Math
Pick one: MATH 105, 106, 111, 121, 131, 132, 171, 172, 221                (3)     ____/_______
PHSC 101 Physical Sci Gen'l Ed I                                   (3)    ____/_______
PHSC 103 Phys Sci Gen'l Ed I Lab                                          (1)     ____/_______


                           Automotive Core Requirements (56 hours minimum)
Course                                        (Credits)    Sem/Year       Grade
AUTT 103 Prin of Auto Electrical                                   (5)    ____/_______
AUTT 248 Prin of Auto Transmission & Transaxle                            (5)     ____/_______
AUTT 111 Prin of Auto Brakes                                       (5)    ____/_______
AUTT 137 Basc Gas Repair/Rebld                                            (5)     ____/_______
AUTT 250 Prin of Auto Computer                                            (3)     ____/_______
AUTT 139 Prin of Electronic Anal                                          (5)     ____/_______
AUTT 252 Auto Air Cnd/Heating                                      (5)    ____/_______
AUTT 141 Mnl Tran/Clutch/Axle                                      (5)    ____/_______
AUTT 254 Prin Auto Fuel Inj/Sys                                           (3)     ____/_______
AUTT 207 Emissn & Ignition Ctrl                                           (4)     ____/_______
WLDT 155 Shield Metal Arc Wld I                                    (3)    ____/_______
AUTT 242 Prin Suspn/Steer/Align                                           (5)     ____/_______
      CMPS 110 or 111 Computer Literacy or
      BOFT 124 Windows & Web                                               (3)   ____/_______
4.    Typical Program of Study
                 Associate of Applied Science AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
                                     Sequence of Courses (66 credit Hours )

               1st Semester
AUTT 103       Principles of Automotive Electrical                                5
AUTT 111       Principles of Automotive Brakes                                    5
MATH 105, 106, 111, 121, 131, 132, 171, 172, 221                                  3
WLDT 155       Shielded Metal Arc Welding I                                       3
                                      TOTAL                                      16

                   2nd Semester
AUTT 137           Basic Gasoline Repair/Rebuilding                               5
AUTT 139           Principles of Electronic Analysis                              5
AUTT 141           Manual Transmission/Clutch and Axle                            5
ENGL 101           Comp & Rhetoric                                                3
                                           TOTAL                                 18

                   3rd Semester
AUTT 248           Principles of Auto Transmission and Transaxle                 5
AUTT 242           Principles of Suspension and Steering and Alignment           5
OFAD 124           Windows and the Web                                           3
     OR
CMPS 111           Computer Literacy
AUTT 207           Emission and Ignition Control System                           4
                                         TOTAL                                   17

                   4th Semester
AUTT 250           Principles of Automotive Computers                            3
AUTT 252           Automotive Air-Conditioning and Heating Systems               5
PHSC 101/103       Physical Science for General Education I & Lab                     4
AUTT 254           Principles of Automotive Fuel Injection/ Fuel Systems          3
                                          TOTAL                                  15

      Engine Repair course sequence
                     AUTT 137 Basic Gasoline Repair/Rebuilding
     Automatic Trans course sequence
                     AUTT 248 Principles of Auto Transmission and Transaxle
     Manual Drive Train and Axles course sequence
                      AUTT141 Manual Transmission/Clutch & Axle
      Suspension and Steering course sequence
                     AUTT 242 Principles of Suspension and Steering and Alignment
      Brakes course sequence
                     AUTT 111 Principles of Automotive Brakes
      Electrical/Electronics Systems course sequence
              AUTT 103 Principles of Automotive Electrical
              AUTT 139 Principles of Electronic Analysis
      Engine Performance course sequence
              AUTT 207 Emission and Ignition Control System
       AUTT 250 Principles of Automotive Computers
       AUTT 254 Principles of Automotive Fuel Injection/Fuel Systems
Heating and Air Conditioning
       AUTT 252 Automotive Air-Conditioning and Heating Systems

The Advisory Committee meets semi-annually, minimum, to review the curriculum and discuss issues
concerning equipment and any other needs of the program. With their assistance, changes have occurred to the
shop area. We are currently in the process of a program certification.

Each course has established task performance requirements, which match the industry standards for ASE
certification. As students complete a task successfully, the student and instructor sign and date the form. The
results of these forms are then entered into Banner and the original copy is filed in the department office.
                          Automotive Technology Enrollment

                                                   Spring Semester 2001

Course/Section                            Subj     Crse          CRN           Enrolled
Title

Engine Performance                        AUTT             122          2367       11
Engine Rebuilding                         AUTT             137          2370       11
Engine Rebuilding                         AUTT             137          2778       11
                                                   Summer Semester 2001

                                                   Fall Semester 2001

Auto Electrical                           AUTT             103          1027       11
Brakes                                    AUTT             111          1515       12
Engine Performance                        AUTT             122          2207       11
                                                   Spring Semester 2002

Auto Electrical                           AUTT             103          3070       11
Engine Performance                        AUTT             122          2354       12
Engine Rebuilding                         AUTT             137          2357       13
                                                   Summer Semester 2002

General Hotrodding                        AUTT             180          3212       10
General Hotrodding                        AUTT             180          3286       14
                                                   Fall Semester 2002

Auto Electrical                           AUTT             103          1022       11
Auto Electrical                           AUTT             103          2053       11
Brakes                                    AUTT             111          1389       11
                                                   Spring Semester 2003
Engine Performance                        AUTT             122          2385       12
Engine Rebuilding                         AUTT             137          2386       13
[Concu] Gen Auto                          AUTT             180          2828        9
Shop
                                                   Summer Semester 2003

Adv Auto Comp Eng                         AUTT             180          3132       10
Ctrls
                                                   Fall Semester 2003

Prin of Auto Electrical    AUTT     103     1389                                   11
Prin of Auto Electrical                   AUTT             103          1805        0
Prin of Auto Brakes                       AUTT             111          1390       12
                                                   Spring Semester 2004


                                                                                          8
Basic Gasoline            AUTT           137          2113   13
Rep/Rbld
Prin of Electrical        AUTT           139          2114    6
Analysis
Manual                    AUTT           141          2115    7
Trans/Clutch/Axl
                                 Summer Semester 2004

Prin of Auto Electrical   AUTT           103          3252    0
Prin of Auto Brakes       AUTT           111          3253    0
Basic Gas Repair/Rbld     AUTT           137          3254    0
                                 Fall Semester 2004
Prin of Auto Electrical   AUTT           103          1001   10
Prin of Auto Brakes       AUTT           111          1002    5
Prin of Auto Brakes       AUTT           111          1788    0
                                 Spring Semester 2005

Basic Gas Repair/Rbld     AUTT           137          2028    7
Prin of Electrical        AUTT           139          2029    7
Analysis
Manuel                    AUTT           141          2030    5
Trans/Clutch/Axl




                                                                  9
5. History of Courses Taught as Program Requirements

Courses have been updated as new technologies have appeared in automobiles and in diagnostic equipment. The
Automotive Technology program is in the process of getting certified through the National Institute for
Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). ASE grants certification to programs that comply with their evaluation
procedures, meet their established standards, and adhere to their policies. This certification is under the direct
supervision of the Board of Trustees of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation, Inc.
(NATEF). While NATEF does not endorse specific curricular materials, it does set standards for facilities and the
content of instruction, which includes tasks, books, tools and equipment, hours, and instructor qualifications. The
eight areas eligible for certification are:

1. Brakes                                                   5. Automatic Transmission & Transaxle
2. Electrical/ Electronic Systems                           6. Engine Repair
3. Engine Performance                                       7. Heating & Air Conditioning
4. Suspension & Steering                                    8. Manual Drive Train & Axles

C. Articulation

The program curriculum encourages the formation of articulation agreements between the university and area
secondary high schools to facilitate a smooth transition through the instructional process. The curriculum is built on a
solid business/education partnership. Articulation agreements are already in place with five (5) area high schools.
These schools are Silver High School, Cobre High School, Deming High School, Lordsburg High School, and
Reserve High School. Open communication and articulation between secondary and post-secondary programs is
supported. Courses taken at the secondary level need not be repeated at the post-secondary level if students can
demonstrate the required competencies. Competencies demonstrate that our students are meeting the needs of
business and therefore serve to market our program to students, administrators, advisory committees, and local
businesses. Competencies eliminate discrimination because learning outcomes are clearly defined and skills can be
demonstrated. It is designed to put our students on the cutting edge of technology so that they may seek employment,
locally, nationally, and even internationally.

D. Planning Processes

The Automotive Technology program meets the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE)
standards to keep up with industry requirements and certifications in the following areas:

1. Brakes
2. Electrical/ Electronic Systems
3. Engine Performance
4. Suspension & Steering
5. Automatic Transmission & Transaxle
6. Engine Repair
7. Heating & Air Conditioning
8. Manual Drive Train & Axles

In addition, the use of internal review, an Advisory Board, student evaluations, and comparisons to similar programs
offered in New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, and Texas form the basis for our planning process. We meet semi-
annually or as needed but no less than twice a year with our Advisory Board to discuss curriculum and business
needs. The people serving on this board represent business, secondary education, and post-secondary education. We
review the input received to improve the quality and content of course offerings.



                                                                                                                10
E. Assessment

The Automotive Technology faculty review the content of the courses at the end of each semester. Part of the
feedback is from the student comments received during the student evaluation process. Changes made as a result of
this process have included course content, course time offerings, and course textbooks. The input from the students
also give insight into the need for better equipment. The final result is an improved learning environment for the
students. CPS eInstruction is used to evaluate student’s progress by giving instant feedback to students and faculty on
course understanding.


CRITERION C: PROGRAM RESOURCES

A. Finances (Budget)

The budget for the Department of Applied Technology currently serves seven (7) programs. The University pays the
Automotive Technology faculty salaries and miscellaneous supplies. Yearly a Carl Perkins fund proposal is
submitted to procure additional funds. These funds have assisted in purchasing equipment and supplies needed to
meet ASE and industry standards in keeping up-to-date technology and equipment to increase the learning experience
for students. We also use a portion of these funds for professional development. Because we are a technology-based
program, it is mandatory we keep current with the changes occurring in our field. In order to do this, we attend
national and regional meetings to network with peers, business representatives, and textbook publishers.

B. Facilities and Capital Equipment

Currently the automotive program has a 7 bay garage with a separate classroom, office storage and shop space, there
is also a fenced yard with parking vehicle storage. Facilities are used Monday through Friday.

ALLDATA system is currently being used by the Instructor and students in the shop for diagnostic, repair and
estimating information, diagnostic and repair articles, manufacturer TSBs and recalls, OEM wiring diagrams,
maintenance schedules and tables, transmission data, emissions information, integrated estimating, etc.

C. Library

The Library contains many resources for our students. Every year we purchase textbooks and videos to increase these
resources. Currently, the following magazine subscriptions are available for student use: Motor Age, Motor Trend
and Undercar Digest. Students and instructors have access to WNMU library which provides a wide variety of
automotive magazines, textbooks, videos and newspapers for student use. Also website links are provided to students
for their use.

D. Other Academic Support Resources and Services

Business and Office Technology students have access to the university’s Academic Support Center. The center
provides a variety of services leading to the academic success of WNMU students including workshops, academic
advising, personal counseling, academic and peer mentoring, and other related services. Students also have access to
the Career Services/ Cooperative Education Office. This office provides personal assistance to students and alumni
seeking employment before and after graduation. Services for students with special needs are provided through the
Special Needs Office. Types of assistance provided are note takers, interpreters, readers, guides, recording of
lectures, transcribing, and academic tutoring. We encourage students to access all resources available to them to help
improve their learning experience at WNMU. Students are also advised about the Writing Center hours. This
resource helps students with all their writing assignments.



                                                                                                                    11
CRITERION D: PROGRAM PRODUCTTIVITY AND EFFICIENCY

A. Major Headcount Enrollment

The chart below shows the major headcount for the Fall semesters from 2000 to 2005. Even though the 2005
numbers are low, we are confident with the recruitment efforts made the number of majors will again be at the
previous levels or better.


       Year              Majors
     Fall 2000            12
    Spring 2001           14
     Fall 2001            16
    Spring 2002           34
     Fall 2002            34
    Spring 2003           29
     Fall 2003            25
    Spring 2004           10
     Fall 2004            18
    Spring 2005           13
     Fall 2005            13


B. Degrees Conferred

The chart below lists the number of degrees conferred for the academic years from 1994 to 2005. Our student
population consists of non-traditional students. The student population consists of older students and single parents.
We provide excellent instruction and support to these students. Unfortunately, many end up leaving because of
financial and/or medical reasons. We live from semester to semester with these uncontrollable factors. Everything
humanly possible is done to find resources for these students to continue. Many of these students return at a later date
to complete their educational goals.

               Year               # of graduates

             1994-1995              5

             1995-1996              3

             1996-1997              2

             1997-1998              2

             1998-1999              2

             1999-2000              0

             2000-20011

             2001-20023

             2002-20031

             2003-20049

             2004-20051




                                                                                                                     12
C. Credit Hour Production

The chart below reveals the credit hour production for the Automotive Technology program. The 2002-2003 were the
“boom” years from an increase from the laid off miners and call center employees.


               MAJORS          SCH
Fall 2000        12            168
Spring 2001      14            184
Fall 2001        16            229
Spring 2002      34            252
Fall 2002        34            227
Spring 2003      29            292
Fall 2003        25            248
Spring 2004      10            145
Fall 2004        18            205
Spring 2005      13            142
Fall 2005        13            139


D. Number of Faculty Based on CHE Productivity Rates

The program consists of a Department Dean who is responsible for all academic and administrative issues. The Dean
interacts with faculty and staff member to ensure the overall quality of the program. The program has a full time
faculty member who is responsible for the delivery of instruction, the sequencing of courses, selection and oversight
of adjuncts. Full time faculty Ignacio (Nacho) Nolasco has been an ASE Master Technician for 24 years, has taught
for 20 years in the Automotive field and has worked in the auto and truck repair industry. ASE Certification in:

 Automobile advanced engine performance        Advanced Level
 Engine repair                                 Master Automobile Technician
 Automatic trans/transaxle                     Master Automobile Technician
 Manual drive train and axles                  Master Automobile Technician
 Suspension and steering                       Master Automobile Technician
 Brakes                                        Master Automobile Technician
 Electrical / electronic systems               Master Automobile Technician
 Heating and air conditioning                  Master Automobile Technician
 Engine performance                            Master Automobile Technician

E. Average Class Size

The class size for the Automotive Technology classes is twenty (10-12) because of equipment limitations and student
access to the instructor so the instructor can give individual attention to any student who needs it. Research shows
that the smaller class size is conducive to the learning environment. The student population also demands that the
class size be small. The majority of the students are non-traditional students. Some of these students have not been in
a classroom for many, many years. They need to feel comfortable in the classroom environment to help retention
purposes.

F. Number of Courses Offered and the Time of Offerings

There are 11 core courses needed for the Automotive Program.

         AUTT 103       Principles of Automotive Electrical
         AUTT 111       Principles of Automotive Brakes

                                                                                                                    13
          AUTT 137     Basic Gasoline Repair/Rebuilding
          AUTT 139     Principles of Electronic Analysis
          AUTT 141     Manual Transmission/Clutch and Axle
          AUTT 248     Principles of Auto Transmission and Transaxle
          AUTT 242     Prin. of Suspension and Steering and Alignment
          AUTT 207     Emission and Ignition Control System
          AUTT 250     Principles of Automotive Computers
          AUTT 252     Auto Air-Conditioning and Heating Systems
          AUTT 254     Principles of Auto Fuel Injection/ Fuel Systems


                          Associate of Applied Science AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
                                     Sequence of Courses (66 credit Hours )

               1st Semester
AUTT 103       Principles of Automotive Electrical                        5
AUTT 111       Principles of Automotive Brakes                            5
MATH 105, 106, 111, 121, 131, 132, 171, 172, 221                          3
WLDT 155       Shielded Metal Arc Welding I                               3
                                         TOTAL                            16
                2nd Semester
AUTT 137        Basic Gasoline Repair/Rebuilding                          5
AUTT 139        Principles of Electronic Analysis                         5
AUTT 141        Manual Transmission/Clutch and Axle                       5
ENGL 101        Comp & Rhetoric                                           3
                                         TOTAL                            18
                3rd Semester
AUTT 248        Principles of Auto Transmission and Transaxle             5
AUTT 242        Principles of Suspension and Steering and Alignment       5
OFAD 124        Windows and the Web                                       3
     OR
CMPS 111        Computer Literacy
AUTT 207        Emission and Ignition Control System                      4
                                         TOTAL                            17
                4th Semester
AUTT 250        Principles of Automotive Computers                        3
AUTT 252        Automotive Air-Conditioning and Heating Systems           5
PHSC 101/103    Physical Science for General Education I & Lab                 4
AUTT 254        Principles of Automotive Fuel Injection/ Fuel Systems     3
                                         TOTAL                            15


   Engine Repair course sequence
                 AUTT 137 Basic Gasoline Repair/Rebuilding
  Automatic Trans course sequence
                 AUTT 248 Principles of Auto Transmission and Transaxle
  Manual Drive Train and Axles course sequence
                  AUTT141 Manual Transmission/Clutch & Axle
   Suspension and Steering course sequence
                 AUTT 242 Principles of Suspension and Steering and Alignment
   Brakes course sequence

                                                                                   14
               AUTT 111 Principles of Automotive Brakes
Electrical/Electronics Systems course sequence
        AUTT 103 Principles of Automotive Electrical
        AUTT 139 Principles of Electronic Analysis
Engine Performance course sequence
        AUTT 207 Emission and Ignition Control System
        AUTT 250 Principles of Automotive Computers
        AUTT 254 Principles of Automotive Fuel Injection/Fuel Systems
Heating and Air Conditioning
        AUTT 252 Automotive Air-Conditioning and Heating Systems




                                                                        15
CRITERION E: PROGRAM QUALITY

A. Other Program Evaluations

The advisory committee has reviewed the curriculum and facilities using the NATEF/ASE standards which
reflect industry standards and have given the program an excellent review.

B. Quality of Faculty

The program has a full time faculty member who is responsible for the delivery of instruction, the sequencing of
courses, selection and oversight of adjuncts. He has been an ASE Master Technician for 24 years, has taught
for 20 years in the Automotive field and has worked in the auto and truck repair industry. He is ASE
Certification in:

       Automobile advanced engine performance       Advanced Level
       Engine repair                                Master Automobile Technician
       Automatic trans/transaxle                    Master Automobile Technician
       Manual drive train and axles                 Master Automobile Technician
       Suspension and steering                      Master Automobile Technician
       Brakes                                       Master Automobile Technician
       Electrical / electronic systems              Master Automobile Technician
       Heating and air conditioning                 Master Automobile Technician
       Engine performance                           Master Automobile Technician

C. Research Activity within the Program

   Since WNMU is a teaching university, research is not a required.

D. Community Service Activity within the Program

   Community service is not required for the Associate of Science degree in Automotive Technology.
   However, the students are encouraged to become involved in their community in whatever way they can.
   This concept is taught in many classes and the faculty strive by example to show their students the
   importance of community service.

E. External Review Process

   The advisory committee has reviewed the curriculum and facilities using the NATEF/ASE standards which
   reflect industry standards and have given the program an excellent review.


CRITERION F: PROGRAM DEMAND/NEED

A. Student Demand for the Program

The number of declared majors cited in Criterion D, Section A, documents the student demand for this program.

B. Employment Needs and Job Opportunities

Automotive service technicians and mechanics held about 803,000 jobs in 2004. The majority worked for
automotive repair and maintenance shops, automobile dealers, and retailers and wholesalers of automotive
parts, accessories, and supplies. More than 16 percent of service technicians were self-employed, more than

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twice the proportion for all installation, maintenance, and repair occupations. Job opportunities in this
occupation are expected to be very good for persons who complete automotive training programs in high
school, vocational and technical schools, or community colleges as employers report difficulty in finding
workers with the right skills. Persons with good diagnostic and problem-solving abilities, and whose training
includes basic electronics and computer courses, should have the best opportunities. Employment of automotive
service technicians and mechanics is expected to increase 9-17% through the year 2014. Over the 2004-14
period, demand for technicians will grow as the number of vehicles in operation increases, reflecting continued
growth in the number of multi-car families. (per 2006-2007 U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics)

C. Societal Needs for the Program

Automotive service technicians and mechanics held about 803,000 jobs in 2004. The majority worked for
automotive repair and maintenance shops, automobile dealers, and retailers and wholesalers of automotive
parts, accessories, and supplies. More than 16 percent of service technicians were self-employed, more than
twice the proportion for all installation, maintenance, and repair occupations. Job opportunities in this
occupation are expected to be very good for persons who complete automotive training programs in high
school, vocational and technical schools, or community colleges as employers report difficulty in finding
workers with the right skills. Persons with good diagnostic and problem-solving abilities, and whose training
includes basic electronics and computer courses, should have the best opportunities. Employment of automotive
service technicians and mechanics is expected to increase 9-17% through the year 2014. Over the 2004-14
period, demand for technicians will grow as the number of vehicles in operation increases, reflecting continued
growth in the number of multi-car families. (per 2006-2007 U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics)

D. Support of Other Programs Outside the Department

The student that completes the associate degree in the Automotive Technology program can continue to a BAS
degree in either Operations Management or Career and Technical Teacher Education. This makes our program
an integral part of a minimum of two other degree offerings on campus.

E. Support of Programs within the Department

The current program draws from the Business and Office Technology course BOFT 124 Windows and the Web.
The curriculum requirements are so specific there is little room for courses from other areas.

F. General Education

The Automotive Technology program requires ten (10) hours of general education courses. A math class,
ENGL 101 Composition and Rhetoric, and PHSC 101/103 Physical Science with Lab is required.


CRITERION G: PROGRAM DUPLICATION

To document any program duplication, an Internet research project was conducted. There are similar programs
at Dona Community College in Las Cruces, College of the Southwest in Hobbs, TVI in Albuquerque, and San
Juan Community College in Farmington.


SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

A. Strengths

   Strengths include the following:

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   1.   Experienced and educated faculty
   2.   In-depth core curriculum
   3.   Quality classrooms and equipment
   4.   Emphasis on quality student advisement
   5.   Emphasis on concurrent/dual-credit for high school students
   6.   Articulation of our program to a BAS degree

B. Concerns

   Concerns include the following:
   1. Low student enrollment
   2. Lack of marketing from the University

C. Recommendations for Action

   The following recommendations for action:
   1. Department needs a full time recruiter
   2. Re-establish concurrent program with high schools

D. Five Year Goals for the Program

   Five-year goals for the program include:
   1. Increase the number of AUTT majors by 10 in 2007-2008
   2. Keep the program current with industry standards




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