Effective Communication in the Workplace - PowerPoint

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Effective Communication in the Workplace - PowerPoint Powered By Docstoc
					  Effective
Communication
   in the
  Workplace
About your facilitators
Brenda Watkins, Trainer, Special Projects
HCC and IT3 were fortunate to lure Brenda away from USF, where she
was a full-time Visiting Instructor in the College of Education since 1996.
Brenda’s work experience also includes a human resource background for
several major companies in the Tampa area. She has a BS in Finance; an
M.A. in Business and Office Education; and is a Ph.D. student in Higher
Ed at USF. She has been a contributor in many conference presentations,
and was an editor for Learning Disabilities 101: A Primer for Parents.

Celeste Fenton, Director IT3
Holding a BA in Psychology, an M.Ed., and a Ph.D. in Education from the
University of South Florida. Celeste has over 16 years experience as an
educator in K-12 and higher-ed; and spent 10 years at Anheuser-Busch in
HR management. In addition to directing the IT3 department, she also
teaches as an adjunct for HCC. Active in the community, she has served
as a board member for the Hillsborough County Children’s Services since
being appointed by the Hillsborough County Commissioners in 2000.
Also in 2000, Celeste was selected as a consultant to the United States
Agency for International Development (USAID) for international
educational and workforce development.
                                 Training Agenda


                   •      Learning Objectives
                   •      Introduction
                   •      Awareness of Your Personal Style
                   •      Skillful Listening
                   •      Expressing Yourself
                   •      Impact of Emotions



Click to advance to next slide        Effective Communication in the Workplace
                                 Learning Objectives

            After completing this workshop
            presentation, you will be able to:
    1.         Develop an awareness of your personality and
               communication tendencies
    2.         Learn how to listen more effectively to others
    3.         Express yourself in a more clear and specific way
    4.         Appreciate the power of emotions



Click to advance to next slide        Effective Communication in the Workplace
                                   Introduction

       •The ability to effectively communicate with others is one of the most
        powerful tools for personal and/or professional success.

       •Most people are challenged by the many day-to-day interactions with
        co-workers, family, and friends.

       •Emotion, communication and conflict are present in all human
        interactions and affects each of us in different ways.

       •Everyone manages emotion, communication and conflict from habit –
        patterns and styles developed early in life and over time.

       •80% of problems in the workplace are communication related




Click to advance to next slide         Effective Communication in the Workplace
Introduction



  •     One of the quickest ways to alienate yourself from other people is to
        communicate unsuccessfully.

  •     Effective communication empowers you to influence others.

  •     Your capacity to communicate is often seen as an indicator of your ability and
        intelligence.

  In this presentation, you will learn a variety of strategies to improve your
  communication skills, and break the cycle of destructive habits of personal
  interaction.




      Click to advance to next slide      Effective Communication in the Workplace
                       Unit One – Awareness of Your
                              Personal Style




Click to advance to next slide   Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit One                                            Awareness of Your Personal Style

                Past Experiences Shape Communication Style

  •Communication doesn’t just happen; your style is based on your experiences that
   over time have developed into a pattern of attitudes and actions.

  •It is a continuous cycle. Your experiences influence your thoughts. Your
   thoughts, over time, become your attitudes. These attitudes become the blueprint
   for new experiences, which develop into patterns of behavior.

  •An awareness of your personal style is critical to begin to transform negative
   attitudes and behaviors into positive ones.

  •It is key to empowering you to establish personal responsibility and accountability
   in the midst of changing your behavior. Remember, the only person you can
   ever really control or change is yourself.



    Click to advance to next slide      Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit One                                                Awareness of Your Personal Style
                                     Communication Skills Test

  Discover your own level of interpersonal communication skills.

  Activity: Click on the link below and read the statements carefully, then indicate
  the degree to which they apply to you. After finishing the Communication Skills
  Test, you will receive a free basic report.
   NOTE: Do not feel pressured to purchase the detailed report for a fee.



  Access the link below, and click on “Non-members take the test – GO”

  http://www.queendom.com/tests/relationships/communication_skills_r_access.html




    Click to advance to next slide             Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit One                                           Awareness of Your Personal Style
                            Take the Kiersey Temperment Sorter

  Temperament is an arrangement of preferences or pre-dispositions towards
  developing certain attitudes and behaviors.


  Activity:
  Access the link below. Complete the questions.

  http://www.advisorteam.com/temperament_sorter/register.asp?partid=1

  For more information on the Kiersey Temperment Sorter and your type, access
  the following link and click on your type (SJ, SP, NF, NT)

  http://keirsey.com/pumII/temperdef.html




    Click to advance to next slide        Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit One                                                 Awareness of Your Personal Style

   Activity: What have you learned about yourself? Based on what you know
   about yourself and how you have handled similar situations in the past,
   how do you think you would handle the following scenario:

   You have been asked to supervise a project. The success of the project is also dependent
   upon the contributions and feedback of other department groups. The deadline is
   approaching. The other managers/department groups have largely ignored requests for
   information, but complained in group meetings that the project is in danger of non-
   completion. During manager meetings, this non-response has been raised as an issue, but
   your manager has not addressed it, stating that all of the managers are busy and that they
   will respond as soon as they can. However when the documentation is not provided to you,
   it is identified as your deficiency and has been designated as a risk to project completion.
   The end result is that you (your project) has been identified by senior management as being
   at risk for completion and as your deficiency. At one meeting, a manager who had ignored
   requests for information for several weeks, complained that you were harassing him. You
   felt frustrated and close to tears.




    Click to advance to next slide          Effective Communication in the Workplace
                             Unit Two – Skillful Listening




Click to advance to next slide         Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit Two                                                                    Skillful Listening
                                     Nine Steps to Effective Listening

   1. Face the speaker and maintain eye contact.
   2. Be attentive, yet relaxed.
   3. Keep an open mind to the speaker’s message – try to feel what the speaker
      is feeling.
   4. Listen to the words and try to picture what the speaker is saying.
   5. Do not interrupt and do not impose your "solutions."
   6. Wait for the speaker to pause to ask clarifying questions - ask questions only
      to ensure understanding of something that has been said (avoiding questions
      that disrupt the speaker's train of thought).
   7. Give the speaker regular feedback, e.g., summarize, reflect feelings, or
      simply say "uh huh."
   8. Pay attention to nonverbal cues -- to feelings, tone of voice, inflection, facial
      expressions, gestures, posture.
   9. Be aware of potential barriers that impact your ability to listen effectively.


    Click to advance to next slide                Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit Two                                                              Skillful Listening
                                     Barriers to Listening
  Sometimes people have a barrier that impedes their listening skills. Awareness of
  a barrier is the first step in being able to overcome it.
  Barriers to listening include:
       •past experiences that influence our reaction to the speaker or the message
       •worry, fear, anger, grief and depression
       •individual bias and prejudice
       •semantics and language differences
       •noise and verbal "clutter"
       •preoccupation, boredom and shrinking attention spans

  Activity:
  Awareness of a barrier is the first step in being able to overcome it and
  improve your listening skills. Look at the above list of barriers. Can you
  identify one or more barriers that may/does impact your ability to listen?



    Click to advance to next slide          Effective Communication in the Workplace
                                                               Skillful Listening

Unit Two

                    Active Listening


   Stay active by asking mental questions.
   Some questions you can ask yourself as
   you listen are:

         1. What key point is the speaker
            making?

         2. How does this fit with what I know
            from experience?

         3. How can this information benefit
            me?



    Click to advance to next slide       Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit Two                                                             Skillful Listening

                         Looking and Acting Like a Good Listener
                               Non-Verbal Communication

  •     Turn your body and tilt your face toward the speaker.

  •     Use other parts of your body besides your ears to receive the message:
         1. Look at the speaker to pick up nonverbal signals or cues
         2. Your eyes will also send signals to the speaker
         3. When the speaker sees a receptive audience they are motivated to work
            harder to communicate their message

  •     React to the speaker by nodding your head.




      Click to advance to next slide      Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit Two                                                                             Skillful Listening
                                                 Acknowledgement


                                     •Listen and acknowledge what you hear the speaker
                                     saying, even if you don't agree with it. At this point do not
                                     express your point of view.

                                     •Acknowledging the speakers thoughts and feelings does
                                     not mean that you approve of or agree with the speaker’s
                                     opinions or actions.

                                     •Your ability to listen and then acknowledge what the
                                     speaker said allows the speaker to feel a sense of
                                     satisfaction of being understood




    Click to advance to next slide                   Effective Communication in the Workplace
                                                                 Skillful Listening

Unit Two
                                     Reflecting back

    •When making a statement, paraphrase and reflect back what you've heard
     the speaker say.

    •Reflecting is affirming to the speaker and encourages the speaker to
     elaborate further or delve more deeply into the topic.

    •Meaningful exchanges between you and the speaker are built on feedback.

    •In order to accurately feedback a person's thoughts and feelings, you have to
      be consciously, actively engaged in the process of listening.

    •Try to experience what the speaker is describing, feeling the speaker’s
     feelings through the lens of your own experience.




    Click to advance to next slide        Effective Communication in the Workplace
                                    Unit Three –
                                 Expressing Yourself




Click to advance to next slide        Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit Three                                                         Expressing Yourself

     Communicating Long or Emotional Messages

   •Briefly explain the intention of your conversation.
        .

   •The other person(s) will attend better if they have a basic
    understanding of the time and effort they will be bringing to the
    conversation.

   •Use “I” statements to communicate your feelings, and what you
    have personally seen, heard, need, or expect.

   •Do not engage in verbal attacks on the other person. if you need
    to criticize, describe the behavior or actions of the other person
    that bother you.

   •State what you need or expect in positive terms.


    Click to advance to next slide        Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit Three                                                           Expressing Yourself
                                     Utilizing “I” Statements

   •Accept responsibility for your emotions
   •Use “I” statements. Say “I feel angry when…” rather than “You make me mad…”

   Activity:
   Consider the following statements you might make. How would you change
   them into “I” statements?
    .

   1. You make me so mad when you don’t complete your work on time.
   2. My supervisor frustrates me when she doesn’t communicate her
      expectations.
   3. My employee aggravates me when she comes in late.
   4. My boss made me happy when he complimented my financial report.
   5. Those students make me sad when they don’t study and fail their tests.



    Click to advance to next slide            Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit Three                                                      Expressing Yourself
                       Five Components of Your Message

  Your communication should include these five important
  components:


  1. What you are seeing – have seen

  2. What you are hearing – have heard

  3. What you are feeling – have felt about the issue

  4. What you need or want

  5. What the positive result will be from receiving/acting on your
     request


     Click to advance to next slide    Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit Three                                                         Expressing Yourself
                               Five Components of Your Message
   Activity: For the three situations listed below, think how you would
   communicate:
       • What you are seeing – have seen
       • What you are hearing – have heard
       • What you are feeling – have felt about the issue
       • What you need or want
       • What the positive result will be from receiving/acting on your request

   1.   Your boss marked you low on your performance review. This was the first
        indication you had of how you were performing in your job.

   2.   An employee you supervise has been frequently absent causing lost
        production and a hardship for the rest of the employees in your unit.

   3.   Your coworker has been opening your mail and going through your desk
        drawers, as well as saying negative things to others behind your back.

    Click to advance to next slide          Effective Communication in the Workplace
                                    Unit Four –
                                 Impact of Emotions




Click to advance to next slide        Effective Communication in the Workplace
                          Unit Four – Impact of Emotions
Unit Four
                               Emotional Obstacles
  Emotional obstacles to effective communication include:

  Vulnerability – people may not express their true feelings
  because they do not want to expose themselves to others

  Protecting – people may not want to express their true
  thoughts because they don’t want to hurt or upset the other
  person

  Expectations - social, professional, or cultural “rules” may
  inhibit expression of some feelings

  Fear – people seek approval and acceptance so they are often
  reluctant to say what they really mean for fear of rejection



    Click to advance to next slide          Effective Communication in the Workplace
                                                                Impact of Emotions

Unit Four
                             Manage your emotions
   •Recognize what you are feeling. Are you angry,
   embarrassed, or hurt?

   •Simplify your feelings. Select one or two words to describe
   how you feel. Be specific.

   •Do not act on your feelings right away. Don’t make a
   decision, enter into a discussion, or send an email in anger or
   frustration.

   •Choose an appropriate time and place to communicate.

   •Accept that you are responsible for your emotions; Use “I”
   statements. Say “I feel angry when…” rather than “You make
   me mad…”


    Click to advance to next slide        Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit Four                                                           Impact of Emotions
                                      Managing a conflict

   •Keep yourself calm by breathing slowly and deeply. Remember that this is only
   one temporary moment in your life.

   •Concentrate on what you need to move forward rather than dwell on the other
   person’s mistakes.

   •Summarize the other person’s feelings to make sure that you understand what
   they are communicating.

   •Give affirmation to the other person about what they may be feeling.

   •Acknowledge and apologize for any mistakes you may have made.

   •Focus on positive results and make specific requests that will enable the
   achievement of those goals.

     Click to advance to next slide          Effective Communication in the Workplace
Unit Four                                                          Impact of Emotions
   Activity:
   Reflect on the following situations.
   1. Your boss reprimanded you at a department meeting for emailing a joke to
      others in the workplace. Personal emails and jokes are routine at the office.

   2. Recently you shared your idea with a coworker on how to improve
      departmental operating procedure that could result in greater efficiency
      and increased revenue for the college. You scheduled a meeting with your
      supervisor to introduce the concept, but your coworker beat you to it, and
      has claimed your idea for their own.

   3. You have learned that one of the employees you supervise frequently
      criticizes you harshly to others in and outside of your department.

   What pointers from Managing Conflict and Managing Your Emotions would be
   helpful to you in the above situations?



     Click to advance to next slide     Effective Communication in the Workplace
                                 Check Your Knowledge




Following are a series of
questions for you to complete.
These questions are designed to
check your understanding of the
information you just reviewed.




Click to advance to next slide         Effective Communication in the Workplace
                                        Question 1

1. Past experiences


               A. have little or no effect on your communication
               B. influence your thoughts which in turn become
                  your attitudes over time
               C. are key to empowering you to establish personal
                  responsibility
               D. All of the above

                                  (Click the answer you think is correct.)




 Click to advance to next slide              Effective Communication in the Workplace
                   You have answered
A. “have little or no effect on your communication”
             This answer is incorrect.


                           Back to Question 1
           Click Back to Question 1 (above) to review the question,
           then click “B” for further explanation.
                        You have answered

C. “Is key to empowering you to establish personal responsibility”

                  This answer is incorrect.
                                Back to Question 1
                Click Back to Question 1 (above) to review the question,
                then click “B” for further explanation.
        You have answered
          D. “All of the above”
  This answer is incorrect.


                Back to Question 1
Click Back to Question 1 (above) to review the question,
then click “B” for further explanation.
                             You have answered
   B. “Influence your thoughts which in turn become your attitudes over time”

                          This answer is correct.
Communication doesn’t just happen; your style is based on your experiences that, over
time, develop into a pattern of attitudes and actions.

It is a continuous cycle. Your experiences influence your thoughts. Your thoughts, over
time, become your attitudes. These attitudes become the blueprint for new experiences,
which develop into patterns of behavior.

An awareness of your personal style is critical to begin to transform negative attitudes
and behaviors into positive ones.

It is key to empowering you to establish personal responsibility and accountability in the
midst of changing your behavior. Remember, the only person you can ever really control
or change is yourself.
                                                                                 Continue
                                      Question 2

2. Acknowledging what the speaker is saying is valuable because

          A. It does not mean that you approve or agree with the
             speaker
          B. It allows the speaker to feel understood
          C. It is a defensive posture
          D. All of the above
          E. Only A and B


                                    (Click the answer you think is correct.)


   Click to advance to next slide              Effective Communication in the Workplace
                      You have answered
A. “It does not mean that you approve or agree with the speaker“

                This answer is incorrect.


                              Back to Question 2
              Click Back to Question 2 (above) to review the question,
              then click “E” for further explanation.
           You have answered
B. “It allows the speaker to feel understood“

     This answer is incorrect.


                   Back to Question 2
   Click Back to Question 2 (above) to review the question,
   then click “E” for further explanation.
        You have answered
     C. “It is a defensive posture“

  This answer is incorrect.


                Back to Question 2
Click Back to Question 2 (above) to review the question,
then click “E” for further explanation.
        You have answered
           D. “All of the above“

  This answer is incorrect.


                Back to Question 2
Click Back to Question 2 (above) to review the question,
then click “E” for further explanation.
                          You have answered
                                E. “Only A and B”

                        This answer is correct.
Briefly explain the intention of your conversation.

The other person(s) will attend better if they have a basic understanding of the
time and effort they will be bringing to the conversation.

Use “I” statements to communicate your feelings, and what you have
personally seen, heard, need, or expect.

Do not engage in verbal attacks on the other person; if you need to criticize,
describe the behavior or actions of the other person that bother you.

State what you need or expect in positive terms
                                                                        Continue
                                        Question 3
3. Consider the following scenario
You and your office coworkers have worked well together for approximately one year.
Another person has joined the work team and trouble has started. This person appears
very sensitive and frequently complains about being ignored. You and the staff have tried
to include this person in conversation and activities, but the employee went to the
supervisor after two weeks on the job and reported on a long list of office infractions.
Several of the complaints were exaggerated or totally false. The supervisor held a
meeting and firmly stated that department rules must be followed, that the office was too
busy for pettiness, and that future complaints or issues should be settled between the
staff. A preferred way to handle the situation would be which of the following?

A. Tell the coworker how mad they make you.
B. Demand to “have it out” with the coworker while it’s all fresh in your mind
C. Listen not as a critic, and desire to understand your coworker rather than to achieve either
   agreement from or change in them
D. Concentrate on what you need to move forward rather than dwell on the other person’s mistakes.
E. B and C
F. C and D
                                 (Click the answer you think is correct.)


Click to advance to next slide                   Effective Communication in the Workplace
                  You have answered
A. “Tell the coworker how mad they make you”
            This answer is incorrect.


                          Back to Question 3
          Click Back to Question 3 (above) to review the question,
          then click “F” for further explanation.
                    You have answered

B. “Demand to “have it out” with the coworker while
it’s all fresh in your mind”

              This answer is incorrect.
                            Back to Question 3
            Click Back to Question 3 (above) to review the question,
            then click “F” for further explanation.
                   You have answered
C. “Listen not as a critic, and desire to understand
   your coworker rather than to achieve either
   agreement from or change in them”

             This answer is incorrect.
                           Back to Question 3
           Click Back to Question 3 (above) to review the question,
           then click “F” for further explanation.
                   You have answered

D. “Concentrate on what you need to move
forward rather than dwell on the other person’s
mistakes.”

             This answer is incorrect.

                           Back to Question 3
           Click Back to Question 3 (above) to review the question,
           then click “F” for further explanation.
        You have answered
                  E. “B and C”
  This answer is incorrect.


                Back to Question 3
Click Back to Question 3 (above) to review the question,
then click “F” for further explanation.
                                   You have answered
                                       F. “C and D”
                                 This answer is correct.
In managing a conflict you should:
1. Concentrate on what you need to move forward rather than dwell on the other person’s
    mistakes. Focus on positive results.
2. Summarize the other person’s feelings to make sure that you understand what they are
    communicating. Give affirmation to the other person about what they may be feeling.
3. Acknowledge and apologize for any mistakes you may have made.
4. Focus on positive results and make specific requests that will enable the achievement
    of those goals.

To manage your emotions:
1. Recognize what you are feeling. Are you angry, embarrassed, or hurt?
2. Do not act on your feelings right away. Don’t make a decision, enter into a
    discussion,
   or send an email in anger or frustration.
3. Choose an appropriate time and place to communicate.
4. Accept that you are responsible for your emotions; Use “I” statements. Say “I feel angry
   when…” rather than “You make me mad…”
                                                                                  Continue
                                     Question 4
4.       When you want to communicate a long or complex
         message, you should

               A. Let the other person know this may be a long
                  conversation
               B. Briefly explain the intent of the conversation
               C. Use “I” statements to specifically state your
                  feelings
               D. Not engage in blame or verbal attacks
               E. All of the above
                                  (Click the answer you think is correct.)




 Click to advance to next slide               Effective Communication in the Workplace
                You have answered
A. “Let the other person know this may be a long conversation ”

          This answer is incorrect.


                        Back to Question 4
        Click Back to Question 4 (above) to review the question,
        then click “E” for further explanation.
             You have answered
B. “Briefly explain the intent of the conversation ”

       This answer is incorrect.


                     Back to Question 4
     Click Back to Question 4 (above) to review the question,
     then click “E” for further explanation.
                    You have answered
C. “Use “I” statements to specifically state your feelings ”

              This answer is incorrect.


                            Back to Question 4
            Click Back to Question 4 (above) to review the question,
            then click “E” for further explanation.
          You have answered
D. “Not engage in blame or verbal attacks”

    This answer is incorrect.


                  Back to Question 4
  Click Back to Question 4 (above) to review the question,
  then click “E” for further explanation.
                          You have answered
                               E. “All of the above”

                        This answer is correct.
When communicating long or emotional messages, you should

Briefly explain the intention of your conversation.

The other person(s) will attend better if they have a basic understanding of the
time and effort they will be bringing to the conversation
Use “I” statements to communicate your feelings, and what you have
personally seen, heard, need, or expect.

Do not engage in verbal attacks on the other person; if you need to criticize,
describe the behavior or actions of the other person that bother you.

State what you need or expect in positive terms                         Continue
                                Conclusion
Congratulations – you have completed the pre-workshop
     on Effective Communication in the Workplace


You will receive verification via email or phone that you are registered for the
instructor led workshop on Effective Communication in the Workplace.

Your supervisor will receive an email notifying them that you have completed the
pre-workshop activity.

Thank you for your participation. If you have any questions, please do not
hesitate to contact the IT3 office at

                           253-7338 or at it3@hccfl.edu




                                      Effective Communication in the Workplace

				
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