Intern HANDBOOK by b0d5gG

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									                           School of Education
  CENTER FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF
                 TEACHERS

            PRE-SERVICE INTERNSHIP I AND II
              THE CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE
                     HANDBOOK




                           School of Education Motto:
 Excellence, Innovation and Leadership in a Learner-Centered Community




NCATE: UHCL is one of only 13 universities in Texas accredited by the National Council for
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). NCATE is a non-profit, non-governmental
alliance of 33 national professional organizations recognized by the U. S. Department of
Education as an accrediting body of schools, colleges, and departments of education.
Meeting NCATE accreditation standards helps to ensure high quality teacher, specialist, and
administrator preparation. Through the process of accreditation, NCATE works to make a
difference in the quality of P-12 education.
Table of Contents
Information Cover Sheet .................................................................................................................... 4

UHCL Internship I Agreement of Compliance .................................................................................. 5

UHCL Internship II Agreement of Compliance ................................................................................. 6

Pre-Service Internship I and II Overview........................................................................................... 7

Overview of Internship Team’s Roles and Responsibilities ........................................................... 7

Internship I : General Description ..................................................................................................... 9

Internship II: General Description ................................................................................................... 10

Internship I and II General Guidelines, Policies and Procedures ................................................. 11

Syllabus ............................................................................................................................................. 11

Unit Assessment System Policy ..................................................................................................... 11

Background Check Policy................................................................................................................ 11

Personal Technology Use Policy .................................................................................................... 12

Dress Code ...................................................................................................................................... 112

Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas Educators, UHCL Student Life
Polices, UHCL Code of Conduct ................................................................................................... 122

UHCL School of Education Disposition Policy ............................................................................ 133

Dismissal, Withdrawal, Resignation or Readmission Process For Internship Program .......... 134

Readmission To Internship I/Internship II..................................................................................... 155

Characteristics of Successful Interns ........................................................................................... 155

Pre-service Teacher Etiquette ....................................................................................................... 166

Pre-Service Internship I ................................................................................................................. 177

Intern I: Policies & Professional Roles and Responsibilities ...................................................... 188

Intern I: Attendance and Absence Policy ..................................................................................... 188

Intern I: Substitute Teaching Policy .............................................................................................. 188

Intern I: Lesson Plan Policy ........................................................................................................... 188

Intern I: Professional Communications Policy ............................................................................. 188

Intern I: Professional Roles and Responsibilities ........................................................................ 199

Intern I: Course Evaluation and Grade Distribution .................................................................... 199

Intern I: Late Work Policy ................................................................................................................. 20
Pre-Service Internship II ................................................................................................................ 211

Intern II: Policies & Professional Roles and Responsibilities ..................................................... 222

Intern II: Attendance and Absence Policy .................................................................................... 222

Intern II: Early Program Release Policy ........................................................................................ 222

Intern II: Class Coverage/Substitute Teaching Policy ................................................................. 222

Intern II: Personal Leave Day For Intern II Mentors ..................................................................... 233

Intern II: Lesson Plan Policy .......................................................................................................... 233

Intern II: Independent Teaching Experience (ITE) ........................................................................ 233

Intern II: Professional Communications Policy ............................................................................ 233

Intern II: Reflective Journaling ...................................................................................................... 244

Intern II: Portfolio Presentation ..................................................................................................... 244

Intern II: Professional Roles and Responsibilities ....................................................................... 244

Intern II: Course Evaluation and Grade Distribution.................................................................... 255

Intern II: Late Work Policy ................................................................................................................ 25

SOE Initial Certification Standards ................................................................................................. 26

STANDARD ONE-Knowledge of the Subject Matter ...................................................................... 27

STANDARD TWO-Professional Responsibility and Ethics ........................................................... 27

STANDARD THREE –Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment ...................................................... 27

STANDARD FOUR-Learning Environment & Classroom Management........................................ 28

STANDARD FIVE-Family & Community Involvement .................................................................... 28

Lesson Planning ............................................................................................................................... 30

Portfolio ............................................................................................................................................. 40

Intern I and II Portfolio ...................................................................................................................... 41

Sample Products for Portfolio by Standard ................................................................................... 41

Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas Educators ....................................................... 44

Resource Section ............................................................................................................................. 46

UHCL School Of Education Internship Absent From Duty Form ................................................. 47

Internship II Classroom Coverage Information .............................................................................. 48

Employment Information.................................................................................................................. 49
                     UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON-CLEAR LAKE
                           Information Cover Sheet
                              Capstone Experience
                         Internship I and II Experience
                            TCED 4738, TCED 4798

UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR:                                              _____

OFFICE:______________________________________________________________

OFFICE HOURS:_______________________________________________________

PHONE:                           ALTERNATE PHONE:

UHCL E-MAIL:




PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOL: ________________________________

MENTOR TEACHER:____________________________________________________

CLASSROOM NUMBER:                                                   _____

MENTOR PHONE:                    ALTERNATE PHONE:         ________________

MENTOR E-MAIL:

DISTRICT SUPERVISOR:                                                _____

DS PHONE: ________________________ALTERNATE PHONE:                  _____

DS E-MAIL: ___________________________________________________________

CAMPUS ADMINISTRATOR:

CAMPUS PHONE:

CAMPUS SECRETARY:

DISTRICT WEB-SITE:
                           UHCL Internship I Agreement of Compliance
Print Name:                                 University Supervisor:
Initial each box that you have read and understood the requirements:
      I have read the course syllabus, which includes the course requirements, outline, assignments,
         and due dates for Internship Semester I.
     I understand that the Pre-Service Internship is a two long semester course and I must enroll in
       consecutive long semesters (fall/spring or spring/fall) to complete these two experiences.
     I agree to read the Internship Handbook prior to the due date stated in the course syllabus and
       provide a copy of the current Internship Handbook to my mentor teacher
     I agree to fulfill all requirements of the course, including the professional responsibilities stated in
       the handbook and those listed in Standard Two.
     I must display professional dispositions, moral and ethical principles.
     I understand that completion of the criteria described in the syllabus and handbook will determine
       my semester grade. Failure to meet the criteria may result in a failing grade or removal from the
       Internship program. I further understand that I must earn a B- or better in Internship I to proceed
       to Internship II.
     I understand that I will actively participate with my mentor teacher’s students and attend
       professional campus meetings each Wednesday the PDS is in session, unless otherwise
       directed by my university supervisor. I will keep weekly field notes of my professional
       experiences.
     I understand that I will attend, actively participate, and keep notes in all seminars and meetings,
       which are directed by my university supervisor.
     I understand that I must complete all assigned district substitute requirements prior to the UHCL
       Mentor Training Day One.
     I will submit all assignments on the due date, unless otherwise directed by university supervisor.
       Failure to do so will result in a grade penalty as stated in the syllabus and handbook.
     I will submit completed lesson plans to my mentor teacher and university supervisor for approval
       on designated due dates. I understand that all lessons must have prior approval before I teach
       the lessons in the classroom. I further understand that all lesson plans will follow the approved
       UHCL School of Education format and rubric for the assignment, if applicable.
     I will write reflections in the format, Description, Analysis, Planning (DAP). I will use information
       from textbooks, articles, websites, course materials, experiences, and other professional
       development activities to enhance my understanding of teaching and learning and to write my
       reflections.
     I understand that I must produce an e-portfolio that demonstrates evidence of satisfactory growth
       in teaching knowledge, skills, and dispositions and is aligned to the SOE Initial Certification
       Standards. I understand the portfolio must be free of spelling, grammar, and sentence structure
       errors.
     I understand that I must adhere to Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas Educators,
       UHCL Student Life Policies, UHCL Student Code of Conduct and the UHCL Academic Honesty
       Policy. Failure to adhere to any of the above standards will result in a failing grade or removal
       from the Internship I Program.
     I understand that I must upload key assessments to UAS no later than the last day of finals for
       this semester or as directed by university supervisor

Please sign and date below. Keep one copy in your own records.
Return one copy of this page to your University Supervisor by stated deadline.

                                                                                      __________
Intern                                                                Date
                         UHCL Internship II Agreement of Compliance
Print Name: __________________________________________________________________

District supervisor:                                           ________Semester Date:                  __

Initial each box that you have read and understood the requirements:
      I have received and read the course syllabus, outline and assignment sheet for Internship II. I agree to
         fulfill the requirements of the course and agree to abide by the policies set forth by my supervisor. I
         further understand that completion of the criteria described therein will define my semester grade.
     I understand that the Pre-Service Internship is a two long semester course and I must enroll in
       consecutive long semesters (fall/spring or spring/fall) to complete these two experiences.
     I agree to read the Internship Handbook prior to the due date stated in the course syllabus and provide
       a copy of the current Internship Handbook to my mentor teacher
     I understand that failure to meet the criteria, including professional responsibilities, will result in a failing
       grade or removal from the Internship II program.
     I am aware that for Internship II, I am expected to be in attendance Monday through Friday that my
       assigned PDS is in session, including any new teacher orientations, teacher workdays and in-services.
       I will follow the public school holiday schedule of my assigned PDS.
     I understand that all assignments and lesson plans must be submitted on the due date. Failure to do so
       will result in a deduction of points from my professional responsibility grade and the assignment grade.
     I will submit completed lesson plans to my mentor teacher and district supervisor for approval on
       designated due dates. I understand that all lessons must have prior approval before I teach the
       lessons in the classroom. I further understand that all lesson plans will follow the approved UHCL
       School of Education format and rubric for the assignment, if applicable.
     I will write reflections in the format, Description, Analysis, Planning (DAP). I will use information from
       textbooks, articles, websites, course materials, experiences, and other professional development
       activities to enhance my understanding of teaching and learning and to write my reflections.
     I understand that I must continue to be eligible to be placed on the PDS district’s substitute roster
       during Internship II.
     I understand that I must adhere to Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas Educators, UHCL
       Student Life Policies, UHCL Student Code of Conduct and the UHCL Academic Honesty Policy.
       Failure to adhere to any of the above standards, will result in a failing grade or removal from the
       Internship II Program.
     I understand that I must produce an e-portfolio that demonstrates evidence of satisfactory growth in
       teaching knowledge, skills, and dispositions and is aligned to the SOE Initial Certification Standards. I
       understand the portfolio must be free of spelling, grammar, and sentence structure errors.
     I understand that I must do a presentation on my e-portfolio and my internship experience as described
       in handbook, the syllabus and as directed by my district supervisor
     I understand that I must upload any key assessments to UAS no later than the last day of finals for this
       semester or as directed by district supervisor.

Please sign and date below. Keep one copy in your own records.
Return one copy of this page to your District supervisor by stated deadline.

__________________________________                     ____________________________________________
Intern                                                             Date




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                                        The Capstone Experience
                                  Pre-Service Internship I and II Overview

The internship capstone experience consists of both Internship I and Internship II semesters. The main
purpose of Internship I and II is to provide interns with experiences that will assist in the development and
application of knowledge, skills and dispositions to continue their growth and development as new teachers. It
is designed to provide pre-service candidates (Interns) with hands-on experience related to every aspect of the
teaching profession. Internship will consist of observations, and individual, small group, and whole-class
instruction, as well as experiences with the myriad non-instructional responsibilities of educators. Throughout
the Internship experience, the intern will develop critical reflective thinking about becoming a self-confident and
effective practitioner.


                          Overview of Internship Team’s Roles and Responsibilities

The Internship Team: Consists of the Center for Professional Development of Teachers, the professional
development school personnel, university supervisor, district supervisor, and the mentor teacher. This team
will be responsible for providing support to the intern, conferring with the intern on a regular basis, providing
feedback on the intern’s progress, and assisting in developing a schedule of experiences for the intern’s
professional development. This same Internship Team will assist in supervising the intern’s development
during the Internship I semester and throughout the Internship II semester.

Center for Professional Development of Teachers (CPDT): The UHCL School of Education has been
designated by the state as a Center for Professional Development of Teachers. It is structured to provide
extensive school-based experiences for prospective educators. This structure includes a two-semester pre-
service internship in a number of public schools that have been designated as professional development
schools. The CPDT directs and supervises in collaboration with the UHCL faculty and partnering school
districts the clinical preparation for interns for Internship I and II. The CPDT also provides technological
support and professional development.


Professional Development Schools: A Professional Development School is characterized by joint work
between and among school and university faculty. These sites operate under the philosophy that every staff
member is a mentor, providing a rich and supportive environment for the preparation of professional educators.
Responsibility for learning is shared and all participants share expertise in the interest of the PK-12 students’
and adults’ learning. Each school has been approved to operate as a PDS through an application and approval
process that is based on stringent criteria and have recommended by the UHCL Teacher Certification Council
to the Dean of the School of Education.


The University Supervisor: Are experienced teachers who have distinguished themselves in the field as
accomplished professional teachers and teacher leaders. They serve in four primary roles for the interns: to
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teach, supervise, mentor and to monitor during semester one and two of the internship year. During the first
semester, they are the primary instructor of record while working in collaboration with Internship Team. In
collaboration with the Internship Team, the university supervisor is responsible for supervising the intern’s
experiences, observing and evaluating the intern’s performance. In addition, the university supervisor facilitates
collaboration with partner schools and district supervisor in the areas of supervision and mentoring to improve
the articulation between teacher preparation at UHCL and experiences in the field.


The District Supervisor: Are experienced educators who have distinguished themselves in the field as
accomplished professional teachers and teacher leaders. They are employed by the public school district,
while also serving as the clinical faculty for UHCL. During the second semester, they are the primary instructor
of record while working in collaboration with the Internship Team. They serve in four primary roles for the
interns: to teach, to supervise, to mentor and to monitor during semester one and two of the internship year. In
collaboration with the Internship Team, the district supervisor is responsible for arranging, coordinating and
supervising the intern’s experiences, observing and evaluating the intern’s performance. In addition, the
district supervisor facilitates collaboration with partner schools and university supervisor in the areas of
supervision and mentoring to improve the articulation between teacher preparation at UHCL and experiences
in the field.


The Mentor Teacher: Will work collaboratively with the university and district supervisors throughout both
internship semesters. She/he will provide professional development experiences, offer feedback to the intern
on his/her growth and development, provide mentoring and serve as a member of the Internship Team.




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                                     Internship I : General Description

Title: TCED 4738 Pre-Service Internship I.

Prerequisite: Approval of Associate Dean

Catalog Description: Supervised field experience conducted in a public school setting that has been
designated as an UHCL Professional Development School (PDS).


Course Description: The main purposes of Internship I are to provide interns with experiences that will assist
in the development and application of knowledge, skills and dispositions to continue their growth and
development as new teachers and to be prepared for Internship II. Intern I’s will begin to demonstrate their
ability to integrate and plan knowledge, skills and dispositions of effective teaching based on the UHCL Initial
Certification Standards. The course is designed to provide Intern I’s with hands-on experiences related to
every aspect of the teaching profession. Internship I consists of focused observations and individual, small
group, and whole-group instruction, as well as, experiences with the professional responsibilities of educators.
These professional responsibilities include, but are not limited to, participation in a variety of classroom
settings, team meetings, faculty meetings, seminars, active small group and individual tutoring, team teaching,
and other identified professional duties. The Intern I’s are responsible for understanding and applying school
policies and procedures for their designated PDS. Throughout the Internship I experience, the Intern I’s will
develop their knowledge, skills and dispositions as critical reflective thinkers while becoming self-confident and
effective practitioners. Each Intern I will be assigned to a mentor teacher and mentoring team. The course
meets every Wednesday according to each school district’s requirements for teachers. A calendar is provided
that gives dates and times for meetings and attendance requirements.


Course Credit: 3 credit hours




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                                     Internship II: General Description

Title: TCED 4798 Pre-Service Internship II.

Prerequisite: TCED 4738 and approval of Associate Dean

Catalog Description: Supervised field experience conducted in a public school setting that has been
designated as an UHCL Professional Development School (PDS).


Course Description: The main purpose of Internship II is to provide interns with experiences that will assist in
the development and application of knowledge, skills and dispositions to continue their growth and
development as new teachers. Interns will increasingly accept responsibilities for their development as
professional educators. Intern II’s will demonstrate their ability to integrate and implement knowledge, skills
and dispositions of effective teaching based on the UHCL Initial Certification Standards. Intern II’s will
participate in ALL aspects of the professional role of teachers including, but not limited to: professional
committees and meetings, monitoring duty (cafeteria, bus lines, etc.), parent and student conferencing, extra-
curricular activities with prior approval of the district supervisor, and other assigned professional duties. During
the Internship II semester, the intern will adhere to the instructional day of the PDS site Monday through
Friday. The Intern II’s are responsible for understanding and applying school policies and procedures for their
designated PDS and the Internship I and II Handbook. Throughout the Internship II experience, the Interns will
continue to develop their knowledge, skills and dispositions as critical reflective thinkers while becoming self-
confident and effective practitioners. Interns will continue the Internship II experience with their assigned
Internship I mentor teacher and mentoring team. District supervisors will provide a calendar that gives dates
and times for meetings and attendance requirements.


Course credit: 9 credit hours




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                    Internship I and II General Guidelines, Policies and Procedures

                                                      Syllabus
A common syllabus and calendar will be provided by UHCL School of Education for both Internship I and II
semesters that will include all required assignments and a description of each assignment. In addition, each
semester, rubrics for the assignments will be provided. University supervisors and district supervisors are
expected to adhere to the common syllabus, but with the approval of the university supervisor coordinator
and/or CPDT director may be adjusted to better meet the assigned interns or district. The course calendar and
assignments due dates will be determined by the university, CPDT, university supervisor and the district
supervisor. The university supervisor and the district supervisor may require additional professional
assignments as deemed appropriate for the development of their assigned interns during the internship
experience.


                                       Unit Assessment System Policy
Every student in a course with a designated Course Assessment must complete and submit the assignment to
the School of Education (SOE) Unit Assessment System (UAS) following the instructions from
http://soe.uhcl.edu/UAS. Unlike assignment grades that contribute to a student’s course grade, Course
Assessment assignment scores are only
used to determine how well the program supports SOE candidates, meets State Standards, and fulfills national
accreditation requirements. Instructors assign each Course Assessment assignment to one of three UAS
categories: Exceeds Standards, Acceptable, or Unacceptable


                                           Background Check Policy
In accordance with Senate Bill 9, it is required that school districts, charter schools, or private schools conduct
criminal background checks on all district employees, any person that is volunteering, or completing any kind
of field experience. Each person to whom this applies must provide the school district with driver’s license
information and any other information necessary to conduct the criminal background check.
For assignments that require either class wide, group participation or activities in which candidates are
necessarily interacting with minor students, each candidate must complete the appropriate criminal
background check form and submit it to the instructor by the stated due date on the syllabus. In most cases
this applies even if the candidate is an employee of the district.
For assignments that require candidates to visit schools (e.g., interviews, etc.), it is the responsibility of the
candidate to provide the school district, charter school, or private school with any information necessary to
conduct a criminal background check. The School of Education accepts no responsibility for candidates who
do not follow established school district, charter school, or private school procedures or state legislation.
No candidate may begin any field experience prior to the formal approval of the school district.




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If a candidate is unable to complete all required field experiences (regardless of the reason, including failing to
have a formally approved criminal background check), then the candidate will not receive credit for the course;
i.e., the candidate will either be withdrawn from the course or receive an “F” in the course.


                                      Personal Technology Use Policy
Acceptable Use Policies (AUP) - These are basically "contracts" that outline how students can use the
technology, what they cannot do with it and the consequences for violating the policy. AUPs are signed by an
authorized representative of the school, students and parents so that all concerned parties are aware of the
policy. It is your responsibility as a visitor to the school to be aware of the AUP and follow its guidelines.
No Student Names - When referring to students on a web page of any kind (blogs, etc.), do not use their
names. When writing emails, do not use names.
Student Pictures – Teachers must get written permission to post student pictures and work before placing it
onto the web.
School or Classroom Web Pages - Teachers should realize that a web site that refers to their school or
district represents them in cyberspace just as a school newsletter or yearbook represents the school in their
community. Because of this you need to respect the interests of the school system and post only appropriate
materials to the web site. What is "appropriate" regarding content is clearly defined in the school’s AUP.
Cell Phones in the Classroom – These are usually not allowed. Do not allow yourself to be photographed
with a cell phone.

                                                  Dress Code
Dressing as a professional educator is important. Schools are traditionally conservative. You are on display at
that school. Some of you may even work in the district some day, so you are a walking advertisement for your
self.
Ladies:
 Full-length dress slacks only. No jeans or Capri pants are allowed
 Loose fitting skirts, at least knee length (in order for you to move around and not be revealing)
 Wear shallow necklines only. No low cut tops.
 Full length shirts/blouses (no midriff showing)
 Regular shoes. No sneakers or flip-flops. Sandals are to be worn with hose. Wear low heels for comfort
    and safety.
 Jewelry should be kept at a minimum. All body piercing, except ear piercing, must not be visible. All
    tattoos or body art must be covered.

Gentlemen:
 Full-length dress slacks only. No jeans or shorts.
 Shirts with collars. No T-shirts or tank tops of any sort.
 Regular shoes. No sneakers or sandal type shoes.
 Jewelry should be kept to a minimum, if at all. All body piercing, except ear piercing, must not be visible.
   All tattoos and body art must be covered

Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas Educators, UHCL Student Life Polices, UHCL
                                     Code of Conduct
Any reported incidents or behaviors that are in violation of the law or Professional Code of Ethics will be
handled as required by law or professional responsibility. The intern is responsible for reading, understanding
and adhering to the Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas Educators, UHCL Student Life Policies

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and UHCL Code of Conduct. A copy of the Professional Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas
Educators is found in this handbook. A copy of the UHCL Student Life Policies may be attained in Office of
Student Services or on the UHCL web site. Student Life Policies


                                      UHCL Academic Honesty Policy
Interns are expected to be honest in all their academic activities. Academic honesty is the cornerstone of the
academic integrity of the university. It is the foundation upon which the student builds personal integrity and
establishes a standard of personal behavior. This policy is designed to encourage honest behavior and is
jointly administered by faculty and students.
                                                 Honesty Code:
I will be honest in all my academic activities and will not tolerate dishonesty.


                              UHCL School of Education Disposition Policy
As an NCATE accredited institution, UHCL will recommend for certification only those persons who have
demonstrated the necessary strong, positive dispositions associated with the professional educator. This
means that a student may be withdrawn from a UHCL program if the student is judged to not have the
required professional dispositions, regardless of the student’s academic record. The statement defining what is
meant by "professional dispositions" is given at.
http://prtl.uhcl.edu/portal/page/portal/SOE/Forms/form_files/DISPOSITIONS.pdf
Every student must read and follow The Policy on Professional Dispositions, which is provided to define the
standard of behavior the School of Education expects of its candidates. At the end of the course and at other
appropriate times, the instructor(s) will assess your compliance with these standards. These assessments will
be invaluable to you, and the program faculty, as you continue to develop professionally.


      Dismissal, Withdrawal, Resignation or Readmission Process For Internship Program
The UHCL School of Education supports and anticipates success for all internship candidates. However,
should problems arise in completion of this important capstone experience, the following procedures will guide
the dismissal, withdrawal, resignation or readmission process.


                            Withdrawal Or Resignation-Satisfactory Progress
During the Internship I/Internship II programs, interns may wish to withdraw or resign for personal or other
reasons. In this case, Interns are to inform their university supervisor and district supervisor that they are
voluntarily withdrawing or resigning from Internship I/Internship II.
If, according to the university personnel, the intern’s progress is satisfactory, then the student is to:
1. Send an e-mail to the university supervisor, district supervisor, mentor teacher and the CPDT director
     informing them of the decision
2. Withdraw from the Internship I/Internship II course through the Office of the Academic Records prior to the
   deadline stated in the UHCL Academic Calendar; if passed the deadline, then the intern will request from
   the CPDT Director to administratively withdraw the intern from the program
3. Return all PDS and/or UHCL materials
4. Meet with the Director of the Center for Professional Development of Teachers and university supervisor or
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    district supervisor to discuss continuation in Internship I/Internship II.
The Director of the Center for Professional Development of Teachers will confirm in writing to the district
supervisor and the university supervisor that the student has withdrawn or resigned.


                             Withdrawal/Dismissal - Unsatisfactory Progress
If an Internship I/Internship II candidate is making unsatisfactory progress, the Internship I/Internship II
candidate may: voluntarily withdraw, or the university supervisor, district supervisor, or PDS campus
administrator based on their documented observations or evaluations, may request the intern to be dismissed
from the program by contacting the Center for Professional Development of Teachers Director. An oral
request should be followed by a written statement to the Center for Professional Development of Teachers
Director stating the reasons for the request.
Unsatisfactory progress includes but is not limited to:
 Behavior that exhibits an Intern’s prejudice toward children, school personnel, or others because of race,
   gender, age, national origin or handicapping condition;
   Behavior that is physically or verbally threatening to children, or school personnel, or school of education
    personnel;
   Behavior that demonstrates refusal of an Intern to fulfill the requirements of the Capstone Experience as
    set out by the UHCL curriculum or the public school and its personnel, the University supervisor or District
    supervisor.
   Behavior that does not enhance or that negatively affects a child’s ability to learn and develop. Behavior
    that indicates to the professional educators involved that an Intern does not have the attitude, commitment,
    personal attributes, or skills to successfully complete the program and be recommended for certification.
   Behavior that does not adhere to the Code Of Ethics And Standard Practices For Texas Educators, the
    UHCL Student Life Policies, the UHCL Code Of Conduct, or the UHCL Academic Honesty Policy.

Should the intern withdraw or be dismissed due to unsatisfactory progress, the following process is to
be followed:

1. The university supervisor or district supervisor will inform the CPDT Director of the decision and the
   reasons for the withdrawal or dismissal through e-mail or in a written letter.
2. The intern will withdraw from the Internship I/Internship II course through the Office of the Academic
   Records prior to the deadline stated in the UHCL Academic Calendar; if passed the deadline, then the
   intern will request from the CPDT Director to administratively withdraw the intern from the program. In
   addition, if the withdrawal or dismissal occurs after the published date to withdraw without penalty, the
   Director will notify the Associate Dean to request an administrative withdrawal from all semester courses in
   which the student is registered.
3. Return all PDS and/or UHCL materials
4. Meet with the Director of the Center for Professional Development of Teachers and university supervisor or
   district supervisor to discuss continuation in Internship I/Internship II. The purpose of the conference is to
   confirm the withdrawal or dismissal, ascertain that all materials have been returned, and request that the
   intern officially withdraw through the Office of Academic Records from the Internship I/Internship II course.
5. The Director of the Center for Professional Development of Teachers will confirm in writing to the district
   supervisor, the university supervisor ,campus administrator, and Associate Dean that the Intern has been
   dismissed or withdrawn for unsatisfactory progress.



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                                 Readmission To Internship I/Internship II
Should the intern wish to be readmitted to Internship I/Internship II, he/she must follow the procedures as
outlined in PROCEDURES FOR REQUESTING READMISSION TO INTERNSHIP I/INTERNSHIP II
FOLLOWING WITHDRAWAL/DISMISSAL-UNSATISFACTORY PROGRESS, a copy of which may be
obtained upon request from the Office of the Associate Dean of the School of Education.


                                   Characteristics of Successful Interns
This is a list of characteristics often observed in successful interns. It is by no means a complete list, and is
only suggestive of behaviors university supervisors, district supervisors and mentor teachers may look for.
They relate to Professional Responsibilities, Dispositions and the UHCL Initial Certification Standards.
Professionalism:
 Relates well to students, peers and supervisors
   When unsuccessful, or having a ‘bad day,’ never targets students
   Does not talk negatively about others
   Never gossips about students, teachers or university personnel

Attitude:
 Is able to self-correct
   When unsuccessful, is not overly frustrated
   Willing to accept responsibility for self and not blame others
   Learns from mistakes
   Is able to accept and use constructive suggestions
   Does not avoid commitments

Motivation:
 Is self-reflective
   Has self-confidence
   Is able to be authoritative before students
   Shows willingness to learn more about the subject matter
   Has initiative
   Demonstrates a commitment to the profession

Capabilities:
 Has good verbal and non-verbal communication skills
   Can adjust to the varying levels of students
   Speaks and writes correct English grammar
   Grades papers accurately
   Demonstrates solid command of subject matter

Dependability:
 Rarely, if ever, tardy or absent
   Willingness to put in extra hours

2/16/2012                                                15
   Can be counted on to “pitch in”
   Completes assigned tasks and duties on time
   Turns in required assignments on time

                                       Pre-service Teacher Etiquette
(taken from: Guests in the Classroom: Top Ten Tips for Pre-Service Teachers, Kappa Delta Pi Record, Fall
2003)
“The dynamics of entering another teacher’s classroom requires sensitivity, patience and flexibility.”

    1. Remember that you are a guest in the cooperating teacher’s classroom: Pre-service teachers who
       enter their cooperating teachers’ classrooms determined to be “good guests” are more likely to be
       rewarded with teaching opportunities and ever-increasing responsibilities.
    2. Observe the cooperating teacher: It is easy to be critical. Instead, pre-service teachers should be
       sure to seek out the voice of experience from their cooperating teachers.
    3. Be positive: Smile a lot. Happy teachers are more productive. Negative attitudes destroy pre-service
       teachers’ relationships with students and other educators.
    4. Be professional and punctual: Being tardy or absent is simply unacceptable. Be on time! Sign in at
       the office and report to designated meeting area or classroom.
    5. Dress in a professional manner: Dressing as a professional educator is important. Schools are
       traditionally conservative. You are on display at that school. Some of you may even work in the district
       some day, so you are a walking advertisement for your self.
    6. Be careful what you say in the teacher’s lounge, especially to other teachers: Cooperating
       teachers expect cooperation, support and respect from pre-service teachers. Remember the old
       adage, “If you don’t have anything good to say about someone, don’t say anything at all.”
    7. Be prepared: In fact, be overly prepared. Pre-service teachers are advised to have “Plan B” ready in
       case their original intentions go awry. Bring the things you need to complete the assignment. Do not
       rely on the teacher to supply paper, books, etc. that you need. Double-check everything before you
       leave home.
    8. Examine your school, home and work responsibilities carefully: Pre-service teachers should enter
       into their teacher-education program with the understanding that they are preparing for careers as
       professional educators. Will the time commitment and rigor of teacher preparation fit with the other
       parts of your life? Field-based teacher education is intensive.
    9. Teaching is hard work: Pre-service teachers should be familiar with the instructional objectives of the
       school, district and state. They must examine the course curriculum and know where their lesson fits in
       the big picture. They should develop instructional objectives that connect the curriculum and establish
       performance standards for their students. Lesson planning is essential.
    10. Ideals are important, but relationships are essential: Teaching is a “relationship-driven” endeavor.
        Pre-service teachers should go into their field-based assignments with high expectations, but
        remember that every day may not always be ideal and pleasant.
    11. Listen and Learn: A pre-service teacher’s primary order of business is to listen and learn. There is
       much to be learned: classroom rules and procedures, students’ names and curriculum standards.
       “Seek first to understand, then to be understood” (Stephen Covey, 1989).




2/16/2012                                               16
            PRE-SERVICE INTERNSHIP I




2/16/2012              17
                                                 Intern I
                      Intern I: Policies & Professional Roles and Responsibilities

                 The University Supervisor is the instructor of record for Internship

                                 Intern I: Attendance and Absence Policy
Intern I’s are required to be in attendance every Wednesday the assigned PDS teachers are in session and, if
possible, attend workshops or in-service days, provided that these days do not conflict with university classes.
They are to follow the PDS mentor teacher’s required daily schedule. Enrollment in 4:00 pm courses on
Wednesdays is strongly discouraged, as they may be in conflict with PDS’s faculty or team meetings. No
appointments of a personal nature should be made on Wednesdays. All absences must be made-up within
seven (7) district instructional days. Make up days cannot conflict with the Intern I’s university classes. All
absences not made-up will result in five (5) points deducted from final grade.
In the event of an emergency, Intern should do the following ASAP:
          1. Contact the mentor teacher
            2. Notify and contact the university supervisor and district supervisor
            3. Confirm a make-up date with all of the above
                                    Intern I: Substitute Teaching Policy
Since the main focus of the Intern I experience is the observance of quality teaching, interns in the Internship I
semester are not available to substitute on Wednesdays at the PDS campus. Intern I’s also may not be left in
charge of a classroom for any length of time without direct supervision by a certified teacher, unless prior
approval has been granted by the university supervisor. Interns must complete all district requirements to be
placed on their PDS substitute rosters by the day of Intern I Mentor Training Day, as the intern will be
substitute teaching that day for the mentor teacher. An intern may substitute for mentor teacher on
Wednesdays, if the mentor is attending professional development activities.


                                         Intern I: Lesson Plan Policy
Lesson plans will be submitted to the mentor teacher and university supervisor for approval prior to the week
the intern plans to teach the lesson(s). The university supervisor and mentor teacher will determine
submission dates. Lesson plans will follow the School of Education’s Lesson Plan Format and scored based
on the School of Education’s Lesson Plan Rubric. Lesson Plan Format, Rubric, Scoring Sheet


                              Intern I: Professional Communications Policy
All professional communications will be submitted directly to the university supervisor by e-mail and will be
read only by the university supervisor. In the unlikely event that something of a legal or ethical concern is
contained within the dialogue (abuse or inappropriate treatment of children, for example), the university
supervisor is legally bound to take appropriate action. Interns will be notified if any action is to be taken.
Any communications from the Center for Professional Development of Teachers will be sent to the intern’s
UHCL e-mail account.


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                            Intern I: Professional Roles and Responsibilities
Professional duties include the variety of professional responsibilities that face an educator. One of the most
important is being a role model of a caring, moral and ethical citizen for all PK-12 students. These include, but
are not limited to such topics as:
      Regular attendance                                            Familiarity with school rules and policies
      Attendance at assigned Internship                             Familiarity with protocol
       activities/meetings                                           Familiarity with appropriate educational
      Punctuality                                                    resources
      Appropriate notification of absence                           Effective communication skills
      Professional dress                                            Adhering to the Code Of Ethics And
      Completion of required responsibilities (such                  Standard Practices For Texas Educators
       as lesson plans, portfolios, journals, daily                  Adhering to the UHCL Student Life Policies,
       preparation and school duty) in a timely                      Adhering to the UHCL Code Of Conduct
       manner                                                        Adhering to the UHCL Academic Honesty
      Flexibility                                                    Policy.
      Positive attitude                                             Adhering the attributes and dispositions
      Initiative                                                     stated on the SOE Professional Attributes
      Dedication to job                                              and SOE Disposition Policy
      Familiarity with school routines
      Familiarity with schedules and duties
                                         Internship I: Responsibilities:
   Responsibilities, but not limited to:
    Regular and on-time attendance at assigned internship activities and meetings
      Completion of all duties assigned by the university supervisor, PDS mentor teacher and district
       supervisor
      Placement on assigned district’s substitute list
      Completion of all assignments by assigned deadlines
      Completion of Internship I E-portfolio
      Adhere and apply all Professional Responsibilities, Ethics and Dispositions
      Upload all required key assessments to the School of Education’s Unit Assessment System (UAS) by
       the last day of finals or as directed by university supervisors

                            Intern I: Course Evaluation and Grade Distribution
   All assignments and lesson plans must be submitted on the due date.
   The final semester grade for Internship I will be determined by the following grading criteria: Note: Intern
   must earn a B- or better in Internship I to proceed to Intern II
   Assignments                            15%
   E-Portfolio                            40%
   Teacher Performance                    20%
   Professional Responsibilities          25%
                                                  Grading Scale
                  94 –100        A                             80 – 82        B-
                  90 – 93        A-                            77 – 79        C+
                  87 – 89        B+                            73 – 76        C
                  83 – 86        B                             70 – 72        C-

2/16/2012                                                 19
In general:
An "A" (or A-) grade indicates that the Intern has completed Internship requirements, including
demonstration of proficiency in each of the Initial Certification Standards, and has demonstrated
performance that exceed expectations in the majority of areas of professional responsibilities and
dispositions.


A "B" (+ or -) grade indicates that the Intern has completed Internship requirements, including
demonstration of proficiency in each of the Initial Certification Standards, and has
demonstrated performance standards that meet expectations in the majority of areas of professional
responsibilities and dispositions.


A "C" (+ or -) grade indicates that the Intern has completed syllabus requirements, including
demonstration of proficiency in each of the Initial Certification Standards, and has demonstrated
performance standards that meet expectations in an acceptable number of areas of professional
responsibilities and dispositions.


                                       Intern I: Late Work Policy
Assignments not submitted by the due date may incur a 10-point assignment grade penalty. Late
assignments will not be accepted 48 hours after the due date without prior approval of the university
supervisor and could result in an assignment grade of zero.




2/16/2012                                             20
            PRE-SERVICE INTERNSHIP II




2/16/2012              21
                                                    Intern II

                   Intern II: Policies & Professional Roles and Responsibilities

               The District Supervisor is the instructor of record for Internship II.

                              Intern II: Attendance and Absence Policy
Intern II’s are required to be in attendance Monday - Friday when the assigned PDS teachers are in
session and attend workshops and in-service days. They are to follow the PDS mentor teacher’s required
daily schedule. The last day of Internship II will be 5 working days after UHCL graduation commencement
ceremony for that semester. Enrollment in 4:00 pm university courses is not allowed, without prior written
approval from CPDT Director and the district supervisor, as they may conflict with PDS’s faculty or team
meetings.
Absences that exceed three (3) consecutive days or extended illness require a physician’s statement. The
absences cannot be of a duration or amount that the program requirements cannot be met.
For each day’s absence or emergency, intern should do the following immediately:
   1. Contact the Mentor teacher
    2. Notify and contact the District supervisor
All absences from work will be reported on the appropriate “Absence From Duty Form” to the district
supervisor. A sample of that form is included in this handbook.


                               Intern II: Early Program Release Policy
In both the fall and spring semesters, if an intern has no absences, the Intern II has the option of having
the completion of the Internship II experience coincide with UHCL graduation commencement ceremony
for that semester. The intern must have successfully completed all course requirements, including
assignments, ITE, e-portfolio, the portfolio presentation, the uploading of the key assessments, eight (8)
days of substituting and mentor teacher’s “perk” day, prior to the commencement ceremony date. The
intern must seek prior approval from both the district supervisor and the CPDT Director in writing by
announced deadline date in order to take this option.


                       Intern II: Class Coverage/Substitute Teaching Policy
   Intern II’s must continue to meet all district requirements to be placed on their PDS substitute rosters.

   Intern II’s are to cover classrooms for a minimum of eight days (excluding Independent Teaching
    Experience) and one day that is arranged by the district supervisor and mentor teacher to permit the
    mentor teacher a “perk” day. Prior to ITE, Intern II candidate may cover classrooms for teachers
    within the intern’s Professional Development School, especially if the teachers are participating in
    professional development activities. In order for an Intern II to cover a teacher’s classroom, prior
    agreement is required among the teacher, mentor teacher, intern, district supervisor and the campus
    administrator.

   Intern II’s may be paid as a substitute teacher at their PDS during the last three week period of the
    public school semester with the knowledge and approval of the district supervisor and the PDS
    administrator, if they have successfully completed their ITE and met all other internship requirements,
2/16/2012                                              22
     including documented eight days of class coverage and the mentor teacher’s “perk” day.


                         Intern II: Personal Leave Day For Intern II Mentors
The personal leave day as a “perk” for mentors of Internship II interns is allowed according to the following
criteria:
THE FOLLOWING MUST EXIST BEFORE PERSONAL DAY LEAVE IS APPROVED:
  1. The Intern II must have been in the Internship II assignment for at least ten (10) school days.
    2. The district supervisor, mentor, and the principal must agree that the Intern II can be successful in
       an unsupervised role.
    3. A certified teacher in an adjacent room must be available to assist, if needed.
    4. An administrator must be available in the building all day, if needed.
    5. The Intern II cannot be paid for the day.


                                      Intern II: Lesson Plan Policy
Lesson plans will be submitted to the mentor teacher and district supervisor for approval prior to the week
the intern plans to teacher the lesson(s). The district supervisor and mentor teacher will determine
submission dates. Lesson plans will follow the School of Education’s Lesson Plan Format and scored
based on the School of Education’s Lesson Plan Rubric. District supervisor will determine if and when
shorter lesson plans may be used. Lesson Plan Format, Rubric, Scoring Sheet


                          Intern II: Independent Teaching Experience (ITE)
Independent Teaching Experience (ITE) is defined as that time when Intern II candidate assume full
responsibility for the planning, instruction, management and assessment of students in their assigned
classes. Interns will be required to assume full responsibility for the classroom for a MINIMUM of 30
days. Each teaching intern’s classroom instruction schedule and sequencing of the ITE will be
individualized and adapted to meet his/her needs. This schedule is to be determined by the district
supervisor, mentor teacher(s) and the intern.
Recommended sequence for Intern II is to gradually add content or class periods until the full day is
reached to start ITE. The district supervisor, mentor and campus administrator will concur regarding the
ITE sequence, which can be interrupted for reflection, remediation, team teaching, or whatever the
professional educators recommend.
Lesson plans will be submitted to the mentor teacher and district supervisor for approval prior to the week
the intern plans to teach the lesson(s). The district supervisor and mentor teacher will determine
submission dates. Lesson plans will follow the School of Education’s approved lesson plan format and
rubric.
                           Intern II: Professional Communications Policy
All professional communications will be submitted directly to the district supervisor by e-mail and will be
read only by the district supervisor. In the unlikely event that something of a legal or ethical concern is


2/16/2012                                              23
contained within the dialogue (abuse or inappropriate treatment of children, for example), the district
supervisor is legally bound to take appropriate action. Interns will be notified if any action is to be taken.
Any communications from the Center for Professional Development of Teachers will be sent to the
intern’s UHCL e-mail account.
                                       Intern II: Reflective Journaling
The district supervisor on a regular basis will make journal assignments. The form of the journal (hard
copy or electronic media) will be determined by the district supervisor. Only the district supervisor will
read journals during Internship II. At their option, however, interns may share their journals with anyone
else they choose.
                                       Intern II: Portfolio Presentation
Intern II s are required to make an oral presentation on based on their e-portfolio and internship
experience, first and second semester. The format of the presentation will be decided by the district
supervisor and the mentor teachers. The presentation should take 15-20 minutes and might be followed
by questions from the internship team members.


                          Intern II: Professional Roles and Responsibilities
Professional duties include the variety of professional responsibilities that face an educator. One of the
most important is being a role model of a caring, moral and ethical citizen for all PK-12 students.
These include, but are not limited to such topics as:
   Regular attendance                                           Practices For Texas Educators
   Attendance at assigned Internship                           Adhering to the UHCL Student Life Policies
    activities/meetings                                         Adhering to the UHCL Code Of Conduct
   Punctuality                                                 Adhering to the UHCL Academic Honesty
   Appropriate notification of absence                          Policy.
   Professional dress                                          Adhering the attributes and dispositions
                                                                 stated on the SOE Professional Attributes
   Completion of required responsibilities (such                and SOE Disposition Policy.
    as lesson plans, portfolios, journals, daily
    preparation and school duty) in a timely
    manner
   Flexibility
   Positive attitude
   Initiative
   Dedication to job
   Familiarity with school routines
   Familiarity with schedules and duties
   Familiarity with school rules and policies
   Familiarity with protocol
   Familiarity with appropriate educational
    resources
   Effective communication skills
   Adhering to the Code Of Ethics And Standard
2/16/2012                                               24
                                     Internship II: Responsibilities
Responsibilities, but not limited to:
     Regular and on-time attendance at assigned Internship activities and meetings
     Completion of all duties assigned by the district supervisor, the mentor teacher and university
       supervisor
     Continued placement on assigned district’s substitute list
     Completion of all assignments by assigned deadlines
     Completion of a minimum of 30 days of ITE
     Completion of Internship II E-portfolio and oral presentation
     Adhere and apply all Professional Responsibilities, Ethics and Dispositions
     Upload all required key assessments to the School of Education’s Unit Assessment System
       (UAS) by last day of finals or as directed by the district supervisor

                          Intern II: Course Evaluation and Grade Distribution
All assignments and lesson plans must be submitted on the due date.
The final semester grade for Internship II will be determined by the following grading criteria:
Assignments                    15%
E-Portfolio                           35%
Teacher Performance                   30%
Professional Responsibilities 20%
                                              Grading Scale
                95 –100       A                            80 – 82       B-
                90 – 94       A-                           77 – 79       C+
                85 - 89       B+                           73 – 76       C
                83 – 86       B                            70 – 72       C-

In general:
An "A" (or A-) grade indicates that the Intern has completed Internship requirements, including
demonstration of proficiency in each of the Initial Certification Standards, and has demonstrated
performance that exceed expectations in the majority of areas of professional responsibilities and
dispositions.
A "B" (+ or -) grade indicates that the Intern has completed Internship requirements, including
demonstration of proficiency in each of the Initial Certification Standards, and has
demonstrated performance standards that meet expectations in the majority of areas of professional
responsibilities and dispositions.
A "C" (+ or -) grade indicates that the Intern has completed syllabus requirements, including
demonstration of proficiency in each of the Initial Certification Standards, and has demonstrated
performance standards that meet expectations in an acceptable number of areas of professional
responsibilities and dispositions.


                                       Intern II: Late Work Policy


2/16/2012                                             25
All assignments and lesson plans must be submitted on the due date as designated by the district
supervisor. Failure to do so will result in a deduction of one point from the Professional Responsibility
semester grade component total for each day the assignment is late. A minimum of 15 points could be
deducted from the final e-portfolio score if the e-portfolio is submitted after the due date and time.




                                      SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
                                INITIAL CERTIFICATION STANDARDS




2/16/2012                                             26
                         STANDARD ONE-Knowledge of the Subject Matter
The candidate demonstrates depth and breadth of content knowledge and skills that are aligned with
national, state or district standards.
Through an ongoing reflective process, the candidate is able to:
1.1 exhibit depth and breadth of accurate content knowledge, skills and dispositions

1. 2 provide relevant content of the discipline being taught, including concepts, principles, relationships,
     methods of inquiry and key issues

1. 3 use appropriate content strategies and materials, including media and technology, which guide
     learners to construct knowledge, increase understanding of subject matter and move to higher levels
     of thinking

1.4   implement instruction that makes connections within the discipline and across disciplines

1.5   use a variety of resources, including technology, to stay abreast of current content knowledge and
      skills and meet district, state and national standards.

1.6   analyze the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for the level of thinking in relation to the
      knowledge, skills and disposition of the discipline.

                     STANDARD TWO-Professional Responsibility and Ethics
The candidate fulfills professional roles and responsibilities, adheres to legal and ethical requirements of
the profession and demonstrates the dispositions necessary to be an outstanding educator.

Through an ongoing reflective process, the candidate is able to:
2.1 demonstrate the dispositions necessary for an educator who adheres to legal and ethical
    requirements of the profession

2.2   collaboratively create a learning environment that reflects local, state, or national standards

2.3   plan educational experiences for all learners, considering developmental, cultural, linguistic, gender
      and socioeconomic characteristics

2.4   exhibit ongoing professional improvement through a commitment to life long learning

2.5   use technology and information from professional resources relevant to the field of teaching

2.6   know and demonstrate the content, pedagogical, and professional knowledge, skills, and
      dispositions necessary to help all students learn.

                   STANDARD THREE –Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment
The candidate creates, organizes and implements developmentally appropriate curriculum, instruction and
assessment that are consistent with current pedagogy, content knowledge and skills.

Through an ongoing reflective process, the candidate is able to:
 3.1 select instructional goals and objectives that are aligned with district, state and national standards

3.2 use technology and other resources in planning and implementing instruction and assessment and
    lessons

3.3 use a variety of instructional and assessment strategies for diverse learners
2/16/2012                                             27
3.4 design instruction that is relevant and actively engages the learner

3.5 design instruction based upon the analysis of results of multiple methods of performance-based
    assessments of student learning

3.6    apply an understanding of environmental and developmental factors that may affect student learning
       to improve instruction

3.7    incorporate relationships among and within concept-based integrated units of various disciplines

3.8    provide timely and accurate evidence of student progress and achievement to students and
       parents/guardians

              STANDARD FOUR-Learning Environment & Classroom Management
The candidate is a leader and collaborative member of a learner-centered community in which an
atmosphere of trust and openness produces a stimulating exchange of ideas, encourages risk-taking, and
promotes feelings of mutual respect.

Through an ongoing reflective process, the candidate is able to:
4.1 create a learning environment that fosters a positive climate of equity and excellence to meet the
    needs of a diverse student population

4. 2 maintain a productive learning environment that consistently implements rules and procedures for the
     effective management of time, materials, personnel and technology to maximize learning for all
     students

4.3 establish a secure, safe, predictable environment

4.4 use strategies to establish an effective classroom routine through effective communication strategies,
    the modeling of respectful behavior and encouragement of self-directed learning

4.5 create a stimulating learning environment that promotes independent and cooperative learners who
    are self-disciplined and motivated

4. 6 generate corrective measures for students’ inappropriate behavior

4.7 collaborate with parents, supervisors, and administrators to arrive at corrective measures for students’
    inappropriate behavior.

                        STANDARD FIVE-Family & Community Involvement
The candidate establishes and uses strong positive relationships among students, families, colleagues,
schools and community to support the needs of all learners. The candidate fosters the development of
caring citizens in their community and in a global society.
Through an ongoing reflective process, the candidate is able to:
5. 1 demonstrate an understanding of the family, community, school, and classroom factors that
      may affect learning

5. 2    establish strong, positive relationships among students, families, colleagues, schools and
        community through effective professional and interpersonal skills
5. 3    use a variety of resources, including technology, to enhance communication and

2/16/2012                                             28
       collaboration with students, families, colleagues and the community

5. 4   make positive contributions to the school, school district and community that foster the
       development of caring citizens in the community and a global society

5.5    develop learning opportunities that involve families and the community to support
       and enhance instruction and the educational environment of the school.




2/16/2012                                           29
            Lesson Planning




2/16/2012         30
                     School of Education Lesson Plan Components
Student Population
 Achievement levels identified
 Grade level is identified
 Demonstrates awareness of special needs of learners

Materials/Resources
 Complete listing of materials
 Complete list of resources
 Safety
 Safety is thoroughly addressed
 Identifies technological considerations regarding safe use of the internet with students and provides
   avenues to avoid improper use of technology with student if appropriate

TEKS/TAKS
 Complete with number and fully stated
 Appropriate for grade level and content
 Matches objective
 Contains both subject-specific and technology TEKS when appropriate
 Integration of two or more subject areas when appropriate

Instructional Objective, Stated Objective, Purpose, or Goal of Lesson
 Typically stated as an advance organizer, when practical
 If we decide not to state directly, we need to know why we are omitting (In a discovery lesson, for
    example)
 May also inform students of how they will be held accountable for their learning
 Stated in specific measurable terms
 Aligned to lesson assessment
 Developmentally appropriate

Anticipatory Set or Introduction
 An activity for the group with whom we are working to focus attention on the subject matter of the
    upcoming lesson and to establish a mental set
 Can be oral statement, review activity, game, board work, or anything related to what we will be
    teaching
 Will not be too long in relationship to the lesson (it is introduction, not main course)

Input or Procedures (Instruction)
 Provides needed information or practice (the lesson itself)
 Includes clearly stated and logically sequenced accurate, age-appropriate explanation
 Includes modifications for special populations

Input or Procedure (Modeling)
 Providing some kind of visual or sensory support related to the lesson
 Builds Network of keys to aid recall
 Integrates multicultural and interdisciplinary components
 Learning activities are student centered
 Can also be pictures, maps, charts, dramatizations, demonstrations of processes, or any other visual
    assists, including the chalkboard.
 Includes modifications for special populations
 Check for understanding to ensure student mastery

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Checking for Understanding
 A check to tell us if learners have understood the material of the lesson or are able to do what we are
   asking them to do
 May be group or individual check
 The more responses the better
 Frequent checks give teacher information needed to plan next steps

Guided Practice
 Initial practice of lesson skill or the follow-up activity, under direct supervision
 Provides extensive and/or highly creative practice of lesson skill
 All learning styles are addressed
 Adequate teacher supervision provided
 Helps assure successful performance
 Requires observation of students to determine if they can do what is asked of them
 Implies that remediation and re-teaching are planned in cases where frequent student errors exist
 Includes modifications for special populations
 Check for understanding

Independent Practice
 Practice of the skill concept of the lesson, without direct adult supervision
 Matches stated objectives, modeling, and/or guided practice
 Includes modifications for special populations
 Clear directions are provided
 Appropriate only after Guided Practice tells teacher that students can perform successfully without
    supervision with very few errors

Assessment or Evaluation
 A formal assessment that provides learning criteria and indicators through traditional or alternative
   assessment means.
 Detailed grading rubric included
 Includes modifications for special populations
 Re-teach
 Addresses objective using new strategies
 Addresses learning styles
 Enrichment/Extension
 Requires students to extend or transfer knowledge and/or skills acquired
 Students create product to be shared when appropriate
 Provides challenging instructional activities for students who demonstrate academic proficiency of
   curriculum objectives

Closure or Ending the Lesson
 A very brief activity that has students - state or demonstrate the main objective(s) of the lesson.
 Includes student participation
 Ties to real-life and/or future learning




2/16/2012                                            32
                               ANTICIPATORY SET OR INTRODUCTION
The introductory activity is often called an Anticipatory Set, to indicate that it directs attention forward
towards the upcoming learning experience. This is its major function in the context of the lesson.
Research shows that learning takes place more readily and retention is enhanced if a mental set has been
established prior to the input of new information. The reliability with which experience can be recalled is
related to the level of concentration with which it was received, and a high level of concentration requires
that the learner be focused on the learning experience. A Set may be any activity that will encourage
learners to focus on the subject matter of the lesson. It may also provide review and practice of previous
learning, and give the teacher diagnostic information about the readiness of learners for the planned
lesson. A good Set need not serve all three of these purposes, but it should gain the students’ attention
and direct it forward towards the process or content to be learned.
                                      OBJECTIVE/PURPOSE/GOAL
Learning is usually more efficient, and retention more reliable, if the learners have a clear understanding of
the direction and purpose of a lesson before it begins. They also need to know that they will be held
accountable for following the learning. This advance information allows them time to prepare themselves
mentally for the new learning by consciously or unconsciously recalling related information they may have
at their disposal. The expectation of accountability will also motivate focusing behavior as the lesson
progresses.
It is usually best to state the objective directly, unless the teacher is aware of a good reason for not doing
so. (In a discovery lesson, for example, a statement of objective at the beginning may not be desirable.)
Many teachers emphasize purpose and accountability by writing the objective on the chalkboard or
overhead. A clearly stated lesson objective serves as an advance organizer, to help students
comprehend, process, and retain new information.
Whether or not the lesson objective is directly stated to the students, it is essential that it be clearly defined
in the mind of the teacher, and that he/she understands its relevance to the total program. This is another
reason for articulating the objective directly; to do so requires that it be defined more specifically than it
might otherwise be. If there are several objectives in the same lesson they should be closely related
enough to be taught, modeled, and practiced congruently so all parts of the lesson will hang together in a
unified way. Each element needs to be consistent with and develop naturally from those that preceded it.
Before developing lesson objectives, the teacher will of course consider the students’ mastery, or lack
thereof, of information and skills prerequisite to the new learning. No learning can proceed successfully
unless the foundations for it are firmly in place. Good planning requires that lessons be designed around
objectives at levels of difficulty and complexity appropriate for the learners.
                                           INPUT-PROCEDURES
This is the heart of the lesson, in which the learners will practice the skills or acquire the information they
need.   Input may be in the form of a teacher-directed lesson, but it doesn’t have to be. Students may
also get information from a reading assignment, a film, a field trip, a research project, a science

2/16/2012                                               33
experiment, an experience in guided or unguided discovery, a cooperative group activity, or some other
method the teacher may devise to get the message across. The teacher may structure input to serve a
dual purpose; that is, a cooperative experience may be planned to generate information and also to
provide practice in group processes.
                                                MODELING
Modeling refers to the inclusion in a lesson of some kind of visual, auditory, or kinesthetic support for the
learning. A model may be of a finished product, or it may be a demonstration of a process. It may serve
to clarify or emphasize, as with color coding, underlining, highlighting, or bold type. It may demonstrate
how something should sound, as occurs in a foreign language lesson. Involving all the senses in a
learning experience allows several kinds of related information to be stored in the brain, and provides
access through multiple channels when the learning needs to be recalled. In teaching how to serve a
tennis ball, an instructor will show how to place the feet and hold the racquet (visual), demonstrate the
moves (kinesthetic), and talk through the process (auditory) as he/she shows how it is done. A student
practicing the skills will have several keys to use in recalling the whole learning experience.
Modeling will not take place at any particular point in a lesson. Instead it may run like a continuous thread
through the entire teaching sequence from beginning to end. It supports any and all of the elements of
Lesson Design.
                                  CHECKING FOR UNDERSTANDING
As students acquire the information that is the “main course” of the lesson, the teacher needs to check
continuously to see if they are getting the intended message. If they miss a point, or get off on the wrong
track, a considerable amount of re-teaching may be needed to undo misconceptions. A well planned
lesson builds learning piece by piece, with each chunk resting on those that preceded it. If any chunk is
missing, or is not securely in place, the whole structure may collapse. The teacher needs to check at
intervals throughout the learning experience to see if the students are following and comprehending. If
they are not, either remediation or re-teaching is indicated; it may even be advisable to go back to the
beginning and start over.
Nothing is to be gained by going on with a lesson that the learners are not understanding. If most of them
seem to be “on board,” the lesson may reasonably proceed. The purpose of a check for understanding is
to give the teacher the information he needs to plan next steps. The lesson will have been pre-planned of
course, but mid-course corrections are often necessary, and enough flexibility must be maintained to allow
for them. Decision making is a continuous process in teaching. The idea is to get the most information
from the most people, as frequently as is practical in and to interpret and use it during the progress of the
lesson.
                                           GUIDED PRACTICE
Practice of learned materials is desirable for several reasons, one of which is that it validates our teaching.
That is, we need to find out if students can do what we’ve been teaching them to do, in order to know if
we’ve been successful. We can get this information from monitoring their practice, provided the practice

2/16/2012                                             34
we’ve assigned is congruent with what we taught, modeled, and checked for. Practice of skills from other
lessons may be useful, but it won’t tell us anything about the success of the lesson in progress. In a tight
and unified learning experience, the parts are consistent with one another.
Guided practice means practice under direct supervision. The teacher needs to be present and available
to give help. Guiding the initial practice of new learning prevents the practice of errors. Students learn
wrong responses by practicing them, in the same way they learn correct ones. If a student does a newly
learned math computation incorrectly twenty times, his error pattern will become quite firmly established.
Furthermore, the first few practices of any new learning are strongest in terms of retention; if these
responses are incorrect, they are often very difficulty to eradicate. By monitoring carefully as students
begin work on their assignments the teacher may intercept and correct errors before they are too well
learned to be changed readily.
A second function of guided practice is to allow the teacher to adjust the level of difficulty for students who
may need extra help in completing the assignment. Even if the lesson seems to be on target for most of
the learners, there may be a few who need extra clarification, explanation, clues, help, or more teaching.
A guided practice period will give the teacher an opportunity to identify these students and make the
needed adjustments.
There is considerable overlap between Checking for Understanding and Guided Practice, and the same
kinds of activities may be used for both. Differences between the two procedures are chiefly in the
purposes for which they are used. Checks for understanding give the teacher information to use in
deciding what to do next. Guided practice may also serve this purpose, but it is more for the benefit of the
students, to help them directly in becoming successful learners. Teachers will also want to use checking
strategies with all their students, if only to confirm the clarity of their own directions. Not all learners will
have an equal need for guided practice.
                                         INDEPENDENT PRACTICE
Independent Practice is practice without direct supervision. The teacher may be present during
independent work periods, but will not be available to give help. Independent work may be done away
from the classroom, as a library assignment, for example, or as homework. Homework is regarded as
independent practice even if it is supervised by parents, since this kind of guidance is not under the control
of the teacher and is not the same for every student.
Since making errors is counterproductive in terms of learning, and since independent work is to be done
without help, the only tasks suitable for independent practice are those the student can be expected to do
without making mistakes. Very few errors are acceptable in a homework assignment, for example, as they
are likely to be practiced over and over before the teacher sees them. Homework or independent
seatwork that has to be covered with red marks was not suitably assigned.
Additional practice beyond the point of initial learning, or over learning, aids retention of skills and
information over time. It correlates strongly with high levels of student achievement. By making retention
more reliable, over learning also strengthens transfer of skills and information to future learning.
2/16/2012                                                35
Continued practice builds speed and fluency in the application of skills and principles. Increased
familiarity with practice material may also strengthen comprehension.
Feedback is as necessary for an independent assignment as for any other, if it is to have any value either
to the student or the teacher. It is important to remember this in dealing with homework. If it is perceived
as meaningless busy-work for which they will not be held accountable, students are not likely to learn
much from it.


Adapted from Phyllis J. Wood
1988

                                          Bloom’s Taxonomy


Evaluation                    Judging the accuracy                  Critique, Judge Prove

Synthesis                     Pulling information together          Imagine, Create, Predict
                              Together in a new way                 Invent, Design, Improve


Analysis                      Take apart and/or examine             Survey, Categorize
                              information about something           Compare/contrast
                                                                    Examine, Describe

Application                   Using what you know in a new          Demonstrate, Apply
                              situation                             Solve, Draw, Act out

Comprehension                 Understanding the facts               Show, Explain, Give main
                                                                    Idea, Re-tell, Paraphrase

Knowledge                     Remembering facts                     Tell, Describe, List,
                                                                    Choose, Remember




2/16/2012                                            36
                Sample Performance Verbs Aligned With
                         Bloom’s Taxonomy
KNOWLEDGE       COMPREHENSION                     APPLICATION
List              Compare                      Compute
Record            Describe                     Demonstrate
Define            Maximize                     Collect
Cite              Recognize                    Generalize
Recall            Summarize                    Interpret
Enumerate         Express                      Use
Relate            Minimize                     Construct
Show              Report                       Operate
Tell              Rearrange                    Illustrate
Specify           Identify                     Calculate
Name              Abbreviate                   Produce
Label             Locate                       Experiment
Identify          Reconstruct                  Transmit
Recount           Conclude                     Classify
Locate            Clarify                      Model
Match             Retell                       Organize
State             Organize                     Personalize
Reproduce         Rewrite                      Sketch
Remember          Transfer                     Rethink
Describe          Review                       Translate
Spell             Symbolize                    Rework
When              Paraphrase                   Group
Where             Interpret                    Revise
Who               Infer                        Order
What              Predict                      Reorganize
Which             Build                        Teach
Why               Substitute                   Project
Know              Translate                    Manipulate
Memorize          Explain                      Extend
Repeat            Restate                      Exhibit
Collect           Discuss                      Stimulate
                                               Solve
                                               Prepare
                                               Simulate
ANALYSIS          SYNTHESIS                    EVALUATION
Isolate            Assume                       Decide
Discriminate      Create                        Evaluate
List              Substitute                    Judge
Compare           Plan                          Compare
Arrange           Suppose                       Conclude
Contrast          Propose                       Select
Distinguish       Minimize                      Prove
Scrutinize        Maximize                      Criticize
Specify           Alter                         Rate
Differentiate     Connect                       Estimate
Recognize         Write                         Disprove
Probe             Invent                        Infer
Structure         Develop                       Challenge
Investigate       Compose                       Deduce
Validate          Design                        Validate
Discover          Embellish                     Score

2/16/2012                        37
Analyze      Formulate          Defend
Outline      Imagine            Predict
Detect       Arrange            Debate
Consider     Elaborate          Choose
Inspect      Assemble           Argue
Diagram      Devise             Recommend
Classify     Construct          Weigh
Observe      Initiate           Determine
Interpret    Prepare            Internalize
Identify     Formalize          Award
Group        Hypothesize        Discuss
Categorize   Originate          Justify
Examine      Incorporate        Appraise
Inquire      Redefine           Prioritize
Survey       Generalize         Discuss
Delineate    Add                Justify
Inventory    Predict            Value
Organize     Reorganize         Solve
Dissect      Contrive           Measure
Explain      Delete             Verify
Order        Symbolize          Editorialize
Question     Concoct
Test         Visualize
Canvass      Produce
Separate     laminate
Divide       Modify
             Solve
             Combine
             Compile
             Organize
             Extend
             Systematize




2/16/2012                  38
                              Sample Alternative Assessment Products
Advertisement                       Film                         Poster
Advice Column                       Filmstrip                    Pottery
Annotated bibliography              FIRST sheet                  Puppet
Art gallery                         Game                         Puppet Show
Batik                               Glossary                     Puzzle
Biography                           Graph                        Questionnaire
Blueprint                           Graphic design               Radio show
Board game                          Greeting card                Reader’s Theater
Book Cover                          Guest speaker                Recipe
Brainteaser                         Haiku                        Reference file
Bulletin board                      Illustrated story            Relief map
Card game                           Illustration                 Report
Cartoon                             Interview                    Rubbing
Celebrity cards                     Invention                    Salt map
Ceramics                            Journal                      Sand-casting
Charcoal sketch                     Labeled diagram              Scenario
Chart                               Large scale drawing          Science fiction story
Choral reading                      Lecture                      Scrapbook
Chinquapin                          Letter                       Sculpture (soap, clay,
Coins                               Letter to the editor           wire, junk, etc.
Collage                             Lesson                       Shadow box
Collection with illustration        Limerick                     Short story
Collection with narrative           Line drawing                 Silk screening
Comic strip                         Logic problem                Skit
Commercial (radio or TV)            Magazine article             Slide presentation
Computer program                    Map                          Small scale drawing
Crossword puzzle                    Map with legend              Song
Costume                             Model                        Songs (collection)
Court Trial                         Mobile                       Sonnet
Dance                               Monograph                    Speech
Debate                              Montage                      Stencil
Demonstration                       Movie                        Stitchery
Detailed illustration               Mural                        Survey
Diagram                             Museum exhibit               Taped recording
Diary                               Musical composition          Terrarium
Dictionary                          News report                  Textbook
Diorama                             Newspaper                    Time Line
Discussion                          News article                 Transparency for an
Display                             Novella                      overhead projector
Drama (comedy. tragedy,             Oil painting                 Travelogue
  melodrama, etc.)                  Opinion poll                 TV documentary
Dramatic monologue                  Oral report                  TV newscast
Dramatic set design                 Package for a product        Video game
Editorial                           Pamphlet                     Video tape
Editorial cartoon                   Panel Discussion               presentation
Elegy                               Pantomime                    Vocabulary list
Essay                               Paper weight                 Watercolor painting
Etching                             Paragraph                    Worksheet
Eulogy                              Pattern with instructions    Word maze
Experiment                          Photo essay                  Written report
Experiment record                   Photographs
Fable                               Picture
Fact File                           Picture dictionary
Fairy Tale                          Picture story for children
Family tree                         Play
Multiple Intelligences Assessment




2/16/2012                                                 39
            Portfolio




2/16/2012      40
                                            Intern I and II Portfolio

In both Internship I and II, the intern must produce an e-portfolio that demonstrates evidence of
satisfactory growth in teaching knowledge, skills and dispositions aligned to the School of Education Initial
Certification Standards. Technology training and e-portfolio development seminars will be held throughout
each of the semesters. Some of the assignments during each semester must be included in the e-
portfolio. At the end of Internship II, the Intern II’s will do an oral presentation of their portfolio.


                               Sample Products for Portfolio by Standard

                          STANDARD ONE-Knowledge of the Subject Matter
The candidate demonstrates depth and breadth of content knowledge and skills that are aligned with
national, state or district standards.
   Research review of the content domain of the academic discipline.
   Samples of teaching lessons to show how the teacher relates the subject to the student’s world.
   Samples of lesson plans to show the different teaching strategies used to present subject matter.
   Analysis of student’s understanding of the subject matter using data from national, state, and teacher-
    made tests.
   Handbook of strategies for relating subject to real-world experiences of students.
   Development of a scope and sequence for a course of study
   Lesson Plans



                      STANDARD TWO-Professional Responsibility and Ethics
The candidate fulfills professional roles and responsibilities, adheres to legal and ethical requirements of
the profession and demonstrates the dispositions necessary to be an outstanding educator.
   A review of the literature available on the professional responsibilities of teachers.
   A plan for demonstrating proficiency in tracking one’s own development in terms of professional
    responsibility including such things as parent/teacher relationships, community/teacher relationships,
    student/teacher relationships, colleague/teacher relationships, and supervisor/teacher relationships.
    Develop a sequence of lessons underscoring the nature of moral reflection.
   Periodic completion of the Wagner/Kierstead Moral Self-Assessment Protocol along with analyses of
    several case studies of classroom scenarios.
   Input from professional teachers, professional ethicists and community human resources personnel.
    Publications detailing available agencies and services the student and student’s family can benefit
    from as well as activities the student can participate in. An awareness of appropriate professional
    literature.
   Evidence of growth from attendance at professional development activities. Evidence of integration of
    information gained from those opportunities into professional activities.
   Lesson Plans with evidence of implementation (sample products, pictures, student products)




                    STANDARD THREE –Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment
2/16/2012                                                41
The candidate creates, organizes and implements developmentally appropriate curriculum, instruction and
assessment that are consistent with current pedagogy, content knowledge and skills.
   A plan for determining and accommodating the level of each student in the classroom.
   Sample of working with small groups of students dealing with personal development that includes
    conflict resolution and decision-making.
   Classroom activities that accommodate the level the student is at and allows for growth in all areas.
   Observations of how students exhibit various developmental characteristics in learning environments
    and develop a classroom profile of student development.
   Assess student’s personal needs and interests and provide activities that would encourage their
    growth and development.
   Case study of an individual student describing background characteristics, learning strengths and
    weaknesses, and proposing an individualized instructional plan.
   An analysis of curricular models for nurturing self-concept at the middle level that provides the basis
    for a curricular unit designed by the teacher;
   A review of multiple measures to identify those that are appropriate for developing a profile of student
    learning;
   Identification of school improvement needs from multiple assessment data sources, including
    International, national, state, and local measures.
   A presentation that describes how a curricular plan, teaching activities, and assessments actually
    come together in an integrated lesson;
   Samples of one-on-one and small group teaching strategies for helping students develop positive self
    concepts;
   Samples of student performance during youth service activities that document intended learning
    outcomes.
   Samples of thematically-based interdisciplinary lesson plans;
   A management plan for delivering an interdisciplinary curricular unit with a team of teachers;
   Lesson plans that demonstrate skill in aligning outcomes, objectives, activities, and assessments.
   Curricular plans judged by several school department staff showing that the student is a participating
    member of a curriculum team;
   Mentor teacher feedback on the Intern’s demonstration of active teaching strategies;
   Samples of classroom measures used to assess student progress and instructional effectiveness and
    interpretations of International, national, state, and local results for organizing instruction.
   Example curricular plans that show the relationship between the school’s essential core curriculum and
    every day life concepts;
   A portfolio of appropriate exploratory program approaches including rationales used at the school level
    for dissemination to other teachers;
   A handbook of measurement instruments, including performance assessments, developed by the
    teacher for real-world contexts is produced.




             STANDARD FOUR-Learning Environment & Classroom Management
2/16/2012                                             42
The candidate is a leader and collaborative member of a learner-centered community in which an
atmosphere of trust and openness produces a stimulating exchange of ideas, encourages risk-taking, and
promotes feelings of mutual respect.
   A review of classroom management models with an emphasis on the particular model used by the
    cooperating school
   Lesson plans that show attention to classroom management
   An analysis of time spend on management or clerical tasks as compared to instructional time; a plan
    for continuous improvement based on the findings
   Input from experienced teachers collected as an aid in dealing with unexpected problems.
   Lesson Plans

                         STANDARD FIVE-Family & Community Involvement
The candidate establishes and uses strong positive relationships among students, families, colleagues,
schools and community to support the needs of all learners. The candidate fosters the development of
caring citizens in their community and in a global society.
   A survey study of local agencies, organizations, homes, and businesses willing to participate with the
    school to serve as a basis of a plan for the school to carry forward the concept of “youth service,” and
    to help teachers find volunteers who will work with groups of adolescents.
   Teachers will learn to plan for the integration of instruction with real-life citizenship duties.
   Description and analysis of conferencing skills with students, parents, and volunteers reflecting on
    activities and results of youth projects and programs.
   A sequence dealing with preparing students to start youth projects.
   Analysis of the impact of youth service projects/programs with recommendations for improvement by
    students, parents, and volunteers. Portfolio includes a summary of activities by Intern.
   Publication describing purposes, operation and impact of a variety of youth service programs at
    national, state, and local level




2/16/2012                                               43
                        Texas Administrative Code                                    Next Rule>>
      TITLE 19                                  EDUCATION
       PART 7                 STATE BOARD FOR EDUCATOR CERTIFICATION
    CHAPTER 247                        EDUCATORS’ CODE OF ETHICS
RULE §247.2               Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas Educators


                       Texas Administrative Code                                          Next Rule>>

    TITLE 19                 EDUCATION
    PART 7                   STATE BOARD FOR EDUCATOR CERTIFICATION
    CHAPTER 247              EDUCATORS’ CODE OF ETHICS
    RULE §247.2              Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas Educators


                                      Professional responsibility.

The Texas educator should strive to create an atmosphere that will nurture to fulfillment the potential of
each student. The educator shall comply with standard practices and ethical conduct toward students,
professional colleagues, school officials, parents, and members of the community. In conscientiously
conducting his or her affairs, the educator shall exemplify the highest standards of professional
commitment.
                              Principle I: Professional Ethical Conduct.
The Texas educator shall maintain the dignity of the profession by respecting and obeying the law,
demonstrating personal integrity, and exemplifying honesty.
Standard 1. The educator shall not intentionally misrepresent official policies of the school district or
educational institution and shall clearly distinguish those views from personal attitudes and opinions.
Standard 2. The educator shall honestly account for all funds committed to his or her charge and shall
conduct financial business with integrity.
Standard 3. The educator shall not use institutional or professional privileges for personal or partisan
advantage.
Standard 4. The educator shall accept no gratuities, gifts, or favors that impair professional judgment.
Standard 5. The educator shall not offer any favor, service, or thing of value to obtain special advantage.
Standard 6. The educator shall not falsify records, or direct or coerce others to do so.
                       Principle II: Professional Practices And Performance.
The Texas educator, after qualifying in a manner established by law or regulation, shall assume
responsibilities for professional administrative or teaching practices and professional performance and
shall demonstrate competence.
Standard 1. The educator shall apply for, accept, offer, or assign a position or a responsibility on the basis
of professional qualifications and shall adhere to the terms of a contract or appointment.
Standard 2. The educator shall not deliberately or recklessly impair his or her mental or physical health or
ignore social prudence, thereby affecting his or her ability to perform the duties of his or her professional
assignment.
Standard 3. The educator shall organize instruction that seeks to accomplish objectives related to
2/16/2012                                             44
learning.
Standard 4. The educator shall continue professional growth.
Standard 5. The educator shall comply with written local school board policies, state regulations, and
other applicable state and federal laws.
                 Principle III: Ethical Conduct Toward Professional Colleagues.
The Texas educator, in exemplifying ethical relations with colleagues, shall accord just and equitable
treatment to all members of the profession.
Standard 1. The educator shall not reveal confidential information concerning colleagues unless
disclosure serves lawful professional purposes or is required by law.
Standard 2. The educator shall not willfully make false statements about a colleague or the school
system.
Standard 3. The educator shall adhere to written local school board policies and state and federal laws
regarding dismissal, evaluation, and employment processes.
Standard 4. The educator shall not interfere with a colleague’s exercise of political and citizenship rights
and responsibilities.
Standard 5. The educator shall not discriminate against, coerce, or harass a colleague on the basis of
race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, disability, or family status.
Standard 6. The educator shall not intentionally deny or impede a colleague in the exercise or enjoyment
of any professional right or privilege.
Standard 7. The educator shall not use coercive means or promise of special treatment in order to
influence professional decisions or colleagues.
Standard 8. The educator shall have the academic freedom to teach as a professional privilege, and no
educator shall interfere with such privilege except as required by state and/or federal laws.
                           Principle IV: Ethical Conduct Toward Students.
The Texas educator, in accepting a position of public trust, should measure success by progress of each
student toward realization of his or her potential as an effective citizen.
Standard 1. The educator shall deal considerately and justly with each student and shall seek to resolve
problems including discipline according to law and school board policy.
Standard 2. The educator shall not intentionally expose the student to disparagement.
Standard 3. The educator shall not reveal confidential information concerning students unless disclosure
serves lawful professional purposes or is required by law.
Standard 4. The educator shall make reasonable effort to protect the student from conditions detrimental
to learning, physical health, mental health, or safety.
Standard 5. The educator shall not deliberately distort facts.
Standard 6. The educator shall not unfairly exclude a student from participation in a program, deny
benefits to a student, or grant an advantage to a student on the basis of race, color, sex, disability,
national origin, religion, or family status.
Standard 7. The educator shall not unreasonably restrain the student from independent action in the
pursuit of learning or deny the student access to varying points of view.
                  Principle V: Ethical Conduct Toward Parents And Community.
The Texas educator, in fulfilling citizenship responsibilities in the community, should cooperate with
parents and others to improve the public schools of the community.
Standard 1. The educator shall make reasonable effort to communicate to parents information that
lawfully should be revealed in the interest of the student.
Standard 2. The educator shall endeavor to understand community cultures and relate the home
environment of students to the school.
Standard 3. The educator shall manifest a positive role in school-public relations.
Source Note: The provisions of this §247.2 adopted to be effective March 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 1022.




2/16/2012                                              45
            RESOURCE SECTION




2/16/2012          46
                 UHCL School Of Education Internship Absent From Duty Form

Intern:________________________________________________________________________

Campus:_____________________________________________________________________

     Absence          Date(s)    Number        Approved        Not Approved       Comments
     Code                        of Days


      1.


      2.


      3.


      4.


      5.


      6.



   District supervisor to initial in either “Approved” or “Not Approved” column for each absence.
   Form to be signed by district supervisor and intern at the end of the year.

Absent from duty codes:
   (1) Personal illness                      (4) Illness/death in family (explain)
    (2) Personal business                    (5) Jury duty
    (3) School business                      (6) Other (explain)

District supervisor _____________________________________________________________

Intern ______________________________________________Date:____________________




2/16/2012                                             47
                         Internship II Classroom Coverage Information

Intern II__________________________________ Campus ____________________________


Covered Class For______________________________________________________________


Date____________________________       Length_______________________________________


Reason_______________________________________________________________________


Subject/Grade Level____________________________________________________________


Mentor Approval:                         Yes               No

Mentor Team Member Approval:              Yes              No

District supervisor Approval:            Yes               No



                   INTERNSHIP II CLASSROOM COVERAGE INFORMATION

Intern II__________________________________ Campus ____________________________


Covered Class For______________________________________________________________


Date____________________________       Length_______________________________________


Reason_______________________________________________________________________


Subject/Grade Level____________________________________________________________


Mentor Approval:                         Yes               No

Mentor Team Member Approval:              Yes              No

District supervisor Approval:            Yes               No




2/16/2012                                       48
                                         Employment Information
                                           (Congratulations!)

Please complete this form when you are employed and sent it directly to:

Center for Professional Development of Teachers
Campus Box 30
2700 Bay Area Blvd.
Houston, TX 77058

This information is strictly confidential and will be used for statistical compilation only.
Intern’s Name_____________________________________________Phone_______________


Address______________________________________________________________________


Date Certified__________________________________________________________________


Certification Areas:
Elementary EC-4 ___________________Specialization________________________________


Secondary 4-8 ______________________Subject Area ________________________________


Secondary 8-12 ______________________Subject Area_______________________________


PK-12 Special Education______________________ __________________________________


Please check appropriate degree and date received:
BS______/_________                              MS______/________                       MA_______/_______


____________________________ ____________________________                               _________________
Job Title/Position/Grade Level                  Starting date                           Salary (optional)


____________________________ ________________________________
Name of school district                  City            State                Zip




2/16/2012                                               49

								
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