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					                                                     Psychology Department
                                                    Program Review Self Study
                                                         Year 2008-2009
                                                                Table of Contents

I. Introduction to Department/Program(s) ................................................................................................ 3
    A. Department/unit mission statement ................................................................................................. 3
    B. Brief description of department and program contexts including date of last review ..................... 3
       Baccalaureate (B.A.) Degree in Psychology .................................................................................... 4
       M.S. in Experimental Psychology .................................................................................................... 5
       M.S. in Mental Health Counseling ................................................................................................... 5
       M.Ed. in School Counseling ............................................................................................................. 6
       M.Ed. in School Psychology ............................................................................................................ 7
       Certification Programs in School Psychology and School Counseling ............................................ 7
       General Education Program .............................................................................................................. 7
       Teacher Preparation Program ........................................................................................................... 8
       Continuing Education ....................................................................................................................... 9
       Summer Session................................................................................................................................ 9
       Service to Other Programs ................................................................................................................ 9
    C. Describe departmental governance system and provide organizational chart for department ...... 10
    D. Department/program(s) goals ........................................................................................................ 12
       Psychology Department Goals (All Programs) .............................................................................. 12
       M.S. in Mental Health Counseling Program Goals ........................................................................ 18
       M.S. in Experimental Psychology Program Goals ......................................................................... 20
       M.Ed. in School Counseling Program Goals .................................................................................. 23
       M.Ed. in School Psychology Program Goals ................................................................................. 26
    E. Results for each department/program goal ..................................................................................... 29
    F. Specific changes based on results of department/program goals ................................................... 29
II. Description of Degree Programs and Curricula ................................................................................. 29
    A. Degree programs (undergraduate and graduate) offered in department ........................................ 29
    B. Courses, location, faculty and student number .............................................................................. 31
    C. Measures of efficiency for department for the last five years ........................................................ 31
    D. Currency of curricula in discipline ................................................................................................ 31
       B.A. in Psychology ......................................................................................................................... 31
       M.S. in Mental Health Counseling ................................................................................................. 33
       M.S. in Experimental Psychology .................................................................................................. 34
       M.Ed. in School Psychology/Washington State Educational Staff Associate Residency Certificate
       in School Psychology ..................................................................................................................... 35
       M.Ed. in School Counseling/Washington State Educational Staff Associate Residency Certificate
       in School Counseling ...................................................................................................................... 36
    E. Effectiveness of instruction ............................................................................................................ 39
    F. Distance Education ......................................................................................................................... 42
    G. Assessment of programs and student learning ............................................................................... 42
III. Faculty .............................................................................................................................................. 44
    A. Faculty profile ................................................................................................................................ 44
    B. Faculty vitae ................................................................................................................................... 45
    C. Faculty awards ............................................................................................................................... 45
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  D. Performance standards ................................................................................................................... 45
IV. Students ............................................................................................................................................ 45
  A. Student accomplishments .............................................................................................................. 45
     SOURCE and Other Research Presentations with faculty mentors................................................ 45
     Student-Faculty Regional, National, and International Presentations ............................................ 47
     Student-Faculty Publications .......................................................................................................... 54
     Employment and Doctoral Placement of Graduate Students ......................................................... 55
  B. Masters thesis/project ..................................................................................................................... 57
  C. Student advising ............................................................................................................................. 57
  D. Other student services offered through the department ................................................................. 57
V. Facilities and Equipment ................................................................................................................... 58
  A. Description of facilities available to department ........................................................................... 58
  B. Description of equipment available to department ........................................................................ 59
VI. Library and Technological Resources .............................................................................................. 59
  A. Library resources ........................................................................................................................... 59
  B. Information technologies ............................................................................................................... 60
  C. Technology available to department .............................................................................................. 61
VII. Analysis of Review Period .............................................................................................................. 62
  A. What has gone well in the department and each degree programs? .............................................. 62
  B. What challenges exist for the department and for each degree program? ..................................... 66
  C. What past recommendations from the previous program review have been implemented? ......... 71
  D. Comparison between the last program review and where the department is now ......................... 73
VIII. Future Directions ........................................................................................................................... 74
  A. Department’s aspirations for the next three to five years .............................................................. 74
  B. Department plans to increase quality, quantity, productivity, and efficiency................................ 75
  C. Resources needed by the department to pursue these future directions ......................................... 77
IX. Suggestions for program review process .......................................................................................... 78
Appendix A: Department/Program Goals Assessment Plans ................................................................. 79
Appendix B: Department of Psychology Program Goal Assessment Checklist .................................... 84
Appendix C: Student Learning Assessment Plans for Psychology ........................................................ 91
  Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan: B. A. in Psychology ................................................. 92
  Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan: M.Ed and State Educational Staff Associate
  Certificate Program in School Psychology ......................................................................................... 99
  Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan: M.Ed and State Educational Staff Associate
  Certificate Program in School Counseling ....................................................................................... 105
  Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan: M.S. in Mental Health Counseling ........................ 108
  Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan: M.S. in Experimental Psychology ......................... 110
Appendix D: Assessment Reports for Psychology, 2007-08................................................................ 117
  Assessment of Student Learning: B.A. Psychology ......................................................................... 118
  Assessment of Student Learning: M.Ed School Psychology............................................................ 124
  Assessment of Student Learning: M.Ed School Counseling ............................................................ 129
  Assessment of Student Learning: M.S. Mental Health Counseling ................................................. 133
  Assessment of Student Learning: M.S. Experimental Psychology .................................................. 136
Appendix E: Changes Since Last Program Review (taken from the Psychology Department NWCCU
Self-Study) Department/Program(s) ..................................................................................................... 139
Appendix F: Psychology Department Committee Assignments and Charges 2007-08 ....................... 144
Appendix G: Performance Standards for the Department, College, and University ............................ 153
Appendix H: Faculty Vitae ................................................................................................................... 165

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                                    Psychology Department
                                   Program Review Self Study
                                        Year 2008-2009


I.        Introduction to Department/Program(s)

          A.    Department/unit mission statement

                Central Washington University’s Department of Psychology provides learning
                opportunities and experiences through which undergraduate and graduate students
                develop an understanding of the perspectives, content, methodology, and technology of
                the science of human and nonhuman behavior and mental processes.

                Undergraduate and graduate programs prepare students for life-long learning and
                advanced study in psychology, as well as providing professional preparation for careers
                in research, business, industry, education, and social service. The department is a major
                participant in the general education and undergraduate teacher education sequences of
                the university and provides selected courses for other majors and programs as
                appropriate to the discipline.

                Specialized master’s degrees are available in experimental psychology, school
                psychology, school counseling, and mental health counseling. The graduate professional
                preparation programs have a particular emphasis on helping students develop the
                competencies and identity of the mental health counselor, school counselor, or school
                psychologist.

          B.    Brief description of department and program contexts including date of last review

                The last program review for the Department of Psychology was January, 2004.

                The Psychology Department is responsible for an undergraduate bachelor’s degree
                program and several graduate degree programs, as follows:

                B.A. in Psychology, (45 or 60 credit major)
                M.S. in Mental Health Counseling
                M.S. in Experimental Psychology
                M.Ed. in School Psychology
                M.Ed. in School Counseling
                Certificate in School Psychology
                Certificate in School Counseling

                Each of these degree programs is briefly described below.

                In addition, the department participates in three interdisciplinary undergraduate major
                programs (Primate Behavior and Ecology, Women Studies, and Gerontology) and one
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          interdisciplinary graduate program (Primate Behavior). A psychology faculty member is
          the current program director of the gerontology program.

          The psychology department significantly contributes to the university’s general
          education program, teacher preparation program, continuing education program, and
          summer session. Our courses are included in the major and minor programs of other
          disciplines. These roles are described after a discussion of the degree programs.

          Baccalaureate (B.A.) Degree in Psychology

          The undergraduate major in psychology at Central Washington University is designed
          to prepare qualified students for advanced study in the discipline and to provide a strong
          foundation in the core areas of the discipline that would support the development of
          competence in a variety of behavioral science-related professions. Our program affords
          opportunities for students to tailor elements of the major and supplementary experiences
          to their career and educational goals. About half of CWU’s graduates are community
          college transfer students, so the major is designed to be finished in two years of upper
          division study, including some allowance for scheduling conflicts and elective choices.

          Requirements for the baccalaureate degree in psychology are predicated on
          recommendations of an American Psychological Association task force, implicit
          expectations of national end-of-major tests, and a survey of graduate school admissions
          expectations. They are similar to major requirements at other universities. All
          psychology majors are expected to take a common set of core courses, determined by
          the following assumptions:

                Students should be acquainted with the basic findings and terminology of
                 contemporary psychology as a whole.
                Students should develop critical thinking and reasoning skills. These skills are
                 developed in no small part by working with quantitative information in courses
                 in statistics and research methods.
                Students should be able to write in the language of the discipline, using elements
                 of style described in the current edition of the Publication Manual of the
                 American Psychological Association.
                Students should understand and have practice in implementing psychological
                 research strategies.
                Students should know the history of the discipline and its place in the broader
                 intellectual traditions of the sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences.

          Beyond the core requirements, students must take at least one course from two of the
          four clusters that span the major subfields of the discipline. Each cluster is comprised of
          a conceptually distinct group of courses. One cluster includes clinically related courses,
          one contains experimental psychology courses, a third cluster consists of courses
          relating to human development, and the fourth cluster is related to applications of
          psychology. The goal is to afford students an opportunity to sample the breadth of
          specializations and approaches to the discipline while allowing some opportunity to
          choose courses that are consistent with their interests.

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          The remainder of the student's major consists of relatively unconstrained electives.
          Students have a 45- or a 60-credit major option. These two major tracks differ only in
          the number of free elective credits. Students who choose the 45-credit major must
          complement the psychology major with a second major or a minor in a related field.
          Students are required to complete at least 180 credits to earn a bachelor’s degree, so the
          psychology major options constitute a quarter or a third of the student’s undergraduate
          coursework. General education requirements make up about a third of the 180-credit
          requirement. This leaves about a third of the psychology student’s coursework to be
          taken in free electives that complement the student’s personal and career interests.

          The bachelor's degree in psychology can provide an avenue into employment in one of
          many areas for which behavioral science skills and knowledge are important, e.g.,
          personnel positions, public relations, administration and management, health services,
          and teaching. Students are encouraged to supplement the major with courses that are
          specifically related to their vocational interests.

          M.S. in Experimental Psychology

          The Experimental Psychology specialization reflects our commitment to provide
          students with a generalized background in experimental psychology while allowing
          them to concentrate in areas of study adequately represented among the faculty. Our
          mission is to prepare students for doctoral or professional study in psychology and
          related fields, prepare students for community college and college teaching in
          psychology, prepare students for research and evaluation positions with public and
          private employers, and support our other masters programs in professional psychology
          with foundational instruction in conducting and interpreting psychological research.

          Students enroll in a common set of core courses that provide a base of information and
          competencies in human and animal learning and performance, biological foundations of
          behavior, research design, and quantitative methods. In addition, following consultation
          with faculty advisors, students develop individual research plans and select specialized
          curricular options that are consistent with their professional objectives. The general
          experimental psychology track requires 48 credits and the Applied Behavior Analysis
          specialization requires 70 to 72 credits.

          M.S. in Mental Health Counseling


          The Mental Health Counseling Program prepares professional Mental Health
          Counselors for the provision of culturally competent services in a variety of community
          and agency settings. The program offers to students training based on a scientist-
          practitioner model that reflects the cultural diversity of the society in which we live and
          work. Graduates are prepared for careers in the field of mental health to provide a full
          range of Mental Health Counseling services that involve psychotherapy, human
          development, learning theory, and group dynamics to help individuals, couples,
          families, adolescents, and children. This program prepares graduates to practice in a
          variety of settings, including independent practice, community agencies and outreach


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          programs, managed behavioral health care organizations, hospitals, and employee
          assistance programs.

          Graduates will be competent and proactive professional counselors. They will be
          knowledgeable, ethical, and skilled in their selected fields; flexible and comprehensive
          in their approach; adaptable to the needs of the people they serve; and effective in
          meeting those needs. Graduates appreciate that advances in knowledge, skills and
          technology within the profession require life-long continuing education for counselors
          as well as monitoring and review of professional standards.

          The program seeks to provide educational excellence by challenging and supporting
          individual and professional development; researching and teaching from a sound
          knowledge base; affirming diversity of ideas, values and persons; upholding the highest
          of ethical principles in professional conduct; and maintaining partnerships with
          institutions and communities within the region. The program is designed to meet the
          curriculum requirements for licensure as a Mental Health Counselor in Washington and
          accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational
          Programs (CACREP).

          M.Ed. in School Counseling

          The mission of the School Counseling Program is to prepare professional counselors to
          work in elementary, middle, and high schools in a diverse, complex society. Graduates
          will receive a counseling foundation that emphasizes the theory and practice of
          comprehensive school guidance, professional identity, multicultural competencies,
          skills for counseling children and adolescents, and the role of school counselors as
          advocates. Experience with technology, clarity regarding appropriate roles for school
          counselors, and awareness of school culture are ingrained into many classes. Graduates
          will understand the importance of (1) professional standards, (2) collaborating with
          parents and other school officials, (3) lifelong learning for themselves, and (4)
          professional literature and professional organizations.


          The program was developed through the efforts of department faculty and members of a
          state-mandated Professional Education Advisory Board (PEAB), which is responsible to
          the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. The program features intense
          practicum experience and a one-quarter full-time internship in a school setting.
          Coursework and competencies that must be completed for school counselor certification
          cover the basic knowledge and skills necessary to function effectively in the K-12
          school setting. All Washington State standards and guidelines applicable to the training
          and certification of school counselors are addressed in the program. In addition,
          standards and guidelines provided by the National Council for the Accreditation of
          Teacher Education (NCATE) are integrated into the program, as are the standards of the
          Council of Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP),
          where feasible.




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          M.Ed. in School Psychology

          The School Psychology Training Program at Central Washington University is
          committed to training professionals who have expertise in both psychology and
          education and are committed to enhancing the strengths of critical socialization
          institutions such as families and schools. This training is accomplished through a
          competency based scientist-practitioner model, which emphasizes comprehensive
          school psychological services and recognizes the individual differences of children.

          The School Psychology Training Program prepares graduate students to receive the
          residency Education Staff Associate (ESA) certification as school psychologists and to
          assume positions in public school systems and related agencies. The training program is
          an intensive course of study that, in addition to traditional coursework, includes two
          counseling practica, two school psychology practica, and a 1200-hour (full year)
          internship in public schools, all of which integrate learning from several courses. The
          breadth and depth of coursework involved is considerable. Students take courses
          designed to build competence in assessment and evaluation; consultation; counseling;
          working with handicapped, minority, and disadvantaged children; and understanding
          the historical and philosophical foundations of psychology and education. The program
          is reviewed by a state-mandated Professional Education Advisory Board (PEAB), a
          group of department faculty and professional educators, which is responsible to the
          Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. The goal of the program is the
          preparation of highly trained professionals who will be effective change agents in
          serving the mental health and educational needs of children and adolescents. The
          program is fully approved by the National Association of School Psychologists, and all
          graduates are eligible for national certification.

          Certification Programs in School Psychology and School Counseling

          The department offers state-approved programs leading to Washington State
          certification in school psychology and school counseling. It is possible for persons
          having advanced degrees in allied disciplines to obtain certification without becoming a
          candidate for the M.Ed. degree, but our students typically combine certification with a
          master’s degree. Many candidates for the M.S. in Mental Health Counseling degree also
          elect to complete the school counseling certification program.

          General Education Program

          Two psychology courses are included in CWU’s general education program. Both
          enroll hundreds of students per year. PSY 101, General Psychology, is also required of
          psychology majors and minors, so its role in general education is difficult to determine
          with precision, but in 2007-2008 for example, 923 students enrolled in PSY 101. The
          majority of those students were probably undecided majors or majors in fields other
          than psychology.

          PSY 205, Psychology of Adjustment, is an introduction to psychology as it is broadly
          applied to mental health. In addition to its scientific content, the course provides
          objective information about successful adjustment to independent adult living. The fall

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          quarter sections of PSY 205 are designed with special attention to adjustment problems
          of beginning university students. The writing exercises in PSY 205 have qualified it as
          one of the few general education “Writing Intensive” courses in the social and
          behavioral sciences. In 2007-2008, 371 students enrolled in PSY 205, with most being
          non-majors or undecided majors.

          Some of our PSY 101 and 205 service is to general education and some is to our major
          and minor. It is difficult to know how many PSY 101 and 205 students eventually
          become psychology majors. A few of our majors have declared their major when they
          take PSY 101, but others do so afterward and still others are community college transfer
          students who have taken General Psychology at a community college. In any event,
          about 87% of our lower division FTES and about 29% of all psychology undergraduate
          FTES is accounted for by enrollment in PSY 101 and 205. A detailed table of data for
          the last five years can be found in Table 3, Section IV.B, below.

          Teacher Preparation Program

          Central Washington University began as a state normal school. Like many of CWU’s
          current departments, the department of psychology evolved from beginnings in teacher
          education. Psychology was the last discipline to become a department independent from
          teacher education, splitting off in 1966. This heritage and our dedication to the study of
          human development and the science of instruction are responsible for a substantial
          presence in the undergraduate teacher education program. At the graduate level, we
          continue to offer two Master of Education programs for school professionals, one in
          school counseling and one in school psychology. Our course offerings, professional
          duties, and faculty hiring priorities reflect a significant commitment to teacher
          education, and we coordinate our offerings, especially at the centers, with teacher
          education programs. Seven faculty members in psychology are members of the Center
          for Teaching and Learning, CWU’s interdepartmental unit for the preparation of
          professional school personnel.

          At the undergraduate level, PSY 314, Human Development and the Learner, and PSY
          315, Educational Psychology, are taken by every teacher candidate in Ellensburg, at
          university centers, and in special cohorts. In addition, the courses are offered through
          the Office of Continuing Education to teacher candidates in our Career Switcher
          program at the Lynnwood center and our Project Teach program at Green River
          Community College. These two courses also serve as prerequisites to several courses in
          Curriculum and Supervision, Early Childhood Education, and Special Education.

          In 2007-08, 405 students enrolled in PSY 314 and 429 enrolled in PSY 315. These
          totals include 91 in PSY 314 and 144 in PSY 315 who were students at our Wenatchee,
          Lynnwood, Green River Community College, and Des Moines programs. The
          proportion of all psychology upper division FTES enrolled in these classes has ranged
          from a low of 18% in 2007-2008 to a high of 31% in 2005-2006, with a five year
          average of 25%. Similarly, the proportion of all undergraduate psychology FTES
          enrolled in these classes over the past five years has ranged from a low of 15% in 2006-
          07 to a high of 21% in 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 (five year average = 19. A detailed
          table of data for the last five years can be found in Table 3, Section IV.B, below.

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          At the graduate level, our M.Ed. program in school psychology, and M.Ed. program in
          school counseling train school professionals. Psychology courses are included as
          electives in the M.Ed. Master Teacher program and the M.Ed. Administration graduate
          programs.

          Continuing Education

          Occasionally, psychology courses are delivered to special groups on a self-support
          funding basis. These course presentations are administered by the Office of Continuing
          Education. Currently, we offer continuing education psychology courses to school
          psychologists seeking certification and to advanced high school students through the
          CWU Cornerstone Program. In 2007-2008, two such continuing education courses were
          offered.

          The department occasionally extends continuing education academic credit to
          professionals attending conferences with psychological content, such as the Washington
          State Association of School Psychologists conference or the Northwestern Association
          of Behavior Analysis conference.

          We strive to maintain high standards of quality in our continuing education offerings.
          Faculty that teach continuing education courses are reviewed and approved by the
          department. Instructors submit teaching evaluations to the department chair, who
          reviews them quarterly. They base their courses on the syllabi of courses taught by full
          time faculty members.

          Summer Session

          The psychology department sponsors an active summer session program. We have
          traditionally offered several courses for teacher preparation students. In recent years, we
          have also offered major and minor core courses and a few major elective courses. In
          2007-08, for example, we offered 227 credits of courses, in 58 separate course sections
          (this includes individual instruction sections), including courses in Lynnwood, Des
          Moines, Pierce, Yakima, and online.

          Summer session is funded entirely by tuition revenues. A portion of any excess
          revenues is returned to the department. Our department funds considerable professional
          development, travel, equipment, and goods and services from these revenues.

          Service to Other Programs

          The university’s Law and Justice (LAJ) Department evolved from an interdisciplinary
          program in which psychology was a participating department. Our research methods is
          still an accepted substitute for the LAJ methods course. At Ellensburg, Yakima, Pierce,
          Lynnwood, and Des Moines, we provide courses leading to a psychology minor, which
          LAJ students often combine with their major.



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               Psychology courses and faculty dedication play important roles in CWU’s teacher
               education program. This service function is described above under “Teacher
               Preparation.”

               Psychology faculty and courses figure prominently in three interdisciplinary programs:
               Gerontology, Primate Behavior and Ecology, and Women Studies. The current director
               of the Gerontology program is Dr. Jeff Penick of the Psychology Department. Primate
               Behavior and Ecology majors are required to have a second major in one of three
               disciplines, including psychology. Dr. Megan Matheson is our PBE double major
               coordinator.

               Psychology courses serve as prerequisites, required or elective courses in the following
               majors and minors:
                   Food Science and Nutrition w/ Specialization (PSY 362, required)
                   Pre-Nursing in Public Health Specialization (PSY 101, prerequisite; PSY 313,
                      required)
                   Professional Education Sequence (PSY 101, prerequisite; PSY 314 and PSY
                      315, required)
                   Social Services Major and Minor (PSY 454, required)
                   Sociology Major (PSY 363, elective)
                   Family and Consumer Sciences Major & Career and Technical Education
                      Teaching Major (FCSF/PSY235, required; PSY 447, required)
                   Family Studies Specialization (PSY 101, PSY 447, and PSY 452, all required)
                   General Education Program (PSY 101 and PSY 205, options in Foundations of
                      Human Adaptations and Behavior)
                   Gerontology Major (PSY 300, PSY 452, and PSY 454, required) (PSY 455,
                      elective)
                   Gerontology Minor (PSY 452, required) (PSY 454 and PSY 455, elective)
                   Pre-Optometry (PSY 101, required)
                   Primate Behavior and Ecology Major (PSY 101, PSY 300, PSY 301, PSY 362,
                      PSY 442, PSY 495C, all required)
                   Public Policy Major (PSY 362, required)
                   Safety and Health Management Major (PSY 456, required)
                   Safety and Health Management Minor (PSY 101, recommended)
                   Social Science Major (PSY 101, required; Psychology electives by advisement)
                   Women Studies Major (PSY 101 and PSY 483, required)
                   Exercise Science Major w/ Clinical Physiology Specialization (PSY 449 and
                      PSY 478, electives)


          C.   Describe departmental governance system and provide organizational chart for
               department.

               The chair of the Department of Psychology is the supervisor of its faculty and staff. The
               dean appoints him or her for a four-year term, following an election by the full time
               faculty of the department. The part-time assistant chair is selected by the chair, with
               approval by the dean. The department is supported by 4.75 FTE staff personnel, as
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               indicated in the organizational chart. The psychology department has a history of stable
               leadership. The current chair, Dr. Stephanie Stein, began her service in 2005. The
               previous three chairs served for 3, 13 and 12 years, respectively.

                                                                     O rg a niza tio n al C ha rt
                                                                                 o
                                                                  C WU P s ych o l g y D epa rtm ent

                                                                           S tep h an ie Stein
                                                                                                r
                                                                        P ro f ess o r an d Ch ai


                 E stelle Mathew s, S ecr etary L ead                                                         T er r y L. DeV ietti - Em eritu s P r o fes s or

                                                                                                                                                  u
                                                                                             Rog er S . Fo u ts - P ro f ess o r ( G r ad u ate S t d ies an d Resear ch , 10 0 %)
                                                7
              D on n a M iglin o, S ecr etary ( . 5 FT E )
                                                                                                                   E ug ene R.J o h ns o n - P ro f es s o r
          Chr is Bu chan an, E ng in eer ing T ech nician I I I
                                                                                                  z
                                                                                               E li ab eth M. S treet - P r o fes s or ( Ch ief P lann ing O ff icer, 1 00 % )
                                                      c
             J oh n Str eet, E ng in eer in g T ech n i ian I I                                                     S us an D . Lo n bo r g - P ro f ess o r
               L or etta N ey, S ecr etar y Lead ,CP SC                                                           S tep h en B.S chep man - P r of es s or

                                                                                                              A nth on y J. S tah els ki - Pr o fes s or ( 5 0% )

                                                                                                                                         t
                                                                                                                  P hilip To lin - Em er iu s Pr o fes s or

                                                                                                            W. O wen Du gm o re, A ss o ciate Pr o f es s or

                                                                                                                                         a
                                                                                                          M ar te Falls ho r e - A ss o ci te Pr o f es s o r ( 5 0% )
                                                                                                                                   z
                                                                                                           T er r ence J .S chw ar t - As s ociate P r o fes s or

                                                                                                                           i
                                                                                                            Wen d y A .W illam s - A ss o ciate Pr o f es s or

                                                                                                            M eg an D . Mathes o n - As s o ciate Pr o fes s or

                                                                                                                                c               e
                                                                                                             J eff r ey M .P en i k - A s s ociat P r of es so r

                                                                                                            Rob er tD . Br amm er - A ss o ciate Pr o f es s or

                                                                                                               J enn if er T .Cates , A ss is tan t Pr o f es s o r

                                                                                                                                  e
                                                                                                               S co tt E. S chaef l , A ss is tan t Pr o f es s o r
                                                                                                                K ar a I .G abr iel,A s sis tant P r of es so r

                                                                                                        e                     s
                                                                                                D an iell C.P o lag e - A s s i tant P r of es so r (CW U- Des Mo in es )

                                                                                                             Ralf R.G r een wald - A s sis tant P r of es so r

                                                                                                               Ryan M. Z ay ac - A ss is tant P ro f ess o r

                                                                                                   i                                                                      e
                                                                                       M ar k So elln g - S enio r Lectur er ( F u l T ime, No n -ten ur e track ,CW U- P i r ce

                                                                                              M ar y Rad ek e- Lectur er (F u l T ime, No n -ten ur e tr ack , Ellens b ur g )

                                                                                                      t                                       e
                                                                                           H olley M ath ews - Lectur er (F u llT ime, No n - t n u re tr ack , Ellens b u rg )

                                                                                                                                                e
                                                                                           M ar y Sch ro ed er - Lectur er (F u llT ime, No n - t n u re tr ack , Ellens b u rg )
                                                                                                                                                          l
                                                                                                       P ar t- time ins tr ucto r s in Ellens b u rg and al Center s



               Personnel recommendations to the dean are made independently by the department
               chair and a three-person Personnel Committee of tenured professors elected by the
               tenure-track and tenured faculty. These recommendations are guided by departmental,
               college, university and collective bargaining agreement policies for retention, tenure,
               and promotion. Other standing committees of the department are the (a) Undergraduate
               Curriculum Committee, (b) MS Mental Health Counseling and School Counseling
               Program Committee, (c) School Psychology Program Committee, (d) Experimental
               Psychology Program Committee, (e) Assessment Committee, (f) Graduate Admissions

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               Committee, (g) Undergraduate Advisement Committee, and (h) the Education Sequence
               Committee. For our current committee memberships and charges, see Appendix F.

               Five academic program directors receive varying amounts of reassigned time for their
               duties. They are the directors of the M.S. programs in Experimental Psychology and
               Mental Health Counseling, and the M. Ed. programs in School Psychology and School
               Counseling, and the interdisciplinary bachelor’s degree program in Gerontology. The
               program director for the Mental Health Counseling program also serves as the director
               for the School Counseling program.

          D.   Department/program(s) goals
               Psychology Department Goals (All Programs)
               1. Goal #1: Assess and improve our undergraduate and graduate curricula.
                  a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                      This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                      strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), and Goal III
                      (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                      and achieve academic excellence).
                      It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                      outstanding academic and student life at all sites) and Goal V (Achieve regional
                      and national prominence for the university).
                  b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                      The psychology department records curriculum improvements resulting from (1)
                      reviews of standards of professional associations, (2) surveys of journal articles
                      on curriculum in psychology, and (3) student performance on the Major Field
                      Test. We also review syllabi, assignments, and student learning objectives at
                      department’s annual assessment day in spring quarter. In addition, we survey
                      student estimates of course effectiveness in the End-of-Major Survey. Finally,
                      there are program-specific assessments in each of the graduate programs (to be
                      described separately).
                  c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                      All of our graduate programs maintain appropriate state and professional
                      association approval status, if applicable. In addition, all courses and degree
                      programs are reviewed by the appropriate department committee(s) at least
                      biennially. The department records and implements all recommended
                      curriculum changes. The averages on MFT content areas should be consistent
                      with national averages. Furthermore, all End-of-Major Survey average ratings
                      of course effectiveness should be above 4 on 7-point scale. Finally, one class
                      per faculty member is reviewed at department assessment day each year.
                  d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                      Major activities include providing high quality, up-to-date instruction in both
                      undergraduate and graduate courses and regular meetings by department
                      committees as well as all-department meetings. Ongoing professional
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                 development provides opportunities for faculty to update their content
                 knowledge and methods for delivery of instruction.

          2. Goal #2: Promote effective teaching.

             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), and Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites) and Goal V (Achieve regional
                 and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 The Student Evaluation of Instruction (SEOI) surveys are administered for every
                 class and reported in reappointment, merit, and post-tenure reviews. The
                 department chair or other designated faculty member conduct an annual peer
                 classroom visit/observation for all probationary faculty. Finally, there are
                 program-specific assessments in each of the graduate programs (to be described
                 separately).
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 All teaching evaluations will be consistent with college and university norms for
                 educational background and experience. Department chair and personnel
                 committee will review teaching commendations and recommendations with all
                 faculty members under review. Constructive guidance or training will be given,
                 where appropriate.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include (1) ongoing professional development for faculty, and
                 (2) personnel committee and department chair review of teaching effectiveness
                 during reappointment, tenure, promotion, and post-tenure evaluations. Merit
                 awards are sometimes available to faculty who excel in teaching. In addition,
                 several university level teaching awards are available to recognize and reward
                 excellence in teaching.

          3. Goal #3: Promote excellence in learning to prepare students for careers and
             advanced study.

             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence), and Goal V (Build partnerships that with
                 private, professional, academic, government, and community-based
                 organizations).
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                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites) and Goal V (Achieve regional
                 and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 The Psychology Department uses several types of data to measure this goal.
                 First of all, the ETS Major Field Test is taken by all graduating seniors. PSY
                 489, Senior Assessment is also taken by graduating seniors. This class includes
                 both portfolio assessment and presentations. We also measure this goal by
                 keeping track of whether our graduates are successful in getting into graduate
                 programs or careers. Surveys are administered to graduating senior and alumni.
                 Department Assessment Committee reviews all goals, gathers the data, and
                 reports to findings to the department. Graduate program committees and
                 undergraduate advisement committee also assess advisory materials, assignment
                 of students to advisors, and advisement at major mileposts.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 The Psychology Department expects that CWU averages on MFT content areas
                 will be consistent with national averages. We also look for satisfactory faculty
                 evaluation of all student portfolios and presentations in PSY 489. Alumni
                 surveys are reviewed regularly for feedback, though no specific criterion of
                 mastery has been identified for this measure. All program goals are reviewed
                 and summary data created at least as often as cyclical program review. Advisory
                 materials are reviewed annually to assure all students are assigned to an advisor
                 and advised at entry to major and registration hold points.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include (1) advisement by faculty, (2) graduate school and
                 career presentations sponsored by Psychology club, and (3) opportunities for
                 field experience in psychology and undergraduate honors thesis (by invitation
                 only).

          4. Goal #4: Support involvement of undergraduate and graduate students in
             psychological research.

             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), and Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites) and Goal V (Achieve regional
                 and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 The Psychology Department collects a variety of data to measure this goal. We
                 track the number of (1) professional meeting papers and presentations with
                 student authors and co-authors annually, (2) students and faculty who participate
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                 in local symposia, poster sessions, or SOURCE, (3) students enrolled in research
                 internships and field research courses (e.g. China Field Station, Children’s
                 Village research), and (4) student members of faculty research teams. We also
                 inspect PSY 489 portfolios for evidence of developing a research proposal and
                 confirm completion of a research thesis or project for graduate students.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 The Psychology Department expects that at least one third of faculty papers and
                 presentations will have student co-authors. We also strive to have at least two
                 internship, field station, or faculty research teams open to students each year.
                 We expect that every graduating senior will have developed a research proposal
                 and that every graduate student will create a complete research project.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include 1) mandatory research methods classes for all
                 psychology minors, majors, and graduate students, 2) the use of a research
                 participation bulletin board in the psychology building, 3) availability of faculty
                 research teams for students to join, 4) quarterly poster sessions for presenting
                 projects in PSY 300, 5) directed research opportunities (PSY 495 and PSY 595),
                 and completion of graduate thesis or project.

          5. Goal #5: Assure faculty staffing adequate to support timely delivery of all courses
             and programs at all sites.

             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Goal III (Provide for outstanding
                 graduate programs that meet focused regional needs and achieve academic
                 excellence).
                 It is also related to the University Goal III (Strengthen and further diversify our
                 funding base and strengthen infrastructure).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 The Psychology Department monitors class sizes and the size of waitlists (if
                 available) for course sections. We also monitor ratios of part-time and full-time
                 instruction. Finally, we count the times a required course must be taken as an
                 “arranged course.”
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 We expect that at least 90% of all course sections will meet the following size
                 criterion: Lower division less than 65, upper division less than 40, and graduate
                 less than 20. We also strive to have no waitlists that exceed one quarter of the
                 course enrollment limit. At least 60% of the classes in the department should be
                 taught by full time faculty. Finally, no more than one “arranged course” per
                 quarter should be required for student progress.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:


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                 Major activities include 1) setting appropriate class size limits, 2) opening up
                 new sections of high demand classes with lengthy waitlists, 3) assigning courses
                 to ensure proper balance of full-time vs. part-time instructors, and 4) advising
                 students about timing of required courses to minimize the need for individual
                 “arranged courses.”

          6. Goal #6: Pursue diversity goals by attracting women and minority students and
             faculty members and by increasing student and faculty contact with diverse
             populations.

             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), and Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites) and Goal IV (Build inclusive
                 and diverse campus communities that promote intellectual inquiry).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 The Psychology Department measures this goal by keeping track of the number
                 of faculty searches conforming to OEO guidelines for recruiting women and
                 minority faculty members. We also compare the proportion of women and
                 minority faculty and students with availability and university averages. We
                 count papers, presentations and professional activities with diversity themes.
                 Finally, we monitor the psychology curriculum to ensure the presence of cross-
                 cultural and diversity content.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 We expect that all faculty searches will conform to OEO guidelines. We strive
                 for attaining departmental proportions of women and minority faculty at least
                 within one person of availability of institutional averages and women and
                 minority students within 5% of university averages. At least three faculty
                 papers, presentations, and professional activities per year should represent
                 diversity themes. At least half of all field placements and internships yield
                 contact with minority or diverse populations. Finally, cross-cultural and
                 diversity content should be in at least one required course in each degree
                 program.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include 1) ensuring the all faculty searches conform to OEO
                 guidelines for recruiting women and minority faculty members, 2) representing
                 diversity themes in faculty papers, presentations, and professional activities, 3)
                 seeking field placements and internships for students that involve contact with
                 minority or diverse populations, and 4) including cross-cultural and diversity
                 content in at least one required course in each degree program (i.e. PSY 574
                 Multicultural Counseling).

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          7. Goal #7: Seek support for faculty teaching, scholarship, and professional
             development activities.

             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goal IV (Develop a
                 diversified funding base to support teaching, research, and service) and Goal V
                 (Build partnerships that with private, professional, academic, government, and
                 community-based organizations).
                 It is also related to the University Goal III (Strengthen and further diversify our
                 funding base and strengthen infrastructure) and Goal V (Achieve regional and
                 national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 The Psychology Department measures this goal by keeping track of the number
                 of (1) faculty applications for internal research and scholarship funding, (2)
                 faculty applications for external research and scholarship funding, (3) faculty
                 applications for professional development funding (college, graduate studies and
                 research, professional leave, spheres of distinction), (4) and type of activities
                 funded by individual professional development fund, and (5) infrastructure
                 (equipment, materials, facilities) requests fulfilled (internal and external
                 sources). We also monitor department staff positions.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 We expect that at least 25% of tenure and tenure-track department faculty will
                 apply for internal research and scholarship funding per year. In addition, we
                 strive to have at least 10% of tenure and tenure-track faculty apply for external
                 research and scholarship funding in two years. We expect that our highest
                 priority infrastructure project will be completed with each program review
                 cycle. All faculty members are expected to engage in at least one activity per
                 year funded by individual professional development fund. Finally, we expect
                 that all department staff positions will be filled.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include 1) faculty applications for internal grants, 2) faculty
                 applications for external grants, and 3) faculty requests for professional
                 development funding.

          8. Goal #8: Serve as a center for psychological and educational services to the
             community and region.

             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goal III (Provide for
                 outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs and achieve
                 academic excellence), Goal V (Build partnerships with private, professional,
                 academic, government, and community-based organizations), and Goal VI
                 (Strengthen the college’s contributions to the field of education.)
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                 It is also related to the University Goal IV (Build mutually beneficial
                 partnerships with the public sector, industry, professional groups, institutions,
                 and the communities surrounding our campuses) and Goal V (Achieve regional
                 and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 The Psychology Department measures this goal by keeping track of the number
                 of courses with service learning requirement or other opportunities for
                 psychology majors. We also count the number of faculty and student
                 community service activities. There are also program-specific assessments in
                 each of the graduate programs (to be described separately), especially
                 professional practica and internships.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 We expect that every graduating student has had the opportunity to participate in
                 a service opportunity. We strive to have at least 25% of undergraduate majors
                 and at least 90% of graduate students who have participated in a service or
                 internship opportunity. Finally, we would like to have an average of 20
                 community clients served in CCPAC in quarters when PSY 593C is offered.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include 1) offering service learning opportunities for students in
                 local schools and human service agencies, 2) requiring practica and internship
                 for graduate students in School Psychology, Mental Health Counseling, and
                 School Counseling, and 3) providing free community counseling and
                 psychological assessment services through the CCPAC.

          M.S. in Mental Health Counseling Program Goals


          1. Goal #1: Prepare students for careers in the field of mental health to provide a full
             range of Mental Health Counseling services that involve psychotherapy, human
             development, learning theory, and group dynamics to help individuals, couples,
             families, adolescents, and children.
              a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), and Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites) and Goal V (Achieve regional
                 and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 The Mental Health Counseling Program completes the Assessment of Student
                 Progress form in the spring of the student’s first year of the program and the fall
                 or winter of their second year. This measure assesses academic performance,
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                 clinical performance, and professional and personal development of graduate
                 students in the program. The program also tabulates career placement and
                 doctoral program acceptance records of graduates through the Alumni survey.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 By their second review, students must receive a “3” or above in all three
                 categories on the Assessment of Student Progress form to continue in the
                 program. Students failing to reach this benchmark may petition for another
                 evaluation the following quarter. In addition, we expect that all students who
                 pursue appropriate professional placement or doctoral program acceptance
                 should be successful.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include 1) providing high-quality graduate instruction in a range
                 of graduate counseling classes, 2) providing timely and specific feedback to
                 graduate students about their performance in the program, and 3) surveying our
                 graduate alumni regarding career placement and doctoral program acceptance.

          2. Goal #2: Meet or exceed current national standards for professional training [i.e.,
             Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
             (CACREP)]
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence), Goal V (Build partnerships that with private,
                 professional, academic, government, and community-based organizations), and
                 Goal VI (Strengthen the college’s contributions to the field of education).
                 It is also related to the University Goal III (Strengthen and further diversify our
                 funding base and strengthen infrastructure), Goal IV (Build mutually beneficial
                 partnerships with the public sector, industry, professional groups, institutions,
                 and the communities surrounding our campuses) Goal V (Achieve regional and
                 national prominence for the university), and Goal VI (Build inclusive and
                 diverse campus communities that promote intellectual inquiry).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:

                 Evaluations from counseling practica and internship (PSY 593A, B, C, and E,
                 and PSY 681) will be used to assess this goal. In addition, the program will rely
                 on the review by the CACREP accreditation team.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 Students must receive a “3” (Expected performance) or above on their PSY
                 593A evaluation. They must receive a “Satisfactory” or above on 593B or C.
                 The student must not receive any “1”s on the evaluation from PSY 681. Finally,
                 the program should maintain full CACREP accreditation status.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:
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                 Major activities include 1) providing high-quality professional training
                 opportunities for graduate students in field placements (practica and internship),
                 and 2) ensuring that our Mental Health Counseling graduate program continues
                 to meet the criteria for CACREP accreditation.

          M.S. in Experimental Psychology Program Goals



          1. Goal #1: Facilitate student progress to advanced levels of knowledge and practice in
             the methods and ethics of experimental psychology.
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence), and Goal V (Build partnerships that with
                 private, professional, academic, government, and community-based
                 organizations).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal V (Achieve regional and
                 national prominence for the university), and Goal VI (Build inclusive and
                 diverse campus communities that promote intellectual inquiry).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 This goal is assessed by a variety of means. First, student performance on
                 assigned papers or projects in various classes is considered. In addition, the
                 thesis proposal, any HSRC or IACUC proposals (if relevant), and the final thesis
                 document are considered.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 Each graduate student in Experimental Psychology should maintain a GPA at or
                 above 3.0 with no grade lower than a C in the required core content and elective
                 courses on student’s course of study form. Successful completion and approval
                 of the thesis proposal is signified by the signing of the option approval form by
                 the thesis committee. The program expects 100% successful approval of
                 research proposals by IACUC or HSRC committees, when relevant. Successful
                 defense of the thesis is signified by the signing of the oral defense of thesis
                 forms and thesis signature pages by the thesis chair and committee, and finally
                 successful acceptance of the written thesis by the graduate school.

             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include 1) provision of high-quality instruction in graduate
                 classes within the MS Experimental Program, and 2) advising and supervision of
                 graduate theses.

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          2. Goal #2: Provide a foundation in the core content areas of experimental psychology
             that supports the development of competence across a variety of sub-disciplines.
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), and Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites) and Goal V (Achieve regional
                 and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:

                 This goal is assessed through assigned papers, projects, and examinations in
                 various classes.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 Each graduate student in Experimental Psychology should maintain a GPA at or
                 above 3.0 with no grade lower than a C in the required core content and elective
                 courses on student’s course of study form.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include provision of core and elective courses in experimental
                 psychology.

          3. Goal #3: Provide a foundation in areas of research specialization in collaboration
             with at least one faculty member with interest and expertise.
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), and Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites) and Goal V (Achieve regional
                 and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:

                 This goal is assessed through assigned papers, projects, and examinations in
                 various classes. It is also assessed through the thesis proposal and the final
                 thesis document.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 Each graduate student in Experimental Psychology should maintain a GPA at or
                 above 3.0 with no grade lower than a C in the required core content and elective
                 courses on student’s course of study form. Successful completion and approval
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                of the thesis proposal is signified by the signing of the option approval form by
                the thesis committee. Successful defense of the thesis is signified by the signing
                of the oral defense of thesis forms and thesis signature pages by the thesis chair
                and committee, and finally successful acceptance of the written thesis by the
                graduate school.

             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                Major activities include 1) provision of research methods courses and 2) thesis
                supervision.

          4. Goal #4: Encourage the development of professional competence among students.
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                and achieve academic excellence), and Goal V (Build partnerships that with
                private, professional, academic, government, and community-based
                organizations).
                It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                outstanding academic and student life at all sites) and Goal V (Achieve regional
                and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:

                This goal is assessed through assigned class presentations in various courses,
                thesis proposal, research presentation proposal forms submitted to the CWU
                SOURCE conference, research presentation proposal forms submitted to a
                regional, national, or international professional conferences, oral thesis defense,
                and the final written thesis document.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                Each graduate student in Experimental Psychology should maintain a GPA at or
                above 3.0 with no grade lower than a C in the required core content and elective
                courses on student’s course of study form. Successful completion and approval
                of the thesis proposal is signified by the signing of the option approval form by
                the thesis committee. Successful defense of the thesis is signified by the signing
                of the oral defense of thesis forms and thesis signature pages by the thesis chair
                and committee, and successful acceptance of the written thesis by the graduate
                school. The program faculty expect that 100% of graduate students will submit a
                research presentation proposal to the CWU SOURCE Conference. They also
                expect that a minimum of 75% of graduate students will submit a research
                presentation proposal to a regional, national or international conference within 1
                year of graduation.

             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

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                 Major activities include 1) advising, and 2) thesis supervision.

          5. Goal #5: For appropriate students, provide a foundation of knowledge and skills that
             supports competence in applied behavioral science positions.
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence), and Goal V (Build partnerships that with
                 private, professional, academic, government, and community-based
                 organizations).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites) and Goal V (Achieve regional
                 and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:

                 This goal is assessed through student performance in service learning roles,
                 assessment by faculty supervisor and site supervisor during elective internship
                 classes, and the completion of master’s thesis in an applied setting.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 Each graduate student in Experimental Psychology should maintain a GPA at or
                 above 3.0 with no grade lower than a C in the required core content and elective
                 courses on student’s course of study form. Successful completion and approval
                 of the thesis proposal is signified by the signing of the option approval form by
                 the thesis committee. Successful defense of the thesis is signified by the signing
                 of the oral defense of thesis forms and thesis signature pages by the thesis chair
                 and committee, and successful acceptance of the written thesis by the graduate
                 school. In addition, the program faculty expect to receive positive assessment
                 reports from field supervisors.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:
                 Major activities include provision of high quality graduate courses and field
                 experiences in applied behavior analysis.

          M.Ed. in School Counseling Program Goals

          1. Goal #1: Train specialists to provide comprehensive, developmental guidance
             programs in the schools and to consult with parents and teachers concerning the
             social, educational, and developmental tasks of children and youth.
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence), and Goal VI (Strengthen the college’s
                 contributions to the field of education).
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                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites) and Goal V (Achieve regional
                 and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 The School Counseling Program completes the Assessment of Student Progress
                 form in the spring of the student’s first year of the program and the fall or winter
                 of their second year. This measure assesses academic performance, clinical
                 performance, and professional and personal development of graduate students in
                 the program. The results of the Professional Education Advisory Board written
                 and oral examination, portfolio review, and Alumni survey are also considered.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 By their second review, students must receive a “3” or above in all three
                 categories on the Assessment of Student Progress form to continue in the
                 program. Students failing to reach this benchmark may petition for another
                 evaluation the following quarter. In addition, all students will receive
                 satisfactory PEAB evaluations. Finally, we expect that all students who pursue
                 appropriate professional placement or doctoral program acceptance should be
                 successful.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include provision of high quality graduate courses and
                 supervised field experiences in School Counseling.

          2. Goal #2: Meet or exceed current national standards for professional training [e.g.,
             Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
             (CACREP); National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE),
             Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI)].
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence), Goal V (Build partnerships that with private,
                 professional, academic, government, and community-based organizations), and
                 Goal VI (Strengthen the college’s contributions to the field of education).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III (Strengthen and
                 further diversify our funding base and strengthen infrastructure), Goal IV (Build
                 mutually beneficial partnerships with the public sector, industry, professional
                 groups, institutions, and the communities surrounding our campuses) Goal V
                 (Achieve regional and national prominence for the university), and Goal VI
                 (Build inclusive and diverse campus communities that promote intellectual
                 inquiry).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:


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                Evaluations from counseling practica and internship (PSY 593A, B, C, and E,
                and PSY 682) will be used to assess this goal. In addition, the results from the
                Comprehensive exam and the Professional Educators Advisory Board (PEAB)
                oral interview will be considered. Finally, any reviews by the NCATE
                accreditation team and reviews by the State Board of Public Instruction for
                conformity to OSPI standards will be considered.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                Students must receive a “3” (Expected performance) or above on their PSY
                593A evaluation. They must receive a “Satisfactory” or above on 593B or C.
                Furthermore, the student must not receive any “1”s on the 79-item evaluation
                from PSY 682. The PEAB and Comprehensive Exam are scored pass/fail and
                students must receive a passing score on both. The program faculty expect that
                the program will achieve initial CACREP accreditation and maintains it
                thereafter. Finally, NCATE and OSPI approvals are regularly maintained.
             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                Major activities include 1) providing high-quality professional training
                opportunities for graduate students in field placements (practica and internship),
                2) ensuring that our School Counseling graduate program continues to meet the
                criteria for OSPI approval, and 3) making the necessary program changes in
                School Counseling to meet the criteria for CACREP accreditation.

          3. Goal #3: Meet annual Washington State approval standards for school counselor
             certification training programs (One standard per year: Professional Education
             Advisory Board, Accountability, Unit Governance and Resources, Program Design,
             Knowledge and Skills).
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                and achieve academic excellence), Goal V (Build partnerships that with private,
                professional, academic, government, and community-based organizations), and
                Goal VI (Strengthen the college’s contributions to the field of education).
                It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III (Strengthen and
                further diversify our funding base and strengthen infrastructure), Goal IV (Build
                mutually beneficial partnerships with the public sector, industry, professional
                groups, institutions, and the communities surrounding our campuses), Goal V
                (Achieve regional and national prominence for the university), and Goal VI
                (Build inclusive and diverse campus communities that promote intellectual
                inquiry).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                In concert with PEAB, the program faculty will submit evidence for annual
                approval standard.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
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                 The School Counseling Program will maintain full approval of each annual
                 standard.

             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include 1) review of one standard a year by the PEAB, and 2)
                 implementation of recommendations by the PEAB regarding the standard.

          M.Ed. in School Psychology Program Goals


          1. Goal #1: Train psychologists to function optimally in the public schools with a
             commitment to understanding and responsiveness to human diversity. Candidates
             for the master's degree and for certification must not only provide evidence that they
             have developed the competencies necessary to work effectively with school systems
             and families, but they must also demonstrate their ability to function with public
             school personnel, parents, and other public and privately employed professionals
             with whom they come in contact.
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence Goal V (Build partnerships that with private,
                 professional, academic, government, and community-based organizations), and
                 Goal VI (Strengthen the college’s contributions to the field of education).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal IV (Build mutually
                 beneficial partnerships with the public sector, industry, professional groups,
                 institutions, and the communities surrounding our campuses), and Goal V
                 (Achieve regional and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 The School Psychology Program assesses these goals by examining rates of
                 graduate student satisfactory completion of all program components: Courses,
                 Praxis II Exam in School Psychology, Portfolio Evaluation, Practicum and
                 Internship Logs, Research Thesis and oral examination, OSPI PEAB written and
                 oral examination. The program committee also looks at job placement rates for
                 our graduates as well as certification rates.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 Graduate students in the School Psychology program are expected to pass all of
                 their courses with at least a 3.0 GPA. The program committee expects the
                 following level of mastery: (1) 100% placement rate for graduates who seek
                 employment as school psychologists, (2) 100% of graduates who apply will be
                 awarded the Washington State Residency Level ESA Certificate in School
                 Psychology, and (3) 100% of students taking the qualifying examination will be
                 awarded National Certification in School Psychology.

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             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include provision of high quality graduate courses and
                 supervised field experiences in School Psychology.

          2. Goal #2: Maintain program standards that comply with the approval standards of the
             National Association of School Psychology (NASP) and the Washington State
             Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence, Goal V (Build partnerships that with private,
                 professional, academic, government, and community-based organizations), and
                 Goal VI (Strengthen the college’s contributions to the field of education).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal IV (Build mutually
                 beneficial partnerships with the public sector, industry, professional groups,
                 institutions, and the communities surrounding our campuses), and Goal V
                 (Achieve regional and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 This goal is measured through the program review by NASP accrediting office.
                 In Washington State, NASP standards are also those of the state. NASP approval
                 is accepted by OSPI as meeting state standards.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 We expect our M.Ed School Psychology program to maintain full approval by
                 NASP and OSPI.

             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include 1) providing high-quality professional training
                 opportunities for graduate students in field placements (practica and internship),
                 and 2) ensuring that our School Psychology graduate program continues to meet
                 the criteria for OSPI approval and NASP accreditation.

          3. Goal #3: Meet annual Washington State approval standards for school psychologist
             certification training programs (One standard per year: Professional Education
             Advisory Board, Accountability, Unit Governance and Resources, Program Design,
             Knowledge and Skills).
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence, Goal V (Build partnerships that with private,

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                 professional, academic, government, and community-based organizations), and
                 Goal VI (Strengthen the college’s contributions to the field of education).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal IV (Build mutually
                 beneficial partnerships with the public sector, industry, professional groups,
                 institutions, and the communities surrounding our campuses), and Goal V
                 (Achieve regional and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 In concert with PEAB, the program committee will submit evidence for annual
                 approval standard, based on written documentation and explanation of how the
                 program addresses the standard. Feedback from the PEAB on the approval
                 standards is also documented.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 We expect our M.Ed School Psychology program to maintain full approval of
                 each annual standard.

             d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                 Major activities include 1) favorable/positive review of one standard a year by
                 the PEAB, and 2) implementation of recommendations by the PEAB regarding
                 the standard.

          4. Goal #4: Maintain program standards that comply with the accreditation standards
             of the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).
             a. Relationship of goal to relevant college and University strategic goals:
                 This goal is related to the College of the Sciences Goals I & II (Maintain and
                 strengthen an outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal III
                 (Provide for outstanding graduate programs that meet focused regional needs
                 and achieve academic excellence, Goal V (Build partnerships that with private,
                 professional, academic, government, and community-based organizations), and
                 Goal VI (Strengthen the college’s contributions to the field of education).
                 It is also related to the University Goals I & II (Maintain and strengthen an
                 outstanding academic and student life at all sites), Goal IV (Build mutually
                 beneficial partnerships with the public sector, industry, professional groups,
                 institutions, and the communities surrounding our campuses), and Goal V
                 (Achieve regional and national prominence for the university).
             b. Data used to measure (assess) goal attainment:
                 This goal is assessed through the review by NCATE accrediting office and
                 visiting team, comparing the NCATE standards to the documentation provided
                 by the School Psychology program.
             c. Criterion of achievement (standard of mastery) for each goal:
                 We expect our M.Ed School Psychology program to maintain full approval by
                 NCATE.
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                      d. Describe the major activities that enabled goal attainment:

                         Major activities include 1) provision of high quality graduate courses and field
                         experiences in School Psychology, and 2) documentation of student
                         performance in knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

          E.     Results for each department/program goal.
                 1.    Provide results in specific quantitative or qualitative terms for each
                      department/program(s).
                      The department began to collect systematic data on department and program goals
                      in 2007-08. The department and program goals are listed in Appendix A and the
                      results of each goal for 2007-08 are listed in Appendix B by criterion of mastery.
                 2. Compare results to standards of mastery listed above.
                      See Appendix B.
                 3. Provide a concise interpretation of results.

                      All department and program goals assessed in 2007-08 achieved our criteria of
                      mastery except for one. Students do not appear to be aware of service learning
                      opportunities within the department.

          F.     Specific changes based on results of department/program goals:
                 1. Specific changes to your department as they affect program(s) (e.g., curriculum,
                    teaching methods).
                      The department plans to continue to offer high quality undergraduate and graduate
                      degree programs. We engage in an ongoing process of examining and revising our
                      curriculum, based on our assessment results and emerging trends in the field.
                 2. Specific changes related to the assessment process.
                      The department does not currently anticipate immediate changes in the assessment
                      process related to department and program goals.
                 3.    Provide documentation of continuing program(s) need including reference to the
                      statewide & regional needs assessment.

                      See Appendices A and B


II.       Description of Degree Programs and Curricula
A.        List each degree program (undergraduate and graduate) offered in department by location,
          regardless of state or self support. Include minor and undergraduate certificate program(s). (See
          Table 2)




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                                                            Table 2 (Section II, A.)
                                                       Programs Offered in Department

          Degree Program       Delivery Location(s)        Instructional Staff          # Students in Major          # Degrees Awarded
                                                          Faculty      Grad       Yr     Yr     Yr     Yr      Yr    Yr Yr Yr Yr Yr
                                                            FTE       Assist.     1       2      3      4      5     1 2 3 4 5
                                                         (average)     FTE
  B.A. in Psychology (60      Ellensburg, Des Moines       18.01        NA       77.7   101.3 113.0 125.7 132.7 27 37 31 47 50
  credits)                    (beginning Fall 2007)
  B.A. in Psychology (45      Ellensburg, Des Moines       18.01        NA       84.0   82.3   104.3 112.7 111.3 37 25 28 36 46
  credits)                    (beginning Fall 2007)
  Total Bachelor Degrees in   Ellensburg, Des Moines       18.01        NA       161.7 183.7 217.3 238.3 244.0 64 62 59 83 96
  Psychology                  (beginning Fall 2007)
  M.Ed. in School             Ellensburg                    1.95        NA       7.0    12.0   10.7   9.7     7.3    0   0   1   4   2
  Counseling
  M.Ed. in School             Ellensburg                    2.23        NA       14.0   20.3   20.7   20.7    19.3   2   4   4   8   9
  Psychology
  M.S. in Mental Health       Ellensburg                    2.03        NA       19.3   18.3   18.7   22.7    19.4   3   6   4   3   10
  Counseling
  M.S. in Experimental        Ellensburg                    1.59        NA       14.7   20.3   19.3   14.0    15.0   4   4   4   5   3
  Psychology
  Total Master’s Degrees in   Ellensburg                    4.07        NA       34.0   38.7   38.0   36.7    34.3   9   14 13 20 24
  Psychology
       Minor Programs         Delivery Location(s)       Instructional Staff            # Students in Minor          #Minors Completed
                                                          Faculty      Grad       Yr     Yr     Yr     Yr      Yr    Yr Yr Yr Yr Yr
                                                           FTE        Assist      1       2      3      4      5     1 2 3 4 5
                                                                       FTE
  Minor in Psychology         Ellensburg, Yakima, Des      18.01        NA       66.0   93.0   113.0 99.7     98.0   46 57 58 72 45
                              Moines, Lynnwood,
                              Pierce




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          B.     Provide a table that lists courses, location, and faculty and student number for the
                 following: (See Table 3)
                 1.      General Education contributions
                         a.    courses delivered
                         b.    location
                         c.    instructional staff
                         d.    number of students
                 2.      Professional Educators contributions
                         a.      courses delivered
                         b.      location
                         c.      instructional staff
                         d.      number of students

          C.     Required measures of efficiency for department for the last five years
                 1.     SFR (FTES/FTEF) disaggregate data


               Psychology Instruction               Student-Faculty Ratio (FTES/FTEF)
                                                    03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08
               Undergraduate Psychology Instruction 25.65 25.40 26.61 25.40 20.01
               Graduate Psychology Instruction       7.26   8.60   7.29    6.59  5.66
               All Psychology Instruction           21.94 22.15 22.99 22.21 17.52


                 2.      Average class size; disaggregate upper and lower division and graduate courses

                  Average Class Size                       Year
                                               03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08
                  Lower Division Undergraduate  44    49    50    52    44
                  Upper Division Undergraduate  28    26    27    25    20
                  Graduate                      10    11     9     8     7
                  All Psychology                27    27    28    27    21

          D.     Describe currency of curricula in discipline. How does the curriculum compare to
                 recognized standards promulgated by professionals in the discipline (e.g., state,
                 national, and professional association standards)?
                 B.A. in Psychology, (45 or 60 credit major)

                      Coherence
                       The design of our major reflects an integrated set of student learning outcomes.
                       The coherence of our curriculum is addressed in department meetings, retreats,
                         and planning sessions.
                       Through our departmental approval process, all faculty members have an
                         opportunity to influence program development.


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             We stress a consistent set of syllabus elements within the department. We are
              moving toward syllabus templates for selected courses often taught at the
              university centers and by part-time faculty members.
             Our department has defined its areas of strength and built a curriculum around
              them. These areas include solid general experimental psychology, research
              methods, statistics, educational psychology, child development, primate
              behavior, and pre-counseling courses. We avoid curriculum and faculty
              appointments in areas that might require very specialized equipment, scant
              student interest, highly-trained assistants, or large professional research teams.

          Breadth
           Our major and minor core course requirements represent all the major subfields
             and research skills of psychology. Elective courses represent common specialty
             areas. The Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology, a service of Division 2
             of the American Psychological Association, has assembled a list of 17 subfield
             topics from a review of 36 university-level comprehensive survey texts. All of
             these topics are addressed in one or more of our courses.

          Depth
           All major subfields of psychology are introduced in the required core courses of
             our major and three topics, learning, cognition, and physiological psychology,
             are pursued in greater depth. Elective courses permit greater depth of study in
             areas of student interest. Two or more courses are available in a few areas:
             general experimental psychology, research methods, statistics, educational
             psychology, child development, primate behavior, and pre-counseling
             psychology.
           Directed research and special topics classes encourage reading and data
             gathering in areas of mutual student-faculty interest.

          Logical Sequencing
           Our course prerequisites direct students into a desirable sequence of courses.
             The online registration system recently has started enforcing these prerequisites.
           Our academic advisors direct students into logical sequences of courses

          Synthesis of Learning
           All senior majors take a capstone seminar course in their last quarter. The course
             brings together their undergraduate major through a portfolio review, career,
             graduate school, and personal assessment presentations, and a major field exam.
           All majors take a comprehensive course in the history and theories of the
             discipline.
           Student-faculty research is presented to regional or national professional
             meetings and at CWU’s annual Symposium on University Research and
             Creative Expression (SOURCE).
           Internships and service learning in applied settings are encouraged.




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          M.S. in Mental Health Counseling

             Coherence
              The curriculum is tightly organized around the knowledge and skills of the
                professional mental health counselor. Our program is CACREP accredited.
                CACREP is the leading national body for accrediting educational programs in
                mental health counseling. It establishes standards for the institution, program
                objectives and curriculum (including foundations, contextual dimensions, and
                knowledge and skills), clinical instruction, faculty and staff, organization and
                administration, and evaluations in the program. The current CACREP standards
                may be found at http://www.cacrep.org/2001Standards.html.
              Relations among courses and between courses and the program mission are
                reviewed annually by the graduate program faculty committee.
              The process of creating a student handbook has focused the faculty on the
                structure and content of the entire curriculum.

             Breadth
              The curriculum addresses all the knowledge and skills of the professional mental
                health counselor, as recommended by the Council for Accreditation of
                Counseling and Related Programs (CACREP), the leading accrediting body for
                masters-level programs in mental health counseling.

             Depth
              This professional masters program is, by its nature, restricted to specialized
                content and skills.
              The research thesis requirement results in deeper study in an area of special
                interest.
              The internship requirement results in intensive experience in a specialized
                professional setting.

             Logical Sequencing
              Courses are formed into a sequence with little permissible variation. Students
                are closely advised into the sequence of courses. The sequence is reviewed by
                the program committee.
              Quarterly course offerings are dictated by the program’s course sequence.
              The program’s student handbook informs students about the sequencing of
                courses.

             Synthesis of Learning
              Students execute, present, and defend a research thesis written in APA style.
                The thesis study may be presented to regional or national professional meetings
                or at CWU’s annual Symposium on University Research and Creative
                Expression (SOURCE).
              Students complete a 900-hour internship in a professional setting




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          M.S. in Experimental Psychology


             Coherence
              Since the APA doesn't accredit either masters programs or programs in
                experimental psychology, we referred to the APA's benchmarks for
                undergraduate psychology programs and adapted some of them for the master's
                level in experimental psychology in forming the general experimental MS
                program objectives.
              In determining our MS general experimental program revisions in 2007-2008,
                we surveyed the MS Experimental programs at institutions that are on CWU's
                list of peer institutions AND which have a terminal master's program in
                experimental psychology. The discussions of the MS Experimental committee
                were informed by this review.
              We consulted the standards of the Animal Behavior Society, CWU Human
                Subjects Review Committee, and CWU Institutional Animal Care and Use
                Committee. The educational requirements of the Animal Behavior Society's
                Associate Applied Animal Behaviorist Certificate can be met by completing the
                appropriate selection of core and elective courses.
              The course requirements of the Applied Behavior Analysis track are designed to
                satisfy the educational requirements for certification as a Board Certified
                Behavior Analyst (see http://www.bacb.com/pages/bcaba_stand.html). After at
                least five years of operation, we will be in a position to ask the Association for
                Behavior Analysis to accredit our program
                (http://www.abainternational.org/BA/education/AP_11.asp). These standards
                influenced the Applied Behavior Analysis track curriculum.
              Courses cover both an advanced core of research methods and content, with
                specialty courses in selected areas of faculty expertise.
              We establish correspondence between student interests and our expertise areas
                before admitting students to graduate study.
              Relations among courses and between courses and the program mission are
                reviewed annually by the graduate program faculty committee.

             Breadth
              Courses cover both an advanced core of research methods and content and
                specialty courses in selected areas of faculty expertise. We emphasize general
                applications in our methods courses but limit program breadth to areas in which
                we have ample faculty expertise.

             Depth
              We limit our content courses and student population to research areas in which
                we have ample faculty expertise.
              The research thesis requirement results in deeper study in an area of special
                interest.
              Internships in applied settings are encouraged.

             Logical Sequencing

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                Courses are relatively independent, so little control is exerted over sequence.
                Research experience begins with collaborative work with a faculty member and
                 culminates in an independent thesis.
                Internships in applied settings are built on prior appropriate course work.

             Synthesis of Learning
              Students execute, present, and defend a research thesis written in APA style.
                The thesis study may be presented to regional or national professional meetings
                or at CWU’s annual Symposium on University Research and Creative
                Expression (SOURCE).

          M.Ed. in School Psychology/Washington State Educational Staff Associate
          Residency Certificate in School Psychology

             Coherence
              The curriculum is tightly organized around the knowledge and skills of the
                professional school psychologist. The curriculum conforms to the requirements
                of the National Association of School Psychology (NASP), the National Council
                for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), and Washington State
                Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) standards for
                Residency Level Educational Staff Associate in School Psychology certification
                programs. Our program is fully approved by all of these accrediting bodies.
              Relations among courses and between courses and the program mission are
                reviewed annually by the graduate program faculty committee.
              The process of creating a student handbook has focused the faculty on the
                structure and content of the entire curriculum.

             Breadth
              The curriculum covers all the knowledge and skills of the professional school
                psychologist, as recommended by NASP, NCATE, and OSPI.

             Depth
              This professional masters program is, by its nature, restricted to specialized
                content and skills.
              The research thesis requirement results in deeper study in an area of special
                interest.
              The year-long internship requirement results in intensive experience in a
                specialized professional setting.

             Logical Sequencing
              Courses are formed into a sequence with little permissible variation. Students
                are closely advised into the sequence of courses.
              Quarterly course offerings are dictated by the program’s course sequence.
              The program’s student handbook informs students about the sequencing of
                courses.



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             Synthesis of Learning
              Students execute, present, and defend a research thesis written in APA style.
                The thesis study may be presented to regional or national professional meetings
                or at CWU’s annual SOURCE.
              Students complete a year-long internship in a professional setting.
              Students complete a portfolio review, a comprehensive written examination, and
                an oral examination conducted by the CWU School Psychology Professional
                Education Advisory Board, a state-appointed board of school personnel from
                our region.

          M.Ed. in School Counseling/Washington State Educational Staff Associate
            Residency Certificate in School Counseling

             Coherence
              The curriculum is tightly organized around the knowledge and skills of the
                professional school counselor. The curriculum conforms to the requirements of
                the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Programs (CACREP),
                a national accrediting body for masters-level programs in school counseling.
                The program is approved by the National Council for the Accreditation of
                Teacher Education (NCATE), and Washington State Office of the
                Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) standards for Residency Level
                Educational Staff Associate in School Counseling certification programs.
              Relations among courses and between courses and the program mission are
                reviewed annually by the graduate program faculty committee.
              The process of creating a student handbook has focused the faculty on the
                structure and content of the entire curriculum

             Breadth
              The curriculum addresses all the knowledge and skills of the professional school
                counselor, as recommended by CACREP, NCATE, and OSPI.

             Depth
              This professional masters program is, by its nature, restricted to specialized
                content and skills.
              The research thesis requirement results in deeper study in an area of special
                interest.
              The internship requirement results in intensive experience in a specialized
                professional setting.

             Logical Sequencing
              Courses are formed into a sequence with little permissible variation. Students
                are closely advised into the sequence of courses.
              Quarterly course offerings are dictated by the program’s course sequence.
              The program’s student handbook informs students about the sequencing of
                courses.



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          Synthesis of Learning
           Students execute, present, and defend a research thesis written in APA style.
             The thesis study may be presented to regional or national professional meetings
             or at CWU’s annual SOURCE.
           Students complete a 600-hour internship in a professional setting.
           Students complete a portfolio review, a comprehensive written examination, and
             an oral examination conducted by the CWU School Counseling Professional
             Education Advisory Board, a state-appointed board of school personnel from
             our region.




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                                                           Table 3 (Section II, B.)
                                                      Courses, Contributions, Locations

             Contributing area           Delivery Location            Instructional Staff        Annual Average Student FTE
          General Education Courses         Location(s)           Faculty FTE    Grad Assist.   Yr 1 Yr 2 Yr 3 Yr 4 Yr 5
                                                                   (average)         FTE
          PSY 101                     Ellensburg                     2.41            NA         88.4 96.9 111.7 115.1 95.2
          PSY 205                     Ellensburg                      .83            NA         41.5 40.2 43.8 45.4 40.1
          Total Psychology General    Ellensburg                     3.24            NA         129.8 137.1 155.4 160.6 135.3
          Education
            Professional Education          Location(s)           Faculty FTE     Grad FTE      Yr 1   Yr 2   Yr 3   Yr 4   Yr 5
                    Courses                                        (average)
          PSY 314                     All Locations                  1.80            NA         48.1   46.0   44.4   45.5   30.2
          PSY 315                     All Locations                  2.17            NA         43.0   42.5   45.7   45.9   34.3
          Total                       All Locations                  3.64            NA         91.1   88.4   90.0   91.4   64.5
          PSY 314                     Ellensburg                     1.17            NA         38.5   36.3   36.7   36.1   23.4
          PSY 315                     Ellensburg                     1.37            NA         30.2   29.3   31.3   31.2   21.5
          Total                       Ellensburg                     2.22            NA         68.7   65.6   68.0   67.3   44.9
          PSY 314                     Des Moines                      .33            NA         7.3    6.3    6.6    6.0    5.4
          PSY 315                     Des Moines                      .33            NA         7.5    7.5    8.5    7.5    6.7
          Total                       Des Moines                      .66            NA         14.8   13.8   15.1   13.5   12.1
          PSY 314                     Lynnwood                        .11            NA         1.6      --     --     --     --
          PSY 315                     Lynnwood                        .13            NA         1.8    3.5    1.8    2.0    0.5
          Total                       Lynnwood                        .15            NA         3.4    3.5    1.8    2.0    0.5
          PSY 314                     Moses Lake                      .11            NA           --   0.2    0.4    0.4    0.4
          PSY 315                     Moses Lake                      .11            NA           --   0.2    0.4    0.5    0.3
          Total                       Moses Lake                      .22            NA           --   0.4    0.8    1.0    0.7
          PSY 315                     Pierce                          .11            NA           --     --     --     --   1.9
          PSY 314                     Wenatchee                       .17            NA         0.7    3.2    0.7    2.9    1.0
          PSY 315                     Wenatchee                       .17            NA         3.6    2.0    3.6    2.8    0.9
          Total                       Wenatchee                       .35            NA         4.3    5.2    4.4    5.7    1.9
          PSY 315                     Yakima                          .11            NA           --     --     --   1.9    2.6


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          E.   Effectiveness of instruction - Describe how the department addresses the scholarship of
               teaching with specific supporting documentation including each of the following:
               1.     Departmental teaching effectiveness – report a five-year history of the “teaching
                      effectiveness” department means as reported on SEOIs, indexed to the
                      university mean on a quarter-by-quarter basis.

                      The following table (Table 4) shows that the department’s average SEOI ratings
                      on these two items have never been below the college or university means in the
                      last five years. T-tests show that the differences between department means and
                      either college or university means are not statistically different, but the direction
                      of the difference consistently places the department above the other two units.


                                                   Table 4
                               Student Evaluation of Instruction Ratings

                Quarter    Item 28 “Teaching effectiveness” Item 29 “Course as a whole”
                           Department College University Department College University
                Fall 03       4.39       4.25        4.24    4.54       4.34       4.36
                Winter
                  04           4.25         4.21         4.25           4.34         4.31         4.33
                Spring
                  04           4.31         4.27         4.29           4.40         4.37         4.38
                Fall 04        4.41         4.17         4.32           4.51         4.28         4.48
                Winter
                  05           4.29         4.17         4.24           4.41         4.27         4.33
                Spring
                  05           4.40         4.20         4.26           4.52         4.28         4.35
                Fall 05        4.25         4.18         4.20           4.37         4.28         4.31
                Winter
                  06           4.41         4.20         4.22           4.49         4.29         4.31
                Spring
                  06           4.34         4.24         4.26           4.42         4.35         4.35
                Fall 06        4.30         4.16         4.19           4.38         4.25         4.29
                Winter
                  07           4.24         4.19         4.23           4.34         4.30         4.33
                Spring
                  07           4.40         4.19         4.24           4.52         4.30         4.33
                Fall 07        4.20         4.16         4.19           4.28         4.24         4.30
                Winter
                  08           4.35         4.18         4.23           4.49         4.30         4.33
                Spring
                  08           4.39         4.24         4.26           4.49         4.34         4.35
                Mean           4.32         4.20         4.24           4.43         4.30         4.34



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          2.   What evidence other than Student Evaluation of Instruction (SEOI) is gathered
               and used in the department to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction?
               The Psychology department conducts a peer-review of instruction retreat every
               June. Faculty participants form small groups and give each other structured
               feedback on each other’s syllabi and assessment procedures. In addition, we
               provide a detailed classroom observation evaluation during the first quarter of
               teaching for all tenure-track faculty. We also provide the option of peer
               classroom observations for faculty, when requested.
          3.   Effectiveness of instructional methods to produce student learning based upon
               programmatic goals including innovative and traditional methods – examples
               include:
               a.      Collaborative research between student and faculty

                      Research partnerships with students are encouraged in the psychology
                      department. Faculty members routinely require undergraduate students to
                      develop and execute a research project in PSY 300, Research Methods in
                      Psychology, and in PSY 301, Learning. Our more motivated students
                      pursue research collaborations in faculty-led research teams, individual
                      projects, and undergraduate honors thesis (by invitation of the chair).

                      Many faculty members assemble research teams of students to work on
                      topics of mutual interest. Students receive credit for PSY 295, 495, or
                      595 (Directed Research), for their work on these projects. Some of this
                      research turns into presentations made at the Symposium for University
                      Research and Creative Expression (SOURCE), a day-long symposium of
                      oral and poster presentations of student research.

                      Until recently, a research thesis was required of all master’s students in
                      psychology. In 2007, the department voted to allow the option of a non-
                      thesis project for graduate students in all of the master’s programs
                      besides M. S. Experimental. However, these projects are expected to
                      include many of the qualities and characteristics on the more traditional
                      experimental theses. Many master’s thesis students also serve as research
                      assistants on faculty projects. Over the last five years, an average of 24
                      theses/projects per year has been produced.

                      Detailed lists of student-faculty research presentations may be found in
                      Section IV.A, below.

               b.     Inquiry-based, open ended learning

                      Learning by inquiry, observation, and discovery is at the heart of all
                      sciences. About three-quarters of our faculty report the overt use of
                      inquiry-based methods in their classes. Our classes in research methods
                      in psychology, analysis of everyday behavior, learning, and directed
                      research are prime examples at the undergraduate level. Thesis research
                      projects and many classes in the M.S. Experimental psychology program
                      employ these methods at the graduate level.
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          c.   Use of field experiences

               More than three-quarters of our faculty members report using field
               experience methods in instruction. Some undergraduate examples
               include observational and intervention opportunities in the Ellensburg
               school district developmental preschool, field experiences in Children’s
               Village in Yakima, DIBELS/CBM benchmark project in the Ellensburg
               schools, China field school, working with students through GEAR-UP,
               etc.

               Extensive field experiences are found throughout our graduate curricula
               in School Psychology, Mental Health Counseling, and School
               Counseling, from the first quarter’s practicum to the internships that
               conclude the programs. Practica and internships are also being developed
               for our students in Applied Behavior Analysis. About half of our
               graduate students in Experimental Psychology learn through observation
               at the Chimpanzee and Human Communication Institute.

          d.   Classic lectures

               Almost all of the faculty reported using lecture in their classes. However,
               if the term “classic lectures” refers to a prepared presentation with no
               opportunities for student questions or comments, then none of the faculty
               use this method.

          e.   Lecture and inquiry based guided discussions

               The lecture-discussion format remains the most commonly used teaching
               method in the psychology department. Every faculty member reports
               using the lecture-discussion format at some times. Typically, the
               instructor prepares a lecture that is interspersed with instructor questions,
               student discussion, small group discussion and problem-solving, hands-
               on practice, video clip discussions, and many other techniques to
               heighten the effectiveness of the instructor’s presentation.

               Lectures are often accompanied by judicious use of electronically
               presented outlines, images, video segments, and internet content. Many
               instructors use Blackboard to continue a discussion outside the
               classroom.

          f.   Service learning or civic engagement

               About one third of our faculty members engage students in service
               learning activities. Most of these activities also could be described as
               field experience courses in Section c, above, and some examples are
               described there. Beyond the activities that carry course credit, many
               faculty and students are involved with volunteer activities with social
               service providers, schools, youth groups, services for victims/survivors
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                             of domestic violence, crisis line service, and other community service
                             settings.

                      g.     Other innovative methods (e.g., online integration)

                             Half of the psychology faculty report using web integration in their
                             classes or some other sort of innovative instructional method. Use of
                             Blackboard is common. In addition, faculty have reported using
                             strategies such as analysis of CD-ROM case examples, computerized
                             simulations, video conferencing, web-based instructional modules, role
                             playing, clickers, and “no drive week” in environmental psychology.

          F.   Degree to which distance education technology is used for instruction (ITV and online).

               The number of distance-education (DE) sections offered through the psychology
               department has increased from a total of eight in 2003-04 to 26 in 2007-08. Fully web-
               based classes are relatively new for the Psychology department. We offered our first
               three web classes in 2006-07, four in 2007-08, and plan to offer 11 or 12 web sections
               in 2008-09. See Table 5 below for more detail.

                                                         Table 5
                                            Distance Education and Web Classes

                                    Term    # of DE sections   # of Web sections
                              Fall 2003             2                 0
                             Winter 2004            2                 0
                             Spring 2004            2                 0
                            Summer 2004             2                 0
                            Total 2003-04           8                 0
                              Fall 2004             3                 0
                             Winter 2005            4                 0
                             Spring 2005            3                 0
                            Summer 2005             0                 0
                            Total 2004-05          10                 0
                              Fall 2005             4                 0
                             Winter 2006            4                 0
                             Spring 2006            2                 0
                            Summer 2006             0                 0
                            Total 2005-06          10                 0
                              Fall 2006             5                 0
                             Winter 2007            6                 0
                             Spring 2007            6                 1
                            Summer 2007             2                 2
                            Total 2006-07          19                 3
                              Fall 2007             6                 0
                             Winter 2008            9                 0
                             Spring 2008            6                 0
                            Summer 2008             5                 4
                            Total 2007-08          26                 4

               G.     Assessment of programs and student learning

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          1.   List student learner outcomes for each graduate and or undergraduate degree
               program and note how the outcomes are linked to department, college and
               university mission and goals.
               The Psychology Department developed its first comprehensive assessment plan
               of student learning outcomes for each program in 2007-08. The assessment
               plans for student learning outcomes, by program, are listed in Appendix C.
               a.     Describe the specific method used in assessing each student learning
                      outcome. Also specify the population assessed, when the assessment
                      took place, and the standard of mastery (criterion) against which you will
                      compare your assessment results. If appropriate, list survey or
                      questionnaire response rate from total population (e.g., alumni,
                      employers served).

                      See Appendix C.

          2.   List the results for each student learning outcome.
               The Psychology Department began to systematically assess student learning
               outcomes for each program in 2007-08. The Assessment Reports for each
               program are provided in Appendix D.
               a.     Provide results in specific quantitative or qualitative terms for each
                      learning outcome.
               b.     Compare results to standards of mastery listed above.
               c.     Provide a concise interpretation of results.

               See Appendix D.

          3.   Based upon the results for each outcome listed above describe:
               a.     Specific changes to your program as they affect student learning (e.g.,
                      curriculum, teaching methods).

               b.     List specific changes related to assessment process if any.

               See Appendix D.




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III.          Faculty

              A.     Faculty profile – Using attached chart show faculty participation for mentoring student
              research, professional service activities, scholarly activities including grant writing and teaching? (Designate graduate or undergraduate
              publications or creative activities) (See Table 5).

                                                                                Table 5 (Section III)
                                                                      Tenured and Tenure-track Faculty Profile

                                                  2003-2004                2004-2005                 2005-2006            2006-2007            2007-2008
                                             # faculty    % of        # faculty    % of        # faculty % of       # faculty   % of      # faculty   % of      5-yr total   Annual   % of
                                              TT - T      faculty      TT - T      faculty      TT - T    faculty    TT - T     faculty    TT - T     faculty                avg      faculty
* Scholarship Measures: (Use categories applicable to your departmental & college criteria)
(e.g. peer reviewed articles)               8             43         14            78         6           39        7           39        2           11        37           7.4      42
(e.g. abstracts/conference proceedings)      2             11          1            6         0           0         2           11        1           6         6            1.2      7
(e.g. conference presentation)               13            71          13           72        11          71        12          67        15          83        64           12.8     73
Other, etc.                                  1             5           1            6         2           13        0           0         0           0         4            .8       5
* Grants: (Use categories applicable to your departmental & college criteria)
External
   Funded / Unfunded                         4/2           22/11       2/2          11/11     2/1         13/6      1/1         6/6       1/1         6/6       10/7         2/1.4    11/8
Internal
   Funded / Unfunded                         2/0           11/0        2/0          11/0      2/0         13/0      0/0         0/0       1/0         6/0       7/0          1.4/0    8/0
* Service measures: (Use categories applicable to your departmental & college criteria)
CWU Committees                              18            98         16             89        14          90        18          100       18          100       84           16.8     96
State Committees                             2             11          2            11        2           13        3           17        4           22        13           2.6      15
Leadership & Service - Professional          8             43          8            44        4           26        11          61        3           17        34           6.8      39
Organizations
Community Service                            8             43          12           67        6           39        14          78        13          72        53           10.6     60
Other
* Faculty Mentored Research: (Use categories applicable to your departmental & college criteria)
Undergrad projects / SOURCE               13            71          14           78            9          58        12          67        11          61        59           11.8     67
Graduate Committees – Supervising            7             38          12           67        7           45        6           33        6           33        38           7.6      43
thesis/projects
Graduate Committees – Participation          13            71          12           67        10          65        11          61        10          56        56           11.2     64
thesis/projects
Other


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          B.     Copies of all faculty vitae (See Appendix H)

          C.     Faculty awards for distinction: instruction, scholarship, and service

                 Andrew Downs: Excellence in Teaching Award, Central Washington University, 2006
                 Steve Schepman: Best Paper Award – Allied Academics International Conference, Fall
                    2004
                 Steve Schepman: Best Paper Award – European Applied Business Research
                    Conference, 2007
                 Stephanie Stein: Distinguished Reviewer Award – Buros Institute of Mental
                    Measurements, 2005

          D.     Include in appendices performance standards by department, college and university
                 (See Appendix G)


IV.       Students – For five years
          A.     Student accomplishments (include SOURCE, career placement information, etc.). List
                 students working in field; students placed in master’s or doctoral programs.

          During the five year period (2003-2008), psychology faculty members and students have
          collaborated on 34 SOURCE research presentations, 97 regional, national, and international
          Presentations, and 16 publications. In addition, our student graduate students have been very
          successful in career placements and acceptance into doctoral programs (data for 2005-2008
          only). Details follow:

          SOURCE and Other Research Presentations with faculty mentors (Fall 2003 - Spring
          2008) (34 presentations):


          SOURCE: Bush, E. (2007, May). Music therapy for mild depression.
          SOURCE: Cazares, A. (2005, May). Comparison of professional achievement of Mexican-
             American, first-generation college graduates and Caucasian-American, first-generation
             college graduates.
          SOURCE: Chang, K., Sorrells, R., & Szymanska, E. (2005, May). The interaction of
             emotionality and textual information in modern art appreciation.
          SOURCE: Christianson, J., Ingram, J., Foster, C., & Neighbors, D. (2007, May). Psychometric
             properties of the Job Search Self-Efficacy Scale.
          SOURCE: Durbin, M. (2004, May). Contributions to the scholarship of teaching: Effects of
             student self-assessment accuracy training on scientific writing effectiveness (First Place
             Poster, 2004 Source).
          SOURCE: Fallshore, M., & Hall, D. (2005, May). Recycling and canvas bags: Can charging
             people increase recycling?
          SOURCE: Fernandez, L. (2005, May). The effect of scheduled versus opportunistic enrichment
             on zoo animals.
          SOURCE: Hall, D., & Fallshore, M. (2005, May). Loss aversion and canvas bags: Can
             charging people increase bag recycling?
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          SOURCE: Hallows, J. (2004, May). Training for multicultural competence in counseling: A
             review of programs and counselors in Washington. (First place oral presentation, 2004
             SOURCE).
          SOURCE: Halberg, R., Jensvold, M.L., & Sheeran, L. (2007, May). Laughter, number of play
             partners, age and play bout duration in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in an
             African sanctuary.
          SOURCE: Hanberg, J. (2004, May). A study of the introduction of twin hand-reared Varedia
             variegate rubra infants to the father and an island exhibit. (Third place oral presentation,
             SOURCE 2004).
          SOURCE: Hartel, J., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S. (2006, May).
             Post-conflict and self-directed behaviors in a population of Tibetan macaques (Macaca
             thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China.
          SOURCE: Guckel, A., & Bennett, A. (2007, May). The cognition of abstract art.
          SOURCE: James, J., & Gabriel, K. I. (2008, May). Statistical analysis of “Attitudes Toward
             Animal Research” survey.
          SOURCE: Jensvold, M. L., Sheeran, L., Halberg, R., & Keyser, J. (2006, May). Laughter,
             number of play partners, and play bout duration in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).
          SOURCE: Lance, L., Grundberg, M., & Fallshore, M. (2006, May). Religious upbringing and
             shame-proneness.
          SOURCE: Leach, J., Molano, F., Fallshore, M., & Varona, J. (2005, May). Predictors of body
             image discrepancy: The influence of gender, sociocultural attitudes towards appearance,
             and objectified body consciousness.
          SOURCE: Leinweber, R. (2007, May). Investigating personality: Do gamers differ from non-
             gamers?
          SOURCE: Lester, J., McCarthy, M., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R.
             S. (2007, May). Green Cascade Frog, Rana livida, detection in the Valley of the Wild
             Monkeys, Mt Huangshan, China.
          SOURCE: Lutz, L., Szymanska, E., King, C., Fitzwater, L., Robinson, E., & Sorrells, R. (2005,
             May). FlexArt: A test of creative mental flexibility.
          SOURCE: Mack, H., Matheson, M., Sheeran, L., Li, J., & Wagner, R. (May, 2008). Grooming
             behavior of Tibetan macaques in the presence of tourists at Mt. Huangshan, China.
          SOURCE: McCarthy, M. (2007, May). Use of gesture sequences in captive chimpanzee play.
          SOURCE: McCarthy, M., M., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Lester, J. D., Li, J. H., &
             Wagner, R. S. (2007, May). Behavioral sequences between Tibetan Macaques (Macaca
             thibetana) and tourists at Mt. Huangshan, China.
          SOURCE: McCoy, C., Matheson, M., Sheeran, L., Li, J., & Wagner, R. (2007, May). An
             abundance survey of Paa spinosa in the Huangshan Scenic District, China.
          SOURCE: McCune, E. (2004, May). Enhancing environmental conservation behavior.
          SOURCE: Phillips, M. (2004, May). Examining Callimico goeldii (Goeldi’s monkey) social
             interactions between an “unfit” mother, a father, and the offspring.
          SOURCE: Ruesto, L., Sheeran, L., Matheson, M., Li, J. H., & Wagner, S. (2006, May).
             Investigation of possible impacts of tourist density, behavior, and decibel level on Tibetan
             macaque aggression.
          SOURCE: Smith, C., Wagner, R., Matheson, M., Sheeran, L., & Li, J. H. (2006, May).
             Population monitoring of the mountain stream frog (Rana spinosa) in Huangshan, China.
          SOURCE: Szymanska, E. (2004, May). Abstract Art: Immediate visual stimulus supercedes
             textual information in students’ judgements of creativity. (Second place oral presentation,
             SOURCE 2004)

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          SOURCE: Talbot, B., Tomaszewski, E., & Martinez, G. (2005, May). Response competition in
             the shape domain: Motor response latency effects.
          SOURCE: Todd, K., & Fallshore, M. (2005, May). Do males and females differ in their
             assessment of crime severity?
          SOURCE: Wallin, J. M., Jensvold, M. L., & Sheeran, L. K. (2007, May). Play, laughter, and
             humor in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).
          SOURCE: Wederquist, C., Schmidt, E., Aydelott, S., & Fallshore, M. (2006, May). Recycling
             and canvas bags: Can charging people increase recycling?
          SOURCE: Yenter, T. A., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S. (May,
             2008). Self-directed behaviors in Tibetan macaques as a function of tourist density and
             proximity at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys.


          Student-Faculty Regional, National, and International Presentations (Fall 2003 - Spring
          2008) (97 presentations)

          Batzle, C., Weyandt, L. L., Johnson, E. R., DeVietti, T. L., Batzle, P., & Street, W. R. (2007,
              April). The potential impact of an ADHD label on teacher expectations. Poster
              presentation to the annual meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists,
              New York, NY.
          Batzle, C., Weyandt, L., & DeVietti, T. (2007, March). The potential impact of an ADHD label
              on teacher expectations. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the National
              Association of School Psychologists, New York.
          Bowen, N. A., & McDonald, B. R. (2004, October). Students’ perceptions of the multicultural
              environment. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the Washington Counseling
              Association, Spokane, WA.
          Bowen, N. A., & McDonald, B. R. (2004, October). Training for multicultural competence.
              Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the Washington Counseling Association,
              Spokane, WA.
          Brammer, R., & Anderson, A. (2008, April). Psychological factors associated with nursing
              assistant expertise. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western
              Psychological Association, Irvine, CA.
          Brammer, R., & Chavez-Gonzalez, D. (2008, April). Game theory and teenagers. Poster
              presentation to the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Irvine, CA.
          Brammer, R. D., & McKenna, S. (2007, May). Intelligence, demographics, and juvenile crime.
              Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association,
              Vancouver, B.C.
          Brammer, R. D., & Meng, P. (2007, May). Factor analysis of the adolescent psychopathology
              scales on incarcerated juveniles. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western
              Psychological Association, Vancouver, B.C.
          Brammer, R., Meng, P., & Duarte, N. (2008, April). How does counseling differ from
              psychology? Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western Psychological
              Association, Irvine, CA.
          Brammer, R., & Minshull, T. (2007, May). Factor analysis of the Reynolds Adolescent
              Adjustment Screening Inventory. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western
              Psychological Association, Vancouver, B.C.



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          Brammer, R., Orndorff, J, Morgan, T., Prout, O., Greear, K (2008, April). Was Homer the first
               Existential Psychologist? Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western
               Psychological Association, Irvine, CA.
          Brammer, R., Pearsall, C., & Basteyns, M. (2008, April). Revising the scientist-practitioner
               model for the practitioner age. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western
               Psychological Association, Irvine, CA.
          Breidert, T. J., Johnson, E., Stein, S., DeVietti, T., & White, D. (2004, March-April). CD vs.
               Cassette tape administration of the Woodcock-Johnson III, Cognitive: How are scores
               impacted? Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the National Association of School
               Psychologists, Dallas, TX.
          Buchanan, D. McKinstry, C. J., & Williams, W. (2007, May). Infra-red leg band technology
               for observational research with pigeons. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the
               Western Psychological Association, Vancouver, B.C.
          Cogswell, M., Stein, S., DeVietti, T., & Tolin, P. (April, 2005). How we cope: Gender
               differences in coping strategies. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western
               Psychological Association, Portland, OR.
          Downs, A., & Johansen, M. (April, 2005). Who benefits from affirmative action? Stereotypes
               and reality. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western Psychological
               Association, Portland, OR.
          Downs, A., Downs, R. C., & Fossum, M. (2007, May). Discrete trial teaching in preschools:
               Effectiveness of two delivery models. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the
               Western Psychological Association, Vancouver, B.C.
          Downs, A., Downs, R. C., Johansen, M. & Fossum, M. (2006, April). Facilitating skill
               development in young children with disabilities. Paper presentation to the annual meeting
               of the Western Psychological Association, Palm Springs, CA.
          Downs, A., & Martin, J. E. (2006, July). Increasing student success through parent
               participation. Symposium presentation to the annual meeting of the National Council for
               Community and Educational Partnerships, Washington, DC.
          Downs, A., & Smith, T. (April, 2005) Socio-emotional development in high-functioning
               children with autism. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western
               Psychological Association, Portland, OR.
          Durbin, M. D., Stein, S., Eubanks, J. L., & DeVietti, T. L. (2007, May). Accuracy of student
               self-assessment and performance on CBM reading. Poster presentation to the annual
               meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Vancouver, B.C.
          Edwards, A., Johnson, E., Williams, W., DeVietti, T., & White, D. (2004, March-April). Age at
               entrance to kindergarten: Does age predict academic success? Poster presentation to the
               annual meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists, Dallas, TX.
          Fallshore, M., & Hall, D. (2005, October). Recycling and canvas bags: Can charging people
               increase recycling? Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the Society of Human
               Ecology, Salt Lake City, UT
          Fallshore, M., & Todd, K. (2004, May). Do males and females differ in their assessment of
               crime severity? Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the American Psychological
               Society, Chicago, IL.
          Fernandez, L. B., Matheson, M. D., & Forbes, S. (2005, July-August). The effect of scheduled
               versus opportunistic enrichment on zoo animals. Poster presentation to the International
               Conference on Environmental Enrichment, Columbia University, New York NY.



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          Fouts, R., Hicks, C., Fouts, D., Fouts, H., & Hoffman, P. (2004, April). Comparison of nest
              building characteristics in sympatric chimpanzees and gorillas. Paper presentation to the
              annual meeting of the Rocky Mountain Psychological Association. Reno, NV.
          Goedecke, P., Schepman, S., & Shimer-Geckle, K. (2006, April). The development of the Office
              Environment Survey. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western
              Psychological Association, Palm Springs, CA
          Hartel, J., Jensvold, M. L., Bowman, H., Fouts, R., & Fouts, D. (2004, April). The effect of
              foraging on activity budgets in captive chimpanzees. Paper presentation to the annual
              meeting of the Rocky Mountain Psychological Association. Reno, NV.
          Hartel J. A., Jensvold M. L., Fouts R. S., & Fouts D. H. (2007, March). Signing chimpanzees'
              (Pan troglodytes) interactions with familiar and unfamiliar signers and nonsigners. Paper
              presentation to The Mind of the Chimpanzee Conference, Chicago, IL.
          Hendricks, K., & Allen, C. (2004, March). An exploration of domestic violence beliefs and
              attitudes. Paper presentation to the meeting of the American Criminal Justice Society, Las
              Vegas, NV.
          Herbold, J., Schepman, S., Matheson, M., Sorrells, R., & Stahelski, A. (2005, April). The
              development of the multicultural assimilation attitudes scale. Poster presentation to the
              annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Portland, OR.
          Hicks, T. C., & Fouts, R. S. (2004, April). Chimpanzee tool use in the Ngotto Forest, Central
              African Republic. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the Rocky Mountain
              Psychological Association. Reno, NV.
          Howells, M., & Matheson, M. (2003, October). Aggression and use of space with move to a
              novel environment in captive Cebus paella. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of
              the American Anthropological Association, Chicago IL.
          Jensvold, M. L., Baeckler, S. A., Fouts, R. S., & Fouts, D. H. (2004, October). Their own
              terms: Techniques in humane caregiving of captive chimpanzees. Paper presentation to
              the meeting of the International Society for Anthrozoology. Glasgow, Scotland.
          Jensvold, M. L., Sheeran, L. S., Halberg, R. H., & Keyser, J. (2006, March). Laughter, number
              of play partners, and play bout duration in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Paper
              presentation to the Northwest Anthropological Conference, Seattle, WA.
          Jewett, N., & Stahelski, A. (2004). A revenue cycle process analysis model. Paper presentation
              to the Physical Therapy Association of Washington.
          Johnson, E., Ferguson, M., Allen, S., & Colasurdo, M. (2008, March). Scoring Woodcock-
              Johnson III Writing Subtests: Are examiners equally prepared? Poster presentation to the
              annual meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists, New Orleans, LA.
          Johnson, E., Ferguson, M., Allen, S., & Colasurdo, M. (2008, March). WJ-III normative
              update: How renorming impacts. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the National
              Association of School Psychologists, New Orleans, LA.
          Johnson, E., & Manker, H. (2005, March). Using CBM to predict reading achievement: Can it
              work? Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the National Association of School
              Psychologists, Atlanta, GA.
          Johnson, E., Peterson, J., Matheson, M., DeVietti, T., & Street, W. (2006, March). School
              psychologist retention and recruitment: Insights from practitioners. Poster presentation to
              the annual meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists, Anaheim, CA.
          Jones, A. M., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S. (2008, June).
              Aggression and habituation toward humans in two troops of Tibetan macaques (Macaca
              thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the
              American Society of Primatologists, West Palm Beach FL.

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          Jones, S, K., Stein, S., Johnson, E. R., & DeVietti, T. L. (2007, May). Predicting 4th grade
              WASL with 2nd grade CBM reading. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the
              Western Psychological Association, Vancouver, B.C.
          Jones, S., Sabol, C., Schepman, S., Fendell, L., Stein, S., & Stahelski, A. (2006, April). The
              relationship between furnout, organizational citizenship behavior, and negative affectivity.
              Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Palm
              Springs, CA.
          Lackey, D., Matheson, M., Sheeran, L., Li, J. H., & Wagner, S. (2006, March). Demography
              and non-invasive individual identification using spot patterns in Chinese salamanders
              (Pachytriton brevipes). Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the Society of
              Northwest Vertebrate Biology, Olympia WA.
          Lance, L., Grundberg, M., & Fallshore, M. (2006, May). Religious upbringing and shame-
              proneness. Paper presentation to the Northwest Cognition and Memory conference,
              Vancouver, B.C.
          Lester, M., Matheson, M., Sheeran, L., Li, J., & Wagner, R. S. (2007, February). Population
              size estimates of Chinese paddle-tail salamanders using mark-recapture with spot pattern
              recognition. Paper presentation to the meeting of the Society for Northwest Vertebrate
              Biology, Victoria, B.C.
          Mack, H. M., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S. (2008, June).
              Grooming behavior of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) in the presence of tourists at
              Mt. Huangshan, China. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the American Society
              of Primatologists, West Palm Beach FL.
          Lonborg, S. D., Christianson, J., Ingram, J., Foster, C., & Neighbors, D. (2008, April). The Job
              Search Self-Efficacy Scale: Initial psychometric studies. Poster presentation to the annual
              meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Irvine, CA.
          Lonborg, S. D., Christianson, J., Ingram, J., Foster, C., Neighbors, D., O’Neill, K., & Stanton,
              N. (2008, March). Measuring job search self efficacy: Research and practice implications.
              Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the International Counseling Psychology
              Conference, Chicago, IL.
          Lonborg, S. D., Christianson, J., Ingram, J., Neighbors, D., Foster, C., Stanton, N., O’Neill, K.,
              Charron, H., & Waldron, L. (2008, August). Psychometric properties of the Job Search
              Self Efficacy Scale. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the American
              Psychological Association, Boston, MA.
          Lonborg, S. D. (Chair) (2008, April). Facilitating undergraduate research self-efficacy through
              collaborative research teams. Symposium presentation to the annual meeting of the
              Western Psychological Association, Irvine, CA.
               When newcomers enter an established research team: What to expect, Nash Stanton
                  (Central Washington University)
               The undergraduate research team: Broadening one’s interests and strengths, Jeffrey
                  Christianson (Central Washington University)
               Bandura was right: Performance accomplishments increase self-efficacy, Dan Neighbors
                  (Central Washington University)
               Managing the organizational details of multiple research studies, Jonathan Ingram
                  (Central Washington University)
               The undergraduate research team: Broadening one’s interests and strengths, Katie
                  O'Neill (Central Washington University)
               Discussant: Cody Foster (Central Washington University)


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          Main, A., & Schwartz, T. (2007, May). Attitudes of counselors in British Columbia regarding
             mandatory certification. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western
             Psychological Association, Vancouver, B.C.
          Marburg, T. L., Jensvold, M. L., Fouts, R., & Fouts, D. (2007, April). Comparison of
             intragroup greeting and reassurance behaviors across four chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)
             social groups in American and African sanctuaries. Paper presentation to the Northeast
             Anthropological Association, New York.
          Matheson, M. D., Hartel, J., Whitaker, C., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S. (2007,
             June). Self-directed behavior correlates with tourist density in free-living Tibetan
             macaques (Macaca thibetana) at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys, Mt. Huangshan, China.
             Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the American Society of Primatologists,
             Winston-Salem NC.
          McCarthy, M. S., Jensvold, M. L., Fouts, D. H., & Fouts, R. S. (2007, April). Chimpanzee use
             of gesture sequences during play. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the Rocky
             Mountain Psychological Association, Denver, CO.
          McCarthy, M. S., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Lester, J. D., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S.
             (2007, June). Sequences of Tibetan macaque behaviors and tourist behaviors at Mt.
             Huangshan, China. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the American Society of
             Primatologists, Winston-Salem N.C.
          Matheson, M. D., Mack, H. M., Sheeran, L. K., Yenter, T., & Schulz, P. (2008, June). Captive
             ex-pet Macaca fascicularis use hair and dental floss to floss their teeth. Poster presentation
             to the annual meeting of the American Society of Primatologists, West Palm Beach FL.
          McCarthy, M., Jensvold, M. L., Fouts, D. H., & Fouts, R. S. (2006, April) Space use in captive
             chimpanzees. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Rocky Mountain
             Psychological Association, Park City, Utah
          McCarthy, M. S., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Lester, J. D., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S.
             (2007, June). Sequences of Tibetan macaque behaviors and tourist behaviors at Mt.
             Huangshan, China. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the American Society of
             Primatologists, Winston-Salem N.C.
          McCune, E. A., Lagerquist, B. J., Eubanks, J. L., DeVietti, T. L., & Matheson, M. D. (2005,
             April). Reconsidering the tragedy of the commons: Effects of feedback on self-assessment
             accuracy and performance. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western
             Psychological Association, Portland, OR.
          McKinstry, C. J., & Williams, W. (2007, May). Group and cage size effects on aggression in
             laboratory pigeons. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western
             Psychological Association, Vancouver, B.C.
          Molano, F., Kennedy, S., & Fallshore, M. (2005, April). Predictors of body image discrepancy:
             The influence of gender, sociocultural attitudes toward appearance, and objectified body
             consciousness. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western Psychological
             Association, Portland, OR.
          Morris, C., Lonborg, S., Schultz. E., Hall, M., & Troupin, J. (2005, April). Investigating
             spirituality and health: Forgiveness, psychological distress, and spiritual well-being.
             Poster presentation to the annual convention of the Western Psychological Association,
             Portland, OR.
          Morris, K., Stein, S., DeVietti, T. L., & Williams, W. A. (2008, April). Predictive validity of
             M-CBM and MAP-Math onto the WASL. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the
             Western Psychological Association, Irvine, CA.


Page 51
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          Penick, J. M., Moore, L. S., & Crouch, S. (2005, April). Meaningful connections: Using
              intergenerational service learning in teaching adult development. Poster presentation to
              the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Portland, OR.
          Peterson, J., Johnson, G., DeVietti, T., Matheson, M., & Street, W. R. (2006, March). School
              psychology: Perceptions of how to retain practitioners, attract new personnel, and
              increase job satisfaction. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the National
              Association of School Psychologists, New York, NY.
          Puffer, A. M., Jensvold, M. L., Fouts, D. H., & Fouts, R. S. (2006, April). Weather influences
              chimpanzees’ choice to go outside. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Rocky
              Mountain Psychological Association, Park City, UT.
          Rasmussen, C., Jensvold, M. L., Fouts, R. S., Fouts, D. H., & Wallin, J. (2008, April). Signs of
              cultural transmission in a chimpanzee. Poster presentation to annual meeting of the Rocky
              Mountain Psychological Association, Boise, ID.
          Ruesto, L., Sheeran, L. K., Matheson, M. D., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S. (2006, March).
              Investigations of possible impacts of tourist density, behavior, and decibel levels on
              Tibetan macaque aggression. Paper presentation to the Northwest Anthopological
              Conference, Seattle WA.
          Sasnett, R., & Weyandt, L. (2004, July-August). School psychologist and teacher knowledge of
              Tourette Syndrome. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the American
              Psychological Association. Honolulu, HI.
          Sayre, A., Stein, S., DeVietti, T. L., & Johnson, E. R. (2008, April). Using M-CBM to predict
              fourth graders’ performance on the WASL. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the
              Western Psychological Association, Irvine, CA.
          Schepman, S., Jones, S., & Fendell, E. (2006, May). The relationship between burnout,
              organizational citizenship behavior, and negative affectivity. Paper presentation to the
              annual meeting of the Hawaii International Conference on Business, Honolulu, HI.
          Schepman, S., Jones, S., Stein, S., Fendell, E., Sabol, C., & Stahelski, A. (2006, April). The
              relationship between burnout, organizational citizenship behavior, and negative affectivity.
              Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Palm
              Springs, CA.
          Schepman, S., Richmond, L., & Becker. (2006, May). The effects of a goal-setting intervention
              on on-time deliveries in a plastic extrusion manufacturing firm. Paper presentation to the
              annual meeting of the Hawaii International Conference on Business, Honolulu, HI.
          Schepman, S., Stahelski, A., Lapsley, R., & Pigeon, N. G. (October, 2006). Role of mood and
              style of dress on performance appraisal. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the
              International Academy of Business and Economics, Las Vegas, NV.
          Shiau, S. J., & Jensvold, M. L. (2006, April). Chimpanzee use of modulation in response to
              questions. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the Rocky Mountain Psychological
              Association, Park City, UT.
          Sorensen, R., & Weyandt, L. (2004, July-August). The impact of an ADHD label on future
              teachers’ expectations. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the American
              Psychological Association. Honolulu, HI.
          Sorrells, R., & Garrout, S. (2006, May). Improving comprehension of scientific texts:
              Condensing and reconstituting knowledge. Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the
              Association of Psychological Science, New York, NY.
          Sorrells, R., & Chang, K. (2006, May). What develops in the development of art appreciation?
              Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the Association of Psychological Science, New
              York, NY.

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          Sorrells, R., Robinson, E., & Lutz, L. (2006, May). FlexArt: A test of mental flexibility. Paper
               presentation to the annual meeting of the Association of Psychological Science, New York,
               NY.
          Stahelski, A. J., Puffer, A., & Schepman, S. B. (2007, May). The effects of an organization
               development intervention in a county corrections facility. Poster presentation to the annual
               meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Vancouver, B.C.
          Stahelski, A. J., Tate, W., & Radeke, M. (2007, May). Violence and cults. Poster presentation
               to the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Vancouver, B.C.
          Stein, S., Blair, D. L., DeVietti, T. L., & Downs, A. (2007, May). Sixth-graders’
               communication, cooperation and social skills following challenge course participation.
               Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association,
               Vancouver, B.C.
          Stein, S., Stahelski, A., Schepman, S., & Arowolo, K. (2004, April). The effects of military
               training on collectivist and individualist awareness. Poster presentation to the annual
               meeting of the Rocky Mountain Psychological Association, Reno, NV.
          Stein, S., Stahelski, A., Schepman, S., & Selberg, A. (2004, April). The role of mood and style
               of dress in performance appraisal. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Rocky
               Mountain Psychological Association, Reno, NV.
          Steilberg, R., Schwartz, T., & Lonborg, S. (2008, April). Stress, coping, and performance:
               Comparison of traditional and non-traditional college students. Poster presentation to the
               annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Irvine, CA.
          Szymanska, E., & Sorrells, R. (2004, May) Abstract art: Immediate visual stimulus supercedes
               textual information in students’ judgements of creativity. Paper presentation to the annual
               meeting of the American Psychological Society, Chicago, IL.
          Tomaszewski, E., Talbot, B., Martinez, G., & Williams, W. (2005, April). Response
               competition in the shape domain: Motor response latency effects. Poster presentation to the
               annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Portland, OR.
          Torres-Jenkins, I., & Fallshore, M., (2004, April). Change blindness: Unconscious or
               conscious memory? Paper presentation to the annual meeting of the Rocky Mountain
               Psychological Association, Reno, NV.
          Vance, T., Weyandt, L., & DuPaul, G. (March, 2007). Professor perceptions of college
               students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Paper presentation to the annual
               meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists, New York, NY.
          Wallin, J., Jensvold, M. L., & Sheeran, L. (2006, October). Chimpanzee play, laughter and
               humor. Poster presentation to the Murdock Charitable Trust Annual Regional
               Undergraduate Research Conference. Portland, OR.
          Wallin, J. M., Jensvold, M. L., Fouts, R. S., & Fouts, D. H. (2008, April). The recent expressive
               lexicon of a cross-fostered chimpanzee. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the
               Rocky Mountain Psychological Association, Boise, ID.
          Ward, E. A., Stein, S., DeVietti, T. L., & Schaefle, S. (2008, April). Using DIBELS and MAPS
               to predict fourth grader WASL-Reading. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the
               Western Psychological Association, Irvine, CA.
          Wederquist, C., Schmidt, E., Aydelott, S., & Fallshore, M. (2006, May). Recycling and canvas
               bags: Can charging people increase recycling? Paper presentation to the Northwest
               Cognition and Memory Conference, Vancouver, B.C.
          Williams, W., & Brett, B. (2006, April). Prior intimacy and gender effects on perceptions of
               rape. Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association,
               Palm Springs, CA.

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          Yenter, T. A., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S. (2007, November).
              Preliminary analyses of self-directed behaviors in Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana)
              at a tourist site. Poster presentation to the 16th Regional Conference on Undergraduate
              Research, Murdock College Science Research Program, Willamette University, Salem OR.
          Yenter, T. A., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J., & Wagner, R. S. (2008, June). Self-
              directed behaviors, tourist density and proximity in a free living population of Tibetan
              Macaques (Macaca thibetana) at an ecotourism destination in Anhui Province, China.
              Poster presentation to the annual meeting of the American Society of Primatologists, West
              Palm Beach FL.


          Student-Faculty Publications, Fall 2003 - Spring 2008 (16 publications)

          Beaudry, A., Schepman, S., Gunn, G., Lettic, S., & Neibusch, R. (2006). The effects of an
              incentive program intervention on driver performance in a private nonprofit agency.
              Journal of Business and Economics Research, 4, 83-91.
          Fouts, R. S., Fouts, D. H., & Waters, G. (2003). Wrist-walking: A candidate for a culturally
              transmitted communicative gesture. International Primatological Society Bulletin, 29(2),
              11.
          Fouts, R., & Waters, G. ( 2003) Unbalanced human apes and syntax. Brain and Behavioral
              Sciences, 26, 221-222.
          Jensvold, M. L., Field, A., Cranford, J., Fouts, R., & Fouts, D. (2005) Incidence of wounding
              within a group of five signing chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Laboratory Primate
              Newsletter, 44, 5-7.
          Jones, A. M., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S. (2008). Aggression
              and habituation toward humans in two troops of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at
              Mt. Huangshan, China (Abstract). American Journal of Primatology, 70 (Suppl.1), 61.
          Herrington, A., Matheny, K. B., Curlette, W. L., McCarthy, C., & Penick, J. (2005).
              Lifestyles, coping resources, and negative life events as predictors of emotional distress in
              university women. Journal of Individual Psychology, 61, 4.
          Hicks, T. C., Fouts, R. S., & Fouts, D. H. (2005). Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes)
              tool use in the Ngotto Forest, Central African Republic. American Journal of Primatology,
              65, 221-237.
          Mack, H. M., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S. (2008). Grooming
              behavior of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) in the presence of tourists at Mt.
              Huangshan, China (Abstract). American Journal of Primatology, 70 (Suppl.1), 59.
          Matheson, M. D., Mack, H. M., Sheeran, L. K., Yenter, T., & Shulz, P. (2008). Captive ex-pet
              Macaca fasciularis use hair and dental floss to floss their teeth (Abstract). American
              Journal of Primatology, 70 (Suppl.1), 56.
          Matheson, M. D., Hartel, J., Whitaker, C., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S. (2007).
               Self-directed behavior correlates with tourist density in free-living Tibetan macaques
               (Macaca thibetana) at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys, Mt. Huangshan, China (Abstract).
               American Journal of Primatology, 69 (Suppl.), 41-42.
          McCarthy, M. S., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Lester, J. D., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S.
              (2007). Sequences of Tibetan macaque behaviors and tourist behaviors at Mt. Huangshan,
              China (Abstract). American Journal of Primatology, 69 (Suppl.), 41-42.
          Schepman, S., Richmond, F. L., & Elsner, J. (2003). The exploration of moderators of the
              job/life satisfaction relationship: A field study. Review of Business Research, 1, 68-70.

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          Stahelski, A., Schepman, S., Bennett, S. & Owens, M. (2004). Using feedback to improve
              human performance in a correctional setting. Review of Business Research, 3, 88-94.
          Weyandt, L., Hays, B., & Schepman, S. (2005). The construct validity of the Internal
              Restlessness Scale. Assessment for Effective Intervention, 30, 53-63.
          Wilbanks, B. A., Matheson, M. D., Eubanks, J. L. & Devietti, T. L. (2005). Effects of
              perceived risk and strength of affiliation on decisions to help others: Toward a
              convergence of evolutionary and social psychology. Psychological Reports, 96, 977-987.
          Yenter, T. A., Matheson, M. D., Sheeran, L. K., Li, J. H., & Wagner, R. S. (2008). Preliminary
              analyses of self-directed behaviors in Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at a tourist site
              (Abstract). American Journal of Primatology, 69 (Suppl.), 41-42.

          Employment and Doctoral Placement of Graduate Students (2005-2008)

              Ph.D. Candidate, Biological Anthropology, University of Southern California
              Ph.D. Candidate, Organizational Psychology, Bowling Green
              Teacher for at-risk children, New Adventures Childrens' Center, Mary Bridge Childrens'
                   Hospital, Tacoma, WA.
              School Psychologist, Snoqualmie Valley School District, Snoqualmie, WA
              Mental Health Counselor, Columbia Valley Behavioral Health
                   Services, Wenatchee, WA
              Central Washington Community Mental Health, Yakima, WA
              Research Assistant, Oregon
              Telephone Company executive, Bend, OR
              Media Project Manager, ENIGMA, Yakima, WA
              Self-employed, Ellensburg, WA
              Human Resources Specialist, Everett, WA
              Financial Services, Edward Jones Financial Consultants
              Trainer, Tri-Cities, WA
              Organization Development, Washington, DC
              External Consultant, Chehalis, WA
              School Psychologist, Brier Terrace Middle School, Edmonds, WA
              Mental Health Counselor, Stevens Hospital, Edmonds, WA
              Caregiver, Chimps, Inc. Bend, OR., then Keeper (Primates) at San Diego Zoo, CA
              Zoo Keeper, Maryland Zoo, MD
              Training Manger, Attachmate, Bellevue, WA
              Organization Development Manager, Focus on the Family, Texas
              Catherine Freer Wilderness Therapy Expeditions, Albany, OR
              Central Washington Community Mental Health Northwest Associates, Ellensburg, WA
              School Psychologist, Mukilteo School District, Mukilteo, WA
              School Psychologist, Yakima (WA) School District
              Career Counselor, Cle Elum (WA) School District
              Central Washington Community Mental Health, Ellensburg, WA
              School Counselor, Ellensburg (WA) School District; Psychology instructor, Central
                   Washington University
              Family Counselor, Greater Minnesota Family Services, Willmar, MN
              Canine Education Instructor, Petco, Mt. Vernon, WA; Whale Watch Excursion Guide,
                   Anacortes, WA
              Organization Development Specialist, Bellevue, WA

Page 55
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          Human Resources Specialist, Yakima, WA
          Executive Director, Raw Network of Washington, Seattle, WA
          Business Education instructor, Richland High School, Richland, WA
          Human Resources, Information Technology, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Keyport,
              WA
          Environmental Health Specialist/Communicable Diseases, Yakima Health District,
              Yakima, WA
          Yakima County Jail Commissary Manager, Yakima, WA
          School Counselor, Ellensburg (WA) School District; Psychology instructor, Central
              Washington University
          School Psychologist, Richland School District, Richland, WA
          School Psychologist, Northshore School District, Bothell, WA
          School Psychologist, New York State
          Rehabilitative Case Manager, Nueces County Mental Health and Mental Retardation
              Clinic, Del Rio and Corpus Christi, TX
          External OD Consultant, Everett, WA
          Completing internship in mental health counseling
          Health, Safety and Nutrition Manager, Kittitas County Head Start, Ellensburg, WA
          Youth Program Leader, Learning for Life, Seattle, WA
          School Psychologist, Franklin-Pierce School District, Tacoma, WA
          School Psychologist, Franklin-Pierce School District, Tacoma, WA
          School Psychologist, Yelm (WA) Community Schools
          School Psychologist, Tahoma School District, Maple Valley, WA
          Director of Special Education, School Psychologist, Cashmere (WA) School District
          School Counselor, Morris Schott Middle School, Wahluke (WA) School District
          Magician, Kennewick, WA
          School Psychologist, Lake Washington School District, Seattle, WA; Cabinet Maker
          School Counselor, Haiku Elementary School, Makawao, Maui, HI
          Counselor, Central Washington Comprehensive Mental Health, Yakima, WA
          School Counselor, Medical Lake Middle School, Medical Lake, Washington
          School Counselor, Wenatchee (WA) School District
          Project SUCCESS Counselor, Secondary Academy for Success (Northshore School
              District's alternative high school)
          School Counselor, Kelso (WA) School District
          Event Coordinator, Apple Tree Resort, Yakima, WA
          School Psychologist, Davis High School, Yakima (WA) School District
          School Psychologist, East Valley School District, Yakima, WA
          School Psychologist, Sumner School District, Sumner, WA
          School Psychologist, Auburn School District, Auburn, WA
          School Psychologist, Franklin-Pierce School District, Tacoma, WA
          School Counselor, Totem Falls School, Snohomish SD, Snohomish, WA
          School Counselor, West Valley HS, Yakima, WA
          School Psychologist, Mt. Baker School District, Deming, WA
          School Psychologist, Fairbanks (Alaska) School District
          School Psychologist, Yakima (WA) School District
          Research Associate at Children's Hospital in Seattle, WA
          Supervisory Survey Statistician for the U.S. Census Bureau at the Los Angeles Regional
              Office

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               Private practice animal behavior consultant, and a dog training expert and consultant for
                   PetCo
               Mental Health Counselor, Washington State Penitentiary, Walla Walla, WA

          B.      Provide one masters project (if applicable); two will be randomly selected during site
                  visit. Available in either the library or through the departmental office.

                  The Psychology Department has at least one recent master’s thesis available in the
                  office and many more available in the library.

          C.      Describe departmental policies, services, initiatives, and documented results for
                  successful student advising.

                      Students interested in a psychology major can arrange for advising sessions with a
                       faculty member of their choice or they can come to the department office for
                       assignment to an advisor appropriate to their interests. All undergraduate majors
                       are assigned a faculty advisor at the time of application for admission to the
                       program. They are required to meet with the advisor and obtain a signature
                       verifying that meeting prior to formal acceptance to the major. We have no formal
                       advisor training.

                      The Advisement Committee is a standing committee of the department. It has
                       developed a set of printed materials to accompany our advisory meetings with
                       students. This set includes a course worksheet, major declaration form, faculty
                       research interests summary, career guide, and undergraduate handbook. These
                       materials are also available on the department web site at
                       http://www.cwu.edu/~psych/ugbook.html

                      Our senior capstone course includes graduate school planning and career advising
                       sessions.

                      All graduate students meet for an orientation session at the beginning of their first
                       quarter. They are assigned an individual advisor and are closely guided through the
                       graduate curriculum. Our graduate handbook is available on the web at
                       http://www.cwu.edu/~psych/gradhandbk.doc.

          D.      Describe other student services offered through the department including any
                  professional societies or faculty-led clubs or organizations and their activities.

                  The psychology department sponsors a chapter of Psi Chi, the national honor society in
                  psychology, and a local Psychology Club, for students who are not eligible for Psi Chi
                  or choose not to join the national organization. Psi Chi/Psychology Club elects its own
                  student officers and has one or two faculty advisors. It sponsors monthly meetings on
                  topics of interest, including faculty research presentations, graduate school advice, and
                  career guidance. Psi Chi/Psychology Club raises funds every year to support student
                  travel to the Western Psychological Association meeting. The Psi Chi web site is at
                  http://www.cwu.edu/~psych/psichi.html and the Psychology Club web site is at
                  http://www.cwu.edu/~psych/psychclub.html. In addition, the counseling faculty have
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                 successfully added a Chi Sigma Iota Chapter (Chi Sigma Phi) in Spring 2007 and
                 created the Counseling Club, an officially sponsored program through Central
                 Washington University, for Fall 2008.

V.        Facilities and Equipment by location

          A. Describe facilities available to department and their adequacy (program delivery location,
             size, functionality, adjacencies, lighting, ventilation, finishes, plumbing, electrical outlets,
             etc.). Describe anticipated needs in the next three to five years.

             The Psychology Building on the CWU Ellensburg campus was built in 1972 and was state
             of the art for its time. Its four floors are divided into three or four wings each. Each wing
             provides a specialized category of service. The first and third floors are fully utilized by the
             Psychology Department for program support and delivery. The second and fourth floors are
             shared with other CWU departments to provide offices, classrooms, and meeting rooms.
             Table 6 below summarizes the Psychology Department's usage of the building.

                                                          Table 6

                               Psychology Department Use of Psychology Building
              Department Program               Psychology        Specialization
                                               Building
                                               Floor/Wing
              School Counseling, Mental Health First South-West  Community Counseling and
              Counseling, School Psychology                      Psychological Assessment Center
              School Psychology                First North-West  Developmental Preschool
              All Programs                     First North-East  Mechanical Engineering Support
              Experimental                     Second South-West Human Research
              Experimental                     Third South-West  Animal Research
              Experimental                     Third North-West  Human Research
              All Programs                     Third North-East  Computer Lab
              All Programs                     Third South-East  Computer & Electronic
                                                                 Engineering Support
              All Programs                     Fourth South-West Offices, Meeting Rooms,
                                                                 Computer Lab

             After over 35 years of service the Psychology Building needs renovation.

             The building exhibits usual and unusual plumbing and electrical problems associated with
             an older structure. Broken pipes, valves and water damage have become routine on all
             floors during the last 3 years. Many electrical fixtures and wiring are no longer legally up
             to code. Tile flooring is warped, loose and mismatched in many places.

             A partial upgrade to the building HVAC system in 2006 improved energy efficiency and
             ensured environmental isolation of the animal research wing from the rest of the building.

             During the HVAC upgrade, the third floor North-West wing was converted from an animal
             technical area to a human research area. Five of the rooms (50% of the space) previously
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               used for animal habitation are not yet remodeled for human occupancy. These rooms are of
               limited value due to their unfinished condition.

               Building illumination is acceptably delivered by energy efficient florescent fixtures.

               Program dependent space requirements are met at current allocated levels. These levels
               appear adequate for the next 3 to 5 years.

          B. Describe equipment available to department include program delivery location and its
             adequacy (office furniture, instructional fixtures, lab equipment, storage cabinets, specialty
             items, etc.) Describe anticipated needs in the next three to five years.

               The Experimental Psychology program presently has a single computer based Physiology
               Laboratory. This small lab will serve a class of up to eight students. The limited lab facility
               precludes larger course offerings. There appears to be considerable demand for this kind of
               research capability within the department. To encourage fresh investigation by faculty and
               students, the number of stations would need to increase. The specialized equipment is not
               inexpensive at a cost of $5,000 per station plus the cost of a computer. A five station
               Physiology lab would be modest. The equipment has an estimated 10-year lifespan.

               The School Psychology program is currently using VHS Camcorders and VHS Cassette
               players to record and review interviews gathered off site. Use of this outdated equipment
               reflects poorly on the School Psychology program and makes it susceptible to criticism
               from accrediting bodies. VHS equipment is expensive to maintain and its media is insecure.
               These units should be replaced as soon as possible with contemporary digital recording
               technology. To entirely replace the VHS inventory 15 portable outfits are needed.

               Laptop computers for off site experimental data gathering are unavailable as a department
               resource. Requests for specialized laptop computers for experimental use are now common.
               Lack of portable computing devices for remote data acquisition closes many potentially
               fertile avenues of research.

               Many department desks, cabinets, chairs and furnishings were new 35 years ago. While still
               serviceable, these dated items tend to leave a poor impression of the Psychology
               Department. There are even a number of classrooms in the building which have chalk
               boards which need to be replaced with white boards.


VI.       Library and Technological Resources by location

          A.      Describe general and specific requirements for library resources by program and
                  location that assist in meeting educational and research objectives. Indicate ways in
                  which the present library resources satisfy and do not satisfy these needs. Describe
                  anticipated needs as to the next 5 year period.

                  The university’s Brooks Library has been very active in developing access to full text
                  electronic journals and web access to library services, including PsycINFO. In the last
                  year, the Summit Alliance has provided us with access to the holdings of academic

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               libraries in Washington and Oregon. We can order books from member libraries and
               delivery is reasonably prompt. A twice-weekly courier delivers items from the Brooks
               Library. Individual journal articles may be provided from a member library in
               photocopy or email PDF form. We can borrow from the holdings of member libraries if
               we are on that institution’s campus and return the item at our own campus library.
               Students at our centers have the same borrowing privileges and online access as those
               on the Ellensburg campus. A knowledgeable interlibrary loan staff has a good record of
               finding and ordering items from libraries around the United States.

               Each academic department on campus has a library representative, who consults with
               our professional librarians about the department’s needs. The library has identified
               disciplinary experts on its staff, providing us with a librarian who keeps informed about
               our needs. The psychology department has benefited from a series of active and
               interested faculty library representatives and our holdings are adequate to our needs.
               The only chronically underrepresented portions of our library collection have been
               journals and video materials. Subscriptions to online journal databases have gone far to
               fill gaps in our print journals. Keeping up with advances in media technology from film
               to tape to CD to DVD has been difficult for all libraries and many professors turn to
               video clips from publishers and online sources instead of traditional library sources.
               Overall, our library holdings and staff are very commendable.

               Book acquisitions primarily are managed by a wholesaler’s purchase plan guided by our
               university profile, but 100-200 books per year from publishers outside the purchase
               plan. Appropriate psychology faculty members review these titles and make purchase
               recommendations. In addition, our department has an annual book budget for faculty
               purchase requests. To some extent, we coordinate our purchases with other Summit
               libraries to avoid multiple purchases of seldom-used volumes.

          B.   Describe the information technologies faculty regularly and actively utilize in the
               classroom. Describe anticipated needs as to the next five year period.

               About 80% of the psychology faculty use instructional technology. Instructors, text
               publishers, and web sources have created effective visual and audio support materials
               for traditional courses. In addition, many instructors use the interactive capabilities of
               Blackboard to present information to students and mediate topical interactions among
               students. Classrooms in the Psychology Building are gradually becoming equipped with
               instructional presentation hardware. Our department has two engineering technicians
               that support our instructional and research needs.

               A sixteen-station PC computer laboratory is currently used for instruction in PSY 300,
               Research Methods in Psychology, PSY 301, Learning, and PSY 450, Cognitive
               Psychology. In-house programming is used for lab exercises in cognitive psychology
               and research methods. Computer-supported laboratory exercises (“Sniffy”) are used in
               PSY 301, Learning. The Sniffy package provides students with hands-on simulation
               experience in setting up and conducting animal experiments in learning and
               conditioning without requiring students to use a real rat. This sixteen-station lab is also
               used for undergraduate and graduate student and faculty research projects, as is a six-
               station PC suite in our human research wing.

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               The Psychology Building houses a 19-station Mac and PC lab supported by university
               student computer fees. It is staffed by a student assistant and can be reserved for group
               instruction. We use this lab for some sections of our three statistics courses.

          C.   Describe technology available to department and its adequacy. Describe anticipated
               needs as to the next five year period.

               For the most part, our faculty members have very good access to research equipment.
               We are able to purchase or build most required equipment. We have a full time
               engineering technician and full time engineering technician specializing in computer-
               based research systems to design and produce hardware and software for instructional
               and research purposes. The building’s research areas include a variety of specialized
               individual and group laboratory spaces that are used by students and faculty for animal
               and human research. Our animal lab space has recently undergone a significant
               remodel to bring it up to animal care standards. We anticipate further technology and
               equipment needs in both of our animal and human laboratories to enable our new
               faculty to teach their classes and conduct their research.

               New buildings house our programs at our Yakima, Wenatchee, and three Puget Sound
               centers. The classroom facilities are equal to or superior to the classrooms in Ellensburg
               in terms of technology and comfort. Technical support and DE facilities are excellent at
               the centers. There are also computer labs at the centers. Though the hours of
               availability of the center computer labs generally aren't as extensive as the computer
               labs on the Ellensburg campus, the center labs are fully supported and well run. Each
               center has online access to the university’s computing resources, including online
               library resources. In addition, all CWU students have free access to the extensive library
               holding at the University of Washington.

               Commodity grade computers are a standard vehicle for program delivery and support.
               Psychology department computers fall into two categories:

               1) Desktop and Classroom computers maintained by CWU ITS.

               2) Special purpose research and instrumentation computers maintained by Psychology
                  Engineering Staff.

               Computers in category 1 are funded by the ITS budget and are on a regular maintenance
               and replacement schedule. These computers are regularly replaced at 5-year intervals.
               Computers in category 2 are currently unfunded and are without a maintenance budget.
               These computers are "donated" to the Psychology Department by ITS with a self
               support proviso. No current funding mechanism exists to assure these units are regularly
               replaced or upgraded. The department has over 80 computers in this aged self-support
               category. They form the backbone of research and teaching systems used by many
               department programs, and are vital to program delivery. These self-support research
               machines are distributed broadly as follows:



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                    The CCPAC Clinic employs a 25 work station video LAN to record and document
                     confidential counseling sessions with clients.

                    Various human and animal research projects use another 20 machines as data
                     acquisition and control computers.

                    Experimental student computer labs utilize another 35 computers.

                 All the above machines are at least 5 years old. Their service life is maximally extended
                 by using the Linux operating system, which places lower demands on older computer
                 hardware. However, these computers do eventually begin to exhibit uncorrectable
                 hardware failures. Research computer replacement is necessary now and will continue
                 into the next 3 to 5 years.

                 The Psychology Building computer network infrastructure received a major upgrade in
                 2008. The upgrade provided all new CAT5/e cabling and Cisco 2960 switches. As a
                 result, the department now has an internal research LAN in the building for
                 administering research projects and student labs. This is in addition to enhanced
                 performance of CWU network services in the building. In addition, wireless network
                 access in the Psychology Building was made available in 2005 by CWU Networks.

                 The Psychology building has eight multimedia classrooms available in the building.
                 These are funded and maintained by CWU ITS. We also have two media carts
                 available for use in non-multimedia classrooms and meeting rooms. The equipment on
                 these carts is funded by the department. We anticipate needing at least two updated
                 Mac laptops to properly equip these carts.

                 No distance education classrooms or meeting rooms currently exist within the building.
                 However, we anticipate the need for at least one distance education room in the building
                 to ensure that we include tenure-track faculty from Des Moines in our department
                 meetings.

VII.      Analysis of the Review Period

          The content of this section and Section VI reflect upon the observations made thus far in this
          document and the results of a department retreat held on December 8, 2008 for the specific
          purpose of discussing our accomplishments, challenges, suggestions for improvement, and
          future directions. Eighteen faculty members met at the retreat, including two of our full-time
          non-tenure track faculty.

       A. What has gone well in the department and each degree programs?
           1. Explain accomplishments of the past five years.
                We are pleased with our department’s academic success, its rigor, and the evidence
                   that validates its quality.
                    Our graduating senior scores are at or above the mean on the MFT in all core
                       course areas.
                    An increasing number of qualified students are choosing to do undergraduate
                       honors theses.
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                 Our undergraduate students are presenting research at regional, state, national &
                  international conferences.
                 Our students are successful in getting into graduate programs, both master’s
                  level and doctoral level.
                 Our School Psychology (SP) graduate program continues to maintain full NASP
                  accreditation.
                 Our Mental Health Counseling (MHC) graduate program has achieved
                  CACREP accreditation and our School Counseling (SC) graduate program is
                  actively working on submitting materials for CACREP accreditation.
                 Both our SP and SC certification programs continue to be fully approved by the
                  Office of the Superintendent for Public Instruction (OSPI) and both were
                  recognized as leaders in the university in meeting the criteria for NCATE
                  accreditation.
                 Student scores from internship evaluations (SP, MHC, and SC) continue to
                  demonstrate mastery in all clinical areas.

             We are committed to an ongoing process of assessment, program improvement, and
              curriculum development.
               We developed and formalized comprehensive program and student learning
                 goals and assessment plans for our undergraduate major and all of our graduate
                 programs.
               Our assessment reports on student learning were highly rated by the University
                 Academic Assessment Committee and were singled out for recognition as being
                 among some of the best assessment reports in the college and university.
               Each graduate program has developed its own internal assessment procedures,
                 which provide evidence of student excellence for skills, knowledge, and
                 dispositions for each student.
               We added a capstone Senior Assessment class to the major.
               We revised our undergraduate major and added classes in cognitive and
                 physiological psychology to the core requirements to be more consistent with
                 changes in the field.
               We revised our undergraduate minor to make it more flexible and relevant to
                 students in other majors.
               We developed and adopted a common set of student learning objectives for each
                 undergraduate psychology class so that there would be consistency across
                 different sections and instructors.
               Our counseling programs integrated more of a counseling identity into the
                 training clinic. To support this emphasis, we changed the name of the clinic
                 from Community Psychological Services Center to the Community Counseling
                 and Psychological Assessment Center.
               We significantly restructured our MS Experimental Psychology graduate
                 program to address the changing emphasis in the discipline and to attract more
                 students.
               We added a specialization in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) to the MS
                 Experimental Psychology graduate program.
               We expanded practicum and intern experiences for clinical programs (SP, SC,
                 MHC)
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                 We revised our Mental Health Counseling graduate program to address the
                  CACREP standards, including expanding the internship requirement from 600 to
                  900 hours and standardizing the practica at all levels.
                 We revised the conceptual framework for both the School Psychology and
                  School Counseling graduate programs.
                 The School Counseling program has started to require multicultural experiences
                  of all students during coursework and during internship.
                 We arranged to start offering the NCE (National Counseling Exam), beginning
                  in October 2008

             We continue to hire highly qualified faculty members who maintain their currency
              with appropriate scholarship, teaching excellence, and service to the academic
              community and public service opportunities.
               We’ve hired three new experimental psychology faculty in the department to
                  strengthen our expertise in cognitive and physiological psychology as well as
                  applied behavior analysis. One of these hires became our first tenure-track
                  faculty member at a university center (Des Moines).
               We’ve hired three new faculty members to support the graduate programs in
                  Mental Health and School Counseling, as well as the undergraduate psychology
                  program.
               One of our faculty members, Andrew Downs, was awarded Excellence in
                  Teaching by the CWU Parent Association.
               Several School Counseling faculty members were successful in receiving a grant
                  with the ESD 105 and through the Department of Education, which has resulted
                  in increased internship and student involvement within the community.
               The counseling faculty has increased their involvement with state professional
                  organizations, especially the Washington Mental Health Counseling Association
                  (WMHCA).
               The counseling faculty have successfully added a Chi Sigma Iota Chapter (Chi
                  Sigma Phi) in Spring 2007 and created the Counseling Club, an officially
                  sponsored program through Central Washington University, for Fall 2008.
               We’ve hosted the Washington State Association of Counselor Educators
                  meeting for the past four years.
               We created a student and faculty liaison position for the Washington School
                  Counselor Association.
               Based on faculty and students comments, we’ve been successful in increasing
                  the atmosphere of collegiality within the department as a whole and within the
                  counseling program faculty in particular.

             Our department maintains a strong commitment to interdisciplinary connections,
              field experience opportunities, and community outreach.
               We participate in an interdisciplinary summer field school in China, along with
                  the departments of biology and anthropology.
               We have developed an Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) interdisciplinary
                  graduate specialization in conjunction with the special education program.
               We continue our collaboration with Children’s Village in Yakima.


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                    We collaborate with the Ellensburg school district alternative middle school and
                     high school that are housed on the CWU campus, as well as the developmental
                     preschool housed in the Psychology building.
                    We coordinate a curriculum-based measurement (CBM) benchmark assessment
                     program for the Ellensburg school district and provide trained undergraduate
                     and graduate student volunteers to participate in this program.

                We are committed to providing access to our undergraduate psychology courses to
                 students at our regional centers.
                  We now offer a psychology major at CWU-Des Moines.
                  We are now offering a range of psychology classes via DE to new centers in
                     Skagit and Everett.
                  We have greatly increased our web-based course offerings to meet the needs of
                     students at our centers.

                We have been successful at increasing our technical and instructional resources as
                 well as updating our research facilities.
                  A majority of the faculty use technological resources in the classrooms
                    (PowerPoint, Blackboard, etc.)
                  We were able to do a significant upgrade of the animal lab on the 3rd floor of the
                    Psychology building.
                  We hired a new full-time engineer technician, which has increased the efficiency
                    and effectiveness of our technological support for instruction and research.
                  We’ve gradually been able to upgrade more of our classrooms in building to be
                    media-capable.
                  We have a faculty member who has utilized “clicker” technology in the
                    classroom.
                  The School Psychology program has been successful at getting grants for test
                    materials from various test publishers.
                  We have completely upgraded our training clinic with digital recording
                    technology, with the help of a COTS equipment grant.
                  A School Counseling faculty member was successful at getting a COTS
                    equipment for the purchase of play therapy equipment.

          2. How have accomplishments been supported though external and internal resources?

             Though the department has not submitted many requests for external funding, we have
             been successful at applying for and receiving funding from within the university.
             Following is a summary of our sources of external and internal support.

                In conjunction with ESD 105, we received a 1.1 million School Counseling grant
                 from the Department of Education.
                We received several test material grants from test publishers.
                We received a COTS equipment grant that allowed us to upgrade the recording
                 technology in clinic from analog to digital.
                We received a COTS equipment grant for play therapy equipment for the clinic.
                We received some internal funding to support CACREP accreditation.
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                  Several faculty members have been successful at getting internal research or SEED
                   grants.
                  Students have received internal funding to present at professional meetings such as
                   ACA and WPA.
                  Upgrade of our animal labs was made possible from a variety of internal funding
                   sources, including the COTS dean.
                  All full-time faculty members have access to professional development funds from
                   sources such as the Provost’s office, the COTS dean, the Graduate Studies and
                   Research office, and the Psychology department summer instruction revenues.
                  Several faculty members have been awarded stipends for developing web-based
                   classes.
                  New faculty members have been provided start-up funds by the COTS dean and the
                   Provost.
                  All new faculty members are provided $2000 towards the purchase of a desktop
                   computer and peripherals for their office.
                  All new faculty members are given five workload units of release from instruction
                   in their first year to assist them in getting started in their research agendas.

     B. What challenges exist for the department and for each degree program?

          This section describes some of the struggles we face as a department and the likely reasons
          for these challenges.

           1. Explain major challenges of the past five years.

                  An increasing budgetary crisis contributes to some of our ongoing challenges.
                    We need more out-of-state tuition waivers, especially for graduate students.
                    We need more graduate assistantships to both attract qualified students and
                       assist the faculty in instruction and research. However, we have not had an
                       increase in the number of graduate assistant allocations in the past five years.
                       Furthermore, when a graduate assistant has to resign their position, for whatever
                       reason, we are not permitted to offer a replacement assistantship.
                    Though we do have faculty development funds, some faculty members find
                       them insufficient to support travel to and the delivery of scholarly presentations
                       at national and international conferences.

                  Although we have been able to hire some outstanding new faculty members in the
                   past several years, we are still plagued with problems related to insufficient staffing.
                    We’ve had a quite a few retirements and resignations in the past five years.
                    We were unable to fill all of our faculty vacancies last year (seven vacancies and
                       only three hires), so we have been forced to rely too heavily on non-tenure track
                       (adjunct) instructors. This year we have been faced with frozen searches, which
                       have prevented us from filling all of our vacancies.
                    The School Psychology program has been particularly hard hit by faculty
                       turnover with two recent resignations, one upcoming retirement, and the fourth
                       and last qualified school psychology faculty member serving as department
                       chair (and thus unavailable for teaching or supervision).

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                 New faculty hires are not permitted by the graduate school to chair master’s
                  theses until they have been a member of a thesis committee. Phased retirees are
                  also not permitted to serve as a thesis chair. This places a very heavy thesis
                  burden on the tenure-track (TT) faculty.
                 Adjunct faculty are not allowed to serve on department committees which places
                  a heavy burden on TT faculty to staff all of our committees.
                 Adjunct faculty are not allowed to advise students which also places a heavy
                  burden on TT faculty.
                 PSY 101, 314, and 315 are taught predominantly by adjuncts, which makes it
                  more difficult to ensure stable and quality instruction in these general education
                  and service classes.
                 It has been difficult to find qualified adjuncts, including at the centers.

             Another significant challenge in the past five years has been the ever-increasing
              workload. Though the increased workload demands have been most event at the
              department chair level, it has impacted all faculty to some degree or another.
               The paperwork and reporting requirements have increased dramatically (i.e.
                 workload plans, structured performance records, annual activity reports, etc.).
               Faculty are often asked to provide redundant information for reports but in a
                 different format so it takes a great deal of time away from instruction,
                 scholarship, and service to complete the paperwork and reporting requirements.
               Additional requirements for the development of department self-studies,
                 assessment plans, and assessment reports are dumped on departments without
                 any corresponding release time or compensation for the additional workload.
               Faculty are being asked to teach larger classes to increase FTES but are still
                 expected to maintain the same high level of scholarship and service.
               Expectations for scholarship have become more stringent but faculty are still
                 expected to teach the same number of classes.
               Counseling faculty continue to be burdened with the inequitable time demands
                 for practica supervision and instructions. More release time is needed for these
                 faculty-intensive roles.

             Insufficient support for new faculty members is another challenge we face.
               There is no formal, ongoing mentoring available for new faculty within the
                  department or the university. However, informal mentoring is available.
               Some new faculty feel they have too many new course preparations, which takes
                  away time needed to establish their research agenda. The balance between
                  teaching and research is a constant stressor.
               New faculty have expressed an interest in having release time to observe how
                  experienced faculty members deliver instruction and manage their courses.

             The department also faces some challenges related to instruction and program
              growth.
               Because of the limited staffing and resources noted earlier, the School
                 Psychology graduate program is not able to admit the number of students needed
                 to meet the regional, state, or national demands for trained school psychologists.


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                    The School Psychology and School Counseling graduate programs would both
                     like to change their current master’s degree programs to specialist degree
                     programs to better reflect the high credit loads for these graduate programs and
                     to provide students with the recognition they deserve for successfully
                     completing these programs. The School Counseling program is also seeking
                     CACREP accreditation, which is a time-consuming process.
                    Classrooms within the psychology building are often not available to our
                     faculty, which forces faculty members to travel to other buildings on campus to
                     teach and to carry laptops and other instructional materials to these distant
                     classrooms.
                    There is a tremendous push within the university to develop and deliver online
                     courses. However, training on online course development and delivery is often
                     insufficient. Furthermore, the university has not done a good job of carefully
                     evaluating the effectiveness of these online classes or ensuring that the quality of
                     these classes is comparable to traditional classroom instruction.
                    The necessary curriculum reorganization of the graduate programs in MS
                     Experimental, ABA, and PBE has resulted in the need for new graduate level
                     courses. However, this pulls faculty away from other teaching obligations and
                     makes it difficult to find qualified instructors for all classes.

                Finally, faculty members within the department of psychology have expressed some
                 concern about inconsistent administrative support and an ill-defined university
                 mission. Many of these concerns have lessened with recent administrative staffing
                 changes, but some concerns still linger.

          2. List likely causes of each challenge as supported by documented evidence.

             As we address the likely causes of the challenges we’ve identified, it becomes very
             apparent that many of the challenges are interrelated and have similar causes.

                The most obvious causes of the budget crisis are insufficient state revenues.

                The causes of staffing challenges are most likely multi-faceted.

                    First of all, we have difficulty recruiting and attracting a broad pool of qualified
                     applicants. Some of this may be due to salaries that are not competitive enough
                     and some is probably due to the lack of diversity in our community, making
                     CWU less attractive to women and minorities.
                    In some cases, the staffing challenge is due to a low availability of qualified job-
                     seeking applicants and/or an excess number of similar job opportunities at other
                     institutions.
                    The high number of retirements in recent years is a natural consequence of
                     having an aging department. The reasons for the resignations are a bit more
                     difficult to discern but are likely due to competition by other institutions.
                    Our excess reliance on adjunct faculty is partially due to our inability to hire
                     tenure-track faculty replacements for retirements and resignations. Furthermore,
                     adjunct instruction costs the university less money so when budgets are tight,

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                  it’s easier for the administration to justify hiring low wage temporary
                  employees.

             Many of the increases in workload (especially for the department chair) came after
              the adoption of the collective bargaining agreement (CBA). Though some of the
              additional workload was probably inevitable, much of it is likely due to poor
              planning and organization, overly restrictive policies and inefficient record-keeping
              at higher levels of administration.

                 Some of the increased workload issues are likely due to an increased recognition
                  of our need for accountability as a department, college, and institution.
                  However, there has been little or no attempt to offset the added workload of
                  reporting with additional release time and/or compensation.
                 The lack of a functional, relational database can also be blamed for much of the
                  excessive and redundant reporting requirements.
                 Furthermore, there could be a much more concerted effort to coordinate the
                  reporting demands so that information is asked for in a consistent and
                  predictable format, allowing for more copying and pasting.
                 Some of the added workload pressures placed on senior TT faculty could be
                  avoided if there was more support within the administration for awarding
                  graduate faculty status earlier to new faculty hire, and thereby distributing the
                  thesis chairing load more equitably.
                 Furthermore, if there was administrative support for routinely adding service
                  and advising workload to adjunct contracts (with appropriate compensation),
                  some of the excessive workload placed on TT faculty could be relieved.
                 The increasing demands for scholarly productivity have not been accompanied
                  by decreased demands for instruction, thereby leading to excessive workload.
                 Until recently, there was very little administrative support for “individualizing”
                  workload plans within the department so that some faculty could focus more on
                  research (and less on teaching) and others could balance the department
                  workload by doing more teaching and less scholarship. In addition, faculty
                  sacrifice their own chance at promotion or tenure if they take on more of the
                  teaching burden within the department and thereby produce less scholarship.
                 Activities such as advising and time spent in maintaining required licensure and
                  certification are not included in workload plans and therefore are not recognized
                  or compensated by the university.
                 Finally, budget limitations can, once again, be targeted as a likely cause of
                  workload challenges. As the budget gets tighter, faculty and chairs are asked to
                  do more with the same or fewer resources.

             The likely causes for the insufficient support of new faculty members are budgetary,
              workload, and organizational.
               Budgetary constraints make it difficult to give new faculty the amount of release
                 time they need for instructional development and to establish their research
                 agendas.
               As for the lack of mentoring, it’s hard to require senior faculty members to
                 invest a lot of time in mentoring their junior colleagues when these senior
                 faculty are already overworked.
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                 Though the department chair and the chair of the personnel committee routinely
                  meet with all new faculty members in their first quarter to provide guidance and
                  information, more on-going and individualized mentoring would probably be
                  beneficial. Though the department has discussed the need for formal mentoring
                  of new faculty, we have not established an organized and reliable method for
                  ensuring that this mentoring takes place.

             The challenges related to instruction and program growth are likely due to
              budgetary restrictions, insufficient classroom facilities, increasing demands from
              external constituents (community, accreditation organization, etc.), and insufficient
              administrative support.

                 The department, college, and university as a whole are under tremendous
                  pressure to maximize student enrollment to meet budgeted numbers. This
                  results in large class sizes and the need for our faculty to teach outside the
                  psychology building (because most of our classrooms are small).
                 Another likely reason why faculty do not have convenient access to fully
                  equipped and well-designed classrooms is that the university’s classroom
                  facilities are often insufficient to meet the technological and capacity demands
                  of our student body, leading to more competition for the limited number of
                  adequate classrooms.
                 The increased demand for trained school psychologists within the state and
                  national is likely part of the challenge that the School Psychology program faces
                  in producing enough certified school psychologists. However, problems
                  recruiting and retaining qualified faculty are another likely cause of this
                  challenge.
                 The challenge of changing our master’s degree programs in School Psychology
                  and School Counseling to specialist degree programs is partially due to the
                  logistical difficulty of getting any new degree approved by the state Higher
                  Education Coordinating (HEC) Board. However, this process is made even
                  more difficult if there is not full support and assistance at the higher
                  administrative levels within the university.
                 Though there appears to be administrative support for gaining CACREP
                  accreditation for the School Counseling program by the administration, the
                  department still faces the inevitable hurtles of trying to align our program and
                  curriculum with the demands of an outside accrediting body.

             It’s difficult to pinpoint the likely reasons for inconsistent administrative support.
              Beyond the obvious budget realities, some of the past problems with administrative
              support are likely due to administrative styles of management that were
              incompatible with faculty morale. In addition, it’s possible that having a prior dean
              and provost who both had a strong natural science background interfered somewhat
              with their ability to fully support a department like psychology with a strong
              behavioral and social science orientation. Regardless of the reasons for the
              perceived lack of support, most of these concerns have diminished significantly with
              a change in administrative personnel.


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     C. What past recommendations from the previous program review have been implemented?


          1. How has each recommendation been implemented and how have the department and
             degree program been impacted?

             The department has attempted to address most of the recommendations from the last
             program review. However, quite a few of the recommendations required changes at
             higher administrative levels of the university. Following are a list of recommendations
             from the previous program review that have been implemented, either partially or
             completely, by the department:

                Define our “niche:” Faculty scholarship expectations have been made more
                 explicit; criteria for reappointment, promotion and tenure have been aligned with
                 those of the college; staffing and curriculum of the undergraduate major have been
                 realigned with national standards, and an applied behavior analyst track has been
                 added to the M.S. Experimental degree

                Mentoring of probationary faculty: The department chair and personnel committee
                 chair meet with new faculty members in their first quarter to discuss personnel
                 policies and procedures and to provide guidance towards favorable reappointment,
                 promotion, and tenure decisions. The department chair also distributes copies of
                 sample syllabi and student learning objectives to new faculty. Informal mentoring
                 by the department chair is provided, as requested. Furthermore, each new faculty
                 member has the opportunity to get direct feedback on their teaching by a more
                 senior faculty member who observes them in the classroom. The impact on the
                 department in terms of workload has been minimal but, then again, the mentoring
                 has been seen as insufficient by some faculty members so clearly more needs to be
                 done.

                Keep new course preparation to a minimum in the first three years: Every attempt
                 is made to give new faculty repeat course assignments to minimize new
                 preparations. However, because many graduate level classes are only taught once a
                 year, there is a limit to how frequently some of these repeat courses can be assigned.
                 The impact on the department has been a modest increase in new course
                 preparations for senior faculty members and an increased reliance on adjunct faculty
                 to cover courses that would otherwise result in excessive new course preparations
                 for new faculty.

                Consider not requiring a thesis in some of the master’s degree programs: The
                 department voted last year to allow master’s students in Mental Health Counseling,
                 School Counseling, and School Psychology to complete a project instead of a thesis.
                 However, the requirements for a project are still fairly rigorous and still require
                 extensive faculty mentoring so the impact on department workload has been non-
                 existent. However, the project option has allowed graduate students to avoid the
                 unreasonably long delays in thesis review at the graduate office level and therefore
                 earn their degrees in a more timely manner.

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             Increase collegiality among faculty: We have made great strides in improving the
              collegial atmosphere of the counseling programs and the department. This
              improvement was achieved through new hires and strategic reassignment of faculty.
              The impact on the department has been significant in terms of increased morale of
              the faculty and the graduate students, based on informal comments by faculty and
              students.

             Assess the goals and success of the 45-credit major vs. the 60-credit major: In 2006-
              2007, the department studied these programs. We found that about half of our
              students select our 45-credit major and half the 60-credit major. The student GPAs
              in both majors were very similar. The core of courses is the same in both majors.
              We concluded that both majors serve purposes valued by our students. Because no
              change occurred, implementing this recommendation did not have an impact on the
              department or degree program.

             Add more of an emphasis in cognitive and physiological psychology to the
              department: We added both cognitive and physiological psychology to the core
              requirements for the psychology major. We also hired three new faculty members
              with expertise in one or both of these areas. The impact on the department is a
              change in the frequency in which these courses are offered (now every quarter) and
              more reliance on adjuncts to teach other undergraduate psychology classes to free
              up faculty time to cover the additional sections of cognitive and physiological
              psychology. The implementation of this recommendation led to a change in degree
              requirements for the B.A.

             Add a capstone course to the major: We added a one-credit Senior Assessment class
              (PSY 489) to the major, beginning in the Fall 2007. This class has helped us be
              more systematic and thorough in our assessment of student learning goals. The
              implementation of this recommendation led to a change in degree requirements for
              the B.A.

             Need to decrease the number of practica and standardize procedures used in
              practica: The Mental Health and School Counseling program committee has been
              successful in addressing this recommendation. Both degree programs decreased the
              number of required practica and developed standardized evaluation procedures for
              practica. The impact has been more consistency and predictability in the counseling
              graduate degree programs.

             Discuss the possibility of adding a psychology major on the West side: We began
              offering a psychology major at the CWU-Des Moines center in the Fall 2007. This
              program was staffed for one year with a full time non tenure-track faculty member
              and is now staffed by a new tenure-track hire. Though the impact to the department
              in terms of new majors has not been significant, we expect that to increase with time
              and visibility of this program.

             Reexamine the role of graduate programs and resources allocated to them: We
              eliminated one master’s degree program (MSOD), allowing us to reallocate faculty
              to undergraduate instruction. In addition, we have added four new experimental
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                 faculty members who all teach some classes within the undergraduate major. The
                 addition of the new faculty has helped the department more fully staff the new core
                 classes in the psychology major. We attempted to address the need for graduate
                 classes by offering layered courses that included both undergraduate and graduate
                 students. In doing so, it appears that we have short-changed some of our graduate
                 students. Therefore, we are exploring options to gradually separate some of the
                 layered classes so that they can be taught separately.

          2. Which recommendations were not implemented and why?

          It is difficult to summarize the recommendations that were not implemented because many
          of the recommendations were either vague or addressed issues that were beyond the control
          of the department. Following are some of the more specific department-level
          recommendations that have not been implemented:

                More faculty should participate in thesis and research supervision: This has been
                 very difficult to implement because we have lost so many of our graduate faculty to
                 retirements or resignations in the past few years. The new faculty, though eager to
                 participate, are not permitted by the graduate school to supervise theses until they
                 have served as a committee member through an entire thesis process. Furthermore,
                 we have not been able to fill all of our tenure-track vacancies so that places more of
                 the thesis burden on fewer of the faculty.

                Foster publication of master’s theses: Most of our graduate students do not submit
                 their theses for publication. Part of this is probably due to their career goals, which
                 are often focused more on practitioner roles within schools and mental health
                 agencies than academia or further graduate studies. However, the unwieldy format
                 of the thesis also discourages publication efforts. Fortunately, the graduate school is
                 currently considering adopting a thesis option that will be a publication-ready
                 manuscript. In addition, our department’s change from a thesis requirement to the
                 option of a project gives our students more flexibility in the formatting of their
                 research.

                Formalize the role of service learning: Though we have discussed this
                 recommendation as a department, we have not yet implemented any changes along
                 these lines.

                Equitable distribution of advising load: Similarly, we have discussed this concern
                 repeatedly as a department but have not yet been successful in implementing this
                 recommendation.

     D.      Make a comparison between the last program review and where the department is now.
             The department has experienced numerous changes since the last program review. The
             most significant changes have been in redesign of the curriculum (major, minor, and
             MS Experimental program) and turnover in faculty. Please see Appendix E for a more
             complete list of changes, organized by program goals.
             1. How have the advances been supported (e.g., internal and external resources)?

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                     We have received internal funding support to hire replacement faculty and pursue
                     CACREP accreditation.
                  2. Are there still outstanding, unmet needs/challenges from the last program review?
                     What has the department done to meet these challenges?
                     Unmet needs/challenges are described earlier in this self-study, as are the
                     department’s efforts to meet these challenges.

          Category VIII. Is the single most important category in the self-study document.

VIII. Future Directions

          A. Describe the department’s aspirations for the next three to five years.

          Many ideas for future directions were bantered about at the Psychology Department retreat on
          December 8, 2008. Some were fairly broad and philosophical, such as clarifying the
          department identity and respecting academic freedom, and others were quite specific and
          focused. Following are some of the more specific recommendations, clustered by general
          theme:

             Curriculum/program development aspirations:

                 Redesign the undergraduate research methods class as a 2-quarter class in which only
                  majors take the 2nd quarter. During that quarter they will conduct a research study and
                  present their research at SOURCE.

                 Broaden the experimental graduate program to encompass more emphasis on cognitive
                  and physiological psychology, as well as human factors and social/experimental
                  psychology.

                 Increase enrollment in the ABA program and develop a fellowship for the ABA
                  graduate students through local or regional organizations.

                 Offer a specialist degree in both the School Psychology and School Counseling
                  graduate programs.

                 Receive and maintain national accreditation of graduate programs (NASP, CACREP,
                  ABA)

                 Develop more online classes, as well as identifying classes that are not appropriate for
                  online delivery

                 Fully support the major at the Des Moines campus and explore additional center
                  offerings.

                 Ensure a reasonable balance of undergraduate and graduate courses.

             Scholarship aspirations
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                 Encourage faculty to work cooperatively on external grants.

                 Increase undergraduate involvement in research. Encourage students to present at
                  SOURCE as well as regional, state, and national conferences.

                 Add a research participation requirement to PSY 101 to help the department develop
                  and maintain a pool of research subjects.

                 Allow more flexibility in workload plans to support research-oriented faculty.

             Staffing aspirations

                 Fill all vacant tenure-track lines with highly qualified faculty hires.

                 Retain and integrate new tenure-track faculty and provide effective mentoring.

                 Ensure equitable treatment of adjunct faculty.

                 Decrease the number/percentage of classes taught by adjuncts in the department.

             Workload aspirations

                 Achieve a flexible balance of teaching, scholarship, and service within the department.

                 Equalize advising loads and thesis supervision among faculty.

                 Reduce paperwork and redundant reporting demands.

             Technological/facility aspirations

                 Continue to upgrade to the digital recording system for the CCAPC.

                 Continue to upgrade the animal research lab, as needed.

                 Acquire sophisticated instrumentation to support research in physiological psychology.

                 Improve the appearance and décor of the Psychology building, especially within the
                  CCAPC.

          B. In this context, describe ways the department or unit plans to increase quality, quantity,
             productivity, and efficiency as a whole and for each program. Provide evidence that
             supports the promise for outstanding performance.

              The following recommendations are intended to support some of the department aspirations
              listed above, as well as some recommendations for increasing faculty collaboration and
              involvement in the profession.
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             Curriculum/program recommendations:

                 Redesign the research methods class to include a separate lab either concurrent or a
                  separate course for a lab OR a combined research/stats in a 1 year sequence. The lab
                  would be for majors only.

                 Encourage collaboration among faculty teaching similar classes and coordinate the
                  assignments across different core classes for continuity.

                 Formalize PSY 495 (Directed Research) requirements to be consistent across faculty.

                 Provide more seminar classes on current topics/issues.

                 Separate layered undergraduate/graduate classes (especially physiological and
                  cognitive).

             Scholarship recommendations:

                 Alter class schedules to allow for more time dedicated to research (teach more web-
                  based courses, allow larger blocks of time for writing, etc.). Streamline the teaching
                  schedule and revisit quarterly and yearlong teaching allocations (to free up one term for
                  research)

                 Raise the national profile of the program by increasing the number of national
                  presentations and publications by both faculty and students.

                 Implement a broader definition of scholarship, consistent with current discussions
                  across CWU departments and colleges. Allow scholarship to include professional work
                  with students (like creating town hall meetings with an academic focus and research
                  agenda).

                 Change department personnel policies so that serving as a co-PI on grants will count as
                  Category A scholarship.

             Staffing recommendations:

                 Hire new faculty to fill all vacant positions.

                 Monitor the balance of classes taught by tenure-track and non tenure-track faculty.

                 Develop a systematic strategy to train graduate assistants.

             Workload recommendations:

                 Provide release time for new faculty to sit in on lectures provided by senior instructors.


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                 Require all faculty to advise students to ensure an equitable advising load. Assign all
                  new majors and minors to a psychology advisor by going through a rotating list of
                  tenure-track faculty. Pull those with too many advisees off the list until the advising
                  load becomes more equitable.

                 Change to semester system. This would provide additional scheduling time and a better
                  balance with research. Quarter systems have additional grading and advising
                  requirements. The semester system would also allow for additional time to cover
                  instructional material.

             Recommendations for increasing faculty collaboration and involvement in the department
              and the profession.

                 Encourage faculty to become more involved in national professional organizations.

                 Identify ways for faculty to become more involved in service to the larger central
                  Washington region.

                 Create a state journal for one of the Washington mental health counseling associations.

                 Plan faculty celebrations and forums for research presentations.

                 Increase professional development funds to support faculty travel.

                 Develop a faculty colloquium during the lunch hour and plan regular department
                  lunches.

          C. What specific resources would the department need to pursue these future directions?

          The resources required by the department include increased funding, increased release time,
          and administrative support for departmental requests. Some of the specific resources identified
          by the department include:

                 More graduate assistantships and out-of-state tuition waivers.

                 Permission to hire faculty to fill all current vacancies as well as future vacancies created
                  by retirements, resignations, or administrative reassignments.

                 External fellowship for ABA graduate student(s).

                 Establish lab fees for courses such as physiological psychology.

                 Funds for physiological lab equipment.

                 More professional development funds to support travel for faculty and students to attend
                  and present at conferences.


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                Assistance in funding a mental health journal.

                More release time to conduct research, write grants, and/or develop instructional skills.

                Support from the administration to reduce redundancy in paperwork requirements. The
                 university needs to compile a database with all pertinent faculty information and with
                 the ability to merge data from separate documents. Faculty should just be required to
                 submit updated vitas that included recent scholarship and service.

                Support from the administration to develop a more flexible department criteria for
                 scholarship.

                Support from the administration for flexible workload plans and teaching schedules.


          D. What do you want us know that is not included in this self-study?

          The department faculty did not have enough time during the retreat to address this question.


IX.       Suggestions for the program review process or contents of the self-study?

          These suggestions represent the opinions of the department chair. Individual faculty members
          have not had the opportunity to provide suggestions yet. If and when then they do so, this
          section will by updated.

                It is not realistic to expect department chairs to absorb the tremendous increase in
                 workload associated with program review without additional compensation and/or
                 release time. A summer stipend for the department chair is strongly recommended.

                The format of program review should match the format of the department self-study
                 required for accreditation.

                Institutional research requires much more staff and resources so that the data needed for
                 program review can be provided in a timely manner.




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                                     Appendix A: CWU Department/Program Goals Assessment Plan Preparation Form
                                                                          Department: Psychology
                                            Program: B.A. Psychology Major (45 and 60 credits) and
                     M.S. Experimental, M.S. Mental Health Counseling, M.Ed. School Counseling, M. Ed. School Psychology
  The program goals and assessments of the Psychology Department as a whole are also the program goals and assessments of the B.A. major in
  psychology. Graduate programs in psychology may have additional goals and assessments.
  Goals and assessments are consistent those published by the American Psychological Association* and the standards of relevant professional
  associations**
Department       Related College             Related               Method(s) of Assessment                   Who/What          When             Criterion of Achievement
     /                Goals                 University                                                        Assessed        Assessed
 Program                                      Goals
  Goals
1. Assess and   Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:         Record curriculum improvements               Structure of     Graduate        All graduate programs maintain
improve our     and strengthen an         Maintain and          resulting from                               major programs   program         appropriate state and professional
undergraduate   outstanding academic      strengthen an                                                                       review cycles   association approval status.
and graduate    and student life at all   outstanding           a. reviews of standards of professional      Course           determined
curricula.      sites                     academic and               associations**                          documents        by state and    All courses and degree programs
                                          student life at all   b. surveys of journal articles on                             professional    reviewed by appropriate department
                Goal III: Provide for     sites                      curriculum in psychology                                 association     committee at least biennially.
                outstanding graduate                            c. student performance on the Major Field
                programs that meet        Goal V: Achieve            Test.                                                    Review by       Record and implement all recommended
                focused regional needs    regional and                                                                        program         curriculum changes
                and achieve academic      national              Review syllabi, assignments, and student                      committees at   Averages on MFT content areas
                excellence.               prominence for the    learning objectives at department’s annual                    least           consistent with national averages.
                                          university.           assessment day in spring quarter                              biennially.
                                                                                                                                              All PSY 489 average ratings of course
                                                                Survey student estimates of course                            Annual          effectiveness above 4 on 7-point scale
                                                                effectiveness                                                 department
                                                                                                                              assessment      One class per faculty member is
                                                                See program-specific assessments in                           day             reviewed at department assessment day
                                                                graduate programs.                                                            each year.
                                                                                                                              Quarterly
                                                                                                                              PSY 489,
                                                                                                                              Senior
                                                                                                                              Assessment
                                                                                                                              includes MFT
                                                                                                                              and student
                                                                                                                              assessment of
                                                                                                                              major
                                                                                                                              program.


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Department            Related College             Related                Method(s) of Assessment                   Who/What            When              Criterion of Achievement
     /                     Goals                 University                                                         Assessed          Assessed
 Program                                           Goals
  Goals
2. Promote           Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:         Student Evaluation of Instruction (SEOI)      Teaching          Annual            All teaching evaluations will be
effective teaching   and strengthen an         Maintain and          administered for every class and reported     faculty           reviews           consistent with college and university
                     outstanding academic      strengthen an         in reappointment, merit, and post-tenure                        (probationary     norms for educational background and
                     and student life at all   outstanding           reviews.                                                        faculty), at      experience.
                     sites                     academic and                                                                          time of merit
                                               student life at all   Annual peer classroom visits for                                application,      Department chair and personnel
                     Goal III: Provide for     sites                 probationary faculty                                            or at least       committee will review teaching
                     outstanding graduate                                                                                            triennially for   commendations and recommendations
                     programs that meet        Goal V: Achieve       See program-specific assessments in                                               with all faculty members under review.
                                                                     graduate programs.                                              tenured
                     focused regional needs    regional and                                                                          faculty           Constructive guidance or training was
                     and achieve academic      national                                                                                                given where appropriate.
                     excellence.               prominence for the
                                               university.
3. Promote           Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:         ETS Major Field Test taken by graduating      Graduating        Quarterly.        CWU averages on MFT content areas
excellence in        and strengthen an         Maintain and          seniors.                                      senior                              consistent with national averages.
learning to          outstanding academic      strengthen an                                                       psychology
prepare students     and student life at all   outstanding           PSY 489, Senior Assessment taken by           majors
for careers and      sites                     academic and          graduating seniors. Includes portfolio
                                                                     assessment and presentation.                                                      Satisfactory faculty evaluation of all
advanced study                                 student life at all                                                                   Annual            student portfolios and presentations in
                     Goal III: Provide for     sites                                                                                 summaries of
                     outstanding graduate                            Placing students in desired graduate                                              PSY 489.
                                                                     programs or careers.                                            university
                     programs that meet        Goal V: Achieve                                                                       surveys           INSPECT ALUMNI SURVEYS
                     focused regional needs    regional and          University senior and alumni surveys
                     and achieve academic      national                                                            Graduates one                       All program goals reviewed and
                     excellence.               prominence for the    Department Assessment Committee               year and three                      summary data created at least as often as
                                                                     reviews all goals, gathers data, reports to   years after       Continuous.       cyclical program review
                                               university.                                                                           Issues
                     Goal V: Build                                   department.                                   graduation.
                     partnerships that with                                                                                          brought for       Annual review of all advisory materials,
                     private, professional,                          Graduate program committees and                                 department        assure all students assigned to an advisor
                     academic, government,                           undergraduate advisement committee                              review and        and advised at entry to major and
                                                                     assess advisory materials, assignment of      Department and    action.           registration hold points.
                     and community-based                                                                           faculty records
                     organizations.                                  students to advisors, advisement at major
                                                                     mileposts.




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Department           Related College             Related               Method(s) of Assessment                     Who/What            When           Criterion of Achievement
     /                    Goals                 University                                                          Assessed          Assessed
 Program                                          Goals
  Goals
4. Support          Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:         Count professional meeting papers and          Psychology         Academic      At least one third of faculty papers and
involvement of      and strengthen an         Maintain and          presentations with student authors and co-     department         year annual   presentations have student co-authors.
undergraduate       outstanding academic      strengthen an         authors                                        faculty and        summary
and graduate        and student life at all   outstanding                                                          student records.                 At least two internship, field station, or
students in         sites                     academic and          Count student and faculty participation in                        Quarterly     faculty research teams are open to
psychological                                 student life at all   local symposia, poster sessions, SOURCE.                          PSY 489       students each year.
research            Goal III: Provide for     sites                                                                                   portfolio
                    outstanding graduate                            Track student enrollment in research                              review        Every graduating major will have
                    programs that meet        Goal V: Achieve       internships and field research courses (e.g.                                    developed a research proposal
                    focused regional needs    regional and          China Field Station, Children’s Village                           PSY 700
                                                                    research).                                                        completion    Every graduate student will create a
                    and achieve academic      national                                                                                              complete research project
                    excellence.               prominence for the                                                                      by graduate
                                                                    Inspect PSY 489 portfolios for evidence of                        students.
                                              university.           developing a research proposal.

                                                                    Confirm completion of a research thesis
                                                                    for graduate students.

                                                                    Count student members of faculty research
                                                                    teams.
5. Assure faculty   Goal III: Provide for     Goal III:             Monitor class sizes                            Enrollment         Annual        90% of all course sections meet size
staffing adequate   outstanding graduate      Strengthen and                                                       records, faculty   summaries     criterion. Lower division less than 65,
to support timely   programs that meet        further diversify     Monitor size of waitlists for course           scheduling                       upper division less than 40, graduate less
delivery of all     focused regional needs    our funding base      sections                                       records                          than 20.
courses and         and achieve academic      and strengthen        Monitor ratios of part-time and full-time
programs at all     excellence.               infrastructure                                                                                        No waitlists should exceed one quarter of
                                                                    instruction                                                                     the course enrollment limit.
sites.
                                                                    Count times a required course must be                                           At least 60% of classes taught by full
                                                                    taken as an “arranged course.”                                                  time faculty
                                                                                                                                                    No more than one “arranged course” per
                                                                                                                                                    quarter required for student progress




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Department            Related College              Related                 Method(s) of Assessment                    Who/What           When              Criterion of Achievement
     /                     Goals                  University                                                           Assessed         Assessed
 Program                                            Goals
  Goals
6. Pursue            Goals I & II: Maintain     Goals I & II:          Number of faculty searches conforming to       Faculty and       At time of       All faculty searches conform to OEO
diversity goals by   and strengthen an          Maintain and           OEO guidelines for recruiting women and        student           every tenure-    guidelines
attracting women     outstanding academic       strengthen an          minority faculty members.                      demographics      track faculty
and minority         and student life at all    outstanding                                                                             hiring search    At least three papers, presentations, and
students and         sites                      academic and           Count papers, presentations and                Faculty           and at time of   professional activities per year with
faculty members                                 student life at all    professional activities with diversity         activities        cyclical         diversity themes.
and by increasing    Goal III: Provide for      sites                  themes.                                                          program
                     outstanding graduate                                                                                                                Cross-cultural and diversity content in at
student and                                                            Presence of cross cultural and diversity                         review.          least one required course in each degree
faculty contact      programs that meet         Goal VI: Build
                     focused regional needs     inclusive and          content in psychology curriculum.                                                 program.
with diverse
populations.         and achieve academic       diverse campus         Compare proportion of women and                                                   Departmental proportions of women and
                     excellence.                communities that       minority faculty and students with                                                minority faculty at least within one
                                                promote                availability and university averages.                                             person of availability institutional
                                                intellectual inquiry                                                                                     averages, students within 5% of
                                                                                                                                                         university averages.

                                                                                                                                                         At least half of all field placements and
                                                                                                                                                         internships yield contact with minority or
                                                                                                                                                         diverse populations.
7. Seek support      Goal IV: Develop a         Goal III:              Count number of applications for internal      Psychology        Reviews          At least 25% of tenure and tenure-track
for faculty          diversified funding base   Strengthen and         research and scholarship funding.              department        every            faculty apply for internal research and
teaching,            to support teaching,       further diversify                                                     records of fund   academic         scholarship funding per year.
scholarship, and     research, and service      our funding base       Count number of applications for external      requests,         year or at
professional                                    and strengthen         research and scholarship funding.              reimbursement     time of          At least 10% of tenure and tenure-track
development          Goal V: Build              infrastructure                                                        requests.         cyclical         faculty apply for external research and
                     partnerships that with                            Count number of infrastructure                                                    scholarship funding in two years
activities.                                                            (equipment, materials, facilities) requests                      program
                     private, professional,     Goal V: Achieve                                                                         review, as
                     academic, government,      regional and           fulfilled (internal and external sources).                                        Highest priority infrastructure project
                                                                                                                                        noted            completed with each program review
                     and community-based        national               Count number of applications for
                     organizations              prominence for the                                                                                       cycle
                                                                       professional development funding
                                                university.            (college, graduate studies and research,                                          All faculty members engage in at least
                                                                       professional leave, spheres of distinction).                                      one activity per year funded by
                                                                                                                                                         individual professional development
                                                                       Count number and type of activities                                               fund.
                                                                       funded by individual professional
                                                                       development fund.                                                                 All department staff positions filled
                                                                       Monitor department staff positions




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Department         Related College             Related              Method(s) of Assessment                   Who/What             When          Criterion of Achievement
     /                  Goals                 University                                                       Assessed           Assessed
 Program                                        Goals
  Goals
8. Serve as a     Goal III: Provide for     Goal IV: Build       Count courses with service learning          Number of           At time of   Every graduating student has had the
center for        outstanding graduate      mutually             requirement or other opportunities for       service             cyclical     opportunity to participate in a service
psychological     programs that meet        beneficial           psychology majors.                           opportunities       program      opportunity.
and educational   focused regional needs    partnerships with                                                 available and       review.
services to the   and achieve academic      the public sector,   Count faculty and student community          filled in                        25% of undergraduate majors have
community and     excellence.               industry,            service activities                           psychology          Quarterly    participated in a service or internship
region                                      professional                                                      courses and         PSY 489,     opportunity.
                  Goal V: Build                                  See program-specific assessments in                              Senior
                                            groups,              graduate programs, especially professional   other service                    90% of graduate students have
                  partnerships with         institutions, and                                                 agencies.           Assessment
                  private, professional,                         practica and internships.                                        includes     participated in a service or internship
                                            the communities                                                                                    opportunity.
                  academic, government,     surrounding our                                                   Number of           portfolio
                  and community-based       campuses.                                                         graduate            review.      Average of 20 community clients served
                  organizations.                                                                              program interns                  in CCPAC in quarters when PSY 593C is
                                            Goal V: Achieve                                                   placed in region                 offered
                  Goal VI: Strengthen the   regional and
                  college’s contributions   national                                                          Number of
                  to the field of           prominence for the                                                community
                  education.                university.                                                       clients served in
                                                                                                              CCPAC
  *Dunn, D. S., McCarthy, M. A., Baker, S., Halonen, J. S., & Hill, G. W., IV. (2007). Quality benchmarks in undergraduate psychology programs. American Psychologist,
  62, 650-670.
  ** We consult and comply with the standards of the American Psychological Association, Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, National
  Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, National Association for School Psychology, American School Counseling Association, American Counseling
  Association, Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs, Animal Behavior Society, Association for Behavior Analysis International, CWU
  Center for Teaching and Learning, CWU Human Subjects Review Committee, and CWU Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, CWU standards are subordinate to
  and consistent with relevant federal and state regulations.




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                                                 Appendix B: Department of Psychology Program Goal Assessment Checklist
                                                    Academic Year: 2007-2008 Assessment Meeting Date: June 2, 2008
Criterion of Achievement                            Results
1. Mental Health Counseling graduate program         CACREP Accreditation awarded 2007 and maintained 2007-2008.
maintains appropriate state and professional
association approval status.
2. School Counseling graduate program maintains      NCATE and Washington State OSPI/PESB approval awarded October 2007. Program will be submitted for
appropriate state and professional association       CACREP approval in April, 2009.
approval status.
3. School Psychology graduate program maintains      NCATE and Washington State OSPI/PESB approval, awarded October 2007. Most recent NASP approval
appropriate state and professional association       awarded 2006 and maintained 2007-2008. Next review will be in 2013.
approval status.
4. Experimental Psychology graduate program          No external review bodies as yet. ABA program planned for accreditation review by the Association for
maintains appropriate state and professional         Behavior Analysis after 5 years of program data.
association approval status.
5. All courses and degree programs reviewed by       Bachelor’s degree program reviewed 2006-2007. All graduate programs reviewed 2007-2008.
appropriate department committee at least
biennially.
6. Record and implement all recommended              All recommended curriculum changes were implemented, including a new ABA specialization in the MS
curriculum changes                                   Experimental degree.
7. Averages on MFT content areas consistent with     The average MFT total scale score for 94 2007-2008 students was at the 60th percentile rank, compared to 280
national averages.                                   US colleges and universities. Subscale scores ranged between the 45th and 70 percentile rank, with one low
                                                     outlier, the sensory and physiology subscale, at the 37th percentile rank.
8. Average PSY 489 student survey ratings of         Yes. N= 66. Range was 4.27 to 6.50. Average of all courses was 5.37. Average of core courses was 5.02
course effectiveness above 4 on 7-point scale for
all courses
9. One class per faculty member is reviewed at       Each faculty member submits a class for review at the department’s spring assessment day.
department assessment day each year.
10. All teaching evaluations will be consistent      Personnel committee and chair review of teaching evaluations confirmed SEOI ratings at or above college and
with college and university norms for educational    university averages in the majority of cases. Isolated mid-scale evaluations in a few classes taught for the first
background and experience.                           time were improved in following quarters.
11. Department chair and personnel committee         Personnel committee and chair conducted teaching assessments of all faculty members under review, including
will review teaching commendations and               part-time faculty. Evaluations were provided to each person.
recommendations with all faculty members under
review. Constructive guidance or training was
given where appropriate.
12. Satisfactory faculty evaluation of all student   All but one PSY 489 students submitted satisfactory portfolios and made satisfactory presentations.
portfolios and presentations in PSY 489.


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Criterion of Achievement                                 Results
13. Average rating in the highest third of possible      Results from university senior surveys and alumni surveys were not available by June 1, 2008. Alumni survey is
ratings on appropriate senior survey and alumni          being revised.
survey items. See addendum for items for each
goal.
14. All program goals reviewed and summary data          Program goals for all programs were reviewed and revised for 2007-2008 department self study for NWCCU
created at least as often as cyclical program review     accreditation self study.
15. Annual review of all advisory materials, assure      Advisory committee reviews advisement materials each year. Proposal regarding faculty advising load is in
all students assigned to an advisor and advised at       progress. All majors are assigned an advisor when they register for the major. Department office monitors
entry to major and registration hold points.             registration holds and refers students to advisors to release holds.
16. At least one third of faculty papers and             34 of 53 (64%) faculty publications and presentations had student co-authors.
presentations have student co-authors.
17. At least two internship, field station, or faculty   China Field Station (Matheson), Children’s Village (Downs), DIBELS (Stein), GEAR-UP (Cates, Schaefle),
research teams are open to students each year.           Career Development (Lonborg), Meaningful Connections (Penick), Yakima Corrections and Police (Stahelski),
                                                         Various Topics (Brammer)
18. At least half of all service learning, field         Of the 18 undergraduates reporting service learning, field experience, and internships, 16 reported service to
experience, and internships will involve contact         minority or diverse populations. All graduate internships in mental health counseling, school counseling, and
with minority or diverse population.                     school psychology require contact with diversity clients.
19. Every graduating major will have developed a         65 of 67 senior surveys reported developing a research proposal. This is required in PSY 300 and 301, so some
research proposal                                        students may not be reporting correctly or transferred into CWU without research experience.
20. Every graduating graduate student has created        Research thesis and project requirements ensure 100% compliance.
a complete research project.
21. 90% of all course sections meet size criterion.      27/30 Lower Division < 65 (90%)
Lower division less than 65, upper division less         222/227 Upper Division < 40 (98%)
than 40, graduate less than 20.                          158/159 Graduate < 20 (99%)
                                                         May want to revisit the target class size of this criterion.
22. No waitlists should exceed one quarter of the        Very few faculty members maintain waitlists. Faculty will reassess individual and department waitlist policies.
course enrollment limit.
23. At least 60% of classes taught by full time          232 group sections taught. 150 (65%) taught by TT faculty, 62 (27%) by FT NTT faculty, 20 (9%) by PT
faculty                                                  faculty. Thus, 91% are taught by full time faculty. May want to raise our target for this criterion.
24. No more than one “arranged course” per               One arranged class was taught in 2007-2008.
quarter required for student progress
25. All faculty searches conform to OEO                  All searches reviewed and cleared by HR and OEO.
guidelines
26. At least three papers, presentations, and            At least nine professional presentations (Cates, Schaefle, Schwatrz, Lonborg, Penick) involve diverse
professional activities per year with diversity          populations.
themes.



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Criterion of Achievement                               Results
27. Cross-cultural and diversity content in at least   66 of 67 senior surveys reported diversity content in at least one course.
one required course in each degree program.
28. Departmental proportions of women and              Faculty: Of 18 TT continuing faculty, 8 (44%) are women and 0 are minorities. Availability targets are about
minority faculty at least within one person of         60% and about 14%. We are not within one person of hitting those targets.
availability institutional averages, students within
5% of university averages                              Students: Female PSY 71%, COTS 49%, CWU 53%. We exceed this target.
                                                       Minorities: PSY 20%, COTS 23%, CWU 26% We are closer than 5% to the college target but farther than 5%
                                                       from the university target.
29. At least 25% of tenure and tenure-track faculty    10 of 18 TT continuing faculty with primary assignment in department (56%) applied for internal funds.
apply for internal research and scholarship funding    Consider deleting the words “research and scholarship” from this criterion.
per year.
30. At least 10% of tenure and tenure-track faculty    5 of 18 TT continuing faculty with primary assignment in department (28%) applied for external funds in the
apply for external research and scholarship            most recent two years.
funding in two years                                   Consider deleting the words “research and scholarship” from this criterion.
31. Highest priority infrastructure project            Completed high priority items: Clinic digital upgrade, animal research facilities remodel, media classroom
completed with each program review cycle               installations.
32. All faculty members engage in at least one         17 of 18 (94%) of faculty members used faculty development funds.
activity per year funded by individual professional
development fund.
33. All department staff positions filled              All five staff positions are filled.


34. Every graduating student has had the               Only 29 of 67 seniors said they had an opportunity to participate in a service opportunity. The department needs
opportunity to participate in a service opportunity.   to make students more aware of service opportunities.
35. 25% of undergraduate majors have                   18 of 67 senior surveys (27%) indicated participation in a service opportunity.
participated in a service or internship opportunity.
36. 90% of graduate students have participated in      95 %. 20 graduate degrees were awarded from spring 2007 to winter 2008. All MHC (5), SC (3), and SP (7)
a service or internship opportunity.                   require an internship. 4 of 5 EXP degrees were CHCI, which requires service at CHCI.
37. Average of 20 community clients served in          Between mental health counseling, school counseling, and school psychology programs, more than 20
CCPAC in quarters when PSY 593C is offered             community clients were served each quarter of the year.




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                                                CWU Senior and Alumni Survey Items in Psychology Department Assessment Plan

For Item 13: Average rating in the highest third of possible ratings on appropriate senior survey and alumni survey items. See addendum for items for each goal.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          psychological knowledge, skills, and values in
                                                                                                                                                                                           Student Learning Outcome 7. Communication
                                                                                                                                         Methods in Psychology: Apply basic research




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Development: Develop insight into their own
                                                                                           Base of Psychology: Demonstrate familiarity




                                                                                                                                         to personal, social, and organizational issues.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          occupational pursuits in a variety of settings.
                                                                                                                                         Student Learning Outcome 4. Application of




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          and International Awareness: Recognize and
                                                                                                                                         Psychology: Apply psychological principles



                                                                                                                                                                                           Skills: Communicate effectively in a variety




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Program Goal 2. Promote effective teaching
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Planning and Development: Pursue realistic
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Student Learning Outcome 8. Sociocultural




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         learning to prepare students for careers and
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          respect the complexity of sociocultural and
                                                                                                                                         methods in psychology, including research




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          and others’ behavior and mental processes
                                                                                           Student Learning Outcome 1. Knowledge




                                                                                                                                         design, data analysis, and interpretation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Program Goal 3. Promote excellence in
                                                                                                                                         Student Learning Outcome 2. Research




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Student Learning Outcome 9. Personal




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Student Learning Outcome 10. Career
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          and apply effective strategies for self-
                                                                                           perspectives, empirical findings, and




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          management and self-improvement.
                                                                                           with the major concepts, theoretical




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          ideas about how to implement their
                                                                                           historical trends in psychology.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          international diversity.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         advanced study
                                                                                                                                                                                           of formats.
                         Senior Survey or Alumni Survey Item

                                  CWU Senior Survey Items
2. To what extent did your experience at CWU help you to achieve these goals? (4 point
scale)
To develop my computer and technology skills                                                                                                        X                                                                                                                                                                                                    X
To develop strong management and organization skills                                                                                                                         X                                                                                 X                                                                                         X
To be reliable (to be on time, carry through tasks, etc.)                                                                                                                    X                                                                                 X                                                                                         X
To be productive and efficient                                                                                                                                               X                                                                                 X                                                                                         X
To improve my ability to get along with others                                                                                                                               X                                X                                                X                                                                                         X
To participate in community volunteer service                                                                                                                                                                                                  X
To understand issues of gender equity                                                                                                                                                                                                          X
To understand issues of ethnic equity                                                                                                                                                                                                          X
3. How satisfied are you with the following instructional and advising services (4 point
scale)
Quality of instruction in your major                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           X                                         X
Assistance by faculty in preparing for a career                                                                                                                                                                                                                X                X                                                                        X
Academic advising in your major                                                                                                                                                                                                                                X                X                                                                        X
5. Of all the instructors you have experienced in the classes of your major, how many
of them you would describe as: (6-point scale)
Setting high expectations for students to learn                                                                                                     X                                                                                                                           X                              X                                         X
Being respectful of students' diverse talents and ways of learning                                                                                                                                                                             X               X                                               X
Encouraging students to be actively involved learners                                                                                                                                                         X                                                X                X                              X
Encouraging student-faculty interactions, in and out of the classroom                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          X
Giving students frequent and prompt feedback                                                                                                                                                                                                                   X                                               X
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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      psychological knowledge, skills, and values in
                                                                                                                                                                                       Student Learning Outcome 7. Communication
                                                                                                                                     Methods in Psychology: Apply basic research




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Development: Develop insight into their own
                                                                                       Base of Psychology: Demonstrate familiarity




                                                                                                                                     to personal, social, and organizational issues.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      occupational pursuits in a variety of settings.
                                                                                                                                     Student Learning Outcome 4. Application of




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      and International Awareness: Recognize and
                                                                                                                                     Psychology: Apply psychological principles



                                                                                                                                                                                       Skills: Communicate effectively in a variety




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Program Goal 2. Promote effective teaching
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Planning and Development: Pursue realistic
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Student Learning Outcome 8. Sociocultural




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     learning to prepare students for careers and
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      respect the complexity of sociocultural and
                                                                                                                                     methods in psychology, including research




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      and others’ behavior and mental processes
                                                                                       Student Learning Outcome 1. Knowledge




                                                                                                                                     design, data analysis, and interpretation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Program Goal 3. Promote excellence in
                                                                                                                                     Student Learning Outcome 2. Research




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Student Learning Outcome 9. Personal




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Student Learning Outcome 10. Career
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      and apply effective strategies for self-
                                                                                       perspectives, empirical findings, and




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      management and self-improvement.
                                                                                       with the major concepts, theoretical




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      ideas about how to implement their
                                                                                       historical trends in psychology.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      international diversity.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     advanced study
                                                                                                                                                                                       of formats.
                        Senior Survey or Alumni Survey Item

Encouraging students to devote sufficient time and energy to their coursework                                                                                                                                                                              X                                               X
Developing opportunities to learn in small groups with fellow students                                                                                                   X                                X                                X               X                                               X
Encouraging students to think and learn independently                                                                                                                    X                                                                                 X                X                              X
Caring about students' academic success and welfare                                                                                                                                                                                                                         X                              X
Being fair and respectful in treatment of students                                                                                                                                                                                         X                                                               X
Providing good academic preparation in major field                                                                                              X                                                                                                                                                          X                                         X
Overall, how would you evaluate your instructors in your major?                                                                                 X                        X                                                                                                                                 X                                         X
6. How satisfied are you with Central Washington University's contribution to your
development in each of the following areas? (4-point scale)
Writing effectively                                                                                                                                                                                       X                                                                                                X
Speaking effectively                                                                                                                                                                                      X                                                                                                X
Critically analyzing ideas and written information                                                                                              X                        X                                                                                                                                 X
Learning independently                                                                                                                          X                        X                                                                                 X                                               X
Using knowledge, ideas, or perspectives gained from your major field                                       X                                    X                        X                                                                                                                                 X
Understanding and applying scientific principles and methods                                               X                                    X                        X                                                                                                                                 X
Understanding and applying quantitative principles and methods                                             X                                    X                        X                                                                                                                                 X
Defining and solving problems                                                                              X                                    X                        X                                                                                                                                 X
Readiness for a career                                                                                                                                                   X                                                                                                  X                                                                        X
Readiness for advanced education                                                                                                                                         X                                                                                                  X                                                                        X
Working cooperatively in a group                                                                                                                                         X                                X
Understanding diverse philosophies and cultures                                                                                                                          X                                                                 X                                                               X
Understanding the interaction of society and the environment                                                                                                             X                                                                 X                                                               X
Exercising public responsibility and community service                                                                                                                   X                                                                 X               X
                                  CWU Alumni Survey Item
How satisfied are you with the following CWU instructional services? (5-point scale)
Quality of instruction in your major                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       X
Page 88
2/17/12
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        psychological knowledge, skills, and values in
                                                                                                                                                                                         Student Learning Outcome 7. Communication
                                                                                                                                       Methods in Psychology: Apply basic research




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Development: Develop insight into their own
                                                                                         Base of Psychology: Demonstrate familiarity




                                                                                                                                       to personal, social, and organizational issues.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        occupational pursuits in a variety of settings.
                                                                                                                                       Student Learning Outcome 4. Application of




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        and International Awareness: Recognize and
                                                                                                                                       Psychology: Apply psychological principles



                                                                                                                                                                                         Skills: Communicate effectively in a variety




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Program Goal 2. Promote effective teaching
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Planning and Development: Pursue realistic
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Student Learning Outcome 8. Sociocultural




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       learning to prepare students for careers and
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        respect the complexity of sociocultural and
                                                                                                                                       methods in psychology, including research




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        and others’ behavior and mental processes
                                                                                         Student Learning Outcome 1. Knowledge




                                                                                                                                       design, data analysis, and interpretation.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Program Goal 3. Promote excellence in
                                                                                                                                       Student Learning Outcome 2. Research




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Student Learning Outcome 9. Personal




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Student Learning Outcome 10. Career
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        and apply effective strategies for self-
                                                                                         perspectives, empirical findings, and




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        management and self-improvement.
                                                                                         with the major concepts, theoretical




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        ideas about how to implement their
                                                                                         historical trends in psychology.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        international diversity.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       advanced study
                                                                                                                                                                                         of formats.
                        Senior Survey or Alumni Survey Item

Quality of instruction in general education courses                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          X
Assistance by faculty in preparing for a career                                                                                                                                                                                                                               X                              X
How satisfied are you with the contribution Central Washington University has made
to your development in each of the following skill areas? (5-point scale)
Writing effectively                                                                                                                                                                                         X                                                                                                X
Speaking effectively                                                                                                                                                                                        X                                                                                                X
Critically analyzing ideas and written information                                                                                                X                        X                                                                                                                                 X
Working and/or learning independently                                                                                                             X                        X                                                                                                                                 X
Working effectively with modern technology, especially computers                                                                                  X                                                                                                                                                          X
Locating information needed to help make decisions or solve problems                                                                              X                        X                                                                                                                                 X
Understanding and applying scientific principles and methods                                                 X                                    X                        X                                                                                                                                 X
Understanding and applying quantitative principles and methods                                               X                                    X                        X                                                                                                                                 X
Defining and solving problems                                                                                X                                    X                        X                                                                                                                                 X
Readiness for a career                                                                                                                                                     X                                                                                                  X                                                                        X
Readiness for advanced education                                                                                                                                           X                                                                                                  X                                                                        X
Working cooperatively in a group                                                                                                                                           X                                X
Understanding and appreciating diverse philosophies and cultures                                                                                                           X                                                                 X                                                               X
Understanding the interaction of society and the environment                                                                                                               X                                                                 X                                                               X
Exercising public responsibility and community service                                                                                                                     X                                                                 X
Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each of the following
statements (5-point scale)
My education and experiences at CWU gave me an awareness of the wide range and variety                                                                                     X                                                                 X               X
of human knowledge.
My general education courses at CWU made me think about things from many perspectives.                                                                                     X                                                                 X               X
My education at CWU provided me with basic competence in reasoning.                                                                               X                        X
My experiences and courses at CWU influenced me to be an active volunteer or a                                                                                             X                                                                                 X
contributing member of my community.
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          ways.




2/17/12
          effective.




Page 90
          activities.




          Career Training
          current position.




          Personal Growth
          Intellectual Growth
          areas? (5-point scale)
                                                                                                    Senior Survey or Alumni Survey Item




          My education provided me with the written and oral communication skills I need to be
          My experiences and courses at CWU encouraged me to think in creative and innovative
          My general education courses provided knowledge and insights useful to my professional




          How well do you feel Central Washington University met your needs in the following
          Through my experiences at CWU, I know how to access and use information I need in my




                                                                                                   Student Learning Outcome 1. Knowledge
                                                                                                   Base of Psychology: Demonstrate familiarity
                                                                                                   with the major concepts, theoretical
                        X




                                                                                                   perspectives, empirical findings, and
                                                                                                   historical trends in psychology.
                                                                                                   Student Learning Outcome 2. Research
                                                                                                   Methods in Psychology: Apply basic research
                        X




                                                                                                   methods in psychology, including research
                                                                                                   design, data analysis, and interpretation.
                                                                                                   Student Learning Outcome 4. Application of
                                                                                                   Psychology: Apply psychological principles
          X
          X
          X




                                                                                                   to personal, social, and organizational issues.
                                                                                                   Student Learning Outcome 7. Communication
                                                                                                   Skills: Communicate effectively in a variety
                                                  X




                                                                                                   of formats.
                                                                                                   Student Learning Outcome 8. Sociocultural
                                                                                                   and International Awareness: Recognize and
                                                                                                   respect the complexity of sociocultural and
                                                                                                   international diversity.
                                                                                                   Student Learning Outcome 9. Personal
                                                                                                   Development: Develop insight into their own
          X
                                                               X
                                                                            X
                                                                                         X




                                                                                                   and others’ behavior and mental processes
                                                                                                   and apply effective strategies for self-
                                                                                                   management and self-improvement.
                                                                                                   Student Learning Outcome 10. Career
                                                                                                   Planning and Development: Pursue realistic
                                                                                                   ideas about how to implement their
                X
                                                               X




                                                                                                   psychological knowledge, skills, and values in
                                                                                                   occupational pursuits in a variety of settings.
                                                                                                   Program Goal 2. Promote effective teaching
                                                                                                   Program Goal 3. Promote excellence in
                X
                X
                                                  X
                                                               X
                                                                                         X




                                                                                                   learning to prepare students for careers and
                                                                                                   advanced study
          Appendix C: Student Learning Assessment Plans for Psychology




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                                                     CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form
                                                                        Department: Psychology
                                                               Program: B. A. in Psychology (45 and 60 credit majors)
        Our Student Learning Outcomes are informed by the standards of the American Psychological Association for the undergraduate
                                                                psychology major*
                   Goals 1-5 are discipline-specific goals and goals 6-10 are general education goals for psychology students.

     Student                  Related             Related College               Related              Method(s) of          Who Assessed               When           Standard of
    Learning               Departmental/               Goals                   University            Assessment           (Only major core and       Assessed     Mastery/ Criterion
                                                                                                                           cluster courses are
    Outcomes                 Program                                             Goals                                           shown)                            of Achievement
                               Goals
1. Knowledge               Goal 3. Promote        Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:           Course grades for     PSY 101, General         Quarterly in   All graduates’ major GPA
                           excellence in          and strengthen an         Maintain and            psychology majors     Psychology               courses        at or above 2.25
Base of                    learning to prepare    outstanding academic      strengthen an                                 PSY 301, Learning
Psychology:                students for careers   and student life at all   outstanding             ETS Major Field       PSY 460, Cognitive       End of major   CWU averages on MFT
Demonstrate                and advanced study     sites                     academic and student    Test taken by         Psychology               for MFT, PSY   content areas consistent
familiarity with the                                                        life at all sites       graduating seniors.   PSY 461, History and     489            with national averages.
major concepts,                                   Goal III: Provide for                                                   Systems of Psychology
                                                  outstanding graduate      Goal V: Achieve         PSY 489, Senior                                               Each student will include in
theoretical                                                                                         Assessment taken by   PSY 478, Physiological                  his or her PSY 489
perspectives,                                     programs that meet        regional and national                         Psychology
                                                  focused regional needs    prominence for the      graduating seniors.                                           portfolio and reflect upon at
empirical findings,                                                                                 Includes portfolio    PSY 489, Senior                         least one paper rated
and historical trends in                          and achieve academic      university.                                   Assessment
                                                  excellence.                                       assessment and                                                satisfactory or higher on all
psychology.                                                                                         presentation.         All cluster classes.                    knowledge base items.

2. Research                Goal 3. Promote        Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:           Course grades for     PSY 101, General         Quarterly in   All graduates’ major GPA
                           excellence in          and strengthen an         Maintain and            psychology majors     Psychology               courses        at or above 2.25
Methods in                 learning to prepare    outstanding academic      strengthen an                                 PSY 300, Research
Psychology:                students for careers   and student life at all   outstanding             ETS Major Field       Methods in               End of major   CWU averages on MFT
Apply basic research       and advanced study     sites                     academic and student    Test taken by         Psychology,              for MFT, PSY   content areas consistent
methods in                                                                  life at all sites       graduating seniors.   PSY 362, Introductory    489            with national averages.
psychology, including      Goal 4. Support        Goal III: Provide for                                                   Statistics,
                           involvement of         outstanding graduate      Goal V: Achieve         PSY 489, Senior                                               Each student will include in
research design, data                                                                               Assessment taken by   PSY 363, Intermediate                   his or her PSY 489
analysis, and              undergraduate and      programs that meet        regional and national                         Statistics
                           graduate students in   focused regional needs    prominence for the      graduating seniors.                                           portfolio and reflect upon at
interpretation.                                                                                     Includes portfolio    PSY 489, Senior                         least one research proposal
                           psychological          and achieve academic      university.                                   Assessment
                           research               excellence.                                       assessment and                                                or completed research study
                                                                                                    presentation.                                                 rated satisfactory or higher
                                                                                                                                                                  on all phases of the
                                                                                                                                                                  research process.



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     Student                  Related             Related College               Related              Method(s) of           Who Assessed                When              Standard of
    Learning               Departmental/               Goals                   University            Assessment            (Only major core and        Assessed        Mastery/ Criterion
                                                                                                                            cluster courses are
    Outcomes                 Program                                             Goals                                            shown)                                of Achievement
                               Goals
3. Critical                Goal 3. Promote        Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:           Course grades for      PSY 101, General          Quarterly in      All graduates’ major GPA
                           excellence in          and strengthen an         Maintain and            psychology majors      Psychology                courses           at or above 2.25
Thinking Skills            learning to prepare    outstanding academic      strengthen an                                  PSY 300, Research
in Psychology:             students for careers   and student life at all   outstanding             ETS Major Field        Methods in                End of major      CWU averages on MFT
Respect and use            and advanced study     sites                     academic and student    Test taken by          Psychology,               for MFT, PSY      content areas consistent
critical and creative                                                       life at all sites       graduating seniors.    PSY 362, Introductory     489               with national averages.
thinking, skeptical        Goal 4. Support        Goal III: Provide for                                                    Statistics,
                           involvement of         outstanding graduate      Goal V: Achieve         PSY 489, Senior                                                    Each student will include in
inquiry, and, when                                                                                  Assessment taken by    PSY 363, Intermediate                       his or her PSY 489
possible, the scientific   undergraduate and      programs that meet        regional and national                          Statistics
                           graduate students in   focused regional needs    prominence for the      graduating seniors.                                                portfolio and reflect upon at
approach to solve                                                                                   Includes portfolio     PSY 489, Senior                             least one paper rated
problems related to        psychological          and achieve academic      university.                                    Assessment
                           research               excellence.                                       assessment and                                                     satisfactory or higher on all
behavior and mental                                                                                 presentation.                                                      critical thinking items.
processes.
                                                                                                                                                                       Every graduating major
                                                                                                                                                                       will have experience
                                                                                                                                                                       developing a research
                                                                                                                                                                       project

4. Application             Goal 3. Promote        Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:           Course grades for      PSY 101, General          Quarterly in      All graduates’ major GPA
                           excellence in          and strengthen an         Maintain and            psychology majors      Psychology                courses           at or above 2.25
of Psychology:             learning to prepare    outstanding academic      strengthen an                                  PSY 301, Learning
Apply psychological        students for careers   and student life at all   outstanding             ETS Major Field        and cluster classes,      End of major      CWU averages on MFT
principles to personal,    and advanced study     sites                     academic and student    Test taken by          especially                for MFT, PSY      content areas consistent
social, and                                                                 life at all sites       graduating seniors.    PSY 346, Social           489               with national averages.
organizational issues.     8. Serve as a center   Goal III: Provide for                                                    Psychology
                           for psychological      outstanding graduate      Goal V: Achieve         PSY 489, Senior                                  Quarterly PSY     PSY 489 survey will
                                                                                                    Assessment taken by    PSY 449, Abnormal         489, Senior       indicate that every
                           and educational        programs that meet        regional and national                          Psychology
                           services to the        focused regional needs    prominence for the      graduating seniors.                              Assessment        graduating student has had
                                                                                                    Includes portfolio     PSY 444, Tests and        includes          the opportunity to
                           community and          and achieve academic      university.                                    Measurements
                           region                 excellence.                                       assessment and                                   portfolio         participate in a service
                                                                                                    presentation.          PSY 445, Clinical,        review.           opportunity.
                                                  Goal V: Build                                                            Counseling and
                                                  partnerships that with                            Success in placing     Community                 Post-graduation   Each student will make a
                                                  private, professional,                            students in desired    Psychology                for alumni        PSY 489 presentation rated
                                                  academic,                                         graduate programs or   PSY 456, Industrial and   surveys           satisfactory or higher on an
                                                  government, and                                   careers.               Organizational                              applied psychological
                                                  community-based                                                          Psychology                                  theme, career opportunity
                                                                                                    University alumni                                                  related to psychology, or a
                                                  organizations.                                    surveys                PSY 489, Senior
                                                                                                                           Assessment                                  graduate program in
                                                                                                                                                                       psychology.




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     Student                Related             Related College               Related              Method(s) of            Who Assessed                When           Standard of
    Learning             Departmental/               Goals                   University            Assessment            (Only major core and         Assessed     Mastery/ Criterion
                                                                                                                          cluster courses are
    Outcomes               Program                                             Goals                                            shown)                              of Achievement
                             Goals
5. Values in             Goal 3. Promote        Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:           Course grades for      PSY 101, General           Quarterly in   All graduates’ major GPA
                         excellence in          and strengthen an         Maintain and            psychology majors      Psychology                 courses        at or above 2.25
Psychology:              learning to prepare    outstanding academic      strengthen an                                  PSY 300, Research
Value empirical          students for careers   and student life at all   outstanding             Completion of          Methods in                 End of major   CWU averages on MFT
evidence, tolerate       and advanced study     sites                     academic and student    human subjects         Psychology,                for MFT, PSY   content areas consistent
ambiguity, act                                                            life at all sites       protection             PSY 362, Introductory      489            with national averages.
ethically, and reflect   Goal 6. Pursue         Goal III: Provide for                             certification course   Statistics,
                         diversity goals in     outstanding graduate      Goal V: Achieve                                                                          Every graduating student
other values that are                                                                                                    PSY 363, Intermediate
                         attracting women       programs that meet        regional and national   ETS Major Field                                                  will have completed a
the underpinnings of                                                                                                     Statistics
                         and minority           focused regional needs    prominence for the      Test taken by                                                    human subjects protection
psychology as a                                                                                                          PSY 489, Senior
                         students and faculty   and achieve academic      university.             graduating seniors.                                              certification course.
science.                                                                                                                 Assessment includes
                         members.               excellence.                                       PSY 489, Senior        senior survey, portfolio                  Each student will include in
                                                                          Goal VI: Build
                                                Goal V: Build             inclusive and diverse   Assessment taken by    review.                                   his or her PSY 489
                                                partnerships that with    campus communities      graduating seniors.                                              portfolio and reflect upon at
                                                private, professional,    that promote            Includes portfolio                                               least one paper or
                                                academic,                 intellectual inquiry    assessment and                                                   presentation rated
                                                government, and                                   presentation.                                                    satisfactory or higher that
                                                community-based                                                                                                    reflects appropriate
                                                organizations.                                                                                                     scientific and ethical
                                                                                                                                                                   values.

6. Information           Goal 3. Promote        Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:           Course grades for      PSY 300, Research          Quarterly in   All graduates’ major GPA
                         excellence in          and strengthen an         Maintain and            psychology majors      Methods in                 courses        at or above 2.25
and                      learning to prepare    outstanding academic      strengthen an                                  Psychology,
Technological            students for careers   and student life at all   outstanding             Confirm use of         PSY 301, Learning          End of major   CWU averages on MFT
                         and advanced study     sites                     academic and student    online resources for   PSY 363, Intermediate      for MFT, PSY   content areas consistent
Literacy:                                                                                         research papers and                               489            with national averages.
Demonstrate                                                               life at all sites                              Statistics
                                                Goal III: Provide for                             literature reviews     PSY 461, History and
information                                     outstanding graduate      Goal V: Achieve                                                                          Each student will include in
competence and the                                                                                Confirm use of         Systems of Psychology.                    his or her PSY 489
                                                programs that meet        regional and national                          PSY 489, Senior
ability to use                                  focused regional needs    prominence for the      computer statistical                                             portfolio and reflect upon at
computers and other                                                                               packages and lab       Assessment                                least one paper or
                                                and achieve academic      university.
technology for many                             excellence.                                       simulation software                                              presentation rated
purposes.                                                                                                                                                          satisfactory or higher that
                                                                                                  PSY 489, Senior                                                  demonstrates appropriate
                                                                                                  Assessment taken by                                              use of technology for
                                                                                                  graduating seniors.                                              statistics, literature review,
                                                                                                  Includes portfolio                                               graphing, instructional
                                                                                                  assessment and                                                   supplement, etc..
                                                                                                  senior survey.




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     Student                  Related             Related College               Related              Method(s) of          Who Assessed              When              Standard of
    Learning               Departmental/               Goals                   University            Assessment           (Only major core and      Assessed        Mastery/ Criterion
                                                                                                                           cluster courses are
    Outcomes                 Program                                             Goals                                           shown)                              of Achievement
                               Goals
7.                         Goal 3. Promote        Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:           Course grades for     PSY 300, Research       Quarterly in      All graduates’ major GPA
                           excellence in          and strengthen an         Maintain and            psychology majors     Methods in              courses           at or above 2.25
Communication              learning to prepare    outstanding academic      strengthen an                                 Psychology,
Skills:                    students for careers   and student life at all   outstanding             PSY 489, Senior       PSY 301, Learning       End of major      CWU averages on MFT
Communicate                and advanced study     sites                     academic and student    Assessment taken by   PSY 461, History and    for MFT, PSY      content areas consistent
effectively in a variety                                                    life at all sites       graduating seniors.   Systems of Psychology   489               with national averages.
of formats.                                       Goal III: Provide for                             Includes portfolio    PSY 489, Senior
                                                  outstanding graduate      Goal V: Achieve         assessment,                                   Post-graduation   Each student will include in
                                                                                                                          Assessment              for alumni        his or her PSY 489
                                                  programs that meet        regional and national   presentation, and
                                                  focused regional needs    prominence for the      senior survey.                                surveys           portfolio and reflect upon at
                                                  and achieve academic      university.                                                                             least one paper
                                                  excellence.                                       Write research and                                              demonstrating satisfactory
                                                                                                    literature review                                               APA style.
                                                  Goal V: Build                                     papers in APA style
                                                  partnerships that with                                                                                            Each student will make an
                                                  private, professional,                            University alumni                                               oral presentation in PSY
                                                  academic,                                         surveys                                                         489 on which he or she
                                                  government, and                                                                                                   earns satisfactory
                                                  community-based                                                                                                   evaluations on all
                                                  organizations.                                                                                                    presentation style items
                                                                                                                                                                    SEE ALUMNI SURVEY




Page 95
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     Student                  Related             Related College               Related              Method(s) of             Who Assessed                When           Standard of
    Learning               Departmental/               Goals                   University            Assessment              (Only major core and        Assessed     Mastery/ Criterion
                                                                                                                              cluster courses are
    Outcomes                 Program                                             Goals                                              shown)                             of Achievement
                               Goals
8. Sociocultural           Goal 3. Promote        Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:           Course grades for        PSY 101, General          Quarterly in   All graduates’ major GPA
                           excellence in          and strengthen an         Maintain and            psychology majors        Psychology                courses        at or above 2.25
and                        learning to prepare    outstanding academic      strengthen an                                    PSY 313,
International              students for careers   and student life at all   outstanding             ETS Major Field          Developmental             End of major   CWU averages on MFT
                           and advanced study     sites                     academic and student    Test taken by            Psychology                for MFT, PSY   content areas consistent
Awareness:                                                                                          graduating seniors.                                489            with national averages.
Recognize and respect                                                       life at all sites                                PSY 346, Social
                           Goal 6. Pursue         Goal III: Provide for                                                      Psychology
the complexity of          diversity goals in     outstanding graduate      Goal V: Achieve         Count students                                                    PSY 489 survey will
sociocultural and                                                                                   participating in         PSY 445, Clinical                        indicate that every
                           attracting women       programs that meet        regional and national                            Counseling, and
international diversity.   and minority           focused regional needs    prominence for the      international studies,                                            graduating student has
                                                                                                    service learning and     Community                                successfully completed
                           students and faculty   and achieve academic      university.                                      Psychology
                           members.               excellence.                                       campus activities                                                 courses that include
                                                                            Goal VI: Build          with diverse groups.     PSY 449, Abnormal                        research on sociocultural
                                                  Goal V: Build             inclusive and diverse   Includes                 Psychology                               influences on behavior and
                                                  partnerships that with    campus communities      psychological            PSY 456, Industrial and                  attitudes toward diverse
                                                  private, professional,    that promote            diversity.               Organizational                           groups.
                                                  academic,                 intellectual inquiry                             Psychology
                                                  government, and                                   PSY 489, Senior
                                                  community-based                                   Assessment taken by
                                                  organizations.                                    graduating seniors.
                                                                                                    Includes portfolio
                                                                                                    assessment and
                                                                                                    senior survey.




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     Student                  Related             Related College               Related              Method(s) of          Who Assessed             When              Standard of
    Learning               Departmental/               Goals                   University            Assessment           (Only major core and     Assessed        Mastery/ Criterion
                                                                                                                           cluster courses are
    Outcomes                 Program                                             Goals                                           shown)                             of Achievement
                               Goals
9. Personal                Goal 3. Promote        Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:           Course grades for     PSY 101, General       Quarterly in      All graduates’ major GPA
                           excellence in          and strengthen an         Maintain and            psychology majors     Psychology             courses           at or above 2.25
Development:               learning to prepare    outstanding academic      strengthen an                                 PSY 313,
Develop insight into       students for careers   and student life at all   outstanding             PSY 489, Senior       Developmental          End of major      CWU averages on MFT
their own and others’      and advanced study     sites                     academic and student    Assessment taken by   Psychology             for MFT, PSY      content areas consistent
behavior and mental                                                         life at all sites       graduating seniors.   PSY 346, Social        489               with national averages.
processes and apply                               Goal III: Provide for                             Includes portfolio    Psychology
                                                  outstanding graduate      Goal V: Achieve         assessment,                                  Post-graduation   SEE ALUMNI SURVEY
effective strategies for                                                                                                  PSY 449, Abnormal
                                                  programs that meet        regional and national   presentation, and                            for alumni
self-management and                                                                                                       Psychology                               Each student will make a
                                                  focused regional needs    prominence for the      personal mission                             surveys
self-improvement.                                                                                                         PSY 460, Cognitive                       personal mission statement
                                                  and achieve academic      university.             statement.            Psychology                               presentation in PSY 489.
                                                  excellence.                                                             PSY 489, Senior
                                                                                                    University alumni                                              Each student will make a
                                                                                                    surveys               Assessment                               PSY 489 presentation rated
                                                                                                                                                                   satisfactory or higher on an
                                                                                                                                                                   applied psychological
                                                                                                                                                                   theme, career opportunity
                                                                                                                                                                   related to psychology, or a
                                                                                                                                                                   graduate program in
                                                                                                                                                                   psychology.




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     Student                  Related             Related College               Related              Method(s) of           Who Assessed                When              Standard of
    Learning               Departmental/               Goals                   University            Assessment            (Only major core and        Assessed        Mastery/ Criterion
                                                                                                                            cluster courses are
    Outcomes                 Program                                             Goals                                            shown)                                of Achievement
                               Goals
10. Career                 Goal 3. Promote        Goals I & II: Maintain    Goals I & II:           Course grades for      PSY 101, General          Quarterly in      All graduates’ major GPA
                           excellence in          and strengthen an         Maintain and            psychology majors      Psychology                courses           at or above 2.25
Planning and               learning to prepare    outstanding academic      strengthen an                                  PSY 300, Research
Development:               students for careers   and student life at all   outstanding             ETS Major Field        Methods in Psychology     End of major      CWU averages on MFT
Pursue realistic ideas     and advanced study     sites                     academic and student    Test taken by          PSY 445, Clinical         for MFT, PSY      content areas consistent
about how to                                                                life at all sites       graduating seniors.    Counseling, and           489               with national averages.
implement their                                   Goal III: Provide for                                                    Community
                                                  outstanding graduate      Goal V: Achieve         PSY 489, Senior                                  Post-graduation   SEE ALUMNI SURVEY
psychological                                                                                       Assessment taken by    Psychology                for alumni
knowledge, skills, and                            programs that meet        regional and national                          PSY 456, Industrial and                     PSY 489 survey will
                                                  focused regional needs    prominence for the      graduating seniors.                              surveys
values in occupational                                                                              Includes career and    Organizational                              indicate that all students
pursuits in a variety of                          and achieve academic      university.                                    Psychology                                  were assigned to an advisor
                                                  excellence.                                       graduate school
settings.                                                                                           orientation            PSY 489, Senior                             and were advised at entry to
                                                  Goal V: Build                                                            Assessment                                  major and registration hold
                                                  partnerships that with                            Record student                                                     points.
                                                  private, professional,                            advising and student
                                                                                                    placement in desired                                               Each student will make a
                                                  academic,                                                                                                            PSY 489 presentation rated
                                                  government, and                                   graduate programs or
                                                                                                    careers.                                                           satisfactory or higher on an
                                                  community-based                                                                                                      applied psychological
                                                  organizations.                                    University alumni                                                  theme, career opportunity
                                                                                                    surveys                                                            related to psychology, or a
                                                                                                                                                                       graduate program in
                                                                                                                                                                       psychology.
*Task Force on Undergraduate Psychology Major Competencies. (2002, March) Undergraduate Psychology Major Learning Goals and Outcomes: A Report. Washington, DC: American
Psychological Association Board of Educational Affairs. Downloaded November 26, 2007 from http://www.apa.org/ed/pcue/taskforcereport2.pdf.




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                                                    CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form

                                                                     Department: Psychology
                                    Program: M.Ed and State Educational Staff Associate Certificate Program in School Psychology
Student learning outcomes of the CWU school psychology program are derived from those of the National Association of School Psychology (NASP)* and the Washington State
Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) standards for Residency Level Educational Staff Associate in School Psychology certification programs.*
 Student Learning Outcomes           Related Program        Related         Related College          Related           Method(s) of          Who                When               Standard of
                                          Goals           Department             Goals              University         Assessment           Assessed                            Mastery/ Criterion
                                                             Goals                                    Goals                                                                      of Achievement
1. School psychology graduate       Goal 2. Train         Goal 3.           Goals I & II:         Goals I & II:     Grades in program      All students   Quarterly: Grades    All students will earn
students will develop knowledge     psychologists to      Promote           Maintain and          Maintain and      courses, especially    in program     in program courses   a 3.0 GPA in program
of varied models and methods of     function optimally    excellence in     strengthen an         strengthen an     PSY 501, 525, 551,                                         courses.
assessment that yield               in the public         learning to       outstanding           outstanding       555, 556, 558, 559,                   Annually: Spring
information useful in identifying   schools with a        prepare           academic and          academic and      561, 564, 566, 573,                   quarter evaluation   All students will be
strengths and needs, in             commitment to         students for      student life at all   student life at   583, 584, 592A,                       meeting with         reviewed at a spring
understanding problems, and in      understanding and     careers and       sites                 all sites         592B, 593B, 683,                      faculty advisor.     quarter evaluation
measuring progress and              responsiveness to     advanced                                                  700, and EDSE 523                                          meeting. Satisfactory
                                                                            Goal III:             Goal IV: Build                                          End of program:      progress or corrective
accomplishments. School             human diversity.      study                                                                                           PEAB oral
psychology graduate students        Candidates for the                      Provide for           mutually          Professional                                               guidance for all
                                                          Goal 4.           outstanding           beneficial        Education Advisory                    examination,         students.
will use such models and            master's degree                                                                                                       comprehensive
methods as part of a systematic     and for               Support           graduate              partnerships      Board (PEAB) oral
                                                          involvement       programs that         with the public   examination,                          written              All students will
process to collect data and other   certification must                                                                                                    examination, and     successfully complete
information, translate assessment   not only provide      of                meet focused          sector,           comprehensive
                                                          undergraduate     regional needs        industry,         written examination,                  portfolio review.    the PEAB oral
results into empirically-based      evidence that they                                                                                                                         examination,
decisions about service delivery,   have developed the    and graduate      and achieve           professional      and portfolio                         Praxis II Exam in
                                                          students in       academic              groups,           review.                                                    comprehensive
and evaluate the outcomes of        competencies                                                                                                          School Psychology    written examination,
services.                           necessary to work     psychological     excellence.           institutions,
                                                          research                                and the           Praxis II Exam in                     Internship Logs,     and portfolio review,
                                    effectively with                        Goal V: Build                           School Psychology                     Evaluation           the internship review,
                                    school systems and                                            communities
                                                          Goal 8. Serve     partnerships          surrounding                                                                  the Praxis II
                                    families, but they    as a center for   with private,                           Internship Logs,                      Research Thesis      examination, and the
                                    must also                                                     our campuses.     Evaluation                            and oral
                                                          psychological     professional,                                                                                      research thesis, with
                                    demonstrate their     and               academic,             Goal V:           Research Thesis and                   examination          oral defense and
                                    ability to function   educational       government, and       Achieve           oral examination                                           examination.
                                                                                                                                                          Post-graduation:
                                    with public school    services to the   community-            regional and
                                                                                                                    Alumni Survey                         Alumni Survey,       For all students
                                    personnel, parents,   community         based                 national                                                Employer Survey      seeking a career as a
                                    and other public      and region        organizations.        prominence for    Employer Survey                                            school psychologist,
                                    and privately                                                 the university.
                                    employed                                Goal VI:                                                                                           the alumni survey and
                                    professionals with                      Strengthen the                                                                                     employer survey will
                                    whom they come                          college’s                                                                                          sbow a successful
                                    in contact.                             contributions to                                                                                   entry into their
                                                                            the field of                                                                                       career.
                                                                            education.




Page 99
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 Student Learning Outcomes            Related Program      Related    Related College     Related        Method(s) of            Who               When              Standard of
                                           Goals         Department        Goals         University      Assessment             Assessed                          Mastery/ Criterion
                                                            Goals                          Goals                                                                   of Achievement
2. School psychology graduate         Same as Student    Same as      Same as Student   Same as       Grades in program        All students   Schedule as shown   Standards as shown
students will develop knowledge       Learning Outcome   Student      Learning          Student       courses, especially      in program     for Student         in Student Learning
of behavioral, mental health,         1, above.          Learning     Outcome 1,        Learning      PSY 501, 551, 556,                      Learning Outcome    Outcome 1.
collaborative, and/or other                              Outcome 1,   above.            Outcome 1,    559, 560, 561, 564,                     1.
consultation models and methods                          above.                         above.        566, 583, 592A,
and of their application to                                                                           592B, 593A, 593B,
particular situations. School                                                                         and 683.
psychology graduate students
will collaborate effectively with                                                                     Other assessments
others in planning and decision-                                                                      as listed in Student
making processes at the                                                                               Learning Outcome
individual, group, and system                                                                         1: PEAB evaluation,
levels.                                                                                               Praxis II, internship,
                                                                                                      thesis, alumni and
                                                                                                      employer surveys.
3. School psychology graduate         Same as Student    Same as      Same as Student   Same as       Grades in program        All students   Schedule as shown   Standards as shown
students will develop knowledge       Learning Outcome   Student      Learning          Student       courses, especially      in program     for Student         in Student Learning
of human learning processes,          1, above.          Learning     Outcome 1,        Learning      PSY 525, 551, 552,                      Learning Outcome    Outcome 1.
techniques to assess these                               Outcome 1,   above.            Outcome 1,    556, 559, 564, 566,                     1.
processes, and direct and indirect                       above.                         above.        573, 583, 592A,
services applicable to the                                                                            592B, 593A, 593B,
development of cognitive and                                                                          683, EDF 507, and
academic skills. School                                                                               EDSE 523.
psychology graduate students
will, in collaboration with others,                                                                   Other assessments
develop appropriate cognitive                                                                         as listed in Student
and academic goals for students                                                                       Learning Outcome
with different abilities,                                                                             1: PEAB evaluation,
disabilities, strengths, and needs;                                                                   Praxis II, internship,
implement interventions to                                                                            thesis, alumni and
achieve those goals; and evaluate                                                                     employer surveys..
the effectiveness of
interventions. Such
interventions include, but are not
limited to, instructional
interventions and consultation.




Page 100
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 Student Learning Outcomes            Related Program      Related    Related College     Related        Method(s) of            Who               When              Standard of
                                           Goals         Department        Goals         University      Assessment             Assessed                          Mastery/ Criterion
                                                            Goals                          Goals                                                                   of Achievement
4. School psychology graduate         Same as Student    Same as      Same as Student   Same as       Grades in program        All students   Schedule as shown   Standards as shown
students will develop knowledge       Learning Outcome   Student      Learning          Student       courses, especially      in program     for Student         in Student Learning
of human developmental                1, above.          Learning     Outcome 1,        Learning      PSY 551, 552, 559,                      Learning Outcome    Outcome 1.
processes, techniques to assess                          Outcome 1,   above.            Outcome 1,    561, 566, 573, 583,                     1.
these processes, and direct and                          above.                         above.        584, 592A, 592B,
indirect services applicable to the                                                                   593A, 593B, 683,
development of behavioral,                                                                            EDF 507, and
affective, adaptive, and social                                                                       EDSE 523.
skills. School psychology
graduate students will be able to                                                                     Other assessments
collaborate with others, develop                                                                      as listed in Student
appropriate behavioral, affective,                                                                    Learning Outcome
adaptive, and social goals for                                                                        1: PEAB evaluation,
students of varying abilities,                                                                        Praxis II, internship,
disabilities, strengths, and needs;                                                                   thesis, alumni and
implement interventions to                                                                            employer surveys..
achieve those goals, and evaluate
the effectiveness of
interventions. Such
interventions include, but are not
limited to, consultation,
behavioral
assessment/intervention, and
counseling
5. School psychology graduate         Same as Student    Same as      Same as Student   Same as       Grades in program        All students   Schedule as shown   Standards as shown
students will develop knowledge       Learning Outcome   Student      Learning          Student       courses, especially      in program     for Student         in Student Learning
of individual differences,            1, above.          Learning     Outcome 1,        Learning      PSY 501, 525, 551,                      Learning Outcome    Outcome 1.
abilities, and disabilities and of                       Outcome 1,   above.            Outcome 1,    552, 556, 559, 564,                     1.
the potential influence of                               above.                         above.        566, 578/588, 592A,
biological, social, cultural,                                                                         592B, 593A, 593B,
ethnic, experiential,                                                                                 683, EDF 507, and
socioeconomic, gender-related,                                                                        EDSE 523.
and linguistic factors in
development and learning.                                                                             Other assessments
School psychology graduate                                                                            as listed in Student
students will demonstrate the                                                                         Learning Outcome
sensitivity and skills needed to                                                                      1: PEAB evaluation,
work with individuals of diverse                                                                      Praxis II, internship,
characteristics and to implement                                                                      thesis, alumni and
strategies selected and/or                                                                            employer surveys..
adapted based on individual
characteristics, strengths, and
needs.



Page 101
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 Student Learning Outcomes           Related Program      Related    Related College     Related        Method(s) of            Who               When              Standard of
                                          Goals         Department        Goals         University      Assessment             Assessed                          Mastery/ Criterion
                                                           Goals                          Goals                                                                   of Achievement
6. School psychology graduate        Same as Student    Same as      Same as Student   Same as       Grades in program        All students   Schedule as shown   Standards as shown
students will develop knowledge      Learning Outcome   Student      Learning          Student       courses, especially      in program     for Student         in Student Learning
of general education, special        1, above.          Learning     Outcome 1,        Learning      PSY 501, 583,                           Learning Outcome    Outcome 1.
education, and other educational                        Outcome 1,   above.            Outcome 1,    592A, 592B, and                         1.
and related services. They                              above.                         above.        683.
understand schools and other
settings as systems. School                                                                          Other assessments
psychology graduate students                                                                         as listed in Student
will work with individuals and                                                                       Learning Outcome
groups to facilitate policies and                                                                    1: PEAB evaluation,
practices that create and maintain                                                                   Praxis II, internship,
safe, supportive, and effective                                                                      thesis, alumni and
learning environments for                                                                            employer surveys.
children and others.
7. School psychology graduate        Same as Student    Same as      Same as Student   Same as       Grades in program        All students   Schedule as shown   Standards as shown
students will develop knowledge      Learning Outcome   Student      Learning          Student       courses, especially      in program     for Student         in Student Learning
of human development and             1, above.          Learning     Outcome 1,        Learning      PSY 501, 551, 552,                      Learning Outcome    Outcome 1.
psychopathology and of                                  Outcome 1,   above.            Outcome 1,    559, 561, 578/588,                      1.
associated biological, cultural,                        above.                         above.        583, 584, 592A,
and social influences on human                                                                       592B, 593A, 593B,
behavior. School psychology                                                                          and 683.
graduate students will provide or
contribute to prevention and                                                                         Other assessments
intervention programs that                                                                           as listed in Student
promote the mental health and                                                                        Learning Outcome
physical well-being of students.                                                                     1: PEAB evaluation,
                                                                                                     Praxis II, internship,
                                                                                                     thesis, alumni and
                                                                                                     employer surveys.
8. School psychology graduate        Same as Student    Same as      Same as Student   Same as       Grades in program        All students   Schedule as shown   Standards as shown
students will develop knowledge      Learning Outcome   Student      Learning          Student       courses, especially      in program     for Student         in Student Learning
of family systems, including         1, above.          Learning     Outcome 1,        Learning      PSY 501, 551, 583,                      Learning Outcome    Outcome 1.
family strengths and influences                         Outcome 1,   above.            Outcome 1,    592A, 592B, and                         1.
on student development,                                 above.                         above.        683.
learning, and behavior, and of
methods to involve families in                                                                       Other assessments
education and service delivery.                                                                      as listed in Student
School psychology graduate                                                                           Learning Outcome
students will work effectively                                                                       1: PEAB evaluation,
with families, educators, and                                                                        Praxis II, internship,
others in the community to                                                                           thesis, alumni and
promote and provide                                                                                  employer surveys.
comprehensive services to
children and families.

Page 102
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 Student Learning Outcomes           Related Program      Related    Related College     Related        Method(s) of            Who               When              Standard of
                                          Goals         Department        Goals         University      Assessment             Assessed                          Mastery/ Criterion
                                                           Goals                          Goals                                                                   of Achievement
9. School psychology graduate        Same as Student    Same as      Same as Student   Same as       Grades in program        All students   Schedule as shown   Standards as shown
students will develop knowledge      Learning Outcome   Student      Learning          Student       courses, especially      in program     for Student         in Student Learning
of research, statistics, and         1, above.          Learning     Outcome 1,        Learning      PSY 551, 555, 558,                      Learning Outcome    Outcome 1.
evaluation methods. School                              Outcome 1,   above.            Outcome 1,    559, 564, 566,                          1.
psychologists evaluate research,                        above.                         above.        592A, 592B, 683,
translate research into practice,                                                                    and 700.
and understand research design
and statistics in sufficient depth                                                                   Other assessments
to plan and conduct                                                                                  as listed in Student
investigations and program                                                                           Learning Outcome
evaluations for improvement of                                                                       1: PEAB evaluation,
services.                                                                                            Praxis II, internship,
                                                                                                     thesis, alumni and
                                                                                                     employer surveys.
10. School psychology graduate       Same as Student    Same as      Same as Student   Same as       Grades in program        All students   Schedule as shown   Standards as shown
students will develop knowledge      Learning Outcome   Student      Learning          Student       courses, especially      in program     for Student         in Student Learning
of the history and foundations of    1, above.          Learning     Outcome 1,        Learning      PSY 501, 556, 564,                      Learning Outcome    Outcome 1.
their profession; of various                            Outcome 1,   above.            Outcome 1,    566, 592A, 592B,                        1.
service models and methods; of                          above.                         above.        593A, 593B, and
public policy development                                                                            683.
applicable to services to children
and families; and of ethical,                                                                        Other assessments
professional, and legal standards.                                                                   as listed in Student
School psychology graduate                                                                           Learning Outcome
students practice in ways that are                                                                   1: PEAB evaluation,
consistent with applicable                                                                           Praxis II, internship,
standards, are involved in their                                                                     thesis, alumni and
profession, and have the                                                                             employer surveys.
knowledge and skills needed to
acquire career-long professional
development.




Page 103
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 Student Learning Outcomes           Related Program       Related       Related College        Related           Method(s) of            Who               When               Standard of
                                          Goals          Department           Goals            University         Assessment             Assessed                           Mastery/ Criterion
                                                            Goals                                Goals                                                                       of Achievement
11. School psychologists have        Same as Student    Same as          Same as Student     Same as           Grades in program        All students   Schedule as shown   Standards as shown
knowledge of information             Learning Outcome   Student          Learning            Student           courses, especially      in program     for Student         in Student Learning
sources and technology relevant      1, above.          Learning         Outcome 1,          Learning          PSY 501, 556, 559,                      Learning Outcome    Outcome 1.
to their work. School                                   Outcome 1,       above.              Outcome 1,        564, 592A, 592B,                        1.
psychology graduate students                            above.                               above.            683, and EDSE 523.
will access, evaluate, and utilize
information sources and                                                                                        Other assessments
technology in ways that                                                                                        as listed in Student
safeguard or enhance the quality                                                                               Learning Outcome
of services                                                                                                    1: PEAB evaluation,
                                                                                                               Praxis II, internship,
                                                                                                               thesis, alumni and
                                                                                                               employer surveys.


     * NASP standards for training programs in school psychology may be found at http://www.nasponline.org/standards/FinalStandards.pdf. Washington State standards for school psychologist
     certification programs are codified in WAC 181-78A-270(6), available online at http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=181-78A-270




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                                                         CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form
                                                                                     Department: Psychology
                           Program: M.Ed. in School Counseling and State Educational Staff Associate Certificate Program in School Counseling
The student learning outcomes of the CWU school counseling program are consistent with those of the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related
Programs (CACREP)*, the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)*, and Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public
Instruction (OSPI) standards for Educational Staff Associate in School Counseling certification programs*.


 Student Learning Outcomes            Related              Related              Related           Related           Method(s) of         Who Assessed       When Assessed            Standard of
  (performance, knowledge,         Program Goals         Departmental         College Goals      University          Assessment         (Students from     (term, dates) ***      Mastery/ Criterion
          attitudes)                                        Goals                                  Goals            (What is the        what courses –                             of Achievement
                                                                                                                   assessment?)*         population)**                             (How good does
                                                                                                                                                                                  performance have
                                                                                                                                                                                       to be?)
1. Academic                        1. Assist the        1. Maintain          Goals I:& II:      Goals I:& II:     Assessment of        All students in     Assessment of          By their second
Performance/Thesis                 department in        currency of          Maintain and       Maintain and      student progress     program. assessed   student progress is    review, students
Development: Students will         fulfilling the       academic             strengthen an      strengthen an     form Appended.       by student’s        completed the          must receive a “3”
organize their work effectively,   department           programs             outstanding        outstanding       Academic             advisor (with       spring of first year   or above in all three
demonstrate critical thinking      goals.                                    academic and       academic and      performance          input from          and fall of second     categories to
skills, function independently,                         2. Promote           student life at    student life at   category. Includes   program faculty).   year.                  continue in the
and use data/research to           2. Train             effective teaching   all sites          all sites         all coursework                                                  program. Students
conceptualize their thinking.      specialists to                                                                 and thesis           All graduating      PEAB                   failing to reach this
                                   provide              3. Promote           Goal III:          Goal V:                                students examined   examination at
                                                        excellence in                                             research).                                                      benchmark may
                                   comprehensive,                            Provide for        Achieve                                by PEAB             end of program         petition for another
                                   developmental        learning to          outstanding        regional and      Professional
                                                        prepare students                                                                                                          evaluation the
                                   guidance                                  graduate           national          Education                                                       following quarter.
                                   programs in the      for careers and      programs that      prominence        Advisory Board
                                   schools              advanced study       meet focused       for the           oral examination,                                               All students earn
                                                        8. Serve as a        regional needs     university.       and portfolio                                                   satisfactory
                                   3. Meet or                                and achieve                          review includes                                                 evaluations on
                                   exceed current       center for
                                                        psychological and    academic                             internship                                                      comprehensive
                                   state and national                        excellence.                          performance.                                                    written examination
                                   standards for        educational
                                                        services to the                                                                                                           and Professional
                                   professional                              Goal VI:                             Comprehensive                                                   Education Advisory
                                   training             community and        Strengthen the                       examination
                                                        region                                                                                                                    Board oral
                                                                             college’s                            constructed with                                                examination and
                                                                             contributions to                     PEAB input.                                                     portfolio review.
                                                                             the field of
                                                                             education.




Page 105
2/17/12
 Student Learning Outcomes            Related              Related              Related            Related           Method(s) of        Who Assessed       When Assessed            Standard of
  (performance, knowledge,         Program Goals         Departmental         College Goals       University          Assessment        (Students from     (term, dates) ***      Mastery/ Criterion
          attitudes)                                        Goals                                   Goals            (What is the       what courses –                             of Achievement
                                                                                                                    assessment?)*        population)**                             (How good does
                                                                                                                                                                                  performance have
                                                                                                                                                                                       to be?)
2. Clinical Performance.           1. Assist the        3. Promote           Goal III:           Goals I:& II:     Assessment of       All students in     Assessment of          By their second
Students will demonstrate skills   department in        excellence in        Provide for         Maintain and      student progress    program. assessed   student progress is    review, students
in oral and written                fulfilling the       learning to          outstanding         strengthen an     form (Appended.     by student’s        completed the          must receive a “3”
communication, listening to        department           prepare students     graduate            outstanding       Clinical            advisor (with       spring of first year   or above in all three
client’s concerns, interpersonal   goals.               for careers and      programs that       academic and      Performance         input from          and fall of second     categories to
relations, and respect for human                        advanced study       meet focused        student life at   category includes   program faculty)    year.                  continue in the
diversity. Students will           2. Train                                  regional needs      all sites         all aspects of                                                 program. Students
demonstrate responsiveness to      specialists to       8. Serve as a        and achieve                           clinical skills                         PSY 593A is            failing to reach this
supervision.                       provide              center for           academic            Goal VI:          development).                           started either the     benchmark may
                                   comprehensive,       psychological and    excellence.         Build                                                     student’s second       petition for another
                                   developmental        educational                              inclusive and     Professional                            or third quarter.      evaluation the
                                   guidance             services to the      Goal V: Build       diverse           Education                               Students continue      following quarter.
                                   programs in the      community and        partnerships that   campus            Advisory Board                          to take the
                                   schools              region               with private,       communities       oral examination,                       sequence until         Students must
                                                                             professional,       that promote      and portfolio                           every quarter until    receive a “3”
                                   3. Meet or           6. Pursue            academic,           intellectual      review includes                         they complete          (Expected
                                   exceed current       diversity goals by   government,         inquiry           internship                              PSY 682.               performance) or
                                   national and state   attracting women     and community-                        performance.                                                   above on their PSY
                                   standards for        and minority         based                                                                         The PEAB and           593A evaluation.
                                   professional         students and         organizations.                        Comprehensive                           Comprehensive          They must receive a
                                   training             faculty members                                            examination                             Exam are taken         “Satisfactory” or
                                                        and by increasing    Goal VI:                              constructed with                        during or after        above on 593B or
                                                        student and          Strengthen the                        PEAB input.                             their final quarter    C.
                                                        faculty contact      college’s                                                                     of internship.
                                                        with diverse         contributions to                                                                                     The student must
                                                        populations.         the field of                                                                                         not receive any
                                                                             education.                                                                                           “1”s on the 79-item
                                                                                                                                                                                  evaluation from
                                                                                                                                                                                  PSY 682.
                                                                                                                                                                                  The PEAB and
                                                                                                                                                                                  Comprehensive
                                                                                                                                                                                  Exam are scored
                                                                                                                                                                                  pass/fail. Students
                                                                                                                                                                                  must receive a
                                                                                                                                                                                  passing score on
                                                                                                                                                                                  both.




Page 106
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 Student Learning Outcomes               Related           Related             Related             Related          Method(s) of         Who Assessed         When Assessed            Standard of
  (performance, knowledge,            Program Goals      Departmental        College Goals        University         Assessment         (Students from       (term, dates) ***      Mastery/ Criterion
          attitudes)                                        Goals                                   Goals           (What is the        what courses –                               of Achievement
                                                                                                                   assessment?)*         population)**                               (How good does
                                                                                                                                                                                    performance have
                                                                                                                                                                                         to be?)
3. Other                              1. Assist the     3. Promote          Goal III:           Goals I:& II:     Assessment of        Student’s advisor     Assessment of          By their second
Professional/Personal                 department in     excellence in       Provide for         Maintain and      student progress     (with input from      student progress is    review, students
Development: Students will            fulfilling the    learning to         outstanding         strengthen an     form (Appended.      program faculty)      completed the          must receive a “3”
take initiative for their clinical,   department        prepare students    graduate            outstanding       Other                                      spring of first year   or above in all three
academic, and personal duties.        goals.            for careers and     programs that       academic and      Professional and     PSY 593A is           and fall of second     categories to
They will demonstrate                                   advanced study      meet focused        student life at   Personal             started either the    year.                  continue in the
dependability and time                2. Train                              regional needs      all sites         Development          student’s second                             program. Students
management skills. Students           specialists to    8. Serve as a       and achieve                           category)            or third quarter.     The PEAB and           failing to reach this
will also maintain                    provide           center for          academic                                                   Students continue     Comprehensive          benchmark may
professional/ethical behavior,        comprehensive,    psychological and   excellence.                           PSY 593A, B,         to take the           Exam are taken         petition for another
work as a team with peers,            developmental     educational                                               and C evaluations    sequence until        during or after        evaluation the
maintain flexibility when             guidance          services to the     Goal VII:                             are completed the    every quarter until   their final quarter    following quarter.
approaching clinical and              programs in the   community and       Create and                            faculty              they complete         of internship.
academic concerns, and                schools           region              sustain                               supervisor.          PSY 682.                                     All students earn
demonstrate appropriate self-                                               productive,                                                                                             satisfactory
                                      3. Meet or                            civil, and                            PSY 593E and         The PEAB and                                 evaluations on
awareness of personal strengths       exceed current                                                              682 evaluations      Comprehensive
and weaknesses.                                                             pleasant                                                                                                comprehensive
                                      national                              learning                              are completed by     Exam are taken                               written examination
                                      standards for                         environments.                         the onsite           during or after                              and Professional
                                      professional                                                                supervisor.          their final quarter                          Education Advisory
                                      training                              Goal VI:                                                   of internship.                               Board oral
                                                                            Strengthen the                        Comprehensive
                                                                                                                  Exam is scored                                                    examination and
                                                                            college’s                                                                                               portfolio review.
                                                                            contributions to                      by the program
                                                                            the field of                          director.
                                                                            education.                            PEAB oral
                                                                                                                  interview is
                                                                                                                  scored
                                                                                                                  collectively by
                                                                                                                  the PEAB
                                                                                                                  members.
*CACREP is a leading national body for accrediting educational programs in school counseling. It establishes standards for the institution, program objectives and curriculum (including foundations,
contextual dimensions, and knowledge and skills), clinical instruction, faculty and staff, organization and administration, and evaluations in the program. The current CACREP standards may be
found at http://www.cacrep.org/2001Standards.html. NCATE standards may be found at http://www.ncate.org/public/standards.asp in which school counselors fall under the standards for “other
school personnel.” Washington State standards for school counselor certification programs are codified in WAC 181-78A-270(5), available online at
http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=181-78A-270




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                                                       CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form
                                                                                     Department: Psychology
                                                                         Program: M.S. in Mental Health Counseling
The student learning outcomes of the CWU mental health counseling program are consistent with the learning and skills standards for mental health counselors of
the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Programs (CACREP)* and the standards of the state of Washington for mental health counselors. Our
graduate program is a CACREP-accredited program.


  Student Learning           Related               Related                Related College         Related          Method(s) of       Who Assessed        When Assessed      Standard of Mastery/
     Outcomes             Program Goals       Departmental Goals               Goals             University        Assessment                                                    Criterion of
                                                                                                   Goals                                                                         Achievement
1. Academic               1. Assist the       1. Maintain currency       Goals I:& II:         Goals I:& II:     Assessment of        All students in     Assessment of      By their second
Performance/Thesis        department in       of academic programs       Maintain and          Maintain and      student progress     program.            student progress   review, students must
Development:              fulfilling the                                 strengthen an         strengthen an     form (Appended.      assessed by         is completed the   receive a “3” or above
Students will organize    department goals.   2. Promote effective       outstanding           outstanding       Academic             student’s advisor   spring of first    in all three categories
their work effectively,                       teaching                   academic and          academic and      performance          (with input from    year and fall of   to continue in the
demonstrate critical      2. Prepare                                     student life at all   student life at   category Includes    program faculty)    second year.       program. Students
                          students for        3. Promote excellence
thinking skills,                              in learning to prepare     sites                 all sites         all coursework and                                          failing to reach this
function                  careers in the                                                                         thesis .research                                            benchmark may
                          field of mental     students for careers       Goal III: Provide     Goal V:
independently, and use                        and advanced study                                                                                                             petition for another
data/research to          health to provide                              for outstanding       Achieve                                                                       evaluation the
conceptualize their       a full range of     8. Serve as a center for   graduate              regional and                                                                  following quarter.
thinking.                 Mental Health       psychological and          programs that         national
                          Counseling          educational services to    meet focused          prominence for
                          services.           the community and          regional needs        the university.
                                              region                     and achieve
                          3. Meet or exceed                              academic
                          current national                               excellence.
                          standards for
                          professional
                          training




Page 108
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  Student Learning              Related               Related               Related College         Related           Method(s) of        Who Assessed        When Assessed        Standard of Mastery/
     Outcomes                Program Goals       Departmental Goals              Goals             University         Assessment                                                       Criterion of
                                                                                                     Goals                                                                             Achievement
2. Clinical                  1. Assist the       3. Promote excellence      Goal III: Provide    Goals I:& II:     Assessment of         All students in      Assessment of        By their second
Performance.                 department in       in learning to prepare     for outstanding      Maintain and      student progress      program.             student progress     review, students must
Students will                fulfilling the      students for careers       graduate             strengthen an     form (Appended.       assessed by          is completed the     receive a “3” or above
demonstrate skills in oral   department goals.   and advanced study         programs that        outstanding       Clinical              student’s advisor    spring of first      in all three categories
and written                                                                 meet focused         academic and      Performance           (with input from     year and fall of     to continue in the
communication, listening     2. Prepare          6. Pursue diversity        regional needs       student life at   category. includes    program faculty)     second year.         program. Students
to client’s concerns,        students for        goals by attracting        and achieve          all sites         all aspects of                                                  failing to reach this
interpersonal relations,     careers in the      women and minority                                                                                           PSY 593A is
and respect for human                                                       academic                               clinical skills                                                 benchmark may
                             field of mental     students and faculty       excellence.          Goal VI: Build    development).                              started either the   petition for another
diversity. Students will     health to provide   members and by                                  inclusive and                                                student’s second
demonstrate                                                                                                                                                                        evaluation the
responsiveness to
                             a full range of     increasing student and     Goal V: Build        diverse campus                                               or third quarter.    following quarter.
supervision.                 Mental Health       faculty contact with       partnerships that    communities                                                  Students
                             Counseling          diverse populations.       with private,        that promote                                                 continue to take     Students must receive
                             services.                                      professional,        intellectual                                                 the sequence         a “3” (Expected
                                                 8. Serve as a center for   academic,            inquiry                                                      until every          performance) or above
                             3. Meet or exceed   psychological and          government, and                                                                   quarter until        on their PSY 593A
                             current national    educational services to    community-based                                                                   they complete        evaluation. They must
                             standards for       the community and          organizations.                                                                    PSY 681.             receive a
                             professional        region                                                                                                                            “Satisfactory” or above
                             training.                                                                                                                                             on 593B or C.
3. Other                     1. Assist the       3. Promote excellence      Goal VII: Create     Goals I:& II:     Assessment of         All students in      Assessment of        By their second
Professional/Personal        department in       in learning to prepare     and sustain          Maintain and      student progress      program.             student progress     review, students must
Development: Students        fulfilling the      students for careers       productive, civil,   strengthen an     form (Appended.       assessed by          is completed the     receive a “3” or above
will take initiative for     department goals.   and advanced study         and pleasant         outstanding       Other Professional    student’s advisor    spring of first      in all three categories
their clinical, academic,                                                   learning             academic and      and Personal          (with input from     year and fall of     to continue in the
and personal duties. They    2. Train            8. Serve as a center for   environments.        student life at   Development           program faculty)     second year.         program. Students
will demonstrate             specialists to      psychological and                               all sites         category)                                                       failing to reach this
dependability and time       provide             educational services to                                                                 PSY 593A is
management skills.                                                                                                                                                                 benchmark may
                             comprehensive,      the community and                               Goal VI: Build    PSY 593A, B, and      started either the                        petition for another
Students will also           developmental       region                                          inclusive and     C evaluations are     student’s second
maintain                                                                                                                                                                           evaluation the
                             guidance                                                            diverse campus    completed the         or third quarter.                         following quarter.
professional/ethical
behavior, work as a team     programs in the                                                     communities       faculty supervisor.   Students
with peers, maintain         schools                                                             that promote                            continue to take
                                                                                                 intellectual      PSY 593E and 681      the sequence
flexibility when
approaching clinical and
                             3. Meet or exceed                                                   inquiry           evaluations are       until every
academic concerns, and       current national                                                                      completed by the      quarter until
demonstrate appropriate      standards for                                                                         onsite supervisor.    they complete
self-awareness of            professional                                                                                                PSY 681.
personal strengths and       training
weaknesses.


*CACREP is the leading national body for accrediting educational programs in mental health counseling. It establishes standards for the institution, program objectives and curriculum (including
foundations, contextual dimensions, and knowledge and skills), clinical instruction, faculty and staff, organization and administration, and evaluations in the program. The current CACREP standards
may be found at http://www.cacrep.org/2001Standards.html



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                                                            CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form
                                                                                     Department: Psychology
                                                                         Program: M.S. in Experimental Psychology


      Student Learning                     Related              Related               Related             Related   Method(s)   Who                       When             Standard of
         Outcomes                          Program            Departmental            College            University     of     Assessed                  Assessed       Mastery/ Criterion
                                            Goals                Goals                 Goals               Goals    Assessment                                           of Achievement
1. Write in the language of the           Goal 1.             Goal 2.              Goals I & II:         Goals I & II:     Assigned           Graduate   During each    GPA above 3.0 and no
discipline, using the elements of style   Facilitate                               Maintain and          Maintain and      papers or          students   academic       grade lower than a C in
described in the Publication Manual of    student             Promote excellence   strengthen an         strengthen an     projects in                   term of        required core content and
the American Psychological                progress to         in learning to       outstanding           outstanding       various classes.              enrollment.    elective classes on
Association.                              advanced            prepare students     academic and          academic and                                                   student’s course of study
                                          levels of           for careers and      student life at all   student life at   Thesis proposal               At time of     form.
                                          knowledge and       advanced study.      sites.                all sites.                                      presentation
                                                                                                                           HSRC or                       of thesis      Successful completion and
                                          practice in the     Goal 5. Support                                              IACUC
                                          methods and                              Goal III:             Goal V:                                         proposal.      approval of the thesis
                                                              involvement of       Provide for           Achieve           proposals, if                                proposal as signified by
                                          ethics of           undergraduate and                                            relevant.                     At the time
                                          experimental                             outstanding           regional and                                                   the signing of the course of
                                                              graduate students    graduate              national                                        of HSRC or     study form by the thesis
                                          psychology.         in psychological                                             Thesis                        IACUC
                                                                                   programs that         prominence        document                                     committee.
                                          Goal 5. For         research.            meet focused          for the                                         submission.
                                          appropriate                              regional needs        university.                                                    Successful approval of
                                                                                                                                                         Thesis         research proposals by
                                          students,                                and achieve                                                           defense
                                          provide a                                academic                                                                             IACUC or HSRC
                                          foundation of                            excellence.                                                           Thesis         committees, when
                                          knowledge and                                                                                                  submission     relevant.
                                          skills that                              Goal V: Build                                                         to graduate
                                                                                   partnerships                                                                         Successful defense of the
                                          supports                                                                                                       committee      thesis as signified by the
                                          competence in                            with private,                                                         and to the
                                                                                   professional,                                                                        signing of the thesis
                                          applied                                                                                                        graduate       signature pages by the
                                          behavioral                               academic,                                                             school.
                                                                                   government, and                                                                      thesis chair and committee.
                                          science
                                          positions.                               community-                                                                           Successful acceptance of
                                                                                   based                                                                                the written thesis by the
                                                                                   organizations.                                                                       graduate school.




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           1.   Describe     Goal 1.           Goal 2. Promote        Goals I & II:         Goals I & II:     Assigned           Graduate   PSY 550,    GPA above 3.0 and no
                and          Facilitate        excellence in          Maintain and          Maintain and      papers or          students   553, 555,   grade lower than a C in
                perform      student           learning to prepare    strengthen an         strengthen an     projects in                   558; 595,   required core content and
                data         progress to       students for careers   outstanding           outstanding       various classes,              700         elective classes on
                analyses     advanced          and advanced           academic and          academic and      course                                    student’s course of study
                for          levels of         study.                 student life at all   student life at   examinations,                             form.
                particula    knowledge and                            sites.                all sites.        and thesis
                r data       practice in the   Goal 5. Support                                                work.                                     Successful defense of the
                sets         methods of        involvement of         Goal III:             Goal V:                                                     thesis as signified by the
                such as      experimental      undergraduate and      Provide for           Achieve                                                     signing of the thesis
                tradition    psychology.       graduate students      outstanding           regional and                                                signature pages by the
                al                             in psychological       graduate              national                                                    thesis chair and committee.
                descripti    Goal 5. For       research.              programs that         prominence
                             appropriate                              meet focused          for the                                                     Successful acceptance of
                ve                                                                                                                                      the written thesis by the
                statistica   students,                                regional needs        university.
                             provide a                                and achieve                                                                       graduate school.
                l
                analyses     foundation of                            academic
                ,            knowledge and                            excellence.
                inferenti    skills that
                             supports                                 Goal V: Build
                al                                                    partnerships that
                statistica   competence in
                             applied                                  with private,
                l                                                     professional,
                analyses     behavioral
                             science                                  academic,
                ,                                                     government, and
                sequenti     positions.
                                                                      community-
                al                                                    based
                analyses                                              organizations.
                , single-
                subject
                designs
                and/or
                multivar
                iate
                analyses
                .




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3. Describe, assess and utilize   Goal 1.           Goal 2. Promote        Goals I & II:         Goals I & II:     Assigned           Graduate   PSYC 550,       GPA above 3.0 and no
common research designs in        Facilitate        excellence in          Maintain and          Maintain and      papers or          students   553, 555.       grade lower than a C in
psychology.                       student           learning to prepare    strengthen an         strengthen an     projects in                   558, 595, 700   required core content and
                                  progress to       students for careers   outstanding           outstanding       various classes,                              elective classes on
                                  advanced          and advanced           academic and          academic and      course                                        student’s course of study
                                  levels of         study.                 student life at all   student life at   examinations,                                 form.
                                  knowledge and                            sites.                all sites.        and thesis
                                  practice in the   Goal 5. Support                                                work.                                         Successful defense of the
                                  methods of        involvement of         Goal III:             Goal V:                                                         thesis as signified by the
                                  experimental      undergraduate and      Provide for           Achieve                                                         signing of the thesis
                                  psychology.       graduate students      outstanding           regional and                                                    signature pages by the
                                                    in psychological       graduate              national                                                        thesis chair and committee.
                                                    research.              programs that         prominence
                                                                           meet focused          for the
                                                                           regional needs        university.
                                                                           and achieve
                                                                           academic
                                                                           excellence.
                                                                           Goal V: Build
                                                                           partnerships that
                                                                           with private,
                                                                           professional,
                                                                           academic,
                                                                           government, and
                                                                           community-
                                                                           based
                                                                           organizations.




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4. Design, conduct, and report   Goal              Goal 2.              Goals I & II:         Goals I & II:     Assigned           Graduate   PSY 550,        GPA above 3.0 and no
psychological research.          1.Facilitate                           Maintain and          Maintain and      papers or          students   555, 553,       grade lower than a C in
                                 student           Promote excellence   strengthen an         strengthen an     projects in                   558, 595, 700   selected design and
                                 progress to       in learning to       outstanding           outstanding       various classes,                              analysis classes on
                                 advanced          prepare students     academic and          academic and      course                                        student’s course of study
                                 levels of         for careers and      student life at all   student life at   examinations,                                 form.
                                 knowledge and     advanced study.      sites.                all sites.        and thesis
                                 practice in the                                                                work.                                         Successful completion and
                                                   Goal 5. Support      Goal III:             Goal V:                                                         approval of the thesis
                                 methods of        involvement of
                                 experimental                           Provide for           Achieve                                                         proposal as signified by
                                                   undergraduate and    outstanding           regional and                                                    the signing of the course of
                                 psychology.       graduate students    graduate              national                                                        study form by the thesis
                                 Goal 5. For       in psychological     programs that         prominence                                                      committee.
                                 appropriate       research.            meet focused          for the
                                 students,                              regional needs        university.                                                     Successful defense of the
                                 provide a                              and achieve                                                                           thesis as signified by the
                                 foundation of                          academic                                                                              signing of the thesis
                                 knowledge and                          excellence.                                                                           signature pages by the
                                 skills that                                                                                                                  thesis chair and committee.
                                 supports                               Goal V: Build
                                                                        partnerships that                                                                     Successful acceptance of
                                 competence in                                                                                                                the written thesis by the
                                 applied                                with private,
                                                                        professional,                                                                         graduate school.
                                 behavioral
                                 science                                academic,
                                 positions.                             government, and
                                                                        community-
                                                                        based
                                                                        organizations.




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5. Describe and contrast major           Goal 2.           Goal 2. Promote        Goals I & II:         Goals I & II:     Assigned           Graduate   PSY 541,    GPA above 3.0 and no
theoretical and practical concepts in    Provide a         excellence in          Maintain and          Maintain and      papers or          students   562, 553,   grade lower than a C in
core content areas of research           foundation in     learning to prepare    strengthen an         strengthen an     projects in                   554, 576,   required core content and
including behavior analysis, cognitive   core areas of     students for careers   outstanding           outstanding       various classes,              578, 588.   elective classes on
psychology, comparative psychology,      experimental      and advanced           academic and          academic and      course exams,                             student’s course of study
and/or physiological psychology.         psychology        study.                 student life at all   student life at   and thesis                                form.
                                         that supports                            sites                 all sites.        work.
                                         the               Goal 5. Support
                                         development       involvement of         Goal III:             Goal V:
                                         of competence     undergraduate and      Provide for           Achieve
                                         across a          graduate students      outstanding           regional and
                                         variety of sub-   in psychological       graduate              national
                                         disciplines.      research.              programs that         prominence
                                                                                  meet focused          for the
                                         Goal 3.Provide                           regional needs        university.
                                         a foundation in                          and achieve
                                         areas of                                 academic
                                         research                                 excellence.
                                         specialization
                                         in                                       Goal V: Build
                                         collaboration                            partnerships that
                                         with at least                            with private,
                                         one faculty                              professional,
                                         member with                              academic,
                                         interest and                             government, and
                                         expertise.                               community-
                                                                                  based
                                                                                  organizations.




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6. Engage in scholarly and             Goal 3.Provide    Goal 2. Promote        Goals I & II:         Goals I & II:     Assigned           Graduate   Various         GPA above 3.0 and no
professional activities, including     a foundation in   excellence in          Maintain and          Maintain and      presentations in   students   required        grade lower than a C in
presenting research at formal and/or   areas of          learning to prepare    strengthen an         strengthen an     various courses,              content and     required core content and
informal professional events.          research          students for careers   outstanding           outstanding       and the oral                  elective        elective classes on
                                       specialization    and advanced           academic and          academic and      thesis defense.               courses on      student’s course of study
                                       in                study.                 student life at all   student life at                                 the course of   form
                                       collaboration                            sites.                all sites.        Required                      study, and
                                       with at least     Goal 5. Support                                                submission of                                 Successful oral defense of
                                       one faculty       involvement of         Goal III:             Goal V:           research to                   PSY 700.        the master’s thesis
                                       member with       undergraduate and      Provide for           Achieve           CWU
                                                         graduate students      outstanding           regional and      SOURCE                        SOURCE          100% of graduate students
                                       interest and                                                                                                   submission      will submit thesis research
                                       expertise.        in psychological       graduate              national          Conference.
                                                         research.              programs that         prominence                                      deadlines       to CWU SOURCE
                                       Goal 4.                                  meet focused          for the           Submission of                 before          Conference.
                                       Encourage the                            regional needs        university.       research to a                 graduation.
                                                                                                                        regional,                                     Minimum of 75% of
                                       development                              and achieve                                                           External        graduate students will
                                       of                                       academic                                national or
                                                                                                                        international                 conference      submit research proposals
                                       professional                             excellence.                                                           submissions     to a regional, national or
                                       competence.                                                                      conference
                                                                                Goal V: Build                           within 1 year of              within 1 year   international conference
                                       Goal 5. For                              partnerships that                       graduation.                   of              within 1 year of graduation
                                       appropriate                              with private,                                                         graduation.
                                       students,                                professional,
                                       provide a                                academic,
                                       foundation of                            government, and
                                       knowledge and                            community-
                                       skills that                              based
                                       supports                                 organizations.
                                       competence in
                                       applied
                                       behavioral
                                       science
                                       positions.




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7. Performing professional skills in a   Goal 3.Provide    Goal 2. Promote        Goals I & II:         Goals I & II:     Internships,       Graduate     Psy 684, 595,   GPA above 3.0 and no
supervised practice setting such as      a foundation in   excellence in          Maintain and          Maintain and                         students     700             grade lower than a C in
research teams, internships, and         areas of          learning to prepare    strengthen an         strengthen an     supervised field   working in                   internships, relevant
graduate research courses.               research          students for careers   outstanding           outstanding       experiences,       applied                      graduate research courses,
                                         specialization    and advanced           academic and          academic and      graduate           settings.                    and thesis work.
                                         in                study.                 student life at all   student life at   research
                                         collaboration                            sites.                all sites.        courses, and
                                         with at least     Goal 5. Support                                                thesis work.
                                         one faculty       involvement of         Goal III:             Goal V:
                                         member with       undergraduate and      Provide for           Achieve
                                         interest and      graduate students      outstanding           regional and
                                         expertise.        in psychological       graduate              national
                                                           research.              programs that         prominence
                                         Goal 4.                                  meet focused          for the
                                         Encourage the                            regional needs        university.
                                         development                              and achieve
                                         of                                       academic
                                         professional                             excellence.
                                         competence.
                                                                                  Goal V: Build
                                         Goal 5. For                              partnerships that
                                         appropriate                              with private,
                                         students,                                professional,
                                         provide a                                academic,
                                         foundation of                            government, and
                                         knowledge and                            community-
                                         skills that                              based
                                         supports                                 organizations.
                                         competence in
                                         applied
                                         behavioral
                                         science
                                         positions.




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           Appendix D: Assessment Reports for Psychology, 2007-08




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                                    Central Washington University
                                    Assessment of Student Learning
                              Psychology Department and Program Report

Please enter the appropriate information concerning your student learning assessment activities
for this year.

Academic Year of Report: 2007-08                        College: COTS
Department: Psychology                                  Program: B.A. Psychology


1. What student learning outcomes were assessed this year, and why?
In answering this question, please identify the specific student learning outcomes you assessed this year, reasons for
assessing these outcomes, with the outcomes written in clear, measurable terms, and note how the outcomes are
linked to department, college and university mission and goals.

Because this is our first year that we offered the PSY 489 Senior Assessment class and administered the current
Senior Survey, our department felt it was important to assess all ten of the Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) so
we can get sense of whether PSY 489 was meeting our assessment needs and whether there was a good match
between PSY 489 and our assessment plan. Please see Appendix C (CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
Plan Preparation Form, Department: Psychology, Program: B.A. in Psychology) for a list of these SLOs and a
summary of the related department, college and university mission and goals.

2. How were they assessed?
In answering these questions, please concisely describe the specific methods used in assessing student learning.
Please also specify the population assessed, when the assessment took place, and the standard of mastery (criterion)
against which you will compare your assessment results. If appropriate, please list survey or questionnaire response
rate from total population.

A) What methods were used?
B) Who was assessed?
C) When was it assessed?

Please see Appendix C (CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form, Department:
Psychology, Program: B.A. in Psychology) for a summary of the methods of assessment employed, classes in which
students were assessed, and when the assessments took place. A total of 39 students completed sections of the PSY
489 class this year. This class is intended for the last quarter before a student graduates. Though it is a required
class in the new major, most of the students enrolled in the class this year were under the old major requirements
and enrolled in the class as an elective. The MFT was administered to a total of 94 graduating seniors. Seventy-one
graduating seniors completed the End-of-Major Senior Survey.


3. What was learned?
In answering this question, please report results in specific qualitative or quantitative terms, with the results linked to
the outcomes you assessed, and compared to the standard of mastery (criterion) you noted above. Please also include
a concise interpretation or analysis of the results.




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    Student Learning Outcomes                    Criterion of Mastery                     Assessment Results
Knowledge Base of Psychology:           All graduates’ major GPA at or above                    100%
Demonstrate familiarity with the        2.25
major concepts, theoretical                                                         60th percentile overall (subscale
                                        CWU averages on MFT content areas
perspectives, empirical findings, and                                                    range from 37th to 70th)
                                        consistent with national averages.
historical trends in psychology.

                                        Each student will include in his or her     24 of 25 of students (96%) who
                                        PSY 489 portfolio and reflect upon at       were assessed on this (14 were
                                        least one paper rated satisfactory or                not assessed)
                                        higher on all knowledge base items.

Research Methods in Psychology:         All graduates’ major GPA at or above                     100%
Apply basic research methods in         2.25
psychology, including research                                                        Measurement/ Methodology
                                        CWU averages on MFT content areas
design, data analysis, and                                                          subscales percentiles per quarter
                                        consistent with national averages.
interpretation.                                                                         ranged from 59th to 94th

                                        Each student will include in his or her     29 of 33 of students (87%) who
                                        PSY 489 portfolio and reflect upon at        were assessed on this (6 were
                                        least one research proposal or                       not assessed)
                                        completed research study rated
                                        satisfactory or higher on all phases of
                                        the research process.

Critical Thinking Skills in             All graduates’ major GPA at or above                     100%
Psychology: Respect and use critical    2.25
and creative thinking, skeptical                                                    60th percentile overall (subscale
                                        CWU averages on MFT content areas
inquiry, and, when possible, the                                                         range from 37th to 70th)
                                        consistent with national averages.
scientific approach to solve problems
related to behavior and mental          Each student will include in his or her     5 of 6 of students (83%) who
processes.                              PSY 489 portfolio and reflect upon at       were assessed on this (33 were
                                        least one paper rated satisfactory or               not assessed)
                                        higher on all critical thinking items.
                                        Every graduating major will have
                                                                                    In the Senior Survey, 69 out of
                                        experience developing a research              71 (97%) reported they had
                                        project                                      developed a research project
Application of Psychology: Apply        All graduates’ major GPA at or above                     100%
psychological principles to personal,   2.25
social, and organizational issues.                                                  60th percentile overall (subscale
                                        CWU averages on MFT content areas
                                                                                         range from 37th to 70th)
                                        consistent with national averages.
                                        PSY 489 survey will indicate that every     In the Senior Survey, 29 out of
                                        graduating student has had the              71 (40%) reported they had an
                                        opportunity to participate in a service      opportunity to participate in a
                                        opportunity.                                      service opportunity
                                        Each student will make a PSY 489                  38 out of 39 (97%)
                                        presentation rated satisfactory or higher         (All were assessed)
                                        on an applied psychological theme,
                                        career opportunity related to
                                        psychology, or a graduate program in
                                        psychology.



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Values in Psychology: Value             All graduates’ major GPA at or above                      100%
empirical evidence, tolerate            2.25
ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect                                                60th percentile overall (subscale
                                        CWU averages on MFT content areas
other values that are the                                                                 range from 37th to 70th)
                                        consistent with national averages.
underpinnings of psychology as a
science.                                Every graduating student will have           In the Senior Survey, 57 out of
                                        completed a human subjects protection            71 (80%) reported they
                                        certification course.                          completed the online human
                                                                                     subjects protection certification
                                        Each student will include in his or her      22 of 25 of students (88%) who
                                        PSY 489 portfolio and reflect upon at        were assessed on this (14 were
                                        least one paper or presentation rated
                                                                                              not assessed)
                                        satisfactory or higher that reflects
                                        appropriate scientific and ethical values.
Information and Technological           All graduates’ major GPA at or above                      100%
Literacy: Demonstrate information       2.25
competence and the ability to use                                                    60th percentile overall (subscale
                                        CWU averages on MFT content areas
computers and other technology for                                                        range from 37th to 70th)
                                        consistent with national averages.
many purposes.
                                        Each student will include in his or her       2 of 6 of students (33%) who
                                        PSY 489 portfolio and reflect upon at         were assessed on this (33 were
                                        least one paper or presentation rated                 not assessed)
                                        satisfactory or higher that demonstrates
                                        appropriate use of technology for
                                        statistics, literature review, graphing,
                                        instructional supplement, etc.

                                        (Need to add this criteria for the Senior    In the Senior Survey, 69 out of
                                        Survey)                                       71 (97%) reported they used
                                                                                      information technology in at
                                                                                         least one paper or class
                                                                                                assignment
Communication Skills:                   All graduates’ major GPA at or above                       100%
Communicate effectively in a variety    2.25
of formats.                                                                          60th percentile overall (subscale
                                        CWU averages on MFT content areas
                                                                                          range from 37th to 70th)
                                        consistent with national averages.
                                        Each student will include in his or her      31 of 33 of students (93%) who
                                        PSY 489 portfolio and reflect upon at        were assessed on this (6 were
                                        least one paper demonstrating                not assessed)
                                        satisfactory APA style.
                                                                                      In the Senior Survey, 71 out of
                                        (Need to add this criteria for the Senior     71 (100%) reported they wrote
                                        Survey)                                      at least one satisfactory paper in
                                                                                                 APA style
                                        Each student will make an oral               32 of 35 of students (91%) who
                                        presentation in PSY 489 on which he or        were assessed on this (4 were
                                        she earns satisfactory evaluations on all             not assessed)
                                        presentation style items
Sociocultural and International         All graduates’ major GPA at or above                      100%
Awareness: Recognize and respect        2.25
the complexity of sociocultural and                                                  60th percentile overall (subscale
                                        CWU averages on MFT content areas
international diversity.                                                                  range from 37th to 70th)
                                        consistent with national averages.


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                                        PSY 489 survey will indicate that every     In the Senior Survey, 70 out of
                                        graduating student has successfully          71 (98%) reported they took a
                                        completed courses that include research      class that covered this content
                                        on sociocultural influences on behavior
                                        and attitudes toward diverse groups.
Personal Development: Develop           All graduates’ major GPA at or above                     100%
insight into their own and others’      2.25
behavior and mental processes and
                                        CWU averages on MFT content areas
apply effective strategies for self-                                                60th percentile overall (subscale
                                        consistent with national averages.
management and self-improvement.                                                         range from 37th to 70th)
                                        Each student will make a personal
                                        mission statement presentation in PSY                Not assessed
                                        489.
                                        Each student will make a PSY 489
                                                                                          38 out of 39 (97%)
                                        presentation rated satisfactory or higher
                                                                                          (All were assessed)
                                        on an applied psychological theme,
                                        career opportunity related to
                                        psychology, or a graduate program in
                                        psychology.
Career Planning and Development:        All graduates’ major GPA at or above                     100%
Pursue realistic ideas about how to     2.25
implement their psychological                                                       60th percentile overall (subscale
                                        CWU averages on MFT content areas
knowledge, skills, and values in                                                         range from 37th to 70th)
                                        consistent with national averages.
occupational pursuits in a variety of
settings.                               PSY 489 survey will indicate that all       In the Senior Survey, 63 out of
                                        students were assigned to an advisor         68 (92%) reported they had a
                                        and were advised at entry to major and        Psychology Dept. advisor.
                                        registration hold points.                   However, they were not asked if
                                                                                     they were advised at entry to
                                                                                      major and registration hold
                                                                                                points.
                                        Each student will make a PSY 489
                                        presentation rated satisfactory or higher         38 out of 39 (97%)
                                        on an applied psychological theme,                (All were assessed)
                                        career opportunity related to
                                        psychology, or a graduate program in
                                        psychology.

This assessment data suggests the following conclusions:
     Our program seems to be doing a very good job of requiring students to complete at least one research
         project (97%), use APA style in at least one paper (100%), exposing students to classes that include
         research on sociocultural influences on behavior and attitudes toward diverse groups (98%), and requiring
         students to give a presentation on an applied psychological theme, career opportunity related to
         psychology, or a graduate program in psychology (97%). However, our current criteria of mastery are
         100% on all of the SLOs related to these activities. It may be more appropriate to change the criteria of
         mastery to something like 95% because there will be some students who transfer into the major after taking
         some of the core classes in which this content is covered.
     Our psychology graduates performed well on nearly all areas of the MFT, in comparison to a national norm
         including hundreds of universities.
     Though we firmly believe that the MFT is important, the data from this assessment does not appear to
         provide meaningful information about most of the SLOs, with the exception of the first two goals related to
         the knowledge base and research methods in psychology.
     The use of grades does not appear to be a very meaningful criterion in this assessment process, except for
         perhaps the first goal related to the knowledge base.


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        There needs to be better coordination between the different sections of PSY 489 (Senior Assessment) so
         that each instructor and student knows what needs to be covered in the class. This was our first year that
         we offered this class and several instructors reported that they did not know that some of the SLOs listed
         above were supposed to be assessed in the class.
        Some of the goals that we said are measured through the portfolio in PSY 489 may be better assessed
         through the Senior Survey.
        We need to do a better job making students aware of service learning opportunities available to them.
        We need to do a better job of informing students that they should keep papers and assignments from their
         classes that can later be included in their portfolio. Since this was the first year we’ve used the portfolio for
         assessment, many students in PSY 489 did not have products to include in their portfolios because they
         hadn’t saved them.
        We are not sure if our strategies for assessing the SLO related to “Values in Psychology” are providing us
         with meaningful information. Perhaps there is another or a better way of assessing this SLO.
        We also don’t seem to have a good way of assessing our SLO related to “Personal Development.” Better
         coordination of PSY 489 classes in the future can help ensure that the personal mission statement
         presentation is both required and reported to the assessment coordinator.

4. What will the department or program do as a result of that information?
In answering this question, please note specific changes to your program as they affect student learning, and as they
are related to results from the assessment process. If no changes are planned, please describe why no changes are
needed. In addition, how will the department report the results and changes to internal and external constituents
(e.g., advisory groups, newsletters, forums, etc.).

Though the department as a whole has not been able to discuss all of these findings yet, the following changes will
be proposed to and discussed by the faculty in the fall of the next academic year (2008-09):

        The syllabus for PSY 489 needs to be reevaluated and standardized so that all instructors cover the same
         core SLOs and require the same core assignments.
        Consistent scoring rubrics should be developed for each assignment in PSY 489 and used by each
         instructor.
        Reporting of student outcome data from the PSY 489 sections would be simpler and more consistent if a
         standardized checklist/report form was developed for the class and provided to all instructors of PSY 489.
         The instructors would be asked to complete the report form and submit it to the department assessment
         coordinator at the end of the quarter.
        The undergraduate student handbook should be revised to include clear recommendations about how
         students can get involved in service learning opportunities through the psychology department during their
         undergraduate career. Perhaps the current “Research Opportunities” board in the Psychology Department
         can be expanded to include “Service Learning Opportunities.”
        The Senior Survey should be revised to assess the following information:
              o Where the student completed the majority of their psychology classes (i.e. on the main Ellensburg
                  campus or at one of the centers). This would allow us to examine differences between the
                  Ellensburg campus and Westside centers, just to be sure that equal quality is maintained. This is
                  the first year we’ve had any Westside graduates and more will be on the way in future years.
              o Whether the student met with an advisor at entry to the major
              o Whether the student met with an advisor at the registration hold points
        Reexamine the Assessment Plan from 2007-08 to ensure that:
              o The plan includes the SLOs that are important to the department
              o The assessment strategies are appropriate and will provide meaningful information
              o The criteria for mastery are appropriate

5. What did the department or program do in response to last year’s assessment
information?



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In answering this question, please describe any changes that have been made to improve student learning based on
previous assessment results. Please also discuss any changes you have made to your assessment plan or assessment
methods.

Previous assessments led to changing the core of required courses in the major (2006-2007), adding a senior
assessment class (2007-2008), and forming a department assessment committee (2007-2008). However, this is the
first year that the Psychology Department has developed a comprehensive assessment plan in compliance with
university standards. Therefore, there are no assessment results from previous years of our current assessment
regimen to examine.


6. Questions or suggestions concerning Assessment of Student Learning at Central
Washington University:

The Psychology Department recommends the following changes to Assessment of Student Learning at CWU:
     The Assessment Plan should be due at the end of the summer, not the end of spring quarter. There was not
        enough time this year to collect, evaluate, and summarize the assessment results.
     If the university believes that assessment is essential, then it needs to provide financial support for this task.
        The university should provide a summer stipend for a department assessment coordinator (or the
        department chair) to prepare the report and to make the recommended changes in response to the
        assessment results. For example, the psychology department needs to develop rubrics and report forms for
        the PSY 489 class before fall, as well as revamp the syllabus. Who is going to do this?
     There should be an identified assessment coordinator for each department. This individual should have a
        specified number of service WL units that accurately reflects the complexity and enormity of the
        assessment process. These service WL units should be above and beyond the regular service allocation for
        that individual (essentially resulting in some reassigned time from either teaching or scholarship). With a
        large undergraduate major, students at five university centers, and four different masters degree programs
        (three of which must meet external certification and accreditation standards), our department assessment
        routine is a daunting task.
     The Psychology Department is struggling with identifying a reliable, valid, and meaningful measure of
        student dispositions (values and belief




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                                           Central Washington University
                                          Assessment of Student Learning
                                          Department and Program Report

Please enter the appropriate information concerning your student learning assessment activities for this year.

Academic Year of Report: 2007-2008             College: COTS
Department: Psychology                         Program: M.Ed School Psychology


1. What student learning outcomes were assessed this year, and why?
In answering this question, please identify the specific student learning outcomes you assessed this year, reasons for
assessing these outcomes, with the outcomes written in clear, measurable terms, and note how the outcomes are
linked to department, college and university mission and goals.

The School Psychology Graduate Program has chosen to assess all 11 of the student learning outcomes. These SLOs
were selected because they are NASP and OSPI standards and annual data collection on these standards will assist
us with future accreditation and certification reports. Please see Appendix C (CWU Student Learning Outcomes
Assessment Plan Preparation Form, Department: Psychology, Program: M.Ed in School Psychology) for a list of
these SLOs and a summary of the related department, college and university mission and goals.

2. How were they assessed?
In answering these questions, please concisely describe the specific methods used in assessing student learning.
Please also specify the population assessed, when the assessment took place, and the standard of mastery (criterion)
against which you will compare your assessment results. If appropriate, please list survey or questionnaire response
rate from total population.

A) What methods were used?
B) Who was assessed?
C) When was it assessed?

Please see Appendix C (CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form, Department:
Psychology, Program: M.Ed in School Psychology) for a summary of the methods of assessment employed, classes
in which students were assessed, and when the assessments took place. A total of five graduating students
completed their internship this year and four have taken the PRAXIS exam. These are typically 3 rd year students in
the program. In addition, grades from all of the five 1st year students and seven 2nd year students were included in
the assessment results.

3. What was learned?
In answering this question, please report results in specific qualitative or quantitative terms, with the results linked to
the outcomes you assessed, and compared to the standard of mastery (criterion) you noted above. Please also include
a concise interpretation or analysis of the results.

           Student Learning Outcomes                        Criterion of Mastery                Assessment Results
1. School psychology graduate students will             All students will earn a 3.0                  100%
develop knowledge of varied models and methods          GPA in program courses.
of assessment that yield information useful in                                                This assessment was not
identifying strengths and needs, in understanding                                               conducted this year
problems, and in measuring progress and                 All students will be reviewed
accomplishments. School psychology graduate             at a spring quarter evaluation
students will use such models and methods as part       meeting. Satisfactory progress
of a systematic process to collect data and other       or corrective guidance for all
information, translate assessment results into          students.                              5 of 5 students (100%)
empirically-based decisions about service                                                    successfully completed the
                                                        All students will successfully
delivery, and evaluate the outcomes of services.                                                  PEAB oral exam
                                                        complete the PEAB oral


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                                                     examination, comprehensive      Comprehensive written exam
                                                     written examination, and           is no longer required
                                                     portfolio review, the
                                                     internship review, the Praxis      5 of 5 students (100%)
                                                     II examination, and the            submitted satisfactory
                                                     research thesis, with oral                portfolios
                                                     defense and examination.
                                                                                         5 of 5 students (100%)
                                                                                         successfully completed
                                                                                     school psychology internship.
                                                                                       Final internship evaluation
                                                                                        scores are available for 4
                                                                                     students. For Standard 1, the
                                                                                     scores ranged from 3.5 to 5.0
                                                                                      with an average score of 4.4.

                                                                                     4 of 5 students have taken the
                                                                                        PRAXIS II and 3 of the 4
                                                                                      (75%) earned passing scores
                                                                                      (at or above 660) on the first
                                                                                       try. Scores were 650, 700,
                                                                                     750, and 780 (average of 720)

                                                                                        3 students successfully
                                                                                      completed a research thesis

                                                                                        Results from the alumni
                                                     For all students seeking a         survey are not available
                                                     career as a school
                                                     psychologist, the alumni
                                                     survey and employer survey
                                                     will show a successful entry
                                                     into their career.
2. School psychology graduate students will          Same as Student Learning          Final internship evaluation
develop knowledge of behavioral, mental health,      Outcome 1, above.                scores are available for four
collaborative, and/or other consultation models                                      students. For Standard 2, the
and methods and of their application to particular                                   scores ranged from 4.0 to 5.0
situations. School psychology graduate students                                      with an average score of 4.5.
will collaborate effectively with others in
planning and decision-making processes at the                                           Other assessment results
individual, group, and system levels.                                                  same as Student Learning
                                                                                          Outcome 1, above.

3. School psychology graduate students will          Same as Student Learning          Final internship evaluation
develop knowledge of human learning processes,       Outcome 1, above.                scores are available for four
techniques to assess these processes, and direct                                     students. For Standard 3, the
and indirect services applicable to the                                              scores ranged from 3.9 to 5.0
development of cognitive and academic skills.                                        with an average score of 4.4.
School psychology graduate students will, in
collaboration with others, develop appropriate                                          Other assessment results
cognitive and academic goals for students with                                         same as Student Learning
different abilities, disabilities, strengths, and                                         Outcome 1, above.
needs; implement interventions to achieve those
goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of
interventions. Such interventions include, but are

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not limited to, instructional interventions and
consultation.
4. School psychology graduate students will           Same as Student Learning     Final internship evaluation
develop knowledge of human developmental              Outcome 1, above.           scores are available for four
processes, techniques to assess these processes,                                 students. For Standard 4, the
and direct and indirect services applicable to the                               scores ranged from 4.0 to 5.0
development of behavioral, affective, adaptive,                                  with an average score of 4.3.
and social skills. School psychology graduate
students will be able to collaborate with others,                                  Other assessment results
develop appropriate behavioral, affective,                                        same as Student Learning
adaptive, and social goals for students of varying                                   Outcome 1, above.
abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs;
implement interventions to achieve those goals,
and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions.
Such interventions include, but are not limited to,
consultation, behavioral assessment/intervention,
and counseling
5. School psychology graduate students will           Same as Student Learning     Final internship evaluation
develop knowledge of individual differences,          Outcome 1, above.           scores are available for four
abilities, and disabilities and of the potential                                 students. For Standard 5, the
influence of biological, social, cultural, ethnic,                               scores ranged from 4.0 to 5.0
experiential, socioeconomic, gender-related, and                                 with an average score of 4.6.
linguistic factors in development and learning.
School psychology graduate students will                                           Other assessment results
demonstrate the sensitivity and skills needed to                                  same as Student Learning
work with individuals of diverse characteristics                                     Outcome 1, above.
and to implement strategies selected and/or
adapted based on individual characteristics,
strengths, and needs.

6. School psychology graduate students will           Same as Student Learning     Final internship evaluation
develop knowledge of general education, special       Outcome 1, above.           scores are available for four
education, and other educational and related                                     students. For Standard 6, the
services. They understand schools and other                                      scores ranged from 4.0 to 5.0
settings as systems. School psychology graduate                                  with an average score of 4.3.
students will work with individuals and groups to
facilitate policies and practices that create and                                  Other assessment results
maintain safe, supportive, and effective learning                                 same as Student Learning
environments for children and others.                                                Outcome 1, above.

7. School psychology graduate students will           Same as Student Learning     Final internship evaluation
develop knowledge of human development and            Outcome 1, above.           scores are available for four
psychopathology and of associated biological,                                    students. For Standard 7, the
cultural, and social influences on human behavior.                               scores ranged from 4.0 to 5.0
School psychology graduate students will provide                                 with an average score of 4.4.
or contribute to prevention and intervention
programs that promote the mental health and                                        Other assessment results
physical well-being of students.                                                  same as Student Learning
                                                                                     Outcome 1, above.

8. School psychology graduate students will           Same as Student Learning     Final internship evaluation
develop knowledge of family systems, including        Outcome 1, above.           scores are available for four
family strengths and influences on student                                       students. For Standard 8, the
development, learning, and behavior, and of                                      scores ranged from 4.0 to 5.0
methods to involve families in education and                                     with an average score of 4.6.
service delivery. School psychology graduate

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students will work effectively with families,                                             Other assessment results
educators, and others in the community to                                                same as Student Learning
promote and provide comprehensive services to                                               Outcome 1, above.
children and families.
9. School psychology graduate students will             Same as Student Learning         Final internship evaluation
develop knowledge of research, statistics, and          Outcome 1, above.               scores are available for four
evaluation methods. School psychologists                                               students. For Standard 9, the
evaluate research, translate research into practice,                                   scores ranged from 4.0 to 4.9
and understand research design and statistics in                                       with an average score of 4.3.
sufficient depth to plan and conduct investigations
and program evaluations for improvement of                                                Other assessment results
services.                                                                                same as Student Learning
                                                                                            Outcome 1, above.

10. School psychology graduate students will            Same as Student Learning         Final internship evaluation
develop knowledge of the history and foundations        Outcome 1, above.               scores are available for four
of their profession; of various service models and                                       students. For Standard 10,
methods; of public policy development applicable                                       the scores ranged from 4.0 to
to services to children and families; and of ethical,                                   4.8 with an average score of
professional, and legal standards. School                                                            4.2.
psychology graduate students practice in ways
that are consistent with applicable standards, are                                        Other assessment results
involved in their profession, and have the                                               same as Student Learning
knowledge and skills needed to acquire career-                                              Outcome 1, above.
long professional development.
11. School psychologists have knowledge of              Same as Student Learning         Final internship evaluation
information sources and technology relevant to          Outcome 1, above.               scores are available for four
their work. School psychology graduate students                                          students. For Standard 11,
will access, evaluate, and utilize information                                         the scores ranged from 4.0 to
sources and technology in ways that safeguard or                                        5.0 with an average score of
enhance the quality of services                                                                      4.5.

                                                                                          Other assessment results
                                                                                         same as Student Learning
                                                                                            Outcome 1, above.


Based on these assessment results, we can draw the following conclusions:
     With the exception of one student in one class, all of our school psychology graduate students have earned
        grades of 3.0 (B) or above in all of their required program classes in the 2007-08 academic year.
     All of our 3rd year school psychology graduate students performed satisfactorily on their PEAB oral exam.
     All of our 3rd year school psychology graduate students performed satisfactorily on their portfolios.
     All of our 3rd year school psychology graduate students performed consistently well on their internships.
        The internship evaluation rating scale is 1-5 with 3 being satisfactory. All students performed satisfactory
        (or often above) on all of the standards.
     Three of the four school psychology students who have taken the PRAXIS II in 2007-08 passed it on the
        first try. The one student who did not pass will be required to retake the exam until she does pass.
     We need to update our assessment plan to eliminate reference to the written comprehensive exam because
        our students no longer take it (replaced by the PRAXIS II).
     We need to make sure that annual spring evaluation by the faculty occurs every year. This will provide us
        more specific data on our 1st year and 2nd year school psychology graduate students.
     Under the “criterion of mastery”, it would be helpful to specify the minimum scores required on the
        PRAXIS II and the internship evaluation.
     It may be helpful to add one more student learning outcome related to professional behavior. Our
        internship evaluation includes 17 items on professional behavior that more closely measure student


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         “dispositions” than our other student learning outcomes. Data about professional behavior of 1 st and 2nd
         year graduate students is also collected annually at the spring evaluation meeting.

4. What will the department or program do as a result of that information?
In answering this question, please note specific changes to your program as they affect student learning, and as they
are related to results from the assessment process. If no changes are planned, please describe why no changes are
needed. In addition, how will the department report the results and changes to internal and external constituents
(e.g., advisory groups, newsletters, forums, etc.).

Though the school psychology program faculty and the department as a whole have not been able to discuss all of
these findings yet, the following changes will be proposed to and discussed by the faculty in the fall of the next
academic year (2008-09):

        These assessment results do not indicate the need for specific curricular changes within the program.
         Instead, the recommendations for change will focus on greater consistency of data collection and more
         precision on the assessment plan.
        We need to make sure that all school psychology students who are not on internship are assessed by the
         faculty at least once every year in the spring using the “School Psychology Professional Work
         Characteristics” Form.
        The assessment plan should be revised to include more precise information about criteria for mastery on
         various measures, such as the PRAXIS II and the internship evaluation.
        The assessment plan should be revised to include a student learning objective related to professional
         behavior.
        Though we do have a newsletter that goes to our alumni every year, we have not used this format to report
         assessment results and proposed program changes. The program faculty will discuss the feasibility of
         including this kind of information in future newsletters or whether there is a more appropriate forum for
         disseminating this information.


5. What did the department or program do in response to last year’s assessment information?
In answering this question, please describe any changes that have been made to improve student learning based on
previous assessment results. Please also discuss any changes you have made to your assessment plan or assessment
methods.

Previous assessments led to the development of a portfolio requirement (2005-06) and changing the organization of
the internship evaluation so that it better reflects the NASP standards (2006-07). We also conduct an alumni follow-
up survey every three years. However, this is the first year that the Psychology Department has developed a
comprehensive assessment plan in compliance with university standards. Therefore, there are no assessment results
from previous years of our current assessment regimen to examine.


6. Questions or suggestions concerning Assessment of Student Learning at Central Washington University:

The School Psychology Graduate Program and the Psychology Department recommend the following changes to
Assessment of Student Learning at CWU:
     The Assessment Plan should be due at the end of the summer, not the end of spring quarter. There was not
        enough time this year to collect, evaluate, and summarize the assessment results.
     If the university believes that assessment is essential, then it needs to provide financial support for this task.
        The university should provide a summer stipend for a department assessment coordinator (or the
        department chair) to prepare the report and to make the recommended changes in response to the
        assessment results.




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                                           Central Washington University
                                          Assessment of Student Learning
                                          Department and Program Report

Please enter the appropriate information concerning your student learning assessment activities for this year.

Academic Year of Report: 2007-2008             College: COTS
Department: Psychology                         Program: M.Ed School Counseling


1. What student learning outcomes were assessed this year, and why?
In answering this question, please identify the specific student learning outcomes you assessed this year, reasons for
assessing these outcomes, with the outcomes written in clear, measurable terms, and note how the outcomes are
linked to department, college and university mission and goals.

The School Counseling Graduate Program has chosen to assess the all three student learning outcomes:
    1. Academic Performance/Thesis Development: Students will organize their work effectively, demonstrate
        critical thinking skills, function independently, and use data/research to conceptualize their thinking.
    2. Clinical Performance. Students will demonstrate skills in oral and written communication, listening to
        client’s concerns, interpersonal relations, and respect for human diversity. Students will demonstrate
        responsiveness to supervision.
    3. Other Professional/Personal Development: Students will take initiative for their clinical, academic, and
        personal duties. They will demonstrate dependability and time management skills. Students will also
        maintain professional/ethical behavior, work as a team with peers, maintain flexibility when approaching
        clinical and academic concerns, and demonstrate appropriate self-awareness of personal strengths and
        weaknesses.

Please see Appendix C (CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form, Department:
Psychology, Program: M.Ed in School Counseling) for a list of these SLOs and a summary of the related
department, college and university mission and goals.

2. How were they assessed?
In answering these questions, please concisely describe the specific methods used in assessing student learning.
Please also specify the population assessed, when the assessment took place, and the standard of mastery (criterion)
against which you will compare your assessment results. If appropriate, please list survey or questionnaire response
rate from total population.

A) What methods were used?
B) Who was assessed?
C) When was it assessed?

Please see Appendix C (CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form, Department:
Psychology, Program: M.Ed in School Counseling) for a summary of the methods of assessment employed, classes
in which students were assessed, and when the assessments took place. School counseling graduate students are
reviewed once a year by the program faculty using the Assessment of Student Progress Form. In 2007-08, there
were four 1st year students and one 2nd year student in the program. All of the 2nd year students were assessed during
Fall 2007 and all of the 1st year students were assessed Spring 2008. Five students completed the school counseling
internship and two more are in process. Only the scores from the students who completed the internship are
included in this report.

3. What was learned?
In answering this question, please report results in specific qualitative or quantitative terms, with the results linked to
the outcomes you assessed, and compared to the standard of mastery (criterion) you noted above. Please also include
a concise interpretation or analysis of the results.




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           Student Learning Outcomes                         Criterion of Mastery                  Assessment Results
Academic Performance/Thesis Development:                  By their second review,            1 out of 1 2nd year students (100%)
Students will organize their work effectively,            students must receive a “3” or       received a “3” or higher on the
demonstrate critical thinking skills, function            above in all three categories to    “Academic Performance” section
independently, and use data/research to conceptualize     continue in the program.              of the Assessment of Student
their thinking.                                           Students failing to reach this     Progress Form. Average score was
                                                          benchmark may petition for                          4.
                                                          another evaluation the
                                                          following quarter.                 4 out of 4 1st year students (100%)
                                                                                               received a “3” or higher on the
                                                                                             “Academic Performance” section
                                                                                                of the Assessment of Student
                                                                                             Progress Form. Average score was
                                                                                                             4.25.
                                                          All students earn satisfactory
                                                          evaluations on comprehensive       6 of 6 students (100%) passed the
                                                          written examination and            comprehensive written exam, the
                                                          Professional Education             PEAB oral exam and the portfolio
                                                          Advisory Board oral                              review
                                                          examination and portfolio
                                                          review.
Clinical Performance: Students will demonstrate           By their second review,            1 out of 1 2nd year students (100%)
skills in oral and written communication, listening to    students must receive a “3” or       received a “3” or higher on the
client’s concerns, interpersonal relations, and respect   above in all three categories to    “Clinical Performance” section of
for human diversity. Students will demonstrate            continue in the program.           the Assessment of Student Progress
responsiveness to supervision.                            Students failing to reach this         Form. Average score was 4.
                                                          benchmark may petition for
                                                          another evaluation the              4 out of 4 1st year students (100%)
                                                          following quarter.                    received a “3” or higher on the
                                                                                              “Clinical Performance” section of
                                                                                             the Assessment of Student Progress
                                                                                                 Form. Average score was 4.3.


                                                          Students must receive a “3”        4 out of 4 1st year students (100%)
                                                          (Expected performance) or           received a “3” or above on their
                                                          above on their PSY 593A                  PSY 593A evaluation.
                                                          evaluation. They must receive
                                                          a “Satisfactory” or above on       2 out of 2 students (100%) received
                                                          593B or C.                          a “Satisfactory” or above on 593B
                                                                                                             or C


                                                                                              5 students completed the PSY 682
                                                          The student must not receive          School Counseling Internship.
                                                          any “1”s on the 79-item             100% earned scores above “1” on
                                                          evaluation from PSY 682.            the evaluation form. The average
                                                                                             score (on a scale of 1 to 5) was 4.68

                                                          The PEAB and Comprehensive
                                                          Exam are scored pass/fail.          6 of 6 students (100%) passed the
                                                          Students must receive a                    PEAB oral exam and
                                                          passing score on both.                    Comprehensive Exam
Other Professional/Personal Development: Students         By their second review,            1 out of 1 2nd year students (100%)
will take initiative for their clinical, academic, and    students must receive a “3” or       received a “3” or higher on the
personal duties. They will demonstrate dependability      above in all three categories to          “Professional/Personal
and time management skills. Students will also            continue in the program.               Development” section of the
maintain professional/ethical behavior, work as a team    Students failing to reach this       Assessment of Student Progress


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with peers, maintain flexibility when approaching      benchmark may petition for        Form. Average score was 3.73.
clinical and academic concerns, and demonstrate        another evaluation the
appropriate self-awareness of personal strengths and   following quarter.               4 out of 4 1st year students (100%)
weaknesses.                                                                               received a “3” or higher on the
                                                                                              “Professional/Personal
                                                                                           Development” section of the
                                                                                         Assessment of Student Progress
                                                                                          Form. Average score was 4.25.


                                                       All students earn satisfactory   6 of 6 students (100%) passed the
                                                       evaluations on comprehensive     comprehensive written exam, the
                                                       written examination and          PEAB oral exam and the portfolio
                                                       Professional Education                         review
                                                       Advisory Board oral
                                                       examination and portfolio
                                                       review.



Based on these assessment results, we can draw the following conclusions:
     Both the 1st year and 2nd year cohort of school counseling students are performing very well in the program
        and have all achieved the criterion of mastery on the practicum evaluations and all sections of the
        Assessment of Student Progress.
     The school counseling students are performing well in their practica, internship, comprehensive exams, and
        PEAB oral exam.

4. What will the department or program do as a result of that information?
In answering this question, please note specific changes to your program as they affect student learning, and as they
are related to results from the assessment process. If no changes are planned, please describe why no changes are
needed. In addition, how will the department report the results and changes to internal and external constituents
(e.g., advisory groups, newsletters, forums, etc.).

Though the school counseling program faculty and the department as a whole have not been able to discuss all of
these findings yet, the following changes will be proposed to and discussed by the faculty in the fall of the next
academic year (2008-09):

        These assessment results do not indicate the need for specific curricular changes within the program.
         Instead, the recommendations for change will focus on increasing the assessment opportunities.
        The school counseling program committee is planning to add the requirement of a student self-evaluation
         on the 79 benchmark standards, both near the beginning of the internship and at the end.
        The school counseling program committee is planning to add the requirement of a student self-
         improvement plan to the portfolio that reflects the results of their self-evaluation and areas of improvement
         needed.
        In 2007, we conducted our first alumni survey. Results from the survey were reported back to the alumni
         in the 2008 alumni newsletter.


5. What did the department or program do in response to last year’s assessment information?
In answering this question, please describe any changes that have been made to improve student learning based on
previous assessment results. Please also discuss any changes you have made to your assessment plan or assessment
methods.

This is the first year that the Psychology Department has developed a comprehensive assessment plan in compliance
with university standards. Therefore, there are no assessment results from previous years of our current assessment
regimen to examine.



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Though we did not have a formal assessment in the department, the program did make changes based on our
assessment data. From student surveys, we started planning for internship earlier. This includes beginning
internship searchers during student's first year. From feedback from the PEAB, we updated the program's
conceptual framework and mission statement. From the alumni surveys, we provided more in-school job shadowing
during introductory school counseling classes. From student surveys, we started the exploration of adding an
Education Specialist degree. We also added the CACREP standards for school counseling to our assessment of all
classes.

6. Questions or suggestions concerning Assessment of Student Learning at Central Washington University:


The School Counseling Graduate Program and the Psychology Department recommend the following changes to
Assessment of Student Learning at CWU:
     The Assessment Plan should be due at the end of the summer, not the end of spring quarter. There was not
        enough time this year to collect, evaluate, and summarize the assessment results.
     If the university believes that assessment is essential, then it needs to provide financial support for this task.
        The university should provide a summer stipend for a department assessment coordinator (or the
        department chair) to prepare the report and to make the recommended changes in response to the
        assessment results.




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                                           Central Washington University
                                          Assessment of Student Learning
                                          Department and Program Report

Please enter the appropriate information concerning your student learning assessment activities for this year.

Academic Year of Report: 2007-2008             College: COTS
Department: Psychology                         Program: M.S. Mental Health Counseling


1. What student learning outcomes were assessed this year, and why?
In answering this question, please identify the specific student learning outcomes you assessed this year, reasons for
assessing these outcomes, with the outcomes written in clear, measurable terms, and note how the outcomes are
linked to department, college and university mission and goals.

The Mental Health Counseling Graduate Program has chosen to assess the all three student learning outcomes:
    4. Academic Performance/Thesis Development: Students will organize their work effectively, demonstrate
       critical thinking skills, function independently, and use data/research to conceptualize their thinking.
    5. Clinical Performance. Students will demonstrate skills in oral and written communication, listening to
       client’s concerns, interpersonal relations, and respect for human diversity. Students will demonstrate
       responsiveness to supervision.
    6. Other Professional/Personal Development: Students will take initiative for their clinical, academic, and
       personal duties. They will demonstrate dependability and time management skills. Students will also
       maintain professional/ethical behavior, work as a team with peers, maintain flexibility when approaching
       clinical and academic concerns, and demonstrate appropriate self-awareness of personal strengths and
       weaknesses.

Please see Appendix C (CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form, Department:
Psychology, Program: M.S. in Mental Health Counseling) for a list of these SLOs and a summary of the related
department, college and university mission and goals.

2. How were they assessed?
In answering these questions, please concisely describe the specific methods used in assessing student learning.
Please also specify the population assessed, when the assessment took place, and the standard of mastery (criterion)
against which you will compare your assessment results. If appropriate, please list survey or questionnaire response
rate from total population.

A) What methods were used?
B) Who was assessed?
C) When was it assessed?

Please see Appendix C (CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form, Department:
Psychology, Program: M.S. in Mental Health Counseling) for a summary of the methods of assessment employed,
classes in which students were assessed, and when the assessments took place. Mental health counseling graduate
students are reviewed once a year by the program faculty using the Assessment of Student Progress Form. In 2007-
08, there were five 1st year students and five 2nd year students in the program. All of the 2 nd year students were
assessed during Fall 2007 and all of the 1st year students were assessed Spring 2008. Eight students completed the
mental health counseling internship and five more are in process.


3. What was learned?
In answering this question, please report results in specific qualitative or quantitative terms, with the results linked to
the outcomes you assessed, and compared to the standard of mastery (criterion) you noted above. Please also include
a concise interpretation or analysis of the results.



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           Student Learning Outcomes                          Criterion of Mastery                 Assessment Results
Academic Performance/Thesis Development:                    By their second review,          5 out of 5 2nd year students (100%)
Students will organize their work effectively,              students must receive a “3” or     received a “3” or higher on the
demonstrate critical thinking skills, function              above in all three categories    “Academic Performance” section of
independently, and use data/research to conceptualize       to continue in the program.      the Assessment of Student Progress
their thinking.                                             Students failing to reach this      Form. Average score was 3.8.
                                                            benchmark may petition for
                                                            another evaluation the            4 out of 5 1st year students (80%)
                                                            following quarter.                 received a “3” or higher on the
                                                                                             “Academic Performance” section of
                                                                                             the Assessment of Student Progress
                                                                                               Form. Average score was 3.68.
Clinical Performance: Students will demonstrate skills      By their second review,          5 out of 5 2nd year students (100%)
in oral and written communication, listening to client’s    students must receive a “3” or     received a “3” or higher on the
concerns, interpersonal relations, and respect for human    above in all three categories     “Clinical Performance” section of
diversity. Students will demonstrate responsiveness to      to continue in the program.      the Assessment of Student Progress
supervision.                                                Students failing to reach this     Form. Average score was 3.75.
                                                            benchmark may petition for
                                                            another evaluation the            4 out of 5 1st year students (80%)
                                                            following quarter.                 received a “3” or higher on the
                                                                                              “Clinical Performance” section of
                                                                                             the Assessment of Student Progress
                                                                                                Form. Average score was 3.3.

                                                                                             5 out of 5 1st year students (100%)
                                                            Students must receive a “3”       received a “3” or above on their
                                                            (Expected performance) or         PSY 593A evaluation (1 student
                                                            above on their PSY 593A          had to retake the class to reach this
                                                            evaluation. They must                            goal).
                                                            receive a “Satisfactory” or
                                                            above on 593B or C.              1 out of 1 students (100%) received
                                                                                              a “Satisfactory” or above on 593B
                                                                                                             or C

Other Professional/Personal Development: Students           By their second review,          5 out of 5 2nd year students (100%)
will take initiative for their clinical, academic, and      students must receive a “3” or     received a “3” or higher on the
personal duties. They will demonstrate dependability        above in all three categories          “Professional/Personal
and time management skills. Students will also maintain     to continue in the program.         Development” section of the
professional/ethical behavior, work as a team with peers,   Students failing to reach this    Assessment of Student Progress
maintain flexibility when approaching clinical and          benchmark may petition for         Form. Average score was 3.73.
academic concerns, and demonstrate appropriate self-        another evaluation the
awareness of personal strengths and weaknesses.             following quarter.                4 out of 5 1st year students (80%)
                                                                                               received a “3” or higher on the
                                                                                                   “Professional/Personal
                                                                                                Development” section of the
                                                                                               Assessment of Student Progress
                                                                                               Form. Average score was 3.58.
Based on these assessment results, we can draw the following conclusions:
     The 2nd year cohort of students is performing very well in the program and have all achieved the criterion
        of mastery on the practicum evaluations and all sections of the Assessment of Student Progress.
     The 1st year cohort of students is generally doing well. Only one student in the 1 st year group had to repeat
        PSY 593A and she performed satisfactorily the second time through the practicum. One other student in
        the 1st year group earned below satisfactory scores on the Assessment of Student Progress.

4. What will the department or program do as a result of that information?
In answering this question, please note specific changes to your program as they affect student learning, and as they
are related to results from the assessment process. If no changes are planned, please describe why no changes are



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needed. In addition, how will the department report the results and changes to internal and external constituents
(e.g., advisory groups, newsletters, forums, etc.).

Though the mental health counseling program faculty and the department as a whole have not been able to discuss
all of these findings yet, the following changes will be proposed to and discussed by the faculty in the fall of the next
academic year (2008-09):

        These assessment results do not indicate the need for specific curricular changes within the program.
         Instead, the recommendations for change will focus on increasing the assessment opportunities.
        The mental health counseling program faculty will review the internship evaluation form to make sure that
         it is addressing all of the desired skills and the needs of the program. Ideally, the internship evaluation
         form can be incorporated into future assessment plans for the program.
        The mental health counseling program faculty are planning to add a portfolio requirement to the program.
         The portfolio will be completed during the internship.
        In June, CWU became an approved testing center for the National Board for Certified Counselors, Inc.
         (NBCC). The NBCC developed the first general practice counseling credential that was national in scope.
         NBCC began credentialing National Certified Counselors (NCCs) in 1983. We will begin offering students
         in their final internship and recent graduates the chance to take their National Counselor Examination for
         Licensure and Certification (NCE) on October 18, 2009. Because of our CACREP accreditation, students
         who pass their test will become Nationally Certified Counselors upon passing.
        In 2007, we conducted our first alumni survey. Results from the survey were reported back to the alumni
         in the 2008 alumni newsletter.

5. What did the department or program do in response to last year’s assessment information?
In answering this question, please describe any changes that have been made to improve student learning based on
previous assessment results. Please also discuss any changes you have made to your assessment plan or assessment
methods.

This is the first year that the Psychology Department has developed a comprehensive assessment plan in compliance
with university standards. Therefore, there are no assessment results from previous years of our current assessment
regimen to examine.

Though we did not have a formal assessment in the department, the program did make changes based on our
assessment data. From student surveys, we started planning for internship earlier. This includes beginning
internship searchers during student's first year. We also created a project option for the thesis requirement, we
created a local chapter of chi sigma iota (the international honor society in counseling), and we reduced the
transcription requirements in all three practica. Our review of CACREP standards led to changes in PSY 552
(Human Growth and Development), PSY 555 (Design and Analysis for Applied Research), and PSY 560
(Introduction to Counseling).

6. Questions or suggestions concerning Assessment of Student Learning at Central Washington University:

The Mental Health Counseling Graduate Program and the Psychology Department recommend the following
changes to Assessment of Student Learning at CWU:
     The Assessment Plan should be due at the end of the summer, not the end of spring quarter. There was not
         enough time this year to collect, evaluate, and summarize the assessment results.
     If the university believes that assessment is essential, then it needs to provide financial support for this task.
         The university should provide a summer stipend for a department assessment coordinator (or the
         department chair) to prepare the report and to make the recommended changes in response to the
         assessment results.




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                                                      Central Washington University
                                                     Assessment of Student Learning
                                                     Department and Program Report

Please enter the appropriate information concerning your student learning assessment activities for this year.

Academic Year of Report: 2007-2008            College: COTS
Department: Psychology                        Program: M.S. Experimental Psychology

1. What student learning outcomes were assessed this year, and why?
In answering this question, please identify the specific student learning outcomes you assessed this year, reasons for assessing these
outcomes, with the outcomes written in clear, measurable terms, and note how the outcomes are linked to department, college and
university mission and goals.

The MS Experimental Psychology Graduate Program has chosen to assess the following three student learning outcomes:
    7. Write in the language of the discipline, using the elements of style described in the Publication Manual of the American
       Psychological Association.
    8. Describe and contrast major theoretical and practical concepts in core content areas of research including behavior analysis,
       cognitive psychology, comparative psychology, and/or physiological psychology.
    9. Engage in scholarly and professional activities, including presenting research at formal and/or informal professional events.

Please see Appendix C (CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form, Department: Psychology, Program:
M.S. in Experimental Psychology) for a list of these SLOs and a summary of the related department, college and university mission
and goals.

2. How were they assessed?
In answering these questions, please concisely describe the specific methods used in assessing student learning. Please also specify the
population assessed, when the assessment took place, and the standard of mastery (criterion) against which you will compare your
assessment results. If appropriate, please list survey or questionnaire response rate from total population.

A) What methods were used?
B) Who was assessed?
C) When was it assessed?

Please see Appendix C (CWU Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan Preparation Form, Department: Psychology, Program:
M.S. in Experimental Psychology) for a summary of the methods of assessment employed, classes in which students were assessed,
and when the assessments took place. During the 2007-2008 academic year, a total of 13 students were enrolled in the MS
Experimental Psychology Graduate Program. Of those, 4 were first year students, 2 were second year students, and the remaining 7
students were in their Nth year of study (3+).


3. What was learned?
In answering this question, please report results in specific qualitative or quantitative terms, with the results linked to the outcomes
you assessed, and compared to the standard of mastery (criterion) you noted above. Please also include a concise interpretation or
analysis of the results.

          Student Learning Outcomes                            Criterion of Mastery                        Assessment Results
Write in the language of the discipline, using the     GPA above 3.0 and no grade lower           All students (100%) passed each of the
elements of style described in the Publication         than a C in required core content and      seven core classes with a grade of C or
Manual of the American Psychological                   elective classes on student’s course        higher. Overall average GPA in each
Association.                                           of study form.                                 course ranged from 3.67 to 4.0


                                                                                                    1 out of 4 (25%) 1st year students
                                                                                                  completed the option approval form.
                                                       Successful completion and approval
                                                                                                 Both 2nd year students (100%) had their
                                                       of the thesis proposal as signified by
                                                                                                 option approval forms completed by the
                                                       the signing of the option approval                      fall of 2007.
                                                       form by the thesis committee.


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                                                                                              0 out of 4 (0%) 1st year students and 1 of
                                                                                              2 (50%) 2nd year students submitted and
                                                     Successful approval of research
                                                                                               obtained approval from the IACUC or
                                                     proposals by IACUC or HSRC
                                                                                                          HSRC in 2007-08.
                                                     committees, when relevant.
                                                                                                  Data on the # of MS Experimental
                                                                                                students who defended their thesis in
                                                     Successful defense of the thesis as
                                                                                                 2007-08 are not currently available.
                                                     signified by the signing of the thesis
                                                     signature pages by the thesis chair
                                                                                                  Data on the # of MS Experimental
                                                     and committee.                           students who had their thesis accepted by
                                                                                                the graduate school in 2007-08 are not
                                                                                                         currently available.
                                                     Successful acceptance of the written
                                                     thesis by the graduate school.
Describe and contrast major theoretical and          GPA above 3.0 and no grade lower          All students (100%) passed each of the
practical concepts in core content areas of          than a C in selected design and           seven core classes with a grade of C or
research including behavior analysis, cognitive      analysis classes on student’s course       higher. Overall average GPA in each
psychology, comparative psychology, and/or           of study form.                                course ranged from 3.67 to 4.0
physiological psychology.
                                                                                                  1 out of 4 (25%) 1st year students
                                                     Successful completion and approval         completed the option approval form.
                                                     of the thesis proposal as signified by    Both 2nd year students (100%) had their
                                                     the signing of the course of study        option approval forms completed by the
                                                     form by the thesis committee.                           fall of 2007.

                                                                                                  Data on the # of MS Experimental
                                                     Successful defense of the thesis as        students who defended their thesis in
                                                     signified by the signing of the thesis      2007-08 are not currently available.
                                                     signature pages by the thesis chair
                                                     and committee.                               Data on the # of MS Experimental
                                                                                              students who had their thesis accepted by
                                                     Successful acceptance of the written       the graduate school in 2007-08 are not
                                                     thesis by the graduate school.                      currently available.

Engage in scholarly and professional activities,     GPA above 3.0 and no grade lower          All students (100%) passed each of the
including presenting research at formal and/or       than a C in required core content and     seven core classes with a grade of C or
informal professional events.                        elective classes on student’s course       higher. Overall average GPA in each
                                                     of study form                                 course ranged from 3.67 to 4.0

                                                                                                  Data on the # of MS Experimental
                                                     Successful oral defense of the             students who defended their thesis in
                                                     master’s thesis                             2007-08 are not currently available.

                                                                                                 Data on the # of MS Experimental
                                                     100% of graduate students will             students and alumni who submitted
                                                     submit thesis research to CWU            research proposals to SOURCE or other
                                                     SOURCE Conference.                       conferences in 2007-08 are not currently
                                                                                                             available.
                                                     Minimum of 75% of graduate
                                                     students will submit research
                                                     proposals to a regional, national or
                                                     international conference within 1
                                                     year of graduation.

Based on these assessment results, we can draw the following conclusions:
     The graduate students in the MS Experimental Psychology program are exceeding the minimum academic standards.
     First year students typically do not meet the goal of completing their proposals before the end of their first year but typically
        do so early in the second year.

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        Many students require more than two years to complete their degree program.
        The Experimental Psychology program committee needs to implement better procedures for tracking student progress. The
         newly developed Student Progress Assessment Survey should ensure that the faculty are better prepared to keep track of
         student academic and professional progress throughout their academic career in the MS Experimental Psychology Program.

4. What will the department or program do as a result of that information?
In answering this question, please note specific changes to your program as they affect student learning, and as they are related to
results from the assessment process. If no changes are planned, please describe why no changes are needed. In addition, how will the
department report the results and changes to internal and external constituents (e.g., advisory groups, newsletters, forums, etc.).

Though the MS Experimental Psychology program faculty and the department as a whole have not been able to discuss all of these
findings yet, the following changes will be proposed to and discussed by the faculty in the fall of the next academic year (2008-09):

        The program committee should discuss whether the goal of having students complete a thesis proposal by the end of their
         first year is appropriate. We will need to decide whether this goal should be revised or whether there is more we can do as
         advisors to help students meet that original goal.
        The program committee should discuss concerns regarding time-to-completion delays. At present, a large proportion of the
         students in the MS Exp program work at the Chimpanzee and Human Communication Institute (CHCI). Many of these
         students require longer than 2 years to complete their degree due to the nature of the investigations they conduct. Also, many
         of the Nth year students are enrolled in a 60-credit degree program. That too has changed and new incoming MS Exp –
         General Experimental students will be completing a 48-credit MS degree program. Reductions in course requirements should
         help improve time to completion. Furthermore, a new Primate Studies Master’s degree program will soon be approved and
         we anticipate loosing a significant number of primate behavior students to that program. However, at the same time, the new
         Applied Behavior Analysis MS degree program will begin this coming fall 2008. These students will be completing 70
         credits as part of their training, including supervised internships. It is reasonable to expect that students in these two programs
         may require different time-to-completion goals. The program committee should review and discuss the current time-to-
         completion goals and to consider establishing distinct time-to-completion goals for students enrolled in the two MS Exp
         programs.
        It will be necessary to allow the new programs to become established, and the new tracking and assessment systems
         sufficient time to glean enough information to make relevant comparisons across academic years. To see the effects of
         current and future modifications to the programs, it will be necessary to allow students to progress far enough into their
         programs for meaningful data to be gathered. Our best data will come when we can look across years to see how well the
         changes that we implement result in meaningful change for the program and for our graduate students.
        The program committee should discuss and make recommendations for how MS Experimental Psychology program
         assessment results and changes should be best communicated to both internal and external constituents.


5. What did the department or program do in response to last year’s assessment information?
In answering this question, please describe any changes that have been made to improve student learning based on previous
assessment results. Please also discuss any changes you have made to your assessment plan or assessment methods.

Previous assessments and discussions led to some recent (2007-2008) significant changes to the MS Experimental Psychology
program requirements, including a reduction in the number of required credits. In addition, the new Applied Behavior Analysis
specialization was developed in conjunction with the special education program to address an unmet regional need for appropriate
training in this field. However, this is the first year that the Psychology Department has developed a comprehensive assessment plan in
compliance with university standards. Therefore, there are no assessment results from previous years of our current assessment
regimen to examine.

6. Questions or suggestions concerning Assessment of Student Learning at Central Washington University:

The MS Experimental Psychology Graduate Program and the Psychology Department recommend the following changes to
Assessment of Student Learning at CWU:
     The Assessment Plan should be due at the end of the summer, not the end of spring quarter. There was not enough time this
       year to collect, evaluate, and summarize the assessment results.
     If the university believes that assessment is essential, then it needs to provide financial support for this task. The university
       should provide a summer stipend for a department assessment coordinator (or the department chair) to prepare the report and
       to make the recommended changes in response to the assessment results.



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                              Appendix E: Changes Since Last Program Review
                       (taken from the Psychology Department NWCCU Self-Study)
Department Mission:

      Our mission statement is found in our undergraduate handbook and on our department web site. This mission
statement was revised after our 2004 program review to be a more concise statement of our mission, to mention each
of our graduate programs, and to remove our earlier enumeration of all of our centers programs, since our mission is
consistent regardless of delivery site.

Psychology Department Goals, All Programs:

       A. Goal: Assess and improve our undergraduate and graduate curricula
       This goal has been maintained since our last program review.
       Changes since the last program review:
           As a consequence of end-of-major exams and shifting emphases in the field, we revised our major in
              2006-2007 to add PSY 460, Cognitive Psychology and PSY 478, Physiological Psychology to our core
              set of required courses.
           To support the department and university’s focus on assessment, we have added PSY 489, a senior
              assessment course required of all graduating majors.
           We have revised our graduate program in experimental psychology by expanding its core of methods
              and content courses and reducing the number of elective credits to yield a 48 credit program instead of
              a 60 credit program. Our new program is much closer to the average length of masters programs in this
              field.
           We have added CACREP accreditation review of our mental health counseling (awarded) and school
              counseling (planned) programs to validate the curricula of these programs. Our school counseling and
              school psychology programs are already accredited by national and state bodies. Our long range plan is
              to seek Association for Behavior Analysis approval of our new applied behavior analysis track in the
              M.S. Experimental Psychology program.
           See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for each program for a complete report on
              this topic.

       B. Goal: Promote effective teaching
       This goal, while always understood, has been made explicit since our last program review. Our emphasis will
       be on more frequent and routine mentoring and assessment of teaching. We will review faculty use of their
       newly-negotiated personal faculty development fund account.
           See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for each program for a complete report on
              this topic.

       C. Goal: Promote excellence in learning to prepare students for careers and advanced study
       This goal, while always understood, has been made explicit since our last program review. Our emphasis will
       be on better assessment of learning by including more clear statements of learning objectives in all syllabi and
       portfolio assessment and universal administration of the Major Field Test to our graduating seniors.
           See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for each program for a complete report on
              this topic.

       D. Goal: Assure faculty staffing adequate to support timely delivery of all courses and programs at all sites.
       This goal has been maintained since our last program review.
       Changes since the last program review:
           The department Undergraduate Curriculum Committee reviews enrollments and recommends changes
              in frequency of course offerings at the Ellensburg campus.


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              We have received strong administrative support for replacement of vacated tenure track positions to
               improve staffing.
              We have been able to raise the level of faculty support at our Puget Sound centers from part-time and
               term appointments to tenure track positions
              We have hired three new school/mental health counselors (2006-2007) and a new physiological
               psychologist with her primary teaching assignment at the undergraduate level (2007-2008). Three of
               the seven tenure track searches conducted in 2007-08 resulted in hires: an experimental psychologist
               with expertise in our new graduate track in applied behavior analysis, and two general experimental
               psychologists to further strengthen the currency of the undergraduate curriculum. One of these latter
               appointees was assigned to our Des Moines center. The three school psychology searches and one
               counseling search were unsuccessful and scheduled to begin again in 2008-09.
              See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for each program for a complete report on
               this topic.

      E. Goal: Pursue diversity goals by attracting women and minority students and faculty members and by
      increasing student and faculty contact with diverse populations.
      This goal has been maintained since our last program review.
      Changes since the last program review:
          In all of our faculty searches, we welcome minority and women applicants. Of the four faculty hires
             since our last program review, two have been women, including one whose primary assignment is
             undergraduate instruction.
          In 2007-2008, about 70% of our bachelors degree candidates are women. The proportion of women in
             our graduate programs ranges from 68% (M. S. Experimental Psychology) to 78% (M. Ed. School
             Counseling).
          Our student body is becoming more ethnically diverse. CWU has the highest percentage of Latino
             students of the state’s four-year public institutions and the psychology major is a representative sample
             of our student body. Twenty-eight percent of undergraduate psychology majors are non-white and
             about half of those are Latino. Twenty percent of our graduate students are non-white and 60% of them
             are Latino.
          In our graduate counseling programs, we are beginning to log practicum hours spend with clients from
             diverse populations.
          See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for each program for a complete report on
             this topic.

      F. Goal: Support involvement of undergraduate and graduate students in psychological research
      This goal has been maintained since our last program review. We have a long-standing record of creating and
      disseminating research by student-faculty teams. Evidence includes publications, presentations at professional
      meetings, presentations at SOURCE, research theses, and research proposals and projects in major classes.
      Changes since the last program review:
          We have begun a new interdisciplinary summer field research course in primate behavior at our field
             station in China. Dr. Megan Matheson leads this program for our department.
          See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for each program for a complete report on
             this topic.
          We bring a scientific perspective to bear on social services in our area.

      G. Goal: Seek support for faculty teaching, scholarship, and professional development activities.
      This goal has been maintained since last program review.
      Changes since the last program review:
          Our new contract includes an individual professional development fund of $700 for each faculty
             member.
          The new workload forms have the potential for flexible apportionment of time among the three areas
             of faculty activity. This flexibility has gone largely unused, however.

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              There has been some reduction in summer session revenues to the department, reducing that source of
               support.
              See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for each program for a complete report on
               this topic.

      H. Goal: Maintain and enhance the infrastructure for the Psychology Department to optimize support for
      instruction and scholarship.
      This goal has been maintained since last program review.
      Changes since the last program review:
          We applied for and won a university equipment grant to upgrade our training clinic to a modern digital
             recording and playback system.
          Through a new hire, we maintained our two engineering technician positions for research and
             instructional support.
          There has been some reduction in summer session revenues to the department, reducing that source of
             equipment support.
          We acquired funds in 2008 to upgrade to our animal research facilities to comply with regulatory
             standards. Lab research with most animal species has been delayed, pending the completion of the
             upgrades.
          See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for each program for a complete report on
             this topic.

      I. Goal: Serve as a center for psychological and educational services to the community and region
      This goal has been maintained since last program review. Through our undergraduate contributions to the
      professional education sequence of courses, we contribute to the teacher education program. Our
      undergraduate degree program also prepares students to enter graduate training in mental health counseling,
      school counseling, counseling psychology, and clinical psychology, eventually serving the growing
      psychological counseling needs of our communities, schools, businesses, and military organizations. Our
      graduate programs in mental health counseling, school counseling, and school psychology provide free
      services to the community through our Community Counseling and Psychological Assessment Center.
      Changes since the last program review:
           Our building now houses the Ellensburg School District Developmental Preschool and our students
             study effective means of instruction with this special needs population.
           Undergraduate and graduate students have gained experience administering DIBELS and other CBM
             assessments in the public schools.
           Several students and faculty are conducting research and gaining guidance experience through the
             CWU GEAR-UP grant program
           A new research and practice relationship has been established between our students and faculty and
             Children’s Village in Yakima, a center for special needs children.
           As examples of service learning experiences for our students, we have supported Meaningful
             Connections, a social contact service for elderly residents of nursing facilities. We have also sponsored
             student action research on sleep disorders in the elderly and our students have served as volunteers at
             the Ellensburg Community Health Clinic, a medical clinic for low-income and uninsured patients.
           See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for each program for a complete report on
             this topic.

     Other Activities: Assessment
     The psychology department considers other desirable activities worth mentioning here. For one, we have been
     moving steadily toward more formalized, regular program assessment. We are augmenting our conventional
     activities such as student evaluation of instruction and peer review of instruction with statements of all program
     goals, evidence for each, and desirable levels of performance.
          In 2007-2008, we inaugurated a new capstone course, PSY 489, Senior Assessment, consisting of
              portfolio review, professional development, and program evaluation activities. We will collate
              assessment results from this class and use them to evaluate our major program.
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              We created a new standing committee of the department for program assessment.
              New online administration of our end-of-major assessment instrument, the Major Field Test, allows us
               to add up to 50 program assessment items to the MFT. We are now creating a group of items to build a
               history of quarterly student assessments of program effectiveness.
              We have formalized an annual spring meeting for assessment purposes. Our 2008 meeting will be the
               fifth of its kind. In topic-specific groups, we review each other’s syllabi, exams and other assignments,
               and discuss assessment problems.

       Other Activities: Student Life
       We promote meaningful informal contacts with our students to complement their classroom experience,
       model professional attitudes and behavior, and guide them toward their next professional or educational level.
       This is consistent with CWU and COTS Goals I and II and applies to our residential campus and to the
       university centers.
           The department sponsors the activities of Psi Chi, the national honor society in psychology, and our
               Psychology Clubs on the Ellensburg and Des Moines campuses. These organizations promote student
               interaction, sponsor a speaker series, and organize student travel to attend the annual meeting of the
               Western Psychological Association. The Psi Chi web site is at http://www.cwu.edu/~psych/psichi.html
               and the Psychology Club web site is at http://www.cwu.edu/~psych/psychclub.html
           The department supports PSY 275, a training course for residence hall advisors.
           Our faculty makes scholarly presentations to colleagues, students, and the community attending the
               Natural Science Seminar and Social Science Seminar series.

        Since our last program review, two goals no longer are immediate concerns. We have improved collegial
        relations within the department and our relations with the campus IRB are much smoother.

Additional Goals, M.S. in Mental Health Counseling:
      See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for this program for a complete report on our
      current goals and assessment methods.
      Changes since the last program review:
          This program was thoroughly reviewed and awarded initial accreditation by the Council for the
             Accreditation of Counseling and Related Programs (CACREP). Changes to the program included new
             procedures (e. g., orientation for internship site supervisors), formalizing procedures (e.g. student
             disciplinary policies) and records-keeping (e.g., define and record skills milestones for practica).
          We separated the mental health and school counseling pro seminars to build professional knowledge
             and identity in students and faculty.
          We upgraded the equipment we use to record our training clinic counseling sessions for later
             supervisory review. We now use digital recording and playback equipment.
          We hired a senior faculty member for 2006-2007 in mental health counseling and school counseling to
             serve as our program director. Two other faculty members with mental health and school counseling
             expertise were also hired for 2006-2007.
         Goals
          Move from initial CACREP accreditation to full accreditation status.

Additional Goals, M.S. in Experimental Psychology:
      See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for this program for a complete report on our
      current goals and assessment methods.
      Changes since the last program review:
          Evaluated and revised our program curriculum in light of our current faculty expertise, current trends
             in research and doctoral programs, preparing our students for contemporary professions and doctoral
             programs, and the programs of peer institutions. We revised our core and optional course selections
             and reduced the program from 60 to 48 credits. We identified biopsychology, cognitive psychology,
             and applied behavior analysis as productive areas for new faculty hires when the opportunities arise.

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              Hired one new tenure-track experimental psychologist (biopsychology) for 2007-2008 and three new
               tenure-track experimental psychologists (applied behavior analysis, general, general/cognitive) for
               2008-2009.
      Goals
         Inaugurate new Applied Behavior Analysis track of the M.S. in Experimental Psychology program.
         Increase enrollment.

Additional Goals, M.S. in Organization Development (MSOD):
      Changes since the last program review:
          In 2005, admissions to the MSOD program were suspended while the program underwent a separate
            program review. The normal schedule of courses continued to be offered to previously admitted
            students so they could all complete the program. While the program was generally commended by
            internal and external reviewers, a faculty team has not been reassembled and the program is has been
            suspended.

Additional Goals, M.Ed. in School Psychology/Washington State Educational Staff Associate Residency
Certificate in School Psychology:
       See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for this program for a complete report on our
       current goals and assessment methods.
       Changes since the last program review:
           We achieved successful state OSPI, NCATE, and NASP program approvals.
       Goals
           Develop a Washington State Educational Staff Associate Professional Certificate program in school
              psychology. This program would award a continuing professional certificate to school psychologists
              with the initial (residency level) certificate.
           Increase ethnic and racial diversity in our students and faculty.
           Respond to recommendations from our last National Association of School Psychologists accreditation
              review with appropriate program changes.
           Hire three new tenure-track school psychology faculty members, including a program director, in
              2008-2009.

Additional Goals, M.Ed. in School Counseling/Washington State Educational Staff Associate Residency
Certificate in School Counseling:
       See the program goals and student learning outcomes tables for this program for a complete report on our
       current goals and assessment methods.
       Changes since the last program review:
           We combined the degree and state certificate programs in compliance with state standards.
           We separated the mental health and school counseling pro seminars to build professional knowledge
              and identity in students and faculty.
           We upgraded the equipment we use to record our training clinic counseling sessions for later
              supervisory review. We now use digital recording and playback equipment.
           We added a new course in administering school counseling programs,
           We hired a senior faculty member for 2006-2007 in mental health counseling and school counseling to
              serve as our program director. Two other faculty members with mental health and school counseling
              expertise were also hired for 2006-2007.
           We achieved successful state OSPI and NCATE program approvals
       Goals:
           Coordinate more closely with our PEAB and Educational Service District 105 to promote internships
              in ethnically diverse schools.
           Seek CACREP accreditation for this program.



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                                                      Appendix F

                             Psychology Department Committee Assignments and Charges
                                                     2007-08


Standing Committees                                                Owen Dugmore
                                                                   Scott Schaefle
Personnel Committee                                                Terry Schwartz
   Warren Street (chair, term ends 2009)
   Steve Schepman (term ends 2008)
   Gene Johnson (term ends 2010)                             Education Sequence Committee
                                                                Michelle Montgomery (chair)
Undergraduate Curriculum Committee                              Terry Schwartz
  Megan Matheson (chair)                                        Jennifer Cates
  Susan Lonborg                                                 Scott Schaefle
  Anthony Stahelski
  Marte Fallshore                                            Ad Hoc Committees
  Terry Schwartz
                                                             ABA Interdisciplinary Track Planning Committee
Assessment Committee                                            Andrew Downs (chair)
   Warren Street (chair)                                        Wendy Williams
   Steve Schepman                                               Libby Street
   Megan Matheson                                               Dan Fennerty
   Kara Gabriel                                                 Robyn Downs
   Phil Tolin
                                                             School Psychology Search Committee
Graduate Admissions Committee                                   Gene Johnson (chair)
   Andrew Downs (chair)                                         Michelle Montgomery
   Rob Brammer                                                  Jennifer Cates
   Gene Johnson                                                 Adrian Elmo
   Wendy Williams
                                                             ABA Experimental Search Committee
MS Experimental Program Committee                              Andrew Downs (chair)
  Wendy Williams (chair)                                       Wendy Williams
  Susan Lonborg                                                Libby Street
  Megan Matheson                                               Crystal Wang
  Warren Street
  Kara Gabriel                                               Des Moines Search Committee
  Marte Fallshore                                               Steve Schepman (chair)
  Terry DeVietti                                                Anthony Stahelski
                                                                Megan Matheson
MS Mental Health Counseling & MEd School Counseling             Key Sun
Program Committee
   Rob Brammer (chair)                                       Chair Advisory Committee
   Jeff Penick                                                  Phil Tolin
   Andrew Downs                                                 Terry DeVietti
   Jennifer Cates                                               Warren Street
   Scott Schaefle                                               Megan Matheson
   Error! Contact not defined. (ex officio)                     Andrew Downs

MEd School Psychology Program Committee                      Department Liaisons
  Gene Johnson (chair)                                          Union Representative: Anthony Stahelski
  Michelle Montgomery                                           Faculty Senators: Kara Gabriel, Michelle Montgomery.
  Error! Contact not defined.                                      Alternate: Rob Brammer
                                                                Library Representative: Megan Matheson
Undergraduate Advisement Committee                              ESD Developmental Preschool Liaison: Andrew Downs
  Susan Lonborg (chair)                                         School Psychology PEAB: Gene Johnson
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   School Counseling PEAB: Scott Schaefle
   CTL: Rob Brammer, Scott Schaefle, Michelle
      Montgomery

Other Department Service
   Psi Chi/Psychology Club Advisor: Rob Brammer and
      Wendy Williams (co-advisors)
   Department statistical advisor: Terry DeVietti
   Other Department Service (continued)

   Des Moines Major /Minor Program Advisor: Steve
      Schepman
   Lynnwood Minor Program Advisor: Ed Kingston
   Pierce Minor Program Advisor: Mark Soelling




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Assessment Committee Charge
2007-2008

The Assessment Committee oversees the department's program assessment regimen, assembles assessment
data, and reports progress toward program goals for departmental action. The department's assessment
program tracks progress toward all of its goals, including not only student learning goals, but goals such as
student recruitment, faculty scholarship, student and faculty diversity, technology upgrades, library
resources, etc.

Gather or create appropriate information to complete AVP Pellett's Department/Program Goals Assessment
Plan. This will involve at least:
 Determine or revise departmental/program goals
 Identify relationship between department/programmatic goals to college and university goals
   (university goals can be accessed at: http://www.cwu.edu/president/archive/goals.html)
 Identify methods of assessment for each department/programmatic goal
 Identify population or items assessed
 Identify timing/dates of assessment collection
 Identify a criterion of achievement or standard of mastery for each goal


Gather or create appropriate information to complete AVP Pellett's Student Learning Outcomes
Assessment Plan. This will involve at least:
 Determine or revise specific programmatic student learning outcomes (knowledge, skills, attitudes)
 Identify relationship between student learning outcomes and department/programmatic goals
 Identify direct and indirect methods of assessment for each student learning outcome
 Identify student population assessed (specific courses, locations, etc.)
 Identify timing/dates of assessment collection
 Identify a criterion of achievement or standard of mastery for each student learning outcome
 Be sure that learning goals and assessments are in syllabi and in provost's curriculum file.

Gather or create appropriate information to complete relevant portions of the NWCCU Department Self
Study

Personnel Committee Charge
2007-2008


   Review tenure-track faculty vitae and professional records and make timely recommendations to the
    dean regarding tenure, promotion, reappointment, post-tenure review and performance adjustment
    (merit), with copies to the department chair and the candidate.

   Meet with each new faculty member individually to discuss expectations for reappointment, promotion,
    and tenure. Help identify a mentor for each new faculty member.

   Review non-tenure track faculty vitae and SEOIs and make recommendations to the chair regarding
    rehire decisions for the following year.

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   Other duties, as assigned by the department chair during the academic year.


Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Charge
2007-2008

One of the major tasks of the department this year is to assist with the necessary tasks required for the
upcoming NWCCU accreditation report and visit. Specifically, I would like the Undergraduate Curriculum
Committee to take on the following tasks:

   Ensure that every undergraduate psychology course has a set of identified learner objectives and
    assessment strategies. This will likely require that courses which haven’t been through the university’s
    curriculum review process in the last 2-3 years will need to have these objectives and strategies
    developed.

       o It is not the task of the committee to develop the missing course objectives and strategies, but
         rather to identify where they are lacking and assign the duty of updating this curriculum
         information to the faculty member (or subgroup of faculty members) who teach this course on a
         regular basis.

       o Once the missing course objectives and assessment strategies are developed, new curriculum
         forms that include this data will be needed.

       o Part of this task is to ensure that all faculty who teach sections of a class, such as PSY 101, PSY
         362, etc. should have the same core learner objectives and assessment strategies listed in their
         syllabi. I believe that assessment strategies can be listed fairly generically so that faculty have
         some freedom in using their preferred methods of assessment.

   Review the transfer agreements between undergraduate psychology classes at CWU and other
    Washington community colleges and universities to ensure that they are appropriate. Where necessary,
    make recommendations for changes in these transfer agreements.

   Review MFT results from the past several years and make recommendations for possible curriculum
    changes, as needed.

   Make recommendations to the department about changes in prerequisites for undergraduate courses, if
    needed.

   Review any proposed curriculum changes to undergraduate psychology courses or programs and assist
    faculty in completing the curriculum change paperwork in a timely manner so that changes can be
    approved and included in the next year’s catalog.

   Promote supportive and collegial relations among faculty and students.

   Other duties, as assigned by the department chair during the academic year.


Graduate Admissions Committee Charge

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2007-2008

   Review graduate program admission applications. Make admission and assistantship award
    recommendations to the department chair in a timely fashion.

   Other duties, as assigned by the department chair during the academic year.


MS Experimental Program Committee Charge
2007-2008

One of the major tasks for the MS Experimental Program Committee is to develop a coherent assessment
plan with program goals, student learning objectives, and assessment strategies. Furthermore, the
committee is asked to do the following:

   Develop a plan and rubric to assess the student learning objectives in the program. Set clear criteria for
    measuring these objectives so that the program can tell whether students have met the objectives.

   Implement the assessment plan and collect the assessment data on student performance.

   Review and summarize the assessment data on student performance. Keep minutes of the meetings.

   Prepare recommendations to the department for changes in the program, based on the assessment data.
    Again, please keep minutes of the meetings.

Another major task of this committee is to ensure that the ABA track for the MS Experimental Psychology
program is ready to be fully implemented, beginning in 2008-09. This will involve the following tasks:

   Preparation and submission of necessary curriculum change forms, as needed.

   Make timely recommendations to the chair about when relevant courses should be offered in 2008-09 to
    ensure the necessary scheduling of courses and assignment of faculty load.

   Advise the chair and department of any other changes needed to ensure that the ABA track is ready to
    be offered to students in 2008-09.

   Make recommendations about effective strategies to advertise the new ABA track and to recruit
    qualified graduate students into the program.

   Prepare a brief handout for faculty about the ABA track that will assist them in advising undergraduate
    students who are interested in the program.

Other tasks for this committee include:

   Review the experimental program material on the psychology web site. Recommend changes and
    provide revised materials as necessary.

   Promote supportive and collegial relations among faculty and students
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   Provide text and possible photos for use in informational brochures about the MS Experimental
    program.

   Other duties, as assigned by the department chair during the academic year.


MS Mental Health Counseling and MEd School Counseling Program Committee Charge
2007-2008

One of the major tasks for the Mental Health Counseling and MEd School Counseling Program Committee
is to ensure that there is a coherent assessment plan for each program with program goals, student learning
objectives, and assessment strategies. Furthermore, the committee is asked to do the following:

   If not already available, develop a rubric to assess the student learning objectives in each program. Set
    clear criteria for measuring these objectives so that the program can tell whether students have met the
    objectives.

   Implement the assessment plan and collect the assessment data on student performance.

   Review and summarize the assessment data on student performance. Keep minutes of the meetings.

   Prepare recommendations to the department for changes in the program, based on the assessment data.
    Again, please keep minutes of the meetings.

Other tasks for this committee include:

   Continue to work towards CACREP accreditation in school counseling.

   Assist the program director, as needed, in preparing documentation for NCATE, CACREP, and the
    Washington State Professional Education Standards Board.

   Review the graduate student handbooks for mental health counseling and school counseling and make
    changes, as needed.

   Review the LiveText artifacts for school counseling, make recommendations for changes (as needed),
    and assist faculty and students in complying with the LiveText requirement.

   Develop strategies for ensuring that the contents and process of supervision are adequately reported so
    that both graduate students and faculty supervisors are protected.

   Review the counseling and school counseling material on the psychology web site. Recommend
    changes and provide revised materials as necessary.

   Promote supportive and collegial relations among faculty and students, especially those of the clinic-
    based graduate programs.



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   Provide text and possible photos for use in informational brochures about the MS Mental Health
    Counseling and MEd School Counseling programs, if needed.

   Other duties, as assigned by the department chair during the academic year.


MEd School Psychology Program Committee Charge
2007-2008

One of the major tasks for the MEd School Psychology Program Committee is to ensure that there is a
coherent assessment plan with program goals, student learning objectives, and assessment strategies.
Furthermore, the committee is asked to do the following:

   If not already available, develop a rubric to assess the student learning objectives in the program. Set
    clear criteria for measuring these objectives so that the program can tell whether students have met the
    objectives.

   Implement the assessment plan and collect the assessment data on student performance.

   Review and summarize the assessment data on student performance. Keep minutes of the meetings.

   Prepare recommendations to the department for changes in the program, based on the assessment data.
    Again, please keep minutes of the meetings.

Other tasks for this committee include:

   Assist the program director, as needed, in preparing documentation for NCATE, NASP, and the
    Washington State Professional Education Standards Board.

   Review the graduate student handbook for school psychology and make changes, as needed.

   Review the LiveText artifacts for school psychology, make recommendations for changes (as needed),
    and assist faculty and students in complying with the LiveText requirement.

   Review the school psychology material on the psychology web site. Recommend changes and provide
    revised materials as necessary.

   Promote supportive and collegial relations among faculty and students, especially those of the clinic-
    based graduate programs.

   Provide text and possible photos for use in informational brochures about the MEd School Psychology
    program.

   Other duties, as assigned by the department chair during the academic year.

Undergraduate Advisement Committee Charge
2007-2008

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The major task of the Undergraduate Advisement Committee this year is to follow up on the tasks assigned
to this committee last year and update information as needed. These tasks include:

   Discuss ways to make the advising load more equitable among faculty. Report recommendations to the
    faculty and the chair.

   Review and revise, if necessary, a student exit survey on advisement experience and quality.

   Ensure that this survey be administered to graduating seniors in the major. Summarize and review the
    results of this survey. Keep minutes of the meetings.

   Prepare recommendations to the department for changes in the advising, based on the assessment data.
    Again, please keep minutes of the meetings.

   Review, update, and disseminate to faculty a list of advising FAQs and answers.

   Other duties, as assigned by the department chair during the academic year.


Education Sequence Committee Charge
2007-08

   Review LiveText assignments and rubrics for PSY 314 and PSY 315; make recommendations for
    changes as needed.

   Ensure that all faculty (including adjuncts) who teach PSY 314 and PSY 315 have the necessary
    materials and information regarding LiveText requirements.

   Review and revise the master syllabi for PSY 314 and PSY 315, as needed.

   Review the LiveText data for PSY 314 and PSY 315. Keep minutes of meetings.

   Prepare recommendations to the department for changes in PSY 314 and PSY 315, based on the
    assessment data from LiveText. Again, please keep minutes of the meetings.

   Represent the psychology department by participating in the Center for Teaching and Learning.

   Advise the department chair of teacher education issues affecting the psychology department as they
    arise.

   Other duties, as assigned by the department chair during the academic year.


Chair Advisory Committee Charge
2007-2008

Meet with the department chair, as requested, to provide advise and guidance on a variety of department issues.


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                                            Appendix G
                  Performance Standards for the Department, College, and University

                                Psychology Department Personnel Policies
                                            Approved 2007

      7.2.11 Department of Psychology
               The psychology department serves the missions of the College of the Sciences and the
               university by
                offering strong undergraduate and graduate programs of study through which students
                    can develop an understanding of the perspectives, content, and methods of the science
                    and practice of psychology,
                serving as a center for research related to human and animal behavior, and
                providing psychological and educational services to the community.
               The department’s standards of faculty performance combine guidance for every faculty
               member with sufficient latitude for complementary individual strengths to maximize the
               effectiveness of the department as a whole. The department’s personnel policies are
               intended only to address issues not covered by college and university level policies.
        7.2.11.1. Instruction: Standard and Evaluation
               Teaching assignments. The department chair assigns teaching responsibilities to faculty
               members in conformity with college and university policies, the collective bargaining
               agreement, and the department’s mission. Within these strictures, faculty expertise,
               experience, balance within and between faculty members, and individual preferences are
               considered by the chair when making assignments.
               Individual instruction. With the approval of the department chair and dean, faculty
               members may offer instruction to individual students by enrolling the student for credits in
               Individual Study, Directed Research, Thesis, and similar courses. The portion of a faculty
               member’s work load credited to individual instruction is subject to approval by the
               department chair and will not exceed 6 work units per year. Arranged courses and PSY
               340 (Teaching of Psychology) credits do not count toward workload units. The need to
               support the department’s scheduled classes takes precedence over individual instruction.
               Student advising. Each faculty member is expected share equally providing academic
               advice to the department’s undergraduate and graduate students.
               Practicum supervision. The demands of graduate clinical practicum supervision warrant a
               higher faculty/student ratio per work unit than typical group courses. The department
               maintains standards of clinical supervision loads consistent with those of national
               accrediting bodies.
               Licensure. Professional licensure or certification, and related continuing education activity,
               may be appropriate to some of the instructional roles in the psychology department. The
               department recognizes a need to support faculty members who have these obligations,
               within the limitations of state law and university policies.
               Evaluation. In addition to the teaching evaluation mechanisms described in college and
               university policies, the department conducts a peer review session in the spring of the year.
               Small groups of faculty review a common facet of each other’s instructional methods.

           7.2.11.2. Research and Scholarly Activity: Standard and Evaluation
                  The policies of the college and university are sufficient to describe the research and
                  scholarly expectations of the department’s faculty. We encourage the development of a
                  coherent and enduring theme that guides one’s research and scholarship. We value
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                  collaborations with colleagues and engaging students in our research and publications.
                  Faculty members are encouraged to seek external funding for their scholarly activities.
                  Evaluation. The department’s evaluation procedures are consistent with college and
                  university policies.

           7.2.11.3. Service: Standard and Evaluation
                  Accreditation. Faculty members in programs that must meet external accreditation
                  standards participate in accreditation-driven activity. This special service is recognized in
                  their overall service assignment.
                  Committee service. Each faculty member is expected to share equally in the work of the
                  standing and ad hoc committees of the department and university. Service to student clubs
                  is considered part of this activity. Where needed, faculty members serve as liaisons to
                  extradepartmental bodies, such as the Center for Teaching and Learning Executive
                  Committee, or the Professional Education Advisory Boards.
                  Program administration. Faculty assignments to departmental program administration are
                  recognized in the faculty member’s workload plan.
                  Evaluation. The department’s evaluation procedures are consistent with college and
                  university policies.

           7.2.11.4. Discipline specific standards for title, rank and tenure
                  The department’s policies regarding title and rank are consistent with college and
                  university policies.
                  Tenure. The decision to award tenure to a faculty member signals a mutual commitment by
                  the university and the faculty member to continuous support and productivity in a career of
                  teaching, scholarship, and service. A tenure decision is based on assessment of the
                  candidate’s entire professional record. In addition to assessment of teaching, scholarship,
                  and service, contributions to the welfare and effectiveness of the department, as well as to
                  an atmosphere of collegiality, are given weight in these deliberations.
                  Benchmarks to Tenure: The following represents a recommended set of benchmarks in the
                  tenure process:
                  Years 1 and 2
                         Candidate Responsibilities
                              Prepare instructional plans and materials for new courses.
                              Advise students as assigned by the department.
                              Establish research infrastructure
                              Develop a written research agenda for discussion with the department chair.
                              If appropriate, submit grant proposals and establish funding.
                              Continue lines of scholarship with publication of work executed at previous
                                institutions or develop new interests, to a point where new Category A or B
                                products are forthcoming in the second year.
                              Perform assigned department service.
                              Serve as member of masters’ thesis committees. Begin to chair masters’
                                thesis committees as soon as graduate faculty status is awarded.
                         Departmental Responsibilities
                              Provide release time to initiate scholarship in first year.
                              Work with administration to provide appropriate facilities and resources to
                                establish research program.
                              Identify external programs and resources for research program support.
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                       Provide evaluation and, as needed, mentoring for teaching and scholarship.
                       Engage in peer review of instruction.
                       Provide annual feedback and specific recommendations on progress toward
                        tenure.
           Years 3 & 4
                Candidate Responsibilities
                     Demonstrate response to self-, peer-, and student assessment of instruction.
                     Advise students as assigned by the department.
                     Actively mentor student research.
                     Submit results of research performed at CWU for peer-reviewed Category A
                       publication(s).
                     Revise research agenda to reflect initial findings, growth, and new
                       opportunities or ideas.
                     Expand service contributions at the college or university level.
                     Establish external service roles, such as activity in professional associations,
                       editorial service, etc.
                     Continue to serve as member and chair of masters’ thesis committees
                Departmental Responsibilities
                     Acknowledge and commend faculty contributions.
                     Enhance the campus-wide visibility of faculty contributions.
                     Continue support for grant submissions, as needed.
                     Engage in peer review of instruction.
                     Provide annual feedback and specific recommendations on
                       progress toward tenure.
           Years 5 & 6
                     Continues the pattern of years 3 and 4, with more consistent and independent
                       teaching, scholarly, and service accomplishments.
                     Begins to take the lead in appropriate department and university activities




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                                          COLLEGE OF THE SCIENCES
                                              POLICY MANUAL

6. Performance Review
   The performance of COTS faculty and staff is periodically reviewed in conformance with accreditation standards,
university policy, and state law. This review supports effective job performance and identifies areas where
professional development would be beneficial to the university; it is coordinated at the college level.
    7.1. College Standards for Faculty Review
    Tenured and tenure track faculty members are reviewed for reappointment, tenure, promotion, award of merit, and
ongoing professional development after tenure. The process and schedules for each type of review are specified in
the collective bargaining agreement (CBA Article 20.2), the Academic Affairs policy manual, and the Academic
Affairs annual calendar; the required materials are detailed on the COTS cover sheet appropriate to each type of
review. The office of the provost maintains the official copy of the Professional Record for COTS faculty.
Notification of required periodic review follows the timelines laid out in the annually published academic affairs
calendar.
    In conformance with university standards, review of tenured and tenure-track faculty centers on the three required
performance areas: instruction, scholarship, and service. Work performed in all three areas is expected to meet
professional standards including collegiality. Non-tenure track faculty and phased retirees are evaluated for
instruction; other duties are evaluated when they are part of their contract.
        7.1.1. Instruction: Standard and Evaluation
            7.1.1.1. Effective instruction is the central element of faculty work.
            7.1.1.2. Effective instruction requires thoughtful and responsive course design, development of
                    appropriate instructional techniques, articulation of student learning objectives, assessment of
                    student learning, and maintenance of the completeness and currency of a faculty member’s
                    understanding of his or her discipline. Effective teaching is shaped by formal evaluation and by
                    ongoing professional development.
            7.1.1.3. The college values multiple modes of instruction and recognizes that student learning occurs in a
                    variety of field, laboratory, research, classroom, and other settings and contexts. Delivery of
                    instruction and its evaluation should reflect this diversity.

            7.1.1.4. The administration of the Student Evaluation of Instruction (SEOI) is required in all courses with
                    five or more students. Departments and individual faculty may develop their own instruments and
                    means of teaching evaluation to complement but not to replace the SEOI.

            7.1.1.5. Departments must retain summaries of SEOI including transcription of written comments, using
                    the university’s SEOI forms and other evidence of teaching effectiveness, in accordance with
                    college and department policies.
            7.1.1.6. In conformance with accreditation standards, all teaching faculty are evaluated using multiple
                    methods that typically include student evaluation, peer evaluation through classroom observation,
                    review of syllabi and/or course materials, self-reflection, and assessment of student learning
                    objectives. The instruments and results of evaluation are included in the personnel file.
            7.1.1.7. Non-tenure track faculty members are expected to maintain effective teaching, as demonstrated
                    through such evaluation.
            7.1.1.8. Candidates for reappointment shall demonstrate concrete evidence of effective teaching and
                    professional growth.
            7.1.1.9. Candidates for tenure shall demonstrate a pattern of productivity that demonstrates effectiveness
                    in teaching and promises sustained productivity throughout their career.
            7.1.1.10. Candidates for promotion are evaluated in accordance with the University Faculty
                    Performance Standard. Effective teaching demonstrated through the evaluation specified in
                    7.1.1.6 and through progressive professional growth is required for promotion to Associate
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                  Professor. Teaching that consistently exceeds expectations and commands the respect of faculty
                  and students is required for promotion to professor.
           7.1.1.11. Faculty members undergoing post-tenure review are expected to maintain these rank-
                  appropriate levels of performance in teaching.

      7.1.2 Research and Scholarly Activity: Standard and Evaluation
           7.1.2.1. Research and scholarly activity are essential duties of university faculty, and are valued for
                   their contribution to instruction, service, professional development, and the advancement of
                   knowledge. Scholarship takes many forms and is characterized by validation of rigor and
                   dissemination outside the university.
           7.1.2.2. University and accreditation standards recognize publication in national peer-reviewed venues
                   as an essential form of such validation and dissemination for all faculty members. These
                   correspond to Category A products identified by the University Faculty Performance Standard or
                   discipline-specific, equivalent products established by departmental standards that have been
                   approved at the college and university levels.
           7.1.2.3. Other forms of faculty scholarship enrich the intellectual life of the faculty, the students, and
                   the university. These correspond to “other products” identified by the University Faculty
                   Performance Standard, herein referred to as Category B products or discipline-specific, equivalent
                   products established by departmental standards that have been approved at the college and
                   university levels.
           7.1.2.4. In the context of the University Performance standard, departments may establish discipline-
                   specific faculty scholarship standards that support the programmatic goals of the department.
                   These standards require approval of the dean and provost.
           7.1.2.5. Candidates for reappointment shall demonstrate concrete evidence of progress towards
                   scholarly contributions.
           7.1.2.6. Candidates for tenure shall demonstrate a pattern of productivity that demonstrates substantive
                   scholarly contributions and promises sustained productivity throughout their career.
            7.1.2.6.1. This record should include regular contributions in both 7.1.2.2 and 7.1.2.3 above.
            7.1.2.6.2. Among the regular contributions, at least one category A product shall demonstrate the
                         candidate’s ability to initiate scholarly work at CWU and lead it to peer-reviewed
                         dissemination.
            7.1.2.6.3. The pattern of productivity is further substantiated by evidence of projects in different stages
                         of development.
           7.1.2.7. Candidates for promotion shall provide evidence of regular and substantive contributions of
                   peer-reviewed scholarly work in the categories listed in 7.1.2.2 or comparable products when
                   these have been established by university-approved department personnel standards. These
                   products shall be complemented by scholarly activities such as those listed in 7.1.2.3 in
                   accordance with the University Faculty Performance Standard. Faculty members are especially
                   encouraged to mentor students in research leading to external dissemination.
           7.1.2.8. In accord with accreditation standards, all tenured faculty members are expected to sustain
                   scholarly activity, during any given post-tenure review period. The balance of instruction,
                   scholarship, and service may evolve throughout an individual’s career and performance
                   expectations in each category are established through the workload plan that is assigned by the
                   department and approved by the dean.
           7.1.2.9. When departments request the evaluation of scholarship by external experts as part of the
                   tenure, promotion, or post-tenure review consideration special procedures for soliciting and
                   handling external evaluations apply. These are detailed in 7.2.5.

       7.1.3. Service: Standard and Evaluation
            7.1.3.1 Service is an essential element of faculty life; faculty service contributes expertise and effort to
                  departments, the university, professional communities of scholars, and the citizenry.



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               7.1.3.2. University service is assigned in accordance with university policy. The dean, in consultation
                      with the department chair, assigns college level service. The department chair assigns department
                      level service.
               7.1.3.3. Service activities are defined in CBA Article 13.3.3 and may include participation in university
                      governance, public lectures, service as chair or program director, unremunerated consultancies,
                      community activities related to one's discipline, advisement of student organizations, service to
                      professional organizations, and contributions to department operations and activities. Faculty
                      members are especially encouraged to mentor and collaborate with students in community
                      service. Departments may establish tailored guidelines for appropriate types and levels of
                      discipline-specific faculty service activities established by departmental standards that have been
                      approved at the college and university levels.
               7.1.3.4. Faculty members are responsible for providing documentation of service activities and
                      contributions in their professional files.
                  7.1.3.4.1 Candidates for reappointment shall demonstrate progressive growth towards appropriate
                  service contributions.
                  7.1.3.4.2 Candidates for tenure shall demonstrate a pattern of productivity that demonstrates
                  appropriate contributions in service and promises sustained productivity throughout their career.
                  7.1.3.4.3 Candidates for promotion are evaluated in accordance with the University Faculty
                  Performance Standard, which requires a substantive contribution to university, professional and/or
                  community service for promotion to Associate Professor, and sustained contributions to university
                  life, and increasing service to professional organizations and/or the community for promotion to
                  Professor.
                  7.1.3.4.4. Faculty members undergoing post-tenure review are expected to sustain contributions in
                  university, professional and community service appropriate to their discipline, tenure, and rank.
   7.2.       Departmental Performance Standards
    University-approved standards guide evaluation of each faculty member by the department personnel committee
and the department chair. These are developed in accordance with 20.1.1 of the CBA, and require approval of the
dean and the office of the provost.
    Departmental standards for reappointment, tenure, and promotion, and for post-tenure review shall align with the
university and college standards. The department will ensure that its personnel policy document is consistent with,
and in no case less stringent than college and university provisions. Periodic revision may be required.
    Modification of approved criteria for reappointment, tenure, promotion, or post-tenure review for an individual
position may sometimes be warranted. A split appointment between science education and a discipline department is
a typical example. The modified criteria are agreed upon by the faculty member, the department chair in consultation
with the department personnel committee, and the dean; and approved in advance by the provost. Approval at all
levels must be in writing (Collective Bargaining Agreement, section 27.3) and the modification must be stipulated in
documents such as the initial contract letter or subsequent letters of agreement.


   Performance standards will be posted at http://www.cwu.edu/~cots/facultyforms.html and linked below, as they
are approved:

          7.2.1 Performance Standard - Department of Anthropology & Museum Studies
          7.2.2 Performance Standard - Department of Biological Sciences
          7.2.3 Performance Standard - Department of Chemistry
          7.2.4 Performance Standard - Department of Computer Science
          7.2.5 Performance Standard - Department of Geography & Land Studies
          7.2.6 Performance Standard - Department of Geological Sciences
          7.2.7 Performance Standard - Department of Law & Justice
          7.2.8 Performance Standard - Department of Mathematics
          7.2.9 Performance Standard - Department of Physics
          7.2.10 Performance Standard - Department of Political Science
          7.2.11 Performance Standard - Department of Psychology
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          7.2.12 Performance Standard - Department of Sociology

   7.3.       Professional Record

          7.3.1. For all performance reviews, it is the candidate’s responsibility to assemble and present an appropriate
                 portfolio of accomplishments during the review period, known as the professional record. The
                 professional record provides documentation of performance in all three areas of evaluation, making
                 clear the relationship between supporting materials and the evaluation categories and criteria.
          7.3.2. The professional record is prepared using a standardized format. The period under review and
                 appropriate materials vary among some review processes; the appropriate materials and review period
                 are specified on the record cover sheet. The dean’s office distributes a binder at the time of the initial
                 reappointment review or upon request, and this should be reused during subsequent review. Format
                 specifications for preparing the professional record can be found in Appendix A of this document.
                 Required forms may be found on the College of the Sciences web site,
                 http://www.cwu.edu/~cots/docs/docs.html.

          7.3.3. Professional records submitted in support of reappointment, tenure, and post-tenure review should
                include all performance evaluations, at all levels, since the initial hire. Promotion considers the record
                of accomplishments in current rank at CWU, and the professional record must contain all performance
                evaluations at all levels for that period. Previous experience may be relevant in establishing a
                sustained record of productivity but the criteria for promotion to a particular rank must be met during
                the period under consideration. The period for consideration of merit is specified at the university
                level.

          7.3.4. Colleagues, students, and others familiar with the candidate’s work are permitted to submit letters that
                 attest to specific contributions or qualities of the candidate relevant to their performance in any of the
                 three evaluation areas. These letters may be submitted to the chair or personnel committee prior to the
                 deadline for file submission.

          7.3.5. Upon completion of the review process, professional records will be maintained in the office of the
                 provost. Each faculty member should retain a copy of his or her professional record and the portfolio
                 of supporting materials.


   7.4.       Review Deadlines, Revision of Departmental Performance Standard, and External Letters

          7.4.1. Eligibility for personnel action is established in the collective bargaining agreement. Deadlines for
                 personnel evaluation and action are published in the Academic Calendar for each year. Responsibility
                 for meeting deadlines rests with the faculty member. The academic calendar may be found online at
                 http://www.cwu.edu/~provost/schedulecalendar.htm

          7.4.2. Recommendation of candidates for reappointment, promotion, tenure, or post-tenure review by tenured
                 department faculty, department personnel committee, chairs, the college personnel committee, and the
                 dean are based on the candidate’s submitted Professional Record, consistent with department, college,
                 and university standards and other factors.
          7.4.5. Solicitation of an external evaluation of scholarship for tenure, post-tenure review, or promotion
                 decisions by the department, dean, or office of the provost must adhere to a routine and clearly
                 specified process. When such evaluation is solicited, opinions from a mix of experts in the relevant
                 sub-discipline are required. The request should identify the activities for which an evaluation is
                 solicited (scholarship), and provide a portfolio that supports the requested evaluation. The candidate
                 may suggest some such experts; a department specified proportion of not less than half of the solicited
                 evaluations must be from people whose names are not provided by the candidate. In support of the
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                confidentiality and objectivity of such evaluation, the letters will be kept in a sealed envelope in the
                faculty member’s professional file in the office of the provost. Only those who formally recommend a
                personnel action may access the evaluations of the candidate during the review process. The letters
                will not be made available to the candidate.

   7.5.       Levels of Review

          The department personnel committee, the chair, the college personnel committee, the dean, and the office of
          the provost provide official recommendations in personnel decisions as specified in CBA Articles 9, 10, and
          13. Faculty members who participate in professional education programs may also seek review by the
          Center for Teaching and Learning.
          7.5.1 Department Personnel Committee
                  7.5.1.1 Committee Membership: The department personnel committee comprises at least three
                        voting members of appropriate rank, and is established in accord with CBA Article 20.5.1.
                        7.5.1.1.1 Faculty members with formal assignment to Science Education may request that a
                              special appointment be made to the department personnel committee from that program.
                        7.5.1.1.2 The dean nominates and the provost appoints special ad hoc committee members in
                              accordance CBA Article 20.5.3.
                  7.5.1.2 Department review for reappointment, tenure, promotion, and post-tenure review follows the
                        process established in CBA Article 20.6.2.
                  7.5.1.3 As part of the formal review process, the department personnel committee reviews and
                        evaluates the work of candidates for reappointment, tenure, promotion, and post-tenure review
                        (CBA Article 20); and also reviews performance in the assigned workload for all non-tenure
                        track faculty (CBA Article 10.2). The committee uses university, college, and department
                        standards as the basis for evaluation and recommendation (CBA Article 20.1). The personnel
                        committee makes separate written evaluation and recommendation to the dean.
                  7.5.1.4 After recommending on reappointment or post-tenure evaluation, the personnel committee
                        will meet with each candidate to discuss performance and professional plans.

          7.5.2 Department Chair
                  7.5.2.1. The chair meets with each new faculty member during his/her first quarter at CWU in order
                           to orient her/him concerning reappointment, tenure, promotion, and post-tenure review
                           procedures and expectations. The chair also provides copies of student evaluation forms,
                           describing how they are administered and maintained in the department as well as explaining
                           their role and significance in reappointment, tenure, promotion, and post-tenure review
                           decisions.
                  7.5.2.2 Department chair review for reappointment, tenure, promotion, and post-tenure review
                        follows the process established in CBA Article 20.6.2.
                  7.5.2.3 As part of the formal review process, the chair evaluates the work of candidates for
                        reappointment, tenure, promotion, and post-tenure review (CBA Article 20); and also reviews
                        performance of the assigned workload for all non-tenure track faculty (CBA Article 10.2). The
                        chair uses university, college, and department standards as the basis for evaluation and
                        recommendation (CBA Article 20.1). The chair makes separate written evaluation and
                        recommendation to the dean.
                  7.5.2.4 After recommending on reappointment or post-tenure evaluation, as well as periodically
                        throughout the year, the chair will meet with each candidate to discuss performance and
                        professional plans.

          7.5.3 College Personnel Committee
                  7.5.3.1 College Personnel Committee membership eligibility and appointment is detailed in CBA
                        Article 20.5.2 and Section 1.2.2 of this manual.


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                  7.5.3.2 College level review for tenure and promotion follows the process established in CBA Article
                        20.6.2.
                  7.5.3.3 As part of the formal review process, the college personnel committee reviews and evaluates
                        the work of candidates in the areas of instruction, scholarship, and service for tenure and
                        promotion (CBA Article 20). The committee uses university, college, and department
                        standards as the basis for evaluation and recommendation (CBA Article 20.1). The college
                        personnel committee makes separate written evaluation and recommendation to the dean.

           7.5.3 Dean
                   7.5.3.1 As part of the formal review process, the dean reviews and evaluates the work of candidates
                         for reappointment, tenure, promotion, and post-tenure review (CBA Article 20).
                   7.5.2.3 The dean uses university, college, and department standards as the basis for evaluation and
                         recommendation (CBA Article 20.1). The dean conveys college and department level
                         recommendations to the provost.
                   7.5.2.4 The dean’s review for reappointment, tenure, promotion, and post-tenure review follows the
                         process established in CBA Article 20.6.2.
    7.6.       Performance Adjustment

The Performance Adjustment process is specified at the University level. The college Structured Performance
Record may also be required, if not specified.


    7.7.       Chair Review

The dean initiates review of the department chair, required annually by university policy. A form for chair review is
available on the college web site.
   7.8.       Staff Review

      7.8.1.     State law and university policy require a Performance & Development Plan and annual review for
                 classified staff. This review is typically conducted by the chair and is forwarded to the dean during
                 spring quarter. Human Resources provides a standard format for this review.

      7.8.2.     University policy requires annual evaluations for exempt employees. This review is typically
                 conducted during spring quarter. Exempt employees are evaluated in the elements of their position
                 descriptions, or according to the tasks specified by grants and contracts. The review is conducted by
                 the supervisor or chair, and is forwarded to the dean during spring quarter.




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                   UNIVERSITY FACULTY PERFORMANCE STANDARD
                           FOR REAPPOINTMENT, TENURE, PROMOTION,
                                  AND POST-TENURE REVIEW

Central Washington University faculty members contribute to the mission and goals of the university in the
three areas of faculty work: instruction, scholarship, and service. This work is framed by university and
program accreditation standards and conducted with collegiality and professionalism (CBA Article 11).
College criteria for faculty performance in these areas will reflect disciplinary standards within the college.
Department criteria will, in turn, align with college and university criteria and standards. Professional
librarians shall constitute a college for administrative purposes, in accordance with CBA Article 13.4.4.

Tenure and/or Promotion in Rank:
Tenure is the right to continuous appointment at the University with an assignment to a specific department
in accordance with the provisions of CBA Article 9.2. The tenure decision is based upon faculty
performance and the potential benefit to the university. Performance towards tenure is annually reviewed
through the reappointment process. A positive tenure review requires a pattern of productivity that
promises sustained contributions in all three areas of faculty performance throughout a career, and is based
on the benefits to the university of entering into the commitment to tenure. For an Assistant Professor,
tenure is awarded with promotion to Associate Professor.
Promotion to the rank of Associate Professor recognizes an established record of effective teaching, a
demonstrated ability to lead independent, peer-reviewed scholarship to dissemination outside the
university, and a substantive contribution to university, professional and/or community service.
Promotion to the rank of Professor recognizes excellent teaching that commands the respect of the faculty
and students; an accumulated record of superior peer-reviewed scholarship since the previous promotion;
and sustained contributions to university life, and increasing service to professional organizations and/or
the community.

Post-tenure review
Post-tenure review assures continued performance in assigned areas of faculty work at appropriate rank and
consistent with the university mission and accreditation standards. Performance in the three areas of
faculty work is typically expected during any three-year post-tenure review cycle.
College and department standards will articulate discipline-specific expectations for tenure, promotion, and
post-tenure review.




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PERFORMANCE
Instruction:
Effective instruction is the central element of faculty work. It requires thoughtful and responsive course
design, development of appropriate instructional techniques, articulation of student learning objectives,
assessment of student learning, general advising, and is informed by active scholarship. Effective teaching
is shaped by formal evaluation using multiple measures and by ongoing professional development.
Instruction activities are specified in Article 13.3.1 of the Collective Bargaining Agreement.
College and department standards shall articulate multiple measures of review that include peer evaluation
of content, pedagogy, and responsiveness to assessment; student feedback; and other measures appropriate
to the content area.

Scholarship:
Faculty scholarship informs instruction and service, contributes to professional development, and advances
knowledge. It includes sustained professional activities leading to regular publication, performance, formal
presentation, or external funding in the field of the faculty member’s academic assignment. It may include
contributions in the four basic areas of discovery, integration, application and teaching, as appropriate to
that assignment. Scholarship is characterized by external peer review and dissemination outside the
university.
Scholarship activities are specified in Article 13.3.2 of the Collective Bargaining Agreement.
College standards shall articulate periodically expected activities in two or more categories.
Category A includes disciplined-recognized products that are formally peer-reviewed and disseminated
outside the university. e.g.:
     refereed journal articles
     research monographs
     scholarly books and chapter
     textbooks
     juried exhibitions and performances
     peer-reviewed external grant (for the lead principal investigator)
Another category or other categories specified by the colleges include formal activities that lead to or
support such products or other scholarly contributions, e.g.:
    peer-reviewed conference proceedings
    proposal submission for peer-reviewed external grant (lead principal investigator)
    serving as co-investigator or co-principal investigator on funded external peer-reviewed grant
    principal investigator on other grants and contracts
    authoring publicly available research and technical papers
    conference presentations
    textbook chapters
    externally published study guides
    book reviews
Department standards shall align with university and college criteria.

Service:
Faculty service contributes academic and professional expertise and effort to the university community, to
professional communities of scholars, and to the citizenry.

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University, professional, and public service activities are specified in Article 13.3.3 of the Collective
Bargaining Agreement.
College and department standards shall articulate professional and public service activities appropriate to
the academic discipline, and the basis for their evaluation.




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           Appendix H

           Faculty Vitae




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