THE BULLET

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					      THE BULLET

An Original Screenplay

          By

     Hudson Owen




               Copyright  by Hudson Owen
Registered with the U.S. Copyright Office
                                                              1

EXT – DESERT – DAY

An Army car, painted olive drab with a white star on it,
drives along an empty desert road, raising a trail of dust
behind it.

TITLE: Alamogordo, New Mexico, 1947

The car stops near a rock formation. A large man in an
Army uniform, GENERAL LESLIE R. GROVES, steps from the
driver’s side. DR. J. ROBERT OPPENHEIMER exits from the
passenger side. He wears a broad brim hat. Both men wear
dark glasses. A BOY looks from the back seat.

                         GROVES
               You stay there, Son.

Groves opens the trunk to the car and Oppenheimer takes out
a high-powered bolt action rifle.

                         GROVES (CONT’D)
               I didn’t know you were a hunter,
               Robert.

                         OPPENHEIMER
               I’m not a hunter. I’m a destroyer.

Oppenheimer takes up a position two hundred yards from a
rock spire. He inserts a copper jacket bullet into the
breach of the rifle and closes the bolt.

                         GROVES
               What did you mean by that comment, Robert:
               “Now, I am become death, the destroyer of
               worlds.” What did you mean by that, from
               the Sanskrit?

                         OPPENHEIMER
               You see that rock over there?
               It looks solid, solid like a
               good American rock.

                              GROVES
               Oh, I know about you physicists
               and your space between atoms. What
               did you mean by that? Do you think
               Truman was wrong to use the bomb?
                                                               2



Oppenheimer shoots at the rock.   The bullet kicks up a tiny
puff of rock dust.

                         OPPENHEIMER
               You were there at Trinity,
               General Groves. You saw
               the Gadget go off.

Oppenheimer chambers a second copper jacket bullet.

                         GROVES
               Yes, but I didn’t think
               anything weird like that.
               There was a war! We were
               losing too damn many troops!
               What are we doing here, anyway,
               Oppenheimer!?

                         OPPENHEIMER
               I was trying to put it into words,
               What we had done, and the Hindu
               text came to mind. It had the
               proper gravity to it.

Oppenheimer shoots at the rock and hits it. Piff.

                         GROVES
               Well, I guess that proves you
               can hit the broad side of a barn.

Oppenheimer puts on gloves and chambers a black bullet with
a gold tip and hands the rifle to Groves.

                         OPPENHEIMER
               Here, General, you do the honors.

                         GROVES
               Just aim at the rock, right?

The General takes aim.

                         OPPENHEIMER
               Yes. (to the Boy). You’re
               going to grow up in one
               helluva world.
                                                              3



EXT. NEW MEXICO, GROVES HOUSE – EVENING

A comfortable looking contemporary house sits nestled among
spectacular desert scenery. Mesas stand in the distance. A
new pickup truck is parked in the driveway.

EXT. GROVES’ HOUSE

BETSY GROVES, 37, trim and pretty, brings a birthday cake
onto the front porch, where her father, SANDY GROVES, 70S,
and younger brother, DALE GROVES, are sitting enjoying the
sunset.

Dale wears Army pants and a tee shirt and has a leg
prosthesis. He has a strong upper body.

Sandy Groves sits comfortably in a rocking chair and wears
a cardigan sweater. The characters wear party hats.

                         BETSY
               More cake, anyone?   Dad?

                         SANDY
               I’m good, thanks.

                         DALE
               I’ll have another slice.

                         BETSY
               So, how’s the birthday boy?

                         SANDY
               It’s been a wonderful day.
               Thank you both. I love you
               both.

Betsy plants a kiss on her father’s cheek and wipes off a
bit of frosting.

                         SANDY
               Love you. MMMMM.

                         BETSY
               How’s the sweater?
                                                     4

                         DALE
               She made that for you.

                         SANDY
               It’s wonderful. It’s warm;
               it fits.
                         BETSY
               What are you thinking?
               You have that faraway look.

                         SANDY
               Well...I was thinking about
               the Old Man. I don’t know why.
               I was thinking about the war.
               He said, you know, they had a
               list of target cities in Japan.

                         BETSY
               Uh huh.

                         SANDY
               Dad told me, that after some
               discussion, he insisted that
               they leave Kyoto off the list.

                         DALE
               What was special about Kyoto?

                         SANDY
               Kyoto had been the capital
               Of feudal Japan. It had
               special cultural meaning to
               the Japanese people. So they
               removed it from the nuclear
               hit list and from the conventional
               hit list, as well. People said
               we had no feeling for the Japanese.
               He was especially proud of that.

                         BETSY
               Happy birthday, Dad.

Everyone hears the SOUND of a helicopter out back.

Dale hops up and moves nimbly

INT. LIVING ROOM
                                                             5



through the living room, decorated with balloons and a
string of HAPPY BIRTHDAY DAD letters, and

DINING ROOM

avoiding furniture,

KITCHEN

into the kitchen.

Dale looks out the kitchen window and sees ARMED MEN
rappelling down ropes from a helicopter.

All the attackers wear camouflage clothing and dark ski
masks.

Dale rushes to the

LIVING ROOM

living room closet, removes and unzips an Army duffel bag.

                         DALE
               Dad! Sis! There’re
               armed men coming!

LIVING ROOM

Sandy and Betsy enter, puzzled. Dale takes out a standard
World War II issue .45 automatic pistol, snaps in a clip
and tosses it to Sandy.

Betsy dials on her cell phone.

                         DALE
               There isn’t time!

She fumbles with the cell and drops it.

Dale loads a banana clip into his M4 carbine and runs back

KITCHEN

into the kitchen. He aims out the window and shoots
ATTACKERS 1 and 2 as they rush toward the house.
                                                             6



LIVING ROOM

Sandy climbs up the stairs as fast as he can.

BEDROOM

He sees ATTACKER 3 tearing through drawers looking for
something, and shoots him BAM.

The force of the heavy bullet knocks the attacker backward
out the window.

EXT. HOUSE

The attacker falls through space.

INT. BEDROOM

Sandy removes a battered tackle box from the closet and
heads back downstairs.

LIVING ROOM

Betsy watches as a rocket propelled grenade sails WHOOSH
through the house, crashes through the front window and
impacts on the pickup truck, destroying it in a BALL OF
FIRE.

Betsy picks up her cell when a hand grenade flies through
the shattered front window from outside.

Betsy SHRIEKS and drops the cell, scoops up the grenade,
bobbles it, and tosses it back through the window.

EXT. FRONT PORCH

The grenade explodes, knocking ATTACKER 4 off his feet and
sends showers of glass and debris back into the living
room.

INT. LIVING ROOM

Sandy enters from the stairs and hands Betsy the tackle
box.
                                                             7

                           SANDY
                 Take this somewhere and bury it.
                 Bury it deep and forget you ever
                 saw it. I love you.

EXT. HOUSE

A black SUV with tinted glass pulls into the driveway near
the burning truck.

The PASSENGER sitting next to the DRIVER sees ATTACKER 5
armed with an AK-47. The passenger whips out his Glock 9mm
pistol when the attacker FIRES A BURST through the
windshield, striking the passenger in the face,

INT. SUV

spraying the back seat with blood and brain matter.


The driver ducks and floors the accelerator, knocking the
attacker backward over the roof of the vehicle.

EXT. DRIVE WAY

The driver exits the vehicle, rolls and comes up in a
firing position with his Glock 9mm. Attacker 5 struggles
to retrieve his AK.

SHANE DONNELLY, 41, kills him with one shot.

INT. HOUSE, LIVING ROOM

Dale hops toward Betsy, losing blood from multiple bullet
wounds. His EYES POP as a rocket propelled grenade hits
him from behind and protrudes from his chest.

He falls forward, pitching the carbine into Betsy’s arms.

Smoke emanates from the tailpipe of the rocket grenade.

Betsy SCREAMS.

Behind him stands the shooter, ATTACKER 6, holding the
rocket launcher.
                                                              8

                           ATTACKER 6
                      Allahu Akhbar!

Betsy turns the carbine on the Attacker and RIPS OFF A
BURST, killing him instantly.

ATTACKER 7 fires his AK from the stairs, hitting Sandy with
several shots. Sandy gets off one shot, grazing the
attacker, and goes down.

Betsy swings the automatic rifle toward the Attacker and
pulls the trigger. CLICK. Empty.

The front door bursts open and Shane enters with gun
forward.

                           SHANE
               FBI!

Shane shoots Attacker 7 with his Glock. The attacker
crumples into a ball at the end of the stairs. Shane goes
UPSTAIRS.

Betsey helps her father, bleeding profusely, over to the
sofa. He frames her face with bloody hands, touches her
head, tries to speak, smiles, and dies in her arms.

Agent Shane Donnelly reenters the living room: tall, dark
handsome, fifteen pounds overweight, and BREATHING HEAVILY.
He is dressed in a suit, has polished shoes and a long
coat.

                         SHANE
               OK, the house is clear.

Betsey looks up at him, smiles faintly, and wipes her eyes.

Shane pulls the ski mask off Attacker 6. The man has a
Middle Eastern face. Shane removes an ID from the man’s
pocket and a brick of one hundred dollar bills.

Shane pockets the money and examines the ID.

                           SHANE (CONT’D)
               Syrian.
                                                             9

Shane takes a picture of the man’s face with his cell
phone.
                         BETSY
               What do we do now?

                         SHANE
               We leave this place. Get
               your purse, any valuables,
               a sweater, and meet me outside.

Betsy climbs the stairs. Shane examines a black and white
photo on the wall. The photo shows a boy grinning and
holding up a big fish. An older man stands proudly beside
him.

Shane gathers up the M4 carbine and Dale’s duffel bag and
exits the shattered, bloody house.

EXT. HOUSE - SUNSET

Shane waits by the damaged SUV. Betsey exits the house and
stands on the porch, in clean clothes. She carries a light
jacket, a shoulder bag and the tackle box.

She brushes her hair from her face and gazes calmly at the
low dark streaks of sunset. She walks slowly toward the
vehicle.

Shane opens the rear door for her. His long coat is spread
out on the back seat and the head of the dead Passenger is
covered by a cloth. Betsy sees, pauses.

                           SHANE
               I know...

Betsy gets into the SUV. Shane closes the door, enters on
the driver’s side and starts the engine.

                         SHANE
               That’s my partner, Gino
               Marchetti. He got it coming
               in. I can’t leave him here—
               in case they come back.
                                                             10

INT. CAR, DESERT HIGHWAY – NIGHT

Shane drives 50-60mph, glancing in the rear view mirror at
Betsy, who sits upright, wipes her eyes, sniffles.
Oncoming headlights illuminate her face.

                         SHANE
               You don’t know what this
               is all about, do you?

                         BETSY
               I’m never going back to that
               house. Never.

                         SHANE
               About a week ago, a blogger
               named Lonesearch5 posted an
               entry on his blog, in which
               he claimed to have information
               that during World War II, J.
               Robert Oppenheimer met with
               Albert Einstein and they cooked
               up some kind of atomic bullet,
               a super bullet with the explosive
               power of a cruise missile.
               It mentioned your father’s name,
               and went viral on the Web.
               Are you sure you didn’t notice that,
               with your father’s name?

                         BETSY
               I was planning his birthday party,
               Mr...

                         SHANE
               Agent Donnelly, Ma’am. Shane
               Donnelly. Do you use the Web
               much Ms. Groves?

                         BETSY
               I’m a writer, Mr. Donnelly.
               I use the internet all the time.
               How do you know my name?

                         SHANE
               Well, it’s part of researching
               a case, Ma’am, this case.
                                                             11




                          BETSY
               Why did those men destroy
               our lives?

                         CAR RADIO VOICE
               Agent Donnelly, Marchetti,
               come in. This is Agent Doyle
               from the Buffalo Office.

Shane reaches for the radio, hesitates.

                         CAR RADIO VOICE (CONT’D)
               Hi, I’m in New York. You haven’t
               reported in seven hours. Give us
               a call. Do you read me?

INT. DARKENED ROOM – NIGHT

A MAN in an Army uniform waits in front of a mic.

INT. CAR - NIGHT

Shane turns off the radio.

                         SHANE
               There’s something not right
               with this picture. I’ve never
               heard of Agent Doyle, and believe
               me, I know the Northeast.

Shane notices in the rear view mirror Betsey about to make
a cell phone call.

                         SHANE (CONT’D)
               What are you doing?

                         BETSY
               I’m calling a friend,
               if it’s any of your business.

                         SHANE
                    (reaching back)
               Give me the cell, please.
                                                           12

                        BETSY
              No! Who do you think you
              are, Mr. FBI Man. It’s none
              of your damn business who
              I call!

                        SHANE
              All right, calm down.
              Just calm down. If you
              make a call, to anyone,
              anywhere, they will intercept
              it.

                       BETSY
              Who? Who is doing these evil
              things?

                        SHANE
              Like I’m trying to say,
              Ms. Groves, the people
              who can do a hit like this,
              of this magnitude, almost
              certainly are capable of
              picking up cell phone calls.
              They already know everything
              about you: who your friends
              are, where they live, work,
              relatives, all that sort of
              thing. So until we can get
              things sorted out, until we
              can see through the fog, so
              to speak, I ask that you don’t
              make any cell phone calls, any kind
              of telephone calls, period.
              If you want to stay alive.

Betsy falls back in her seat, puts away the cell, stares
blankly ahead. The cloth falls off the dead passenger’s
head, revealing a gaping exit wound in the back of his
neck.

                        BETSY
              Oh, God! Stop the car!
              Stop! Please! The man’s
              dead, for God’s sake! I
              can’t take it anymore. I
              really can’t. Please...
                                                            13



Betsy breaks into INCONSOLABLE SOBS.

Shane pulls off the road onto the shoulder and rests his
head on the steering wheel.

EXT. DESERT – NIGHT

Shane shovels dirt over the dead agent in a shallow grave,
near the vehicle, with a piece of board, as Betsey watches.
He smoothes the surface of the grave, stands and holds his
device to the sky.

                         BETSY
               What’s that?

                         SHANE
               I’m getting GPS coordinates.
               Gino Marchetti will be re-buried
               in the family plot on Staten Island.
               We graduated from the Academy together.
               He leaves behind a wife and one child.
               He was my friend.

                         BETSY
               Who are you? Where are you from?

Shane goes into the back of the SUV and takes out a
sandwich wrapped in aluminum foil and a water bottle. He
sits on the end of the vehicle, unwraps the sandwich and
chomps down on the mountain of deli meat. Betsy keeps her
distance.

                         SHANE
               New York Anti-Terrorism Task
               Force. They sent us down here
               three days ago to investigate.

                         BETSY
               How did you know it was terror-
               related?

                         SHANE
               The blogger appears to be
               foreign-born. You just can’t
               be too careful these days.
               Plus, we have the manpower.
                                                              14

                         SHANE (CONT’D)
               Mmmm. This is good. Three
               days I’ve been eating crap
               burgers and milk shakes. I was
               saving this. It’s a little mushy,
               but I’m telling you, it’s worth it.
               The next time you get to New York...
               You want anything? I have power bars.

                         BETSY
               I’ve never been to New York.
               This is surreal.

Shane steps away a few yards and vomits.   Betsy swigs from
a water bottle.

                         BETSY
               I think we’re both upset.
               Are you from New York?

                         SHANE
               No, Ma’am. I’m “Bastan”
               Irish. I was transferred.

                         BETSY
               You can call me Betsy.

                         SHANE
               I’m sorry, Ma’am. I didn’t
               properly identify myself.

                         BETSY
               You gave me your name.

                         SHANE
               I mean, if I had introduced
               myself properly, I would have
               asked your name. Actually,
               I know who you are. They gave
               me details in New York. I mean,
               they provided some information.
               Betsy, I’m sorry for your loss.
               You sure you don’t want something?

                         BETSY
               Thanks. The RPG that killed
               my brother...why didn’t it explode?
                                                    15

                         SHANE
               You know about things like that?

                         BETSY
               An RPG took his leg in Iraq.
               He survived three tours. And
               now he gets killed by one at home.

                         SHANE
               To answer your question, the
               rocket hadn’t time to
               arm itself—that’s probably
               the reason. That’s to protect
               the shooter. Or it was a dud.

                         BETSY
               If it had gone off, it would
               have killed me.

                         SHANE
               Thank God, it didn’t.
               I’ve never fired a shot
               in anger before.

                         BETSY
               You didn’t have time to
               get angry. You just reacted.
               That’s what you’re trained to
               do. So, what’s the plan?

                         SHANE
               The plan is to get some sleep.
               I drove the last seven hours
               straight.

He rearranges things in the back of the SUV.

                         BETSY
               I’d prefer to sleep outside.

                         SHANE
               You would be safer in the vehicle.


                         BETSY
               I’m not afraid of the desert.
               The desert is lucky for me.
                                                            16



                         SHANE
               Suit yourself. Here’s a blanket.

                         BETSY
               You’re a good man, Shane
               Donnelly. Good night.

                         SHANE
               See you in the morning.

Betsy puts on her jacket and makes a pillow with her bag
beneath the moon and stars, and covers herself with the
blanket.

LATER:

Betsy wakes and goes off into the bushes, squats and does
her business. A COYOTE trots up and eyes her.

                         BETSY
               What’s the matter? Never
               seen a woman before?

The coyote shies away. Betsy returns to the vehicle and
looks in on Shane. He is fast asleep, Glock in his RIGHT
HAND.

EXT. GROVES HOUSE – NIGHT

The front of the house is crowded with ambulances and
police cars with flashing lights, limos, news vans with
satellite dishes, two helicopters parked at a distance.
MEDICS bring body bags from the house to the ambulances.
REPORTERS talk into cameras. The house is fenced off with
police tape. Two MILITARY POLICEMAN guard the front door.

                         REPORTER
               Just hours ago, what appears
               to be a foreign terrorist
               attack has rocked this quiet
               desert community.


INT. HOUSE
                                                             17

DEPUTY SHERIFF WALLY PRUFUROY pushes through the crowded
living room. A PHOTOGRAPHER snaps flash photos. MEN IN
SUITS mill around chatting, pointing, shaking their heads.
MEDICS take out another bodybag.

                        PRUFUROY
              OK, people, listen up.
              I need to see some IDs.
              IDs, please. You, sir.

                         COMSTOCK
                    (flipping ID)
               Jim Comstock, National
               Security Agency.

                        PRUFUROY
              Thank you, sir. You?

                         ECKLES
                    (flipping ID)
               Baynard J. Ecckles, Atomic
               Energy Commission. Do you
               know where the bathroom is?

                         PRUFUROY
               I think it’s upstairs.   Good
               evening, Sir.

                         ADELMAN
                    (showing ID)
               Adelman, What’s good about it?
               This place is a slaughter house.

                         PRUFUROY
               I’m just trying to do my
               job, sir.

                         ADELMAN
               Deputy Director of Homeland
               Security.

                         PRUFUROY
               May I see some ID?

                         ADELMAN
               You’re an idiot, Prufuroy.
               I’ll show you my ass.
                                                         18



Adelman stalks off. The only man present in uniform,
COLONEL STEIG, tough, trim, holds up two photos. Steig has
a PURPLISH SKIN CONDITION and wears dark glasses.

                        COL. STEIG
              Have you seen these two men?
              They’re FBI agents: Donnelly
              and Marchetti? Supposedly, they
              were here earlier.

                        PRUFUROY
              And you would be?

                         COL. STEIG
              Sure. (shows ID) U.S. Army
              Intelligence. Have you seen
              these men?

                        PRUFUROY
              I don’t think so, sir.   No,
              sir, I have not.

                        COL. STEIG
              I need access for my forensics
              team to go over this place.
              I need you to clear out this circus.

                        PRUFUROY
              I don’t know if I can do that,
              Colonel Steig.

                        COL. STEIG
              Sure you can. It’s a matter of
              national security.

                        PRUFUROY
              Everyone here is national security.

                         COL. STEIG
              Here’s my card. If you see
              anything, hear anything, give
              me a call.

                        PRUFUROY
              Will do, Colonel. How about
              you sir?
                                                           19



                         SINGELTERRY
               OK, let’s both take a deep breath.
               My name is Jonas A. Singleterry, and
               I represent the Foreign Asset Tracking
               Task Force. And I left my ID in
               the glove compartment.

                         PRUFUROY
               Judas Priest!

SHERIFF BEVERLY BUTTRICK, all 200 pounds of her, enters.
She surveys the scene.

                         BUTTRICK
               Good God! Lord, forgive
               me for taking your name in
               vain. But you have allowed
               this to happen on my shift.

She makes her way through the crowd, bullhorn in hand.
Colonel Steig makes a beeline toward her.

                         COL. STEIG
               Hello. I’m Colonel Steig, and
               I represent Army Intelligence,
               and I need to know if you have seen
               either of these two men, or heard
               anything about them. We have
               reason to believe they were here
               earlier in the day. They’re
               FBI agents.

Buttrick examines Steig’s credentials.

                         BUTTRICK
               Colonel, I just got here
               and I don’t know anything
               about any FBI agents here today.
               There’s either FBI here or
               soon will be here, and you can
               ask them.

                         COL. STEIG
               I need to ask you a favor.

Beverly sees Prufuroy milling around.
                                                           20



                        BUTTRICK
              And I need to ask you to step
              outside until we can get this
              situation under control.

 She cuts through the crowd and confronts her deputy.

                        BUTTRICK (CONT’D)
              Wally, what are you doing?

                        PRUFUROY
              Boy, am I glad to see you!

                        BUTTRICK
              What are you doing, Wally?

                        PRUFUROY
              I’ve been taking names.   Boy,
              is this a mess!

                        BUTTRICK
              It is a mess, and I need you
              to help me make it less of
              a mess. Understand what I’m
              sayin’?

                        PRUFUROY
              I think so, Bev.

                        BUTTRICK
              Man up, Prufuroy, and get
              your head out of the place
              where it is currently wedged.
                   (through bullhord)
              LISTEN UP, PEOPLE, THIS IS
              A CRIME SCENE AND I NEED ALL
              OF YOU TO GO OUTSIDE WHERE I WILL
              TAKE YOUR STATEMENTS. I REPEAT,
              THIS IS A CRIME SCENE, AND UNTIL
              FURTHER NOTICE, I AM IN CHARGE!

Prufuroy nods in agreement and makes shepherding motions
with his hands.

                        PRUFUROY
              Everyone outside like she says!
                                                         21



EXT. DESERT – MORNING

Shane is up, drinking coffee over a fire. He wears jeans,
trail boots and a field jacket. Betsy rolls over under the
blanket, opens her eyes.

                           SHANE
                Morning.   Want some coffee?

                          BETSY
                Coffee would be wonderful.
                (looks at her watch) It’s too
                early to get up.

                          SHANE
                We need to get going.

                          BETSY
                Where are we going?     What’s
                the plan?

                          SHANE
                The plan is to stay one step
                ahead of the bad guys. What’s
                in the tackle box?

                          BETSY
                I don’t know.

                          SHANE
                I think we should find out.

She jumps up.

                           BETSY
                No!   Absolutely not!

                          SHANE
                Betsy, people are dying
                because your father knew
                or had something in his
                possession of great importance.

                          BETSY
                No. He said to bury it
                and to forget about it.
                                                           22

                         BETSY (CONT’D)
               Those were his dying words
               to me.

                         SHANE
               Men kill for information.

                         BETSY
               No. Maybe later. I want
               to take a shower. I have
               blood in my hair. What
               happened to the blogger—
               he started all this?

                         SHANE
               He’s in federal custody.

She pours coffee for herself.

                         BETSY
               What was his source?

                         SHANE
               He’s hired a lawyer. I
               don’t know. There’s milk
               and sugar in the back.

                         BETSY
               Somebody must know something.

                         SHANE
               All of this is dark   matter,
               black ops. We need    to ditch
               the vehicle and get   a new one.
               Know anyone you can   trust?

LATER:

Shane and Betsy cover the vehicle, in a ditch, with sage
brush and tumble weed. Shane places a wildflower on
Marchetti’s grave. He tosses off a salute.

                         SHANE
               Farewell, my friend.

Shane shoulder Dale’s duffel bag plus his own knapsack, and
he and Betsy take off on foot across the desert.
                                                             23



EXT. NEW MEXICO TOWN – DAY

Shane crosses the highway and walks toward Sal’s Garage &
Gas. He sees three old clunkers off to the side.

SAL is in the garage, working on the underside of a vehicle
up on the lift.

                         SHANE
               Good morning. Maybe you
               can help me. I’m looking
               to buy a used car, nothing
               fancy.

Sal wipes his hands on a greasy rag and scrutinizes Shane.

                           SAL
               You   mean those wrecks
               out   front? I could fix
               the   Corvair; would take a
               day   or so. You in a hurry?

                         SHANE
               I could use sooner rather
               than later.

                         SAL
               Well, there’s Ray’s Auto
               down the road.

                          SHANE
               How far?

                         SAL
               ‘Bout twenty-six miles.
               You’re not from around here?

                         SHANE
               Just passing through.

                         SAL
               Listen, if your car broke
               down, I can tow it. No problem.

                          SHANE
               Thanks.
                                                          24



Shane crosses to Mirabel’s diner.

INT. MIRABEL’S DINER – DAY

Shane scans the menu.

                         SHANE
               I’ll have a flame broiled
               cheese burger, a chocolate
               shake. Make that two burgers,
               and do you have any salad?

                         WAITRESS
               We can fix a chef’s salad,
               to go. We have cole slaw.
               Anything on those burgers?

                         SHANE
               Tomato and lettuce, and sliced
               onions. I’ll take a pint of
               cole slaw. And...fries, and
               pickle slices, and that’s it.

                         WAITRESS
                    (smiling)
               Coming right up. I’m low
               maintenance, if you’re interested.

Shane smiles. He turns around and notices the news box,
with photos of Dale and Sandy splashed on the front page of
The Santa Fe Chronicle and the headlines: NINE SLAIN IN
TERRORIST ATTACK, INCLUDING LOCAL WAR HERO. Shane buys a
paper.

EXT. DESERT – DAY

Betsy combs her hair fiercely, sitting by their gear.
Shane walks up.


                         SHANE
               It’s all over the news.
               You’re a missing person.
                                                          25

                         BETSY
               It’s all over the world.
               We made The New York Times.
               I read it online. My x-pod

LATER:

Betsy and Shane devour the burgers.

                         BETSY (CONT’D)
               I’ve been thinking...There’s
               a man who knew my father, knew
               Leslie, General Groves too.

                         SHANE
               That’s good.

                         BETSY
               I haven’t seem him in years.
               I don’t know if he would remember me.
               I don’t know if he’s still alive.

                         SHANE
               We’ve got no vehicle,
               unless you want to walk
               or hitch a ride to Ray’s Auto,
               twenty-six miles down the road.

                         BETSY
               If I remember correctly, it’s
               about twelve miles that way—
               through the desert. I can hoof
               it. You could check it on your
               GPS map. This guy worked at Los
               Alamos, a physicist. If there’s
               anything in that box, anything
               technical, he would know how to
               interpret it. I’m trying to help.

                          SHANE
               Okay.   Let’s go for it.

LATER:

They are deep in the desert now, with no road in sight.
Shane struggles under his load.
                                       26

          SHANE (CONT’D)
You said you were a writer.
What do you write about?

          BETSY
I’m a freelance writer. I’ll
write whatever you pay me to write.
I cover health topics. Some
local color. I blog about politics.
Of course, there’s no money in that.
I worry that I’ll end up being
just another blogger.

          SHANE
Why is that?

          BETSY
There’re sooo many writers. I find
it progressively more difficult
to snag good paying jobs.

          SHANE
I don’t see too many writers out
here. Maybe you’ll write about
this someday and make a million.

          BETSY
How much do you know about me?
I’ll bet you’ve read my LifeSpace
page. (Shane smiles) You have,
haven’t you! You know where I
live, don’t you?

          SHANE
You live in Santa Fe. You’re
good friend, Jeannie, lives there
too. You like alternative rock,
the painter Georgia O’Keefe—

          BETSY
I love Georgia O’Keefe.

          SHANE
--and you’ve competed in
the triathlon.
                                                        27

                         BETSY
               What’s my shoe size?

                         SHANE
               I’m not a pervert.

Betsy speeds ahead.

                         BETSY
               What’s the matter, Mr. FBI Man,
               can’t keep up with a woman? Ha ha. I’m
               going to change my privacy settings.

                         SHANE
               You’re not carrying my load.

                         BETSY
               Oh, boo hoo. Big strong
               Shane Donnelly. Let the
               pity party begin. We haven’t
               walked five miles, dude.

Shane puts down his load and sits on it.

                         SHANE
               I’m a desk jockey, Betsy. I
               shuffle paper and search the
               Web. People call and tell me
               they’ve seen bin Laden in the
               subway. Every three months, I
               burn powder on the range. I
               work out once a week, most weeks.
               Obviously, it doesn’t do me much
               good. I was sharp when I got out
               of the Academy. It’s all those crap
               burgers.

                         BETSY
               I thought the food you brought
               me was pretty good. The cole slaw
               didn’t have too much liquid in it.

                         SHANE
               We’re taking five.

EXT. DESERT – DAY
                                                             28

A grizzled middle-age DESERT HIKER in hiking clothes and
boots, a tough customer with some warmth, pulls brush from
Shane’s SUV and examines the interior. He follows the
footprints from the site, walking at a rapid pace.

INT. HELICOPTER – DAY

Colonel Steig scans the desert landscape with binoculars.
Nothing moves down below other than pronghorn antelope.

                         COL. STEIG
                    (to PILOT)
               We’ll have to expand the search area.

The Pilot gives thumbs up. A radio call comes in.

                         COL. STEIG (CONT’D)
               What have you got?

EXT. SANTA FE – DAY

An AIDE in plain clothes walks down a residential street in
Santa Fe. He answers on his cell.

                         STEIG AIDE
               Betsy Groves lives here, alright.
               I’ve checked with friends, neighbors.
               Nobody’s seen her since the incident.

                         COL. STEIG (V.O.)
               Keep looking.

                         STEIG AIDE
               Roger that.

EXT. DESERT – DAY

Betsy and Shane hear the helicopter.

                         SHANE
               Lie down flat!

Shane covers them both with a camouflage blanket. Like a
chameleon, the blanket changes color and pattern to match
the immediate surroundings. The helicopter passes
overhead.
                                                            29

EXT. DESERT – AFTERNOON


Betsy leads, Shane plods slowly behind. They walk through
an old graveyard of a small Spanish church with a bell
tower and worn wood crosses.

A DIAMOND BACK RATTLESNAKE slithers from one of the
crosses. Shane draws his Glock.

                        BETSY
               No! It’s going away from us.
               See?

                         SHANE
               You never knew your grandfather,
               General Groves.

                          BETSY
               No.   He died before I was born.

                         SHANE
               Your Dad must have told you
               stories about his father.

                         BETSY
               Oh, sure. We both knew, Dale
               and I, all about the famous
               Leslie Groves, head of the Manhattan
               Project and his role in building the
               Pentagon. Sometimes journalists
               or authors came to our house
               for information or a profile.

                          SHANE
               Your father and the general
               got along?

                         BETSY
               There was mutual love and respect.
               They shared a love of the outdoors.
               Grandad took my father fishing.

                         SHANE
               The picture on the wall at the house.
                                                            30

                         BETSY
               Yes. Dale was eleven when
               that picture was taken. Sandy
               made quite a career for himself
               in the Department of the Interior.
               We’ve lived out West all our lives.
               It’s beautiful here. I can’t say
               I’m feeling it right now.

They come to a rise and look out across the plain below.
Golden shafts of sunlight pierce through the clouds on
BISON grazing peacefully in the distance. Shane holds his
GPS device up to the sky.

                         SHANE
               We’ll find those men behind
               what happened and bring them
               to justice.

                         BETSY
               There is no justice for
               men like that.

                         SHANE
               We’ll think of something.
               According to my GPS, we’ve
               only done nine miles today.
               It feels like more than that.
               We’re not going around in
               circles, are we?

                         BETSY
               I think it’s just over there.
               Two hours, maybe three.

Betsy puts on her music ear buds, slips Dale’s duffel bag
from Shane’s shoulder and slings it over her shoulder.

                         BETSY (CONT’D)
               I’m feeling strong today.


EXT. DESERT – AFTERNOON

The desert hiker sits eating an orange. He watches as a
large van drives up and stops a hundred feet away.
                                                             31

Two MEXICAN MEN exit the cab and walk toward him, laughing
and joking in Spanish. One drinks from a liquor bottle;
both tote automatic weapons.

Casually, the hiker draws a mini-Uzi from his pack and cuts
down the men with a LONG BURST. He approaches the men, one
of whom is still alive, and finishes him off with a SHORT
BURST.

He unloads their weapons and pours sand and dirt into their
chambers. He notices the van rocking, and loads a fresh
clip into the Uzi.

He approaches the van warily, circles it and looks inside.
He hears VOICES coming from the back. He tries the
handles—the van is locked.

The hiker takes a handheld cutting laser from his pack and
cuts out the lock. He steps back, gun raised.

The van doors are pushed open from inside. Terrified
MEXICAN MEN AND WOMEN stare back at him, talking excitedly
and motioning for him not to shoot. He motions to them to
exit the van. Reluctantly, they climb out with their hands
on their head.

                          DESERT HIKER
               Go!   Abandonar! Get out of here!

The Mexicans makes gestures of prayer and thanks, and run
off into the desert.

The hiker watches them disappear, finishes eating the
orange, picks up his trail and continues on his journey.

EXT. DESERT – AFTERNOON

Shane examines a distant house through binoculars, Betsy
beside him.

He sees an old man, OTTO JESPERSON, and a younger Navajo
woman, RITA OOLJEE, walking beside him, holding him steady.
She points out bright flowers in a circle in the driveway,
in front of the impressive Spanish style house.

Shane passes the binoculars to Betsy.
                                                            32

                          SHANE
                Is this the man you’re talking
                about, who knew your father?

                          BETSY
                He’s gotten so old.    I don’t
                recognize her.

                          SHANE
                Do you think it’s safe?

                          BETSY
                I think he’s our best shot.
                Yes.

EXT. JESPERSON HOUSE – AFTERNOON

Shane and Betsy approach the house. Two DOBERMANS charge
around the corner, BARKING FEROCIOUSLY. Shane reaches into
his pocket. Rita opens the fancy front door and shushes
the dogs.

                           RITA
                Hello.   Can I help you?

                          BETSY
                Hi. I’m Betsy Groves. Otto
                is a friend of the family. He
                knows me from way back.
                Tell him it’s Betsy Getsy.

Rita disappears inside the house.     Shane looks around.

                          SHANE
                I wouldn’t mind retiring
                in a place like this. It’s
                quiet.

Rita returns.

                          RITA
                Please, come in.

She shows the pair into the house.

INT. HOUSE, FOYER
                                                             33

The foyer is spacious, with decorative floor tiles.    The
walls are a cream color and are hung with tasteful
paintings of desert scenes.

Otto comes forward, arms outstretched.    Betsy rushes to
greet him.

                         OTTO
               Betsy Getsy! Look, you’re
               all grown up!

                         BETSY
               Otto, this is my friend, Shane.
               Shane, this is Otto Jesperson.

                         SHANE
               Hello, Mr. Jesperson.     Pleased
               to meet you.

                         OTTO
               Likewise. To what do I owe
               this pleasure?

                         BETSY
               Well, we’re here on some
               serious business.

                         OTTO
               Serious business?   Will you
               be staying?

                         BETSY
               If you don’t mind; we’d love to.

                         OTTO
               Well then. Rita will show
               you to your rooms. Rita Ooljee
               is my housekeeper. “Ooljee”
               means “moon” in Navajo. I
               think that’s lovely.

Rita and Otto exchange tender glances.

                         OTTO (CONT’D)
               You can freshen up. I’ll take
               a nap, and we’ll talk over dinner.
                                                             34

                         BETSY
               That sounds wonderful.

                         OTTO
               Betsy Getsy...She always
               gets her way.

INT. HOUSE, BATHROOM

Betsy showers, shampooing her hair.   BLOOD mixes with soapy
water in the drain.

Shane pokes his head through the door, holding a shaving
kit. He notices her figure through the glass shower door,
and smiles.

                         BETSY
               I’ll be out in a minute.

Shane exits, closing the door behind him.

EXT. FORT HUACHUCA, ARIZONA – AFTERNOON

An Army truck passes through the main gate marked by a
rustic sign: Fort Huachuca, Est. 1877, Home of U.S. Army
Intelligence.

SOLDIERS carrying boxes embark from the truck toward a
large shed with a satellite dish on the roof. They
enter...

INT. INTELLIGENCE BUILDING

...and set down their boxes among a stack of boxes.   Col.
Steig, smoking a cigarillo, directs the men.

                         COL. STEIG
               Over here. Keep everything
               in alphabetical order. We
               should be up to the letter G
               by now.

The boxes contain old files. The soldiers distribute them
to DATA ENTRY WORKERS, also in uniform, keying the
information into their computers.
                                                           35

                           COL. STEIG (CONT’D)
                 The bad news is over one hundred
                 thousand people worked at Los
                 Alamos during the war. The good
                 news is that not all of them were
                 scientists. What we want is the
                 names of scientists who worked
                 at Los Alamos on the Manhattan
                 Project who are alive today and
                 living in the Southwest. It’s
                 a tall order, but you men can
                 accomplish it.

                           SGT. RAMONE
                 Isn’t any of this stuff on disk?

                           COL. STEIG
                 Sergeant Ramone has asked a question.
                 He wants to know if any of these
                 files are on disk. Gentlemen,
                 what we are talking about here are
                 files that were typed out by
                 secretaries using manual typewriters
                 with smudgy carbon ribbons and made
                 copies with smudgy carbon paper.
                 How sad is that!

The men GROAN.

                           COL. STEIG (CONT’D)
                 I mean, we’re talking about the age
                 of dinosaurs here. Monsters dropping
                 huge glops of doo doo for you to shovel
                 through.

                           PVT. MOLLER
                 How did they make corrections, Sir?
                 Did they use White Out?

                           COL. STEIG
                 Private Moller wants to know,
                 how did these good people make
                 corrections. Did they have White
                 Out? I don’t know if they used
                 White Out, Private Moller. And
                 I don’t care. I don’t care,
                 because we’re gonna to find
                                                          36

                         COL. STEIG (CONT’D)
               the sonofabitch we’re looking
               for!

He holds up a wad of bills.

                         COL. STEIG (CONT’D)
               A thousand dollars cash to the
               man who finds the winning file!
               Ramone, your wife just had a
               baby.

                          SGT. RAMONE
               She did, Sir. A beautiful
               baby girl.

                         COL. STEIG
               I’ll bet an extra thousand
               would pay for a whole lot of
               diapers and baby food.

                         SGT. RAMONE
               Oh, yes sir, it would!

Colonel Steig moves to a different section of the room
where INTERCEPT OFFICERS, with headsets, watch lines a code
racing across the screen and Scrolling up.

                         COL. STEIG
               What are you hearing?

Steig lifts the headset and listens in.

                         COL. STEIG (CONT’D)
               Just checking for Miley Cyrus.

                         INTERCEPT OFFICER
               The usual chatter. Nothing to
               report, Sir.

                         COL. STEIG
               They’re smart. They’ve turned
               off their cells, Remember,
               these people are considered to
               be armed and extremely dangerous.
               They are a threat to national
               security, and must be stopped.
                                                             37

                         COL. STEIG (CONT’D)
               We work in eight hour shifts
               with ten minute breaks between
               shifts. That’s an order!


INT. JESPERSON HOUSE, DINING ROOM - EVENING

Otto, Shane and Betsy are seated at a long heavy wood
dining table in the spacious dining room, beneath a wagon
wheel chandelier, eating from thick earthenware plates and
serving dishes. Otto sips from a goblet of red wine.

                         OTTO
               How is dinner?   More wine, anyone?

                         BETSY
               It’s all delicious.     Thank you
               so much. Really.

Otto winks at Betsy, looks at Shane.

                         OTTO
               She’s a real tigress, you know.

                           SHANE
               I’m good.    The food is great.

                         OTTO
               You’ve both been quiet. What
               is it that weighs on you?
               What is this ‘serious business,’
               you mentioned?

                         BETSY
               How to begin. Some really, really
               bad things have happened. We
               were celebrating Sandy’s birthday,
               at the house. (pause) We experienced
               a home invasion.

                         OTTO
               A home invasion?

                         BETSY
               It was more of an attack.
               These ninjas, these attackers
                                                            38

                         BETSY (CONT’D)
               came into the house...and
               there was a gun fight.

                         OTTO
               A gunfight? Who would do
               such a thing?

                          BETSY
               Sandy and Dale were killed.
               I shot the man who killed Dale.
               I think I got another one with
               a grenade.

Otto rubs his eyes and looks off into space.   He reaches
across the table and holds Betsy’s hand.

                         OTTO
               There can be no words for
               such a horror. I can only
               say I am thankful you are alive.

                         BETSY
               This man here, Shane, saved
               my life. He’s an FBI agent.

                          OTTO
               FBI?   Then I must thank you.

                         SHANE
               Yea, it’s complicated. We
               don’t know many of the details.
               It has something to do, a lot
               to do, with a report about an
               alleged atomic bullet developed
               during the Manhattan Project.
               General Groves’ name was mentioned
               and his son. I drove down from
               New York to investigate.

                         OTTO
               Atomic bullet?   What did you do?

                         SHANE
               I got one of them coming
               down the stairs. Betsy
               had run out of ammo. We
                                    39

          SHANE (CONT’D)
don’t know whether it was
a terrorist plot; some of
them, maybe all of them,
were of Middle Eastern origin.

          BETSY
The Washington Post is casting
doubt on that theory. They say
all but two of the dead attackers
were U.S. citizens.

          SHANE
You don’t know about any of this?

          OTTO
No...No...I don’t listen to
the news anymore. It’s all
bad, you know. I paint,
listen to music, take walks.

          SHANE
Betsy said you were part of
the Manhattan Project.

          OTTO
I was a junior scientist, a
physicist. I had a minor
role in all that.

          SHANE
Did you know General Groves
and Robert Oppenheimer?

          OTTO
I had one or two talks with
Oppie. I saw the General at
Los Alamos. A lot of people
were involved in the Manhattan
Project, a lot of very bright
people. You could have lit
every neon bulb in Times Square
with all that brain power.

          SHANE
Do you remember if Oppenheimer
made a special trip to Princeton
                                                          40

                            SHANE (CONT’D)
                  in 1945, 46, to talk with Einstein?
                  Try and remember. It’s important.

                            OTTO
                  Of course, we all talked about
                  Einstein. No, I don’t know about
                  any special trip.

                            BETSY
                  You were there, at Trinity.
                  You saw the bomb go off?

                            OTTO
                  You mean the Gadget? That’s
                  what they called it, you know.

                            SHANE
                  You saw the first atom bomb
                  go off?

                             OTTO
                  Yes.

                             SHANE
                  Wow.   What was it like?

                            OTTO
                  I’ve been asked that a
                  thousand times. Of course,
                  they gave us darkened glass,
                  so we wouldn’t be blinded
                  by the thing. It was quite
                  extraordinary. For a moment
                  it was the clearest light,
                  in which you saw the most
                  trivial thing in the sharpest
                  detail. Come, I’ll show you
                  what I saw.

INT. ART STUDIO

Otto leads Betsy and Shane into his studio. There are
paintings in various stages of completion on easels and
about the room.
                                                              41

Otto turns on track lighting directed toward one wall. He
turns off the room light and pulls open the curtain
covering that wall, revealing a painting nearly the size of
the wall.

The painting is a violently colorful rendering of the first
atomic explosion.

                         OTTO
               I call it the Eye of God.
               It was if a giant eye had
               opened and somehow had shined
               a light on us, on our puny
               world. It was an angry eye.
               July 16, 1945.

                         SHANE
               Brighter than a thousand suns.
               That was the headline?

                         OTTO
               Yes. We had created something
               momentarily brighter than the
               sun, than nature. We had
               become godlike—that is when
               man is most dangerous.

                         BETSY
               It’s your masterpiece.

Otto kisses her tenderly on the forehead.

                         OTTO
               That, my children, is the
               show for tonight. I’m
               going to bed and try to
               sleep off this awful news.

Otto exits. Betsy and Shane stand close, hands touching,
as they contemplate the painting.

HALLWAY OUTSIDE RITA’S ROOM

Shane sees Rita keying on a laptop inside.   He raps on the
door.
                                                            42

                            SHANE
                  Hi. I need to ask a favor.
                  I need to send an email
                  from your account. It’ll
                  only take a minute.

                             RITA
                  Sure.   Take your time.

She steps outside.

SHANE’S ROOM

Shane sits at the side of the bed slumped over studying a
photo, in his undershirt and trousers, by the light of a
table lamp. Betsy comes to the open door in a robe.

                             BETSY
                  Hi.

Shane looks up.

                            BETSY (CON’T)
                  I just wanted to say thanks.
                  I know it sounds terribly
                  inadequate. But, you know,
                  words do mean something, even
                  at a time like this. Thanks
                  for coming when you did.

Shane nods.    She sits on the bed beside him.

                            BETSY (CONT’D)
                  That’s your friend’s family?

                            SHANE
                  That’s Trish, his wife, and
                  Daniel, his son. They’ll
                  get the news before I return
                  to New York. I’ll still have
                  to watch him die all over
                  again in when I talk to them.

Betsy rests her hand on his shoulder.

                            BETSY
                  Some day, just maybe, we
                                                             43

                         BETSY (CONT’D)
               can put this ordeal behind us.

She stands, walks to the door and turns, as if to say
something more.

                         SHANE
               Good night, Betsy.

                         BETSY
               Good night, Shane.

EXT. FEDERAL PLAZA, NEW YORK CITY – NIGHT

TITLE: Federal Plaza, New York City

A modern office building with lights on many floors stands
out in the mix.

INT. FBI OFFICE OF JOINT TERRORISM TASK FORCE

CRAIG SIDOWSKI sits in his cubical opening email. He opens
an email marked URGENT, stares intently at the screen,
prints the email and runs to the head office.

JOHN D. MCCLOSKY, Director, sits in his office looking
reflectively out the high office across the city. His name
and the shield of the New York Joint Terrorism Task Force
are on the glass door.

                         SIDOWSKI
               Sir, I just opened an email
               from Donnelly. He’s outside
               of Taos. Marchetti didn’t make it.

McClosky spins around in his chair, grabs his suit jacket,
and leaves the office.

                         MCCLOSKY
               Donnelly is alive.

Everyone looks up.
                           MCCLOSKY (CONT’D)
               Saddle   up. We’re flying to
               Mexico   tonight. Fisk, Patel,
               you’re   coming with me. Sidowski,
               you’re   in charge.
                                                            44



Patel straps on his shoulder holster. Fisk does a turn
around jump shot and tosses his soda can into the trash
basket. They are a pair of young guns in their 20s.

                         FISK
               Any word on Gino?      His wife
               keeps calling.

                         MCCLOSKY
               We’ll be bringing Gino back
               with us.

                         FISK
               I’m sorry to hear that, Sir.
               I mean...

                         SIDOWSKI
               Do you want me to say anything
               to his wife?

                         MCCLOSKY
               No, not yet. Craig, get on
               the horn to the Southwest
               offices. There’s an Air Force
               base down there. Tell them
               we’ll need a helo and tactical
               support when we get there.
               Notify the NYPD, the Mayor’s Office.
               Hell, go through the whole damn
               list. No media. Got that?

                           SIDOWSKI
               Yes, Sir!

INT. JESPRSON HOUSE, DINING ROOM – MORNING

Sunlight slashes through the open architecture.

Otto, Betsy and Shane sit at the long table. Breakfast
dishes have been pushed aside and the tackle box has been
set on the table. They drink coffee.

                         OTTO
               Rita! Has anyone seen
               my housekeeper?
                                                     45

Betsy and Shane shake their heads no.

                         OTTO (CONT’D)
               So you think this box is important?

                         SHANE
               Documents, a tape recording,
               What the attackers might have
               been after, specifically.
               Something that would clear away
               the fog.

                         BETSY
               It’s Pandora’s Box, and it
               contains violence and evil.
               And if we open it, that’s
               what we’ll get.

                         SHANE
               Otto is maybe the one person
               living who can make sense of
               this thing. Sure, there are
               risks. It might contain a bomb.
               It might blow up in our faces.

                         BETSY
               My father would not give
               me a box with a bomb,
               with his dying breath.

                         SHANE
               Well then, why did he keep it?

                         BETSY
               I really don’t know.

                         SHANE
               Well then, that’s why we
               have to open it. (to Otto)
               Do you have anything to cut
               metal? It’s been welded shut.

                         OTTO
               I would have to look.    My
               dogs...
                                                             46

The desert hiker enters the room silently, with Rita bound
and gagged. He totes his Uzi, with a long silencer
attached.

                         DESERT HIKER aka BENNY
               Not a problem. I can open the
               box.

Shane goes for his gun. Benny fires a SHORT BURST into the
ceiling. Shane places his hands on the table. Benny puts
Rita into a chair.

                          OTTO
               And who would you be,
               breaking into my house
               like this!

                         BENNY
               I am Mossad. And I am
               on a mission. You can call
               me Benny, if you like.

                         OTTO
               You killed my dogs!

                         BENNY
               They are napping, Dr.
               Jesperson. We will all
               get along much better if
               we just calm down and
               conduct our business in
               a sane and rational manner.
               Agent Donnelly, your weapon,
               please...slowly.

Benny steps behind Shane to collect his Glock.

                         SHANE
               Do you have any identification?

                         BENNY
               Here is my passport...one
               of several I keep handy.

Shane looks it over.
                                  47

          SHANE
Are you aware of the Foreign
Agents Registration Act?

          BENNY
Enacted in 1938, I believe.
Can we get on to our real
purpose here?

          SHANE
How did you find us?

           BENNY
I put a tracer on your
vehicle shortly after you
left New York. It wasn’t
difficult.

          BETSY
Yes, but we walked through
the desert.

          BENNY
I learned tracking from
a Bedouin in the Negev Desert.
Any more questions?

          SHANE
How do we know you’re Mossad
and not some gangster?

          BENNY
     (sighing)
I suppose I have no document
to convince you of anything.
Do I look like a gangster?

          SHANE
I’ve seen them in different
shapes and sizes.

          BENNY
You see, that’s the difference
between us. We interview the
person at airport security. You
rely on the machine. You are
afraid to profile, to offend
                                                            48

                         BENNY (CONT’D)
               anyone, even those who would
               destroy you.

                         OTTO
               You look like a man who would
               do anything to achieve his ends,
               however civil he might appear.

                         BENNY
               Well, Dr. Jesperson, you make
               a good point. I would go to
               to great lengths to serve my
               country.

                         BETSY
               We need to establish some
               ground rules.

                         SHANE
               What do you mean?   He’s got
               the gun.

                         BETSY
               I mean—

                         BENNY
               Why don’t we open the box
               and see what we’re talking
               about here. It might be
               nothing at all.

Benny brings his laser cutter to the table. He shakes the
box gently, hears METALLIC SOUNDS. He begins cutting.

INT. FORT HUACHUCA, INTELLIGENCE BUILDING – MORNING

Colonel Steig dozes in a chair. Nerdy looking PRIVATE
KEEBLE nudges the colonel awake.

                         PVT. KEEBLE
               Colonel, Sir. I think I might
               have found something.

Keeble leads Steig to his computer screen.
                                                           49

                         PVT. KEEBLE (CON’T)
               You have to figure than nearly
               everyone alive at that time is
               now dead. So your database of
               possible matches is actually
               very small. This is what I’m
               looking at. I think this is
               your man.

Steig examines the screen intently and breaks into a big
smile.

                          COL. STEIG
               Keeble, you’ve just made me a
               happy man.

Steig slaps the wad of cash into Private Keeble’s hand.
Keeble lets out a WHOOP.

INT. JESPERSON HOUSE, DINING ROOM – DAY

Rita, released now, serves coffee and pastries to Shane,
Otto, Betsy and Benny. She glares at Benny. The tackle
box is open. Benny sorts out the contents on the table.

                         BENNY
               One reel fishing line, one
               box assorted lead sinkers,
               assorted hooks and flies,
               one fish knife, one box of
               marbles—

                         BETSY
               Those belonged to my father.

                         BENNY
               Three plastic toy soldiers,
               one pottery sherd, two arrowheads,
               one Eagle Scout pin, one wedding
               ring and wisp of hair.

                         BETSY
               Those belonged to my mother.
               She died when we were children.

                         BENNY
               A basefall card.   And one opened
                                                      50

                         BENNY (CONT’D)
               envelope. “To Sandy” on the outside.

Betsy snatches the envelope from Benny’s hands.

                         BETSY
               That’s family treasure.
               You have no business reading it.

                         BENNY
               I am afraid I do. Why don’t
               you read it for us.

                         BETSY
               All right, since you show
               a tiny bit of courtesy.
                    (reads letter)
               “My dear son, I am writing
               to clarify the events you
               witnessed one day in the
               summer of 1947, involving
               myself and the scientist,
               J. Robert Oppenheimer.
               What you saw was the world’s
               first test of an atomic bullet.

                         OTTO
               Jesus God! So it’s true.

                         BETSY
               “The research for this weapon
               was conducted by Oppenheimer
               and Albert Einstein, in 1944,
               while we were working on the
               Manhattan Project. The bullet
               was constructed by scientists
               at Los Alamos, in secret,
               apart from the main project.
               I was not informed of its
               development until the day
               of the test. What a rude
               awakening that was!

                         SHANE
               I’ll bet it was.   Unbelievable!
                                                          51

                         BETSY
               “The scientists and engineers
               manufactured five thousand rounds.
               Each bullet contains a trace of U-235.
               The one hundred eighty grain bullet
               contains the equivalent explosive
               power of approximately one thousand,
               three hundred pounds of TNT.
               The bullets were stored in thirty
               caliber machine gun boxes with
               a lead lining. They were made
               black with a gold tip to distinguish
               them from other bullets. They were
               hidden at Trinity.
                    (Pause)
               “I am writing this letter so that
               you will know the story from me in
               case any of this material comes to
               light. It is my sincerest hope that
               none of these bullets will ever be
               recovered, as we have plenty of
               destructive power already. With love,
               Leslie.”

                         BENNY
               So it was a thirty (.30) caliber
               bullet. It was meant for the U.S.
               Army weapons of the day.

                         SHANE
               But where at Trinity?

                         BETSY
               There’s a diagram.

Benny snatches the diagram from Betsy.   He examines it
closely, and hands it to Otto.

                         BENNY
               See what you can make of this.
               I am not a scientist.

Otto puts on his reading glasses and pours over the
diagram.
                                       52

          OTTO
Well, it appears to be a
design for miniaturizing the
uranium bomb, the gun type
bomb, that was dropped on Hiroshima.

          BENNY
Would it work?

          OTTO
Well, you just heard the words
of General Groves, who was there.
It would have to be a highly
efficient explosion since the
amount of fissile material is
very small, well below the critical
mass required in the bombs, X
number of pounds.

          SHANE
This stuff is on the Internet
today.

          OTTO
That would be a mistake.

          BENNY
What about the math? Do you
understand the math? And the
“A.E.” signed at the bottom.
Would that be “Albert Einstein”?

          OTTO
I haven’t done higher math
in decades. I understand
the symbols. The “A.E.” might
be Einstein. You know, they
saved some of the blackboards
he worked on at Princeton. Stored
them away in a room somewhere.

          BETSY
     (to Benny)
Why do you care about any
atom bullet? Don’t you have
enough bombs already?
                                     53

          BENNY
As you may know, the State
of Israel does not comment
on any alleged nuclear arsenal.
That said, we would not want
this information and material
to fall into enemy hands.

          BETSY
If you have the bomb, or are
trying to build the bomb,
what’s a few bullets?

          SHANE
Five thousand is more than a few.

          BENNY
I’ll connect the dots for you.
A sniper, aiming from the window
of a waterfront apartment in
New Jersey, say, could destroy an
ocean liner cruising down the
Hudson River, with one, two shots.
Or a warship. Or the Eiffel Tower,
Or Big Ben. Or the Golden Gate
Bridge. One man with one rifle and
one bullet. Or two, or three, or
four. Do you see the danger?

          SHANE
But how could anyone get away
with something like this?

          OTTO
Los Alamos was like a mid-size
city. It was impossible to
know what everyone was doing.

          BETSY
So what do you propose to do?

          BENNY
We need to find these materials
before the whole world starts
looking for them, and neutralize
them.
                                                          54

                         SHANE
               What do you mean by “neutralize?”

                         BENNY
               Whatever is required. Take
               them apart, render them harmless.

Betsy grabs the diagram from Otto and crams it into her
half-filled coffee mug. Benny levels his Uzi at her.
Shane and Otto rise from their chairs.

                         BETSY
               What are you going to do,
               shoot me in here? Huh?
               You know, I once placed a
               prayer in the Wailing Wall.
               I’ll bet you didn’t know that.

                         BENNY
               Are you Jewish?

                        BETSY
               No. You know what I prayed
               for? Huh, Mr. Mossad?

                         BENNY
               What did you pray for?

                         BETSY
               Peace.

Benny sighs and lowers the submachinegun.

                         BENNY
               Well, we are allies, after all.
               Get your things together. We’re
               leaving in ten minutes.

                         SHANE
               But where at Trinity?

                         OTTO
               I’m not going anywhere,
               and neither is my housekeeper.
               And I’m going to send your
               government a bill for damages
               done to my estate.
                                                           55



                          BENNY
                No need for that.

Benny lays out ten and twenty dollar bills on the table.

                          BENNY (CONT’D)
                I seem to be a little short.

Shane pulls out the banded block of bills he recovered from
the dead attacker, and lays out a dozen or so c-notes.
Otto smiles.

Benny holds one c-note up to the light.

                          BENNY (CONT’D)
                Looks good.

                          SHANE
                You think I would pass along
                funny money? I’d got to send
                one more email.

EXT. DRIVEWAY

Shane loads a jerry can into the back of the older model
Land Rover. Rita hands Shane the keys to the vehicle.

                          RITA
                I made you some sandwiches.
                Good luck to you. Your
                heart is true.

                          SHANE
                Thanks, Rita.
                     (to Otto)
                You need security. Call the
                local sheriff. These are
                very bad people we’re dealing with.

Betsy hugs Otto.

                          BETSY
                If I don’ see you again...
                paint a beautiful sunset.
                                                            56

                         OTTO
               You’ll always have my love.

Benny piles into the back; Betsy sits next to Shane, who
starts the engine and drives away from the house.

INT./EXT. LAND ROVER ON HIGHWAY – DAY

Shane drives, elbow out the window, while Betsy sits beside
him, listening to music on her headset. Betsy and Shane
eat sandwiches from the bag Rita prepared. Benny sketches
on a note pad. His jacket covers the Uzi on the seat
beside him.

Shane eyes him in the rear view mirror.

                         SHANE
               What are you up to, Benny?

                         BENNY
               Oh, just taking some notes.
               I must file a report when I
               get back home.

In fact, he is recreating the atomic diagram from memory.


Benny taps Betsy on the shoulder and hands her a photo.

                         BENNY (CONT’D)
               Those are my daughters, Hila
               and Ilana and my wife Ruth.
               Ilana is still in school. Hila,
               on the right, is in the Army.
               We have the draft, girls too.

Betsy returns the photo to Benny.

                         BETSY
               You must be proud of them.

                         BENNY
               I love them to pieces.
               I worry about them all the time.
               When they walk out the door,
               I wonder if I’ll see them again.
               The world we live in...
                                                           57



                         BETSY
               They must think the same of you
               Where do they live?

                         BENNY
               Normally I would not give
               out that kind of personal information.
               But, since we are comrades-in-arms,
               they live in the northern town of
               Tiberius by the Dead Sea, which
               Christians refer to as the Sea of
               Galilee, from the New Testament.
                    (pause)
               Yes. They listen to music
               just like you. It’s the same
               everywhere, really. It’s a
               pity there are so many differences.

Benny hums a tune, conducting with his finger.

Shane reaches back and gives Benny the photo document he
took off the dead “Syrian” attacker.

                         SHANE
               What do you think of this?

                         BENNY
               What is it?

                         SHANE
               I took it off one of the
               attackers at the scene of
               the shooting. He looked
               Middle Eastern. Is it
               authentic? Can you tell?

                         BENNY
               It’s not a military document.
               The Arabic is a trifle sloppy.
               I’d say it’s a fake.

                         SHANE
               That’s what I think. It’s
               a cover-up, a diversion.
               The real question is: who is
               behind all this?
                                                             58



The Land Rover passes a road sign: 32 miles to White Sands
Missile Range.

INT. JESPERSON HOUSE, DINING ROOM – DAY

Otto and Rita are tied to the high back dining room chairs.
Colonel Steig is accompanied by two HENCHMEN. They wear
non-descript fatigues. Henchman 1 piloted the helicopter
for Steig.

                         HENCHMAN 1
               Give me a lap dance, and
               I might let you go.

Rita spits in his face.   He slaps her hard across the face.

                         OTTO
               Leave her out of this! Do
               what you’re going to do to me.

                         RITA
                    (to Henchman 1)
               Dogs will chew on your
               entrails in the desert!

Henchman 1 slaps her hard again.   Blood trickles from her
nose.

Steig snaps open a glass ampoule and prepares a syringe.

                         COL. STEIG
               Oh, we’ll do what we’re going
               to do to you. You don’t have
               to worry about that.

                         OTTO
               I don’t know anything that
               would interest the likes of you.

Otto sits calmly in the chair.   Henchman 2 assists Steig.

                         COL. STEIG
               Now, that’s where I think you’re
               wrong. I think you know one or
               two tidbits that would interest me.
                                                             59

                         OTTO
               I’ve lived my life. I’m
               mostly a corpse. There is
               very little pain left in my
               body.

                         COL. STEIG
               Wrong again. You see, I’m
               not going to cause you any
               pain at all. You’ll hardly
               feel a thing.

                         OTTO
               Do your worst.   Just let
               Rita go.

Steig injects the needle into Otto’s arm.

                         COL. STEIG
               You’re going to sing for me.
               I just injected you with a
               chemical a hundred times more
               potent than sodium pentathol.
               The Russians invented it.
               They’re very good at this
               sort of thing.

Colonel Steig steps back and watches as Otto becomes semi-
conscious. His head slumps to his chest. He begins to
BABBLE. Rita WEEPS quietly.

EXT. HOUSE

Two SHOTS RING OUT.   Birds in a nearby tree scatter in
flight.

INT./EXT. LAND ROVER, WHITE SANDS – DAY

Shane, Betsy, and Benny drive along a deserted road.   Benny
removes the M4 carbine from the bag.

                         BENNY
               I’m getting that sensation
               in the pit of my stomach again,
               part fear, part joy.
                                                           60

                         BETSY
               Look, it’s clouding up.
               Where are we?

                         SHANE
               We’re here.

Shane points to a dot on his GPS display.

                         BETSY
               Why don’t we find a diner
               somewhere and think this
               thing through.

                         BENNY
               It’s the zing of it. You
               know, the adventure. The
               chutzpah.

                         BETSY
               Shane?

                         SHANE
               We’re going to take a look
               around see what’s here.
               Have you been here before?

                         BETSY
               No.

Benny attaches the telescopic sight on top of the barrel
and the grenade launcher under the barrel. He snaps in a
banana clip.

The vehicle stops at a gate in a cyclone fence with dense
coils of razor wire on top and a large padlock on the gate.
One sign reads: RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS – CAUTION. The
second sign reads: WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE – KEEP OUT.

The characters leave the vehicle and approach the fence.
Benny takes out his cutting laser.

                         BENNY
               I hate these case hardened
               steel locks.

He goes to work with the laser on the lock.
                                                              61



LATER:

Shane drives the vehicle through the opened gate and stops.
Benny secures the gate so that it looks like no one broke
in. Benny gets in the vehicle and they drive on.

The paved road comes to an end. Shane consults the GPS and
they drive across the desert floor. Clouds thicken on the
horizon.

The desert floor is flat and empty except for tufts of
grass. Benny searches the landscape with binoculars.

                         BENNY
               Over there, do you see it?

Shane drives in the direction indicated by Benny, a tiny
spire on the horizon.

LATER:

Shane brings the vehicle to a halt hear the Trinity
Monument, an obelisk made of cemented sections of black
lava rock twelve feet high. On the obelisk is a bronze
plaque.

The characters leave the vehicle.   Shane reads the plaque.

                         SHANE
               “This site marks the spot where
               the first nuclear device was
               exploded to test the theory of
               the atomic bomb. The nuclear
               device, known as the Gadget,
               exploded on a one hundred foot steel
               tower at 5:29 AM on July 16, 1945.
               The explosion vaporized the tower
               and created a green glass known
               as Trinitite. The force of the
               explosion was estimated at twenty-one
               kilotons and was heard two hundred
               miles away. The Trinity test
               ushered in the Atomic Age.”

Shane notices rusted metal stumps in the ground.
                                                             62

                            BENNY
                  That’s what’s left of the
                  tower. They set the thing
                  off in a tower to see what
                  an air burst would be like.

CROSS CUT SEQUENCE:

Black-and-white footage of the nuclear device with wires
protruding from it, atop the steel tower, with dark clouds
overhead.

The characters. The characters look around them as if
expecting something.

The device explodes: first in real time, then in split
second intervals as caught by high speed cameras.

The characters.

The fireball as a giant mushroom.

The characters.

The giant mushroom evolves with spots on it resembling sun
spots.

The characters.

The mushroom cloud rises high in the sky, and a shock wave
travels rapidly across the ground.

END OF CROSS CUT SEQUENCE, BACK TO SCENE

Betsy is visibly uneasy. She separates herself from Shane
and Benny. Benny samples the air around the monument with
a Geiger counter. The Geiger counter CRACKLES.

Betsy runs away.


                            BENNY
                  Stop. It’s only a few millirems,
                  maybe not even that. It’s
                  perfectly safe.

Betsy turns toward the men with clenched fists.
                                                 63



                         BETSY
               Look at us! We’re covered
               in blood! All of us! This
               is crazy! The whole thing!
               Tell me anything good that
               has come out of it? (pause)
               You know, sometimes I’m just
               a woman. I don’t pretend to
               be hard like you. You know?
               I want to make things grow.
               I want the earth to be green,
               alive, vibrant. I want us all
               to be safe and happy. Is that
               too much to ask?

The men stand stunned.   Finally...

                         SHANE
               Yea, you could say something
               like that. Hell, I rather be
               some place else. I’d rather
               be on Cape Cod watching the
               sun rise, or watching a show
               in Times Square. I’ve got
               a hundred and seventy days
               of annual leave, and look where
               I am. But you know, you know,
               you just can’t quit. You just
               can’t. Dammit!

Shane kicks up a spray of sand.

                         BETSY
               I’ll bet it’s under there,
               the monument, the box of
               bullets. The box of evil.

                         SHANE
               What we need is ground
               penetrating radar.

Benny sees a speck half a mile away.

                         BENNY
               Let’s drive over there.
                                                            64

LATER:

Shane parks the Land Rover near a block house. The
characters get out and investigate. The concrete block
house has narrow slits. Weeds grow inside. Betsy sees
something, brushes the sand away and turns it over in her
hand.

EXT./INT. BLOCK HOUSE

                         BETSY
               What do you think this is?

                         BENNY
               Huh. It looks like an old
               radiation gage, a dosimeter.
               You’ve found something, an
               artifact of the early Atomic
               Age!

                         SHANE
               Wouldn’t this have been too
               close for humans?

                         BENNY
               This was probably for instruments.

                         BETSY
               Someone’s coming.   Look.

Benny looks where Betsy points with binoculars. He sees a
Humvee and an Army truck shimmering in the distance.

                         BENNY
               Someone’s coming, alright.

Benny breaks out the weapons from the duffel bag. He hands
the Glock pistol and the Uzi to Shane and keeps the M4
carbine for himself. Betsy stands SHAKING.

                         SHANE
               Who put you in charge?

                         BENNY
               How many wars have you
               fought in? Have you ever
               used an Uzi?
                                                             65



                        SHANE
              I’ve trained on similar weapons.

                       BENNY
              Good. I’ve always admired
              the FBI.

Shane steadies Betsy on the shoulders and gives her the
Glock.

                        SHANE
              If it comes to it, just
              aim and pull the trigger.

Shane kisses Betsy on the cheek and lightly caresses her
hair. Shane runs back to the vehicle and returns with the
camouflage blanket. He positions her a few yards from the
block house and covers her with the blanket.

Using the butt of the carbine as a shovel, Benny furiously
digs a shallow trench behind a clump of grass.

                        SHANE (CONT’D)
              So where does that put me?

                        BENNY
              You must do the talking.
              Maybe you can buy them off.
              You have money.

Benny wriggles into the trench, throws sand over himself,
and sights in the scope.

Shane stands in front of the block house, holding the
submachine gun barrel down, casual, waiting.

The Humvee and truck stop a hundred yards away. THREE MEN
walk toward the block house; slowly, confidently. OTHER
MEN WITH WEAPONS take up position around the Humvee and
truck.

They draw closer. It is Colonel Steig and his two
henchmen. All wear bullet proof vests. The henchmen carry
M-16 rifles, while Steig wears a standard Army issue
Beretta 9mm automatic pistol on his hip. The flap is
unsecured.
                                                             66



They stop fifteen feet from Shane.

Shane shows his ID.

                         SHANE
               FBI, Special Agent Shane Donnelly.

                         COL. STEIG
               Billy the Kid. Special agent,
               huh? I’m impressed. Taking the
               day off, or are you here on business?

                         SHANE
               Just driving around, seeing the
               sights.

                         COL. STEIG
               Uh huh. All alone? Mind if
               I take a look inside?

                         SHANE
               Sure, it’s a free country.

Betsy clenches and unclenches her hands under the blanket.

INT. BLOCK HOUSE

Colonel Steig looks around, kicks the sand, exits.

EXT. TRINITY SITE

                         COL. STEIG
               It doesn’t look like there’s
               a whole lot going on today.

                         SHANE
               Yea, it’s pretty quiet.
               Have we met before? Your
               voice sounds vaguely familiar?

                         COL. STEIG
               I don’t think so. Is the Uzi
               standard FBI issue these days?

Steig lights a cigarillo.   He looks around, notices the
heavy clouds.
                                                          67



                        SHANE
              Well, we get to choose.

                       COL. STEIG
              Uh huh. Can I offer you
              a smoke?

                        SHANE
              I’m good. Thanks all the same.

                        COL. STEIG
              I know, ugly habit. My
              dentist keeps telling me
              to quit—stains my teeth.
              I slap her on the ass.
              She threatens to bring
              me up on charges, but it
              never comes to anything.

A guided missile speeds overhead and impacts beyond the
horizon, setting off a FLASH OF LIGHT.

                        SHANE
              Must be test day on the range.
              The cavalry is coming.

                        COL. STEIG
              Freaking A. Oh, the cavalry.
              This conversation is getting
              stranger and stranger.

                        SHANE
              I just thought I’d mention it.
              You being Billy the Kid, and all.

                        COL. STEIG
              He died young, Billy did.
              An errant youth, he was. Lived
              around here, they say.

                        SHANE
              You don’t know where to look,
              do you?

                        COL. STEIG
              Look for what, exactly?
                                                             68



                         SHANE
               Whatever it is you’re looking
               for. I don’t have a clue either.

                         COL. STEIG
               Whatever it is you’re looking for.

                          SHANE
               Exactly.

                         COL. STEIG
               I’ve got ground penetrating radar.
               But I don’t know, given that
               there aren’t any clues and the
               cavalry is coming, as you say.

                         SHANE
               And it looks like it might rain.

In the distance, lightening forks down to the earth from
menacing clouds and thunder RUMBLES across the desert.

Col. Steig lunges forward and marches Shane back up against
the block house wall with his finger in Shane’s chest.

Betsy listens intently to all this.

                         COL. STEIG
               I want to tell you something,
               college boy. My grandpappy was
               a human guinea pig in the trenches
               during those bomb tests in the Fifties.
               Fried his ass. He died of leukemia at
               age thirty. My father was an alcoholic
               and my mom had a goiter down to here
               (indicating), stuck her head in a gas oven.
               And, as you can see, I was born with
               beautiful skin. So whatever it is around
               here that’s worth something, I figure
               it belongs to me. Comprehende?

                          SHANE
               You could sell it on Ebay,
               depending.
                                                             69

                            COL. STEIG
                  That’s right! I could sell it
                  on Ebay, one freaking bullet at
                  a time!

Steig starts to retreat with his back toward the Humvee,
looking up at the threatening skies, when he notices Benny.

In one motion, he spins around, gun drawn.    The henchmen
turn in unison with him.

Shane sweeps across the three of them with a LONG BURST
from the Uzi. BUDDABUDDABUDDABUDDA.

Near simultaneously to the first shots being fired, Benny
rises from his prone position and opens fire at the armed
men near the truck and Humvee. POP POP POP.

The men at the Humvee return fire on Benny.    Bullets ZIP
around him.

Benny fires a grenade from the M4 carbine, striking the
Humvee and sending it up in flames. Benny gets several of
the men. Benny is hit by return fire.

Shane gets Colonel Steig in the arm and leg.

Henchman 1 is hit in the bullet proof vest. The bullets
don’t penetrate but knock him backward. He fires his M-16
erratically. Shane hits him around the head and neck,
mortally wounding him.

Henchman 2 is similarly driven backward but hits Shane in
the shoulder. Shane goes down. Wounded, Benny finishes
off Henchman 2.

An Army Black Hawk helicopter flies low overhead.

INT. HELICOPTER

FBI agents McClosky, Fisk and Patel fly in full combat
gear, alongside of ARMED TROOPS. McClosky speaks to an
ARMY MAJOR beside him.

                            MCCLOSKY
                  Remember, these are rogue
                  elements. The men may not
                                                            70

                         MCCLOSKY (CONT’D)
               even know what they are doing.

The Major nods yes.

EXT. DESERT

Steig notices the human form under the blanket and crawls
on his elbows toward it, pistol in hand, trailing blood.

Betsy raises the blanket and sticks her pistol into Steig’s
mouth.

                         BETSY
               You killed my father and brother.

She pulls the trigger, terminating him.

Betsy hears Shane MOANING and rushes toward him. Blood
pours from his right shoulder. She uses her jacket to try
and stop the bleeding.

                         BETSY (CONT’D)
               Help! Please help! A man is
               down! I need an ambulance!
               Somebody call 911! Help! Please!

The remainder of Steig’s men speed off in the truck. The
helicopter cuts off its escape. The DOOR GUNNER fires his
machine gun into the truck’s engine. Steam pours from the
engine as the truck grinds to a halt. The men get out,
arms raised in surrender.

SOLDIERS from the helicopter round up Steig’s men.
McClosky and his men rush toward Betsy and Shane.

Benny lies dead, loosely holding the diagram he drew, smile
on his face. A wind gust blows the diagram, mottled with
blood, from his hand, as the first drops of rain fall.

FADE TO:

EXT. ISRAEL, TIBERIAS, SEA OF GALILEE – DAY

SOMBER MOURNING VOCALS OVER
                                                           71

Benny’s WIFE and TWO DAUGHTERS console one another as
RABBIS, FRIENDS and SOLDIERS, some wearing prayer shawls,
place hands and flowers on Benny’s flag-draped coffin in a
private plot above the sea. The coffin is lowered into the
grave.

EXT. HOSPITAL, NEW MEXICO – DAY

As Betsy walks toward the hospital entrance, holding a
sprig of wildflowers, PHOTOGRAPHERS, OFFICIALS and McClosky
leave. Betsy overhears a remark.

                         MCCLOSKY
               That man should get the Medal
               of Honor, as far as I’m concerned.

INT. HOSPITAL, HALLWAY

Betsy walks along the hallway; all eyes follow her.

                         CHARGE NURSE
               He’s down there.

Betsy nods and continues down the hall. She sees Fisk
sitting in a chair beside an open doorway. He half rises
to greet her.

                           FISK
               Jim Fisk.    You remember...

                           BETSY
               Hi.

Betsy pokes her nose inside the single room. A YOUNG NURSE
adjusts the flow on an IV bottle. She plumps up Shane’s
pillows.

                         NURSE
               If you need anything, anything
               at all, just push the buzzer.

                          SHANE
               Thanks.   I’ll remember that.

The nurse exits. Betsy enters. She notices flowers all
over the room, covering the level surfaces.
                                                           72

                         BETSY
               Hello, Shane.

                         SHANE
               Hello, Betsy.

                         BETSY
               I brought you some flowers:
               yellow poppies. I’ll just
               put them over here.

Shane holds out his left hand. His right shoulder is
heavily bandaged. She places the poppies into his hand.   He
sniffs the poppies.

                         BETSY
               I’m afraid they don’t have
               much of a scent.

                         SHANE
               They’re pretty.   Thanks.
               How are you?

                         BETSY
               I was scared you’d bleed
               to death. I couldn’t stop
               the bleeding.

Shane looks out the window.

                         SHANE
               Your voice sounded far away,
               like I was slipping out.

                         BETSY
               Out of your body?

                         SHANE
               Something like that.
               You brought me back.
               So how are you?

                         BETSY
               I’m okay. You look
               kind of banged up.
                                                    73

                         SHANE
               I’ll be all right.

                         BETSY
               That’s what they all say.

                         SHANE
                    (chuckling)
               Yea, that’s what we all say.
               What good are we, anyway?
               We bust up the world pretty good.

                         BETSY
               I suppose you’ll be returning
               to New York soon.

                         SHANE
               Yea, if they ever let me
               out of this joint.

The nurse enters, holding a medication tray.

                         BETSY
               Let me know before you go.
               Maybe we can get together
               for a coffee or something.

                         SHANE
               I’d like that. Hey,
               thanks.

He holds up the flowers.   Betsy exits.

HALLWAY

Agent Patel, newspaper in hand, comes up to Fisk.

                         PATEL
               Did you see the news?
               Arsenal whipped Manchester.

                         FISK
               We play football in this
               country. (to Betsy) Do
               you have a minute?
                                                            74

Betsy turns and waits.    Fisk jumps up from the chair.
Patel takes his place.

EXT. HOSPITAL, PARKING LOT – DAY

Fisk pulls out a pack of cigarettes.   Betsy deftly helps
herself to a cigarette.

                         FISK
               I didn’t know you smoked.

                           BETSY
               I don’t.

He lights them both.

                         FISK
               I’ve gotten tired of apologizing
               for smoking. I’ll quit when I’m
               good and ready.

Betsy laugh heartily.

                         BETSY
               What is it you want to talk
               to me about, Mr. Fisk?

                         FISK
               I want to talk to you
               about Shane. He’ll tell
               that he’s okay. Fact is,
               his shoulder is all torn up.
               He’ll need reconstructive
               surgery; even with that, he
               may never regain full use of
               his right arm. Shane was a
               star at Boston College. The
               pros gave him a look-see.

                         BETSY
               I didn’t know that.

                         FISK
               See, that’s the thing.
               Shane doesn’t tell you
               things like that unless
               you know him real well.
                                                              75

                         FISK
               I don’t know what you two
               talked about.

                         BETSY
               We didn’t talk relationships.
               I thought that was odd. It’s
               usually the first thing I go
               for--the jugular.

                         FISK
               He had a big breakup about
               a year ago. He’d been seeing
               this woman for months. I don’t
               know what happened; he was pretty
               bummed over about it. He thought
               he’d be married by now with a
               family. Maybe it was his fault,
               I don’t know.

                         BETSY
               And, this pertains to me, how?

                         FISK
               Look, all I’m saying is give
               the guy a chance. He doesn’t
               need pity. He needs a friend.
               The President called him personally
               this morning, and the poor guy is
               lying in a hospital bed wondering
               what kind of man he will be when
               he gets out.

                         BETSY
               I’ve lost all the men in
               my life, Mr. Fisk. I’m
               not quite certain how I’ll
               replace them.

                         FISK
               I’m deeply and truly sorry
               for your losses. Gotta run.
               Think about it.

Fisk runs back toward the hospital.   Betsy flicks the last
of the cigarette.
                                                             76

EXT. TRINITY SITE – DAY

The site is divided into narrow strips marked by string on
posts and color tags.

WORKERS push ground penetrating radar units on small wheels
through the lanes demarcated by the string. The box-like
units each have an antenna.

The antennas transmit images to a master screen observed by
the ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS. The images show wave patterns
of the earth beneath the surface.

LATER:

Backhoes did a deep hole in the sandy soil.

LATER, NIGHT:

A mountain of dirt is piled by the hole, illuminated by
banks of lights. A worker at the bottom, some thirty feet
down, WHISTLES, and signals that he has found something.
Engineers and workers crowd at the edge of the pit and
CHEER.

EXT. PIT - NIGHT:

A ramp leads in two directions down to an object. VISITORS
in stylish HAZMAT suits walk down the ramp and gather
around the object. The object is illuminated so that the
inside is clearly visible.

ARMED GUARDS cover the pit on the surface. American flags
line the pit on both sides.

Popular World War II songs like “I’ll Be Seeing You,” and
“It’s Been a Long, Long Time,” play from speakers.

Visitors enter a large Army style tent to change into their
HAZMAT suits. When they emerge, suited up, they are
offered flutes of champagne by WAITERS and WAITRESSES
dressed as 1940s-era bellhops and cigarette girls.

The visitors sit in comfortable chairs, sipping champagne
and eating expensive snacks, and chat with one another, as
they wait their turn to enter the pit.
                                                          77

PROTESTERS CHANT at the periphery of the site. They are
restrained by the armed guards and site ORGANIZERS.

                        PROTESTORS
              No more nukes! No more nukes!

Below, the visitors walk around the object, touching it
lightly with their protective gloves. Expressions of
wonder, awe and fear are visible through their suit
helmets.

The object appears to be a glass cube eight feet on a side.
Embedded in the green-tinted transparent material is a wood
pallet on which are neatly stacked boxes with Army
stenciling: “.30 caliber ball ammunition.” Entombed in the
clear substance are diamond back rattlesnakes and strange
dolls.

                        VISITOR 1
              Mother of God! There it is!

VISITOR 2 furtively taps the object lightly with a rock
hammer.

                        VISITOR 1 (CONT’D)
              I don’t know that I would do that
              if I were you.

                       VISITOR 2
              Why? Do you think it will
              explode?

                        VISITOR 1
              We don’t really know what
              we’re dealing with here.
              I’d say caution is called for.

                        VISITOR 3
              What do you say, glass?
              I’m guessing ballistic glass.
              I’m an aeronautical engineer.

                        VISITOR 2
              Possibility. It could be that
              stuff created by the blast,
              Trinitite. That was green.
                                                        78

                         VISITOR 1
               I’m just saying that the ethical
               implications of tampering with
               such a thing must be considered.

A GUARD speaks to the DIRECTOR, decked out in black
leather.

                         GUARD
               Shouldn’t we have someone
               down in the pit?

                         DIRECTOR
               These people paid three
               thousand each to be here.
               This is bigger than the
               Super Bowl. You’ll get
               your cut.

The guard smiles.   VISITOR 4 sidles up to VISITOR 2.

                         VISITOR 4
               I’ll bet you’re wondering
               what those funny looking dolls
               are.

                         VISITOR 2
               I was, actually.

                         VISITOR 4
               I’m a local anthropologist,
               and I can say with a fair
               degree of certainty, that
               that are Navajo witch dolls.

                         VISITOR 2
               Oh, right. This stuff is
               bad medicine. Don’t mess.
               And with the snakes.

                         VISITOR 4
               Exactly. By the way, my
               name is Barbara. We met at
               the cocktail party...when
               we didn’t have these gold fish
               bowls covering our heads.
                                                    79

                         VISITOR 2
               Oh, right...right. Nice to
               meet you, Barbara. I’m Garth.

They shake hands.   VISITOR 5 butts in.

                         VISITOR 5
               The men who made this thing
               were giants. We stand on the
               shoulders of giants. And I say
               that as a scientist.

                         VISITOR 6
               Who’s in charge here?
               I want to purchase this object.
               It’s a fabulous work of art.
               I’m offering thirty million
               dollars for it.

Helmeted heads turn and look at one another.

                         VISITOR 6 (CONT’D)
               That’s the problem with America.
               Nobody’s in charge.

  VISITOR 7 steps forward.

                         VISITOR 7
               I’m not sure exactly who is in
               charge here. My name is Bob
               Bechtel, Secretary, Department
               of Homeland Security.

                         VISITOR 6
               You’re a secretary?

                         VISITOR 7
               No. I am the Secretary. I’m
               the boss. To whom do I have
               the pleasure of addressing myself?

                          VISITOR 6
               My name is Kashoggi. I am
               on the Forbes’ list of top
               forty richest individuals in
               the world.
                                                          80

                         VISITOR 7
               Well, Mr. Kashoggi, I don’t
               think this object is for sale.

                         VISITOR 6
               Thirty-five million.

                         VISITOR 7
               The government owns it.
               Write to your elected officials.

A crowd gathers.

                         VISITOR 6
               Forty million.

                         VISITOR 8
               I say we cut the crap and take a
               jackhammer to it and see if the
               damn bullets work!

                         DIRECTOR THRU SPEAKER
               Your time will be up in thirty seconds.
               Please be ready to leave at that time.
               The next group will be ready to enter
               the display area in sixty seconds.
               Thank you for your cooperation.

INT. DEEP MINE SHAFT

The object descends slowly down the shaft. As:

                         BECHTEL (V.O.)
               Dear Mr. President: I wish to strongly
               recommend that the alleged nuclear
               materials recently uncovered at the
               Trinity Site, New Mexico, be disposed
               of in a manner consistent with our
               commitment to THE environment and
               to national security.

EXT. PRINCETON UNIVERSITY – DAY

TITLE: Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey.

Students come and go on the grounds in this idyllic
setting.
                                                              81



                           BECHTEL (V.O.)(CONT’D)
                 I also recommend that all references
                 to the Atomic Bullet Project not
                 already in the public domain, be placed...

INT. INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY, HALLWAY - DAY

A JANITOR, carrying a bucket of water and a squeegee,
unlocks a store room...

INT. STOREROOM

...and turns on the light. The room is filled with
numbered, old-fashioned black boards with complex
mathematical formulations scrawled on them. A photograph
of Albert Einstein writing on a blackboard hangs on one
wall.

Consulting a clipboard, the janitor erases a certain black
board with the squeegee. It contains a diagram of a rifle
bullet.

                           BECHTEL (V.0.) (CONT’D)
                 ...under government safekeeping for
                 the the greater good of the nation.
                 Sincerely, Robert P. Bechtel,
                 Secretary, Department of Homeland
                 Security.

EXT. SANTA FE, JEANNIE’S HOUSE – DAY

Betsy enters through a gate, skips up a short walk and
rings the door bell to an A-frame cottage with flowers and
evergreens in front.

The door is opened by JEANNIE, 48, an earth mother, with
long hair and flowing skirt. They embrace at the door.

                           JEANNIE
                 Betsssyyyy!

                           BETSY
                 Hiiii, Jeannieee!

INT. HOUSE
                                                             82

Their embrace carries into the main interior space, with a
rugged stone fireplace in the middle and large window walls
letting in oceans of light. A CAT rubs against Betsy’s
leg.

                         JEANNIE
               It’s sooo good to see you!

                         BETSY
               It’s so good to be back!
               I love this house, all the light!

Crystals and stained glass miniatures of unicorns and
mythological beings adorn the windows and fireplace, along
with books and paintings.

                         JEANNIE
               Oh, I know what. Now, where
               did I put it? Oh, here it is.
               I made a scrapbook while the
               world’s biggest adventure was
               happening, mostly Web pages.

Betsy sits down with JEANNIE on a leather couch.

                         JEANNIE (CONT’D)
               Here we are at day one,
               the worst day in state history
               in many a year.

Betsy turns away.

                         JEANNIE (CONT’D)
               Oh, I’m sorry. How thoughtless
               of me. But you’re writing about
               all this?

                         BETSY
               Yes, that’s about all I’ve
               been doing, writing and giving
               interviews and refusing interviews.

                         JEANNIE
               Writing must be therapeutic
               for you.
                                                      83

                         BETSY
               It is. I feel I could go
               on and on—and some days, I
               can’t write a single word.
               I have nightmares, big
               scary ones.

                         JEANNIE
               Are you seeing a therapist?

                            BETSY
               No.

                         JEANNIE
               I could recommend a good one.

                         BETSY
               I’ll stick with the writing
               for now.

                         JEANNIE
               Are you writing a book?

JEANNIE pours tea. A SECOND CAT enters the room and
settles beside Betsy.

                         BETSY
               Eventually, maybe, I don’t know.

                         JEANNIE
               What besides writing?

Betsy hovers over the tea, not drinking.

                         BETSY
               Besides writing...?
               Besides writing, emptiness.
               A really terrifying emptiness.
               So I write, rent movies, take
               walks. I have be careful
               about walks...

                            JEANNIE
               Paparazzi?

                         BETSY
               Yes, photographers, journalists,
                                                      84

                         BETSY (CONT’D)
               strangers out of the blue;
               lawyers who want to represent me.
               Investment advisers. It’s kind of
               like your junk mail coming to life.

Jeannie laughs heartily.

                         JEANNIE
               You didn’t think you were
               going to say something funny.
               But you did. Betsy, you walked
               on the world stage. Of course
               people want a piece of you.

                         BESTY
               Marriage proposals. I put
               some of them in a file. I
               don’t know, Jeannie. I feel
               like my life is over. I’m
               living in an afterlife through
               the writing.

                         JEANNIE
               But you can’t really believe
               that. You aren’t forty yet.

                         BETSY
               I soon will be. I’m not
               looking forward to it.

                         JEANNIE
               Look at you. You’re a survivor,
               you wear that red badge of courage.
               Your writing is assured for years
               to come. Me? I’m facing foreclosure.

                           BETSY
               No!

                         JEANNIE
               Sales are down: online and in
               my shop. I could lose this
               beautiful place. Who knows
               where I might end up.
                                        85

          BETSY
I could purchase it for you,
and we could live together.

          JEANNIE
As reassuring as that sounds,
no, it’s not going to happen.

           BETSY
Why not?

          JEANNIE
Let’s get real. Have you
heard from—

          BETSY
No, I haven’t heard from Shane.
I haven’t written to him, either.

           JEANNIE
I thought it was Jim. Here
I go, losing my memory at age
forty-eight! Well, why not,
why not send him an email?
You’ve taken bigger chances
than that.

          BETSY
Well, I don’t want to leave
the Southwest, and long distance
relationships never work. One
side or the other has to give way.

          JEANNIE
Betsy the Rock, and here she stands.
Maybe Shane will be the one to budge.

          BETSY
It’s different now, the Southwest.
There are places where I can’t go
anymore. People I loved are gone.
I suppose, logically, I should
be ready to leave for a fresh
start.

          JEANNIE
Betsy Gurl, for all the pain,
                                          86

          JEANNIE (CONT’D)
life has given you a great
opportunity. It’s taken you
far from your comfort zone,
the little world of gossip
and relationships that most of us
live in most of the days of our lives,
and flung you onto a higher plane—
where, God knows, you can live beyond
your wildest dreams. There’s a bond
between you. There has to be. Unless
this guy is a total dud.

          BETSY
I don’t know, Jeannie. I
had to put up with a lot from
Dale after he came home from Iraq.
As much as I loved Dale, it got
to be a bit much at times, helping
him with therapy, helping him readjust.

          JEANNIE
Oh, well, if that’s the case...

          BETSY
He kissed me, right before
the attack, the final attack,
the colonel and his men, Shane did.
He kissed me on the cheek and
brushed back my hair, like it was
a great gift, the gift of his
life he was giving me, as
we both faced danger. Maybe
I don’t deserve such a gift.

          JEANNIE
I’d give five years of my
life for an ounce of your
soul right now.

          BETSY
As it happens, I will be
going to New York soon, to
see my editor at the New Yorker.
They’re publishing my account,
when I get around to finishing it.
                                                           87

                         JEANNIE
               There you go. That’s your
               opportunity.

                         BETSY
               But I’m afraid. What if
               it’s all be over in the
               first five seconds? He’s
               changed; I’ve changed. And
               we kill each other with kindness?
               He must be seeing someone by now.
               Or he’s not seeing anyone at all—
               which would be even worse. New York
               will be a disaster.

JEANNIE takes Betsy by the hands.

                         JEANNIE
               Listen to me, Betsy. Go in grace;
               go in confidence. Whatever
               has pushed you forward this
               far is nudging you one last mile.
               Aren’t’ you going to try my tea?

Betsy sips the tea.

                         BETSY
               It’s delicious.   Thank you.

INT. BETSY’S HOUSE – DAY

Betsy sits in front of the computer, drinking a steaming
mug of coffee. The room is covered with large prints of
Georgia O’Keefe paintings and similar, tasteful works of
art and photography.

Betsy looks up Shane on LifeSpace. She sees that Shane has
thirty-seven friends, some of them younger women. The
picture shows Shane jogging through a park. She sees: “If
you want to know more about Shane, befriend Shane,” She
holds the cursor over the befriend button.

Betsy enters her email program and starts a new email. She
types “Dear Shane,”. She gets up and paces around the
room, looks out the window and sees a HAPPY FAMILY with MAN
and WOMAN walking with laughing CHILDREN.
                                                              88

Betsy sits in front of the computer.   Her fingers tremble.

                         BETSY
               Well, Betsy Gurl, are you
               feeling lucky today?

She keys: “Dear Shane, How are you? Next week, I’ll be
traveling to New York on business.” She pauses, takes a
swig of coffee and keys: “I thought, maybe if you’re not
too busy, we could meet for a coffee or a drink.” She
backspaces out “drink” and substitutes “bite to eat.”

INT. COMMERCIAL AIRLINER – DAY

Betsy sits next to the window, looking out on the puffy
white clouds, relaxed, listening to her headset.

                         BETSY (V.O.)
               I would be remiss if I failed
               to mention that I wonder, from
               time to time, how you are,
               especially considering your
               grave wound and all the
               experiences we endured together.
               When last I saw you in the
               hospital, there were so many
               emotions, so many things I
               wanted to say, seeing you
               lying there all banged up.
               But that wasn’t the time and
               place for a serious conversation.

INT. NEW YORK CITY, SUBWAY CAR – DAY

Betsy holds on to the steel pole as she reads the subway
map on the wall. She wears a light jacket over jeans and
dark shades. The car is filled with all sorts of PEOPLE.

INT. 34TH STREET SUBWAY STATION

Betsy exits from the train and searches for the exit from
the station.

EXT. 34TH STREET

Betsy climbs up the subway stairs in front of Macy’s.
EVERYONE around her moves more quickly than she does.
                                                            89



She consults a piece of paper and walks east along 34th
Street, pausing to look at the Macy’s window displays.

Betsy takes a digital snap of the Empire State Building,
and continues along 34th Street.

She trips over an uneven slab of sidewalk.

EXT. HERALD SQUARE, PEDESTRIAN MALL

At the intersection of 34th Street and Broadway, Betsy finds
the mall, with small tables and chairs and beach type
umbrellas. She threads her way slowly between tables,
looking left and right.

                         SHANE
               Hey, stranger.

Betsy whirls around, brushing the gentleman behind her with
her bag, and sees Shane, sitting at a table. He rises to
greet her.

                         BETSY
                    (to gentleman)
               Sorry.
                    (to Shane)
               I walked right by you!

Betsy kisses Shane on the cheek. He embraces her with his
left arm. His right arm hangs stiffly by his side. She
takes the chair opposite him. He wears a sporty blazer,
open collar shirt, and shades.

He smiles, she smiles. They raise their shades
simultaneously, and laugh.

                          SHANE
               You look great.    How was
               your trip?

                         BETSY
               Oh, it was ok, I mean,
               it was good. I lost a
               few days of my life getting
               through airport security.
               You look great, too.
                                                          90

                          SHANE
               Thanks. I’ve had some time
               to unwind.

Using his left hand, he takes out a business card and gives
it to her.

                         BETSY
                    (reading card)
               “Shane Donnelly, Security
               Consultant.” Does this
               mean you’re off the force?

                         SHANE
               The agency. Yea, I mean, Yes.
               Yes, I wasn’t much use to the FBI
               anymore. Too many young guns
               for me to handle. You know...

                         BETSY
               Uh huh.

Awkwardly, he raises his right arm to the table to grip the
cup while he sucks from the straw.

                         SHANE
               It’s called a smoothie.
               Not me, the drink.
                    (pause)
               If you find any good right
               arms lying around, give me
               a call.

Betsy smiles, looks down, cracks up.

                         BETSY
               I have nightmares.

                         SHANE
               I see a therapist. I
               hear you’ve made The
               New Yorker. Congratulations!

                         BETSY
               I’m excited. I feel like
               walking. Can we walk for awhile?
                                                             91

                            SHANE
                  Sounds good to me.

She takes him by his left arm as they leave the mall.

MUSIC OVER AS:

EXT. BROADWAY

Shane points out the sights; Betsy nods.

EXT. CENTRAL PARK – THE MALL

They walk hand-in-hand along the path lined on either side
by large leafy trees.

EXT. CENTRAL PARK – THE HANS CHRISTEN ANDERSON SCULPTURE

Betsy snaps a pic of Shane posing by the statue. Betsy
shows the camera to a PASSERBY, who snaps several pics of
Shane and herself posing like a cutie pie.

EXT. CENTRAL PARK – THE JOHN LENNON MEMORIAL

Betsy and Shane stare at the circular black-and-white tile
memorial with the word “Imagine” in the center.

                            BETSY
                  Do you think it’s still
                  possible to imagine?

                            SHANE
                  I think you have to, especially
                  in this place. Ya hungry?

Betsy nods yes.

                             SHANE (CONT’D)
                  Hey, I kept up with you
                  this time.

Betsy laughs and squeezes him.

INT. POSH RESTAURANT – EVENING

Betsy and Shane lean over candles, laughing and feeding
each other bites from their different dishes. A MAN and
                                                            92

WOMAN several tables away notices Shane and Betsy and
whisper to one another.

END MUSIC OVER

EXT. SHANE’S APARTMENT BUILDING – NIGHT

A yellow cab pulls up to the building. Shane gets out and
pays the driver and opens the door for Betsy. The cab
drives off.

                           BETSY
                      (grinning)
                 So what’s the plan?

                           SHANE
                 Oh, I don’t know. Can
                 you plan on getting lucky?

INT. SHANE’S APARTMENT, BEDROOM – NIGHT

Half-undressed, Betsy starts to pull off Shane’s
undershirt, in the intimate lighting.

                           SHANE
                 I’d like to keep that on
                 for tonight...If you don’t
                 mind. I’ve had five operations.

Betsy caresses his chest, kisses his neck, face, lips.
They make passionate love in SLOW FRAMES.

LATER:

Betsy moves violently in her sleep, clenching and
unclenching her fists, as if she is fighting someone in a
nightmare.

Shane awakens and turns on the table lamp.    He gently
shakes her.

                            BETSY
                 Nooo!   Nooo! Noooo!

Her eyes flutter open.
                                                            93

                         SHANE
               It’s just a dream, Betsy.
               It’s gone now. It’s OK.

She kisses him and goes back to sleep.

INT. SHANE’S APARTMENT, KITCHEN – MORNING

Betsy rummages through Shane’s refrigerator, in a half-
length robe. Shane stands by the kitchen window, drinking
coffee, watching her.

                         BETSY
               I don’t believe what I’m
               seeing: veggi burger, bean
               sprouts, soy milk, soy spread.
               I don’t believe my eyes.

                         SHANE
               I decided to change my diet.

                         BETSY
               What, no more crappy burgers?

                         SHANE
               I enjoy a steak now and again.
               I donate the baked potato to
               charity.

                         BETSY
               You have lost weight. So,
               this is part of the new,
               reconstructed Shane Donnelly.

As soon as the words leave her mouth, she realizes what she
has done and buries her face in her hands.

                         BETSY
               I’m so sorry. The words
               just popped out of my mouth.

                         SHANE
               It’s all right.

                         BETSY
               No, it’s not all right. You
               deserve better than that.
                                                          94

                         BETSY (CONT’D)
               You deserve smooth sailing
               for the rest of your days.

                         SHANE
               What do you suggest I do?

                            BETSY
               Well...

She presents her rear end to Shane.

                         SHANE
               Kick or spank?

                         BETSY
               Your choice.

He propels her forward from the kitchen toward the bedroom.

EXT. RIVERSIDE PARK – DAY

Betsy and Shane walk by the Hudson River, hand in hand.
Bikers and joggers share the macadam path. It’s a sunny
day and the flower beds are in bloom.

                         BETSY
               It’s beautiful here. I
               can see how you might want
               to spend some serious time
               in a place like this.

                         SHANE
               I like to come down here
               and jog, especially when the
               weather is nice like today.

                         BETSY
               I’m not sure it would work
               for me, though.

                         SHANE
               Why is that?

                         BETSY
               I feel clumsy here. I
               keep running into things.
                                  95



          SHANE
That’s just the New York
Jitters.

          BETSY
What? You’re pulling my
leg, right?

          SHANE
Nah, it’s the tall buildings,
the pace of the city. People
write books about it.

           BETSY
Oh, pooh. Do you remember back
at Otto’s place, you said,
you could retire in a place
like this?

          SHANE
I remember that.   Why?

          BETSY
I was just wondering.

          SHANE
I’m flexible. I’m on
disability. As long as
the government prints money,
I can live anywhere. I can
take my business most anywhere.
How did it go with your editor?

          BETSY
Real well. I want to run
a few things by you before
we go to print.

          SHANE
Sure.

          BETSY
Are you really this easy
to get along with? ‘Cause
I can really bug the hell
out of a man.
                                  96



          SHANE
Sure. As long as you don’t
point a gun at me.

          BETSY
I don’t know, Shane.
I don’t know what I want,
anymore. I’ve had The
Hunk, The Sensitive Male,
The Wounded Artist. Sorry.

          SHANE
What would that make me?

          BETSY
Oh, you would be The Hero,
for sure.

          SHANE
I’m an ordinary man who
found himself in extraordinary
circumstances, that’s all.

          BETSY
Oh, you’re way better than
ordinary, Shane, believe me.
What about you? I can go on
and on about myself.

          SHANE
I was dating this woman. Her
ex was up on narcotics charges.
It turned out they were both
growing marijuana out on Long
Island.

          BETSY
And you got burned.

          SHANE
And I got burned.   I showed
poor judgment.

          BETSY
We’re already had a fight.
                                                            97

                         SHANE
               What, back there in the desert?
               I try not to think too much about
               all that. I mean, it’s there.
               It jumps out in front of me
               sometimes. I talk about it to
               the therapist. It’ll always be
               in there.

                         BETSY
               I want this day to last,
               every minute of it, whatever
               else happens.

INT. SHANE’S APARTMENT, BEDROOM – NIGHT

Shane and Betsy lie in bed together, facing one another.
Shane runs his fingers through her hair.

                         SHANE
               I fell in love with you
               when you were standing on
               the porch. Your life had
               just been destroyed. And
               there you were, about to ride
               off with a strange man with
               a gun. You were brave standing
               there looking into the sunset.
               Into an unknown future.

                         BETSY
               With a strange man who had
               just saved my life.

She tugs at his undershirt.

                         SHANE
               Think a moment, Betsy.
               Is this a body you want
               to wake up next to a year
               from tonight?

He sits up and allows her to take off the shirt. The
patchwork of scars around his right shoulder are plain to
see in the lamp light.
                                                            98

                         SHANE (CONT’D)
               This is as good as it’s ever
               going to be. I’ve got nowhere
               to run, no place to hide.

She runs her fingers lightly over the scars, presses her
cheek against them, kisses them, a tear rolls down her
cheek.

                         BETSY
               You can hide inside of me,
               Shane Donnelly. You can
               hide inside of me.


EXT. DESERT - DAY

FLASHBACK to 1947

Oppenheimer puts on gloves and chambers a black bullet with
a gold tip, and hands the rifle to Groves.

                         OPPENHEIMER
               Here, General, you do the honors.

                         GROVES
               Just aim at the rock, huh?

                         OPPENHEIMER
               Yes.

The General takes aim and pulls the trigger. BOOM! There
is a brief, intense FLASH and a SHOCK RING emanating from
the target. The rock spire breaks in half and crumbles to
the ground.

The General looks at Oppenheimer in amazement.   Oppenheimer
turns to the boy.

                         OPPENHEIMER (CONT’D)
               You’re gonna grow up in one helluva
               world, kid.

Focus on the boy, FREEZE FRAME

FADE TO:
                                                             99

Music over. Something like Louis Armstrong’s “It’s A
Wonderful World.”

Montage:

--“Now we are all sons-of-bitches,” Dr. Kenneth Bainbridge,
Director of Trinity Test.

--Photo of Little Boy atom bomb.

--Brief footage of the Hiroshima bomb explosion.

--Photo of Fat Man atom bomb.

--Brief footage of the Nagasaki bomb explosion.

--Footage of Japanese civilians with radiation burns.

--Still photo of Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer conferring with
Albert Einstein.

--Footage with sound of Civil Defense siren going off on a
building.

--Footage of school duck & cover drill in the 1950s.

--Still photos of typical U.S. air raid shelters of the
1050s.

--Footage of Nevada nuclear test with soldiers climbing
from their trenches after the blast and advancing on foot
with their rifles toward the mushroom cloud.

--Footage of U.S. Biki Atoll nuclear test with ships.

--Footage of U.S. underground hydrogen bomb test, with test
objects shaking on the surface.

--Color photo of Russian “Tsar Bomba” hydrogen bomb test,
largest test blast ever at 50 megatons.

--News Commentator: “Today, at Homestead Air Force Base, in
Florida, a B-47 bomber crashed during take-off. One
nuclear bomb burned in the resulting fire.”

--News Commentator: “A U.S. Navy Skyhawk aircraft with one
B43 nuclear bomb on board fell off the aircraft carrier
                                                            100

Ticonderoga today. The pilot, plane and bomb have not been
recovered in 16,000 feet of water.”

--Still photo of the collapsed and burning reactor at the
Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

--Still photo of Nikita Khrushchev squaring off with
Richard Nixon in the Kitchen Debate, July 24, 1959.

--Newspaper headline: Scientists Express Growing Fear that
Strontium 90 from Nuclear Tests May Harm Children’s Growth.

--Newspaper headline: August 5, 1963, Nuclear Test Ban
Treaty Signed in Moscow.

--Still photo of John Lennon with the caption “Give Peace a
Chance.”

--Still photos from the 1967 March on the Pentagon.

--Slide show of various versions of the universal peace
symbol.

FADE TO BLACK:

CLOSING CREDITS

				
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