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					    Staten Island West Shore
Land Use and Transportation Study


  Existing Conditions Report
  Land Use & Transportation


             Prepared for


            New York City
            Economic Development
            Corporation


            New York City
            Department of
            City Planning




            Submitted by




            Consultant Team

      PPSA ▪ ERA ▪ SMWM
 HALCROW ▪ ASGEC ▪ ZETLIN ▪ HPI

          October 2008
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report




II
WEST SHORE STRATEGIC VISION
EXISTING CONDITIONS REPORT FOR LAND USE AND TRANSPORATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.         EXECUTIVE SUMMARY                                                                          1
2.         LAND USE EXITING CONDITIONS                                                                3
2.A.       Land Uses in the West Shore Study Area                                                     3
2.A.1.     Description of the Study Area                                                              3
2.A.2.     Overview of Historic Uses in Study Area                                                    8
2.A.3.     Overview of Area Wide Land Uses                                                           10
2.A.4.     Summary of Area Wide Zoning                                                               14
2.A.4.a.          Manufacturing Districts                                                            14
2.A.4.b.          Residential Districts                                                              14
2.A.4.c.          Commercial Districts                                                               17
2.A.4.d.          South Richmond Special District                                                    17
2.A.4.e.          Rezonings                                                                          17
2.A.5.     Summary of Shoreline Conditions                                                           18
2.A.6.     Summary of Area Wide Open Space                                                           24


2.B.       Zone I: Howland Hook, Port Ivory, Arlington Existing Land Use/ Constraints and            26
                   Opportunities
2.B.1.     Existing Land Use Analysis                                                                26
2.B.2.     Vacant Land Analysis                                                                      30
2.B.3.     Newly Developed Properties & Rezonings                                                    32
2.B.4.     Property Ownership Analysis                                                               34
2.B.5.     Underutilized Sites Analysis                                                              36
2.B.6.     Environmental Constraints                                                                 38
2.B.7.     Areas for Discussion                                                                      40

2.C.	 	    Zone	II:	Blooomfield/Teleport	Existing	Land	Use/	Constraints	and	Opportunities	 											42
2.C.1.     Existing Land Use Analysis                                                                 42
2.C.2.     Vacant Land Analysis                                                                       46
2.C.3.     Newly Developed Properties & Rezonings                                                     48
2.C.4.     Property Ownership Analysis                                                                50
2.C.5.     Underutilized Sites Analysis                                                               52
2.C.6.     Environmental Constraints                                                                  54
2.C.7.     Areas for Discussion                                                                       56

2.D.       Zone III: Travis/ Fresh Kills Park, Land Use/ Constraints and Opportunities               58
2.D.1.     Existing Land Use Analysis                                                                58
2.D.2.     Vacant Land Analysis                                                                      62
2.D.3.     Newly Developed Properties & Rezonings                                                    64
2.D.4.     Property Ownership Analysis                                                               66
2.D.5.     Underutilized Sites Analysis                                                              68
2.D.6.     Environmental Constraints                                                                 70
2.D.7.     Areas for Discussion                                                                      72




                                                                                                      III
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.E.        Zone IV: Charleston/ Tottenville Land Use/ Constraints and Opportunities               74
2.E.1.      Existing Land Use Analysis                                                             74
2.E.2.      Vacant Land Analysis                                                                   78
2.E.3.      Newly Developed Properties & Rezonings                                                 80
2.E.4.      Property Ownership Analysis                                                            82
2.E.5.      Underutilized Sites Analysis                                                           84
2.E.6.      Environmental Constraints                                                              86
2.E.7.      Areas for Discussion                                                                   88


3.          TRANSPORTATION EXISTING CONDITIONS

3.A.        Study Area Travel Patterns                                                             90
3.A.1.      Auto Ownership                                                                         90
3.A.2.      Journey-to-Work Commuter Patterns                                                      90

3.B.        Study Area Roadway Network                                                               92
3.B.1.      Key Vehicular Corridors                                                                  94
3.B.1.a.            Staten Island Expressway (I-278)                                                 94
3.B.1.b.            West Shore Expressway (NY 440)                                                   94
3.B.1.c.            Korean War Veterans Parkway                                                      94
3.B.1.d.            Arthur Kill Road                                                                 96
3.B.1.e.            Victory Boulevard                                                                96
3.B.1.f.            Richmond Avenue                                                                  97
3.B.1.g.            Travis Avenue                                                                    97
3.B.1.h.            South Avenue                                                                     97
3.B.1.i.            Forest Avenue                                                                    97
3.B.1.j.            Truck Routes                                                                     98
3.B.2.	 	   Roadway	Traffic	Congestion	 	         	      	 	          	      	         	   									100
3.B.3.	 	   Roadway	Traffic	Safety	       	       	      	 	          	      	         	   									104
3.B.4.      Transit Services                                                                        106
3.B.4.a.            Local/Limited Bus Service                                                       106
3.B.4.b.            Express Bus Service                                                             106
3.B.4.c.            Staten Island Rapid Transit Line                                                108
3.B.4.d.            Ferry                                                                           108
3.B.4.e.            Planned Transit Projects and Trend                                              108
3.B.4.f.            Park-and-Ride Lots                                                              108
3.B.5.      Pedestrian and Bicycle                                                                  110
3.B.6.      Planned and Programmed Transportation Improvements                                      112
3.B.6.a.            Public Transit                                                                  112
3.B.6.b.	   	       Roadway	Safety	and	Traffic	Mobility	 	 	          	      	         	   									112




IV
V
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report



Index of Maps

Map 1       Project Area and Regional Context                                                                                               3
Map 2      Study Area Zones                                                                                                                 4
Map 3       Study Area Aerial                                                                                                               5
Map 4       Development Chronology                                                                                                          9
Map 5      Area Wide Land Use                                                                                                              13
Map 6      Area Wide Zoning                                                                                                                15
Map 7      Shoreline Condition Observation Points                                                                                          19
Map 8      Open Space / Wetland and Natural Resources                                                                                      25
Map 9      Aerial Map Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                                                                            27
Map 10     Land Use Map, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                                                                         29
Map 11     Vacant Land Analysis, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                                                                 31
Map 12     Proposed Projects, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                                                                    33
Map 13     Ownership Analysis, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                                                                   35
Map 14     Underutilized Land Analysis, Arlington- Port Ivory Zone                                                                         37
Map 15     Environmental Constraints, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                                                            39
Map 16     Areas of Opportunity, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                                                                 41
Map	17		   Aerial	Map,	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone																																																																																						43
Map	18		   Land	Use	Map,	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	               																																																																									45
Map	19		   Vacant	Land	Analysis,	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	                   																																																													47
Map	20		   Proposed	Projects,	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone																																																																										49
Map	21		   Ownership	Analysis,	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	                     																																																													51
Map	22		   Underutilized	Land	Analysis,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone	                        																																																	53
Map	23		   Environmental	Constraints,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone	                          																																																55
Map	24		   Areas	of	Opportunity,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone	                  																																																		            57
Map 25     Aerial Map, Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                                                                                             59
Map 26     Land use Map, Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                                                                                           61
Map 27     Vacant Land Analysis, Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                                                                                   63
Map 28     Proposed Projects, Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                                                                                      65
Map 29     Ownership Analysis, Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                                                                                     67
Map 30     Underutilized Land Analysis, Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                                                                            69
Map 31     Environmental Constraints, Travis-Fresh Kills Area                                                                              71
Map 32     Areas of Opportunity, Travis – Fresh Kills Zone                                                                                 73
Map 33     Aerial Map, Charleston-Tottenville Zone                                                                                         75
Map 34     Land Use Map, Charleston-Tottenville Zone                                                                                       77
Map 35     Vacant Land Analysis, Charleston-Tottenville Zone                                                                               79
Map 36     Proposed Projects, Charleston-Tottenville Zone                                                                                  81
Map 37     Ownership Analysis, Charleston-Tottenville Zone                                                                                 83
Map 38     Underutilized Land Analysis, Charleston-Tottenville Zone                                                                        87
Map 39     Environmental Constraints, Charleston – Tottenville Zone                                                                        89
Map 40     Areas of Opportunity, Charleston – Tottenville Zone                                                                             91
Map	41		   Functional	Classification	of	Roadways	                																																																																									93
Map	42		                                  	
           Average	Daily	Traffic	Volumes	 																																																																																																97
Map 43     Freight Transportation                                                                                                          99
Map 44     Congested Intersections, 2004 and 2014                                                                                        101
Map 45     Congested Corridors,2005 and 2030, AM and PM 4Hr Peak Periods                                                                 103
Map 46     High Accident Locations                                                                                                       105
Map 47     Transit Access                                                                                                                107
Map 48     Bike Network                                                                                                                   111



VI
Map 49        Transportation, Projects – Planned and Underway                                 113
Map 50        Transportation, Existing Conditions and Issues                                  114

Index of Figures

Figure 1      Analysis of Area Wide Land use                                                  12
Figure 2      Study Area Zoning Analysis                                                      16
Figure 3      Land Use Analysis, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                    29
Figure 4      Vacant Land Analysis ( by parcels), Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                   31
Figure 5      Vacant Land Analysis (by area) Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                        31
Figure 6      Property Ownership Analysis (by parcels), Arlington-Port Ivory Zone             35
Figure 7      Property Ownership Analysis (By area), Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                35
Figure 8      Underutilized Land Analysis (by parcels), Arlington-Port Ivory Zone             37
Figure 9      Underutilized Land Analysis (by area) Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                 37
Figure	10	    Land	Use	Analysis,	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone		         	       	     	   	   	   45
Figure	11		   Vacant	Land	Analysis	(	by	parcels),	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	       	   	   	   47
Figure	12	    Vacant	Land	Analysis	(by	area)	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	 	          	   	   	   47
Figure	13	    Property	Ownership	Analysis	(by	parcels),	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone		    	   	   51
Figure	14	    Property	Ownership	Analysis	(By	area),	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	 	      	   	   51
Figure	15	    Underutilized	Land	Analysis	(by	parcels),	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	 	   	   	   53
Figure	16	    Underutilized	Land	Analysis	(by	area)	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	     	   	   	   53
Figure 17     Land Use Analysis, Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                                      61
Figure 18     Vacant Land Analysis ( by parcels), Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                     63
Figure 19     Vacant Land Analysis (by area) Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                          63
Figure 20     Property Ownership Analysis (by parcels), Travis-Fresh Kills Zone               67
Figure 21     Property Ownership Analysis (By area), Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                  67
Figure 22     Underutilized Land Analysis (by parcels), Travis-Fresh Kills Zone               69
Figure 23     Underutilized Land Analysis (by area) Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                   69
Figure 24     Land Use Analysis, Charleston-Tottenville Zone                                  77
Figure 25     Vacant Land Analysis ( by parcels), Charleston-Tottenville Zone                 79
Figure 26     Vacant Land Analysis (by area) Charleston-Tottenville Zone                      79
Figure 27     Property Ownership Analysis (by parcels), Charleston-Tottenville Zone           83
Figure 28     Property Ownership Analysis (By area), Charleston-Tottenville Zone              83
Figure 29     Underutilized Land Analysis (by parcels), Charleston-Tottenville Zone           85
Figure 30     Underutilized Land Analysis (by area) Charleston-Tottenville Zone               85
Figure 31     Vehicle Ownership by Zones                                                      90
Figure 32     Place of Work by Residents, by Zones                                            91
Figure 33     Place of Residence for Workers, by Zones                                        91
Figure 34     Comparative Journey to Work Data for New York City Boroughs                     91
Figure 35     Mode of Travel to Work for Residents, by Zones                                  92
Figure 36     Comparison of Commute Times from Different Zones                                92




                                                                                              VII
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


Index of Tables

Table 1     Zoning Districts by Study Zone                                                                16
Table 2     Details of Zoning Districts                                                                   16
Table 3     Proposed Developments, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                              33
Table 4     Vacant Land Analysis, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                               30
Table 5     Underutilized Land Analysis-Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                         36
Table 6     Breakdown of Underutilized Parcels by Zoning Districts, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone             36
Table 7     Potential Development Sites, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone                                        41
Table	8		   Vacant	Land	Analysis,	Bloomfield	–	Teleport	Zone	 	         	       	       	      	          46
Table	9		   Proposed	Developments,	Bloomfield	–	Teleport	Zone	   	      	       	       	      	          49
Table	10	   Underutilized	Land	Analysis-Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	       	       	       	      	          52
Table	11	   Breakdown	of		Underutilized	Parcels	by	Zoning	Districts,	Bloomfield	–	Teleport	Zone											52
Table	12	   Potential	Development	Sites,	Bloomfield	–	Teleport	Zone	    	       	       	      	          57
Table 13    Vacant Land Analysis, Travis – Fresh Kills Zone                                               62
Table 14    Proposed Developments, Travis – Fresh Kills Zone                                              65
Table 15    Underutilized Land Analysis-Travis- Fresh Kills Zone                                          68
Table 16    Breakdown of Underutilized Parcels by Zoning Districts, Travis – Fresh Kills Zone             68
Table 17    Potential Development Sites, Travis-Fresh Kills Zone                                          73
Table 18    Vacant Land Analysis, Charleston – Tottenville Zone                                           80
Table 19    Proposed Developments, Charleston – Tottenville Zone                                          81
Table 20    Underutilized Land Analysis-Charleston-Tottenville Zone                                       84
Table 21    Breakdown of Underutilized Parcels by Zoning Districts, Charleston- Tottenville Zone          84
Table 22    Potential Development Sites, Charleston – Tottenville Zone                                    89
Table 23    Designated Truck Routes Within West Shore Study Area                                          98
Table 24    High Accident Intersections, By Total Accidents                                             104
Table 25    Bus Ridership Data                                                                          106




VIII
1: SUMMARY                                                      future scenarios for the West Shore, based
                                                                on an assessment of baseline conditions and
The West Shore Staten Island Land Use and                       market studies and extensive public outreach
Transportation Study, referred to as the “West Shore            efforts, including discussions with involved
Strategic Vision,” was initiated by its co-sponsors, the        agencies and numerous meetings with Study
New York City Economic Development Corporation                  Area stakeholders.
(NYCEDC) and the New York City Department                  •	   Recommended Scenario & Implementation
of City Planning (NYCDCP). The purpose of this                  Plan – development of a recommended vision
effort is to develop a planning framework for                   for the West Shore, based on a consensus
future land use and infrastructure improvements                 building process that integrates the concerns
along Staten Island’s West Shore. The study will                and aspirations of the community of residents,
seek to build a consensus among stakeholders,                   businesses, and employers with the various
including community members, business owners                    agencies who plan and provide services for the
and transportation agencies, incorporating market               region. This planning framework will identify
based research and variety of technical planning and            implementation strategies to achieve the
engineering studies to assess alternative land use              recommended future for the area and priorities
and infrastructure scenarios. Including extensive               for future actions to get there.
opportunities for public input and discussion, these
efforst will provide:                                      This Land Use and Transportation Existing
                                                           Conditions Report, presents the results of an
•	   A frame work for intergovernmental coordination       assessment of existing land use and transportation
     and teamwork;                                         conditions within the West Shore. To better address
•	   A vision that has the support of a broad spectrum     the various planning studies throughout this process,
     of the community;                                     the overall Study Area was divided into the following
•	   A process for integrating and phasing future land     four study zones:
     uses with needed infrastructure; and
•	   Recommendations that connect West Shore jobs          •	 Zone I: Arlington - Port Ivory
     and neighborhoods to the rest of the borough          •	 Zone	II:	Bloomfield	-	Teleport
     and provide solutions for borough-wide issues.        •	 Zone III: Travis – Fresh Kills
                                                           •	 Zone IV: Charleston - Tottenville
The West Shore Strategic Vision involves four major        •	
components                                                 This	 report	 briefly	 reviews	 the	 history	 of	 the	 West	
                                                           Shore, from its extensive pre-historic resources to
•	   Existing Conditions Assessments -- detailed           the major industrial activities throughout the 19th
     assessments of existing land use, transportation      and	20th	Centuries	and	the	five	decades	of	Fresh	
     and infrastructure conditions within the West         Kills	 landfill	 operations.	 Reviews	 of	 land	 use	 and	
     Shore, as well as a comprehensive market              zoning patterns show that:
     analysis of recent, ongoing and projected land
     use and economic development trends in the            •	   while over 84% of the area is zoned for
     area.                                                      manufacturing,	 strongly	 reflecting	 its	 industrial	
•	   Baseline Conditions Assessment – a                         past, industrial uses currently occupy only 20%
     projection of likely future conditions in the              of the area’s land area; and
     near future (approximately 10 years) in the           •	   approximately 15% of the Study Area is zoned
     absence of any new proposed changes in land                residential, but almost 90% of the area’s
     use regulations, infrastructure, transportation            residentially zoned land is in the Travis area of
     networks, etc., beyond those already proposed              Zone II.
     for the area and under existing socio-economic
     trends.                                               Key land uses include (1) old-growth communities
•	   Alternative Land Use Scenarios – alternative          like Travis, Charleston and Tottenville; (2) the



                                                                                                                    1
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


important Howland Hook Terminal; (3) large-scale               much	of	the	traffic	onto	a	limited	number	of	north-
retail areas in Charleston, along Forest Avenue in             south of arterials. Any further developments in the
Arlington and on Richmond Avenue; and (4) major                West Shore will place demands on the existing
open space and nature preserves, which soon will               transportation network, and one of the main goals
include the proposed 2,000-acre Fresh Kills Park to            of this study is to balance future development with
be developed over the next 30 years.                           the infrastructure needed to support it.

The Study Team screened development patterns
and land use characteristics throughout the Study
Area	 to	 define	 the	 location	 and	 amount	 of	 viable	
vacant or underutilized land which could potentially
be redeveloped as part of the long-term vision for
the West Shore. This included assessments of
each parcel’s size, existing development density,
ownership patterns (public vs. private), and
wetlands or other conditions that would limit its
development potential, along with any recently
proposed or planned developments in each of the
four	 study	 zones.	 This	 process	 identified	 “Areas	
for Discussion” – i.e., sites with fewer barriers to
development and where land use changes were
more likely to occur.

These results will help shape discussion in the
Study’s upcoming Vision Workshops to be held in
each of the four zones. In those workshops, the
Study Team, local residents, businesses, interest
groups, and representatives of involved agencies
and	 elected	 officials	 will	 work	 together	 to	 identify	
alternative futures for these areas. The results of the
parallel Market Analysis report recently completed
by the Study Team will provide important information
on recent development trends in the New York City
region and on Staten Island.

The	final	section	of	this	Existing	Conditions	report	
reviews the existing transportation network within
the Study Area, including roads and arterials, major
highways and bridge connections, rail passenger
and freight operations and bus transit services.
In many ways the West Shore’s transportation
network strongly links the area to the rest of the
region by the major limited-access highways and
associated bridge connections to New Jersey,
along with extensive local and express bus routes
and the MTA Staten Island Railway. However, the
Fresh	Kills	landfill	and	the	large	areas	of	wetlands	
and other natural and park areas have limited
east-west roadway connections and concentrated



2
2:LAND USE EXISTING CONDITIONS                           and rail lines to the region’s major rail and water-
                                                         borne hubs in New Jersey.
2.A.1: West Shore of Staten Island in its Region-
al Context                                               2.A.2: Description of the Study Area

Map 1 shows the regional context of the Staten Is-       The West Shore Study Area (“the Study Area”) is
land	West	Shore	Study	Area.	As	the	figure	highlights,	   approximately 11 square miles (approximately
Staten Island, but particularly the West Shore area,     7,000	 acres)	 and	 is	 slightly	 less	 than	 one-fifth	 of	
is very well served by intra-borough and regional        Staten Island’s total land area. For comparison, the
highways, with three bridge connections to New           total Study Area is about half the size of Manhattan.
Jersey (Outerbridge Crossing and the Goethals and        This	 initiative	 presents	 one	 of	 the	 most	 significant	
Bayonne Bridges) and a fourth connecting Staten          planning efforts in New York City - an opportunity
Island to the rest of New York City (the Verrazano-      to create a strategy for one of the last remaining
Narrows Bridge to Brooklyn). Newark Liberty In-          working industrial waterfronts in the City. The Study
ternational Airport, one of the region’s three major     Area extends from Howland Hook Marine Terminal
airports, is located in nearby New Jersey, while the     to the north to Tottenville in the south, with the Ar-
Howland Hook Containerport is the largest such fa-       thur Kill forming its western boundary and segments
cility in the City and directly connected by highway     of South and Richmond Avenues, Arthur Kill Road




Map 1-Project Area and Regional Context




                                                                                                                  3
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report




    Map 2-Study Area Zones




4
Map 3 -Study Area Aerial




                           5
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


and the West Shore Expressway forming its east-
ern edge. With approximately 12 miles of shoreline,
the Study Area is characterized by a wide variety of
uses,	with	significant	changes	in	land	use,	form	and	
density over the past 30-40 years.

The Study Area is strategically organized into four
Zones; these zones are based on geography and
predominant uses—Zones I through IV from north
to south. (See Map 2)

Zone I (Arlington - Port Ivory) is dominated by the
presence of the Howland Hook Marine Terminal,
which is operated by the Port Authority of New York
and New Jersey (PANYNJ) and provides bulk and
container storage, transfer and logistical services.
The Goethals Bridge and its toll plaza and access
roads and ramps form another major physical pres-
ence. Its central and northern areas have many
wetlands and marshes, most of which are located
within designated park areas.

Zone	II	(Bloomfield	-	Teleport) includes a substan-
tial	amount	of	office	space,	primarily	in	two	facilities-	   Existing Manufacturing in West Shore
the Staten Island Corporate Park and the Teleport.
The western section of Zone II (west of the West
Shore Expressway) is comprised of large tracts,
many vacant, dominated by the former GATX site.

Zone III (Travis – Fresh Kills)	will	be	defined	signif-
icantly in the future by the Fresh Kills Park. The his-
toric Travis residential community, the largest within
the Study Area, is also located within Zone III, along
with some major industrial uses at the western end
of Victory Boulevard.
                                                             Residential Neighborhood in Travis
Zone IV (Charleston - Tottenville ) has a number
of large industrial and institutional uses, including
Port Mobil, a New York State Department of Cor-
rectional Services prison, as well as the residential
areas of Tottenville and Charleston. The eastern
section of this zone is dominated by the Clay Pit
Ponds State Park and further south by the recently
developed at Bricktown I.

Due to its industrial history, the infrastructure nec-
essary to support residential and commercial uses
was often never planned or built. However, several
pockets of historically residential communities like         Home Depot on Forest Avenue




6
Travis and Tottenville have held their own in recent
years while residential areas in the equally historic
Charleston/Kreisherville community have faced
strong competition from expanding industrial and
warehouse uses. The presence of large vacant lots
and good highway access has also fostered the in-
flux	of	distinct	commercial	uses,	such	as	“Big	Box”	
retail, including two Home Depots (there are three
in Staten Island), and retail complexes with tenants
such as Target and Costco establishing themselves
and expanding.

Overall,	the	Study	Area	is	defined	by	three	distinct	
features:
                                                        Aerial View of Waterfront along Study Area
•	   The Arthur Kill Shoreline and extensive interior
     streams, marshes and wetlands,
•	   The area’s major highway infrastructure, includ-
     ing the West Shore Expressway, Richmond (Ko-
     rean War Veterans) Parkway, the Staten Island
     Expressway and the Goethals Bridge and Out-
     erbridge Crossing, and
•	   The planned Fresh Kills Park.

The West Shore Expressway, in particular, clearly
separates the Study Area from the rest of Staten
Island. The Study Area is bordered by primarily resi-
dential neighborhoods to the east and south. The
proposed Fresh Kills Park, and the interconnecting
network of parks, wetlands and natural areas, will
serve as a unifying feature linking the Study Area
from north to south.
                                                        View of West Shore Expressway, Separating Study Area from Resi-
                                                        dential Neighborhoods to the east.




                                                        Aerial View of the Fresh Kills area in the foreground.




                                                                                                                          7
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.A3: Historic Presence of Industrial Uses in the               port operation at the Howland Hook Marine Termi-
Study Area                                                      nal, the accompanying improvements to Arlington
                                                                Yards and the Travis Branch, and the reconstruction
The	 first	 rail	 line	 in	 Staten	 Island,	 connecting	 Tot-   of the Arthur Kill Railroad lift bridge that connects
tenville in the southern end of the Study Area and              these rail operations to New Jersey. NYCEDC, PA-
Clifton, NJ, was built in 1860 as manufacturing as-             NYNJ and other agencies are making efforts on a
serted its pivotal role in Staten Island’s economy.             number of fronts to build on these infrastructure in-
Linoleum, masonry and Ivory Soap, to name a few,                vestments and the availability of vacant land to cre-
were all produced and transported from the West                 ate expanded opportunities for new and expanded
Shore along the Arthur Kill and via rail and highway.           industrial activity within the Study Area.
Manufacturing declined during the Great Depres-
sion, but then thrived through World War II. While              .
the	following	decades	reflected	the	general	decline	
of manufacturing in the region, much of the West
Shore is still dominated by productive industrial ar-
eas.

Decline of Industry

By 1948, many of the industrial operations in the
Study Area had begun to decline, and the core area
of the Study Area was designated for use as the
Fresh	 Kills	 Landfill,	 which	 evolved	 into	 the	 largest	
waste disposal facility in the world. The need for
bulk oil facilities also led to the creation of large oil
tank farms along both sides of the Arthur Kill, in-
cluding Port Mobil (now Kinder Morgan) in Zone III,
which is still in use. By 1960, Proctor and Gamble’s
Port Ivory, the Howland Hook Marine Terminal and
several large petroleum storage operations were
the only remaining large industrial operations in the
Study Area. Limited road and pier access and overall
national patterns (manufacturing shifting out of the
Northeast) and international trends (manufacturing
moving abroad to lower-cost locations) contributed              Kreischer Mansion
to the decline of the industrial use after World War II
and especially over the past three decades. Finally,
in 1991 Proctor and Gamble left its Port Ivory site.

Since the decline of manufacturing and industry in
New York City in the second half of the twentieth
century, many efforts have been made to revitalize
and reuse these large tracts of land, many of which
are vacant, and in many ways represent the last
frontiers of large tracts of developable land in New
York City. (These vacant land areas are discussed
in greater detail in the review of conditions within
each of the Study Area’s four zones.) One of the
primary efforts is the rejuvenation and expansion of            New Multi-Family Construction




8
Map 4 -Built Year Map




                        9
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.A.4: Overview of Area Wide Land Uses                     •	   The development of big-box retail operations
                                                                expands	shopping	opportunities	and	a	significant	
While much of the Study Area is characterized by                number	of	jobs,	but	their	large	traffic	needs	can	
land in manufacturing zones that presently lies                 pose local problems; and
vacant, there is a substantial amount of major             •	   Residential and commercial/industrial uses are
developments. Some major landmarks and points                   often directly adjacent to each other, creating
of interest in the Study Area are:                              conflicts	and	future	decisions	about	which	uses	
                                                                will end up dominating in those areas.
•	   The Goethals Gardens mobile home park, the
     Goethals Bridge and the Howland Hook Marine           Opportunities:
     Terminal in Zone I;
•	   The	Teleport	Office	Park	and	the	vacant	former	       •	   The expansion of operations like the Howland
     GATX site in Zone II;                                      Hook terminal, riding the continued and
•	   The Travis community and the former Fresh                  projected	 surge	 in	 containerized	 freight	 traffic,	
     Kills	Landfill	in	Zone	III;	and                            would	 provide	 significant	 numbers	 of	 high-
•	   Port Mobil/Kinder Morgan, Kreischerville, and              paying	jobs,	with	secondary	economic	benefits	
     Clay Pit Pond Park in Zone IV.                             to the surrounding communities;
                                                           •	   The evolution of Fresh Kills Park will provide
                                                                substantial opportunities for other spin-off
Historically single family detached housing has                 development and will enhance the value of
dominated the limited residential areas in the West             surrounding residential and commercial areas;
Shore. Over the past two decades, however, higher          •	   The historic charm of areas like Travis can
density two-family, attached or semi-detached                   be built upon to create mixed-use residential
housing has been common in the residential centers              and ancillary retail or other uses that enhance
of Travis, Charleston, and Tottenville. In general, non-        the character of those areas while providing
conforming uses in the Study Area consist of older              expanding community assets.
homes that pre-date the 1961 Zoning Resolution,            •	   The 12-mile waterfront includes many areas for
which created most of the zoning districts in the               community access to the waterfront and possible
area. There are isolated areas with housing within              development of various water-dependent uses
M3, M2, and M1 districts.                                       (e.g., marinas, expanding maritime operations).

Figure 1 shows the existing distribution of land uses
within the Study Area. Residential uses occupy
approximately 39% of Staten Island but only 3% of
the Study Area, which is dominated by Open Space
(40%) and vacant land (34%) as its two largest land
uses.	These	specific	land	uses	are	concentrated	in	
certain areas in the West Shore, creating interesting
development patterns. The preponderance of these
land uses poses some challenges as well as some
opportunities for the Study Area; the following are a
few examples:

Challenges:
•	 Certain large and important uses – large
   petroleum tank farms, the Howland Hook
   Terminal, the State prison – provide good
   employment but tend to limit what can be
   developed in their immediate area;



10
Land Uses in Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




Land	Uses	in	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone




Land Uses in Travis Freshkills Zone




Land Uses in Charleston-Tottenville Zone




                                           11
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


SUMMARY OF AREA WIDE LAND USE
                                                       Summary of Findings:
Analysis of the Study Area (total area of approxi-
mately 6,322 acres) reveals a dominance of two
kinds of land-uses: Open Space at approximately
2,460 acres (inclusive of the proposed Fresh Kills         •	 2,460 Acres (approximately 40%)
Park) accounts for approximately 40% of the total             of the Study Area is Open Space
area and vacant land totaling 2,140 acres accounts            (Inclusive of the proposed Fresh
for about 34%. These two major categories are fol-            Kills Park)
lowed by transportation/utility related land uses at       •	 2,140 Acres (approximately 34%)
approximately 9% of the area and industrial land-             of the Study Area is Vacant Land.
uses at approximately 7%. Commercial land-us-              •	 17% of the land has transportation/
es account for approximately 4% of the area and               utility related and industrial uses.
residential (combination of one and two-family and
                                                           •	 Residential uses account for only
multi-family ) account for 3% of the total.
                                                              3% of the land use
The dispersion of land uses throughout the Study
Area is not uniform in nature, with most of the open
space concentrated in Zone III, vacant land in Zone
II, transportation and utility related land uses in
Zone I, industrial uses in Zone IV and the bulk of
the residential uses are in Zones III and IV.




     Figure 1- Analysis of Area Wide Land Use




12
Map 5 -Area Wide Land Use




                            13
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.A.5: Zoning                                                Area fall within the boundaries of the planned Fresh
                                                             Kills Park and in other parks and natural areas (e.g.,
As shown in Map 6, the bulk of the Study Area,               the Davis Nature Preserve), excluding those areas
particularly in Zones I and II in the north, is zoned        as future manufacturing sites.
manufacturing. The remaining zoning is generally
residential, with a couple of small heavy commercial         In M2-1 districts (8% of zoned land), a maximum
zones between Howland Hook and Arlington. Anal-              FAR of 2.0 is permitted and a 20-foot rear yard is
ysis of the zoning districts show the overwhelming           required. Further, the sky exposure plane, which
majority of the land within the Study Area is in man-        starts at 60 feet above street level, may not be pen-
ufacturing districts (84.1%). Residential districts          etrated without NY City Planning Commission au-
account for approximately 15.1% and commercial               thorization. M2-1 districts are common along the
zones	 a	 mere	 0.78%.	 (A	 significant	 portion	 of	 the	   City’s older industrial waterfront areas in Brooklyn
Study Area’s residential zoning area falls within the        and Staten Island. The same sky exposure plane
boundaries of the planned Fresh Kills Park. The              limitation exists in M3-1 districts (accounting for
eventual mapping of this park will preclude that             36% of the zoned area), as does the 2.0 FAR limit,
area from future residential development.) Detailed          but there are provisions for smoke stacks and other
analysis reveals that M1-1, M3-1 and R3-2 are the            performance structures. Generally, M3-1 districts
top three zoning districts in terms of the area. Figure      house power plants, solid waste transfer facilities,
2 and Table 1 provide the distribution of zoning dis-        and fuel supply depots. These districts are com-
tricts throughout the Study Area’s four zones.               mon along the Arthur Kill in the Study Area in Zones
                                                             II, III, and IV.
2.A.5.a: Manufacturing Districts
                                                             In total, there are 4,859 acres zoned manufactur-
Manufacturing zoning districts encompass a wide              ing in the Study Area, or approximately 85% of the
range of industrial and manufacturing activities             5,717 acres of manufacturing district area on the
that serve a vital role in New York City’s economy.          entire island. Of that, excluding Fresh Kills, 2,612
Mills, catering suppliers, warehouses and distribu-          acres are vacant.
tion centers, ferry and ship terminals, and municipal
facilities, such as sewage treatment centers are all         2.A.5.b: Residential Districts
generally found in Manufacturing Zones. The three
subcategories, M1, M2, and M3 denote differences             Island-wide, residential districts account for 75 per-
in performance standards, with M1 being the most             cent of the land area. However, within the Study
stringently regulated and M3 permitting the most             Area - residential accounts for approximately 18%
potentially noxious uses. Special permitting allows          of the total zoned land. The zones found in the
certain retail uses, hotels and motels in M1 districts,      Study Area -- R1-2, R3-2, R-3A and R3X -- are all
but not in M2 or M3. Some community facility uses            lower density districts with different bulk and density
may also be found in M1 districts, but not M2 and            limitations as well as parking regulations. Zone I has
M3.                                                          no residential districts but borders on R3-2 and R5
                                                             districts within the adjacent Arlington neighborhood.
Within M1, M2 and M3 zoning districts, there are             Zone II similarly has no residential zoning but the
sub-categories that restrict building size and lot           adjacent Bulls Head neighborhood includes R3-1,
coverage. M1-1 districts, which account for ap-              R3-2 and R3X districts. Zone III has R3-2 and R3A
proximately 40% of the Study Area’s zoned land               zoning, and Zone 4 has R3X, R3-2, R3A, and R1-2.
and	exist	in	all	four	Zones,	permit	a	maximum	floor	         The following is a brief descriptions of the controls
area ratio (FAR) of 1.0, a minimum 20-foot rear yard         in these residential districts:
and a building envelope that does not penetrate
the sky exposure plane — which begins at 30 feet.            •	   R1-2 is a single family residence district with re-
As noted above for the area’s residential zoning, a               quirements for 20 foot minimum yards, 60 foot
substantial portion of the M1-1 districts in the Study            minimum lot width and a sky exposure plane



14
Map 6 -Area Wide Zoning




                          15
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report




Figure 2- Study Area Zoning Analysis




Table 1- Zoning Districts by Study Zones




      Table 2- Details of Zoning Districts




16
     that begins at 25 feet. There is a maximum FAR
                                                           these regulations were enacted, all of Staten Island
     of 0.5 and 1 parking space per dwelling unit.
                                                           was	designated	as	the	City’s	first	LDGMA.	The	goal	
•	   R3A districts feature modest single- and two-
                                                           of the regulations is to reduce the density of new
     family detached homes on lots narrower than
                                                           residential projects and enhance their site design
     other zoning districts. Here, the minimum re-
                                                           through changes in yard, open space, off-street
     quired is 25 feet, a 21 foot sky exposure plane
                                                           parking, private road design and other guidelines.
     height with a 35 foot maximum building height,
     1 parking space per dwelling unit, and 2 modest
                                                           2.A.5.c: Commercial Districts
     side yards totaling 8 feet. A maximum FAR of
     0.5 is permitted and a minimum front yard of 10
                                                           While commercial uses account for a relatively small
     feet is required.
                                                           (4%) of the Study Area land use, commercial zoning
•	   R3X districts are mapped generally in low den-
                                                           districts account for an even smaller 1% of the Study
     sity neighborhoods, like many of those found in
                                                           Area’s zoning. (Many commercial uses are, howev-
     Staten Island. Only one- and two-family homes
                                                           er, also allowed in manufacturing districts.) There
     are permitted on lots that are at least 35 feet
                                                           are small areas where commercial zoning has been
     wide. With the same FAR as the other districts
                                                           mapped within Zones II and IV. In Zone II, C4-3 zon-
     above, there is a 21 foot sky exposure plane
                                                           ing permits commercial FAR of 3.4 and residential
     height and the front yard must be at least 10 feet,
                                                           FAR of 0.78-2.43. The uses in a C4-3 district are
     or as deep as the neighboring yard. Two side
                                                           intended to serve a larger geographic area than just
     yards are required that total 10 feet in depth.
                                                           the surrounding community and include theaters
•	   R3-2 districts require one space per unit, a max-
                                                           and specialty department stores (the West Shore
     imum FAR of 0.5, but allow for higher density
                                                           Plaza is presently located in that area). In Zone IV,
     including two-family homes. In these districts,
                                                           a C3A district along Ellis Street permits waterfront
     houses may be attached and are required to
                                                           recreation	activities,	like	boating	and	fishing,	in	ar-
     only have one eight foot side yard, not two, as
                                                           eas generally near residential areas. C3A districts
     in R1-2. The lots may be narrower and have
                                                           also permit residential development that adheres to
     smaller yards. The sky exposure plane starts at
                                                           the R3A zoning district standards. There is also a
     21 feet.
                                                           C8-2 district (intended for heavy repair shops and
                                                           automotive uses) located along Arthur Kill Road in
In 2004 the City adopted Lower Density Growth
                                                           the Charleston section of Zone IV.
Management Text Amendments, which apply to
any new residential districts (primarily relevant to
                                                           2.A.4.d: Special South Richmond Development
R1 – R5 districts) within a designated “Lower Den-
                                                           District (Staten Island)
sity Growth Management Area” (LDGMA). When
                                                           The Special South Richmond Development Dis-
                                                           trict (SSRDD) was established in 1975 to guide
                                                           development of predominantly vacant land in the
                                                           southern half of Staten Island. The Special District
                                                           maintains the densities established by the under-
                                                           lying zones and ensures that new development is
                                                           compatible with existing communities. To maintain
                                                           the existing community character, the district man-
                                                           dates tree preservation, planting requirements,
                                                           controls on changes to the topography, height lim-
                                                           its, and setback and curb cut restrictions along rail-
                                                           roads and certain roads. It established Designated
                                                           Open Space (DOS) areas to protect natural and
                                                           open space areas within southwestern Staten Is-
                                                           land. By restricting construction within those areas,



                                                                                                               17
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


a network of such areas was effectively preserved.        vey of the waterfront areas, followed by an in-depth
To avoid penalizing the owners of such areas, they        boat survey to gather a complete picture of current
are permitted to transfer development rights from         conditions and to examine future utilization potential
the DOS to the balance of their property. Any pro-        of the Staten Island Waterfront. Details of these are
posed	development	on	significantly	vacant	parcels	        stated below.
within the SRRDD must also certify the availability
of public school seats within the District prior to the   Initial Upland Connectivity Survey
issuance of building permits.
                                                          An inland drive/walk-through survey of waterfront
2.A.5.e: Rezonings                                        access along the Study Area boundary was initially
                                                          undertaken by the Study Team in November 2007.
There have been three notable rezonings in the re-        This	effort	confirmed	that	this	segment	of	the	Stat-
cent past that have affected the Study Area. The          en Island waterfront has few connections to inland
goal of each of these rezonings was to preserve the       areas, and very limited transit options to these ar-
older, low density quality of the existing residential    eas from nearby communities or from other parts
areas.                                                    of Staten Island. As discussed further in Section
                                                          3 (Transportation Existing Conditions), the major
In 2003, several private rezoning applications sub-       roads in the vicinity of the waterfront -- Arthur Kill
mitted by the Borough President were approved.            Road (in the southern half of the Study Area) and
These included an approximately 181-block area in         the West Shore Expressway – have few local road-
the neighborhoods of Arlington, Port Richmond, and        ways providing any type of waterfront connection.
West Brighton in the northwestern section of Staten       Past and present industrial and waste management
Island. Previously, there were R4, R3-2, and R3-1         activities cut off large segments of the waterfront,
zoning districts that were rezoned to lower-density       and continue to limit their accessibility and use. In
districts of R3A and R3X, which were more consis-         many ways, public waterfront access has effectively
tent with existing development patterns.                  been limited to portions of Zone IV in the residential
                                                          and marina areas in Tottenville.
At the same time, the City adopted zoning changes,
also submitted by the Borough President, for por-         While there are some areas with attractive views of
tions of the communities of Travis, Bulls Head, New       the waterfront and the Bayonne, Outerbridge and
Springville, Heartland Village, and Willowbrook, in       Goethals Bridges, these vistas are often seen by
or near Zone III. In this rezoning, large R3-2 tracts     looking through fencing surrounding present or
were rezoned into three different zoning districts:       former	 industrial	 and	 landfill	 properties	 or	 through	
R3X, R3A or R3-1. In 2005, by resolution of the City      portions of heavily wooded or fenced-off land. Most
Planning Commission, another two R3A areas were           east-west roadways are limited to industrial uses that
similarly rezoned within the Study Area.                  end in dead-ends with no sense of a complete net-
                                                          work (e.g. Industrial Loop, Johnson Street, Chemi-
2.A.6: Sumamry of Shoreline Conditions                    cal Lane, Muldoon Avenue, Meredith and South Av-
                                                          enue, etc.). While the Island of Meadows presents
The Study Area includes approximately 12 miles            views of waste transfer barges and the New York
of shoreline along the Arthur Kill and the southern       City Department of Sanitation (DSNY) waste trans-
end of Newark Bay. Conditions along this shoreline        fer facility, there are also some serene views of the
range from well-preserved natural areas to active         Fresh Kills Park land.
marine/industrial and shipping activities, and much
of it is effectively cut off from the remainder of the    Historically the West Shore of Staten Island has
Island, with very few points for convenient public ac-    been dominated by industrial activity, including oil
cess.                                                     refining	and	construction,	with	many	areas	used	for	
                                                          the bulk storage of materials and heavy construc-
The Study Team completed an initial land-side sur-        tion equipment, such as cement mixers. The grad-



18
Map 7 - Shoreline Conditions Observation Points




                                                  19
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


ual evolution of land uses over the 19th and 20th
Centuries, with an often vibrant industrial sector
combined with scattered old-growth residential con-
centrations, has left portions of the Study Area with
a mix of uses that pose serious questions to City
planners regarding the long-term use of these wa-
terfront areas. Many of these uses are the type that
cities have often relegated to out-of-the-way water-
front sites – e.g., construction materials storage,
large parking lots for buses and service vehicles,
secondary warehouse operations, etc., with many
of these uses not dependent upon or utilizing in any
way their proximity to the waterfront. However, in
the Study Area these heavy commercial or indus-
trial uses are often located very close to small resi-      Area of Recent Dredging of Arthur Kill near New York Container Termi-
dential streets, schools and park areas, as well as         nal at Howland Hook
a number of historic cemeteries, with portions going
back to the 18th Century, located on or near the wa-
terfront in Zones IV. Overall, the 12-mile waterfront
has numerous areas where public access to the wa-
terfront could be established and waterfront-related
amenities (e.g., esplanades, boardwalks) could be
developed.

Boat-Based Survey

The boat-based survey of the waterfront, completed
in December 2007, made waterfront observations
along the full length of the Study Area’s shoreline
(see Map 7). “Observation Point” reference num-
bers in the following text refer to the numbered
points	 shown	 in	 this	 figure	 from	 which	 the	 shore-
line was observed. The northern end (Zone I) is
dominated by the Howland Hook Marine Terminal               Container Ship Off-Loading at Howland Hook Terminal
presently operated by New York Container Termi-
nals (NYCT) and located at the northwest corner of          •	   six quayside gantry cranes;
Staten Island next to the Goethals Bridge. Owned            •	   four new post-Panamax cranes (able to service
by New York City since its purchase from American                the	largest	ships	that	will	fit	through	the	locks	of	
Export Lines in 1973, for the past 23 years it has               the Panama Canal)
been leased from the City by the Port Authority of          •	   9 empty container handlers;
New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ). This terminal             •	   63 yard tractors;
primarily	handles	container	traffic	and	is	an	increas-      •	   24 paperless computerized truck gates;
ingly important part of the Port system of New York         •	   22 full container handlers;
and New Jersey.                                             •	   42 stevedoring chassis; and
                                                            •	   on-dock intermodal rail service to the Express
With a footprint of 187-acres, the terminal can ser-             Rail system.
vice three vessels on its three berths totaling over
3,000 feet (1,200 feet at a depth of 45 feet and 1,800      Other structures include a 20,000 sq. ft. deep freeze
feet at 43 feet). The terminal is equipped with:            warehouse, 66,000 sq ft refrigerated warehouse



20
(notably for banana storage), 28,785 sq ft equip-
ment maintenance and repair shop, a 39,000 sq ft
main	office	building,	and	a	412,000	sq	ft	container	
freight station.

Since 2004, NYCT has undergone approximately
$32 million in upgrades and renovations. Recent
developments include berth expansion, dredging,
development of an on-dock rail system, improved
security and gates, four Leibherr Cranes, and ex-         Waterfront Structure for Sale
panded warehouse capacity. The City of New York
has	placed	significant	emphasis	on	developing	the	
on-dock Express Rail system for better mobility and
reduced	truck	traffic.	Future	expansion	plans	have	
been proposed for the main terminal and the adja-
cent Port Ivory parcel.

As expected the shoreline conditions are main-
tained with proper berthing and retaining wall con-
struction. The needed dredging of the Arthur Kill in
this area has been completed and planned expan-           Dilapidated Piers and Exposed Shoreline Showing Typical Waterfront
sions (Port Ivory) are expected to be in place soon.      Condition seen the length of the Shoreline

The growth and expansive future developments at           and the adjacent DSNY and Con Edison facilities. In
Howland Hook were clearly made possible by the            the approximate vicinity of points 9 and 10 in Map
reconstruction of the Arthur Kill rail lift bridge and    7, there are a series of roads (South and Meredith
the Arlington Yards, as well as the re-establishing of    Avenues and Victory Boulevard) that could be uti-
the Travis freight line.                                  lized more fully in the future to expand access to the
                                                          waterfront in this portion of the Study Area.
Moving southward, the waterfront along Zone II
(Bloomfield-Teleport)	 is	 dominated	 by	 the	 former	    Point 11 marks the location of a structurally safe and
GATX site and the Saw Mill Creek ecological areas.        protected shoreline in the vicinity of the Con Edison
The shoreline is heavily weathered and decayed,           Power Station. Neighboring this on the south side
with driftwood and old dilapidated pier structures        is the Department of Sanitation waste transfer fa-
that indicate that the area was once accessible           cility at the end of Victory Boulevard. The facility’s
by boat. Any future waterfront uses would require         buildings extend to the shoreline, where barges pull
detailed marine inspections and likely extensive          into a covered waterfront structure and waste is off-
shoreline/bulkhead rehabilitation, as these areas         loaded for recycling.
appear to be long-unused and very decayed. There
is also evidence of oil tanker activity due to an ob-     To the east and south of these areas is the former
served working pier with oil supply pipes, although       landfill	 that	 is	 the	 site	 of	 the	 proposed	 Fresh	 Kills	
this small facility could not handle the types of large   Park. The proposed park’s shoreline is next to a
oil barges serviced on the New Jersey side of the         small island called “Island of Meadows.” The inlets
channel.                                                  around the Island of Meadows are blocked off on
                                                          one side with an in-water fence and the channel
The Study Area’s central area (Zone III: Travis/          depth around the Island ranges from 12’ to 5’. This
Fresh Kills), involves the longest stretch of shore-      area could potentially provide ferry access to the
line in the entire Study Area (between observation        Fresh Kills Park after proper dredging and securing
points 8 through 25 in Map 7). This shoreline area        of	the	shoreline	–	a	concept	that	has	been	identified	
is dominated by the proposed Fresh Kills parkland         as part of the park’s overall Master Plan.



                                                                                                                          21
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report




Potentail Waterfront Road Access Point- Zone III


                                                   Typical Ship “Graveyard” Shoreline Conditions

                                                   At	the	borderline	of	Zone	III	and	IV,	there	is	a	signifi-
                                                   cant ship “graveyard” where old and unused ships
                                                   have been beached or grounded close to the shore-
                                                   line over the years. Although often considered an
                                                   unsightly	view	at	first,	from	a	marine	point	of	view	it	
                                                   was a very common practice, and if done properly
                                                   can expand the shoreline’s marine habitat potential.
                                                   In considering possible future actions in this “grave-
                                                   yard” area, further investigation is required before
                                                   considering the possible removal of the ships, barg-
                                                   es and other abandoned marine equipment, or the
                                                   cultivating it as a marine habitat. Due to the aquatic
                                                   ecological potential of such areas, any plans for
                                                   these areas are subject to regulatory review by NYS
                                                   DEC and the Corp of Engineers as well as by the
                                                   Coast Guard (for impacts on navigation).

                                                   The coastal areas of the southernmost portion of
                                                   the Study Area (Zone IV: Charleston/ Tottenville)
                                                   have some shoreline residential development but
                                                   are more dominated by the State prison, and the
                                                   Port Mobile storage tanks connected by underwater
                                                   pipeline to similar facilities on the New Jersey shore
                                                   in the vicinity of points 31 through 36.
Arthur Kill Power Generation Plant

                                                   A working waterfront areas is located near obser-
                                                   vation point 25 (at or near Chemical Lane) as well
                                                   as further south (below the Outerbridge Crossing)
                                                   at observation points 44-45 (Arthur Kill Road/Ellis
                                                   Street), which includes a working waterfront area
                                                   (some form of driftwood or broken-boat handling/
                                                   loading was observed) and an active marina. Other
                                                   waterfront activity was observed north of the Port
                                                   Mobile facility (at the end of Johnson Street and In-
                                                   dustrial Loop), where a former waterfront warehouse
                                                   and industrial building appeared to be vacant, but
Visy Paper




22
Wood-Loading Operations at Arthur Kill Road/ Ellis Street   Tottnville MTA Railway Station, Adjacent to Waterfront



                                                            was adjacent to a secured shoreline and retaining
                                                            wall, with extensive excavation or earth-moving ac-
                                                            tivities being carried out at this location.

                                                            At observation point 41, just before the Outerbridge
                                                            crossing, the 190-unit Tides senior housing complex
                                                            is visible. This development was required to provide
                                                            a public waterfront esplanade as part of its approv-
                                                            als from the City Planning Commission. Otherwise,
                                                            the project has no docks or other waterfront facili-
View of Tides Development from Shoreline                    ties and has a natural rip rap shoreline. A small boat
                                                            club is also located just north of the Outerbridge
                                                            Crossing.

                                                            At point 48 (adjacent to Ellis Street) the MTA Staten
                                                            Island Railway’s Tottenville Station (the last station
                                                            on this line) is located at the end of Ellis Street di-
                                                            rectly adjacent to the waterfront. The shoreline in
                                                            this	area,	with	a	mixture	of	mud	flats	and	rip	rap,	is	
                                                            not secured and extensive waterfront work would
                                                            be needed to take advantage of this shoreline rail
                                                            access.

                                                            Just south of the Study Area, at the end of Bentley
Vacant Warehouse Building (Johnson Street/ Industrial)
                                                            Street, re-creation of the ferry service between Tot-
                                                            tenville and Perth Amboy (within a ten-minute walk
                                                            of the waterfront to the NJ Transit Perth Amboy Sta-
                                                            tion) is often mentioned. The service has been gone
                                                            for over 40 years and only the rotting wooden piles
                                                            from the former ferry piers remain on the Staten Is-
                                                            land side at the end of Bentley Street in Tottenville,
                                                            near the SIR station. However, on the Perth Amboy
                                                            side, the ferry slip piers have been rebuilt, the adja-
                                                            cent waterfront has been re-activated with a marina
                                                            and dinner cruise operations, and a replica of the
                                                            original ferry station house has been constructed in
                                                            recognition of the importance of this ferry, which be-
Small Boat-club next to Outerbridge Crossing Piers




                                                                                                                     23
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


Open Space/ Wetlands/ Natural Resources                    Street) indicate the type of recreational opportuni-
                                                           ties for residents that could be further capitalized on
Given its extensive industrial history, the Study          in the future. The remediation and redevelopment
Area still possesses a surprising number of natu-          of Fresh Kills and numerous industrial sites, such as
ral and recreational resources, particularly within        the Port Mobil oil tank farm, could diversify the land
the planned Fresh Kills recreation area which ac-          use activity along the waterfront.
counts for roughly a third of the Study Area. The
West Shore already has several park and natural            Along the West Shore, the tidal wetlands of the Ar-
areas that complement and extend the well-estab-           thur Kill are critical areas that provide food and hab-
lished Staten Island Greenbelt that runs through the       itat	 for	 fish,	 birds,	 and	 other	 wildlife	 while	 filtering	
center of the island. For example, the William Davis       harmful chemicals from the water, buffering inland
Wildlife refuge, just east of Travis and north of the      regions from storms, and controlling erosion. Up to
planned Fresh Kills Park, already provides a large         eighty percent of the island’s wetlands have been
natural open space for area residents.                     lost	to	filling,	dredging	and	other	human	influence.	
                                                           These wetlands have been the subject of much at-
In the West Shore Study Area, open space is the            tention and study by organizations such as the Trust
predominant land use category, with a total area of        for Public Land (TPL) and the Audubon Society. In
approximately 2,460 acres (approximately 40% of            recent years, TPL has protected 472 acres of wet-
the Study Area). This includes the proposed 2,200-         lands on Staten Island, including a recent 15-acre
acre Fresh Kills Park, for which a Master Plan and         tidal wetland site located at the intersection of the
its associated environmental and land use reviews          Arthur Kill and Neck Creek, near Meredith Avenue.
are presently being completed. The park, which has
a 30-year phased development schedule, including           The Study Area has an extensive variety of wet-
some near-term plans for park improvements within          lands, both tidal and freshwater, that occupy ap-
Travis and in other portions of the Study Area.            proximately 1,150 acres of the area. When com-
                                                           bined with the existing and planned open space,
Other major open space areas within the Study              these combined uses cover approximately 3,500
Area (all passive recreation/natural areas) include        acres, which accounts for more than half the Study
the City-owned 107-acre Mariner’s Marsh located            Area. The tidal wetlands in the area include coastal
in Zone I, the City-owned 111-acre Saw Mill Creek          shoals,	 bars	 and	 mudflats,	 littoral	 zones,	 vegetat-
Marsh located within Zone II and the 225-acre Clay         ed coastal shoals, broad-leaf vegetation, intertidal
Pits Pond State Park Reserve located within Zone           marsh, fresh marsh, graminoid vegetation and high
IV. While Clay Pits Pond is not part of the City’s         marsh. This extensive coverage of natural resourc-
Greenbelt, this state-run park complements the             es within the Study Area, including both Prall’s Is-
extensive Greenbelt system of parks. Additionally,         land and the Island of Meadows directly off-shore,
there are numerous parks in the Study Area with            gives it an unique characteristic which needs to be
baseball diamonds and other active recreational            considered as the area develops in the future.
amenities, with the largest concentration found in
Zone	III	(such	as	the	ball	fields	along	Travis	Avenue	
west of Victory Boulevard).

One of the Study Area’s most important natural re-
source is its waterfront. The Arthur Kill, which divides
Staten Island and New Jersey, could potentially
provide some recreational and expanded strategic
commercial waterfront opportunities. Historically
vital to the City’s industry, several marina areas in
the southern portion of the Study Area (along Ellis




24
Map 8 -Open Space/ Wetland and Natural Areas




                                               25
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2B: Zone I: Arlington - Port Ivory: Existing
Land Use/ Constraints and Opportunities

2.B.1: Existing Land Use Analysis

This is the northernmost of the four study zones,
stretching over an area of approximately 900 acres
and containing the most transportation infrastructure
of any of the Study Area’s four zones. This zone
is characterized by the shipping related uses
within the Howland Hook Terminal on the west and
residential uses to the east and southeast beyond
the boundaries of this zone, with a buffer area
consisting of parks, railroad and retail uses between
the port and residential areas. The Arthur Kill and
Kill Van Kull channels and the Goethals Bridge and            Cranes at unloading berth at New York Container Terminal, Howland
Staten Island Expressway form the northern and                Hook
southern borders, respectively.

The main features of this zone are:

•	   The Goethals Bridge, connecting commuters
     and	truck	freight	traffic	to	New	Jersey;		
•	   PANYNJ’s Howland Hook Marine Terminal, a
     key terminal and growing container facility;
•	   The Arlington Rail Yards, which expands the
     container terminals’ capabilities with additional
     rail capacity and connections inclusive of the
     recently re-constructed rail lift bridge to New
     Jersey.		PANYNJ	also	owns	a	significant	portion	
     of Port Ivory, the former Proctor & Gamble
     manufacturing facility, for future expansion and
                                                              View of a section of Mariner’s Marsh, looking south.
     development; and
•	   Significant	open	space	resources,	including	the	
     Mariner’s Marsh and the proposed park space
     at Arlington Marsh.

Transportation Uses

As discussed in Section 2.A.5 above, the Howland
Hook Marine Terminal site can service three vessels
on its three berths totaling 3,012 feet. Since 2004,
the New York Container Terminal, the major user of
the site, has undergone approximately $32 million
in upgrades and renovations. The City is stressing
continued development of the on-dock Express Rail
system	 and	 reducing	 the	 impact	 of	 truck	 traffic	 on	
adjacent roadways and communities. The recently               Home Depot on Forest Avenue
completed dredging of the Arthur Kill and facility



26
Map 9 - Aerial Map, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




                                                27
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


                                                                corridor.       Several     restaurant/entertainment
                                                                operations in the area include a Charlie Brown
                                                                Steakhouse and Jonsey’s Tavern, a restaurant and
                                                                nightclub, respectively. Several contractors have
                                                                located their operations in Zone I and there is also a
                                                                real estate company, Kirby International.

                                                                Industrial/Manufacturing

                                                                The zone also includes a portion of the historic
                                                                Arlington neighborhood, even though it forms an
                                                                extraneous rectangle outside the Study Area’s
                                                                general border. This rectangular area, site of the
                                                                former Bethlehem Steel operation and presently
                                                                occupied by various construction-related uses, is
                                                                zoned manufacturing and represents one of the
Goethals Gardens, Mobile Home Park, located south of Goethals   few	 significantly	 large	 commercial/industrial	 sites	
Bridge Approach.                                                adjacent to the rail line. Because of its strategic
expansions will allow this key facility to continue its         location and likely potential for redevelopment,
growth.                                                         it was added to the Study Area for review in
                                                                conjunction with the rest of Zone 1. There are two
Residential Uses                                                active manufacturing sites, Coca Cola Bottling
                                                                Company and Grandview Structural Steel as well
There are very few residences within the boundaries             as a recycling service.
of Zone I, with the exception of the 9- acre Goethals
Garden mobile home park (directly north of the                  Parks and Natural Areas
Goethals Bridge toll plaza), where space for a mobile
home can be rented for less than $ 500 per month,               Zone 1 includes the 107.2 acre Mariner’s Marsh
including water, garbage removal and taxes.                     Park, a large nature preserve that acts as a buffer
                                                                between the industrial shores of northwest Staten
Commercial Uses                                                 Island and the residential areas to the east. This
                                                                natural area alone occupies four percent of the land
In spite of the lack of a major residential population,         area in this zone.
this	 area	 benefits	 from	 its	 proximity	 to	 many	 large	
residential neighborhoods, such as Arlington and                Detailed land use analysis reveals that the
Mariner’s Harbor. With this strategic location and              dominant land use (approximately 48%) in Zone I
proximity to the Staten Island and West Shore                   is Transportation/ Utility, most of which is the New
Expressways, big box retailers have used the area’s             York Container Terminal. The second most dominant
manufacturing zoning to expand their presence                   land use in this zone is vacant land which accounts
in Staten Island and in New York City as a whole.               for approximately 28% of the land. Other important
One of the three Home Depots on Staten Island,                  land uses are industrial, at about 8%, and open
for example, is located in Zone I on Forest Avenue.             space, in the form of Mariner’s Marsh and Arlington
Other commercial uses in the area include, but                  Marsh which accounts for about 14.5% of the area.
not limited to, storage and movers, self-storage
facilities, a night club on Holland Avenue, as well as
restaurants, a multiplex movie theater, construction
material stores, contractor companies, and truck
repair service shops, mostly concentrated along the
Forest Avenue and the Staten Island Expressway



28
Map 10- Land Use, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




Figure 3- Land Use Analysis, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




                                                         29
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.B.2: Vacant Land Use Analysis                            the 91 parcels under 1 acre represent 82% of the
                                                           parcels but 19% of the acres, while the 4 parcels
Vacant	land	is	this	analysis	is	defined	as	areas	de-       over 3 acres account for almost half of the total net
void of any kind of development and not a desig-           vacant acreage. Map 11 includes this same infor-
nated open space or nature preserve, although is           mation in graphic format as well as the approximate
may be partially or wholly covered by natural fea-         location of these vacant parcels.
tures like wetlands or marshes. It is one of the most
dominant land uses within the Study Area, account-
ing for almost 28% of the land area, making it the
second largest land use category in terms of land
area.

Though vacant land can provide an opportunity
for new development, it is crucial to determine the
actual usable land within these parcels. To do this,
the vacant parcels was overlaid with mapped wet-
land	areas,	both	tidal	and	freshwater,	as	defined	by	
NYS DEC, along with their respective development
buffers of 100 feet and 150 feet. The “net” vacant
parcel acreage included in the study’s land analy-
sis represented the areas that remained after these
wetlands and associated buffer areas had been re-
moved. These remaining land areas were then sub-
divided into three categories:

•	   parcels less than 1 acre in area,
•	   parcels between 1 and 3 acres in area, and
•	   parcels more than 3 acres in area.

Findings

Applying this methodology to Zone I resulted in the
following distribution of vacant land:




Table 4- Vacant Land Analysis, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone



As shown, removing wetland and buffer areas re-
duced the number of vacant parcels from 122 to 111
and the total available vacant land from 215.7 acres
to 91.34 acres. Of the 111 vacant parcels in Zone I,



30
            Map 11- Vacant Land Analysis Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




Figure 4- Vacant Land Analysis (by parcels), Arlington-Port Ivory Zone   Figure 5- Vacant Land Analysis (by area), Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




                                                                                                                                               31
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.B.3: Newly Developed Properties/ Rezonings

Proposed Developments is a generic term that re-
fers to any kind of project, private or public, that is
expected to occur in the future and is in some stage
of	development,		from	early	planning	stages	to	final	
execution.

In Zone I the New York City Department of Sanita-
tion (DSNY) is planning a parking facility on Block
1306, Lot 14 along Richmond Terrace, while the
City’s Department of Parks and Recreation (NYCD-
PR) is planning the designation and development
of Arlington Marsh ( Block 1301, Lot 1), also along
Richmond Terrace, as public open space. Arlington
Marsh still retains a lot of the functions of a wetland
and is an important connection between Mariners
Marsh to the south and the waters of Kill Van Kull.
Most of the area of the marsh will be placed un-
der the stewardship of NYCDPR, and it is expected
that the future programs will include environmental
clean-up, protection and restoration of the marsh
area and the wetlands.

The Port Authority plans to expand the New York
Container Terminal further north onto Parcel C of
the Procter and Gamble Site. This new site will ac-
commodate a new 1,200-foot berth with a storage
area	of	approximately	fifty	acres.	This	berth	and	its	
50-foot deep channel along the Kill Van Kull will work
in conjunction with the existing 3,000-foot berth on
the Arthur Kill.

Recently NYCEDC has sought expressions of inter-
est for the development of rail-dependant uses for
all or any portion of an approximately 9-acre parcel
of land located within the Arlington Railyards. This
site will offer access to local and continental rail
connection and highways and proximity to the New
York Container Terminal located at Howland Hook.




32
           Map 12- Proposed Projects, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




Table 3- Proposed Developments, Arlington Port-Ivory Zone




                                                                  33
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.B.4: Property Ownership Analysis

Ownership analysis of the Study Area parcels was
undertaken to provide data to better determine
development potentials within the Study Area.
The parcels were divided into seven ownership
categories:

•	   Private
•	   Private (tax -exempt)
•	   Public-Private
•	   Port Authority of NY and NJ
•	   Public, City Owned
•	   Public, State Owned
•	   No Data.

This categorization was based on the name of the
owner as provided by NYC Department of Finance.
Due to a lack of data set a small percentage of
the	 parcels	 were	 left	 unclassified	 and	 have	 been	
grouped under the category “no data”.

Findings

The following is the overall land use distribution by
ownership:

•	   The City of New York (NYC) owns 41 parcels,
     or approximately 14% of the parcels and 427
     acres or 51% of the land within this zone, largely
     due to the ownership of the parcels in Howland
     Hook and the Mariner’s Marsh.
•	   The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
     (PANYNJ) owns 11 parcels (4%) with 149 acres
     or 18% of the area. The above mentioned three
     constitute the top three categories of ownership
     in terms of number of parcels.
•	   New York State (NYS) which owns 8 parcels
     (3% of the total ) and approximately 69 acres
     (8% of the total).
•	   Private owners control 214 parcels (76% of the
     total) including 176 acres (21% of the total).

As shown, in Zone I most of the parcels are privately
owned while most of the land area (77%) is publicly
owned (New York City and State and the Port
Authority).




34
            Map 13- Ownership Analysis, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




Figure 6- Ownership Analysis (by parcels), Arlington-Port Ivory Zone   Figure 7- Ownership Analysis (by area), Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




                                                                                                                                           35
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.B.5: Underutilized Sites Analysis                        Findings

Identifying underutilized parcels in the Study Area        In Zone I (see Figure 8 and 9) there are 22 parcels
gives an indication of those partially occupied            totaling 375.38 acres with less than 50% of the
areas most likely to be targeted for potential future      allowable FAR. The following is the distribution of
developments, either new uses or an expansion of           these parcels by built FAR category:
existing ones. As with vacant land, net underutilized
area	is	defined	as	the	area	left	over	after	subtracting	
any wetlands and their associated buffer areas
from the actual lot area. This methodology removes
those parcels with minimal developable area due
to extensive coverage by wetlands – a common
condition along the West Shore of Staten Island.
                                                           Table 5- Analysis of Underutilized Parcels by Utilization Levels,
Underutilized	 land	 has	 been	 defined	 as	 parcels	               Area and Number of Parcels- Arlington-Port Ivory Zone
of land which (1) are at least 1 acre in area (after
deducting wetlands and buffer area), and (2) have
a built FAR ( Floor Area Ratio) -- the ratio of the        The parcels were further analyzed in terms of
amount of development on the parcel relative to the        whether they were in residential or commercial/
maximum allowed under existing zoning -- which is          industrial zoning districts. The results, shown in
50% or less than the allowable FAR. However, due to        Table 6, indicate that of the 22 underutilized parcels,
the nature of manufacturing uses on the West Shore,        19 parcels presently at 25% utilization or less are
many parcels have unbuilt areas that are being             within manufacturing districts, and include a total
used for parking, storage and other ancillary uses         area of 366.51 acres. There are no underutilized
required by those industrial operations. Therefore,        parcels in commercial or residential districts. This
when analyzing parcels in manufacturing districts,         indicates that almost all of the manufacturing–zoned
the built FAR criterion has been reduced to 25%.           sites are below the 25% being used as the cut-off
For parcels in residential and commercial districts,       for underutilization, indicating a greater potential for
the 50% screening criteria for FAR was used.               redevelopment of those sites.

Underutilized parcels also do not include parcels
categorized as open space or vacant land,
as discussed in Section 2.B.2. Not including
designated open space or vacant space ensures
a clear distinction among sites which already
have some development activity, those currently
completely vacant, and those likely to be preserved
                                                           Table 6- Breakdown of Underutilized Parcels by Zoning Districts,
as open space. The underutilized land has been                      Arlington Port-Ivory Zone
further	categorized	into	five	sections	based	on	the	
percentage of the built FAR as compared to the
allowed FAR:

•	   0% -- almost negligible built FAR,
•	   more than 0% and up to 10%,
•	   more than 10% and up to 25%,
•	   more than 25% and up to 40%, and
•	   more than 40% up to 50%.




36
             Map 14- Underutilized Land Analysis, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




Figure 8- Underutilized Land Analysis (by parcels), Arlington-Port            Figure 9- Underutilized Land Analysis (by area), Arlington-Port Ivory
          Ivory Zone                                                                    Zone




                                                                                                                                                 37
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.B.6: Environmental Constraints                               brownfields,	 thereby	 minimizing	 the	 use	 of	 public	
                                                               clean-up funds and reducing the development
Zone I contains a number of natural features                   pressures	 on	 “greenfield”	 (uncontaminated)	 sites	  	
in the form of marshes and wetlands, both tidal                All three sites are located within the former Procter
and freshwater, spread throughout the Study                    and	Gamble	site	and	are	identified	as	Port	Ivory	Site	
Area. These features form a natural constraint to              (Former P&G) Site 1, Site2 and Site 3. (See Map
development proposals and have to be accounted                 13). No other superfund or remediation sites were
for while proposing potential future developments .            identified	within	Zone	I.

As a result of the historical manufacturing land
uses in this area, there are also a number of
environmentally contaminated sites that have been
subjected to clean-up. These potentially degraded
sites also act as environmental constraint towards
future development proposals.

Findings

As shown in Map15, portions of the northern and the
southern sections of Zone I lie within the 100 year
flood	 zone,	 which	 is	 an	 additional	 environmental	
aspect	that	has	to	be	considered.	These	flood	risks	
raise the complexity and costs of development,
especially residential, further reducing the probability
of development in those areas.

The natural features that lie within Zone I include
the following :

•	   Bridge Creek
•	   Arlington Marsh
•	   Mariner’s marsh
•	   Old Place Creek
•	   Goethals Bridge Pond
•	   Cable Avenue Woods
•	   Graniteville Swamp

Virtually all of these areas are under public
ownership.

Records at the New York State Department of
Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) also
identified	 three	 sites	 within	 this	 Zone	 which	 have	
been subjected to the NYS Voluntary Cleanup
Program (VCP), which the State establishes to
address	environmental,	legal	and	financial	barriers	
that often hinder the redevelopment and reuse of
contaminated properties. The program makes it
easier	 financially	 for	 the	 private	 sector	 to	 cleanup	



38
Map 15- Environmental Constraints, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




                                                               39
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.B.7: Areas for Discussion                                    edge of the Staten Island Railroad right-of-way.
                                                               Currently this site is zoned M1-1, is partially oc-
The previous assessments in this section provide               cupied by industrial uses and is under private
information that is useful in identifying sites and as-        ownership.
semblages that may be suitable for new develop-           •	   Site 2 (7.3 acres), a privately owned property lo-
ment, new or expanded open space opportunities                 cated on Western Avenue, surrounded on three
or for transportation investments. This information,           sides by the New York Container Port. This site
along with the results of the study team’s parallel            is zoned M3-1 and current records shows that
Market Analysis and input from Study Area stake-               the site was used for industrial purposes in the
holders collectively will help determine the most              past.
advantageous future scenarios for Staten Island’s         •	   Site 3 (an assemblage of 172 parcels, with ap-
West Shore.                                                    proximately 278 acres) is bound by the Stat-
                                                               en Island Rail Road right-of-way to the north,
Based	on	the	identification	of	vacant	and	underuti-            Western Avenue to the west, South Avenue to
lized sites as discussed in the previous sections,             the east and Goethals Road North to the south.
focusing especially in larger contiguous parcels. As           Dominant land uses of the parcels within this
future land use scenarios are developed as part of             assemblage include transportation and utility
the study, these sites will be further analyzed for a          and vacant land and the predominant zoning
range of possible uses and then assessed against               is M1-1 and M2-1. The site is characterized by
such factors as:                                               the presence of large parcels (area in excess of
                                                               10 acres) and a multitude of smaller parcels. A
•	   Ownership (Public or private),                            substantial proportion (130 acres – 47% of total
•	   Existing land use; existing tenant,                       of the site) is publicly owned (NYC and NYS). A
•	   Existing zoning,                                          substantial percentage of this site is designated
•	   Waterfront location,                                      wetlands or wetlands buffer, which must be con-
•	   Access to transportation,                                 sidered while developing any future scenarios.
•	   Proximity to resource or amenities (i.e. local re-        It should also be noted that the NYC EDC is
     tail or open space),                                      presently seeking development interest to en-
•	   Potential synergies/connections,                          courage rail-dependant uses on 9 acres within
•	   Environmental conditions (comprised by wet-               this site.
     lands	and/or	brownfields),
•	   Political or community considerations, and           The Study Team will continue to analyze these and
•	   Access to infrastructure.                            other parcels within this zone in this manner, and
                                                          develop alternative future scenarios for the Study
This assessment and evaluation process will help          Area in close consultation with the study’s Advisory
focus future discussions around those areas with          Committee and extensive public interaction through
the greatest potential for positive long-term chang-      a series of open houses and public visioning ses-
es along the West shore.                                  sions.

Findings

Map 16 shows the areas for discussion that emerged
in Zone I after this analysis.The following are some
of the initial sites that warranted further review by
the study team and discussion with other agencies
and community groups:

•	   Site 1 (11.51 acres), comprises of 27 parcels of
     various sizes and is located along the northern



40
Map 16- Areas of Opportunity, Arlington-Port Ivory Zone




Table 7- Potential Development Opportunities, Arlington Port-Ivory Zone




                                                                          41
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2C:	 Zone	 II:Bloomfield/	 Teleport:	 Existing	
Land Use/ Constraints and Opportunities

2.C.1: Existing Land Use Analysis

Zone II is zoned mainly for manufacturing, though
there are a variety of commercial uses within this
area, including the borough’s largest concentration
of	high-end	office	space.	It	is	dominated	by	one	of	
the largest privately owned vacant parcels in the
City, which has been the focus of considerable
discussion within the West Shore community in
recent years. The main features of this zone are:

•	   the Staten Island Corporate Park                        Staten Island Corporate Park

•	   the Teleport,
•	   large tracts of privately owned vacant land,
     especially the former GATX site,
•	   the West Shore Expressway and its interchange
     with the Staten Island Expressway and the
     Goethals Bridge, and
•	   significant	 areas	 of	 wetlands,	 streams	 and	
     nature preserves.


Transportation Uses

The	 most	 significant	 transportation	 facility	 in	 the	
area is the West Shore Expressway. Due to the
presence of the former GATX site and numerous
wetlands and natural areas, this zone has a very
limited roadway network.                                     Teleport Complex


Residential Uses

Other than several private homes along Decker
Street in the southwest corner of the zone, there
are no residential uses within this zone. The zone’s
eastern side borders on the Bulls Head community.

Commercial Uses

Bloomfield	 is	 best	 known	 for	 its	 suburban	 type	
corporate	 office	 parks.	 The	 Corporate	 Park	 of	
Staten Island, developed through a public-private
partnership with NYCEDC and located along
South Avenue, offers approximately 200,000 sq.
ft.	of	traditional	office	space	and	also	includes	two	       West Shore Plaza`
hotels (the Hilton Garden Hotel and Hampton Inn).



42
Map	17-	Aerial	Map,	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	




                                                43
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


The Teleport, operated by the PANYNJ and also in
Bloomfield,	is	a	office	facility	that	offers	its	multiple	
tenants high technology communications capabilities
and a high level of security. There are four primary
office	buildings	as	well	as	several	other	developable	
sites. Tenants include Allstate Insurance, American
Express, IDB Communications, Merrill Lynch
Capital	 Markets,	 and	 other	 offices	 that	 generally	
function	as	back-office	financial	data	procession	and	
communication centers. Collectively, the Teleport
and the Corporate Park of Staten Island represent
a	 significant	 employment	 center	 with	 a	 large	
concentration of relatively high-paying jobs. Even
though	these	office	spaces	offer	quality	employment	
centers, vacancy is high (approximately 31% in
Spring 2008). It is presumed that these commercial
                                                             Vanbro Corporation, a Construction Material Business
properties are at a leasing disadvantage due to
lack of convenient public transit connections and
supporting food establishments.                              one of the largest vacant privately owned sites in
                                                             New York City. The former GATX tank farm, now
There is a broad array of other commercial uses              owned by the International Speedway Corporation
within the zone. Along Victory Boulevard, there is           (ISC), is already cleared and partially remediated.
an auto sales store, several delis, and contractors          The recent proposal for a NASCAR racetrack and
and building materials stores, while Gulf Avenue             retail	 center	 was	 withdrawn,	 and	 no	 firm	 plans	
and South Avenue include recycling facilities, the           have emerged for this 440-acre property (including
Visiting Nurse Home Care service, and the Nitecap            240	 acres	 of	 wetlands)	 	 Finally,	 benefiting	 from	
Adult Video Megastore.                                       the remoteness of the West Shore, the Staten
                                                             Island Sportsmen’s Club, between Edward Curry
Industrial/Manufacturing                                     and	 Bloomfield	Avenues,	 is	 one	 of	 the	 few	 active	
                                                             shooting ranges in the City.
The largest industrial-type use within the zone is the
VanBro construction materials operation on Industry
Road near the waterfront and several similar types
of uses along Chelsea Road and Edward Curry
Avenue.

Park and Natural Areas

There are a number of marshes and nature preserves
along the shoreline of the Arthur Kill (including Prall’s
Island), throughout and south of the GATX site, and
along both sides of South Avenue (see discussion
below).

Zone II is primarily zoned M3-1 and M1-1, although
the area includes only limited manufacturing and
substantial	 amounts	 of	 corporate	 office	 space.	 	
Vacant Land (74%) and open space (14%) account
for most of the land area in Zone II, which contains



44
Map	18-	Land	Use	,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone




Figure	10-	Land	Use	Analysis,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone




                                                          45
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.C.2: Vacant Land Use Analysis

To establish the amount of available and developable
vacant land, all vacant parcels (those with no
development) was overlaid with mapped wetland
areas,	 both	 tidal	 and	 freshwater,	 as	 defined	 by	
NYS DEC, along with their respective development
buffers of 100 feet and 150 feet. The “net” vacant
parcel acreage therefore represents the areas that
remained after these wetlands and associated buffer
areas had been removed. These remaining land
areas were then subdivided into three categories:

•	   parcels less than 1 acre in area,
•	   parcels between 1 and 3 acres in area, and
•	   parcels more than 3 acres in area.

Findings

Applying this methodology to Zone II resulted in the
following distribution of vacant land:




Table	8-	Vacant	Land	Analysis,	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	



As shown, removing wetland and buffer areas
reduced the number of vacant parcels from 123 to
77 and the total available vacant land from 1,222
acres to 582 acres. Of the 77 vacant parcels in
Zone II, the 42 parcels under 1 acre represent
55% of the parcels but only 2% of the area, while
the 20 parcels over 3 acres account for 94% of
the total net vacant acreage. Map 19 includes this
same information in graphic format as well as the
approximate location of these vacant parcels. As
is evident in Map 19, the presence of contiguous
vacant land offers opportunities for potential large-
scale development.




46
              Map	19-	Vacant	Land	Analysis	,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone




Figure	11-	Vacant	Land	Analysis	(by	number	of	parcels),	Bloomfield-	     Figure	12-	Vacant	Land	Analysis	(by	area	in	acres),	Bloomfield-Tele	
          Teleport Zone                                                             port Zone




                                                                                                                                            47
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.C.3: Newly Developed Properties/ Rezonings

Proposed projects in Zone II include the possible ex-
pansion by the Port Authority of New York and New
Jersey of the Howland Hook Container Port along
the shoreline, just south of the Goethals Bridge, and
a possible MTA bus depot on Block 1801, Lot 150
and Lot 155 at the southern tip of the zone.




48
              Map	20-	Proposed	Projects,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone




Table	9-		Proposed	Projects-	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone




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Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.C.4: Property Ownership Analysis

The parcels were divided into seven ownership
categories, based on information from the NYC
Department of Finance database:

•	   Private
•	   Private (tax -exempt)
•	   Public-Private
•	   Port Authority of NY and NJ
•	   Public, City Owned
•	   Public, State Owned
•	   No	 Data	 (ownership	 not	 classified	 in	 the	
     NYCDOF database)

Findings

Ownership analysis of the parcels within Zone II
shows two prominent categories - privately owned
land and land under the ownership of New York City,
both in terms of the number of parcels and the total
area of the parcels under each of the categories.

•	   The zone has 119 parcels (49% of total) under
     private ownership, totaling approximately 837
     acres (51% of the area).
•	   New York City owns 74 parcels (30% of total)
     and including approximately 446 acres (27% of
     total area).
•	   Tax exempt private land accounts for 21 parcels
     (9% of total) with a total area of 101 acres (6%
     of the total area). These areas are generally
     included	 in	 the	 office	 developments	 along	
     South Avenue, developed under public-private
     partnerships.
•	   7 parcels (3% of parcels) are also owned by
     the PANYNJ, totaling approximately 85.5 acres
     (5% of total area) and 16 parcels (6% of total)
     totaling 58 acres (4% of acreage) are owned by
     New York State.

Overall 36% of land in Zone II is publicly owned either
by the New York City or State or by the PANYNJ.




50
              Map	21-	Ownership		Analysis	,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone




Figure	13-	Ownership	Analysis	(by	parcels),	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	   Figure	14-	Ownership	Analysis	(by	area),	Bloomfield-Teleport	Zone	




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Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.C.5: Underutilized Sites Analysis                                  These	 figures	 show	 that	 roughly	 half	 of	 the	
                                                                     underutilized land is within parcels that are less
Identifying underutilized parcels gives an indication                than 25% utilized, with increased chance for future
of those partially occupied areas most likely to be                  redevelopment, while the other half is within parcels
targeted for potential future developments. As with                  that fall into the 25% to 50% categories, which
vacant	 land,	 net	 underutilized	 area	 is	 defined	 as	            somewhat limits future development potential due
the area left over after subtracting any wetlands                    to the greater amount of existing activity on those
and their associated buffer areas from the actual                    sites.
lot	 area.	 Net	 underutilized	 land	 is	 then	 defined	 as	
parcels of are at least 1 acre in area that have a                   The parcels were further analyzed in terms of
built FAR which is 50% or less than the allowable                    whether they were in residential or commercial/
FAR. When analyzing parcels in manufacturing                         industrial zoning districts. The results, shown
districts, the built FAR criterion has been reduced to               in Table 11, indicate that of the 26 underutilized
25%	to	reflect	the	amount	of	unbuilt	land	on	many	                   parcels, 12 parcels presently at 25% utilization or
manufacturing sites, while for parcels in residential                less are within manufacturing districts, and include a
and commercial districts, the 50% screening criteria                 total area of 65.54 acres. There are no underutilized
for FAR was used. Underutilized parcels also do                      parcels in commercial or residential districts. This
not include parcels categorized as open space or                     indicates that roughly half of the manufacturing–
vacant land.                                                         zoned sites are below the 25% being used as the
                                                                     cut-off for underutilization, indicating a somewhat
The underutilized land has been further categorized                  more limited potential for redevelopment of those
into	 five	 sections	 based	 on	 the	 percentage	 of	 the	           sites than in other zones.
built FAR as compared to the allowed FAR:

•	   0% -- almost negligible built FAR,
•	   more than 0% and up to 10%,
•	   more than 10% and up to 25%,
•	   more than 25% and up to 40%, and
•	   more than 40% up to 50%.
                                                                     Table 11 Breakdown of Underutilized Parcels by Zoning Districts,
Findings                                                             	        Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone

In Zone II (see Figure 15 and 16) there are 26
parcels totaling 115 acres with less than 50% of the
allowable FAR, approximately 7% of the zone’s total
land area. The following is the distribution of these
parcels by built FAR category:




Table 10- Analysis of Underutilized Parcels by Utilization Levels,
	         Area	and	Number	of	Parcels-	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone




52
            Map	22-	Underutilized	Land	Analysis,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone




Figure	15-Underutlilized	Land	Analysis	(by	parcels),	Bloomfield-	        Figure	16-	Underutlized	Land	Analysis	(by	area),	Bloomfield-Teleport		
          Teleport Zone                                                             Zone




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Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.C.6: Environmental Constraints

Even though Zone II has the highest amount of
vacant	 land,	 a	 significant	 portion	 of	 that	 land	 is	
covered by wetlands and buffer areas (see Map
23), which effectively reduces the actual amount of
land available for redevelopment. Also, a majority
of the western section of Zone II lies within the 100
year	flood	plan,	which	poses	a	challenge	for	many	
types of development.

Findings

The natural features that lie within Zone II include
the following:

•	   Gulf Port Marsh and Uplands
•	   Old Place Creek
•	   Saw Mill Creek Marsh
•	   Teleport Woods
•	   Prall’s Island

There are two sites – R. Baker & Sons Machinery
Dismantlers and Teleport Staten Island – that have
been	 identified	 as	 environmentally	 contaminated.	
Both of these sites have been included in the New
York State Superfund Program.




54
Map	23-	Environmental	Constraints,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone




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Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.C.7: Areas for Discussion                                    ISC. Site 4 (See Map 24) which is an assem-
                                                               blage of 75 parcels, most of which is in private
The previous assessments in this section provide               ownership. This assemblage, zoned M3-1, has
information that is useful in identifying sites and            a total area of approximately 857 acres (over
assemblages that may be suitable for new devel-                half of which is wetlands and buffer areas) and
opment, for new or expanded open space oppor-                  presents by far the largest amount of contigu-
tunities or for transportation investments. This infor-        ous developable land within the Study Area.
mation, along with the results of the study team’s             The fact that most of the parcels within the as-
parallel Market Analysis and input from Study Area             semblage are jointly owned opens up potential
stakeholders collectively will help determine the              development opportunities.
most advantageous future scenarios for Staten Is-         •	   Site 5A is a combination of 23 parcels (zoned
land’s West Shore.                                             M1-1) totaling approximately 34 acres in area.
                                                               The current land use for most of the parcels in
After identifying vacant and underutilized sites as            this area is either “vacant land” or industrial. Cur-
discussed in the previous sections, the study fo-              rently, some of the smaller parcels within site 5A
cused on larger contiguous parcels in these catego-            have low scale industrial operations, while oth-
ries. As future land use scenarios are developed as            ers like a site owned by Teleport has a “dish an-
part of the study, these sites will be further analyzed        tenna farm” (since removed).
for a range of possible uses and then assessed            •	   Site 6 comprises of 3 parcels, having an aggre-
against such factors as:                                       gate area of 16.13 acres. Two of the parcels are
                                                               currently vacant where as the third one has in-
•	   Ownership (Public or private),                            dustrial use on it. The vacant parcels are both
•	   Existing land use; existing tenant,                       zoned M3-1 where as the one with the industrial
•	   Existing zoning,                                          use on it is zoned M2-1.
•	   Waterfront location,                                 •	   Site 7 which is located at the very southern tip of
•	   Access to transportation,                                 Zone II, abutting Meredith Avenue, is comprises
•	   Proximity to resource or amenities (i.e. local re-        of 4 parcels totaling 2.63 acres. All the four par-
     tail or open space),                                      cels are zoned M3-1 and currently have trans-
•	   Potential synergies/connections,                          portation/utility related or industrial land use on
•	   Environmental conditions (comprised by wet-               them.
     lands	and/or	brownfields),
•	   Political or community considerations, and           The Study Team will continue to analyze these and
•	   Access to infrastructure.                            other parcels within this zone, and develop alter-
                                                          native future scenarios for the Study Area in close
This assessment and evaluation process will help          consultation with the study’s Advisory Committee
focus future discussions around those areas with          and extensive public interaction through a series of
the greatest potential for positive long-term chang-      open houses and public visioning sessions.
es along the West shore.

Findings

The following are some of the initial sites that war-
ranted further review by the study team and discus-
sion with other agencies and community groups:

•	   Potential areas for future discussion in Zone II
     are dominated by the presence of vast tracts of
     vacant land west of the West Shore Express-
     way, including but not limited to land owner by



56
Map	24-	Areas	of	Opportunity,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone




Table	12-	Potential	Dvelopment	Opportunities,	Bloomfield-	Teleport	Zone




                                                                          57
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2D: Zone III: Travis/ Fresh Kills Park Existing
Land Use/ Constraints and Opportunities

2.D.1: Existing Land Use Analysis

The largest of the four study zones, Zone III was
long dominated by the presence of the Fresh Kills
landfill	and	is	posed	to	be	equally	dominated	by	the	
planned conversion of that area to a major park and
natural area. Bordered on the west by Arthur Kill, the
waters of Little Arthur Kill and Main and Richmond
Creek reach into and divide the area, while the
West Shore Expressway runs north-south roughly
through its center. Richmond Avenue and Arthur               Traditional Residences in Travis
Kill Road form its eastern and southern boundar-
ies, while Travis and South Avenue form is northern
edge.

Zone III is zoned mostly M1-1, but it also has the
Study Area’s largest residential zones (in the Travis
community). The main features of this zone are:

•	   The Fresh Kills Park;
•	   The residential neighborhood of Travis;
•	   A major new truck-to-rail waste transfer station
     at the southern end of the recently improved
     Travis Rail branch; and
•	   A waterfront with several major manufacturing
     and utility uses.

Transportation                                               Arthur Kill Power Generation Plant

The	 two	 significant	 transportation	 facilities	 within	
                                                             flourished	because	of	its	proximity	to	the	world’s	first	
Zone II are the West Shore Expressway, which has
                                                             linoleum plant. The site where the linoleum-making
its longest segment within this zone, and the Travis
                                                             process	 was	 refined	 sits	 in	 the	 north	 of	 this	 zone.	
Branch of the Staten Island Railway freight opera-
                                                             Changed to Travis in the 1930s, the area is charac-
tion, which was recently upgraded by NYCEDC to
                                                             terized by older homes and maintains a rural qual-
provide alternative freight access to this area and
                                                             ity with many buildings still existing from before the
make possible the City’s truck-to-rail waste transfer
                                                             eighteenth century. There are also a few residences
station.
                                                             along the southern end of Victory Boulevard.
Residential Uses
                                                             Commercial Uses
The	historic	Travis	neighborhood	was	first	the	site	
                                                             There are a variety of commercial uses located
of a Native American village and was later redevel-
                                                             along Victory Boulevard, a mix of local retail and
oped as a European settlement, and its ferry be-
                                                             national chain stores and services. In Travis, small
came an important connection to New Jersey during
                                                             businesses, restaurants and churches line Victory
the American Revolution. Known as Linoleumville
                                                             Boulevard. To the north and south of Travis, the
from the 1870s into the early 20th century, the area



58
Map 25- Aerial Map, Travis- Fresh Kills Zone




                                               59
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


Boulevard takes on a different feel. There is a Fex-
Ex/Kinko’s, a Mercury Lincoln car dealership to the
north, several home improvement stores and ser-
vices, pet grooming and kennel business, and delis,
wine shops, and bars. There are a variety of restau-
rants and food service establishments, like Da Noi
Restaurant, Mother Mousse Bakery and Boulevard
Bakery and Pizza, as well as residential services
like several pet grooming and kennel operations and
a	veterinarian	office.		As	is	common	in	other	com-
mercial and manufacturing districts along the West
Shore,	Zone	III	has	significant	home	improvement	
businesses and self-storage facilities. The Staten
Island Mall and related big-box retail operations are
located along the eastern side of Richmond Avenue              Commercial Establishments on Victory Boulevard
across the eastern border of Zone II, with plans
in that area for a 30,000 square foot expansion of
Costco and a 50,000 sq. ft. extension of the Staten
Island Mall.

Industrial/Manufacturing Uses

Along the protected Arthur Kill shoreline at the
southern terminus of Victory Boulevard is the Con
Ed Arthur Kill Power Station and further south, the
Department of Sanitation/Visy Paper Waster Trans-
fer Facility. Visy Paper transports recyclables from
Manhattan via barge using the Arthur Kill channel at
Pier 99, and is the Borough’s second largest private
business, employing many Staten Island residents.
There are also some industrial-type uses associ-
ated with the on-going maintenance operations of               Waste Transfer Station

the Department of Sanitation within portions of the
former	 Fresh	 Kills	 landfill,	 taking	 advantage	 of	 the	
upgraded Travis rail branch and the excellent con-
nections to the West Shore Expressway, as well as
Four Star Trucking Corp., Solid Waste Technologies,
Inc., and a wine making facility that offers classes.

Parks and Natural Areas

At over one third of the entire Study Area, the Fresh
Kills Park site occupies most of Zone III. The pro-
posed Fresh Kills Park extends to the Arthur Kill
waterfront, and the potential for access via ferry to
the	Fresh	Kills	Park	has	been	identified	in	the	park’s	
Master	Plan.	The	Fresh	Kills	landfill	opened	in	1948	
and became the world’s largest solid waste disposal
facility. While it received its last shipment of waste         Visy Paper




60
Map 26- Land Use, Travis- Fresh Kills Zone




Map 17- Land Use Analysis, Travis-Freshkills Zone




                                                    61
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


in March, 2001, it was reopened in September of                 2.D.2: Vacant Land Use Analysis
that year to handle materials from the World Trade
Center site.                                                    To establish the amount of available and develop-
                                                                able vacant land, all vacant parcels (those with no
As a result of a multi-year master planning process,            development) were overlaid with mapped wetland
the City devised the current plan which, according              areas,	both	tidal	and	freshwater,	as	defined	by	NYS	
to the New York City Parks Department, will create a            DEC, along with their respective development buf-
world-class park with an incredible variety of public           fers of 100 feet and 150 feet. The “net” vacant
spaces and facilities for social, cultural and physi-           parcel acreage therefore represents the areas that
cal activity, for learning and play. Fresh Kills Park           remained after these wetlands and associated buf-
will also support richly diverse habitats for wildlife,         fer areas had been removed. These remaining land
birds and plant communities, while providing ex-                areas were then subdivided into three categories:
traordinary natural settings for recreation. A network
of paths, recreational waterways, and enhanced                  •	   parcels less than 1 acre in area,
access to and from the West Shore Expressway                    •	   parcels between 1 and 3 acres in area, and
through a system of park drives will help to create             •	   parcels more than 3 acres in area.
an animated, inter-connected parkland.
                                                                Findings
There are three phases that form the development
framework for Fresh Kills;                                      Applying this methodology to Zone III resulted in the
                                                                following distribution of vacant land:
•	   Phase	1	(first	ten	years)	will	focus	on	developing	
     basic connections to the park, the park’s identity
     and basic programming around a limited area of
     the park.
•	   Phase 2 (second ten years) will see the expan-
     sion of the park’s area and extension of its pro-
     grams and services as well as the development
     of	non-profit	and	commercial	ventures	within	the	
     park.
•	   Phase	3	(final	ten	years),	will	see	completion	of	
                                                                Table 13- Vacant Land Analysis, Travis- Fresh Kills Zone
     the project, with a connection to the Arthur Kill
     waterfront,	 the	 significant	 expansion	 of	 access	
     to restored natural areas, and the continued
     emergence of new habitats.
                                                                As shown, removing wetland and buffer areas re-
Overall,	about	three-fifths	of	the	land	use	in	Zone	III	        duced the number of vacant parcels from 109 to 91
is within the Fresh Kills Park. In its current state of         and the total available vacant land from 151 acres
transition	 from	 landfill	 operations,	 it	 is	 categorized	   to 80 acres. Of the 91 vacant parcels in Zone III, the
by the City as a “transportation/utility” use. Howev-           75 parcels under 1 acre represent 82% of the par-
er, given the advanced status of the proposed park              cels but only 17% of the acres, while the 6 parcels
plans, it is shown in this report as “open space/out-           over 3 acres account for 59% of the total net vacant
door recreation.” There is additional open space,               acreage. Map 27 includes this same information in
particularly the Davis Wildlife Refuge, a 814-acre              graphic format as well as the approximate location
salt marsh that sits between Zone II and III. This              of these vacant parcels. As is evident in Map 27,
area represents the diversity found in the ever-                the presence of several areas of contiguous vacant
shrinking salt marshes in New York City.                        land offers interesting opportunities for innovative
                                                                infill-type	 development	 within	 an	 existing	 built	 en-
                                                                vironment.



62
             Map 27- Vacant Land Analysis, Travis- Fresh Kills Zone




Figure 18- Vacant Land Analysis (by parcels), Travis- Fresh Kills Zone   Figure 19- Vacant Land Analysis (by area), Travis-Fresh Kills Zone




                                                                                                                                              63
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.D.3: Newly Developed Properties/ Rezonings

Proposed projects in Zone III include a mix of com-
mercial, open space, residential and transportation
related projects. Developments include hotels (Ex-
press Inn, Courtyard, Comfort Inn) on Block 2645,
Lot 1 and Lot 45 and Block 2644, Lot 1 and Lot 45
at the southern end of Travis, development of open
space in the vicinity of the Visy Paper, a private pro-
posal to rezone Block 2784, Lot 29 in Travis neigh-
borhood from M1-1 to R3, and the development of
the MTA/ NYPD Park-and-Ride located at the south-
ern tip of the zone. The park-and-ride will probably
span across study Zone III and Study Zone IV.




64
            Map 28- Proposed Projects, Travis- Fresh Kills Zone




Table 14- Proposed Developments, Travis-Freshkills Zone




                                                                  65
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.D.4: Property Ownership Analysis

The parcels were divided into seven ownership
categories, based on information from the NYC
Department of Finance database:

•	   Private
•	   Private (tax -exempt)
•	   Public-Private
•	   Port Authority of NY and NJ
•	   Public, City Owned
•	   Public, State Owned
•	   No	 Data	 (ownership	 not	 classified	 in	 the	
     NYCDOF database)

Findings

Analysis of the parcels in Zone III shows the
following:

•	   Private owners hold most of the parcels (982,
     or 82% of the total) but the associated acreage
     (330) accounts for only 12 % of the land,
     reflecting	 the	presence	 of	numerous	 small	 lots	
     in the residential neighborhoods of Travis.
•	   The City’s 130 parcels (12% of the parcels)
     understandably account for 84% of the acreage,
     due to the large tracts of land in the Fresh
     Kills which are owned by the Department of
     Sanitation.




66
             Map 29- Ownership Analysis, Travis- Fresh Kills Zone




Figure 20- Ownership Analysis (by parcels), Travis- Fresh Kills Zone   Figure 21- Ownership Analysis (by area), Travis-Fresh Kills Zone




                                                                                                                                          67
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.D.5: Underutilized Sites Analysis                                   25% utilized, increasing the chance for individual
                                                                      parcels or groups of parcels to be redeveloped at
Identifying underutilized parcels gives an indication                 some time in the future.
of those partially occupied areas most likely to be
targeted for potential future developments. As with                   The parcels were further analyzed in terms of
vacant	 land,	 net	 underutilized	 area	 is	 defined	 as	             whether they were in residential or commercial/
the area left over after subtracting any wetlands                     industrial zoning districts. The results, shown in Table
and their associated buffer areas from the actual                     16, indicate that of the 16 underutilized parcels, 13
lot	 area.	 Net	 underutilized	 land	 is	 then	 defined	 as	          parcels presently at 25% utilization or less are within
parcels of are at least 1 acre in area that have a                    manufacturing districts, and include a total area of
built FAR which is 50% or less than the allowable                     138 acres, while there is 1 residentially owned parcel
FAR. When analyzing parcels in manufacturing                          (1.3 acres) and 2 commercially zoned parcels (11.23
districts, the built FAR criterion has been reduced to                acres). The presence of underutilized commercial
25%	to	reflect	the	amount	of	unbuilt	land	on	many	                    and residential parcels – a relatively unique situation
manufacturing sites, while for parcels in residential                 within the Study Area – along with the normal range
and commercial districts, the 50% screening criteria                  of manufacturing-zoned sites, indicates a somewhat
for FAR was used. Underutilized parcels also do                       broader range of redevelopment opportunities in
not include parcels categorized as open space or                      this zone, especially with virtually all of these sites
vacant land.                                                          below 25% utilization.

The underutilized land has been further categorized
into	 five	 sections	 based	 on	 the	 percentage	 of	 the	
built FAR as compared to the allowed FAR:

•	   0% -- almost negligible built FAR,
•	   more than 0% and up to 10%,
•	   more than 10% and up to 25%,
                                                                      Table 16- Breakdown of Underutilized Parcels by Zoning Districts,
•	   more than 25% and up to 40%, and                                           Travis-Fresh Kills Zone
•	   more than 40% up to 50%.

Findings

In Zone III (see Figures 22 and 23) there are 17
parcels totaling 151.45 acres with less than 50% of
the allowable FAR, approximately 6% of the zone’s
total land area. The following is the distribution of
these parcels by built FAR category:




Table 15- Breakdown of Underutilized Parcels by Utilization Levels,
          Area and Number of Parcels- Travis Fresh Kills Zone


These	 figures	 show	 that	 virtually	 all	 of	 the	
underutilized land is within parcels that are less than



68
            Map 30- Underutilized Land Analysis, Travis- Fresh Kills Zone




Figure 22- Underutilized Land Analysis (by parcels), Travis- Fresh Kills    Figure 23- Underutilized Land Analysis (by area), Travis-Fresh Kills
           Zone                                                                        Zone




                                                                                                                                                   69
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.D.6: Environmental Constraints

Zone III’s long shoreline and extensive stream and
wetland areas (see Map 31) effectively reduce the
actual amount of land available for redevelopment,
although most of these areas are within the Fresh
Kills Park or other preservers. Also, major portions
of the western section of Zone III lie within the 100
year	flood	plan,	which	poses	a	challenge	for	many	
types of development.

Findings

The natural stream and wetland features within
Zone III are concentrated within its northern section
(north of Fresh Kills Main Creek) and at the southern
portion of Richmond Creek within this zone. Other
rime features in this zone are the Neck Creek
Marshes, which continue from the northern edge of
this section down to the waterfront area adjoining
Little Fresh Kill, and the Isle of Meadows west of the
Study Area.(See Map 31).

There are also three contaminated sites located
within the northern section of the zone. Two sites,
Positive Chemical and Con Ed’s Arthur Kills Station,
are both within the State Superfund Program, and
the third, Visy Paper, site is part of the NY State’s
Voluntary Cleanup Program.




70
Map 31- Environmental Constraints, Travis- Fresh Kills Zone




                                                              71
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.D.7: Areas for Discussion                               •	   Site 5B (See Map 32), located within the bound-
                                                               aries of Zone III, is actually a part of an assem-
The previous assessments in this section provide               blage of parcels which are included in site 5A
information that is useful in identifying sites and            in Zone II. Site 5B by itself is approximately 5.5
assemblages that may be suitable for new devel-                acres of underutilized land, currently in private
opment, for new or expanded open space oppor-                  ownership of UPS Inc. Along with the parcels in-
tunities or for transportation investments. This infor-        cluded in site 5A, the total area of this assembly
mation, along with the results of the study team’s             of land is approximately 40 acres.
parallel Market Analysis and input from Study Area        •	   Site 8, located on the south side of Meredith Av-
stakeholders collectively will help determine the              enue, opposite Site 7, consists of 5 parcels with
most advantageous future scenarios for Staten Is-              a total area of 1.34 acres. Current land uses in-
land’s West Shore.                                             clude single family residences, vacant land and
                                                               parking facility.
After identifying vacant and underutilized sites as       •	   Site 9 consists of an assembly of four parcels
discussed in the previous sections, the study fo-              on Meredith avenue with a total area of approxi-
cused on larger contiguous parcels in these catego-            mately 34 acres. These parcels are all zoned
ries. As future land use scenarios are developed as            M3-1, but two have industrial facilities on them,
part of the study, these sites will be further analyzed        and the other two are vacant. Three of the par-
for a range of possible uses and then assessed                 cels are in private ownership and the fourth is
against such factors as:                                       owned by the Trust for Public Land.
                                                          •	   The largest Area for Discussion site in Zone III
•	   Ownership (Public or private),                            is Site 10 which consists of 57 parcels of ap-
•	   Existing land use; existing tenant,                       proximately 107 acres. This site includes a few
•	   Existing zoning,                                          large sized parcels (in excess of 10 acres), a
•	   Waterfront location,                                      few medium sized parcels (between 1 and 3
•	   Access to transportation,                                 acres ), the rest comprises of smaller parcels.
•	   Proximity to resource or amenities (i.e. local re-        The bigger parcels are either categorized as va-
     tail or open space),                                      cant or have transportation/ utility related land
                                                               use. Within the boundaries of Victory Boulevard,
•	   Potential synergies/connections,
                                                               Wakefield	Avenue,	Baron	Avenue	and	Shenan-
•	   Environmental conditions (comprised by wet-
                                                               doah Avenue, there are small lot industrial and
     lands	and/or	brownfields),
                                                               commercial uses. Sandwiched within these in-
•	   Political or community considerations, and
                                                               dustrial and commercial uses are a few single
•	   Access to infrastructure.
                                                               family residential uses. Most of the land (ap-
                                                               proximately 65%) in this area is publicly owned
This assessment and evaluation process will help
                                                               by the City of New York.
focus future discussions around those areas with
                                                          •	   Site 11 consists of 2 parcels of approximately
the greatest potential for positive long-term chang-
                                                               5.5 acres at the intersection of Victory Boule-
es along the West shore.
                                                               vard and West Shore Expressway East Service
                                                               Road/ Glen Street. City records show that one
Findings                                                       of the parcels is used for commercial, while the
                                                               other is vacant. However, aerial views of this site
Due to the presence of the proposed Fresh Kills                show the vacant lot to be currently used as a
Park in the southern section of Zone III, most of the          parking facility, probably to support the commer-
development opportunities in this zone are located             cial use across the street Beresford Avenue.
in the northern section. The following are some of
the initial sites that warranted further review by the    The Study Team will continue to analyze these and
study team and discussion with other agencies and         other parcels within this zone in this manner, as it
community groups:                                         develops alternative future scenarios for the Study
                                                          Area.



72
Map 32- Areas of Opportunity, Travis- Fresh Kills Zone




Table 17- Potential Development Opportunities, Travis-Freshkills Zone




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Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2E: Zone IV: Charleston-Tottenville: Existing
Land Use/ Constraints and Opportunities

2.E.1: Existing Land Use Analysis

This approximately 1,500 acre zone includes a
number of the Study Area’s old growth neighbor-
hoods, a long history of industrial activity, and at its
southern end the Study Area’s only rail passenger
service. Zone IV is composed mostly of M1-1, M2-1
and M3-1 zoned lots with small pockets of resi-
dential (R3-2) and commercial (C8-2) lots, and like
many	areas	along	the	West	Shore	it	includes	signifi-
cant amounts of vacant land and public open space.
The waterfront is also dotted with vacant lots and
vacant structures such as old warehouses and for-
                                                               Arthur Kills Correctional Facility
mer industrial buildings with inactive smoke stacks.
Much of the shoreline is secured with a bulkhead
although many such sections have deteriorated and
piers have collapsed.

Zone IV has the most diverse land use of the Study
Area’s four zones and also the most housing and
services for area residents. While vacant land is
still the largest land use category, there are similarly
sized industrial, open space and residential por-
tions	of	the	area	and	significant	commercial,	utility	
and public facility uses that are similar in cumulative
area to each other. New residential developments
are generally either larger homes on or near the
waterfront or attached or semi-attached two-family
homes on smaller lots.

Tottenville	was	first	inhabited	by	Native	Americans	           Defunct LNG Tanks
and eventually became a European settlement
based upon the ferry that transported people from
New York to Philadelphia. With the deep waters
of	 the	 Arthur	 Kill	 well-suited	 to	 fishing	 and	 water	
transport,	the	area	flourished	as	a	stop	for	boats	on	
their way to Manhattan. The Staten Island Railroad
connected Tottenville to Saint George in the 1860s.
Later, in the last decade of the nineteenth century,
the Atlantic Terra Cotta Company built a factory
on the Arthur Kill, and became one of the largest
employers on the island until the 1930s. Boatyards
also played an important role in Tottenville’s devel-
opment until the beginning of the twentieth century,
when steel replaced wood as the primary material
for boat manufacture. The Staten Island Railway                Port Mobil, Oil Tank Farm




74
Map 33- Aerial Map, Charleston-Tottenville Zone




                                                  75
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


line comes right up to the shore in Tottenville, open-
ing up the possibility of transit-supported waterfront
development in this area.

The main features of this zone are:

•	   The Outerbridge Crossing and its connections
     to the West Shore Expressway and Richmond
     Parkway.
•	   Port Mobil, an oil tank farm and a working oil
     storage facility.
•	   The Clay Pit Ponds State Park.
•	   Bricktown Center, a retail establishment located
     near the southern part of the zone.
•	   Charleston and Tottenville residential neighbor-     Marina in Tottenville
     hoods and the maritime uses along Ellis Street
     in Tottenville.
•	   The Staten Island Railroad

Transportation Uses

Zone IV is probably the best served by a variety of
transportation facilities, including the Outerbridge
Crossing to New Jersey, the West Shore Express-
way and Richmond Parkway connecting to points to
the north and east, and the Staten Island Railroad,
providing regular passenger rail service, including
express service to the Staten Island Ferry. Charles-
ton is also the proposed site of a new 300-bus MTA
Bus Depot, which will contribute to improved ex-
press bus service from Staten Island.
                                                          Staten Island Gun Club
Residential Uses
                                                          mately 108 additional senior housing units have
Although the bulk of Tottenville is outside of the        been proposed on Androvette Street in Charleston.
Study Area, it is a well anchored suburban commu-         As shown in Map 34, there are other small pockets
nity with old and new homes and is worth mention-         of residential growth along Sharrotts Road on both
ing	due	to	its	influence	on	future	planning	decisions.	   sides of Arthur Kill Road, and others between Tot-
The residential population in this and other nearby       tenville and the Outerbridge Crossing. Preliminary
areas in southwestern Staten Island grew rapidly          plans for the Bricktown II development planned for
over the past two decades. Another historically im-       the southern side of Edgewood Avenue also in-
portant residential area, know both as Charleston         cludes,	among	other	potential	uses,	an	unspecified	
and Kreischerville, has mainly single-family homes        number of residential units.
on a number of small streets that often have resi-
dences juxtaposed next to more recently developed         Commercial Uses
commercial or light industrial or warehouse uses. A
major new senior housing development – the Tides          The zone includes a large big-box retail center (Brick-
– transformed a major section of the zone’s water-        town Center) just north of the Outerbridge Cross-
front property, and just north of the Tides approxi-      ing toll plazas with a Home Depot and the island’s



76
Map 34- Land Use, Charleston-Tottenville Zone




Figure 24- Land Use Analysis, Charleston-Tottenville Zone




                                                            77
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


first Target store. The center takes full advantage        Arthur Kill Road but never operated due to public
of the access provided by the highways and bridge          safety concerns. Other manufacturing and produc-
connections in that area, and of the rapid residen-        tion facilities include MDS Arch Metal and Glass.
tial growth in southwestern Staten Island in recent        Contractors and a variety of electrical, plumbing,
years. Another recently development retail center,         general, and landscape contractors.
located across Veterans Road West from Bricktown
Center I, added about 72,000 square feet. Finally, a       Parks and Natural Areas
development scheduled west of Arthur Kill Road at
Richmond Valley Road, the Waterfront Commons,              Other than Zone III, which includes the 2,200 acre
would add 443,000 sq. ft. of outlet shopping and           Fresh Kills Park, Zone IV includes the most open
multiplex cinema to the area.                              space, in terms of total acreage (279 acres) and
                                                           percent of total land area in the zone (18%), of any
Overall, Zone IV has the majority of the Study Area’s      of the other Study Area zones. The bulk of this is
commercial establishments. For example, there are          in the Clay Pit Pond Park, a 260-acre State-oper-
many convenience retail and service outlets, like piz-     ated facility that is primarily a nature preserve that
zerias, bagel shops, delis and nail salons along with      includes wetlands, ponds, sand barrens, spring-fed
restaurants like Big Nose Kate’s Saloon, Killmey-          streams and woodlands. It has a variety of educa-
ers and the Old Bermuda Inn. Other retail/service          tional programs available for school children and
outlets include Pathmark, a large health club, and a       other,	along	with	picnic	areas,	hiking	trails	and	five		
healthy mix of retail, banks, medical facilities, food     miles of horseback riding paths. There is also a pri-
service, auto repair and home improvement op-              vate driving range along Arthur Kill Road just north
erations. Some of the zone’s commercial uses are           of the State correctional facility.
those that require large lots but are suitable for areas
near higher density residential areas, like Movies at      2.E.2: Vacant Land Analysis
Staten Island 14, and E. Taglianetti Yacht Sales.
The area also includes some of the most diverse            As shown in Figure 24, over one-third of the zones
uses, including several adult entertainment spots,         land use is vacant land, with open space (primarily
a chamber music society, a tractor repair operation,       Clay Pit Pond Park) and industrial and manufactur-
a dance school, and Michael Angelo’s Unique Mir-           ing uses both accounting for 18% of the total. The
rors.                                                      residential sector’s 8% share of total land area is
                                                           well above the equivalent share in the other three
Industrial/Manufacturing                                   zones,	reflecting	the	presence	of	several	older	resi-
                                                           dential areas and the recent substantial residential
More so than for much of the Study Area, Zone IV           growth along Arthur Kill Road.
includes active working waterfront uses, including
the Tottenville Marina and Simple Seafoods on El-          To establish the amount of available and develop-
lis Street, a waterfront lumber loading facility, and      able vacant land, all vacant parcels (those with no
the Port Mobil facility. The zone includes the least       development) were overlaid with mapped wetland
amount of land area categorized as manufacturing           areas,	both	tidal	and	freshwater,	as	defined	by	NYS	
and industrial land use, although there is a consid-       DEC, along with their respective development buf-
erable amount of active industrial uses. The largest       fers of 100 feet and 150 feet. The “net” vacant
of these industrial uses is Port Mobil, a large oil tank   parcel acreage therefore represents the areas that
facility, directly west of the State-owned and oper-       remained after these wetlands and associated buf-
ated Clay Pit Ponds Park. This 260-acre nature pre-        fer areas had been removed. These remaining land
serve provides this study zone’s largest recreation        areas were then subdivided into three categories:
spot. The waterfront in this northern portion of Zone
IV includes the State’s medium-security Arthur Kill        •	   parcels less than 1 acre in area,
Correctional Facility, the Industrial Loop properties,     •	   parcels between 1 and 3 acres in area, and
warehouse and light-industrial operations, and the         •	   parcels more than 3 acres in area.
massive	 Liquefied	 Natural	 Gas	 tanks	 built	 along	



78
            Map 35- Vacant Land Analysis, Charleston-Tottenville Zone




Figure 25- Vacant Land Analysis (by number of parcels), Charleston-     Figure 26- Vacant Land Analysis (by area, in acres), Charleston-
           Tottenville Zone                                                        Tottenville Zone




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Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


Findings                                                       2.E.3: Newly Developed Properties/ Rezonings

Applying this methodology to Zone IV resulted in               The major proposals in Zone IV include the Water-
the following distribution of vacant land:                     front Commons, a proposed 443,000 sq. ft. com-
                                                               mercial development along the waterfront just south
                                                               of the Outerbridge Crossing, the 135-unit Kreisch-
                                                               erville Senior Housing Facility, a 300- bus depot for
                                                               MTA along Arthur Kill Road near Kreischer Street,
                                                               and a Loew’s building supply on Arthur Kill Road
                                                               near the existing Pathmark store. There are prelimi-
                                                               nary plans for a Bricktown II development along the
                                                               southern side of Edgewood Avenue, including an
                                                               unspecified	mixture	of	residential,	commercial	and	
Table 18- Vacant Land Analysis, Charleston-Tottenvillet Zone
                                                               recreational uses, as well as a new public school.
                                                               Finally, at the southern portion of the zone a new
                                                               Staten Island Railroad train station, with a park-
                                                               and-ride lot for 150 cars, has been proposed. This
As shown, removing wetland and buffer areas re-                roughly 7.4-acre facility, located on Block 8020,
duced the number of vacant parcels from 355 to 334             Lots 6, 80 and 86, would located roughly between,
and the total available vacant land from 463 acres to          and would replace the existing Nassau and Atlantic
389 acres. Of the 91 vacant parcels in Zone III, the           stations.
265 parcels under 1 acre represent 79% of the par-
cels but only 18% of the acres, while the 31 parcels
over 3 acres account for 66 of the total net vacant
acreage. Map 35 includes this same information in
graphic format as well as the approximate location
of these vacant parcels. As is evident in Map 35,
there are several areas of large vacant parcels or
groups of smaller contiguous parcels, often next to
relatively stable exiting uses, offering considerable
potential for innovative development within an exist-
ing built environment.




80
            Map 36- Proposed Projects, Charleston-Tottenville Zone




Table 19- Proposed Developments, Charleston-Tottenville Zone




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Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.E.4: Property Ownership Analysis

The parcels were divided into seven ownership
categories, based on information from the NYC
Department of Finance database:

•	   Private
•	   Private (tax -exempt)
•	   Public-Private
•	   Port Authority of NY and NJ
•	   Public, City Owned
•	   Public, State Owned
•	   No	 Data	 (ownership	 not	 classified	 in	 the	
     NYCDOF database)

Findings

Analysis of the parcels in Zone IV shows the
following:

•	   Private owners hold most of the parcels (763, or
     68% of the total) and the associated 928 acres
     in those parcels accounts for 65% of the zone’s
     land area.
•	   New York State’s 184 parcels (16% of the total)
     account for 20% of the land.
•	   New York City’s 117 parcels (11% of the parcels)
     account for 12% of the acreage.

The 462 acres of publicly owned land               is
approximately 32% of Zone IV.




82
            Map 37- Ownership Analysis, Charleston-Tottenville Zone




Figure 27- Property Ownership Analysis (by parcels), Charleston-      Figure 28- Property Ownership Analysis (by area), Charleston-Totten-
           Tottenville Zone                                                      ville Zone




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Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.E.5: Underutilized Sites Analysis                                   Zone	 IV.	The	 figures	 in	 the	 table	 above	 show	 that	
                                                                      virtually all of the underutilized land is within parcels
Identifying underutilized parcels gives an indication                 that are less than 25% utilized, increasing the
of those partially occupied areas most likely to be                   chance for individual parcels or groups of parcels to
targeted for potential future developments. As with                   be redeveloped at some time in the future.
vacant	 land,	 net	 underutilized	 area	 is	 defined	 as	
the area left over after subtracting any wetlands                     The parcels were further analyzed in terms of
and their associated buffer areas from the actual                     whether they were in residential or commercial/
lot	 area.	 Net	 underutilized	 land	 is	 then	 defined	 as	          industrial zoning districts. The results, shown
parcels of are at least 1 acre in area that have a                    in Table 21, indicate that of the 51 underutilized
built FAR which is 50% or less than the allowable                     parcels, 43 parcels presently at 25% utilization
FAR. When analyzing parcels in manufacturing                          or less are within manufacturing districts, and
districts, the built FAR criterion has been reduced to                include a total area of 365.88 acres, while there
25%	to	reflect	the	amount	of	unbuilt	land	on	many	                    are 3 residentially owned parcel (26.83 acres)
manufacturing sites, while for parcels in residential                 and 1 commercially zoned parcel (4.06 acres).
and commercial districts, the 50% screening criteria                  The presence of underutilized commercial and
for FAR was used. Underutilized parcels also do                       residential parcels, along with the normal range of
not include parcels categorized as open space or                      manufacturing-zoned sites, indicates a somewhat
vacant land.                                                          broader range of redevelopment opportunities in
                                                                      this zone, especially with virtually all of these sites
The underutilized land has been further categorized                   below 25% utilization.
into	 five	 sections	 based	 on	 the	 percentage	 of	 the	
built FAR as compared to the allowed FAR:

•	   0% -- almost negligible built FAR,
•	   more than 0% and up to 10%,
•	   more than 10% and up to 25%,
•	   more than 25% and up to 40%, and
•	   more than 40% up to 50%.
                                                                      Table 21- Breakdown of Underutilized Parcels by Zoning Districts,
                                                                                Charleston-Tottenville Zone
Findings

In Zone IV (see Figures 22 and 23) there are 51
parcels totaling 419.84 acres with less than 50% of
the allowable FAR, approximately 6% of the zone’s
total land area. The following is the distribution of
these parcels by built FAR category:




Table 20- Breakdown of Underutilized Parcels by Utilization Levels,
          Area and Number of Parcels- Charleston-Tottenville Zone



The 420 acres on these underutilized parcels
accounts for 29% of the total area (1,429 acres) in



84
            Map 38- Underutilized Land Analysis, Charleston-Tottenville Zone




Figure 29- Underutilized Land Analysis (by parcels), Charleston-         Figure 30- Underutilized Land Analysis (by area), Charleston-Totten
           Tottenville Zone                                                         ville Zone




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Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.E.6: Environmental Constraints

Zone IV is the section of the Study Area with the
least amount of wetland and 100-year Flood Plain
coverage (see Map 39). The natural features within
this zone include the following:

•	   Blazing Star
•	   Sutton Woods
•	   Port Mobil Swamp Forest and Tidal Flats
•	   Sharrotts Road Shorelands
•	   Engelwood Boundary Tract
•	   Kreischer’s Cove
•	   Charleston Woods/ Kreisler Hill
•	   Outerbridge Shorelands

There are also two contaminated sites - Nassau
Recycling (part of the NYS Superfund Program) and
Nassau Metals (part of the NYS Voluntary Cleanup
Program)




86
Map 39- Environmental Constraints, Charleston-Tottenville Zone




                                                                 87
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


2.E.7: Areas for Discussion                                       Zoning District.(SRD).
                                                             •	   Like Site 12, Site 13 is also a group of parcels
The previous assessments in this section provide                  located between Arthur Kill Road and the
information that is useful in identifying sites                   waterfront. Site 13 consists of 72 parcels with a
and assemblages that may be suitable for new                      total of approximately 92 acres. All the parcels
development, new or expanded open space                           are under private ownership and primarily consist
opportunities or for transportation investments.                  of a few big parcels of vacant land to the south
This information, along with the results of the study             and the smaller lots abutting Industrial Loop. The
team’s parallel Market Analysis and input from Study              smaller lots are primarily industrial in nature,
Area stakeholders, collectively will help determine               along with a few vacant parcels and a parking-
the most advantageous future scenarios for Staten                 related facility. All parcels within the site are
Island’s West Shore.                                              zoned M3-1 and fall within the boundaries of the
                                                                  South Richmond Special Zoning District (SRD).
After identifying vacant and underutilized sites as dis-     •	   Site 14 consists of 60 parcels (all but one under
cussed in the previous sections, the study focused                private ownership) and totaling approximately
on larger contiguous parcels in these categories. As              95 acres in area. Most of the land (70 acres) is
future land use scenarios are developed as part of                vacant and the rest of it has industrial uses. Most
the study, these sites will be further analyzed for a             of the parcels are in a M1-1 zoning district, while
range of possible uses and then assessed against                  the others are zoned M3-1. Also, 48 out of the 60
such factors as:                                                  parcels are located within the boundaries of the
                                                                  SRD.
•	   Ownership (Public or private),                          •	   Site 15, which is located on Arthur Kill Road across
•	   Existing land use; existing tenant,                          from Site 14, consists of 114 parcels totaling
•	   Existing zoning,                                             approximately 63 acres. The site includes a few
•	   Waterfront location,                                         large vacant lots (5 parcels totaling 30 acres) and
•	   Access to transportation,                                    a multitude of smaller lots whose current land
•	   Proximity to resource or amenities (i.e. local retail        use is either residential, industrial or vacant land.
     or open space),                                              All the parcels are under private ownership and
•	   Potential synergies/connections,                             a majority of the parcels are zoned M1-1 except
•	   Environmental conditions (comprised by wetlands              10 parcels in R3X and 3 parcels in R3-2. Of the
     and/or	brownfields),	                                        114 parcels, 108 are within the boundaries of the
•	   Political or community considerations, and                   SRD.
•	   Access to infrastructure.                               •	   Sites 16 to Sites 22 are all smaller assemblages of
                                                                  land, most of the them vacant by current records,
This assessment and evaluation process will help                  interspersed with industrial or commercial uses.
focus future discussions around those areas with                  There are a total of 72 parcels within these seven
the greatest potential for positive long-term changes             sites with a total area of 134 acres. Sites 17, 18,
along the West shore.                                             19 and 20 each has at least one vacant parcel
                                                                  which	 is	 more	 than	 7.5	 acres	 in	 area.	 The	 five	
Findings                                                          largest of these seven parcels are currently vacant
                                                                  and account for 41% (55.2 acres) of the site’s
•	   Site 12 (See Map 40) is an assemblage of 27                  combined area. Most of the 72 parcels within the
     parcels (approximately 138 total acres) located              seven sites are under private ownership and with
     between Arthur Kill Road and the waterfront                  the	 exception	 of	 five	 	 parcels	 all	 of	 them	 are	 in	
     on the northern section of this zone. Almost all             the SRD.
     the parcels are under private ownership and
     their predominant land use is industrial and            The Study Team will continue to analyze these
     transportation/utility related business. All the        and other parcels within this zone, as it develops
     parcels in this site are either zoned M3-1 or           alternative future scenarios for the Study Area.
     M2-1 and are within the South Richmond Special




88
Map 40- Areas of Opportunity, Charleston-Tottenville Zone




Table 22- Potential Development Opportunities, Charleston-Tottenville Zone




                                                                             89
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


3:TRANSPORTATION EXISTING                                 of them work within the other boroughs. Although
  CONDITIONS                                              very close to the West Shore, a relatively small per-
                                                          centage (4% -10%) works in New Jersey. Close
3.A: Study Area                                           to two-thirds of those who work in the West Shore
                                                          are Staten Island residents(Figures 32 and 33). Pie
Staten Island is the borough of New York City with        charts show where residents of each zone work,
development patterns and a transportation network         and where those working in each zone live. Any-
closer to New Jersey than to the rest of New York         where from 60% to 70% of workers in each of the
City. The private auto and its overall travel and com-    zones live on Staten Island, and 12% to 17% live
muting	patterns	in	Staten	Island	reflect	these	land	      in New Jersey, which understandably represent the
use patterns, and the borough stand out as very           two largest segments. (See Figures 32 and 33)
different than the City Average.
                                                          Almost three-fourths of all Staten Island commut-
3.A.1: Automobile Ownership                               ers travel by car – more than double the Citywide
                                                          average of 34%. Transit usage is much lower than
Auto ownership for West Shore residents in 2000           the	citywide	figures	--	roughly	20%	of	Staten	Island	
is shown in Figure 31, based on US Census data.           commuters use transit compared to 54% Citywide.
Broken down by zone, vehicle ownership rates are          In determining what mode a commuter uses, if mul-
generally consistent across all four zones, with          tiple modes are used for a trip (e.g., a person takes
about 80% - 90% of households having one or               a bus to the Staten Island Ferry and then uses the
more vehicles. Approximately 23% of households            subway in Manhattan), the Census methodology
in Zone I have no vehicle compared to less than           counts the last leg of a trip (subway in this instance)
10% in all other zones. Throughout the four zones,        as the mode of travel. Overall, approximately 75%
                                                          of West Shore residents drive to work – slightly
                                                          higher than the borough-wide average. (See Fig-
                                                          ure 35, Mode-of-Travel to Work) Overall public
                                                          transportation usage among West Shore residents
                                                          (21%) closely matches the borough-wide 20% lev-
                                                          el. Public transportation takes a greater share in
                                                          Zone I (40%) than in the other zones, which are still
                                                          dominated by automobile travel.

                                                          Analysis of census data shows that commute times
                                                          for Staten Island have risen over the past few de-
                                                          cades to some of the longest in the country. Aver-
                                                          age commute times were 26 minutes in 1980, 39
                                                          minutes in 1990, and 44 minutes in 2000, for the is-
Figure 31: Vehicle Ownership by Zones                     land as a whole. For commuters living in the Study
                                                          Area, average travel time to work was actually
from 70 to 80% of all households have either one or       higher. The average commute time for residents of
two vehicles available                                    Zone	I	was	57	minutes,	while	the	figures	for	Zones	
                                                          II/III and Zone IV were 48 and 47 minutes, respec-
3.A.2: Journey-to-Work Commuter Patterns                  tively (US Census 2000). Zone I commutes were
                                                          noted to be typically longer as a higher percentage
U.S. Census “Journey-to-work” data on commuting           of the residents worked in Manhattan as compared
patterns	in	the	Study	Area	indicate	that	a	significant	   to the other three zones.
percentage of the West Shore’s residents work on
Staten Island (from 35% to 55% across the four            These average commute times do not reveal what
zones) or in Manhattan (20% - 40%), and the rest          proportion of residents have so-called “extreme”



90
                                                   Figure 33: Place of Residence for Workers, by Zones




                                                   Figure 34: Comparative Journey to Work Data for New York City
Figure 32: Place of Work for Residents, by Zones              Boroughs




                                                                                                                   91
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


                                                              commutes of 90 minutes or more. Therefore, travel
                                                              time to work is shown in categories ranging from
                                                              less than 5 minutes to more than 90 minutes. Nota-
                                                              bly, commute times for Study Area residents tend to
                                                              be either short or long, with few of “medium length.”
                                                              Approximately 75% of all commutes are either less
                                                              than 25 minutes or greater than 45 minutes. Figure
                                                              36, Comparison of Commuter Times, shows that
                                                              this commute times pattern is generally consis-
                                                              tent across zones. One exception to this is Zone I,
                                                              which has a much larger percentage of commutes
                                                              of 90 minutes or more: 28% as compared to ap-
                                                              proximately 16% for all other zones.


                                                              3.B: Study Area Road Network

                                                              The roadway network within the Study Area con-
                                                              sists of routes owned and maintained by either
                                                              New York City or New York State. Regardless of
                                                              jurisdiction,	all	roadways	are	classified	according	to	
                                                              a	 federal	 system	 called	 “functional	 classification,”	
                                                              reflecting	 the	 character	 of	 roadway	 service	 they	
                                                              provide. Roads such as highways and arterials are
                                                              devoted almost exclusively to mobility (e.g. uninter-
                                                              rupted	 flow),	 while	 local	 neighborhood	 streets	 are	
                                                              devoted almost exclusively to access to local areas
                                                              and	 properties.	 The	 four	 roadway	 classifications	
                                                              are Principal Arterials, Minor Arterials, Collector
                                                              Roads, and Local Roads. See Map 41-Functional
                                                              Classification	of	Roadways.	

                                                              3.B.1: Key Vehicular Corridors

                                                              Major east-west corridors in the Study Area include
                                                              the Staten Island Expressway and the Korean War
                                                              Veterans	 (Richmond)	 Parkway,	 both	 classified	 as	
Figure 35: Mode-of-Travel to Work for Residents, by Zones
                                                              Principal Arterials, and Arthur Kill Road and Tra-
                                                              vis	Avenue,	which	are	classified	as	Minor	Arterials.	
                                                              The east-west corridors provide access among lo-
                                                              cations within the Study Area, and all except Travis
                                                              Avenue also provide access to locations outside
                                                              of it. Major north-south corridors include the West
                                                              Shore Expressway and Richmond Avenue, both of
                                                              which	are	classified	as	Principal	Arterials,	providing	
                                                              some intra-area connections but also providing lo-
                                                              cal residents and businesses with access to loca-
Figure 36: Comparison of Commute Times from different Zones
                                                              tions outside of it. In addition, South Avenue and
                                                              Victory Boulevard traverse the northern half of the



92
Map	41-	Functional	Classification	of	Roadways	




                                                 93
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


Study Area diagonally but primarily serve the north-
south direction. Outside the Study Area, South Av-
enue continues to the north whereas Victory Bou-
levard continues to the east. Finally, Forest Avenue
provides a connection between Zone I and areas to
the east along the North Shore of Staten Island.

The road network within the Study Area connects to
three major bridges, two of which fall within the Study
Area. The Goethals Bridge and the Outerbridge
Crossing (both operated by the Port Authority of New
York and New Jersey – PANYNJ) connect Staten Is-
land to New Jersey, where as the Verrazano-Nar-
rows Bridge (operated by MTA Bridges and Tunnels
– MTA B&T) connects Staten Island to Brooklyn. All          West Shore Expressway (with service roads), Looking South, Adja-
three bridges have one-way inbound (eastbound)              cent to Staten Island Corporate Park
tolls, with the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge being the
only MTA B&T crossing with one-way tolls.

Studies by the New York Metropolitan Transportation
Council (NYMTC) show that the Outerbridge Cross-
ing is deemed to be extremely congested (i.e., with a
volume-to-capacity ratio > 1) during both the morn-
ing and the evening four-hour peak period, while
the Verrazano-Narrows bridge is deemed extremely
congested during the morning peak hours only.
                                                            Korean War Veteran Highway between Interchange with West Shore
                                                            Expressway and Outerbridge Crossing
The following are descriptions of the major vehicular
corridors along Staten Island’s west shore (see Map
41-	Functional	Classification	of	Roadways	and	Map	          •West	Shore	Expressway	(NY	440)
42-	Average	Daily	Traffic	Volumes):                         Traveling through or on the borders of all four Study
                                                            Area zones, NY 440 is a discontinuous route through
•Staten	Island	Expressway	(I-278)                           Staten Island. Within the Study Area, it is comprised
Dividing Zones I and II, the section of I-278 within        of	 two	 separate	 roadway	 segments.	 The	 first	 seg-
the borough is known as the Staten Island Express-          ment traverses north to south through the Study Area
way (SIE). It traverses east to west along the North        from the SIE on the north end to Korean War Vet-
Shore of Staten Island, carrying this critical interstate   erans (Richmond) Parkway on the south end. This
link from the Goethals Bridge to the Verrazano-Nar-         segment is known as the West Shore Expressway
rows Bridge and from there into Brooklyn, Queens            or Pearl Harbor Memorial Expressway. This section
and the Bronx. Within Staten Island, I-278 ranges           includes two continuous travel lanes in each direc-
from two lanes in each direction on the Goethals            tion separated by a landscaped median and shoul-
Bridge to a considerably wider cross-sections to the        ders. Service roads exist in some locations but are
east, varying from four to eight travel lanes, shoul-       not continuous. This Principal Arterial is maintained
ders, and paved or landscaped median. There are             by the State and is categorized as a freeway.
toll plazas at both ends for those using the Goethals
Bridge to New Jersey or the Verrazano-Narrows               •Korean	War	Veterans	Parkway	
Bridge to Brooklyn. I-278 is categorized as a divided       The second segment of NY 440, extending east-
urban freeway throughout Staten Island, with ser-           to-west through the center of Zone IV between the
vice roads in some locations but not continuously on        Outerbridge Crossing and the interchange with
either side.                                                West Shore Expressway, is known as the Korean




94
Map	42-	Average	Daily	Traffic	Volumes




                                        95
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


War Veterans Parkway (also frequently referred
to by its former name -- Richmond Parkway). This
highway segment generally has two travel lanes
in each direction, separated by a concrete median
on the Outerbridge Crossing or by a grass medi-
an. Within the Study Area, the roadway widens to
accommodate	a	toll	plaza	for	eastbound	traffic	on	
the east side of the bridge, with entrances and ex-
its at various locations, and shoulders (except on
the bridge). This State-maintained roadway with a
functional	classification	of	Principal	Arterial	is	a	fully	
access-controlled freeway.

•Arthur	Kill	Road
Connecting Zones III and IV, the southern end of
Arthur Kill Road meanders through the coastal
neighborhoods of Tottenville and Charleston along             Arthur Kill Road at Annadale Road
the southwestern shore of the Study Area. Forming
the southern boundary of Zone III, it extends east-
ward and northeastward to its northern terminus in
Historic Richmondtown. Under the jurisdiction of
the	City,	Arthur	Kill	Road	has	a	functional	classifica-
tion of Minor Arterial within the Study Area. A cross
section of Arthur Kill Road reveals one travel lane
in each direction with occasional but discontinuous
shoulders. The roadway widens to accommodate
turn lanes at some intersections. Throughout the
majority of its length there is no median, although
there are occasional locations with a landscaped
or striped median, or with turning lanes. Parking
is generally not permitted, although in the more
densely developed areas in its western portion,
a lane of on-street parking is permitted along the
                                                              Victory Boulevard at West Shore Expressway, Looking East
shoulders.

•Victory	Boulevard
In	1816	the	first	‘highway’	was	built	in	Staten	Island	
and called the Richmond Turnpike, an island-long
thoroughfare that linked ferry service from Manhat-
tan at Tompinksville to ferry service to New Jersey
at Travis. Later the Richmond Turnpike became
Victory Boulevard. Crossing Zones II and III, Victory
Boulevard traverses approximately north to south
from its origin on the Western Shore to its northeast
extension beyond the Study Area. Under the juris-
diction	of	the	City,	it	has	a	functional	classification	
of Principal Arterial. With a cross section similar to
Arthur Kill Road, Victory Boulevard has one travel
lane in each direction with shoulders. In general             Victory Boulevard (Independence Way) in Travis




96
there is no median except at locations of widening
to accommodate turn lanes at intersections. Park-
ing is permitted on the shoulder at some locations.
Widening of the road also occurs at some locations
to accommodate parking and, where space per-
mits, wider than standard lanes. Victory Boulevard
passes through and acts as the “Main Street” of the
historic Travis community in Zone III.

•Richmond	Avenue
Richmond Avenue is a major north-south thorough-
fare along the eastern border of Fresh Kills Park.
Under the jurisdiction of the City, it has a functional
classification	 of	 Principal	 Arterial.	 Richmond	 Av-
enue is a divided roadway with a center median.
At major intersections the median accommodates
                                                                 Richmond Avenue between Staten Island Mall and Fresh Kills Park
turn lanes. A cross section reveals four travel lanes
in each direction and shoulders that can accom-
modate parking. The roadway narrows to three
travel lanes in each direction just north of Korean
War Veterans Parkway. With the park on the west
side and access to commercial properties along the
east side, the character of the corridor is primarily
commercial, including major retail concentrations
like the Staten Island Mall.

•Travis	Avenue
Dividing Zones II and III, Travis Avenue extends
east to west from South Avenue to Richmond Ave-
nue. Under the jurisdiction of the City, it has a func-
tional	classification	of	Minor	Arterial	with	one	lane	
in each direction with no median. Along the majority
of its length there are no shoulders, but toward its
western end there is space for wider than standard
lanes and there is room for shoulders and some                   Forest Avenue/ South Avenue in Arlington (Zone I) Looking West
parking at its eastern end.
                                                                 at intersections. Parking is generally not permitted.
•South	Avenue                                                    In densely developed areas on the western portion
Crossing portions of Zones I, II and III, South Av-              of its length, however, a lane of on-street parking is
enue traverses approximately north to south from                 permitted along the shoulders.
its southern origin at Meredith Avenue to its north-
ern terminus at Richmond Terrace in the northeast                •Forest	Avenue
corner of the Study Area. Under the jurisdiction of              With its western terminus in Zone I of the Study
the	 City,	 it	 has	 a	 functional	 classification	 of	 Minor	   Area, Forest Avenue is a major east-west roadway
Arterial. West of its interchange with NY 440, it is an          along the North Shore. Starting on the west at the
undivided roadway with one travel lane in each di-               interchange of I-278 and NY 440 next to the Go-
rection without shoulders. East of NY 440 it has two             ethals Bridge toll plaza, it travels through the North
travel lanes in each direction, with shoulders, plus a           Shore neighborhoods to its terminus at Victory Bou-
center median with landscaping and turning lanes                 levard near Silver Lake Park. Under the jurisdiction



                                                                                                                                   97
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


of	the	City,	it	has	a	functional	classification	of	Prin-                    large-dimension trucks with 53 foot trailers are not
cipal Arterial. Forest Avenue is primarily an undi-                         allowed within New York City limits. The City further
vided roadway within the Study Area; a center me-                           established its own set of truck routes for all sizes
dian is provided only to accommodate turn lanes at                          and types of truck.
intersections. Its cross section includes two travel
lanes in each direction and shoulders that can ac-                          According	to	the	Traffic	Rules	set	forth	by	the	City,	
commodate parking. With a number of moderate to
             TRUCK ROUTES                                                   the New York City Department of Transportation
large commercial properties abutting the roadway                            designates a network of truck routes throughout
       Zone I, the character York State law, the is York all the boroughs. (See designates certain roads as
within According to Federal and New of the corridor Newpri- State Department of TransportationMap 43-Freight Transporta-
                                                                            tion.) a designated two classes of roadway to
marily routes for large-dimension vehicles (tractor-trailers). However, except for There areroute across the Bronx and Queenssegments
       commercial within the Study Area.
                                                                            -- with 53 foot trailers are not allowed Local Truck
       allow access to Nassau and Suffolk counties, large-dimension trucksThrough Truck Routes and within New YorkRoutes.
       City limits. The City further established its own set of truck routes for all sizes and types of truck.
3.B.2: Truck Routes                                                         Commercial vehicles with two axles and six tires,
                                                                            or three or more axles, are required to follow the
       According to the Traffic Rules set forth by the City, the New York City Department of Transportation designates a network
                 Federal and New York State law, Freight truck route There are two classes of roadway segments
According toroutes throughout all the boroughs. (See Map X,the Transportation.)network. The Through Truck Routes are
       of truck
       -- Through Department Local Truck Routes. Commercial intended for all and six tires, or three or more axles,
New York StateTruck Routes and of Transportation des- vehicles with two axlestruck trips that have neither an ori-
ignates certain roads as routes for network. The Through Truck Routes are intended for all truck trips thatborough. The Local
       are required to follow the truck route large-dimension               gin nor a destination within the have neither an
       origin nor a destination within the borough. except Truck Truck intended are truck trips for all truck trips with
vehicles like tractor-trailers. However, The Local for Routes are Routes for all intendedwith an origin and/or
       destination within the borough. For local and Queens
a designated route across the Bronxloadings or deliveries off of this system, trucks are required to take the most direct
                                                                            an origin and/or destination within the borough.
       route to their                                                        within the study area:
to allow access destination. The following table lists the truck routes For local loadings or deliveries off of this system,
                      to Nassau and Suffolk counties,
                   DESIGNATED ROUTES FOR TRUCK TRAFFIC ALONG THE WEST SHORE OF STATEN ISLAND
                         ROUTE                     TYPE                                     EXTENTS
            Staten Island Expressway (I-278)      Through        entire length within study area
            West Shore Expressway (NY 440)        Through        entire length within study area
          Korean War Veterans Pkwy. (NY 440)      Through        entire length within study area
                       Amboy Rd.                   Local         entire length within study area
                       Arden Ave.                  Local         entire length within study area
                     Arthur Kill Road              Local         entire length within study area
                     Bloomfield Ave.               Local         entire length within study area
                    Bloomingdale Rd.               Local         entire length within study area
                     Boscombe Ave.                 Local         Page Ave. to Weiner St.
                      Chelsea Rd.                  Local         Meredith Ave. to Bloomfield Ave.
                     E. Glen Street                Local         entire length within study area
                   Edward Curry Ave.               Local         Chelsea Rd. to South Ave.
                    Englewood Ave.                 Local         Veterans Road E. to Veterans Road W.
                     Forest Avenue                 Local         entire length within study area
                    Goethals Road N.               Local         entire length within study area
                        Gulf Ave.                  Local         entire length within study area
                     Huguenot Ave.                 Local         entire length within study area
                      N. Bridge St.                Local         Veterans Road W. to Arthur Kill Rd.
                   Richmond Avenue                 Local         entire length within study area
                     Rossville Ave.                Local         entire length within study area
                      Sharotts Rd.                 Local         Veterans Road E. to Veterans Road W.
                     South Avenue                  Local         entire length within study area
                    South Bridge St.               Local         Arthur Kill Road to Page Ave.
                     Travis Avenue                 Local         entire length within study area
                   Veterans Road W.                Local         Arden Ave. to Bloomingdale Rd., Sharotts Rd. to Arthur Kill Rd.
                    Victory Boulevard              Local         West Shore Expressway to study area boundary
                      Western Ave.                 Local         Forest Avenue to Richmond Terrace
          Source: New York City DOT (2007)
Table 23 -Designated Truck Routes Within West Shore Study Area


                                                                     5
98
Map 43 - Freight Transportation




                                  99
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


trucks are required to take the most direct route to             •	   South Avenue and Forest Avenue
their destination. The following table lists the truck
routes within the Study Area:                                    For its future (2014) scenario, West Shore Manu-
                                                                 facturing	Zones	Study	identified	nine	additional	in-
                                                                 tersections that would experience further conges-
3.B.3:	Roadway	Traffic	Congestion                                tion as part of its assumed development scenario.
                                                                 These intersections, which are also shown in the
The Study Area has a relatively limited and often                Map 44-Congested Intersections, include the fol-
discontinuous roadway system, often making it dif-               lowing:
ficult	and	time-consuming	to	travel	within	the	Study	
Area and to connect to other areas of Staten Island.             •	   Arthur Kill Road and Huguenot Avenue
With	 traffic	 concentrated	 into	 a	 limited	 number	 of	       •	   Richmond Avenue and Forest Hill Road
key corridors, high volumes results in recurring traf-           •	   Victory Boulevard and WSE SB Ramp
fic	congestion	that	further	decreases	mobility.	Con-             •	   Victory Boulevard and Travis Avenue
gestion occurs not only during peak commuting pe-                •	   South Avenue and Chelsea Road
riods on weekdays, but also on weekends due to                   •	   South Avenue and Travis Avenue
the area’s strong dependence on car travel. Exten-               •	   South Avenue and Glen Street
sive	 analysis	 of	 traffic	 conditions	 within	 the	 Study	     •	   Forest Avenue and Gulf Avenue
Area has been done in several studies. The follow-               •	   Arden Avenue and Service Road West
ing is a review of those portions of these studies
addressing existing congestion in the Study Area                 Charleston Transportation Study
as well as projected levels within approximately 10-
20 years.                                                        An	 analysis	 of	 traffic	 conditions	 in	 the	 autumn	 of	
                                                                 2002 was conducted at 27 selected intersections as
West Shore Manufacturing Zone Study                              part of the Charleston Transportation Study (NYC
                                                                 DCP), which overlaps much of Zone IV of the Study
An	 analysis	 of	 traffic	 conditions	 in	 the	 summer	 of	      Area. These intersections were analyzed using the
2004 was conducted at 24 selected intersections                  Highway Capacity Manual 2000 level of service
as part of the West Shore Manufacturing Zones                    procedures noted above. There were nine congest-
Study (NYC DCP), assessing conditions in an area                 ed	 intersections	 identified	 in	 that	 study	 which	 are	
which overlaps most of Zones I, II and III. The loca-            in the West Shore Study Area. Those found to be
tions of these intersections are shown in the Map                most congested include the following:
44 -Congested Intersections. These intersections
were analyzed to determine their “level of service,”             •	   Bloomingdale Road and Veterans Road West
an	 “A”	 through	 “F”	 grading	 of	 the	 quality	 of	 traffic	   •	   Arthur Kill Road and Bloomingdale Road
flow	based	on	calculations	of	traffic	delay	following	           •	   Arthur Kill Road and Veterans Road West
procedures outlined in the Highway Capacity Man-                 •	   Arthur Kill Road and North Bridge Street
ual 2000. Conditions were analyzed for Existing                  •	   Arthur Kill Road and Richmond Valley Road
(2004) and future (2014) scenarios. The most con-
gested	 intersections	 identified	 in	 that	 study	 which	       NYMTC Congestion Management System Status
are in the West Shore Study Area are highlighted in              Report
the Map 44-Congested Intersections and include
the following:                                                   Finally the Congestion Management System Sta-
                                                                 tus Report prepared by the New York Metropolitan
•	    Arthur Kill Road and Arden Avenue                          Transportation	Council	(NYMTC)	identifies	freeway	
•	    Arthur Kill Road and Drumgoole Road West                   or expressway segments as “Priority Congestion
•	    Richmond Avenue and Draper Place                           Locations”	based	on	the	ratio	of	traffic	volume	ex-
•	    Richmond Avenue and Drumgoole Road West                    perienced to actual capacity. Based on projected
•	    Richmond Avenue and Richmond Hill Road                     population and employment growth within Staten



100
Map 44- Congested Intersections, 2004 and 2014




                                                 101
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


island and throughout the New York City region,
estimates are also made of likely congestion levels
in 2030 on these same roadways. As shown in the
Map 45-Congested Corridors within the Study Area
the following highway/arterial segments were iden-
tified	as	either	close	to	capacity	(volume-to-capac-
ity (v/c ratio of 0.8-1.0) or “Extremely Congested”
(v/c ratio> 1.0 in 2005:

AM Peak Period:

•	    Outerbridge Crossing Eastbound to West Shore
      Expressway interchange/ Bloomingdale Road.
•	    Portion of the West Shore Expressway (NY 400)
      Northbound and Southbound (vicinity of Arthur
      Kill Road and Victory Boulevard interchanges
•	    Segments of Richmond Avenue near and north
      of Staten Island Mall
•	    Staten Island Expressway-”SIE”:(I-278) East-
      bound, east of interchange with West Shore
      Expressway

PM Peak Period:

•	    Travis Avenue-Richmond Avenue to Victory
      Boulevard
•	    West Shore Expressway at interchanges with
      the SIE, Arthur Kill Road, Bloomingdale Road
      and Victory Boulevard.

As shown in the Map 45-Congested Corridors, the
location and extent of projected congestion in the
Study Area in 2030 is approximately the same as
those shown in 2005. The major difference is a
somewhat longer congested segment of the West
Shore Expressway in the AM Peak. These projec-
tions	reflect	both	projected	growth	in	traffic	and	the	
implementation of likely planned improvements in
the Study Area.




102
Map 45 - Congested Corridors,2005 and 2030, AM and PM 4Hr Peak Periods (Source: NYMTC)




                                                                                         103
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


3.B.3:	Roadway	Traffic	Safety                                            are as follows: the section in question must have:

The Map 46-Accident Locations shows data per-                          •	 experienced an accident rate greater than or
taining	to	traffic	safety	along	roadways	in	the	Study	                      equal	to	a	specified	threshold,	for		similar	facility	
Area.	 Data	 are	 based	 on	 all	 reported	 traffic	 acci-                  types, and
dents, including those involving pedestrians and                       •	 an	accident	rate	which	exceeds	a	specified	sta-
                                                                            tistical	 confidence	 level.	 The	 most	 Area, these
    The Staten Island Transportation Task Force shown several perceived congested corridors. Within the Studyrecent	 HAL	
bicyclists. Accident-prone locations are identified for
                     portions of and Kill Road, Victory Boulevard, Richmond Avenue and Forest Avenue.
    included majorsegments Arthurfor intersections. As
both roadway                                                                data are for the year 2006 based on data from
the Accident Location Map makes clear, Richmond                             the prior two or three-year period.
Avenue	 has	 the	 greatest	 number	 of	 traffic	 safety	
     4.       ROADWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY
concerns for roadways in the Study Area. Five out                      High accident intersections are shown as points on
    the ten highest accident Map X, Accident Location) the map. The highest accident intersections were
of The Accident Location Map (seeintersections (ranked shows data pertaining to traffic safety along roadways in the
    frequency) are along on all reported traffic accidents, identified	and	then	ranked	based	on	crash	frequen-
by Study Area. Data are basedRichmond Avenue. South including those involving pedestrians and bicyclists. Accident-
    prone and Arthur Kill Road follow closely behind
Avenue locations are shown for both roadway segments and for intersections. ten are shown on the Map 46- Accident
                                                                       cy. The top
in	 number	 of	 traffic	 safety	 concerns.	 The	 majority	 Locations and listed in the table below. It is important
    High accident locations intersections are along the                to note that ranking hazardous intersections been
of the highest accident(HALs) as designated by the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) haveby fre-
                                    Area routes under                  quency can be biased towards Shore Expressway).
    identified along the two Studythe Study Area. State jurisdiction -- I-278 (SIE) and NY 440 (West locations that have a
most developed portions of
                                                                       high patterns that accidents poor roadway geometry are
    NYSDOT monitors accident data to identify unusually high accident number of may indicate simply because theyor
                    deficiencies. NYSDOT’s designated by
    other highway locations (HALs) as annual list of HALs identifies roadway segments with accident rates above specified
High accident                                                          on high volume roadways. This type of ranking may
thecriteria for similar roadways across the State, indicating that some factor besides pure chance may be behind the accidents in
      New York State Department of Transportation                      miss some low- volume intersections that have a
(NYSDOT)	have	been	identified	along	the	two	Study	 disproportionately high
    those locations. The criteria for selection are as follows: the section in question must have: accident rate (accidents per
                   o experienced an accident rate greater than
Area routes under State jurisdiction -- I-278 (SIE) or equal to a specified threshold,for similar facility types, and
                                                                       total vehicle miles of travel)*.
                   o an
                           Shore rate which exceeds a specified
and NY 440 (West accident Expressway). NYSDOT statistical confidence level. The most recent HAL data are for
                                                                       Additionally, period.
monitors accidentthe year 2006 based on data from the prior two or three-yearsome intersections that are not listed in
                         data to identify unusually high
accident patterns that may indicate poor roadway                       the	table	below	were	identified	as	hazardous	inter-
    High accident intersections are shown as points on the map. The highest accident intersections were identified and then
geometry	or	other	highway	deficiencies.	NYSDOT’s	 sections in NYCDCP’s West Shore Manufacturing
    ranked based on crash frequency (i.e. the total number of crashes). The top ten are shown on the map and listed in the table
annual	 list	 of	 HALs	 identifies	 roadway	 segments	 Zones Study. Although based on earlier data, these
    below. It is important to note that ranking hazardous intersections by frequency can be biased towards locations that have a
with	accident	rates	above	specified	criteria	for	simi-                 are worthy of note as intersections with unsafe con-
    high number of accidents simply because they are on high volume roadways. This type of ranking may miss some low-
lar roadways across the State, indicating that some                    ditions. They include the following:
    volume intersections that have a disproportionately high accident rate (accidents per total vehicle miles of travel). Data are
factor besides pure chance may be behind the ac-                       •	 Arthur Kill Road at Veterans Road West
    based on accident summary reports obtained from the NYSDOT Safety Information Management System for a three-year
cidents in those locations. The criteria for selection                 •	 Arthur Kill Road at Drumgoole Road West
    period spanning July 1, 2004 to June 30, 2007.
                                                                       •	 Richmond Avenue at Forest Hill Road
                               HIGH ACCIDENT INTERSECTIONS, BY TOTAL ACCIDENTS
                                                                         Total
                               Rank Major Street      Minor Street       Accidents
                                   1    Richmond Avenue               Draper Place                         50
                                   2    Richmond Avenue               Richmond Hill Road                   46
                                   3    South Avenue                  Forest Avenue                        41
                                   4    Richmond Avenue               Arthur Kill Road                     33
                                   5    Richmond Avenue               Platinum Avenue                      32
                                   6    Arthur Kill Road              Arden Avenue                         21
                                   7    South Avenue                  Goethals Road North                  19
                                   8    Victory Boulevard             Travis Avenue                        14
                                   9    Richmond Avenue               Nome Avenue                          13
                                  10    South Avenue                  Travis Avenue                        12
                           Table 24 -High Accident Intersections by Total Accidents
    Additionally, some intersections that are not listed in the table above were identified as hazardous intersections in
    NYCDCP’s West Shore Manufacturing Zones Study. Although based on earlier data, these are worthy of note as
*Data are based on accident summary reports obtained from the NYSDOT Safety Information Management System for a three-year period spanning
                         unsafe
    intersections with 2007. conditions. They include the following:
July 1, 2004 to June 30,
                   o Arthur Kill Road at Veterans Road West
                   o Arthur Kill Road at Drumgoole Road West
                   o Richmond Avenue at Forest Hill Road
104
   As the Accident Location Map makes clear, Richmond Avenue has the greatest number of traffic safety concerns for
   roadways in the Study Area. Five out of the ten highest accident intersections (ranked by frequency) are along Richmond
Map 46- High Accident Locations




                                  105
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report



3.B.4: Transit Services                                   •	   Zones I-II: X11, X12/42, X15, X31
Transit services on the west shore of Staten Island       •	   Zone III: X1, X2, X5, X6, X7, X8 (operating out
consist primarily of local, limited-stop and express           of the Eltingville Transit Center in the southeast
bus routes. Most of the local/limited bus routes con-          corner of Zone III
nect the Study Area to the Saint George Ferry Ter-        •	   Zone IV: X17, X19, X22, X23, X24 and AE7
minal, with a few of the routes connecting to other
major trip generators. Information discussed below        Except for the X23 and AE7 routes, which are oper-
is shown graphically in Map 47-Transit Connec-            ated by Atlantic Express, all other routes are oper-
tions.                                                    ated by MTA NYCT. While some routes (e.g., X22,
                                                          X23, X24, and X30) go via the Goethals Bridge,
3.B.4.a: Local/ Limited Bus Service                       the NJ Turnpike and Lincoln Tunnel to access their
                                                          destinations in Midtown Manhattan, the other routes
There are 11 local bus routes that serve the Study        utilize the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, the Gowanus
Area, all operated by the Metropolitan Transporta-        Expressway and the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel to ac-
tion Authority (MTA) through New York City Tran-          cess Lower Manhattan. The schedules on most ex-
sit (NYCT). These routes provide local circulation        press routes are geared towards people commuting
within Staten Island, with most routes connecting         to Manhattan from Staten Island, with Manhattan-
the Study Area with the Saint George Ferry Terminal       bound service on many routes only offered in the
for connections to the ferry to Manhattan. Connec-        morning peak commuting times, and return service
tions are also provided to Bay Ridge Brooklyn, as         from Manhattan only operating during the PM peak
well as other parts of Staten Island. Most of the local   commuting times. However, in addition to these
bus routes operate seven days a week, with a few          commuting time services, the X1 and X17 also pro-
routes providing service 24 hours a day. the local        vide midday, evening, and Saturday service, as well
bus routes in the Study Area include S40, S44, S46,       as reverse commute services. The X1 also provides
S48, S55, S56, S59, S61, S62, S74, and S79.               service on Sundays.

Limited stop service is provided during peak com-
muting hours to supplement local bus service con-
necting to the Saint George Ferry Terminal during
the AM peak, and from the ferry terminal during the
PM peak period. Limited stop bus routes operate
along the same routing as local bus routes, but skip
many of the local bus stops. There are a total of 8
limited stop bus routes, which mirror local routes in
the Study Area. In some instances the limited stop
bus routes replace local routes for portions of the
route. One of the limited stop routes provides in-
terstate connections by linking the Study Area with
the Hudson-Bergen light rail in Bayonne, NJ. The
limited stop bus routes include S84, S89, S90, S91,
                                                          Table 25 -Bus Ridership Data
S92, S94, S96, and S98.

3.B.4.b: Express Bus Service

There are 16 express bus routes that connect the
study area with Manhattan. The express bus routes
that serve the Study Area, roughly divided by the
zones that they serve, include:



106
Map 47- Transit Access




                         107
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


                                                               in late 2009 and the $149 million facility is being
3.B.5.c: Staten Island Rapid Transit Line                      funded through a variety of federal, state and lo-
                                                               cal funds as part of the MTA Capital Plan.
The MTA Staten Island Railway operates between            •	   Atlantic/Nassau Station – this project will close
Tottenville and the Saint George Ferry Terminal,               and demolish the Atlantic and Nassau stations
where connections to the ferry to Manhattan can be             on the Staten Island Railway, both of which are
made. There are a total of four SIR stations in the            in poor condition, and construct a new station
far southern portions of the Study Area -- Tottenville,        between these two locations, including a park-
Atlantic, Nassau, and Richmond Valley. These sta-              ing facility for 200 vehicles.(See image of exist-
tions are also the four southernmost stations on the           ing Nassau Station on page 77). Construction is
line. Average weekday ridership on the SIR in the              expected to begin in August 2009 with a com-
second quarter of 2008 was 16014.                              pletion date of August 2010.
                                                          •	   Huguenot/Route 440- West Shore Park and
3.B.5.d: Ferry                                                 Ride – As discussed below, portions of Hugue-
                                                               not Avenue and Arthur Kill Road at the West
There are currently no ferry boat services operat-             Shore Expressway already operate as a de-fac-
ing to the West Shore area. Local/limited bus and              to park and ride. The formal park-and-ride being
Staten Island Railway transit services provide con-            built at this location by NYSDOT in conjunction
nections from the Study Area to the Staten Island              with a NYPD police sub-station, will allow this
Ferry at Saint George. There have been numerous                important intermodal transfer to occur in a safe
plans and proposals to provide ferry services to the           and	efficient	manner.	
West Shore, including services planned in connec-
tion	with	the	redevelopment	of	Fresh	Kills	Landfill,	     3.B.5.f: Park-and-Ride Lots
and proposals made in connection with preliminary
plans for the Waterfront Commons project near             Within the Study Area, there is one park-and-ride
the intersection of Arthur Kill and Richmond Valley       area located at the interchange of the West Shore
Roads. NYCEDC is also conducting a feasibility            Expressway and Arthur Kill Road/ Huguenot Ave-
study of a proposal of ferry service from the South       nue, where passengers park their cars along road-
Shore of Staten Island to two Manhattan piers, one        way shoulders near the point where express bus
in Lower Manhattan and one in Midtown.                    lines serving the surrounding communities enter
                                                          the West Shore Expressway. A bus stop on a grass
3.B.5.e: Planned Transit Projects and Trends              strip along the northbound entrance ramp serves
                                                          as the pick-up point, with cars parking along both
In addition to these existing transit services, there     sides of both the northbound off-ramp and Arthur
are a number of planned projects that will impact         Kill Road (see image of adjoining page). There are
transit services in the Study Area. These include         currently plans to build a formal park-and-ride fa-
the planned construction of a new MTA NYCT bus            cility at this location, in conjunction with a police
storage and maintenance facility, a new park- and-        sub-station. The location serves Atlantic Express
ride facility and a plan for a new station that would     and MTA NYCT Express Bus routes X19, X22, X23,
combine and replace two existing stations on the          X24, and AE7, and MTA NYCT Local/Limited Bus
Staten Island Railway.                                    route S74/84. (See Map 47-Public Transit)

•	    Charleston Bus Depot – the Charleston Bus De-       There are two Park-and-Ride facilities outside but
      pot will provide a third MTA NYCT bus storage       adjacent to the Study Area. One is the MTA’s Elt-
      and maintenance facility on Staten Island. This     ingville Transit Center, located at the southeast cor-
      will allow NYCT to alleviate overcrowding at the    ner of Arthur Kill Road and Richmond Avenue at the
      other two depots, and to expand local and ex-       southeast corner of Zone III. This facility has con-
      press bus services in southern communities in       venient access to and from the Korean War Veter-
      Staten Island. The bus depot is expected to open    ans Parkway. Based on observed illegal parking at



108
this facility, demand for this lot currently exceeds
the capacity at this facility. The location serves MTA
NYCT Express Bus routes X1, X4, X5, X6, X7, X8,
X15, X17, and X31, and MTA NYCT Local/Limited
Bus routes S55, S56, S59, S74/84, S79, and S89.
Another facility is NYSDOT’s Pleasant Plains Park-
and-Ride, located at the southern terminus of West
Shore Expressway (NY 440). The location serves
Atlantic Express Bus route AE7.

Other Park-and-Ride locations of note, but also out-
side of the Study Area, include one next to the Hu-
guenot Station at Huguenot Avenue and Drumgoole
Road East and an informal one next to NY 440 at
Morningstar Road and Walker Street. Additionally,
field	observations	along	Arthur	Kill	Road	and	its	ad-
joining side streets indicate that informal on-street
                                                         SIR Nassau Station- Looking South
park-and-ride activity is generally occurring in areas
that have express bus service.




                                                         Informal Park and Ride Area at Arthur Kill Road/ West Shore Express-
                                                         way




                                                                                                                        109
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report



3.B.5: Pedestrian and Bicycles

Due to the historical development of Staten Island’s
West Shore to serve local industry, most of the ma-
jor roadways were not designed with pedestrians in
mind. The pedestrian network along the roads in the
Study Area is generally limited, because most road-
way have no or discontinuous sidewalks. Although
major intersections accommodate pedestrians,
many intersections lack crosswalks or pedestrian
signals.

There are few provisions for bicycles along road-
ways on the West Shore of Staten Island. Within
the Study Area, there is currently only one type
of bicycle route: designated off-roads bike paths.
There is only one designated bicycle path within the
Study Area, an off-road Greenway between Arthur
Kill Road, Englewood Avenue, and Veterans Road
in the southwest corner of the Study Area. There
are no on-road bicycle lanes within the Study Area.
However, several on-road bicycle routes and off-
road bicycle paths are planned for the area. (See
Map 48-Bike Network.)

In the past it has been advocated to convert the
abandoned SIRR line into a bicycling trail which
would function as a link in the East Coast Greenway
and also as commuter and cultural route in Staten
Island. Activation of the rail line to support DSNY
facility has probably reduced the viability of such a
greenway.




110
Map 48 - Bike Network




                        111
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report


                                                         •	  Proposed roadway access improvements in
                                                             Howland Hook area
                                                         Additionally,	 several	 specific	 recommendations	
3.B.6: Planned and Programmed                            for the local roadway network are put forth in two
       Transportation Improvements                       companion studies which together overlap most of
                                                         Zones I through IV of the Study Area.
Beyond ongoing maintenance and equipment up-
grades, a number of major improvements to the            The Charleston Transportation Study (NYCDCP,
transportation infrastructure in the Study Area are      2003), which overlaps Zone IV, contains recom-
planned or proposed for implementation. Some of          mendations for vehicle and pedestrian safety, ve-
these are planning or feasibility studies for projects   hicle	mobility,	parking,	and	freight	traffic.	Due	to	the	
that would take 10-15 years to implement, while          elapsed time since the study, some recommenda-
others are in more advanced stages of planning and       tions have already been implemented. Recommen-
design or already under construction. The following      dations pertinent to this study include the following:
list includes these initiatives:                         •	 Operational and safety improvements for the
                                                             most congested intersections (listed in the above
3.B.7a: Public Transit                                       section	 Roadway	 Traffic	 Congestion),	 through	
                                                             upgrades to intersection geometry, changes in
•	    Combine Staten Island Railway’s Atlantic and           existing signalized controls or consideration of
      Nassau stations into Arthur Kill Road station.         signalizing presently unsignalized locations.
      (MTA)                                              •	 Provision of sidewalks along eleven streets
•	    Huguenot Avenue Park and Ride facility (NYS-           within Zone IV, and in all new developments.
      DOT).                                              •	 Prohibiting parking along Arthur Kill Road be-
•	    Proposed Charleston Annex bus depot.(MTA)              tween Sharrotts Road and Kreischer Street,
•	    S89 Service to Bayonne (Hudson-Bergen LRT              and improved parking regulations along Carlin
      connection) – Implemented in Summer 2007.              Street.
•	    Restoration of North Shore rail right-of-way       •	 Improved truck route signage along Arthur Kill
      (North Shore Land Use Study).                          Road and other roads in the Charleston/ Port
•	    Passenger light rail service (West Shore Light         Mobil area.The West Shore
      Rail Feasibility Study).Staten Island Express
      Bus Network Study.                                 The West Shore Manufacturing Zones Study (NY-
                                                         CDCP, 2007) which overlaps Zones I-III, contains
3.B.7b:	Roadway	Safety	and	Traffic	Mobility              both short and long term recommendations:
•	 Increased crossing capacity on Goethals
   Bridge                                                Task Force Short-Term Recommendations
•	 Improvements at NY 440 and Korean War Vet-
   erans Parkway interchange                             •	   Operational improvements for all 15 congest-
•	 Improved access and egress at NY 440 and                   ed intersections (as discussed above section
   I-278 interchange                                          Roadway	 Traffic	 Congestion	 section),	 through	
•	 Safety and operational improvements along Ar-              either	 signal	 timing	 modifications	 or	 geometric	
   thur Kill Road corridor                                    changes.
•	 Allowance of right-turn-on-red at various signal-     •	   Operational improvements for all 13 high ac-
   ized intersections                                         cident intersections (listed in the above sec-
•	 Improvements at Goethals Road North and                    tion	Roadway	Traffic	Safety),	through	the	same	
   Western Avenue intersection                                types of signal or roadway geometric changes.
•	 Roadway connections between NY 440 and                •	   Pavement and sidewalk improvements at in-
   Richmond Avenue through Fresh Kills Park                   tersections along designated truck routes, spe-
•	 Proposed ferry service between Fresh Kills Park            cifically	 larger	 corner	 radii	 for	 curbs	 to	 provide	
   and Manhattan                                              more maneuvering space for turning trucks at



112
   those locations.

Task Force Long Term Recommendations
•	 Expanding and extending the roadway system,
   including the following:
     •	 Construct roads proposed though Fresh
         Kills ParkConstruct mapped but unbuilt
         Kent Street to connect Sharrotts Road and
         Englewood Avenue
     •	 Construct Englewood Avenue to its full
         mapped length and width
     •	 Widen Arthur Kill Road
•	 Creating transit-oriented mixed-use real estate
   developments around transit stations. Arthur Kill
   Road and Victory Boulevard interchanges.




  Map 49- Planned and Ongoing Transportation Projects in Study Area




                                                                      113
Staten Island West Shore Existing Conditions Report




  Map 50- Existing Transportation Related Issues and Conditions


gan operations in the early 18th Century.




114
115

				
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