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					      Department of Anthropology



COURSE OPTIONS FOR MASTERS STUDENTS
                  IN
 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
      MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
    MATERIAL AND VISUAL CULTURE
       DIGITAL ANTHROPOLOGY
  ANTHROPOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT AND
          DEVELOPMENT

   CULTURE MATERIALS AND DESIGN
       MRes in ANTHROPOLOGY

            2011/2012




                                      1
             OPTION COURSES FOR MASTERS STUDENTS

                                  2011/2012

_______________________________________________________________________________



 The following course options are for all Masters students, with the
  exception of those doing the MSc in Human Evolution and Behaviour.

 The content of the course may vary each year.

 Masters students must obtain permission from their individual Masters
  tutors to attend a particular optional course.

 Optional courses for Masters students are run through 11/2 hour/2 hour
  specialist seminars but students are advised to attend the lectures
  associated with the options they choose, which are open to both
  postgraduate and undergraduate students.

 Masters seminars will normally assume knowledge of the material
  presented in these open lectures, and deal with the issues raised at a more
  advanced level.

 One extended essay is normally required for each option you take. Please
  check with your tutor for the requirements of your specific Masters
  programme.

 Times of seminars can be by arrangement and as such will be confirmed at
  the first lecture for the course.



Always check the online timetable for the
     time and place of the lectures
______________________________________________________________________________




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CHECK ONLINE TIMETABLE – http://www.ucl.ac.uk/timetable


                                FIRST TERM OPTIONS

ANTHGC09 – ANTHROPOLOGY AND PHOTOGRAPHY
Prof Chris Pinney
This course has three central purposes: to provide a historical introduction to the way in
which anthropologists have used photography, to provide a grounding in photographic
theory, and to encourage students to think how they might best use photography in their
own anthropological projects. We will explore how photography was used both before
and after the systematization of fieldwork as the central anthropological method, explore
criticisms of photography's "externality", and look at recent ethnographies of "vernacular"
photographic practices. The course is assessed by an essay and a portfolio.

ANTHGA01A – APPLIED STUDIES / GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP
Dr Rodney Reynolds; Dr Olga Lupu
This course is designed to integrate a short applied placement or internship in an NGO,
governmental, community, or business organisation, within a supporting framework of
lectures, tutorials, seminars and supervised coursework. A series of lectures and
tutorials will provide instruction on applied studies, including methods training. In addition
to lectures and tutorials, students will have the opportunity to apply their skills in a work
environment. Placements total 10-20 days, usually on a one-day a week
basis. Available opportunities are listed at
www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/placements. Care will be taken to ensure that placements
are directly relevant to students' interests and overall programme of study. Places on this
course are limited.

ANTHGC25 – ANTHROPOLOGY OF GAMES AND SIMULATION
Dr Lane DeNicola
While being “just a game” is usually a trivializing qualifier reserved for leisure activities
and child's play, games are a form of social interaction that have persisted for millennia
and are present in all cultures. As a set of practices, artefacts, and protocols, games are
distinct from literature or drama, art or audiovisual media, worship or education (though
they have overlapped with each). With the proliferation of digital technologies, computer
games now challenge the primacy of television and cinema as the dominant
entertainment media, and together with professional sports, “games” represent many
billions of dollars in revenue. This course will effect a deep reading of games as a key
cultural phenomenon and will illuminate the role that anthropologists have to play in their
design. The course will begin with classic anthropological work on the games and
gameplaying of disparate cultures, gradually moving into the burgeoning game studies
literature and ethnographic accounts of diverse forms of play and mimicry. For the final
essay, students are tasked with building a “deep reading” of a specific game, simulation,
or related event or institution.

ANTHGD12 – MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Dr Joe Calabrese
This course provides a framework by topic on which to construct an analysis of medicine
and human wellbeing as practiced in any one system of healing--cosmopolitan,
traditional, or hybrid. Examples and readings are drawn from a range of contemporary
cultures as well as from ‘classic’ ethnographic texts, addressing in particular how diverse
forms of embodiment challenge the anthropologist as participant observer. The course
focuses on the ‘therapeutic triangle’ of patient, healer, and community, as well as the
manner in which each of these components functions in the construction of illness and
wellbeing. In addition, the course examines the cognitive construction of illness and
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CHECK ONLINE TIMETABLE – http://www.ucl.ac.uk/timetable


medical expertise, the epistemologies of healing and healing systems, and the ways in
which risk and efficacy are understood and managed in therapeutic encounters by
individuals and groups.

ANTHGS19 – ANTHROPOLOGY OF KINSHIP
Dr Rebecca Empson
The anthropology of kinship, the study of how we are related and what it means to be
related, lies at the heart of the discipline of anthropology. This course will introduce you to
classic and new debates in kinship theory. Focusing on topics such as love, sex, social
networking sites, houses, the body, ancestors, and the role of the state in shaping family
lives and histories, we will see how these topics are being questioned in light of new
ethnographic concerns.

ANTHGS20 – PRACTICAL ETHNOGRAPHIC FILMMAKING (LAB-BASED)
Dr Michael Yorke
The course will train students in the practical and creative skills of video and digital
technology to represent and document social and ethnographic research to a broadcast
standard. For anthropology students there will be a requirement to complete a film theory
course as well (ANTHGS17). Each student will be assessed on the quality of a 10-15
minute short documentary to be devised, shot and edited during the course by each
student. This course will entail a lab fee for UCL students of £1,000 on top of any fee for
a Masters degree to cover the staff costs of putting on this course. Students will have full
access to the UCL Anthropology Audio Visual lab with 11 Final Cut Pro enabled Macs as
well as cameras for the duration of the course. Students and others from outside UCL
may take this course, for an unsubsidised rate of £1,300. Students who bring their own
cameras will be reimbursed £180.

ANTHGS17 – DOCUMENTARY FILM AND THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL EYE
Dr Michael Stewart
Through the presentation of a range of ethnographic, documentary, fiction and ‘current
affairs/news’ films (including historic material) we will explore the ways in which film can
frame and convey ethnographic investigation. We will look at the basic possibilities and
limitations of film for going beyond traditional written ethnography to communicate the
significance, style and substance of other modes of life as well as considering film as a
distinct means to explore social interaction through what you might describe as its ‘call to
performance.’
Against the grain of current trends, rather than read films ‘intertextually,’ or as part of a
closed world of ‘discourse’ we will endeavour, together, to discover the historical and social
contexts in which filmic ethics and aesthetics have developed. It has become fashionable
to lament a past when ethnographers were ‘orientalists.’ One of the dangers of such
interpretive strategies is that they tend to glorify ourselves in a distorted mirror of ‘post
modern otherness’. This course will encourage you to question such naïve (and
patronising) approaches.




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CHECK ONLINE TIMETABLE – http://www.ucl.ac.uk/timetable


                                DUAL TERM OPTIONS
ANTHGE03 – POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT
Prof Sara Randall
The course introduces students to a range of development related issues in population
through examining topical issues, which are relevant to development and development
interventions with a particular focus on fertility and mortality in developing countries.
Data collection methods are a constant theme and we reflect on how these influence both
academic and interventionist perspectives on population. There is an introductory
meeting followed by 10 seminars where students are expected to present key issues from
articles they have read, followed by more general discussion. Students may choose to
also attend some of the Population Studies (ANTH7005) lectures in Term 1. Each
student will submit two essays. The one with the higher mark will be put forward for
assessment

ANTHGE02 – ECOLOGY OF HUMAN GROUPS
Prof Katherine Homewood
This course introduces the ecology of four different types of rural production system in
less developed countries: Gathering/hunting societies, farmers, pastoralists and fishers.
The course will run from halfway through Term 1 through to the end of Term 2. It
combines social and natural sciences approaches to the study of rural populations in
developing countries. Starting with rather separate bodies of knowledge the course aims
to integrate insights and perspectives from the different disciplines as the course goes
along. You may find the following journals useful general browsing: Human Ecology,
Development and Change.

Meetings commonly involve an hour of staff talks outlining general principles behind the
topic, and an hour of student presentations and discussion - these are backed up by
several hours directed reading each week.


                              SECOND TERM OPTIONS
ANTHGA01B – APPLIED STUDIES / GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP
Dr Rodney Reynolds; Dr Olga Lupu
This course is designed to integrate a short applied placement or internship in an NGO,
governmental, community, or business organisation, within a supporting framework of
lectures, tutorials, seminars and supervised coursework. A series of lectures and
tutorials will provide instruction on applied studies, including methods training. In addition
to lectures and tutorials, students will have the opportunity to apply their skills in a work
environment. Placements total 10-20 days, usually on a one-day a week
basis. Available opportunities are listed at
www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/placements. Care will be taken to ensure that placements
are directly relevant to students' interests and overall programme of study. Places on this
course are limited.

ANTHGC13 – ANTHROPOLOGY OF ART AND DESIGN
Prof Susanne Kuechler
The course is aimed at those who wish to deepen their understanding of the material in
visual culture. It provides an overview of 19th century theory of style and reveals the long
shadow it cast on contemporary art. Both theoretically and materially, the course will
focus on 'assemblage' art, tracing phenomena such as the 'scrap-book', collage, and
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CHECK ONLINE TIMETABLE – http://www.ucl.ac.uk/timetable


recyclia in western culture as well as contemporary 'non-western' examples as found
mainly in the culture of Voodoo, and in the cultures of Oceania.

ANTHGC21 – SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF LANDSCAPE
Prof Chris Tilley
Landscapes are never inert: people engage with them, re-work them, appropriate them and
contest them. They are part of the way in which identities are created and disputed. Criss-
crossing between history and politics, social relations and cultural perceptions, landscape is
a ‘concept of high tension’. It is also an area of study that blows apart from conventional
boundaries between disciplines. This course looks at the number of theoretical approaches
to the Western Gaze; colonial, indigenous and prehistoric landscapes; contested
landscapes; and questions of heritage and ‘wilderness’.

ANTHGC10 – TRANSFORMING AND CREATING THE WORLD
Dr Ludovic Coupaye
This seminar series will approach two interrelated topics: the first is the question of
technology within anthropology and other social sciences. The second will consider
objects as “processes-made-things”, that is, objects as the coalescence of what we call
“practices”, “techniques”. Technology is always about more than material production, but
can in fact recruit and produce ontologies and meta-physics. Through this perspective,
we hope to investigate how an anthropology of techniques (disentangled from its colonial
and determinist past) contributes to our understanding of the relations between material
culture, environment and sociality. Our exploration might take us through a series of
examples ranging from indigenous gardening systems to modern transport technology,
and from carving or cooking to rituals and magical operations, as well as digital
technology. Complementing contemporary approaches of material culture, and issues of
heritage, environment, development and technical innovation, these anthropological
analyses of techniques show how to link body, mind and materiality through the course of
choices, strategies, and actions on materials.

ANTHGC12 – ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
Dr Victor Buchli
Buildings are good to think. This course will explore anthropological approaches to the
study of architectural forms. It will focus primarily on the significance of domestic space
and public private boundaries, gender and body, the materiality of architectural form and
materials and the study of architectural representations. The course will be structured
chronologically beginning with early anthropological encounters with built forms and the
philosophical, historical and social context of these approaches up to the present day
within anthropology.



ANTHGC14 – ANTHROPOLOGY OF MEDIA AND CONSUMPTION
Prof Danny Miller
As a specialist course for postgraduates this has been designed around research work
and to give a sense of how to actually engage with research on media and consumption
issues as an anthropologist. The intention is to focus on readings, with a short
introductory lecture but mainly a focus upon discussion. For that reason there will be
approximately 4 article length readings per week and a strong expectation that students
have read these prior to that weeks discussion. The idea is for you to imagine yourselves
as potential researchers, the issues that you have to face and the way you draw
conclusions from the ethnographic evidence. By the final week we will also turn to the
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CHECK ONLINE TIMETABLE – http://www.ucl.ac.uk/timetable


construction of general theory as appropriate to the study of media and consumption,
though theoretical issues will be tackled throughout. Two of the weeks will be led by
individuals who have recently finished their PhD’s which will also give an opportunity to
discuss research while it is still fresh and discuss with them the ethnographic method and
how actually one undertakes research. This includes the first week since I am not in
London on that date. You might consider purchasing my book Stuff since I use quite a bit
of this in the course and it is intended as a teaching volume.

ANTHGD11 – ANTHROPOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY
Prof Roland Littlewood
Through a series of seminars involving personal reading and presentation, the course
examines (a) popular understandings of psychology, self-hood and abnormal experience
in different societies, and how they may be organised into a body of knowledge; (b) the
relationship between popular and professional notions of "mental illness" and their roots
in the wider social, economic and ideological aspects of particular societies, with
particular respect to women and minority groups; (c) the contribution of academic
psychology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis to social anthropology.The subjects include
the development of colonial psychiatry and of ethno psychiatry; the experience and
classification of sickness and dysphoria; is therapy universal?; the cultural specificity of
abnormal experience and social response; psychoactive substance use; the self, its body
and its emotional states; gender and mental illness; racism and mental illness-symbolic
embodiments; psychoanalysis and anthropology.

ANTHGD21 – MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND PRIMARY CARE
Dr Jennifer Randall
The course covers major dimensions of clinically relevant medical anthropology, but
focuses particularly on dimensions of primary care giving in the contemporary UK, and
especially among ethnic groups where compliance to therapy is influenced by cultural,
ethnic, and religious factors. Course designed to assist medical students in career
choices.

ANTHGS11 – POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY
Dr Luke Freeman
Much of the twentieth century was spent in an effort to realise various utopian social
projects designed by both the left and the right. At the end of that century a darker view
of human potentialities has re-emerged and this course examines some of the main
issues in political and economic anthropology in the light of recent developments. The
issues raised in the course also concern debates regarding the basis of social
anthropology, and the political implications of its practice.
Course Topics: Gift and Commodity, property, peasant farming; the nation state; political
violence; the politics of identity.

ANTHGS13 – RELIGIOUS SYMBOLISM AND POLITICAL BELIEF
Dr Charles Stewart
This course aims to familiarise the student with the major anthropological approaches to
religion. Different topics will be studied week by week and will include belief, magic and
science, possession/shamanism, religious experience and reflexivity, the Protestant ethic,
new religions, syncretism and fundamentalism. A solid background knowledge of social
anthropology will be assumed.



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CHECK ONLINE TIMETABLE – http://www.ucl.ac.uk/timetable


ANTHGS03 – RISK, POWER AND UNCERTAINTY
Dr Allen Abramson
This course sets out to explore risk, power and uncertainty. Why so? Because,
increasingly, late modern settings come to be specified and evaluated in terms of the
hazards, risks and uncertainties they appear to generate: more so, perhaps, than the
inequities, oppressions and alienations that formerly characterised the social analysis of
modern malaise. The extent of this shift; the reasons for it; the place of power in its
operation; its socio-cultural (and indeed, cosmological) implications are all matters of
controversy that need to be rigorously examined. The course begins with a brief survey
of pre-modern notions of fate, destiny and magical protection; moves onto consider key
contributions in the anthropology of risk (Douglas); assesses the applicability of the
concept of 'chaos' in socio-cultural anthropology; and concludes with a critical
examination of the sociology of 'the risk society' (Beck) and associated ideas. The
second part of the course tackles a series of special issues chosen from areas of science,
environment, medicine, politics, marginality, material culture, art, finance, gambling and
extreme play. It is intended that the course will link together social, biological and
material cultural trends in contemporary anthropology.

ANTHGS16 – ANTHROPOLOGY OF NATIONALISM, ETHNICITY AND RACE
Dr Ruth Mandel
This course focuses on theories and practices of ethnicity, race and nationalism. The
reading material is divided between theoretical work on these issues and a variety of
ethnographic examples. Though most of the readings are contemporary, historical sources
will be used as well. The course will combine lectures, seminar discussion, student
presentations, and a few relevant films. Attendance at all sessions is a requirement.

ANTHGS18 – GENDER, LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
Dr Alex Argenti-Pillen
This course explores the linguistic construction of gendered cultures. It is built around a
set of key ethnographies on language and gender:
- Veiled sentiments - Abu-Lughod
- The hidden life of girls – Goodwin
- Masking terror – Argenti
- Vicarious language – Inoue
- Pronouncing and persevering – Hirsch
- Eloquence in trouble - Wilce
- I could speak until tomorrow – Barber
- Gender in Crisis - Peteet
- In the realm of the diamond queen - Tsing
- Beauty and power – Johnson

The lectures include multi-media presentations, and draw on theory within contemporary
linguistic anthropology. First of all we consider linguistic relativism, and the language
socialization of boys and girls in differing cultural contexts. This initial debate provides a
framework to consider gendered affective regimes, soundscapes, and verbal art. Finally,
we consider the impact of rapid cultural change, globalization and modernization on
language and gender: the loss of genres/gender, the postmodern construction of voices,
and emerging rhetorical and ironic selves.




                                                                                              8
CHECK ONLINE TIMETABLE – http://www.ucl.ac.uk/timetable


ANTHGS25 – PRACTICAL DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING (LAB-BASED)
Dr Michael Yorke
The course will train students in the practical and creative skills of video and digital
technology to represent and document social and ethnographic research to a broadcast
standard. For anthropology students there will be a requirement to complete a film theory
course as well (ANTHGS17). Each student will be assessed on the quality of a 10-15
minute short documentary to be devised, shot and edited during the course by each
student. This course will entail a lab fee for UCL students of £1,000 on top of any fee for
a Masters degree to cover the staff costs of putting on this course. Students will have full
access to the UCL Anthropology Audio Visual lab with 11 Final Cut Pro enabled Macs as
well as cameras for the duration of the course. Students and others from outside UCL
may take this course, for an unsubsidised rate of £1,300. Students who bring their own
cameras will be reimbursed £180.




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