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City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive Plan Evaluation and Appraisal

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					City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive Plan




 Evaluation and Appraisal Report 2011
              (2nd Draft – April 2011)


                                         1
PUNTA GORDA CITY COUNCIL              PLANNING COMMISSION
   Harvey Goldberg, Mayor                Lynne Matthews, Vice Chair
   William F Albers, Vice Mayor          Edward Zapke, Chair
   Lawrence Friedman, Councilmember      John Burrage
   Rachel Keesling, Councilmember        Masten Longhman
   Charles Wallace, Councilmember        Bill Schindler
                                         Charles Zajicek
                                         Donna Aveck
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
                                         Thomas Feneran
   Harvey Goldberg, Chair
   William F Albers, Vice Chair
   Lawrence Friedman                  GROWTH MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT
   Rachel Keesling                       Dennis B Murphy Sr., PG PSM, Director
   Charles Wallace                       David Hilston, AICP, Urban Design Manager
   Frank Weikel                          Joan F LeBeau, AICP, Chief Planner
   Jane Struges                          Mitchell S Austin, AICP, Urban Planner
                                         Cherry Cash Prewitt, Planner
                                         Teri Tubbs, Zoning Official
CITY OFFICIALS
                                         Lisa Hannon, Zoning Coordinator
   Howard Kunik, City Manager
                                         Julie Ryan, Administrative Assistant
   David Levin. City Attorney
   Sue Foster, City Clerk




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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This Evaluation and Appraisal Report represents an evaluation of the past seven years and the implementation of the existing
Comprehensive Plan (Plan) which was adopted in 2008. Over the past seven years, the City of Punta Gorda has seen substantial
redevelopment since the 2004 Category IV hurricane devastated the businesses and residential communities within the City. The
purpose of this EAR is to provide a summary analysis of the successes and failures of the Plan, to identify major issues of
concern, and to identify proposed changes to amend and update the Plan. The Plan was evaluated through the collaboration of
The City of Punta Gorda staff, state agencies, other units of government, and the general public. Many issues were identified
during the evaluation process, some of which are new and some of which already are being addressed in existing policies. The
issues that were identified as of primary importance all deal with some aspect of accommodating future growth. As growth
occurs, conflicts between adjacent land uses become more frequent, and demands upon roads and other infrastructure increase.


The implementation of the Plan generally has been good; however, some policies have not been fully implemented.
Implementation of the Plan is proceeding and most of the programs eventually will be implemented. The EAR process has
resulted in renewed vigor and interest in adopting an improved plan to guide the City’s growth through 2030. The entire Plan
will be updated with the best available data and analysis and will be edited to ensure accuracy and consistency. Goals, objectives,
and policies also will be updated to reflect new information but major policy revisions are not expected except as noted in this
report. Some policies and programs will be revised with more achievable implementation targets and time frames. When
completed, the revised Plan is expected to better accommodate both expected and unexpected growth in addition to maintaining
the quality of life and ambiance of the community.

The EAR identifies four (4) issues that will be addressed in the EAR-based Plan Amendments. These issues were identified by
residents and staff. Each issue and proposed actions are briefly summarized below.

      Issue 1: Development of Supportive Policies for a Functional Transportation Concurrency Area (TCEA)



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As the City continues to grow, the City is looking to provide policies in the Future Land Use and Transportation Elements that
would support the development of a TCEA and the subsequent development of a Mobility Plan.

       Issue 2: Analysis of Energy Efficient Alternatives

The City will examine policies within the existing Plan that address House Bill (HB) 697 which deals with greenhouse gas emission
reductions. The City will review the proximity of daily needs and workplaces to residential and commercial areas in an effort to
connect the communities through alternative transportation modes thereby reducing the vehicular miles traveled.

       Issue 3: Analyze Climate Adaptation/Sea Level Rise Strategies

The City will be reviewing alternative strategies provided in The City of Punta Gorda’s Climate Adaptation Plan. Staff will be
developing an action plan that will prepare Punta Gorda for future climate change.      The proposed Conservation Element will
review and possibly add policies to promote energy conservation as well as providing future directions for the City to address sea
level rise.   In addition potential policies may be added to develop strategies to combat sea level rise effects on the City’s
shoreline.    Staff will also review the Housing Element to develop strategies for future housing to include the use of energy
resources based on energy deficient design and construction.

       Issue 4: Declining Tax Revenues & Budget Cutbacks

The City will review the Capital Improvements Element to assure that continued adequate levels of service are maintained with
the ongoing limited funding and budget cutbacks.
TABLE OF CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................. 3             Location of Existing Development in Relation to Location of

TABLE OF CONTENTS ............................................................... 5            Anticipated Development [163.3191(2)(d)] ...................... 32

INTRODUCTION ....................................................................... 9         Assessment of Successes and Shortcomings Related to Each
                                                                                               Element [163.3191(2)(h)] ................................................. 38
  Purpose Statement ............................................................. 10
                                                                                               Changes in Growth Management Laws [163.3191(2)(f)] ... 76
  City of Punta Gorda Profile ................................................. 11
                                                                                          ANALYZING MAJOR ISSUES ................................................... 107
  Public Participation Process [163.3191(2)(j)] ....................... 12
                                                                                            Development of Supportive Policies for a Functional
     EAR Workshop/Public Meeting......................................... 15
                                                                                            Transportation Concurrency Exemption Area (TCEA) ......... 111
     Scoping Meeting - F.S. 163.3191 (3) ............................... 15
                                                                                               Density & Intensity ........................................................ 113
     Discussion of the Community Vision [163.3177(13)] ....... 16
                                                                                               Pattern of Land Uses ...................................................... 115
  Preparing the Community-Wide Assessment ...................... 19
                                                                                               Outline a Strategy for the Development of a Mobility Plan
     Population Growth [163.3191(2)(a)]................................. 20                    ..................................................................................... 116
     Change in Land Area [163.3191(2)(a)] ............................. 23                     Include Provisions for Fixture Fixed Route or Circulatory
     City of Punta Gorda Vacant Land Area Changes                                              Transit........................................................................... 125
     163.3191(2)(b) ................................................................ 25        Analysis of Logical Extents of a Transportation Concurrency
     Location of Development [163.3191(2)(d)] ...................... 28                        Exemption Area ............................................................. 127

     Vacant and Developable Land [163.3191(2)(b)]................ 30                        Analysis of the Energy Efficiency Alternatives .................... 130

     Provision of Infrastructure and Maintenance of Level-of-                                  Proximity of Daily Needs and Workplaces to Residential130
     Service Standards [163.3191(2)(c)] .................................. 31



                                                                                                                                                                             5
  Study Optimal Commercial Intensity/Residential Densities                                         Divide the Conservation & Coastal Management ............ 159
  that are Walkable, Bicycle Friendly, and Transit Supportive                                      Aging in Place................................................................ 160
  ..................................................................................... 131
                                                                                                   Unforeseen Changes in Circumstances [163.3191(2)(g)] 161
  Sustainable Food Production ......................................... 132
                                                                                              EVALUATING SPECIAL TOPICS ............................................... 162
  Develop Future Land Use Category Suitable for Local Food
                                                                                                Coordination of Land Use Planning and School Planning
  Production .................................................................... 133
                                                                                                [163.3191(2)(k)] ............................................................... 162
  Support Creation of Community Gardens ...................... 134
                                                                                                Exemption From School Concurrency [163.3191(2)(k) and
  Study Existing and Potential Food Production Areas in all of                                  163.31777(7)] .................................................................. 162
  South Charlotte County ................................................. 134
                                                                                                Implementation of the 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Work
Analyze Climate Adaptation/Sea Level Rise Strategies ...... 135                                 Plan [163.3191(2)(l)] ......................................................... 163
  Review & Evaluate the Recommended Adaptation Strategies                                       Coastal High-Hazard Areas [163.3191(2)(m)] ................... 166
  with Regard to HB697 ................................................... 142
                                                                                                Land Use Compatibility Near Military Installations
  Explore City's Future Directions Regarding Sea Level Rise, &                                  [163.3191(2)(n] ................................................................ 167
  Emission of Greenhouse Gases ...................................... 144
                                                                                                Evaluation of Concurrency Exception Areas [163.3191(2)(o)]
Declining Tax Revenues and Budget Cutbacks .................. 147                                ........................................................................................ 167
Other Identified Issues ..................................................... 148               Evaluation of Long-Term Concurrency Management Systems
  Water Supply Facilities Planning..................................... 150                     [163.3180(9)(d)] ............................................................... 167

  Development of a Historical Element ............................. 152                         Evaluation of Roadway Impact Methodology [163.3191(2)(p)]

  Annexation ................................................................... 158             ........................................................................................ 168

  Analysis & Updates Based on the 2010 Census Data ...... 159                                   Evaluation of Urban Infill and Redevelopment Areas
                                                                                                [163.2517(6)] ................................................................... 168
  Comprehensive Planning Certification Program                                                    MAP SERIES .......................................................................... 182
  [163.3246(12)] ................................................................. 168            ACRONYMS .......................................................................... 183
RECOMMENDATIONS / PROPOSED CHANGES [163.3191(2)(i)]                                               REFERENCES ......................................................................... 184
........................................................................................... 169
                                                                                                  APPENDIX 1.......................................................................... 186
  Plan Amendments Needed to Address Major Issues .......... 169
                                                                                                  APPENDIX 2.......................................................................... 193
CONCLUSION ....................................................................... 179



LIST OF TABLES

Table 1 – City Visioning ......................................................... 19             Table 12 – Projects within the Community Redevelopment Area
Table 2 – City of Punta Gorda’s/Charlotte County Population                                       (CRA) 2004-2011 ................................................................... 36
Percent of the Population Share ............................................. 20                  Table 13 – Projects outside the Community Redevelopment
Table 3 – City of Punta Gorda’s Population Estimates &                                            Area (CRA) 2004-2011 ........................................................... 37
Projections ............................................................................ 21       Table 14 – Results Through Collaboration Project List ............ 55
Table 4 – Applied Growth Rates ............................................. 21                   Table 15 – Park & Recreation Master Plan Projects .................. 61
Table 5 – City of Punta Gorda’s Population & Housing                                              Table 16 – Changes to Chapter 163, F.S., 2005-2009 ........... 106
Characteristics (2006-2030) .................................................. 22                 Table 17 – City of Punta Gorda Evaluation and Appraisal Report
Table 6 – City of Punta Gorda’s Seasonal Population &                                             Identified Major Issues ......................................................... 110
Projections (2009-2025) ........................................................ 23               Table 18 – Two Other Alternative Future Climate Scenarios for
Table 7 – Annexation – January 2004 – December 2010 ......... 24                                  Florida ................................................................................. 135
Table 8 – 2007vs 2010 Vacant Land Use by Type ................... 25                              Table 19 – Adaptation Strategy Evaluation Example.............. 147
Table 9 – 2007 vs 2010 Existing Land Use ............................. 27                         Table 20 – City of Punta Gorda Evaluation and Appraisal Report

Table 10 – Future Land Use Amendments 2004-2010 ............ 29                                   Other Identified Issues ......................................................... 149

Table 11 – Vacant Land by Type ........................................... 31



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Table 21 – Low Income and Cost Burdened Elderly Households,                                Table 22 – Recommended Policy Changes ............................ 178
2005-2020. ......................................................................... 161



LIST OF MAPS

Map 1 – City Limits Map ........................................................ 12        Map 14 – Potential NEV’s Map .............................................. 122
Map 2 – City Market Place Location Map ................................ 14                 Map 15 – Proposed Charlotte County Fixed Route Transit (2009)

Map 3 – Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) .................... 17                         ............................................................................................ 123

Map 4 – Annexation 2004-2010............................................. 24               Map 16 – Ring Around the City Map ..................................... 124
                                                                                           Map 17 – Charlotte Count-Punta Gorda MPO Long Range
Map 5 – Existing Land Use Map.............................................. 26
                                                                                           Transportation Plan Transit Needs Map ................................ 126
Map 6 – FLU Amendment Map ............................................... 28
                                                                                           Map 18 – Existing Charlotte County Argiculture Zoning Map 132
Map 7 – Vacant Land Use Map ............................................... 30
                                                                                           Map 19 – Future Land Use Map ............................................ 133
Map 8 – Preservation Land Use Map ....................................... 44
                                                                                           Map 20 – Portable Water Infrastructure in the CHHA Map ..... 138
Map 9 – Administrative Facilities Map .................................... 64
Map 10 – Charlotte County Elementary School Concurrency                                    Map 21 – Sanitary Sewer in the CHHA Map ........................... 139

Service Area Map ................................................................... 72    Map 22 – Road Infrastructure in the CHHA Map .................... 139

Map 11 - Freight Map .......................................................... 119        Map 23 – Historic Overlay District Map ................................. 153

Map 12 – Bicycle Route Map................................................. 120            Map 24 – Trabue Woods Historic Overlay District Map .......... 154

Map 13 – Pedestrian Map ..................................................... 121          Map 25 – Annexation Study Area Map .................................. 158
INTRODUCTION
                              Pursuant to Section 163.3191, Florida Statutes, "each local government shall adopt an evaluation
                              and appraisal report (EAR) once every seven years assessing the progress in implementing the local
                              government's comprehensive plan." The evaluation and appraisal report is the principle process for
                              updating local comprehensive plans to reflect changes in local conditions and state policy on
                              planning and growth management. The report evaluates how successful a community has been in
                              addressing   major   community     land   use   planning   issues   through   implementation   of   its
                              comprehensive plan. Based on this evaluation, the report suggests how the plan should be revised
                              to better address community objectives, changing conditions and trends affecting the community,
                              and changes in state requirements. The last major evaluation, the 2003 City of Punta Gorda
Evaluation and Appraisal Report helped set the stage for the adoption of the City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive Plan 2025 in
December 2008.

The EAR process mandates local governments to examine the changes in state legislation, and how these changes are accounted
for in their Comprehensive Plans. This 2011 Evaluation and Appraisal Report of the City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive Plan
2025 addresses Chapter 163 F.S., Rule 9J-5 Florida Administrative Code F.A.C., as well as redevelopment and new development
changes the City has undergone over the past few years.          It also reviews the proposed development, redevelopment and
challenges facing the City over the next five (5) and ten (10) year planning periods.

Two major pieces of legislation passed since the 2008 Comprehensive Plan are Senate Bill (SB) 360 and House Bill (HB) 697.
Senate Bill 360 imposes local planning requirements for Transportation Concurrency Exception Areas (TCEA) to communities
designated Dense Urban Land Areas (DULA) pursuant to the bill. Within two years after a TCEA becomes effective, the local
government must amend its comprehensive plan to include "land use and transportation strategies to support and fund mobility




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within the exception area, including alternative modes of transportation." Also enacted by the Florida Legislature was HB 697 in
the 2008 session. HB 697 establishes local planning requirements relating to energy efficient land use patterns, transportation
strategies to address greenhouse gas reductions, energy conservation, and energy efficient housing. These new requirements
became effective on July 1, 2008. Local governments are advised to use the existing substantial body of literature addressing the
connection among land use, transportation, energy, and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

There has been much controversy over the purpose, intent, and effect of these major legislative changes to Florida’s Growth
Management Laws. While the ongoing legal challenges to SB 360, the lack of clear direction regarding HB 697, and the change in
Administration in the Florida Executive Branch interject a high degree of uncertainty into the Comprehensive Plan process, the
City of Punta Gorda has incorporated the legislative changes into this Evaluation and Appraisal Report.       The City sees the
guidance provided by the enacted legislation as serving to further Punta Gorda’s established goals, objectives and policies.
Regardless of the outcomes of the legal challenges and administrative code (F.A.C.) changes, the City will move forward in its
mission to “promote the unique character and environment of Punta Gorda, while enhancing property values and advancing the
quality of life”.


Purpose Statement
Section 163.3191, F.S. states "Each local government shall adopt an Evaluation and Appraisal Report (EAR) once every seven years
assessing the progress in implementing the local government's comprehensive plan." This EAR will evaluate how successful the
City of Punta Gorda has been in addressing major community and land use planning issues through the implementation of its
comprehensive plan. Specifically the EAR will:

       Identify major issues for the community
       evaluate the effectiveness of the City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive Plan since the last EAR adoption
       Assess the degree to which plan objectives as they relate to the major issues have been achieved
       Assess both successes and shortcomings of the plan
      Identify ways that the plan should be changed
         o   Respond to changing conditions and trends affecting the local community
         o   Respond to the need for new data
         o   Respond to changes in state requirements regarding growth management and development
         o   Respond to changes in regional plans
      Ensure effective intergovernmental coordination

This will assist staff and the community to fulfill the City’s vision and the action necessary to successfully implement the policies
that address the major issues. Based on this evaluation, recommendations are provided as to how the plan should be revised to
better address our community objectives, changing conditions and trends that are affecting the community.


City of Punta Gorda Profile
The year 1884 marked the beginning of Punta Gorda when, on the instructions
of subdivision founder Isaac Trabue, surveyor Kelley B. Harvey laid out streets
and blocks along the Peace River that would become the City of Punta Gorda.
Today, Punta Gorda boasts a small town atmosphere in approximately thirty two
(32) square miles of land (15.97 sq. mi.) and water (16.01 sq. mi.). It is located
on the southwestern coast of Florida about one hundred (100) miles south of
Tampa and twenty-five (25) miles north of Fort Myers. Like most South Florida
communities Punta Gorda grew in the boom and bust cycle in keeping with the
trends of irrational exuberance and depression, of war and peace and prosperity.
Then in 2004 the City of Punta Gorda received a direct landfall hit from
Hurricane Charley. With sustained winds in excess of one hundred and twenty-                     ORIGINAL PLAT FOR THE TOWN

five (125) miles per hour the City encountered extensive damage during the



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relatively brief, period of extreme conditions.         The cost of
Hurricane Charley included a significant loss in the City’s stock
housing and commercial buildings.         The City of Punta Gorda
Comprehensive Plan 2025 addresses the redevelopment and growth
that occurred during the aftermath of Hurricane Charley.       Today,
over six (6) years later, the City of Punta Gorda has seen an
extensive   redevelopment   of   single   family,   multi-family   and
commercial structures.   However, due to increased construction
and land costs it continues to struggle with overall housing
affordability. There has been significant population growth in the
City of Punta Gorda. According to the United States Census Bureau,
in 2000, the population was14,344. The city utilizing the Florida
Statistical Abstract 2010, of the Florida Bureau of Economic and
Business Research estimates the 2011 population to be 16,907.


Public Participation Process [163.3191(2)(j)]
Engaging the public in the evaluation and appraisal of the
Comprehensive Plan is challenging.        While city staff pursued
specific exercises to obtain input and feedback from its citizens,
public outreach and involvement is a continuing, year-round
activity, requiring the planning staff to continually listen in all
forums, not just those devised for the EAR.     Described below are
the various activities and events used to gain input into the long
term desires of the City of Punta Gorda citizens, business owners,
                                                                         MAP 1 – CITY LIMITS MAP
regulatory agencies, and other stakeholders. In addition to those activities which were specific to the EAR, other methods of
obtaining input into the EAR and long range planning process are described.

While the City of Punta Gorda has established a clear vision of itself, keeping the community vision is an on-going, proactive
process that not only meets statutory mandates, but actively seeks out resident and stakeholder input from the most formal
public hearing to the least formal community and neighborhood settings. While many formal and informal visioning efforts have
undoubtedly occurred since Isaac Trabue’s plat in 1884, this EAR will focus on those ideas previously identified in other plans as
well as those recently acquired during the July public workshop. The recent adoption of the City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive
Plan 2025 in December 2008 provides the City with a relatively new and focused Comprehensive Plan which will be reviewed and
tweaked during this latest state mandated Evaluation and Appraisal Report Process. A representative cross section of the City’s
citizenry met to re-examine many of the issues covered in the Comprehensive Plan. The resulting report to City Council in July
discussed the City’s image, population growth, economic diversity and future development.               The results stated in the
presentation reflected the consensus among the participants of what they wanted the City to be in the future.

Public input assists staff and elected officials in developing public policy which helps shape the City’s Comprehensive Plan, and is
critical in the development of the City’s capital improvements program. Many projects identified through public workshops are
essential to the City’s economic and social well-being and have been successfully funded through voter-approved sales tax
initiatives.   Examples include: the development of the Ring Around the City, a series of connected recreational trails linking
neighborhoods to business communities; the support for the acquisition of environmentally sensitive lands; the installation of
more than 8 miles of sidewalks, the construction of the new Public Works Campus to improve current and provide for future
growth needs in the delivery of services to our residents; and numerous other projects which contribute to the quality of life
enjoyed by residents and visitors. Additional citizen’s initiatives are currently underway in the different communities of the City
regarding the development of community-specific plans for these areas. Given the popularity of such initiatives – which have the
common theme of preserving the character of their areas – it is likely that the number of community plans will grow, bringing
“visioning” to the level where it has the greatest impact: the neighborhood. It is interesting to note, that this was a general



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consensus during the visioning process for the EAR public input
sessions. In addition to bringing the City’s attention to the needs
of specific neighborhoods, citizens have expressed their concerns
regarding the City’s commercial areas.       Particular concern within
these areas is the appearance of development along with the
functionality of the small, shallow lots which occur along the City’s
major road corridors.    This is not a recent concern.      In fact, the
inadequacy of the City’s commercial areas was discussed at some
length in the 1995 EAR, leading to the 1997 Comprehensive Plan’s
designation of “Commercial Center” areas, and the limitation of
new Commercial Corridors. The latest planning effort focuses on
completing a variety of projects that will enhance the “destination
point” concept at the heart of downtown infill and redevelopment.
Among    the   larger   issues   addressed   in   this   area   are   the
development of the “City Marketplace” (identified on Map 2), a two
block area vacant since shortly after Hurricane Charley at the heart
of downtown, and the completion the Ring Around the City, a
system of multi-use recreational trails intended to connect all of
Punta Gorda’s neighborhoods to the major commercial areas and
destination points within the City.   While the primary purpose of
the Ring Around the City will be to provide non-motorized
transportation connections, the various projects of the Ring will
improve the general aesthetic character of different areas through
sidewalk, landscaping, and drainage improvements. These capital
                                                                            MAP 2 – CITY MARKET PLACE LOCATION MAP
improvements are intended to strengthen the commercial destinations within the area and may set the stage for the creation of
new policy directives, and possibly the establishment of some form of special district to ensure Implementation. Again, these
issues were a concern during the EAR public input sessions, as well as a variety of other meetings held with the residents and
business owners. Below is a brief description of the numerous public outreach efforts leading up to the development of this EAR.



EAR Workshop/Public Meeting
On July 15, 2010, a public workshop was held for the purpose of obtaining citizen input into the process
of identifying major issues. The workshop was advertised in the local newspaper and on the City’s
website. The workshop provided an opportunity for all interested parties to ask questions about the
Comprehensive Plan and the EAR process. The input received from the public workshops was important
in the development and refinement of visioning issues and opportunities.      The results of the public
workshop were presented to the Punta Gorda City Council during the approval process of the Major
Issues then sent to DCA in the City’s Letter of Understanding.


Scoping Meeting - F.S. 163.3191 (3)
The City of Punta Gorda held a Scoping Meeting on August 10, 2010. In attendance at this meeting were
representatives of the following adjacent local governments and regional review agencies: Department of
Community Affairs, Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council, Charlotte County, Metropolitan
Planning Organization, Department of Transportation, and the School Board of Charlotte County. The
purpose of the Scoping Meeting was to discuss the subject matter for the EAR with the agencies that
would be reviewing the document.     In addition, the meeting was an opportunity to identify information
needs and get commitments from the review agencies to provide data to the City to be used in the
preparation of the EAR. The City received the Letter of Understanding from DCA on October 8, 2010.




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Discussion of the Community Vision [163.3177(13)]
Pursuant to 163.3177(13) F.S., local governments are encouraged to develop a community vision that provides for sustainable
growth, recognizes its fiscal constraints, and protects its natural resources. The City believes it has surpassed the minimum
criteria in this regard. In the aftermath of Hurricane Charley, a Category 4 hurricane that damaged and destroyed large parts of
                                             the downtown area and numerous residential homes in 2004, the citizens of Punta
                                             Gorda came together in a grassroots effort to re-establish and redefine visioning
                                             ideas established previously through various City planning activities. These efforts
                                             were first led through the actions of the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA)
                                             during February of 2005.     The CRA, as seen on Map 3, focuses redevelopment
                                             efforts on projects which assist in the rebuilding our public spaces and stress the
                                             importance of the City’s waterfront as an economic engine for the downtown area
                                             and adjacent neighborhoods.     The CRA sought direct community input through a
                                             charrette process that resulted in the 2005 CRA Charrette document, which built on
                                             the visioning efforts first established in the, 1990 Downtown Redevelopment Plan
            2005 CITIZEN MASTER PLAN
                                             and 2000 Eastside and Downtown Planning Study.

At the February 2005 CRA Charrette, in an overwhelming show of community pride and resiliency, the citizen founded advocacy
group TEAM Punta Gorda announced its intention to develop a comprehensive community vision for Punta Gorda not constrained
by existing regulatory or municipal boundaries.     The primary mission of TEAM Punta Gorda “is to serve as a collaborative
resource uniting our citizens in accelerating revitalization to achieve the potential of our unique waterfront community”. In order
to fulfill this mission TEAM Punta Gorda hired renowned urban planning firm Jaime Correa and Associates to help the community
crystallize a comprehensive community vision. The results of this effort, the 2005 Citizens Master Plan, extended well beyond
the boundaries of the CRA, throughout the current city limits and into the surrounding area helping to define the logical
extension of the community desired development pattern.
The compact and contiguous pattern of development in the City is appropriate given the historic nature of the City and the
citizen’s vision of the community is outlined in the 2005 Citizen’s Master Plan as a great place to live, work, and play. In order to
ensure a logical development pattern that minimizes the cost of delivery of services and increases quality of life, higher densities
and intensities of new development need to occur in close proximity to existing infrastructure.            This concentration of more
intense uses serves the dual purpose of maximizing the utilization of existing infrastructure while decreasing development
pressure on environmentally sensitive and rural
lands.   As the only City in Charlotte County,
Punta Gorda stands in a unique position to
deliver the logical locations for various types of
development to occur.

Table    1   below,   is   a    list   of   the   planning
documents       and        major       recommendations
associated with each.          Each document includes
citizen input which assists the City in fulfilling
the vision of our community.




                                                                         MAP 3 – COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AREA (CRA)




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City Visioning

        Planning Document         Year                                   Major Recommendations

Downtown Community                       Listed infrastructure projects to reverse decline of downtown and surrounding
                                  1990
Redevelopment Plan                       neighborhoods

                                         updated the 1990 Downtown Community Redevelopment Plan recommending further
Eastside and Downtown Planning
                                  2000   infrastructure improvements and implementation of some type of design provisions to
Study
                                         retain historic character

                                         Set of practical design guidelines for the various historic architectural styles found in
Historic Design Guidelines        2003
                                         Punta Gorda

                                         Completely rewritten Land Development Code with a design focus designed to respect
Land Development Regulations      2005
                                         the history of the City

                                         Post-Charley truth check that built upon the vision established in the Eastside and
CRA Charrette                     2005   Downtown Planning Study, focus on implementation of specific projects including new
                                         Land Development Regulations
                                         Document produced at the behest of citizens group TEAM Punta Gorda by renowned
                                         New Urbanists Planning firm Jamie Correa and Associates.        This document in vivid
Citizens Master Plan              2005   detail reaffirmed the steps the City was already taking to redevelop and expand this
                                         vision beyond the confines of the CRA to encompass the greater South Charlotte
                                         County area
                                         Assessment of existing bicycle and pedestrian transportation network establishing a
2030 Alternative Transportation
                                  2006   vision for the future expansion of that network into a vital component of the
Plan
                                         transportation system of the City
                                                       Analyzed the existing and projected parking       and traffic demands in the downtown
  Downtown Parking & Traffic
                                             2006      core   and   recommended    specific   planning   activities,   regulations,   and   capital
  Circulation Study
                                                       improvements to maximize the long term viability of the core Downtown

                                                       Complete rewrite of the 1997 Comprehensive Plan that more clearly reflected the
  City of Punta Gorda
                                             2008      quantity, quality, and character of planning that had occurred in creating a complete
  Comprehensive Plan 2025
                                                       vision of the City of Punta Gorda since 2000
                                                       Analysis of existing parks system combined with substantial public and stakeholder
                                                       input to achieve the vision of "Advancing the quality of life through the creation of a
  Parks and Recreation Master Plan           2009
                                                       comprehensive interconnected and sustainable Park System that promotes the unique
                                                       character and environment of Punta Gorda"

                                                       City/County/TEAM Punta Gorda initiative to generate publicly driven vision for the
  South County Gateway Planning
                                             2010      unincorporated portions of South Charlotte County adjacent to the City and
  Project
                                                       recommend County Land Development Regulations to assist in achieving this vision
TABLE 1 – SOURCE: CITY OF PUNTA GORDA URBAN DESIGN DIVISION




Preparing the Community-Wide Assessment
Florida Statutes require that certain subjects be addressed in the evaluation and appraisal report in addition to the locally defined
major issues. These required subject analyses represent minimum requirements for the EAR. They include analysis of population,
change in land area, suitability of vacant lands for development, ability of our City to meet demands of growth on infrastructure,
location of development relative to where development was planned, and the successes and shortcomings of each element of the
Plan. The required analyses also evaluates coordination with schools and water management district plans and reviews changes
in state and regional planning laws, rules and policies that necessitate update of the Comprehensive Plan.




                                                                                                                                            19
Population growth [163.3191(2)(a)]
Florida’s steadily increasing population since the 1940’s is well documented through the Bureau of Economic and Business
Research (BEBR).         The BEBR reports a variety of statistics of all Florida Counties including population projections.    These
projections are provided in a low, mid and high range. Charlotte County uses the mid range BEBR population projections. The
City also uses the mid range BEBR population projections and establishes the following planning period for this Comprehensive
Plan. As required under Chapter 163.3177 (3)(a)1 and Rule 9J-5(4) & (5)(a), the City establishes two planning periods: one for the
first five year period subsequent to the EAR adoption (2010 – 2015) and one for at an overall ten-year period (2021).            Staff
reviewed the City’s population growth since 1970. Census population figures for the years 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000 and BEBR
estimated populations for 2010 and 2020 are shown in Table 2. This table compares the City’s growth from 1970 through 2010
& 2020 projected growth with the County’s growth. In addition to the population growth comparison between the City and the
County, the table also identifies the percent of share of the total County population.



City of Punta Gorda’s/Charlotte County Population Comparison Percent of the Population Share

                 Place                           1970                1980              1990      2000       2010              2020

City of Punta Gorda                              3,789               6,797            10,747    14,344     16,641         19,185

Charlotte County                                27,559              58,460            110,975   127,283   156,106        185,654

Total                                           31,348             154,030            121,722   141,627   172,747        204,839

% of Share                                        14%                 12%              10%       11%       9.75%              10%
TABLE 2 – SOURCE: 2010 BUREAU OF ECONOMIC & BUSINESS RESEARCH AND URBAN DESIGN 2011
The City’s population was 14,344 in 2000 and was estimated at 16,989 in 2009. Table 3 identifies the growth rates applied to in
Table 4. By applying the appropriate growth rate to City’s Census 2000 and 2009 BEBR population numbers and the projected
2010 population the projected populations were calculated annually for five years 2011-2015, and ten years 2021.


City of Punta Gorda’s Population Estimates & Projections
                                                                          Applied Growth Rates
               2009                                 16,989
               2010                                 16,641                                Year                               % Change

               2011                                 16,907                             Year one                               0.0157%

               2012                                 17,177                             Year Five                                4.3%

               2013                                 17,452                            Year Seven                               9.75%

               2014                                 17,719                TABLE 4 - SOURCE: URBAN DESIGN 2011 CALCULATED BASED ON 2009 & 2010 BEBR
                                                                          PROJECTIONS
               2015                                 18,073

               2021                                 19,491

               2025                                 21,050
TABLE 3 – SOURCE: 2010 BUREAU OF ECONOMIC & BUSINESS RESEARCH AND URBAN
DESIGN 2011


As the City begins to near build out within the existing boundaries, the growth rate will begin to stabilize and ultimately
decrease.     Strategies to maintain a stable growth rate including redevelopment, increased densities, and annexations will need
to be deployed as appropriate by the City. Maintaining a stable growth rate will lessen growth pressures on the Unincorporated
County; decrease the relative attractiveness of converting rural lands into suburban sprawl, and serve to maximize the utilization
of existing infrastructure within and adjacent to the current City Limits. The City of Punta Gorda’s Demographic and Housing
Characteristics 2006-2030 completed in March of 2007, identifies the population of 17,595, an increase over the last planning




                                                                                                                                           21
period of 22.7% which is slightly lower than the BEBR’s projections identified above.           The average age within the City is
approximately sixty-four (64) years. The 2000 Census Data identifies over half the City’s population is over fifty (50) years in
age. Table 5 identifies the breakdown of the City’s population extrapolated from the limited available 2010 US Census Data.



City of Punta Gorda’s Population & Housing Characteristics (2006 – 2030)
                   Type                                 2006                            2010   2020                 2030

Workforce population                                   4,408                        4,327      4,988                5,047

Non-Workforce population                               12,544                      12,314      14,197              20,189

Population: 0-17                                       1,356                        1,331      1,535                1,413

Population: 18-34                                      1,187                        1,165      1,343                1,640

Population: 35-49                                      1,526                        1,498      1,727                2,265

Population: 50-64                                      4,746                        4,654      5,371                7,029

Population: 65 and older                               8,137                        7,988      9,209               12,889

Total Population                                       16,952                      16,641      14,185              25,236
TABLE 5 – SOURCE: FL STATISTICAL ABSTRACT 2010, CITY OF PUNTA GORDA URBAN DESIGN 2011


Seasonal Population
The part time residents of South Florida typically present during the winter months produce a significant increase to the base
population. These seasonal residents usually cause a spike in the population from mid-November through mid-April. They may
own a second home or condominium in the region or may have a long term rental arrangement. The Southwest Florida Regional
Planning Council (SWRPC) estimates that during the season, winter residents may increase the six (6) county region’s population
by as much as twenty-two percent (22%). SWFRPC based this estimate on a combination of taxable sales, the number of homes
held for seasonal use, and the ratio of seasonal households to total households.                       Although precise numbers are not readily
available, it was estimated that the seasonal population in the City and Charlotte County is similar to these seasonal population
estimates as illustrated in Table 6 below.

City of Punta Gorda’s Seasonal Population & Projections 2009-2025




      275,000
      225,000
      175,000
      City*          16,989       16,641       16,907       17,177      17,452       17,719       18,073       19,491      21,050
      125,000
      County**
       75,000        150,514     152,976      155,479      158,022      160,607     163,176      165,786      182,349      194,300
       25,000
      Seasonal***    37,073       37,695       38,327       38,970      39,624       40,257       40,901       44,985      47,931
      (25,000)
       Total         204,576     207,312      210,713      214,169      217,683     221,152      224,760      246,825      263,281
                      2009        2010         2011         2012         2013        2014         2015         2021         2025




TABLE 6 – SOURCE: *2010 BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH ** 2010 CHARLOTTE COUNTY *** SEASONAL POPULAITON BASED ON THE COUNTY


Change in land area [163.3191(2)(a)]
Over the last seven years, the City has annexed 1,343.09 acres into the City limits. Since 2004, the City has proactively annexed
properties within the following 2006 Annexation Study Areas, US 41 Commercial Enclaves, Environmental Enclave, Burnt Store
Road Enclaves, and US 17 Corridor West as illustrated in Map 4 and described in Table 7.



                                                                                                                                        23
 Annexation January 2004 – December 2010

  Ordinance       Effective Date        Land Area    Square Miles

   1375-04           6/2/2004                 10      0.015625

   1396-04          12/1/2004                 0.8     0.00125

   1433-06           4/5/2006                0.41     0.00064

   1456-06          11/1/2006                13.37    0.02089

   1492-07           6/1/2007                33.38    0.051256

   1472-07           4/4/2007                3.86     0.006031

   1473-07           4/4/2007                0.56     0.000875

   1524-07          11/7/2007                4.94     0.007718

   1510-07          11/7/2007                0.79     0.001234

   1528-08           1/2/2008                 1.3     0.002031

   1541-08           3/5/2008                0.61     0.000937

   1473-07           4/4/2007                0.56     0.046515

   1551-08           4/4/2008                 3.3     0.005156

   1584-09          2/18/2009                1,240     1.9375

                             Total       1,343.1      2.097658
TABLE 7 – CITY OF PUNTA GORDA URBAN DESIGN




                                                                    MAP 4 – ANNEXATION 2004-2010
City of Punta Gorda Vacant Land Area Changes 163.3191(2)(b)
Table 8, illustrates the number of acres of vacant land type, Residential, Commercial, and Industrial in 2007 and in 2010. The
analysis of the 2010 data revealed inconsistencies in the 2007 data which lead to the revised 2007 data. The revisions reduced
the percentage of vacant land in the City. The 2010 numbers reveal a 1.68% reduction in vacant lands within the City. This
decrease in available vacant lands occurred in both the Residential and Commercial vacant land use types. Pursuant to
[163.2517(a), F.S.], these declines in vacant lands imply that the City’s efforts to encourage infill and redevelopment appear to be
working.    Furthermore, the reduction in vacant lands tends to support the policy of continuing annexations following parameters
identified in the 2006 Annexation Study Areas as identified in the Future Land Use Element.


2007 vs 2010 Vacant Lands by Types

                                         2007                                  Revised 2007                            2010

Vacant Land                         % of Vacant      % of Total                % of Vacant    % of Total               % of     % of Total
                         Acres                                        Acres                                 Acres
Types                                   Land         Land Uses                    Land        Land Uses               Vacant    Land Uses

Vacant Residential      872.28         82.80%          9.67%         870.60      82.85%        9.54%       854.45     85.00%      8.36%

Vacant
                        178.65         16.96%          1.98%         177.65      16.91%        1.95%       146.39     14.56%      1.43%
Commercial

Vacant Industrial         2.53         0.24%           0.03%          2.53       0.24%         0.03%         4.34      0.43%      0.04%

Total Vacant Land      1,053.46       100.00%         11.68%        1,050.78    100.00%        11.51%      1,005.18   100.00%     9.83%

TABLE 8 – SOURCE: 2007 AND 2010 CITY OF PUNTA GORDA& CHARLOTTE COUNTY GIS




                                                                                                                                    25
In addition to vacant lands, there are various generalized existing
land uses in the City:

      Residential
      Commercial
      Industrial
      Education
      Public buildings & grounds
      Institutional

The locations of these categories within the City are identified on
Map 5.   All data is based on information compiled by the City of
Punta Gorda from the Charlotte County Property Appraiser data from
August 2007 and October 2010.         Table 9 illustrates the number of
acres associated with each of the various generalized Existing Land
Use   Categories.        The   analysis   of   the   2010   data   revealed
inconsistencies in the 2007 data which lead to the revised 2007 data.
The revisions were confined to the generalized land use types of
residential, vacant, and right of way lands. The changes to the 2007
data included reductions in the number of acres of residential and
vacant lands, which were offset by an increase in the number of acres
of right of ways.


                                                                              MAP 5 – EXISTING LAND USE MAP
2007 vs 2010 Existing Land Use

                                          2007                        Revised 2007*                       2010                Change in Existing Land
Land Use
                               Acres           % of Total           Acres       % of Total        Acres       % of Total         Acres         % of Total
                                                 L dU                           L dU                          L dU                             L dU
Residential                  2,246.96            24.9211%         2,163.43      23.7146%        2,175.18      21.2782%           11.75          0.1149%

Commercial                     325.83            3.6138%           325.83        3.5716%         327.34        3.2021%            1.51          0.0147%

Industrial                     55.60             0.6167%           55.60         0.6095%         56.26         0.5504%            0.66          0.0065%

Agricultural                    0.00             0.0000%            0.00         0.0000%          0.00         0.0000%            0.00          0.0000%

Recreational                   434.74            4.8217%           434.74        4.7654%         434.74        4.2527%            0.00          0.0000%

Conservation                 3,924.36            43.5252%         3,924.36      43.0171%        5,027.92      49.1845%         1,103.56        10.7953%

Educational                    96.61             1.0715%           96.61         1.0590%         121.86        1.1921%           25.25          0.2470%
Public Buildings &             78.05             0.8656%           78.05         0.8555%         78.05         0.7635%            0.00          0.0000%
G      d
Institutional                  88.86             0.9855%           88.86         0.9740%         91.50         0.8951%            2.64          0.0258%

Vacant Land                  1,053.46            11.6840%         1,050.78      11.5181%        1,005.18       9.8330%          -45.59          -0.4460%

Right of Ways Land             711.82            7.8948%           904.54        9.9152%         904.54        8.8485%            0.00          0.0000%

Right of Ways Water**        6,297.81                             6,297.81                      10,265.6                       3,967.84
                                                                                                   5
Historic Resources***          99.21                               99.21                         99.21                            0.00

Total Land Uses              9,016.29            100.00%          9,122.79       100.00%        10,222.5       100.00%         1,099.77        10.7583%
TABLE 9 – SOURCE: 2007 & 2010 CITY OF PUNTA GORDA & CHARLOTTE COUNTY GIS; *ANALYSIS OF THE 2010 DATA REVEALED INCONSISTENCIES IN THE 2007 DATA WHICH LEAD TO
THE REVISED 2007 DATA; **RIGHT OF WAYS WATER INCLUDES ALL NAVIGABLE WATER BODIES USED FOR TRANSPORTATION PURPOSES AND ARE NOT ADDED INTO THE TOTALS FOR
LAND AREAS; ***HISTORIC RESOURCES ARE INDIVIDUALLY ASSIGNED TO ANOTHER GENERALIZED LAND USE CATEGORY AND ARE NOT ADDED INTO THE TOTALS FOR LAND AREA




                                                                                                                                                  27
Location of Development [163.3191(2)(d)]
Since the City’s EAR based amendments were adopted in November,
2004, there have only been four (4) Future Land Use Map (FLUM)
amendments approved for parcels larger than 10 acres in size. An
additional 10 small scale map amendments have resulted from
annexations during this time period. These map amendments are
detailed in Table 10.   Map 6 identifies the Future Land Use Map
Amendments by year.     No land use amendments were adopted in
2010.




                                                                   MAP 6 – FLU AMENDMENT MAP
Future Land Use Map Amendments 2004-2010
                                                                               Land Area     Square Miles
        City Case #                        Effective Date   Ordinance Number
                                                                               (Acres +/-)      (+/-)
         CP-01-04                            6/2/2004           1377-04           7.1         0.011093

         CP-02-04                            6/2/2004           1376-04            10         0.015625

         CP-03-04                           12/012004           1397-04           0.8         0.00125

         CP-01-06                            4/5/2006           1434-06          0.414        0.000646

         CP-01-07                           7/11/2007           1496-07          13.37        0.02089

         CP-02-07                           9/17/2008           1565-08          33.38        0.052156

         CP-04-07                           11/7/2007           1511-07           0.79        0.001234

         CP-05-07                            1/2/2008           1529-08           1.3         0.002031

         CP-06-07                            3/5/2008           1542-08           0.61        0.000953

         CP-07-07                           12/5/2007           1525-07           4.94        0.007718

         CP-01-08                            6/4/2008           1550-08           3.3         0.005156

         CP-02-08                           9/17/2008           1566-08          16.47        0.025734

         CP-06-08                           11/5/2008           1569-08           3.86        0.006031

         CP-09-08                            6/3/2009           1593-09          29.77        0.046515

         CP-01-09                            6/3/2009           1594-09          1,240         1.9375

         CP-02-09                            6/3/2009           1597-09           0.56        0.000875
TABLE 10 – SOURCE: CITY OF PUNTA GORDA URBAN DESIGN




                                                                                                    29
Vacant and Developable Land [163.3191(2)(b)]
Vacant and developable lands represent less than ten percent (10%)
of the land area of the City of Punta Gorda. The City contains large
undeveloped areas; however, the vast majority of this area is owned
by State, County, City, or otherwise protected for conservation
purposes. These conservation lands represent a little more than fifty
percent (50%) of the total land area of the City. An additional (8.8%)
of the total land is devoted to right of ways leaving approximately
forty-one percent (41%) of the total land area of the City developed.

Of the developed lands in the City especially within the Community
Redevelopment Area there is great potential for redevelopment as
the current building stock does not generally encompass the full
buildable envelop of individual sites.     The City expects to see
continued redevelopment in gray-field or otherwise occupied sites
within the CRA and adjacent mixed-use commercial Future Land Use
Categories.   Table 11 illustrates the current extent of vacant lands
broken down by type, residential, commercial, and industrial. Please
note that all Commercial and Industrial lands have residential
potential based on mixed-use development configurations.        Map 7
identifies the location of existing vacant residential, commercial and
industrial lands.


                                                                         MAP 7 – VACANT LAND USE MAP
Vacant Lands by Type                                                            43%
                                           2010         Percentage of
                                                                                                                       85%
Vacant Land Types         Acres       Percentage of       Total Land
                                       Vacant Land           Uses

Vacant Residential       854.45          85.00%              8.36%             15%

Vacant Commercial        146.39          14.56%              1.43%

Vacant Industrial          4.34            0.43%             0.04%                Residential   Commercial     Industrial

Total Vacant Land       1,005.18         100.00%             9.83%
TABLE 11 - SOURCE: 2010 CITY PUNTA GORDA & CHARLOTTE COUNTY GIS


Provision of Infrastructure and Maintenance of Level-of-Service Standards [163.3191(2)(c)]
The City of Punta Gorda has sought to fund all needed capital projects during the planning period through a combination of ad
valorem tax revenues, non-ad valorem tax revenues such as franchise fees, utility taxes, gas taxes, impact fees and tax
increment financing. In addition, the City has benefitted greatly from federal and state grant programs following the direct hit of
Hurricane Charley in 2004. The City has a good credit rating, unused debt capacity, and adequate debt coverage. The most
significant challenge facing the City is a decline and/or stagnation in both ad valorem and non-ad valorem tax revenues due to
housing foreclosure crisis and the overall economy.

The Capital Improvements Program (CIP) and annual budget process provide the means through which the City of Punta Gorda
takes a planned and programmed approach to using its financial resources in the most responsive and efficient manner to meet
its level of service and facility needs.

Capital projects are budgeted to account for funds that may carry over from one fiscal year to the next for a defined purpose
such as funding a specific capital project or a grant. Once funds are committed to a capital project, those funds typically remain



                                                                                                                             31
with that project until either all funds are expended or until a budget change is approved by the City Council. The CIP provides
for acquisition, construction, reconstruction, equipment and fixtures, renovation, rehabilitation, or replacement of facilities and
any related cost for land acquisition, land improvements, design, feasibility studies and engineering. It may include projects
which are or will become the property of the City, as well as projects that although not owned by the City, will be part of a joint
project agreement with other governmental agencies and/or private enterprise.

Development of the CIP requires analysis of needed capital projects with projected revenues to determine if sufficient funds will
be available to pay for needed improvements in the year(s) that projects are scheduled. Only those projects that are funded or
projected to be funded in a future year are included in the CIP. Therefore, the adopted CIP is, by definition, financially feasible.
Currently, the City of Punta Gorda does not have any backlogged facilities and has been able to maintain its adopted levels of
service. On a whole, the City of Punta Gorda has a financially feasible capital improvements program in place that has been able
to provide its residents and property owners with adequate public services and facilities in a timely manner.


Location of Existing Development in Relation to Location of Anticipated Development [163.3191(2)(d)]
The City of Punta Gorda remains focused on implementing its vision as the economic and cultural hub of Charlotte County,
grounded by a strong connection to its rich history and the beauty of the natural environment. The implementation of this vision
is carried out through the Comprehensive Plan, the Community Redevelopment Area Redevelopment Plan, the Parks and
Recreation Master Plan, and other planning documents. There are three basic strategies that the City is implementing to achieve
its vision:

              Fostering redevelopment
              Encouraging infill development
              Pursuing annexations that maximize the value of existing infrastructure
Also pursuant to [163.2517(6)(a) F.S.], the City continues to encourage redevelopment. Within the Community Redevelopment
area major capital improvement projects from streetscapes and parking facilities to parks and community facilities are
implemented to catalyze private sector investment by providing the foundation for lasting economic vitality. Table 12 list major
capital improvements projects within the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA).



Projects within the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) 2004-2011
                                                                                                      Funding      Completion
      Project Name                                     Project Description
                                                                                                       Amount         Date
Wood Street Renovation    Streetscape improvements- storm sewer, parallel parking and landscape          $42,200      2004
A C Freeman House         Move and restore historic AC Freeman House                                   $275,000       2005
City Marketplace          Purchase of ROW for Retta Esplanade and Marion Avenue                       $2,000,000      2005
Indian Statue             Moved statue by renowned artist Peter Toth, saved from destruction              $6,000      2005
Herald Court              Alleyway improvements including parking and landscaping                      $102,800       2006
Bernice Russell CDC
                          Public/private partnership development of business/residential space           $75,000      2007
Mixed Used Project
Government Center
                          Design/construction of parking facility for City Hall Complex                $544,700       2007
Expansion
Racks 'n Plaques          Placement of bicycle racks (parking) in public areas throughout the CRA        $20,000      2007

History Park              Construction of brick pathway and relocation of historic structure           $193,000       2007

Charlotte County          Renovation of the historic Charlotte County Courthouse, City contribution    $357,000
                                                                                                                      2008
Courthouse Renovation     $357,000                                                                    $5,000,000
Trabue Woods
                          Public/private partnership to develop property with 8 units of attainable
Community                                                                                              $360,000       2008
                          housing
Development




                                                                                                                        33
Façade Improvements        Matching grants for commercial & residential property façade improvements        $494,800      2008

Nesbit Street Parking      Public surface parking lot near the Punta Gorda Post Office                       $54,200      2008

Land Acquisition           Acquisition of property within the CRA to complete the Downtown Plan            $1,101,500     2008

Landscape                  Landscape improvements, sidewalk renovation and site furnishings       along
                                                                                                            $238,400      2008
Improvements               US 41N and US 41S within the CRA

Laishley Park Marina       Purchase of PG Harbor Project property for the construction of Laishley Park
(Punta Gorda Harbor        - 15 acres waterfront park with boat ramp, marina, pavilions, playground,       $6,967,000   2008-2011
Project )                  interactive fountain, and marina building

Marion Avenue Sidewalk     Construction of brick walks, landscape improvements along both Marion
                                                                                                            $464,800      2009
Improvements               Avenue from Nesbit Street to US 41 SB
Trabue Park                Purchase of property for City Park                                               $400,000      2009

US 41S Sidewalk            Construction of brick sidewalks, landscape improvements US 41 SB from
                                                                                                            $200,000      2009
Improvements               Carmalita St to Marion Ave

Charlotte County Event     Design/construction of conference & event center with Harborwalk County         $1,200,000
                                                                                                                          2009
Center                     project, City contribution $1.2 million                                        $19,649,798
Carmalita Road             Improvement to Carmalita St from Cooper St to Taylor St, drainage &
                                                                                                            $455,000      2009
Improvements               sidewalks
Cooper Street Recreation
                           2,700+ SF addition to neighborhood recreation center                             $492,200      2009
Center Expansion

East Virginia Parking      Provide on-street parking                                                         $17,000      2009

                           Property purchase, design, and construction of urban park and public
Hector House Plaza                                                                                          $493,500      2009
                           parking
Downtown Flood
                           Utility relocation, storm water system improvements within the CRA                $3,200,000   2010
Mitigation
Henry Street
                           Joint project w/County to widen road in school area                                $105,100    2010
Improvements
Hounds on Henry            Construction of dog park                                                            $90,100    2010
Harborside Avenue
                           Construct brick paver sidewalks/decorator lighting from Taylor to US 41N            $40,000    2010
Beautification
Mary Street Lighting
                           Design & installation of decorative street lighting on Mary/Showalter Streets       $22,000    2010
Project
Park Improvements          Impact fee funded park improvements                                                $145,300    2010
On Street Public Parking
                           On-street public parking improvements at various locations in the CRA              $225,700    2010
Improvements
Retta Esplanade
                           Construction of Retta Esplanade from US 41 NB to US 41 SB                          $458,300    2010
Extension

                           Installation of storm shutters or impact resistant glass on various properties
Shutter Installation                                                                                          $164,000    2010
                           in the Historic District

                           Streetscape improvements including parking and sidewalk on Taylor St from
Taylor Street Parking                                                                                         $150,945    2010
                           Marion Ave to Harborside Drive

                           Design & Construction of Linear Park as part of the City's "Ring-around-
Linear Park                                                                                                  $2,124,000   2011
                           the-City"

Wayfinding System          Wayfinding Signage System for pedestrians & vehicles                               $185,900    2011
Herald Court Center
                           400 space parking facility with 17,000 sq ft street level retail space           $13,157,300   2011
Parking Garage

ADA Improvements           Remove barriers from City facilities to allow all citizens access                   $54,000    2011




                                                                                                                           35
Cooper Street                   Design and installation of a new playground at the Cooper Street Recreation
                                                                                                                     $135,000   2011
Playground                      Center

Olympia Avenue                  Design/Construction of sidewalk improvements along Olympia Avenue
                                                                                                                     $100,000   2011
Improvements                    between US 41N/US41S

                                5 phase streetscape project from Ida Ave to Charlotte Harbor including off
MLK                                                                                                                  $972,900   2011
                                site stormwater detention (includes Baker Academy Park)

Mooring Fields                  Construct a municipal mooring field for 42 vessels up to 50 feet long.               $265,900   2011

Harborwalk                      Design/construction of waterfront trail system east of US 41 to City Limits          $790,100   2011

                                                                Total Public Capital Investments Within The CRA   $63,590,443
TABLE 12 – SOURCE: CITY OF PUNTTA GORDA URBAN DESIGN DIVISION


In areas outside the CRA the City encourages infill development of scattered vacant residential and commercial sites. In order to
do this with limited resources the City focuses on providing a predictable and comprehensive set of development rights,
comprehensive set of high quality municipal services, and targeted capital improvements. Properties are appropriately entitled
and development proceeds through staff level reviews without the necessity of legislative review incumbent in the
Comprehensive Plan Map Change or Rezoning processes. After the development process is completed properties receive a full
array of municipal services including fully accredited Police Services, professional Fire Protection, Sanitation, Parks, right of way
and drainage maintenance, Code Compliance, and in our canal front communities Canal Maintenance (seawalls, signage, and
channel dredging).        Finally the City engages in capital improvements designed to enhance livability and improve existing
infrastructure. Table 13 illustrates capital improvement projects outside the Community Redevelopment Area.
Projects Outside the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) 2004-2011

                                                                                                                    Funding      Completion
      Project Name                                               Project Description
                                                                                                                    Amount          Date
Firehouse #2                  Replacement of Forestation #2                                                         $1,617,900     2007

Tripoli Blvd. Sidewalk        Repair and install sidewalks along Tripoli Boulevard                                   $262,552      2008

West End Sidewalk             Repair and install sidewalks along West End Drive                                       $85,273      2008
Public Works & Utility
                              Replacement of the facility destroyed by Hurricane Charlie                            $4,538,600     2009
Campus
                              Design and construction of a 175 thousand square feet new middle school
Punta Gorda Middle                                                                                                $32,640,885      2008
                              which was destroyed by Hurricane Charley
City Beautification           Miscellaneous landscape projects within the City                                      $1,660,300     2010

Drainage Improvement          Drainage improvements – San Rocco Drive                                                 $69,600      2010

Forestry Improvements         Tree Plantings and digital inventory                                                   $231,500      2010
Shreve/Pompano
                              Joint City/County project to add turn lanes and sidewalks                              $486,500      2010
Improvements
                              Design and construction of the entire Charlotte High Campus which
Charlotte High School
                              included the renovation of the original 3 story historic classroom building         $84,430,476      2010
(not yet finalized)
                              that were severely damaged by Hurricane Charley in 2004
                              Bridge and roadway reconstruction including improved stormwater and                    $122,400
Aqui Esta Improvements                                                                                                             2011
                              sidewalks, City Contribution $122,400                                                 $6,851,700
Multi Use Recreational
                              Design/Construction of multi-use recreational trail (4 phases)                        $1,808,800     2011
Trail (MURT)
                                                               Total Public Capital Improvement Outside the CRA   $134,806,486
TABLE 13 – SOURCE: CITY OF PUNTA GORDA URBAN DESIGN DIVISION




                                                                                                                                       37
Assessment of Successes and Shortcomings Related to Each Element [163.3191(2)(h)]
F.S. 163.3191(2)(h) requires “a brief assessment of successes and shortcomings related to each element of the plan.”       This
section explores each element of the City’s Comprehensive Plan and identifies whether or not the goals of each element have
been attained. Information was obtained from various City department staff and compiled by staff of the Urban Design Division.

Future Land Use
                  The Future Land Use Element defines the logical pattern of development for the City including the protection
                  of important historical, environmental, and neighborhood resources and seeks to provide the framework for a
                  compact and contiguous pattern of development. It is through the Future Land Use Element and the Future
                  Land Use Map that the City's growth management strategy is fully implemented. It is essential that the uses
                  prescribed by the Future Land Use Map be consistent with sound urban development policies which promote
                  compatibility between development activities. The Future Land Use Element provides the foundation for all
                  other Elements of the Comprehensive Plan to create a cohesive and precise vision of the future of the
community.

Successes
Since Hurricane Charley, a category 4 storm which destroyed or significantly damaged a large percentage of the structures within
the City, the City of Punta Gorda experienced tremendous development and redevelopment activity. This activity was focused in
the Community Redevelopment Area and other adjacent infill locations. While the storm acted as a catalyst for this development
activity, type and location of redevelopment and infill development was clearly envisioned by various planning efforts over the
preceding 15 years since the formation of the Community Redevelopment Area in 1990. The integration of mixed use provisions
into all commercial and industrial Future Land Use categories provided an additional spark for continued redevelopment interest
in the established areas of the City. Furthermore the establishment of commercial intensity standards in combination with new
Land Development Regulations, more clearly defined the scale and type of development envisioned by the community.
The major visioning documents of the City have detailed various public sector
investments in parks, streetscapes, and other amenities that the City has worked
tirelessly to implement.       These investments have provided the private sector
investment community with tangible evidence of the City’s commitment to infill
and redevelopment. The City’s vision demands a strong traditional downtown that
serves as the economic and cultural hub of the City and the County.      This hub
focus serves to protect existing residential, environmental and rural lands from
encroachment by uncontrolled suburban sprawl.          Furthermore maintaining a
smaller “footprint” for development the City is more able to efficiently and
economically deliver public goods to citizens and businesses.
                                                                                                 The Sunloft Center
Mixed use development received a significant boost in the City since Hurricane       A vertically integrated “Mixed-Use” building
Charley through the provisions of new Land Development Regulations. A number
                                                                                       in the heart of downtown Punta Gorda
of redevelopment and infill projects brought the first new vertically mixed-use
structures to the City since WWII. These mixed-use developments will help to re-
establish a residential presence in the business district as a key to creating a
vibrant downtown.

The City in its last Comprehensive Plan update in 2008, defined commercial
intensity allowances within the Future Land Use Element which more clearly
establish the parameters for commercial development. Floor to area ratios (FAR)
that are more urban in scale recommend the type and pattern of development that
the citizens envision. The relatively large FARs allows the development community
to provide the appropriate scale for development based on market parameters not
arbitrary regulatory limits.    The City’s Land Development Regulations define the



                                                                                                                          39
permissible envelope for such development ensuring that no matter how much
commercial intensity is added to a site it is in scale with the City and in keeping
with its vision.

The success of the City of Punta Gorda since Hurricane Charley has been
recognized by the citizens to the point that they through the grassroots TEAM
Punta Gorda organization have requested action from the County. The County
in concert with the City and TEAM Punta Gorda in 2010 kicked off the South
County Gateway Planning Project. This joint initiative was designed to generate
publicly driven vision for the unincorporated portions of South Charlotte County
adjacent to the City. These public visioning sessions are expected to generate
recommendations      for   modifications     to   the   County   Land   Development
Regulations to assist in achieving this vision.

Challenges
As the economy slowly turns toward recovery, the primary challenge facing the
City will be the continuation of the successes of the recent past.

Maintain focus on infill and redevelopment
The City will face tremendous pressure from large scale greenfield development
that is likely to accompany any economic recovery. Large areas of vacant land are
immediately adjacent to the current City Limits and within the Utilities Services
Area.   The challenge for the City is to ensure that when development occurs
within these areas, it does not draw development away from the core
                                                                                      BAL HARBOR PLAZA: POTENTIAL INFILL DEVELOPMENT
redevelopment and infill areas of the City. Furthermore any development within              SCENARIO OF A STRIP SHOPPING CENTER
these greenfield areas should be on a scale and pattern consistent with the established vision for the City.

Annex areas to create a more cohesive economic and social unit
The City of Punta Gorda has a fragmented eastern boundary that confuses the general public and development community and
increases City and County costs for the provision of public services.       Annexations that serve to “smooth” this boundary and
further the vision of the City will be pursued.    The primary challenge will be balancing the short-term costs associated with
annexation with the long-term cost avoidances associated with more contiguous municipal boundaries. A long term assessment
of proposed annexations is essential as short term inefficiencies may be increased due to the timing, location, and configuration
of annexations.   As long as annexations are consistent with the long term vision outlined in the Comprehensive Plan, these
annexations will be aggressively pursued.

Establishing greater residential densities more consistent with the development of a less auto-centric City
The successful implementation of an Alternative Transportation Concurrency strategy will require a pattern of development that
is less auto-centric. A less auto-centric pattern of development will require walkable
streets, comfortable bikeways, and transit services.           This less auto oriented
transportation network implies a pattern of development that is more integrated and
interconnected, smaller blocks, few cul-de-sacs, and more mixed-use development.
In order to make walkable streets and transit economically feasible, commercial will
need to be built at greater intensities accompanied by higher residential densities.
Currently the City has commercial and industrial intensities that are more urban in
scale than the surrounding unincorporated County and more in-line with our
regionally neighboring Cities of Fort Myers, Naples, and Sarasota.         However, our
residential densities are more aligned with the unincorporated County. Commercial               GULF BREEZE APARTMENTS: NEW RESIDENTIAL
                                                                                              DEVELOPMENT SET ON A TRADITIONAL STREET GRID
development is dependent on residential development therefore aligning residential




                                                                                                                                    41
densities to make them more supportive of maximum intensity levels is vital to providing an economical viable Punta Gorda.

Creation of strategies for preserving and enhancing local food production
Another challenge facing the City is the loss of rural and agriculturally productive lands. Across the State agricultural and rural
lands have been under intense pressure from suburban sprawl and international competition. Fallow field and abandoned citrus
groves are found throughout Southwest Florida including areas immediately outside the current City Limits.            These areas
represent a tremendous opportunity to reduce our regional greenhouse gas emissions by balancing the local economy with
agricultural jobs by incentivizing local food production. Once upon a time in Florida citrus and truck farms supplied the coastal
population centers with all the fresh produce while cattle and poultry supplemented seafood as the primary protein source for
the population. The land for agriculture is largely intact in South Charlotte County. Unlike our regional neighbors this land has
not as yet been planted with the final crop of tract homes and strip malls.         These lands therefore represent an economic
opportunity in the long term for a regionally significant local food production reserve area in South Charlotte County.        The
challenge is to find ways to discourage suburban sprawl in the short term and provide viable incentives for the productive use of
these lands.

Recommended Actions
It would be easy to rest upon the laurels of recent successes the City has achieved since Hurricane Charley; however that is not in
the spirit of Punta Gorda.     The City stands prepared to face challenges on the horizon, forging these challenges into
opportunities to further the citizens’ vision of their community.     Punta Gorda has the foundation in place for the economic
recovery ahead. Maintaining focus on redevelopment and infill, increasing long term economic viability through annexations,
better integrating land use and transportation planning, and keeping the options open for local food production are critical to
building on the foundation established in order to create the City the citizens desire.

Study the optimal residential density to commercial intensity mix, residential/commercial proximity to ensure that Future Land
Use is consistent with Alternative Transportation Concurrency strategy.
      Identify changes necessary to decrease Greenhouse Gas Emissions
      Identify potential local food production areas within the City and the established Annexation Study Areas
      Develop a Future Land Use Category for agricultural uses.


Examine existing Future Land Use Categories to ensure that community gardens and other innovative food production typologies
are allowable. These actions will require substantial data and analysis. This data and analysis will recommend any necessary
policy changes to the City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive Plan.

Conservation & Coastal Management
                   The purpose of the Conservation and Coastal Management Element is to plan, promote and manage the
                   conservation and protection of the City’s natural resources.         It is important for the City to plan for
                   development activities in areas that would mitigate or otherwise lessen the disturbance of upland or coastal
                   resources. The current element addresses measures to protect human life and limit public expenditures in
                   areas that are subject to destruction by natural disaster.




Successes
The City of Punta Gorda has significant land areas in preservation which are identified on Map 8. City, County and State owned
environmentally protected lands account for over 46 percent of the total land area of the City. The City has continued to work
along with its partners at the County and State level, to realize additional preservation opportunities, and continues to develop
alternative measures for managing our coastal resources. One such strategy was the successful annexation of 1,240 acres of
state owned environmentally sensitive lands into the City’s boundary under Preservation and Recreation and Future Land Use
Designation. This annexation clarifies the City’s southwestern border. Although no development is proposed at this time, the
types of facilities that will be considered future development are consistent with the land use designation.




                                                                                                                         43
The City also realizes the importance of linkage zones, areas between
existing preservation areas, and the need to identify and retain these
natural areas as reserves during the design of large projects such as
Developments of Regional Impact (DRI).             The City is committed to
participate in the State-wide effort to preserve those important areas
necessary   to     complete   wildlife        linkages,     habitat     plans    and
conservation areas.

The City moved forward with its commitment and annexation strategy
by actively working with the FDEP to successfully annex the previously
mentioned 1,240 acres of state lands.

The   successful    implementation       of    Policy     2.2.2.4     provided   the
opportunity for the City to work with both the SWFRPC and the CHNEP
in producing a Vulnerability Assessment and a Climate Adaptation
Plan specific to the City of Punta Gorda. These plans provide the City
with the most recent information relation to sea level rise and other
climate adaptation strategies that need to be reviewed as the City
continues to develop.

With the City’s historic waterfront area in a flood prone area, the City
pursued two strategies to mitigate for this condition. First, pursuant
to a FEMA hazard mitigation grant, the City conducted a drainage
study, which resulted in a comprehensive program for stormwater                        MAP 8 – PRESERVATION LAND USE MAP

management within this area. Second, the City continues to purchase
lands in the highest risk velocity zone areas, as designated by FEMA, in order to preserve those lands from development.

The Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) continues to focus redevelopment efforts on projects which assist in rebuilding our
public space.    These efforts concentrate on maintaining our public waterfront and help to re-establish the critical mass of
structures and economic activity within the historic downtown area and adjacent neighborhoods. The City of Punta Gorda
continues to pursue grant funding which contributes to the renovation/construction of development, landscaping, reforestation
and economic development of the City’s CRA.

Challenges
The current Conservation and Coastal Management Element has become cumbersome and non-user friendly due to the size and
content.   The combined goals, objectives and policies make it extremely difficult for users to understand.        In reviewing the
Florida Statutes which govern the Comprehensive Plan and the 9J-5 Florida Administrative Code which provides guidance for the
individual elements, both address Conservation and Coastal Management separately.          With the changes in the legislature on
energy, conservation and transportation, staff will be able to focus more on the specific goals of the elements if conservation and
coastal management are separate elements.

Recommendations:
The City will divide the existing Conservation and Coastal Element in two separate elements each emphasizing the data and
analysis outlined in 9J-5. The separation of the element into two individual elements is described in detail under the Major Issue
section of this document.

The City will work with the County wherever possible to assist in the implementation of their wildlife corridors specifically within
the Urban Service Area will review those connections/linkages and consider incentives for including greenway connections within
the City’s boundaries.




                                                                                                                            45
The City will monitor the County’s progress towards maintaining natural buffers adjacent to waterways along the Peace River.
The inclusion of this natural buffer may compliment some of the City’s strategies in reducing potential pollution impacts, i.e.
fertilizer run-off, from urban development and landscaping. Although the City does not have a fertilizer ordinance in place at
this time, it may be appropriate to revisit this issue during the EAR-based amendments.

The City will continue to work along with its partners at the County and State level, to realize additional preservation
opportunities, and continue to develop alternative measures for managing our coastal resources.

The City needs to develop an action plan that will prepare the City of Punta Gorda for future climate change and will need to
review and add policies regarding energy conservation.

By utilizing these combined strategies, the City will promote a synergy between residents, visitors, developers and business
owners that will focus on the natural environmental resources, such as Charlotte Harbor, as a key component in advancing and
improving the City’s economic viability, unique historic character and small town charm.

Infrastructure
                 The purpose of the Infrastructure Element is to identify the facilities necessary to provide for public services
                 correlated to future land use and population projections. The element is divided into three sections: potable
                 water & sanitary sewer, solid waste, and stormwater management. There are no aquifer recharge areas within
                 City limits, nor within the annexation study area; therefore, this component is not a part of the City’s
                 Infrastructure Element.

                 Successes
The level of service standards adopted for all three infrastructure sections have been successfully met. The provision of potable
water and sanitary sewer, improvements to stormwater design and removal capacity and the collection and disposal of solid
waste and recyclables have met or exceeded the established LOS standards in the Comprehensive Plan.
Potable water:
The City’s Water Treatment plant treats and monitors 1.7 billion gallons of raw water on an annual basis and provides our
residents and other customer’s high quality drinking water.    The City continues to implement new techniques and upgrade
equipment to improve water quality, provide sufficient capacity for growth, and to lower the cost, when possible. Recent efforts
include:

      Replacement of the 45 year old Dam structure
      Development of groundwater supply coupled with a membrane treatment process to improve finished water quality and
      reliability
      Maintenance and implementation of a 20 year water supply master plan, updated in 2008, pursuant to the Southwest
      Florida Water Management District

Wastewater:
The City has completed two studies over the last few years. An extensive Inflow
and Infiltration Study and a Wastewater Collection System Master Plan were both
completed in 2008.   Implementation of the recommendations of these studies
is ongoing and programmed in a 10 year corrective action plan.        Inflow &
Infiltration reduces groundwater inflow into the wastewater system reducing
wastewater plant demand and increasing viability of reuse water.           The
Wastewater Collection System Master Plan forecasts 5 & 20 year flows and
provides hydraulic modeling analyses to determine future wastewater collection
infrastructure requirements, documented existing conditions in the collection
system and made recommendations to improve system efficiency.
                                                                                            DOWNTOWN FLOODING PROJECT




                                                                                                                        47
Stormwater:
The City has in place policies and other regulations that provide for a decrease to impervious surfaces; there are provisions with
the Land Development Regulations that allow for limiting the number of parking spaces for commercial development through
shared parking agreements, open space requirements, alternative surface options for excess parking, and landscape
requirements.

The construction of the Downtown Drainage Project was completed.         The project required the retrofitting of several major
outfalls in the downtown area with larger pipes to relieve flooding potential and the installation of Tideflex check valves to
reduce occurrences and severity of tidal inundation.

The Drainage Study, Engineering Design and Water Management Permitting
for San Rocco Drainage Improvements were also completed. Also in a joint
County, School Board and City Project, a master stormwater system was
implemented in the Charlotte High and Punta Gorda Middle School Area.
Drainage improvements for this project also included Education Avenue and
Carmalita Street.

Solid Waste:
The City’s Solid Waste Program continues to provide for the needs of current
and future populations of the City. Improvements to the curbside collection
and disposal process services for solid waste; recyclables, yard waste, and
                                                                                        ZEMEL ROAD LANDFILL, CHARLOTTE COUNTY
hazardous waste continue to be implemented. The City continues to utilize
the Zemel Road Landfill which is the only solid waste operational landfill in
Charlotte County.
Challenges

Potable Water:
One challenge identified with the Potable Water Section is conservation to reduce total water demand. Although the City meets
the per capita water demand goal of the Southern Water Use Caution Area, additional conservation measures could likely further
decrease potable water demand, thereby delaying the need for future capacity capital improvements. However, implementing
additional conservation reduces revenue and typically requires rate increases, which tends to draw public opposition.

An additional water source is needed to meet the water quality standards for total dissolved solids (TDS).              Shell Creek
experiences elevated levels of dissolved solids that exceed secondary drinking water standards in the dry season. The current
treatment process at Shell Creek WTP does not remove TDS, which results in finished water that does not meet the secondary
standard during some months of the year. Secondary standards are set for aesthetic water quality purposes only. A timetable for
meeting the regulatory standard is under review with the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP).

The City currently has a variance from FDEP to exceed the secondary TDS
standard. Because the City’s existing surface water treatment plant has
sufficient capacity to meet the City’s water demand needs until 2018, the
City has applied for an exemption to the existing TDS variance. A timeline
for a 5-year extension to the variance may be necessary if the
groundwater treatment plant is required for water quality purposes prior
to 2016.


                                                                                            SHELL CREEK, PUNTA GRODA




                                                                                                                           49
Wastewater:
All of the Utility Service Area inside the City limits is served by the public sewer system, and no properties utilize septic systems
for wastewater treatment. However, septic systems are used extensively outside the City limits. Conversion of septic systems to
a central sewer system is delayed due to lack of cost and public support. The cost to convert from septic to public sewer is
prohibitive unless grant funds are available.

Stormwater:
One major challenge for the Stormwater Section is the City’s low elevation and the ongoing sea level rise issues. How the City
prepares for this will have influence on infrastructure placement or replacement and stormwater improvements.

Solid waste:
No challenges are identified during this planning period because the majority of these facilities were constructed and upgraded
in the last ten years.   Therefore no major capital expenditures are anticipated in the next planning decade and projections
indicate that the landfill has sufficient capacity, through 2023.   Other capacity is available through 2027 with the expansion of
cell structures into additional permitted acreage surrounding acreage.

Recommended Actions
While the City, like most other municipalities in the State, is facing tax revenue shortfalls that could delay the implementation of
projects or modify the scale or scope of proposed projects, the City continues to move forward on numerous projects. However,
the City will continue to evaluate the population projections, development trends, and internal needs analysis to determine the
future project needs. Evaluation of recommendations will be incorporated within the Capital Improvements Program as plans for
new facilities become necessary.

The City will continue to review proposed projects carefully, seek alternative funding sources, enhance existing public-private
partnerships, and community group relationships to ensure that community needs are being met.
The City will implement projects identified in the City’s Water Supply Plan. The City will update its Water Supply Plan within 18
months of the latest approval of the Districts’ regional plans.

Housing
                  The Housing Element of the City of Punta Gorda’s Comprehensive Plan will act as the guide to local decision
                  makers in their efforts to enact policy that will affect the housing needs of the City’s residents. The Element
                  examines existing household characteristics and existing housing quality to determine current (short-term)
                  needs while population projections and housing trends will be considered when determining future (long-term)
                  needs.




Successes
The City of Punta Gorda has been successful in the housing arena by providing for adequate land use categories that promote a
functional mix of housing types, densities and levels of affordability. The City has maintained close relationships with public and
private housing providers through the current housing market downturn to ensure that current codes and policies are in place if
or when the housing market returns.

The City also provides public outreach to the community regarding affordable housing via its webpage. ( www.ci.punta-
gorda.fl.us) Housing policies and City Code regulations advocating for and/or promoting affordable housing have been placed
into an easy to read matrix. Examples include land development regulations which provide for multiple housing types and lot
size options, density incentives, promotion of infill development, accessory dwellings, and other similarly housing creation
supportive policies or regulations.




                                                                                                                           51
Challenges

Until the 2010 Census data is made available, the City is relying on long range,
extrapolated   demographic       information       to   measure   and   assess   housing
adequacies as they relate to the 2025 Comprehensive Plan. This lack of recent
data hinders planning efforts to reliably focus on those housing concerns (i.e.
affordable housing needs, aging in place needs, etc) for those in the most need
of help.   In addition, the housing downturn affecting all municipalities in the
State especially those in the retiree/visitor dependent Southwest Florida Region,
                                                                                                TRABUE WOODS HOUSING COMPLEX:
has hampered if not totally shutdown providers of housing such as developers
                                                                                            INFILL AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT
and general contractors.

Recommended Actions

With the state of the overall economy improving marginally, housing supply is at
the mercy of the market. It is recommended that the City act on the following:

      Monitor data updates as they become available from the Census Bureau.
      Review     “Aging    in    Place”   best     practices   and    compare    existing
      Comprehensive       Plan    policies   and    current    City   Land   Development
      Regulations to determine if changes are advised.
      Continue working closely with all housing providers to ensure that the
      City is in position to move forward once housing market conditions
                                                                                                   GULF BREEZE APARTMENTS:
      improve.
                                                                                                 AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROJECT
                                                                                            BY THE PUNTA GORDA HOUSING AUTHORITY
Recreation & Open Spaces
                   The Recreation and Open Space Element provides a process for determining the recreation and open space
                   needs of the community based on analysis of existing recreational facilities servicing the community and
                   establishing goals, policies and objectives to meet future community demands.

                   Successes
                   The City with strong public input and overwhelming community support completed its Parks & Recreation
                   Master Plan in 2009. This plan details short, mid, and long term strategies to implement a variety of projects.
These projects are designed to fulfill the citizens’ vision of “Advancing the quality of life through the creation of a comprehensive
interconnected and sustainable Park System that promotes the unique character and environment of Punta Gorda”.          A key feature
of this plan is the “Ring Around the City" Project. This project, a series of multi-use recreational trails and complete streets, will
provide access for all residents to the Park System, Points of Interest, and commercial destination areas within the City.

The City has developed strong partnerships with a wide variety of community groups, TEAM Punta Gorda, Punta Gorda Chamber
of Commerce, Downtown Merchants Association, Main Street Punta Gorda, School Board of Charlotte County, Charlotte County
Chambers of Commerce, Punta Gorda Historical Society, Charlotte County Historical Societies, Arts and Humanities Council of
Charlotte County, Punta Gorda Historic Mural Society, Neighborhood and Property Owner’s Associations, South Charlotte County
Coalition, Punta Gorda Boater’s Alliance, and Public Safety oriented groups including Community Emergency Response Teams,
Volunteers in Fire Service, and Neighborhood Watch Marine Patrol. The organizational skills, diversity of community members,
and wide spectrum of public support represented by these groups has enabled the City to complete projects that may not
otherwise been completed. Table 14 identifies a list of these projects.




                                                                                                                              53
Results Through Collaboration Project List

             Project                      Project Description                                                           Partners
                                                                                          TEAM Punta Gorda, Downtown Merchants Association ,
                            A workshop/retail platform for artists and
                                                                                          Arts & Humanities Council, Visual Arts Center, Main
Artisans Atelier            craftspeople located         in     the   Herald      Court
                                                                                          Street Punta Gorda, Charlotte Community Foundation,
                            Centre (City Parking Garage/Retail Space)
                                                                                          Private Sector
                            Refurbishing of a small urban park with new
                                                                                          City of Punta Gorda, TEAM Punta Gorda, Punta Gorda
Herald Court Park           plants,   mulch,     and         maintenance     of    site
                                                                                          Chamber of Commerce
                            furniture.
                                                                                          City    of     Punta    Gorda,     Florida    Department   of
Downtown Streetscaping      New plantings on various downtown streets                     Transportation, TEAM Punta Gorda, Main Street Punta
                                                                                          Gorda
                            Development     of      a    critical     link   in     the   Private      Sector,   City   of   Punta     Gorda/Community
Four Points by Sheraton
                            Harborwalk                                                    Redevelopment Agency, TEAM Punta Gorda
                            Redevelopment      of       an    existing   alley     that
Wyvern Hotel & Dean’s       facilitated the development of the Wyvern                     Private      Sector,   City   of   Punta     Gorda/Community
Alleyway                    Hotel and redevelopment of Dean’s South of                    Redevelopment Agency
                            the Border

Historic House Renovation   Renovation of a historic home                                 Private Sector, Community Redevelopment Agency

                            Development of a City park on School Board
Baker Park                  of Charlotte County property which will be                    City of Punta Gorda, School Board of Charlotte County
                            maintained by the School Board
 Cooper Street Recreation &                                                                  New Operation Cooper Street, City of Punta Gorda,
                                   Renovations to the facility
 Education Center                                                                            Federal/State, Charlotte County

                                   Provides a variety of art classes for the
 Visual Arts Center                                                                          Charlotte County Art Guild, City of Punta Gorda
                                   residents of the City and County
                                                                                             City   of   Punta    Gorda/Community      Redevelopment
                                   Waterfront Events Park with marina & private
 Laishley Park                                                                               Agency, Charlotte County, TEAM Punta Gorda, Privet
                                   restaurant & rental development
                                                                                             Sponsor, Marina Park, LLC and Smuggler’s Enterprise
                                   Developer      funded       park   improvement       in
 Pittman Park                                                                                Private Sector, City of Punta Gorda
                                   undeveloped City right-of-way
                                   City owned facility operated by local non-
                                                                                             City of Punta Gorda, YMCA, Community Sailing Center,
 Bayfront Center                   profits providing various recreation & social
                                                                                             Peace River Power Squadron
                                   programs
                                   Development of a critical linkage to the Ring             City of Punta Gorda, Advisory Boards & Committees,
 Harborwalk
                                   Around the City Project                                   Community Groups, Private Sector

 Linear Park/Multi Use             Development        of   a    critical   link   in   the
                                                                                             City of Punta Gorda, Federal/State
 Recreational Trail                Harborwalk
                                                                                             Prepared by City Staff, TEAM PG and volunteers
                                   Working with TEAM PG, the City produced this
 Parks & Recreation Master                                                                   through a series of planning charrettes with the
                                   plan in-house avoiding $30,000+ cost to
 Plan                                                                                        Community       at    large.          Incorporated    into
                                   taxpayers
                                                                                             Comprehensive Plan
                                   1st   bicycle loaner program operating in the             TEAM Punta Gorda, Private Sector, City of Punta Gorda,
 Bike Loaner Program
                                   State of Florida                                          Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program
TABLE 14 - SOURCE: CITY OF PUNTA GORDA URBAN DESIGN DIVISION




                                                                                                                                                  55
Challenges
At this time, the most pressing challenge is the funding of projects outlined in the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. The City is
actively pursuing Federal Transportation funds for various segments of the Ring Around the City.        Additionally, the City has
identified General Fund and/or Optional Infrastructure Sales Sur-Tax revenues to complete some segments of the Ring Around
the City. However, with shrinking tax revenues and current uncertainty regarding Federal Transportation funding the following
projects listed on Table 15 may not be financially feasible in the timeframes outlined in the Parks and Recreation Master Plan:




Parks & Recreation Master Plan Projects

Short Range
                                                                                                          Potential    Project Year
                                                                                            Projected
  Project Name            Description of Project                Location   Responsibility                 Funding           for
                                                                                              Cost
                                                                                                           Sources     Completion

                    Design     &    Contract      the   Patty
                                                                                                         Contractual
Trabue Park         Avenue trail from Cooper St. to                        Public Works       TBD
                                                                                                          Services
                    Laishley Park Fishing Pier.
                    Proposed project to include boat
                    storage        for    non-motorized
                    boats (sailboats, kayaks, canoes)
Waterfront Sports                                                          Public Works &
                    and a launching facility. Staff is             TBD                        TBD           TBD            2010
Activity Park                                                              Urban Design
                    to   gather      preliminary        needs
                    analysis   and       report    back    to
                    Council.
                   Implement provision of police
                   patrol on paths, trails and other
Park Safety
                   hard to access areas through                City Wide   Police Department     TBD by Police       TBD         2010
Equipment
                   the purchase of a T-3 electric 3
                   wheel vehicle.
                   Detailed     needs        analysis     to
                                                                             Urban Design,
Parks & Grounds    determine level of service and
                                                                                Facilities
Maintenance        staffing       requirements           for   City Wide                           $10,000       Grant Funding   2010
                                                                             Maintenance, &
Standards          maintaining        the     City’s    Park
                                                                           Parks and Ground
                   System.
                   Review and revise the Nature
Nature Park        Park Management Plan to allow                Nature                                             City Staff
                                                                             Urban Design            N/A                         2010
Management Plan    for      greater         diversity     of    Park                                                 Time
                   recreational activities
                   Improvements to Laishley Park
                                                               Laishley
Laishley Parking   to include grading, drainage &
                                                                Park          Public Works         $50,000           FSIF        2011
Improvements       turf improvements to the Center
                   Drive Circle
                   Gazebo         improvements            at
Marriage Point                                                 Laishley      Urban Design
                   Marriage Point including site re-                                              $100,000           FSIF        2013
Hardscape                                                       Park          Public Works
                   design

                   Rework the main Event Lawn, to                          City of Punta Gorda
                                                               Laishley
Laishley Park      include     regarding,        drainage,                   Urban Design         $500,000           TBD         2014
                                                                Park
                   irrigation & turf management                               Public Works




                                                                                                                                 57
                                                             West side of
                     Creating of a mooring field and            US 41         Urban Design,
West Mooring         public      access      boardwalk         Bridge –     Public Works with                  Private/Public
                                                                                                  $200,000                       2012
Field                assisting in establishing Punta         Peace River     Partnership with                   Partnership
                     Gorda as a boaters destination            @ best        the Best Western
                                                               Western


City of Punta
Gorda
                     Required per Florida Statute as
Comprehensive
                     evaluated         through         the                                        $ 25,000 -      Annual
Plan, 2025 -                                                   City Wide      Urban Design                                       2011
                     Evaluation and Appraisal Report                                               30,000         Budget
Recreation &
                     Process.
Open Space
Element Update


                                                                                                                 Business
                                                                              Urban Design,
                                                                                                               Sponsorships
                      Monthly      Movies        on    the      Laishley      Public Works &
Movies in the Park                                                                                   TBD          & CRA         Ongoing
                     Laishley Park Event Lawn                   Park           Partnership
                                                                                                                Operating
                                                                               Opportunity
                                                                                                                 Revenue



                                                                                                               Public Private
                                                                              Urban Design
                     Weekly     yoga   classes    on   the      Laishley                                        Partnership
Yoga in the Park                                                            Private Partnership      TBD                        Ongoing
                     Laishley Park Event Lawn                   Park                                             Business
                                                                               Opportunity
                                                                                                                Partnership
Intermediate Range
Intersection
                                                                  Taylor &
Enhancements
                     To enhance pedestrian safety &               Herald       Urban Design                ISS Funding &
(Taylor & Herald                                                                                $100,000                   2014
                     access                                      Maude &       Public Works                Grant Funding
Ct. /Maude &
                                                                  Marion
Marion)
                     To    enhance        street    parking,
                                                                  W. Retta
                     sidewalks, & lighting and increase
Retta Esplanade                                                  Esplanade     Urban Design
                     open space in Gilchrist Park along                                         $200,000    ISS Funding    2014
Improvements                                                    from Harvey    Public Works
                     the   north   side     of     W.   Retta
                                                                 to Berry.
                     Esplanade

Intersection                                                      Retta &
Enhancements         To enhance pedestrian safety &                Taylor      Urban Design                ISS Funding &
                                                                                                $200,000                   2014
(Retta & Taylor/     access                                      Olympia &     Public Works                Grant Funding
Olympia & Maude)                                                  Maude


                                                                   Historic
                     Update the existing tree inventory                        Urban Design
Tree Inventory                                                    Overlay                         TBD      Grant Funding   2014
                     to include Historic Overlay District                      & Public Works
                                                                  District

Parks &
                     Review and update the Parks &
Recreation Master                                                City Wide     Urban Design       TBD          TBD         2014
                     Recreation Master Plan
Plan

                     Community garden, small pavilion,          Colony Point   Urban Design
Colony Point Drive                                                                              $75,000     Impact fees    2015
                     on street parking                             Drive       & Public Works




                                                                                                                           59
                    Restrooms,        bus    loop,   parking,                                                    State & Local
Nature Park                                                           Nature       Urban Design
                    educational pavilion, and paddle                                                $500,000     Funds/ CHNEP    2016
Improvements                                                          Park         & Public Works
                    craft launch                                                                                   SWFWMD


                    US 17 S / Marion Ave streetscape,                                                                State
                    pavilions,   restrooms,      play   area,     Adrienne to      Urban Design                  Recreational
Trabue Park                                                                                         $1,500,000                   2017
                    environmental                mitigation,         Mary          & Public Works                Grants/ FDOT
                    observation pier                                                                                CDBG

Long Range


                    Update and assess tree inventory to           Miscellaneous        Urban
Tree Inventory      include streets & neighborhoods               City Right-of-    Design/Parks       TBD       Grant Funding   2019
                    not included in the 2009 inventory                 Way           & Grounds


                    Bicycle/pedestrian        improvements,           Royal
Royal Poinciana                                                                     Urban Design
                    street   trees,     overhead     utilities,   Poinciana US
Avenue                                                                                & Public      $600,000         TBD         2019
                    drainage modifications – connects              41 to Burnt
Improvements                                                                           Works
                    US 41 MURT to Burnt Store Road                 Store Road

Burnt Store         Neighborhood            meetings      and
                                                                                    Urban Design
Meadow (BSM)        concept design, construction and
                                                                        BSM           & Public      $180,000         TBD         2019
Neighborhood        permitting          documents          for
                                                                                       Works
Park                neighborhood park
Parks &
                    Review and update the Parks &
Recreation Master                                                    City Wide      Urban Design       TBD           TBD         2020
                    Recreation Master Plan
Plan
Burnt Store
                       Construction of Playground area,                                     Urban Design
Meadow (BSM)
                       picnic pavilion, parking and other                        BSM          & Public     $600,000     TBD   2020
Neighborhood
                       improvements                                                            Works
Park
                       Bicycle/pedestrian            improvements,                          Urban Design
Monaco to Madrid
                       street   trees,     overhead           utilities,          BSI         & Public     $600,000     TBD   2021
Improvements
                       drainage modifications                                                  Works
                       Bicycle/pedestrian            improvements,                          Urban Design
Bal Harbor Avenue                                                          PGI– Marion to
                       street   trees,     overhead           utilities,                      & Public     $600,000     TBD   2022
Improvements                                                                 Deborah
                       drainage modifications                                                  Works
                                                                              Gilchrist     Urban Design
                       Concept       design,        construction      &
Gilchrist Park                                                             Park/Bayfront      & Public     $100,000     TBD   2022
                       permitting design documents
                                                                              Center           Works
                       Construction            of       community          Old Boat Club    Urban Design
Bayfront Redesign
                       facilities,       parking          &        site      / Bayfront       & Public     $2,500,000   TBD   2025
& Construction
                       improvements                                         Center Site        Works

                       “Summer Houses” gazebo in style
                       of   original     pavilions       associated                         Urban Design
Park Beach Circle                                                           Park Beach
                       with the Punta Gorda Hotel, on                                         & Public     $500,000     TBD   2025
Park                                                                        Circle Park
                       street         parking,            landscape                            Works
                       improvements

                       As   transit    becomes          available     a                        Urban
Alternative
                       study     to     provide         access       of                       Design,
Transportation                                                                City Wide                       TBD       MPO   TBD
                       surrounding communities to the                                       Public Works
Study
                       Park System                                                             & MPO
TABLE 15 – SOURCE: CITY OF PUNTA GORDA PARKS & RECREATION MASTER PLAN




                                                                                                                              61
RECOMMENDED ACTIONS

Although economic and budgetary conditions challenge the City on completion of projects, the City will continue to seek funding
from appropriate grant opportunities and will continue to utilize assistance from its relationships with a wide array of community
groups.

      Continue to monitor and update the Short, Mid, and Long Term Projects detailed in the Parks and Recreation Master Plan.
      Explore additional grant and other non-traditional funding opportunities in order to complete the project list.
      Build on the strength of its public private partnerships and relationships with community groups in order to design,
      construct and maintain the City’s extensive park system.

Community Facilities
                   The purpose of the Community Facilities and Services Element is to identify the locations and arrangements of
                   civic and community centers, public schools, hospitals, libraries, police and fire stations and other public
                   facilities. This element identifies not only the City facilities but also other facilities and services available to
                   the community. The City owns and maintains a variety of facilities ranging from government administration
                   buildings, public utilities, to roads and drainage systems.       The Map 9 shows the locations of the City’s
                   administration buildings and the public works facilities.

                   Successes
The City Public Works and Utilities facility was damaged in 2004 when the City took a direct hit from Hurricane Charley forcing
employees to be relocated to the City’s Bayfront Center facility. In reviewing the growing needs of the City and considering the
surrounding residential and historic development, the 1997 Comprehensive Plan considered moving City Public Works and
Utilities campus to another area of the City more suitable for this type of office/industrial facility. The 2025 Comprehensive Plan
outlined plans to reorganize the City Departments to increase efficiencies, realize economies of scale, and relocate personnel and
equipment to a new facility. The City completed the plan in 2009 when the new Public Works and Utilities Campus on Cooper
Street Extension opened for business. The successful completion
of the project enabled all six (6) Divisions that make up the
Public Works Department, four (4) Divisions of the Utilities
Department,    and the Central Warehouse, a Division of the
Finance Department, to be housed in one location in warehouse
office space with a purpose built service/equipment storage yard
immediately adjacent to the current City Limits.          The new
location including the service yard is at a slightly higher
elevation above sea level than the previous location.

Challenges                                                                             NEW PUBLIC WORKS / UTILITY CAMPUS

The City, like most other municipalities in the State, is facing tax
revenue shortfalls that will delay the implementation of projects
or modify the scale or scope of these proposed projects.        Therefore, it will be imperative to review projects carefully, seek
alternative funding sources, and enhance existing public-private partnerships and community group relationships to ensure that
community needs are being met.


An additional challenge faced by the City is the site selection process. Given the limited extent of available vacant land in the
City and its coastal location, facility sitting must be carefully considered. Most of the City’s population as well as its commercial
centers lie within the Category Two (2) Storm Surge or less vulnerability zones. Siting of any facility outside of these areas, while
maintaining close proximity to existing facilities and citizens and businesses that require public services, is extremely difficult.
In siting public facilities, the City implements sound compact and contiguous urban development techniques.                Through the
implementation of the land development regulations, the City promotes a coherent built environment which respects local




                                                                                                                               63
historical and regional architecture, an integrated and balanced transportation system, adequate provision of public utilities,
schools, parks, and other public infrastructure in concert with a strong desire to preserve the natural environment.

Recommended Actions
The City currently has no major facility needs at
this time.       However, the City will continue to
evaluate the population projections, development
trends, and internal needs analysis to determine
the     future      facility     needs.         Evaluation
recommendations will be incorporated within the
Capital Improvements Program as plans for new
facilities become necessary. The City will continue
to    review     proposed      projects   carefully,   seek
alternative funding sources, and enhance existing
public private partnerships, and community group
relationships to ensure that community needs are
being met.




                                                                             MAP 9 – ADMINISTRATIVE FACILITIES MAP
Transportation
                  The purpose of the Transportation Element is to develop a multimodal system built around an expanded and
                  developed street network which will provide pedestrian/bicycle facilities and accommodate future transit
                  options. The plan is intended to assist in developing streets that are integral components of community
                  design. Streets shall be detailed to compliment neighborhoods and commercial centers serving all users,
                  freight, auto, transit, bicycle, and pedestrian.




Successes
Since Hurricane Charley, a category 4 storm which destroyed or significantly damaged a large percentage of the structures within
the City, the City of Punta Gorda experienced tremendous development and redevelopment activity. This activity was focused in
the Community Redevelopment Area and other adjacent infill locations.        Infill and redevelopment were clearly envisioned by
various planning efforts of the City over the preceding 15 years since the formation of
the Community Redevelopment Area in 1990. This focus on infill and redevelopment
has served to maximize the utilization of the existing municipal infrastructure
including the transportation network. The integration of mixed use provisions into all
commercial and industrial Future Land Use categories provided a firm foundation for
the growth of bicycling and walking to serve as viable transportation modes as well as
setting the stage for future fixed route transit.   Furthermore, the establishment of
new Land Development Regulations, more clearly defined the scale and type of
development envisioned by the community.

The City has policies which consider sidewalk and bicycle improvements as a priority
                                                                                                      HARBORWALK
in planning for capital improvements, roadway capacity improvement projects and



                                                                                                                        65
                                               even roadway maintenance. The City prioritizes funding for sidewalks and bikeways
                                               which serve schools and parks and significant investments have been made in
                                               supporting infrastructure for pedestrians including street furniture, landscaping,
                                               markings and signage. To date, the City has made great strides in establishing and
                                               refining policies which support the enhancement of a more bicycle and pedestrian
                                               friendly community.

                                               The City recognized life cycle costing and infrastructure utilization as important
                                               determinants for the allocation of limited financial resources far in advance of the
          HERALD COURT CENTRE:                 onset of the recent recession. This is evident from the continual focus on the urban
400 SPACE PARKING FACILITIES WITH 17,000 SQ.
                                               core and policies which encourage redevelopment and infill development. In 2009, to
            FT. OF RETAIL SPACE
                                               increase the vitality of the urban core and remove barriers faced by private developers,
                                               the City constructed a 400 space structured parking facility. These short term parking
                                               spaces are available free of charge for all City residents and visitors.

                                               The City was able to improve the City’s pedestrian network through a variety of City,
                                               County, FDOT and private developer funded projects.           The City has maintained a
                                               funding priority for pedestrian infrastructure improvements. Even during the recent
                                               economic and budgetary crisis the City has maintained its focus on pedestrian
                                               improvements by adding just over eight (8) miles of pedestrian facilities from 2006 to
                                               2010 through a combination of Community Redevelopment Agency, City, County,
                                               Federal, and Developer funded projects.

 PARK & RECREATION MASTER PLAN ADOPTED         The City enhanced the Parks and Recreation Master Plan to provide a 15 year vision of
                  2009
                                               the City’s parks and recreation aspirations. The highly visual/graphic document was
conceived entirely “In-House” through the assistance of TEAM Punta Gorda, volunteer
labor and pro-bono services of the local professional design community.        The City
won an Award of Merit from Florida Chapter of the American Planning Association for
efforts related to this plan.

The award winning Parks and Recreation Master Plan furthers transportation
connectivity and modal choice for neighborhoods and increases the quality and
uniqueness of public recreation areas within the City. An example of this connectivity
is Punta Gorda’s Linear Park. A three-phase project, Phase 1 was completed in June
2010. This project increases modal choice for residents and visitors through                           LINEAR PARK PHASE I

increasing neighborhood connectivity and accessibility options for residents and
visitors.   Another success is the City’s “Ring Around the City,” a multiuse trail which increases modal choice by linking the
waterfront, activity centers and residential areas. This pathway will support a system of bicycle and pedestrian facilities that will
ultimately connect all the neighborhoods of the City to each other and to the primary activity centers. These pathway systems
will also strengthen existing connections between the waterfront and other land uses in the urban core. These connections are
important to maintaining Punta Gorda’s heritage and character as a waterfront community.

Challenges
The primary challenge facing the City will be the continuation of the many successes of the recent past. The City will need to
focus its attention on the following items to ensure compliance with State Statues and to further the community vision:

Development of supportive policies for a functional Transportation Concurrency Exemption Area (TCEA)
The successful implementation of a TCEA as an alternative transportation concurrency strategy will require a pattern of
development that is less auto-centric than the typical pattern of development in Southwest Florida. Close alignment of Future
Land Use and Transportation policies are vital to creating a less auto-dependent transportation network with walkable streets,



                                                                                                                             67
comfortable bikeways, and convenient transit services.   This less auto oriented network implies a pattern of development that is
more integrated and interconnected, smaller blocks, few cul-de-sacs, and more mixed-use development.             In order to make
walkable streets and transit economically feasible, commercial development will need to be built at greater intensities
accompanied by higher residential densities. Currently the City has commercial and industrial intensities that are more urban in
scale than the surrounding unincorporated County and more in-line with our regionally neighboring Cities of Fort Myers, Naples,
and Sarasota.    However, our residential densities more closely resemble those found in suburban unincorporated Charlotte
County. Commercial development is dependent on residential development therefore aligning residential densities to make them
more supportive of maximum intensity levels is vital to providing functional TCEA that will serve to enhance the economic
viability of infill and redevelopment in Punta Gorda.

Analysis of the energy efficiency alternatives
The City may be able to address the new energy efficient alternative requirements through the strengthening of existing policies
which support compact, contiguous development with appropriate densities and intensities that incorporate a high degree of
connectivity. Strengthened policies will provide support for City’s goal of establishing a TCEA and assist in improving energy
uses and reducing greenhouse gas emissions resulting from land development decisions. The establishment of a TCEA further
supports HB 697’s requirement to address energy efficiency by the creation of a geographic area within the City that will
encourage multi-modal transportation. The creation of a mobility plan will provide the guidelines for implementing the TCEA
and include measurement techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Together the TCEA and mobility plan will
address the statutory requirement to “incorporate transportation strategies to address reduction in greenhouse gas emissions
from the transportation sector.”

Recommended Actions
It would be easy to rest upon the laurels of recent successes the City has achieved since Hurricane Charley; however that is not in
the spirit of Punta Gorda.       The City stands prepared to face challenges on the horizon, forging these challenges into
opportunities to achieve the City’s goals as identified in the Comprehensive Plan.     The City will seek to support its focus on
redevelopment and infill, through the development of a Transportation Concurrency Exemption Area (TCEA) which will better
integrate land use and transportation planning. Furthermore the City will analyze the relationship of the proximity, density, and
intensity of land uses to the use of energy and the production of greenhouse gases.

The City pursues the following action items to achieve the goals set out in the Transportation Element:

      Study the optimal residential density to commercial intensity mix and the necessary proximity of residential/non-
      residential land uses
      Analyze the logical boundaries of a Transportation Concurrency Exception Area (TCEA) based on the above studies of
      intensities and densities
      Develop a Mobility Plan that enhances modal choices, decreases Greenhouse Gas Emissions and promotes energy-efficient
      land uses
      Identify changes/policies necessary to better integrate transportation and land use planning to maximize the value of the
      public investments in the transportation network

Public School Facilities
                     The relationship between residential development and the provision of public schools, coordination between
                     local governments and the school districts is critical to ensuring that future student growth needs are
                     addressed and can be accommodated.        The Public School Facilities Element establishes a level of service
                     standard for schools, addresses the correction of any existing school capacity deficiencies, identifies the
                     financial feasibility of the School District’s Capital Plan, coordinates the location of planned public school
                     facilities with the plans for supporting infrastructure, and coordinates location of public school facilities
                     relative to the location of other public facilities such as parks, libraries and community centers to the extent
                     possible.




                                                                                                                             69
The adoption of the Public Schools Facility Element formally linked the City, the County and the School Board in a structured
environment for the planning of school capacity based on changes to Future Land Use and other major development activities.
Representatives of the three entities, known as the staff working group, actively engage in monthly meetings and coordinate
proposed Future Land Use changes with school planning. These meetings serve as a focused forum for tracking capacity and
development trends in concert to anticipate potential issues and opportunities ensuring that the result of development is
stronger communities.

Successes
Although successful implementation of this relatively new element, adopted in 2008, and the implementation of school
concurrency in 2009 has been hampered by the drastic decline in residential housing, there are success stories in the City
regarding the rebuilding of the last two of the six schools severely damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Charley.

The original Punta Gorda Middle School (PGMS) was destroyed by Hurricane Charley on August 13, 2004. The new 175 thousand
square foot replacement school reopened on August 19, 2008. The new Punta Gorda Middle School was awarded United States
Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification in June 2009. PGMS became
the first silver rated LEED certified middle school in the South East Region of the United States.

Charlotte High School's (CHS) original 3 story classroom building, built in 1926, was severely damaged during Hurricane Charley
on August 13, 2004. A total of 35 buildings on the Charlotte High Campus were destroyed during that hurricane. The three story
classroom building listed on the National Historic Register of Historic Places in 1990 was preserved and rebuilt to its original
splendor and reopened on April 13, 2009. The remaining campus totaling 375 thousand square feet was completed and
reopened in stages with the final ribbon cutting on August 2, 2010. CHS is currently under review by the United States Green
Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) team for certification.

The decision to preserve CHS was based not only on the 3 story classroom building's historical status but the school also serves
as an anchor to the history of the City of Punta Gorda, Charlotte County and the state of Florida. CHS has the distinct honor of
being the first High School in the State of Florida to voluntarily integrate
without pressure from the federal government or a pending lawsuit.

The staff working group continues to meet on a regularly scheduled basis to
discuss issues associated with population projections, updates to the
Interlocal agreement and the potential of new residential development.
These scheduled meetings continue to improve communication and build
strong relationships between the School District and the local governments or
a pending lawsuit.

Challenges
Through the regularly scheduled meetings and discussions, two (2) issues were
                                                                                  PUNTA GORDA MIDDLE SCHOOL
identified with the implementation of school concurrency. The first centered
on the calculation of student generation rates in terms of impacts from new
residential development.    Initially, the student generator was geo-coded by
student addresses in the County and by housing types. Developers challenged
the definitions of housing types as to which rates should apply. For instance,
Condominiums as housing type versus a form of ownership.

In response to this issue, the student generator rate was redesigned. It now
provides for a single, county wide rate for each school level (K-5, 6-8, and 9-
12as well as K-12) regardless of housing type. This eliminates the confusion
of housing types and provides a fair result for all concerned.
                                                                                    CHARLOTTE HIGH SCHOOL




                                                                                                              71
The second issue dealt with the Concurrency Service Area (CSA) at the elementary school level (Map 10). Despite the fact that
there were ten elementary schools, the staff working group originally designated only three CSA’s. When the adjacency rule was
applied in considering potential new developments in the middle CSA, it had the effect of making capacity for that level available
county wide rather than allowing excess students to shift to “adjacent” schools that might have available capacity.

This issue was resolved by modifying the original
CSA map from three (3) CSA’s to ten (10) CSA’s
which now corresponds with the actual elementary
school     attendance       boundaries.          Now        when
adjacency is applied for, the impacts of the new
development, only the capacity of the schools
adjacent to the proposed development will be
considered.

Recommendations
Regular meetings of the Staff Working Group, the
group created to implement the school concurrency
program,    should     continue      as    outlined    in    the
Interlocal Agreement.          As part of the regular
meetings,     the    group    will   continue     to   include
discussions on school planning especially as it
relates to the siting of new schools and school
concurrency.        In addition, the annual workshop
                                                                   MAP 10 – CHARLOTTE COUNTY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CONCURRENCY SERVICE AREA MAP
between     the     three    entities     will   continue     in
accordance with the terms within the ILA. Because
of the severe decline in the residential housing market, the school concurrency program in Charlotte County has not been
tested enough for a complete evaluation. Update the Plan to include the most recent adopted Interlocal Agreement.

Inter Governmental Coordination
                  The purpose of the Intergovernmental Coordination Element is to examine existing intergovernmental
                  coordination processes and to consider how these might be improved in light of anticipated future planning
                  needs. This element identifies the governments and other agencies, which have or should have mechanisms of
                  coordination to implement the other Elements of the City’s Comprehensive Plan.

                  Successes
                  The City continues to coordinate with all other levels of government and local government agencies on issues
of mutual concern. The successful coordination efforts between the Charlotte School District, Charlotte County and the City, for
the Public School Facilities Element (PSFE) have brought the three organizations together into unprecedented levels of
cooperation. The on-going discussions and negotiations have ensured successful PSFE implementation.

The City also worked with the SWFWMD and the CHNEP in completion of a Climate Adaptation Plan specific to the City of Punta
Gorda. This plan has a menu of options for the City to review and utilize as they move forward in the next planning decade. One
of the critical concepts of this report was the citizen and stakeholder input, who, through several engaging public workshops,
designed the issues that were important to them to see studied in the report.

The City continues to work with Charlotte County on a citizen-based initiative to provide transitioning land development
regulations for areas of unincorporated Charlotte County abutting the corporate limits of the City of Punta Gorda. These efforts
have included City and County Staff along with members of TEAM Punta Gorda, holding two well attended public workshops
soliciting public input through visual surveys and charrette type design exercises. Currently, the City and County are finalizing




                                                                                                                         73
proposed     code   changes   for   Charlotte   County   adoption   which   will   equalize
landscaping, signage and architectural requirements between County and City
jurisdictions to provide a more visually consistent pattern of development in South
Charlotte County.

Challenges
Given the City’s small geographic area relative to Charlotte County and the regional
nature of the transportation network that traverses the City, many issues facing Punta
Gorda are multi-jurisdictional in nature.       In addition to transportation land use
decisions, economic conditions, housing, crime, and other public infrastructure cross
                                                                                               CLIMATE ADAPTATION PUBLIC WORKSHOP
jurisdictional boundaries.    The biggest challenge to addressing these issues is
continuing to nurture open communication and understanding among all levels of
local, state and federal agencies.     This communication will be achieved by the City of Punta Gorda through the continued
participation in advisory committee meetings, board roles for elected officials and dynamic staff level interactions with all levels
of local, state and federal government agencies as needed.

Recommended Actions
The City will continue to monitor programs, policies and legislative decisions which will affect the City of Punta Gorda. Such
monitoring will be for both positive and negatively impacting issues and to communicate City concerns or support for said
issues.

The City will work with the FDOT and Charlotte County proactively in the review and development of a Transportation
Concurrency Exemption Area.

The City will continue to work with the SFRPC and the MPO as it reviews the climate adaptation strategies and recommendations
identified in the Climate Adaptation Plan.
The City will work with jurisdictional agencies and related historical groups as well as concerned citizens on the development of a
Historical Element.

Capital Improvements
                      The Capital Improvements Element (CIE) presents an analysis of the fiscal capability of the City to fund needed
                      public facilities, recommends financial policies to guide the funding of those identified improvements, and
                      schedules the funding and construction of improvements in a manner necessary to ensure that capital
                      improvements are provided when required.

                      Successes
                      The City has successfully incorporated into its comprehensive plan the Charlotte School Districts capital
                      improvements program schedules pursuant to statute. The City continues to maintain its fiscal capabilities
through the adoption of the Capital Improvements Element, a 5 year capital improvements program, a strategic plan for the City,
a business plan for the City and a long term financial plan for the City.

The Capital Improvement Element (CIE) provides policy guidance for replacement of obsolete or worn out facilities, eliminating
existing deficiencies and meeting future needs. It also provides policies regarding the land development process to ensure that
development approval is dependent on meeting required level of service standards.

Challenges
The City of Punta Gorda has sought to fund all needed capital projects during the planning period through a combination of ad
valorem tax revenues, non-ad valorem tax revenues such as franchise fees, utility taxes, gas taxes, impact fees and tax
increment financing. In addition, the City has benefitted greatly from federal and state grant programs following the direct hit of
Hurricane Charley in 2004. The City has a good credit rating, unused debt capacity, and adequate debt coverage. The most




                                                                                                                             75
significant challenge facing the City is a decline and/or stagnation in both ad valorem and non-ad valorem tax revenues due to
housing foreclosure crisis and the overall economy.

Currently, the City of Punta Gorda does not have any backlogged facilities and has been able to maintain its adopted levels of
service. On a whole, the City of Punta Gorda has a financially feasible capital improvements program in place that has been able
to provide its residents and property owners with adequate public services and facilities in a timely manner.

Recommended Actions
The City will continue to annually develop its 5 year capital improvement program, strategic plan, business plan and long range
financial plan to ensure that residents and property owners are provided with adequate public services and facilities in a timely
manner. The existing City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive Plan 2025 provides that on the 15th of July of each year, the Growth
Management Department shall prepare a report for the City Council containing the current capacity within each public facility
category, including any encumbrances or deficiencies. The City will amend this date to coincide with the Annual Capital
Improvements Element update mandated by Chapter 163, F.S. and undertaken in December of each year.


Changes in Growth Management Laws [163.3191(2)(f)]
Comprehensive plans should address all current statutory and rule requirements. The City’s EAR presents an opportunity to
compare the content of the comprehensive plan with current requirements along with the State Comprehensive Plan to ensure
that our plan is up to date. To assist in this comparison, the Department prepared a summary of changes to Chapter 163, Part II,
Florida Statutes, and Rule 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code.    For purposes of this report and pursuant to 163.3191,(2)(f) FS
changes in legislation include those changes since 2003 and those adopted through 2009. No table for Rule 9J-5, Florida
Administrative Code is included in the EAR because there have been no rule changes made to the Code since 2001.

Chapter 163, Part II, F.S was reviewed by the City of Punta Gorda’s Staff and Planning Commission to determine whether the
changes in legislation was addressed or needs to addressed in the City’s Comprehensive Plan. Table 16 is taken from the table
posted on the Department of Community Affairs website. Only those changes made since 2003, the adoption date of the City’s
most recent evaluation and appraisal report update amendments, are included.

In 2008, the State approved climate change and greenhouse legislation to address reducing the impacts of pollution within the
State, encouraging the use of alternative fuels, and increasing building energy efficiency; however, no specific requirements for
implementation have been developed at this time. Although specific requirements for implementation have not been developed
by the state, the City’s current planning efforts along with the State Regional Policy Plan, already include: encouraging more
compact development, creating multimodal transportation opportunities, encouraging less dependence on the use of the
automobile, and promoting transit supportive development patterns. In addition the City already encourages management and
conservation of natural resources in their continuing efforts to promote a walkable and long-term sustainable community which
efficiently uses its natural resources. The existing Comprehensive Plan contains many policies promoting and requiring the City
to implement energy efficient directives. As the mandated requirements become better defined, the City will incorporate and
address those that specifically apply to and are financially feasible for the City of Punta Gorda.



Changes to Chapter 163, F.S. 2005 - 2009

                                                           Chapter 163, F.S.                 Addressed               Amendment
                                                                               N/A*
          Changes to Chapter 163, F.S.                         Citations                    (where/how)               by Element

2005 [Ch. 2005-157, ss 1, 2 and 15; Ch. 2005-290; and Ch. 2005-291, ss. 10-12, Laws of Florida]

     Added       the     definition    of   “financial                                Defined in the Capital
 1                                                       163.3164(32) [New]                                    No action required
     feasibility.”                                                                    Improvements Element
     (2): Required comprehensive plans to be
                                                                                      Defined in the Capital
 2   “financially”     rather   than   “economically”    163.3177                                              No action required
                                                                                      Improvements Element
     feasible.




                                                                                                                                    77
(3)(a)5.: Required the comprehensive plan
to include a 5-year schedule of capital
improvements. Outside funding (i.e., from
developer, other government or funding                   Capital Improvements
                                                                                    No action required
pursuant to referendum) of these capital                 Element
improvements must be guaranteed in the
form of a development agreement or
interlocal agreement.
(3)(a)6.b.1.: Required plan amendment for
the annual update of the schedule of
capital improvements. Deleted provision                  Capital Improvements
                                                                                    No action required
allowing updates and change in the date of               Element Policy 10.1.3.6
construction    to   be    accomplished      by
ordinance.
(3)(a)6.c.: Added oversight and penalty                  Capital Improvements
provision for failure to adhere to this                  Element Policy 10.1.3.4
                                                                                    No action required
section’s        capital       improvements              for oversight and Policy
requirements.                                            10.1.1.5 for penalty
(3)(a)6.d.: Required a long-term capital
improvement      schedule     if    the    local
                                                   N/A   N/A                        No action required
government      has adopted a long-term
concurrency management system.
(6)(a): Deleted date (October 1, 1999) by
                                                         Public School Facilities
which school sitting requirements must be                                           No action required
                                                         Element Adopted
adopted.
(6)(a):   Requires   the   future   land    use
                                                         Future Land Use Element
element to be based upon the availability                                           No action required
                                                         Policy 1.1.2.1
of water supplies (in addition to public
water facilities).

(6)(a): Add requirement that future land
                                                      Conservation & Coastal
use element of coastal counties must
                                                      Management Element        No action required
encourage the preservation of working
                                                      Policy 2.3.1.2
waterfronts, as defined in s.342.07, F.S.
(6)(c): Required the potable water element
to be updated within 18 months of an
updated regional water supply plan to
incorporate the alternative water supply
projects      and    traditional    water    supply
projects      and    conservation     and     reuse
selected by the local government to meet              Infrastructure Element:
its projected water supply needs. The ten-            Potable Water Section     No action required
year water supply work plan must include              Policy 3.2.1.2
public, private and regional water supply
facilities,    including       development       of
alternative     water      supplies.          Such
amendments do not count toward the
limitation on the frequency of adoption of
amendments.
(6)(e): Added waterways to the system of              Addressed in the
sites addressed by the recreation and open            Recreation & Open Space   No action required
space element.                                        Element
(6)(h)1.:           The        intergovernmental
                                                      Intergovernmental
coordination         element       must     address
                                                      Coordination Element      No action required
coordination with regional water supply
                                                      Policy 9.1.2.2
authorities.




                                                                                                     79
(11)(d)4.c.:        Required               rural          land
stewardship areas to address affordable                          N/A                -                         -
housing.
(11)(d)5.: Required a listed species survey
be performed on rural land stewardship
receiving      area.      If    any    listed       species      N/A                -                         -
present, must ensure adequate provisions
to protect them.
(11)(d)6.:     Must        enact       an        ordinance
establishing a methodology for creation,
conveyance,         and        use    of    stewardship          N/A                -                         -
credits within a rural land stewardship
area.
(11)(d)6.j.: Revised to allow open space
and     agricultural       land       to    be     just    as
                                                                 N/A                -                         -
important      as      environmentally             sensitive
land when assigning stewardship credits.
(12): Must adopt public school facilities                              Public School Facilities
                                                                                                  No action required
element.                                                               Element Adopted 2008
(12)(a) and (b): A waiver from providing
this element will be allowed under certain                       N/A                -                         -
circumstances.
                                                                       Public School Facilities
(12)(g): Expanded list of items to be to                               Element Policies 8.1.3.4
include collocation, location of schools                               (Collocation), 8.1.3.3
                                                                                                  No action required
proximate to residential areas, and use of                             (Schools located
schools as emergency shelters.                                         proximate to residential
                                                                       areas), 8.1.3.5 (school
                                                                     used as emergency
                                                                     shelters)


(12)(h): Required local governments to
provide      maps      depicting    the      general                 Addressed within the
location     of   new    schools       and   school                  Public Schools Facilities    No action required
improvements        within    future    conditions                   Element
maps.
(12)(i):    Required    DCA    to      establish   a                 Public School Facilities
schedule for adoption of the public school                     N/A   Element adopted 2008         No action required
facilities element.                                                  (on-time)
(12)(j): Established penalty for failure to                          Adopted Public School
                                                                                                  No action required
adopt a public school facility element.                              Facility Element



(13):      (New   section)    Encourages       local                                              Part of the EAR analysis.
governments to develop a “community                                                               City continuing to utilize
                                                                     Addressed in the EAR
vision,” which provides for sustainable                [New]                                      the visioning residents
                                                                     under Public Participation
growth, recognizes its fiscal constraints,                                                        and stakeholders have
and protects its natural resources.                                                               established since 1990.



(14):      (New   section)    Encourages       local
governments to develop an “urban service
                                                                     Addressed in the EAR         Part of the EAR
boundary,” which ensures the area is
                                                       [New]         under the Future Land        discussion in the Future
served (or will be served) with adequate
                                                                     Use                          Land Use Element
public facilities and services over the next
10 years. See s. 163.3184(17).




                                                                                                                       81
                                                  163.31776 [Now:
3   163.31776 is repealed                                           N/A               -                            -
                                                  Repealed}

    (2): Required the public schools interlocal
                                                                          Addressed in the Public
    agreement (if applicable) to address
                                                                          School Facilities Element.
    requirements for school concurrency. The      163.31777                                            No action required
                                                                          Objective 8.1.2 Policies
    opt-out provision at the end of Subsection
                                                                          8.1.2.1 through 8.1.2.3
    (2) is deleted.
    (5): Required Palm Beach County to
    identify, as part of its EAR, changes
    needed in its public school element
4                                                                   N/A               -                            -
    necessary to conform to the new 2005
    public school facilities element
    requirements.
    (7): Provided that counties exempted from
    public school facilities element shall
    undergo re-evaluation as part of its EAR to                     N/A               -                            -
    determine if they continue to meet
    exemption criteria.
                                                                          Addressed in the
    (2)(g): Expands requirement of coastal                                Conservation & Coastal
    element to include strategies that will be                            Management Element
5   used to preserve recreational and             163.3178                Goal 2.5 Policies 2.5.1.1    No action required
    commercial working waterfronts, as                                    through 2.5.1.4, Future
    defined in s.342.07, F.S.                                             Land Use Element Policy
                                                                          1.1.14.11
                                                               Addressed in the Capital
    (1)(a): Added “schools” as a required                      Improvements Element
                                                     163.318                              No action required
    concurrency item.                                          and the Public Schools
                                                               Facilities Element
    (2)(a): Required consultation with water
                                                               Future Land Use Element
    supplier prior to issuing building permit to
                                                               Policy 1.1.2.1
    ensure “adequate water supplies” to serve
                                                               Infrastructure Element     No action required
    new development will be available by the
                                                               (Potable Water Section)
    date of issuance of a certificate of
                                                               Objective 3.2.2
    occupancy.
    (2)(c): Required all transportation facilities
    to be in place or under construction within                Addressed in Capital
                                                                                          No action required
6   3 years (rather than 5 years) after approval               Improvements Element
    of building permit.
    (4)(c): The concurrency requirement,
    except as it relates to transportation and
    public schools may be waived in urban
                                                               Will be Part of the EAR
    infill and redevelopment areas. The waiver
                                                               based Amendments for       Part of the EAR Analysis
    shall be adopted as a plan amendment. A
                                                               the Transportation         for Transportation
    local government may grant a concurrency
                                                               Element
    exception pursuant to subsection (5) for
    transportation facilities located within an
    urban infill and redevelopment area.
    (5)(d): Required guidelines for granting                                              Part of the EAR Analysis
    concurrency exceptions to be included in                                              of the Capital
    the comprehensive plan.                                                               Improvements Element




                                                                                                               83
(5)(e) – (g): If local government has
established transportation exceptions, the
guidelines for implementing the
exceptions must be “consistent with and
support a comprehensive strategy, and
promote the purpose of the exceptions.”
Exception areas must include mobility
strategies, such as alternate modes of
transportation, supported by data and                  N/A               -                          -
analysis. FDOT must be consulted prior to
designating a transportation concurrency
exception area. Transportation
concurrency exception areas existing prior
to July 1, 2005 must meet these
requirements by July 1, 2006, or when the
EAR-based amendment is adopted,
whichever occurs last.

                                                             Addressed in the Capital
(1)(a): Added “schools” as a required                        Improvements Element
                                             163.318                                    No action required
concurrency item.                                            and the Public Schools
                                                             Facilities Element

(6): Required local government to maintain
records to determine whether 110% de
minimis transportation impact threshold is                   Addressed in the annual
reached. A summary of these records must                     Capital Improvements       No action required
be submitted with the annual capital                         Element update.
improvements element update. Exceeding
the 110% threshold dissolves the de
minimis exceptions.

(7): Required consultation with the
Department of Transportation prior to
designating a transportation concurrency
management area (to promote infill
development) to ensure adequate level-of-      N/A                -                         -
service standards are in place. The local
government and the DOT should work
together to mitigate any impacts to the
Strategic Intermodal System.
(9)(a): Allowed adoption of a long-term
concurrency management system for              N/A                -                         -
schools.
(9)(c): (New section) Allowed local
governments to issue approvals to
commence construction notwithstanding s.       N/A                -                         -
163.3180 in areas subject to a long-term
concurrency management system.
                                                     Addressed in the
                                                     following Elements:
                                                     Capital Improvements,
(9)(d): (New section) Required evaluation in         Transportation,
                                                                                Part of the EAR Analysis
Evaluation and Appraisal Repot of progress           Recreation & Open Space,
                                                                                for Transportation
in improving levels of service.                      Infrastructure (Potable
                                                     Water, Sanitary Sewer, &
                                                     Solid Waste), & Public
                                                     School Facilities




                                                                                                     85
(10): Added requirement that level of
service standard for roadway facilities on
the Strategic Intermodal System must be
                                             N/A   N/A                         N/A
consistent with FDOT standards. Standards
must consider compatibility with adjacent
jurisdictions.
                                                   Adopted Public School
(13): Required school concurrency (not             Facilities Element and
                                                                               No action required
optional).                                         Policies supporting
                                                   School Concurrency

                                                   Adopted Public School
(13)(c)1.: Requires school concurrency
                                                   Facilities Element Policy
after five years to be applied on a “less
                                                   8.1.1.2 specifying school   No action required
than district wide basis” (i.e., by using
                                                   concurrency "less that
school attendance zones, etc).
                                                   district wide".

                                                   Adopted Public School
(13)(c)2.: Eliminated exemption from plan          Facilities Element Policy
amendment adoption limitation for                  8.1.1.2 specifying school   No action required
changes to service area boundaries.                concurrency "less that
                                                   district wide".

(13)(c)3.: No application for development
approval may be denied if a less-than-             Adopted Public School
district wide measurement of school                Facilities Element Policy
concurrency is used; however the                   8.1.1.2 specifying school   No action required
development impacts must to shifted to             concurrency "less that
contiguous service areas with school               district wide".
capacity.
(13)(e): Allowed school concurrency to be
satisfied if a developer executes a legally            Public School Facilities
                                                                                  No action required
binding commitment to provide mitigation               Element Policy 8.1.2.4
proportionate to the demand.
(13)(e)1.: Enumerated mitigation options
                                                       Public School Facilities
for achieving proportionate-share                                                 No action required
                                                       Element Policy 8.1.2.4
mitigation.
(13)(e)2.: If educational facilities funded in
one of the two following ways, the local
                                                       Public School Facilities
government must credit this amount                                                No action required
                                                       Element Policy 8.1.2.4
toward any impact fee or exaction imposed
on the community:
                                                       Public School Facilities
·      contribution of land                                                       No action required
                                                       Element Policy 8.1.2.4

·      construction, expansion, or                     Public School Facilities
                                                                                  No action required
payment for land acquisition                           Element Policy 8.1.2.4
(13)(g)2.: (Section deleted) – It is no longer
required that a local government and
school board base their plans on
consistent population projection and share
information regarding planned public             N/A                -                         -
school facilities, development and
redevelopment and infrastructure needs of
public school facilities. However, see
(13)(g)6.a. for similar requirement.




                                                                                                       87
(13)(g)6.a.: [Formerly (13)(g)7.a.] Local
governments must establish a uniform
                                                            Public School Facilities
procedure for determining if development                                               No action required
                                                            Element Policy 8.1.2.3
applications are in compliance with school
concurrency.
(13)(g)7. [Formerly (13)(g)8.] Deleted
language that allowed local government to
                                              [New]   N/A                -                          -
terminate or suspend an interlocal
agreement with the school board.
(13)(h): (New 2005 provision) The fact that
school concurrency has not yet been                                                    Part of the Public Schools
                                                            Part Schools Facilities
implemented by a local government should                                               Facility Element
                                                            Element
not be the basis for either an approval or                                             assessment
denial of a development permit.
(15): Prior to adopting Multimodal
Transportation Districts, FDOT must be
consulted to assess the impact on level of
service standards. If impacts are found,
the local government and the FDOT must                      Part of the EAR Analysis   Part of the EAR Analysis
                                              [New]
work together to mitigate those impacts.                    for Transportation         for Transportation
Multimodal districts established prior to
July 1, 2005 must meet this requirement
by July 1, 2006 or at the time of the EAR-
base amendment, whichever occurs last.
(16): (New 2005 section) Required local
governments to adopt by December 1,                         Public School Facilities
                                                                                       No action required
2006 a method for assessing                                 Element Policy 8.1.2.4
proportionate fair-share mitigation
    options. FDOT will develop a model
    ordinance by December 1, 2005.


    (13)(g)6.a.: [Formerly (13)(g)7.a.] Local
    governments must establish a uniform
                                                                        Public School Facilities
    procedure for determining if development                                                          No action required
                                                                        Element Policy 8.1.2.3
    applications are in compliance with school
    concurrency.
    (17): (New 2005 section) If local
    government has adopted a community
    vision and urban service boundary, state
    and regional agency review is eliminated                                                          Will be addressed during
                                                                        Public Participation of the
    for plan amendments affecting property       163.3184 [New]   N/A                                 the EAR amendment
                                                                        2011 EAR
    within the urban service boundary. Such                                                           process
    amendments are exempt from the
    limitation on the frequency of plan
7   amendments.
    (18): (New 2005 section) If a municipality
    has adopted an urban infill and
    redevelopment area, state and regional
    agency review is eliminated for plan
                                                                  N/A                -                            -
    amendments affecting property within the
    urban service boundary. Such amendments
    are exempt from the limitation on the
    frequency of plan amendments.




                                                                                                                           89
    (1)(c)1.f.: Allowed approval of residential
    land use as a small-scale development
    amendment when the proposed density is
    equal to or less than the existing future      163.3187         Future Land Use Element     No action required
    land use category. Under certain
    circumstances, affordable housing units
    are exempt from this limitation.
    (1)(c)4.: (New 2005 provision) If the small-
8
    scale development amendment involves a
                                                   [New]      N/A               -                           -
    rural area of critical economic concern, a
    20-acre limit applies.
    (1)(o): (New 2005 provision) An
    amendment to a rural area of critical
    economic concern may be approved               [New]      N/A               -                           -
    without regard to the statutory limit on
    comprehensive plan amendments.
    (2)(k): Required local governments that do
    not have either a school interlocal
    agreement or a public school facilities
    element, to determine in the Evaluation        163.3191   N/A               -                           -
    and Appraisal Report whether the local
    government continues to meet the
9
    exemption criteria in s.163.3177(12).
    (2)(l): The Evaluation and Appraisal Report                     Addressed in the
    must determine whether the local                                Infrastructure Element
    government has been successful in              [New]            (Potable Water Section)     No action required
    identifying alternative water supply                            Policies 3.1.1.2 2.1.3.5
    projects, including conservation and reuse,                     (Alternative Water Supply
     needed to meet projected demand. Also,                               Projects), Policies 2.1.2.5
     the Report must identify the degree to                               and 2.1.3.6 (conservation
     which the local government has                                       ) and Policies 3.1.2.2 &
     implemented its 10-year water supply                                 3.1.2.8 (reuse)
     workplan.
     (2)(o): (New 2005 provision) The Evaluation
     and Appraisal Report must evaluate                                   Will be addressed as part
     whether any Multimodal Transportation         [New]                  of the EAR based              Part of the EAR analysis
     District has achieved the purpose for                                Amendments
     which it was created.
     (2)(p): (New 2005 provision) The Evaluation
                                                                          Will be addressed as part
     and Appraisal Report must assess
                                                                          of the EAR based              Part of the EAR analysis
     methodology for impacts on transportation
                                                                          Amendments
     facilities.
     (10): The Evaluation and Appraisal Report
     -based amendment must be adopted
     within a single amendment cycle. Failure
     to adopt within this cycle results in                                EAR Appendix                  Part of the current EAR
     penalties. Once updated, the
     comprehensive plan must be submitted to
     the DCA.

     (10) New section designating Freeport as a
                                                                    N/A                -                            -
     certified community.

10   (11) New section exempting proposed DRIs
     within Freeport from review under
                                                   163.3246 [New]   N/A                -                            -
     s.380.06, F.S., unless review is requested
     by the local government.




                                                                                                                            91
2006 [Ch. 2006-68, Ch. 2006-69, Ch. 2006-220, Ch. 2006-252, Ch. 2006-255, Ch. 2006-268, Laws of Florida]

     Establishes plan amendment procedures
 1   for agricultural enclaves as defined in        163.3162(5) [New]    N/A              -                           -
     s.163.3164(33), F.S. Ch. 2006-255, LOF.
     Defines agricultural enclave. Ch. 2006-
 2                                                  163.3164(33) [New]   N/A              -                            -
     255, LOF.
     (6)(g)2.: Adds new paragraph encouraging
     local   governments      with    a   coastal
                                                                                                          Reviewed as part of the
     management element to adopt recreational
                                                                                                          EAR Coastal Management
     surface water use policies; such adoption      163.3177(6)(g)2.           Conservation and Coastal
 3                                                                                                        review. If appropriate will
     amendment is exempt from the twice per         [New]                      Management Element
                                                                                                          be included in the EAR
     year limitation on the frequency of plan
                                                                                                          Based amendments
     amendment adoptions.        Ch. 2006-220,
     LOF.
     Allows the effect of a proposed receiving
     area to be considered when projecting the
 4   25-year or greater population with a rural     163.3177(11)(d)6.    N/A              -                            -
     land stewardship area.      Ch. 2006-220,
     LOF.
                                                                             Addressed in the Housing
                                                                             Element Although does
    Recognizes              “extremely-low-income                            not specifically address
    persons” as another income groups whose                                  accessory dwelling units,
    housing needs might be addressed by               163.31771(1), (2)      Policy 4.1.5.4 would allow
5                                                                                                         No action required
    accessory dwelling units and defines such         and (4)                consideration of the
    persons consistent with s.420.0004(8), F.S.                              accessory dwelling unit
    Ch. 2006-69, LOF.                                                        and 4.1.1.10 allows for
                                                                             accessory apartments for
                                                                             relatives.
    Assigns to the Division of Emergency
    Management the responsibility of ensuring                                Conservation & Coastal
6   the      preparation    of   updated   regional   163.3178(2)(d)         Management Element           No action required
    hurricane evacuation plans. Ch. 2006-68,                                 Policy 2.1.6.1
    LOF.

    Changes the definition of the Coastal High
    Hazard Area (CHHA) to be the area below                                  CHHA is defined in the
7   the elevation of the category 1 storm surge       163.3178(2)(h)         Conservation and Coastal     No action required
    line as established by the SLOSH model.                                  Management Element
    Ch. 2006-68, LOF.

    Adds a new section allowing a local
    government        to     comply    with    the
    requirement that its comprehensive plan                                  Addressed in the
                                                                                                          Addressed in the EAR
8   direct     population    concentrations   away    163.3178(9)(a) [New]   Conservation & Coastal
                                                                                                          update
    from the CHHA and maintains or reduces                                   Management Element
    hurricane evacuation times by maintaining
    an adopted LOS Standard for out-of-



                                                                                                                               93
     county hurricane evacuation for a category
     5   storm,     by        maintaining    a    12-hour
     hurricane evacuation time or by providing
     mitigation        that     satisfies    these        two
     requirements. Ch. 2006-68, LOF.
     Adds a new section establishing a level of
     service     for         out-of-county        hurricane
     evacuation of no greater than 16 hours for
                                                                                        Addressed in the
     a   category        5     storm   for       any     local                                                    Addressed in the EAR
9                                                                163.3178(9)(b) [New]   Conservation & Coastal
     government that wishes to follow the                                                                         update
                                                                                        Management Element
     process in s.163.3178(9)(a) but has not
     established such a level of service by July
     1, 2008. Ch. 2006-68, LOF.

     Requires local governments to amend their
     Future    Land          Use   Map      and        coastal                          Addressed in the Future
     management element to include the new                                              Land Use and
10                                                               163.3178(2)(c)                                   No action required
     definition of the CHHA, and to depict the                                          Conservation & Coastal
     CHHA on the FLUM by July 1, 2008. Ch.                                              Elements.
     2006-68, LOF.

     Allows the sanitary sewer concurrency
     requirement to be met by onsite sewage                                             Addressed in
11   treatment and disposal systems approved                     163.3180(2)(a)         Infrastructure Element:   No action required
     by the Department of Health. Ch. 2006-                                             Sanitary Sewer Section
     252, LOF.
     Changes                 s.380.0651(3)(i)              to
12   s.380.0651(3)(h) as the citation for the                    163.3180(12)(a)        Future Land Use Element   No action required
     standards a multiuse DRI must meet or
     exceed. Ch. 2006-220, LOF.



     Deletes use of extended use agreement as
13   part of the definition of small scale                     163.3187(1)(c)1.f.   N/A               -                           -
     amendment. Ch. 2006-69, LOF.

     Creates a new section related to electric
     distribution       substations;           establishes
     criteria addressing land use compatibility
     of substations; requires local governments
     to   permit      substations        in     all     FLUM
     categories          (except              preservation,
     conservation      or     historic    preservation);
14   establishes compatibility standards to be                 163.3208 [New]             Future Land Use Element     No action required
     used    if   a   local   government          has    not
     established such standards; establishes
     procedures for the review of applications
     for the location of a new substation; allows
     local governments to enact reasonable
     setback and landscape buffer standards
     for substations. Ch. 2006-268, LOF.

     Creates a new section preventing a local
     government from requiring for a permit or
                                                                                          City does not require
     other   approval       vegetation        maintenance
15                                                             163.3209 [New]             permits for tree or other   No action required
     and tree pruning or trimming within an
                                                                                          vegetation maintenance.
     established      electric     transmission          and
     distribution line right-of-way. Ch. 2006-




                                                                                                                                           95
     268, LOF.




     Community Workforce Housing Innovation
     Pilot Program; created by Ch. 2006-69,
     LOF, section 27.         Establishes a special,
16                                                       New        Housing Element            No action required
     expedited adoption process for any plan
     amendment      that      implements    a    pilot
     program project.
     Affordable housing land donation density
     incentive bonus; created by Ch. 2006-69,
     LOF, section 28.      Allows a density bonus
     for land donated to a local government to
     provide     affordable     housing;    requires
                                                                    Housing Element Policy
17   adoption of a plan amendment for any                New                                   No action required
                                                                    4.1.1.11
     such   land;   such    amendment      may     be
     adopted as a small-scale amendment;
     such amendment is exempt from the twice
     per year limitation on the frequency of
     plan amendment adoptions.

2007 [Ch. 2007-196, Ch. 2007-198, Ch. 2007-204, Laws of Florida]

     (26) Expands the definition of “urban                          Future Land Use Element
 1   redevelopment” to include a community               163.3164   Capital Improvements       No action required
     redevelopment area. Ch. 2007-204, LOF.                         Element , Transportation
    (32) Revises the definition of “financial               Element, Public Schools
    feasibility” by clarifying that the plan is             Facilities Element
    financially feasibility for transportation and
    schools if level of service standards are
    achieved and maintained by the end of the
    planning period even if in a particular year
    such standards are not achieved.                   In
    addition, the provision that level of service
    standards need not be maintained if the
    proportionate      fair    share        process    in
    s.163.3180(12) and (16), F.S., is used is
    deleted. Ch. 2007-204, LOF.
    (2) Clarifies that financial feasibility is
    determined       using    a      five-year    period
    (except     in   the      case     of     long-term     Capital Improvements
                                                                                      No action required
    transportation     or     school         concurrency    Element
    management, in which case a 10 or 15-
    year period applies). Ch. 2007-204, LOF.
    (3)(a)6. Revises the citation to the MPO’s
                                                            Transportation Element
    TIP and long-range transportation plan.                                           No action required
2                                                           Objective 7.3.2
    Ch. 2007-196, LOF.
    (3)(b)1. Requires an annual update to the
    Five-Year        Schedule           of       Capital
    Improvements        to     be      submitted      by
                                                            Capital Improvements
    December 1, 2008 and yearly thereafter. If                                        No action required
                                                            Element Policy 10.1.1.1
    this date is missed, no amendments are
    allowed until the update is adopted.              Ch.
    2007-204, LOF.




                                                                                                           97
(3)(c) Deletes the requirement that the
Department must notify the Administration
Commission if an annual update to the
capital improvements element is found not
                                                  N/A               -                         -
in compliance (retained is the requirement
that notification must take place is the
annual update is not adopted). Ch. 2007-
204, LOF.
(3)(e) Provides that a comprehensive plan
as revised by an amendment to the future
land use map is financially feasible if it is
supported    by   (1)   a   condition    in   a
development order for a development of
regional impact or binding agreement that
addresses proportionate share mitigation
consistent with s.163.3180(12), F.S., or (2)            Capital Improvements
                                                                                  No action required
a    binding      agreement        addressing           Element Policy 10.1.3.5
proportionate      fair-share       mitigation
consistent with s.163.3180(16)(f), F.S., and
the property is located in an urban infill,
urban        redevelopment,         downtown
revitalization,     urban       infill     and
redevelopment or urban service area. Ch.
2007-204, LOF.
(6)(f)1.d. Revises the housing element
requirements to ensure adequate sites for               Housing Element Policy
                                                                                  No action required
affordable     workforce    housing      within         4.1.1.2
certain counties. Ch. 2007-198, LOF.
    (6)h. and i.          Requires certain counties to
    adopt    a     plan       for ensuring affordable
    workforce housing by July 1, 2008 and                         [New]     N/A          N/A       N/A
    provides a penalty if this date is missed.
    Ch. 2007-198, LOF.
    (4)(b) Expands transportation concurrency
    exceptions to include airport facilities. Ch.                 163.318   N/A          N/A       N/A
    2007-204, LOF.

    (5)(b)5 Adds specifically designated urban
                                                                                                   May be addressed is a
    service areas to the list of transportation
                                                                            N/A          N/A       transportation exception
    concurrency exception areas.                  Ch. 2007-
                                                                                                   area is established
    204, LOF.

    (5)(f) Requires consultation with the state
                                                                            N/A (No
    land planning agency regarding mitigation
                                                                            SIS
    of impacts on Strategic Intermodal System
                                                                  [New]     facilities         -               -
3   facilities        prior         to      establishing     a
                                                                            in the
    concurrency exception area.                  Ch. 2007-
                                                                            City)
    204, LOF.
    (12) and (12)(a)          Deletes the requirement
    that     the          comprehensive         plan      must
    authorize         a     development         of     regional
    impact       to       satisfy        concurrency     under
    certain conditions.                   Also, deletes the                 N/A                -               -
    requirement            that     the    development      of
    regional impact must include a residential
    component to satisfy concurrency under
    the conditions listed. Ch. 2007-204, LOF.




                                                                                                                         99
    (12)(d)     Clarifies that any proportionate-
    share      mitigation     by     development          of
    regional       impact,         Florida        Quality
                                                                                      Capital Improvements
    Development        and     specific        area     plan                                                       No action required
                                                                                      Element Policy 10.1.5.2
    implementing an optional sector plan is
    not responsible for reducing or eliminating
    backlogs. Ch. 2007-204, LOF.
    (13)(e)4.    A development precluded from
    commencing             because        of          school                          Public School Facilities &
    concurrency may nevertheless commence                      [New]                  Capital Improvements         No action requirements
    if certain conditions are met.             Ch. 2007-                              Elements
    204, LOF.
    (16)(c) and (f)    Allows proportionate fair-
    share mitigation to be directed to one or
    more specific transportation improvement.                                         Capital Improvements
                                                               [New]                                               No action required
    Clarifies that such mitigation is not to be                                       Element Policy 10.1.5.2
    used to address backlogs. Ch. 2007-204,
    LOF.
    (17) Allows an exempt from concurrency
    for certain workforce housing developed                                           Capital Improvements         Need to add citation to FS
    consistent        with      s.380.061(9)            and                           Element                      380.
    s.380.0651(3). Ch. 2007-198, LOF.
    Allows a local government to establish a
    transportation           concurrency          backlog
    authority to address deficiencies where
4                                                              163.3182 [New]   N/A                -                           -
    existing     traffic     volume    exceeds           the
    adopted level of service standard. Defines
    the powers of the authority to include tax
    increment    financing      and   requires     the
    preparation of transportation concurrency
    backlog plans.      Ch. 2007-196, LOF and
    Ch. 2007-204, LOF.



    Allows plan amendments that address
    certain   housing        requirements    to    be                               Housing Element Policy
5                                                        163.3184(19) [New]                                  No action required
    expedited under certain circumstances.                                          4.1.5.6
    Ch. 2007-198, LOF.
    Exempts from the twice per year limitation
    on the frequency of adoption of plan
    amendments       any     amendment      that    is   163.3187(1)(p)
6                                                                             N/A              -                         -
    consistent with the local housing incentive          [New]
    strategy consistent with s.420.9076.           Ch.
    2007-198, LOF.
    Add an amendment to integrate a port
    master plan into the coastal management
7   element     as    an      exemption     to     the   163.3191(14) [New]   N/A              -                         -
    prohibition in ss.163.3191(10). Ch. 2007-
    196, LOF and Ch. 2007-204, LOF.
    Extends the duration of a development
8   agreement from 10 to 20 years.                 Ch.   163.3229             N/A              -             -
    2007-204, LOF.
    Establishes an alternative state review
    process          pilot        program           in
9                                                        163.32465 [New]      N/A              -                         -
    Jacksonville/Duval, Miami, Tampa, Hialeah,
    Pinellas and Broward to encourage urban



                                                                                                                                  101
     infill and redevelopment.      Ch. 2007-204,
     LOF.



     If a property owner contributes right-of-
     way and expands a state transportation
     facility, such contribution may be applied                      Capital Improvements
10                                                  339.282 [New}                                Need to add language.
     as     a    credit   against    any   future                    Element
     transportation concurrency requirement.
     Ch. 2007-196, LOF.
     Establishes an expedited plan amendment
     adoption process for amendments that
     implement      the   Community     Workforce
     Housing Innovation Pilot Program and
11                                                  420.5095(9)      Housing Element             Need to add language.
     exempts such amendments from the twice
     per year limitation on the frequency of
     adoption of plan amendments. Ch. 2007-
     198, LOF.

2008 [Ch. 2008-191 and Ch. 2008-227, Laws of Florida]

     The future land use plan must discourage                        Future Land Use Element
 1                                                  163.3177(6)(a)                               No action required
     urban sprawl. Ch. 2008-191, LOF.                                Policy

     The future land use plan must be based
     upon energy-efficient land use patterns                         Will be addressed as part
 2   accounting for existing and future energy      163.3177(6)(a)   of the EAR based            Part of the EAR analysis
     electric power generation and transmission                      Amendments
     systems. Ch. 2008-191, LOF.
    The future land use plan must be based                                   Will be addressed as part
3   upon greenhouse gas reduction strategies.          163.3177(6)(a)        of the EAR based            Part of the EAR analysis
    Ch. 2008-191, LOF.                                                       Amendments
    The   traffic   circulation    element      must
                                                                             Will be addressed as part
    include     transportation     strategies     to
4                                                      163.3177(6)(b)        of the EAR based            Part of the EAR analysis
    address     reduction   in    greenhouse     gas
                                                                             Amendments
    emissions. Ch. 2008-191, LOF.

    The conservation element must include                                    Will be addressed as part
5   factors that affect energy conservation.           163.3177(6)(d)        of the EAR based            Part of the EAR analysis
    Ch. 2008-191, LOF.                                                       Amendments

    The future land use map series must                                      Will be addressed as part
6   depict energy conservation.        Ch. 2008-       163.3177(6)(d)        of the EAR based            Part of the EAR analysis
    191, LOF.                                                                Amendments

    The   housing     element      must      include
    standards, plans and principles to be
                                                                             Will be addressed as part
    followed in energy efficiency in the design        163.3177(6)(f)1.h.
7                                                                            of the EAR based            Part of the EAR analysis
    and construction of new housing and in             and i.
                                                                             Amendments
    the use of renewable energy resources.
    Ch. 2008-191, LOF.

    Local governments within an MPO area
                                                                             Will be addressed as part
    must revise their transportation element
8                                                      163.3177(6)(j)        of the EAR based            Part of the EAR analysis
    to include strategies to reduce greenhouse
                                                                             Amendments
    gas emissions. Ch. 2008-191, LOF.
    Various changes were made in the State                                   Will be addressed as part
                                                       State Comprehensive
9   Comprehensive Plan (Chapter 187, F.S.)                                   of the EAR based            Part of the EAR analysis
                                                       Plan
    that address low-carbon-emitting electric                                Amendments




                                                                                                                            103
        power plants.        See Section 5 of Chapter
        2008-227, LOF.

2009 [Chapters 2009-85 and 2009-96, Laws of Florida]

        Changes “Existing Urban service area” to
        “Urban     service    area”   and       revises    the                                                     Address in the update of
    1                                                            163.3164(29)         Future Land Use Element
        definition of such an area.               Section 2,                                                       the Element
        Chapter 2009-96, LOF.
                                                                                      Will be addressed as part
        Adds definition of “Dense urban land
    2                                                            163.3164(34)         of the EAR based             Part of the EAR analysis
        area.” Section 2, Chapter 2009-96, LOF.
                                                                                      Amendments
        Postpones from December 1, 2008 to
        December 1, 2011, the need for the annual
                                                                                      Capital     Improvements
3       update     to   the     capital        improvements      163.3177(3)(b)1.                                  No action required
                                                                                      Element
        element to be financially feasible. Section
        3, Chapter 2009-96, LOF.
        Requires the future land use element to
        include by June 30, 2012, criteria that will
        be used to achieve compatibility of lands                                     Will be addressed as part
4       near public use airports.               For military     163.3177(6)(a)       of   the     EAR    based    Part of the EAR analysis
        installations, the date is changed from                                       Amendments
        June 30, 2006, to June 30, 2012. Section
        3, Chapter 2009-85, LOF.
        Requires         the          intergovernmental
                                                                                      Intergovernmental
        coordination element to recognize airport
5                                                                163.3177(6)(h)1.b.   Coordination       Element   No action required
        master plans.        Section 3, Chapter 2009-
                                                                                      Policy 9.1.1.7
        85, LOF.
        Requires         the          intergovernmental                               Intergovernmental
6                                                                163.3177(6)(h)1.c.                                No action required
        coordination     element          to     include    a                         Coordination       Element
    mandatory (rather than voluntary) dispute                                             Policy 9.1.1.8
    resolution process and requires use of the
    process prescribed in section 186.509,
    F.S., for this purpose. Section 3, Chapter
    2009-96, LOF.
    Requires             the        intergovernmental
    coordination         element     to      provide     for
    interlocal        agreements           pursuant       to                              Will be addressed as part
7   s.333.03(1)(b), F.S., between adjacent local               163.3177(6)(h)1.d.         of   the     EAR   based    Part of the EAR analysis
    governments          regarding        airport    zoning                               Amendments
    regulations. Section 3, Chapter 2009-85,
    LOF.
    Defines         “rural     agricultural     industrial
    center” and provides for their expansion                   163.3177(15)(a)
8                                                                                   N/A               -                             -
    though     the      plan    amendment           process.   [New]
    Section 1, Chapter 2009-154, LOF
    Allows a municipality that is not a dense
    urban        land        area   to       amend       its
                                                                                          Will be addressed as part   The    City   is   a    DULA
    comprehensive plan to designate certain
9                                                              163.3180(5)(b)2.           of   the     EAR   based    however the County is
    areas      as       transportation        concurrency
                                                                                          Amendments                  not.
    exception areas. Section 4, Chapter 2009-
    96, LOF.
    Allows a county that is not a dense urban
    land area to amend its comprehensive plan
A   to      designate           certain       areas      as    163.3180(5)(b)3.     N/A               -                             -
    transportation           concurrency        exception
    areas. Section 4, Chapter 2009-96, LOF.




                                                                                                                                             105
     Requires local governments with state
     identified         transportation      concurrency
                                                                                     Will be addressed as part
     exception areas to adopt land use and
11                                                         163.3180(5)(b)4.          of   the    EAR    based    Part of the EAR analysis
     transportation strategies to support and
                                                                                     Amendments
     fund mobility within such areas. Section 4,
     Chapter 2009-96, LOF.
     Except      in      transportation     concurrency
     exception areas, local governments must
     adopt the level-of-service established by
12   the      Department       of   Transportation   for   163.3180(10)        N/A              -                            -
     roadway          facilities    on   the   Strategic
     Intermodal System.             Section 4, Chapter
     2009-96, LOF.
     Defines      a      backlogged       transportation
     facility to be one on which the adopted
     level-of-service is exceeded by existing              163.3180(12)(b) &
13                                                                             N/A              -                            -
     trips,       plus         additional      projected   (16)(i)
     background trips.              Section 5, Chapter
     2009-85, LOF.
TABLE 16 – CHANGES TO CHAPTER 163, F.S. URBAN DESIGN STAFF
ANALYZING MAJOR ISSUES
                                           The    Evaluation   and   Appraisal   Report   provides   a   frank   assessment   of    the
                                           Comprehensive Plan’s successes and shortcomings in handling the major planning
                                           issues over the last seven years. Based on this assessment, the EAR recommends
                                           corrective actions and new approaches to address the Plan’s shortcomings and to steer
                                           the community toward its long term vision. There have been numerous opportunities
                                           over the past few years for citizens to voice their concerns about the way the City is
                                           growing and more importantly, to express how they would like to see it grow.             The
                                           Florida Statutes governing the EAR direct the local government to address major issues
                                           in the following manner:



          Identify the impacts of the issue (163.3191[2][e], F.S.)
          Assess whether objectives of the Plan as they pertain to major issues have been achieved (163.3191[2][g], F.S.)
          Discuss whether there have been changes in circumstances that were not anticipated and whether these changes
          resulted in either problems or opportunities for the community (163.3191[2][g], F.S.)and
          Identify actions or corrective measures, including plan amendments, that are anticipated to address the major issues
          (163.3191[2][i], F.S.)


The City of Punta Gorda’s process of identifying major local issues began in July 2010 when the City held public workshops to
discuss changes to the Comprehensive Plan.       As a result of the public workshop, the City of Punta Gorda identified several issue
outlined in Table 17.




                                                                                                                              107
City of Punta Gorda Evaluation and Appraisal Report Identified Major Issues
                   Issue                         Source      Major Issue                         Related Element & Comments

1)    Development      of       supportive     City Staff   Yes              Future Land Use:      must encourage a pattern of development
policies     for           a     functional                                  supportive of the non-auto transport.       Transportation Element:
Transportation                 Concurrency                                   Ensure policies are supportive of a Transportation Concurrency
Exemption Area (TCEA)                                                        Exception Area & the future development of a logical Mobility Plan.
      a) Density & Intensity                   City Staff   Major    Issue   Future Land Use: Appropriate densities and intensities given
                                                            Component        existing and planned levels of Public Infrastructure

      b) Pattern of Land Uses                  City Staff   Major    Issue   Future Land Use: location efficiency of pattern of land uses.
                                                            Component        Transportation Element: Identify strategies to increase pedestrian
                                                                             safety by promoting traffic calming alternative strategies.

      c) Outline a strategy for the            City Staff   Yes              Transportation   Element:   A   requirement     of    a    Transportation
development of a Mobility Plan                                               Concurrency Exemption Area.
           c-1)    Account         for   all   City Staff   Major    Issue   Transportation Element: Analyze all modes of auto, freight, bicycle,
viable transportation modes                                 Component        pedestrian, neighborhood electric vehicles, air, rail, and transit and
                                                                             analyze potential future use within the TCEA.
           c-2)    Include      provisions     Citizen      Major   Issues   Future Land Use & Transportation Elements: Creation/existence of
for    future      fixed        route    or    Concern      Component        transit supportive land uses and bicycle/pedestrian networks
circulator transit                                                           should guide system planning, timing, and development.

      d) Analysis of logical extents           City Staff   Yes              Transportation Element: Address SB 360 and should be supportive
of a Transportation Concurrency                                              of the concepts outlined in HB 697 greenhouse emission reductions.
Exemption Area

           d-1) Analysis of existing           City Staff   Major    Issue   Transportation   Element:   Develop    baseline      for   Transportation
&      committed               multi-modal                  Component        Concurrency Exemption Area.
transportation network
            d-2)      Study       Existing     City Staff   Major   Issue   Future Land Use & Transportation Elements: Proximity, availability,
development                pattern        &                 Component       connectivity/access,    and    balance   of   residential   units    to
coordinate with FLU                                                         retail/workplace
            d-3)              Coordinate       City Staff   Major   Issue   Future Land Use, Infrastructure, Intergovernmental Coordination, &
w/Charlotte          County       in    the                 Component       Transportation Elements:      Ensure coordination of existing and
definition of the Transportation                                            development plans in affected areas.
Concurrency Area boundary.
2)     Analysis       of    the      energy    City Staff   Yes             Examine all element policies to address HB 697 greenhouse
efficiency alternatives                                                     emission reductions

       a) proximity of daily needs             Citizen      Major   Issue   Future Land Use: proximity of uses may reduce number of auto trips
and workplaces to residential                  Concern      Component       and/or vehicle miles traveled. Transportation Element: Component
                                                                            of the new Mobility Plan.     Recreation & Open Space: Connectivity
                                                                            between all major residential, commercial, and recreational areas
                                                                            through the completion of the City's Ring Around the City

       b) Study optimal commercial             City Staff   Major   Issue   Future Land Use: balance of residential units to retail/workplace
intensity/residential             densities                 Component       potential Transportation Element: This will address a portion of the
that        are     walkable,        bicycle                                HB 697 requirements & may overlap w/ other issues discussed in
friendly, and transit supportive                                            Climate Adaptation and FLU.

       c)         Sustainable          food    City Staff   Yes             Future Land Use: Increases in local food production could help
production                                                                  address concepts of HB 697.      Recreation & Open Space Element:
                                                                            Implementation of GOP's identified in the recently adopted Parks &
                                                                            Recreation Master Plan.

            c-1) Develop Future Land           City Staff   Major   Issue   Future Land Use: Development is required only if analysis supports
Use category suitable for local                             Component       the creation due to the proximity of appropriate lands adjacency to
food production                                                             the existing City Limits.




                                                                                                                                           109
          c-2) Support creation of         Citizen       Major      Issue   Future Land Use: Ensure no roadblocks exist to community garden
community gardens                          Concern       Component          creation. Recreation & Open Space: Implementation of GOP's of the
                                                                            Parks & Recreation Master Plan.

          c-3) Study existing and          City Staff    Major      Issue   Future Land Use: May identify the need for strategies to annexation
potential food production areas                          Component          non-urban areas for food production area preservation
in all of South Charlotte County
3)           Analyze             Climate   City Staff    Yes                Staff will be reviewing the alternative strategies provided in The City
Adaptation/Sea          Level       Rise                                    of Punta Gorda's Climate Adaptation Plan which was approved by
Strategies                                                                  Council to be used in the EAR review. The goal will be to develop
                                                                            an action plan preparing Punta Gorda for future climate change.


     a)   Review    &   evaluate     the   City Staff    Major      Issue   Conservation & Coastal Management Elements:                 Review and add
recommended                 adaptation                   Component          policies to include factors that affect energy conservation. Housing
strategies with regard to HB697                                             Element: Review strategies for future housing to include use of
                                                                            energy     resources     based    on    energy      deficient   design   and
                                                                            construction.

     b)   Explore       City's    future   City Staff    Major      Issue   Conservation    &   Coastal      Management        Elements:    Review   and
directions    regarding     sea    level                 Component          consider    strategies   from    the   City   of    Punta   Gorda's   Climate
rise, & reduction of greenhouse                                             Adaptation Plan over the next planning decade. Seek strategies to
gas emissions                                                               combat SLR effects on the City's shoreline.

4) Declining Tax Revenues and              City Staff    Yes                Capital Improvement Element: How does the City maintain its LOS
Budget Cutbacks                                                             and complete capital improvement projects with limited funding
                                                                            and budget cutbacks?

TABLE 17 – SOURCE: CITY OF PUNTA GORDA URBAN DESIGN DIVISION 2010
Development of Supportive Policies for a Functional Transportation Concurrency Exemption Area (TCEA)
The City’s current Comprehensive Plan calls for the exploration of alternative transportation concurrency methods to ensure that
roadway construction and regional traffic demands do not impede the continued infill and redevelopment of the core areas of the
City.   The City has examined three strategies, a Transportation Concurrency Management Area (TCMA), a Multi-Modal
Transportation District (MMTD), and a Transportation Concurrency Exception Area (TCEA).            These strategies have various
requirements and conditions that make them more or less applicable to the City. The three strategies are described below.

Transportation Concurrency Management Area (TCMA)
The establishment of a Transportation Concurrency Management Area (TCMA) can promote infill development. TCMA boundaries
require careful delineation within a compact urban environment which has a highly connected transportation infrastructure with
alternate routes and/or modes. Establishing a TCMA allows local governments to adopt an area-wide Level of Service (LOS) if the
local government provides analysis describing how infill development will be facilitated and how travelers will meet their mobility
needs within the TCMA.

Multi-Modal Transportation Districts (MMTDs)
Multi-Modal Transportation Districts (MMTDs) are geographic areas which also must be
carefully defined.    MMTDs are areas in which a local government establishes
automobile   travel   as   a   secondary   priority.   The   local   government’s   primary
transportation priority in these areas is the movement of people on foot. Pedestrian
activity is encouraged with a focus on safety and supporting amenities such as lighting,
landscaping, building orientation and street furniture.      Urban design and access to
transit services are crucial in the establishment and successful operation of MMTDs.
While Punta Gorda is very progressive in its urban design, the current lack of public
transit services may preclude this option.




                                                                                                                          111
Transportation Concurrency Exception Areas (TCEAs)
Transportation Concurrency Exception Areas (TCEAs) are geographic areas, also carefully defined, that promote infill, adaptive
reuse and redevelopment activities. These areas are typically established where appropriate transportation infrastructure already
exists and where travelers can reasonably use a number of travel modes. TCEAs can provide incentives to developers to build
within their boundaries through opportunities for increased density, utilization of existing infrastructure and reduced need for
parking and road building. These benefits to developers can discourage sprawl and influence the allocation of public investment
funds.

The tools above focus on the enhancement of the existing transportation system. Expansion of existing roadways is typically not
considered or considered as a much lower priority.         Enhancing existing infrastructure and mode choice for well defined
geographic areas which have compact development patterns and a wide mixture of land uses in close proximity is a priority for
the City of Punta Gorda.

The City places a high priority on the enhancement of existing infrastructure and facilities for two reasons.             The City is
committed to creating a livable community through the development of a compact, contiguous mixture of land uses which are
well connected. The City also must effectively invest and/or reinvest limited financial resources in public facilities which support
the broader economy and facilitate a healthy, high quality lifestyle for Punta Gorda residents and visitors alike.

To further the City’s goals, objectives and policies regarding compact, contiguous mixture of well connected land uses, the City
will analyze the logical extents of a Transportation Concurrency Exception Area (TCEA) in lieu of the other two alternatives. This
choice was significantly influenced by the Florida Legislature’s passage of Senate Bill 360 (SB 360) in 2009.        This bill allowed
areas identified as Dense Urban Land Areas (DULAs) to delineate Transportation Concurrency Exception Areas (TCEAs) through
establishing and implementing mobility plans. To qualify as a DULA a jurisdiction’s density has to exceed 1,000 persons per
square mile. As of the fourth quarter of 2010, Punta Gorda has an estimated full time population of over 17,000 persons and
just over 15.6 square miles of land area. Thus, Punta Gorda’s estimated density is slightly below 1,100 persons per square mile
which qualifies the City as a DULA. Although a challenge to SB 360 is underway in the courts, the legislation, coupled with House
Bill 697 (HB 697) passed in 2008, which requires communities address energy efficiency and the reduction of greenhouse gas
emissions, provides guidance to the City to further explore the establishment of a TCEA and the development of a comprehensive
mobility plan for the City.

In order to successfully develop a TCEA, transportation and land uses must be considered in concert. Evaluation of a proposed
TCEA should contain an analysis of the following:

          Land use densities and intensities
          Proximity of land uses to one another
          Connectivity of the existing transportation network
          Transportation mode options including facilities and frequency of service
          Future plans for funding services and infrastructure improvements


The purpose of conducting this analysis is to determine if viable alternatives to automobile travel exists within specific
geographic areas. If viable transportation alternatives exist within a proposed TCEA(s), then the City can take steps to further
promote infill, adaptive reuse and redevelopment activities by strengthening land use connections and having appropriate land
use densities and intensities.   These factors also influence the City’s ability to generate tax revenue and thus the strategic
allocation of limited financial resources. These issues were identified as minor issues related to developing supportive policies
for a functional TCEA.


Density & Intensity
In order to develop, manage and operate a complete, cost effective multi-modal transportation system that facilitates the
efficient movement of people and freight through and within the city, land uses must be balanced. A mix of nonresidential and
residential uses (jobs, services and housing) should be located in close proximity to one another to encourage interactions



                                                                                                                        113
                                      between uses; this type of area is commonly referred to as a livability center.     Land use
                                      decisions should be continuously coordinated with transportation decisions and supported
                                      by the existing and proposed transportation network. The City currently supports and will
                                      continue to support densities and intensities that encourage livability centers where citizens
                                      have transportation modal choice and commercial options within close proximity to housing
                                      options.

                                      The City evaluated nonresidential intensities during their last update to the Comprehensive
                                      Plan.   Moving forward, it is necessary to evaluate the City’s residential densities.      As
                                      identified in the review of the Future Land Use Element, the successful implementation of a
                                      TCEA strategy will require establishing greater residential densities more consistent with
                                      those of a less auto-centric city.     The City continues to support densities which will
                                      encourage walking and bicycling.      These enhanced densities support place making and
       DOWNTOWN MARION AVENUE         provide sufficient magnitude to support transit/circulator services through pedestrian trip
           BRICK REPAVING
                                      generation.   Transit supportive densities within the City may reduce greenhouse gas
                                      emissions from both commuter and leisure travelers who currently use the automobile as
the transportation mode of choice.

Appropriate densities also benefit the City by reducing infrastructure expenditures on a per acre basis due to increased
infrastructure utilization. Appropriate densities also offer a mix of housing types. Compact residential developments provide
housing options for all of Punta Gorda’s citizens from young professionals to empty nesters. Compact residential areas allow the
City to deliver essential services in both a timely and cost effective manner.
Pattern of Land Uses
Just as important as the density and intensity of land uses is the mix of land uses within and around a community. The pattern
of land uses influences transportation decisions and vice versa. Typically, transportation is a derived demand. That is to say that
residents travel between residential and nonresidential land uses to fulfill daily needs and not for the sake of travel itself.
Greater distances between land uses limit modal choice and typically promote the use of the automobiles.                These greater
distances increase vehicle miles traveled, increase greenhouse gas emissions associated with combustion of fossil fuels, promote
surface transportation congestion and increase the reliance on fuels imported from outside of the region which has adverse
economic implications for the local economy.

Modal choice is increased through a variety of municipal regulatory mechanisms which guide the pattern of land uses within the
City.   One important way Punta Gorda seeks to increase modal choice is by
strongly encouraging both the horizontal and vertical integration of disparate yet
complimentary land uses, residential and nonresidential as appropriate. The City
uses ordinances and the Land Development Regulations to govern the physical
layout of land parcels, easements and rights-of-way upon the urban landscape.
These documents are implementation tools for the comprehensive plan and
should provide specific rules which execute the policies contained in the
Comprehensive Plan. The City realizes that some of these implementation tools,
including chapters regarding Subdivision Regulations and Streets, may need
modifications. Modifications to these chapters should include:

        Promotion   and   development   of   small   blocks   which   increase   the
                                                                                                 2005 CITIZEN MASTER PLAN:
        connectivity of land uses.                                                                 PLAN REDEVELOPMENT

        Development of transportation infrastructure which takes all users into




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      account not only automobiles.
      Promotion of land use connectivity for pedestrians and cyclists.


Outline a Strategy for the Development of a Mobility Plan
To appropriately coordinate land use decisions and effectively allocate public financial resources to transportation improvement
projects within a TCEA, the development of a comprehensive mobility plan is required. A local government’s mobility plan is
commonly defined as the strategies which support and fund mobility within a Transportation Concurrency Exception Area (TCEA)
including alternative modes of transportation. Briefly, mobility plans examine existing conditions, provide principal findings and
strategic areas of improvement, propose mobility or mitigation strategies, project results and finally address funding and
implementation strategies.    During the examination of existing conditions, the analysis identifies the study area boundaries,
reviews of local, regional and state regulatory guidelines, performs an analysis of the multimodal environment and performs a
transportation network analysis. This is the baseline data.

Mobility planning efforts involve examining baseline travel data, including an accounting of all existing viable transportation
modes and infrastructure.      This baseline provides the starting point for population growth and growth in travel by mode
projections. Mobility planning also sets monitoring activities at regularly scheduled intervals to measure the effectiveness of the
local jurisdiction’s transportation strategies.

Account for all viable transportation modes
The City has made and continues to make every practical, financially feasible effort to account for all viable transportation
modes. However, existing land uses must be taken into consideration. It is not practical to construct sidewalks connecting all
low density residential neighborhoods to all nonresidential land use attractors. Nor is it financially feasible for a future transit
system to provide service to scattered residential areas isolated from nonresidential land uses. Residential density and proximity
of residential and nonresidential land uses are important factors influencing modal choice and practicality of providing
transportation options.
Transportation options become limited as distances increase between disparate land uses. The City’s goal is to increase modal
choice for residents and visitors alike. This goal can only be realized through close coordination of transportation and land use
decisions and quality urban design with a focus on place making. These coordinated decisions should continue to require the
consideration of all viable transportation options.

Consideration of all transportation modes is essential to creating a livable community.            Accounting for all modes of
transportation promotes modal choice for residents and visitors and creates many benefits for communities. Modal choice can:

      reduce the cost of transportation, which is especially important for low income families and housing affordability for these
      families
      increase physical activity which improves health and thus quality of life
      reduce greenhouse gas emissions
      decrease dependence on foreign oil
      reduce the vulnerability of the local economy to energy price
      increases


All trips, even single occupancy personal automobile commuter trips, begin
and end on foot except for those persons who are transportation
disadvantaged.    Recognizing this fact, it is important to consider the
transportation network from a comprehensive, interrelated, multi-modal
view. Travelers make trip planning decisions related to mode choice based
upon a number of factors.       Whether consciously or unconsciously, the
traveler will always consider travel alternatives during trip planning. These
                                                                                             2005 CITIZEN MASTER PLAN:
conscious or unconscious travel decisions are made through a quick                              PLAN TRAFFIC STUDY

analysis of accessibility, convenience, and cost.      In order to increase



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opportunities for modal choice the City will examine the existing conditions related to the following transportation modes:

Automobiles
Automobiles are the dominant form of surface transportation in Southwest Florida and in the City of Punta Gorda.         The vast
majority of work and non-work trips are made by private automobiles. Automobiles will continue to serve the majority of the
City’s population for some portion of their regular trip making. Through trips, made by automobiles along the US 41 and US 17
corridors will continue to be a significant challenge to Punta Gorda’s efforts to increase the walkability of the CRA as it is
bisected by these one way pairs. Automobiles must be considered as part of the overall transportation system. However, the
City will continue to emphasize improvements to alternate modes of travel in order to decrease dependence on the automobile as
the sole viable modal option.

Rail
The Seminole Gulf Railway is the only railway service provider for the City of Punta Gorda and the Southwest Florida Region.
Seminole Gulf Railway is a short-line railway operator that connects to the
national    railway   network   via   CSX    tracks   in    Arcadia,   Florida   located
approximately 25 miles northeast of the City. At present the Seminole Gulf Rail
line experiences limited demand due primarily to a lack of heavy industry in
Southwest    Florida.    Designation    of   a   TCEA      and   implementation    of   a
comprehensive mobility plan will increase the need for collaboration between
railway operators and the City’s s planning and transportation staff regarding
public investment, increased use of alternative modes of transportation and
increased need for pedestrian safety.
                                                                                                SEMINOLE GULF RAILWAY
                       Freight
                       Trucking still dominates other forms of transportation in the
                       delivery of freight. Freight delivery by truck is supported by Punta
                       Gorda’s extensive, interconnected roadway network, which includes
                       US 17, US 41, I-75, N Jones Loop Road and Burnt Store Road. The
                       Punta Gorda Airport (PGD), which offers two regularly scheduled
                       service carriers Allegiant Air and Direct Air, and general aviation
                       services, is co-located with an industrial park and thus is well
                       positioned to serve industrial park tenants’ needs for high value
                       freight transport. While Punta Gorda rests on the banks of the Peace
                       River which flows into Charlotte Harbor, the harbor is not a
                       deepwater port and thus does not support freight shipments. The
                       Seminole Gulf Railway is the only railway service provider for the
                       Southwest Florida Region.

                       The rail line runs within a couple of miles of the Punta Gorda airport
                       and passes under I-75 and US 17 prior to running parallel to US 41
                       through the southern extent of the City of Punta Gorda. Seminole
                       Gulf Railway is a short-line railway operator that connects to the
                       national railway network via CSX tracks in Arcadia, Florida located
                       approximately 25 miles northeast of the City. Map 11 delineates the
                       extensive freight network in the Punta Gorda Area.

MAP 11 - FREIGHT MAP   Designation of a TCEA and implementation of a comprehensive
                       mobility plan will increase the need for collaboration between freight



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transporters and the City’s planning and transportation staff.
Balancing pedestrian/bicycle safety and freight movements, finding
ways to maximize the utilization of non-truck freight movement, and
increasing   public   investment    in   these   alternative   modes   of
transportation will be prime areas of future collaboration and
planning.

Bicycle
Following national trends, the City has seen interest in bicycling
grow in recent years. Due to this growing interest and as a strategic
decision to enhance Punta Gorda’s standing as a boating destination
of choice, the City is investing heavily in bicycle supportive
infrastructure and programs.       Through the Ring Around the City
project, the City intends to connect all major neighborhoods to each
other and to all activity centers. The Ring Around the City will serve
as the arterial system for a fully integrated bicycle/pedestrian
transportation network.    In recognition of this effort, the City of
Punta Gorda received Honorable Mention from the League of
American Bicyclists on City’s 2010 application for Bicycle Friendly
Community. On the programmatic front, the grassroots community
group TEAM Punta Gorda partnered with the City of Punta Gorda and
the local business community to implement the first bicycle loaner
                                                                            MAP 12 – BICYCLE ROUTE MAP
program in the State of Florida.     The program allows tourists and
residents to borrow bicycles from three locations within the CRA and
                          return them during daylight hours.            The program primarily serves
                          leisure travelers; however, it does reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT)
                          and increases the awareness of alternate modes of travel within the
                          City. Designation of a TCEA and implementation of a comprehensive
                          mobility plan will generate pressure to maintain existing bicycle
                          facilities and provide public investment to expand the bicycle
                          transportation network and increase safety measures.                    Map 12
                          identifies the existing and future bike routes available for the City’s
                          residents and tourists.

                          Pedestrian
                          With Punta Gorda’s continued emphasis on quality urban design and
                          compact and contiguous development, the City will seek to increase
                          pedestrian activity through development of pedestrian corridors and
                          connections,     as   shown   on    Map      13.   The     City   currently   has
                          representation    on    the   MPO’s     Bicycle    and    Pedestrian    Advisory
                          Committee and continues to prioritize funding for sidewalk facilities
                          and search for grant opportunities to enhance existing sidewalks with
                          landscaping, lighting and street furniture. The City would like to take
                          additional   steps    including    traffic   calming     and   other   innovative
                          techniques to increase pedestrian safety in the CRA, particularly
                          crossing the US 41 and US 17 one way pairs. Designation of a TCEA
                          and implementation of a comprehensive mobility plan will increase the
MAP 13 – PEDESTRIAN MAP
                          need for collaboration between the MPO, FDOT, other stakeholders and




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                               the City’s planning and transportation staff regarding public investment,
                               increased use of alternative modes of transportation and increased need
                               for pedestrian safety.

                               Neighborhood Electric Vehicles
                               Also known as Low Speed Vehicles, Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEVs)
                               have four wheels, a top speed of no more than 25 miles per hour and a
                               gross vehicle weight rating of less than 3,000 pounds.          While these
                               vehicles are seldom observed in Punta Gorda, the street network and
                               speed limit of most streets present an almost ideal environment for the
                               operation of these vehicles. Widespread adoption of these vehicles could
                               provide a local, short trip alternative to the private automobile, enhance
                               tourism and provide much notoriety for the City. The City may consider
                               future ordinances which align speed requirements of transportation
                               facilities in the CRA and other areas as appropriate with NEV requirements.
                               Designation of a TCEA and implementation of a comprehensive mobility
                               plan will increase the need for collaboration between the MPO, FDOT and
                               other stakeholders and the City’s planning and transportation staff
                               regarding public investment and safety concerns related to NEVs. Map 14
                               identifies the potential NEV routes available within the City boundaries.




MAP 14 – POTENTIAL NEV’S MAP
Transit
Neither the City nor Charlotte County currently has a fixed
route transit system.   As detailed on Map 15, Charlotte
County’s initial fixed route transit service proposal, the
County recently considered the following routes and stops
for future service within both the City and the County.

While Charlotte County’s initial plan does not include
service to either Fisherman’s Village or the Punta Gorda
Airport, these two areas are significant hubs of activity for
Punta Gorda visitors and residents. Fisherman’s Village is
a tourist area with a number of retail shops and eateries.
The Airport experiences significant variations in surface
transportation volumes which correspond to flight arrivals
and departures.    These areas, along with other activity
centers within Punta Gorda, should be considered as
stops on a fixed route transit system or as stops on a
local circulator system as transit services in Charlotte              MAP 15 – PROPOSED CHARLOTTE COUNTY FIXED ROUTE TRANSIT (2009)

County and Punta Gorda are developed.         The City has
taken steps to identify major activity centers. The initial
activity centers identified are the downtown, the medical district, Fishermen’s Village within the CRA, and the airport located just
outside the current City Limits. Further refinement of nodes with appropriate land use mixes will establish priority areas for the
establishment of a more interconnected transportation network including the location of future transit service.                The refined
inventory of activity centers will allow the City to examine which nodes currently support the park once strategy and those that




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need land use modifications to support the strategy.
Identified nodes should be examined for connectivity
with other nodes, land uses and circulation within the
node itself. Designation of a TCEA and implementation
of a comprehensive mobility plan will increase the need
for collaboration between Charlotte County, a future
transit agency, the MPO and the City’s s planning and
transportation    staff    regarding     public    investment,
service routes, service headways and increased need for
pedestrian safety.

“Ring Around the City”
The City is also working to promote connecting the
waterfront   to   the     other   land   uses     and   surface
transportation options within the City.           The City has
created a multi-modal path known as the “Ring Around
the City”, Map 16. This pathway system, shown below,                             MAP 16 – RING AROUND THE CITY MAP
will serve as the “arterial” spine for a feeder system of
bicycle and pedestrian facilities that will ultimately
connect all the neighborhoods of the City to each other and to the primary activity centers.

Air
The Punta Gorda Airport has made amazing strides since 2008.          The airport currently has two regularly scheduled service
carriers: Allegiant Air and Direct Air. Allegiant Air connects Punta Gorda to five regional airports: Knoxville, TN, Greenville –
Spartanburg, SC, Lexington, KY, Greensboro, NC, and Grand Rapids, MI.         Direct Air connects Punta Gorda to eight regional
airports: Kalamazoo, MI, Niagara Falls, NY, Worcester, MA, Toledo,
OH, Allentown, PA, Plattsburg, NY, Rockford, IL, and Springfield –
Central, IL.   The airport also offers general aviation services
including flight training and hangar storage for personal aircraft.
The airport is collocated with an industrial park and thus is well
positioned to serve industrial park tenants’ business travel needs
and high value freight needs.    It should be noted that the Punta
Gorda Airport is outside of the municipal boundaries of the City of
                                                                                        BAILEY TERMINAL - PUNTA GORDA
Punta Gorda; however it is within the City’s Utility Service Area and
the Annexation Study Area defined in the Comprehensive Plan.
Designation of a TCEA and implementation of a comprehensive mobility plan will increase the need to provide improved
connectivity to the airport through the use of alternative modes of transportation.


Include Provisions for Fixture Fixed Route or Circulatory Transit
The basis of a financially feasible transit system is appropriate land use densities and intensities. The City has worked diligently
to be transit ready and continues to encourage transit supportive land uses with a connected multi-modal transportation network
(as illustrated by the “Ring Around the City”). The existence of transit supportive land uses and bicycle/pedestrian networks will
contribute to and guide system planning, timing, and development.         However, factors beyond the control of the City affect
availability of transit service within the City and surrounding communities.

Punta Gorda has worked closely with and continues to work closely with Charlotte County and the Charlotte County-Punta Gorda
Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in planning for transit options which connect points within the City to destinations in
the broader region. Charlotte County does not currently provide fixed route transit and has deferred implementation that had
been planned according to the MPO’s adopted Transit Development Plan in recent years.            The City currently does not have




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sufficient resources to develop such a system on its own. Instead, the City receives service through the Charlotte County Dial-a-
Ride system.   In recent months, Charlotte County has considered fixed route transit for select locations within the County
including locations within the City of Punta Gorda. County Staff confirmed that the issue of fixed route transit will be considered
again by the Charlotte County Board of County Commissioners in 2011.           Map 17 presents potential transit routes and stops
contemplated by the MPO long range transportation plan.

While lack of a fixed route transit system can limit modal choice, the City’s planning activities have created a supportive
environment for future transit services. The
City will continue to revise Comprehensive
Plan policies to explicitly encourage transit
supportive development. Much of the urban
design and infrastructure that facilitates a
cost effective, efficient transit system also
supports    walkability,    bikeability   and
liveability within a community. Punta Gorda
continues to support compact urban design
that mixes land uses and enhances the
pedestrian experience. Public facilities such
as bikeways and pedestrian ways are a
primary      focus     of       transportation
improvements within the City.

Even with the establishment of fixed route
transit at the County level, modal choice may            MAP 17 – CHARLOTTE COUNT-PUNTA GORDA MPO LONG RANGE TRANSPORTATION PLAN

need to be supplemented within or between                                           TRANSIT NEEDS MAP
the major activity nodes in the City with a circulator transit program. The City has had some success with a seasonal privately
run trolley. This service is for hire and typically runs during the cooler winter months when the population of Southwest Florida
swells with seasonal visitors. The City has already expressed interest in developing a viable circulator transit program based on
the long term goal of providing increased connectivity with the CRA. A circulator transit program could provide another modal
choice for residents and visitors and support the overall mobility and livability of the community.


Analysis of Logical Extents of a Transportation Concurrency Exemption Area
Transportation Concurrency Exception Areas (TCEAs) are carefully defined geographic areas that promote infill, adaptive reuse
and redevelopment activities. These areas are typically established where appropriate transportation infrastructure already exists
and where travelers can reasonably use a variety of travel modes. TCEAs, by virtue of their existing infrastructure, may provide
an incentive to developers.   The establishment of a TCEA can incentivize compact and contiguous development discouraging
suburban sprawl and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector.

This choice was significantly influenced by the Florida Legislature’s passage of Senate Bill 360 (SB 360) in 2009.       This bill
allowed areas identified as Dense Urban Land Areas (DULAs), which were defined as having more than 1,000 persons to the
square mile, to delineate TCEAs through establishing and implementing mobility plans.         Punta Gorda qualifies as a DULA.   It
should be noted that a challenge to SB 360 is currently underway in the courts. However, the City recognizes the creation of a
TCEA and its prerequisite Mobility Plan will support the City’s established Transportation and Future Land Use Goals.

The establishment of a TCEA is a viable tool the City could use to address some of the statutory requirements introduced into law
by House Bill 697 (HB 697). HB 697, which was passed in 2008, requires comprehensive plans to address energy efficiency in
land use and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector.

Given the City’s compact size, a viable TCEA may include portions of the unincorporated County. In order to maximize the value
of any proposed TCEA special consideration should be given to unincorporated areas to determine if existing or emerging activity




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centers exist which have a high degree of trip ends from the City of Punta Gorda.               This analysis may recommend
intergovernmental coordination of the proposed TCEA.

Analysis of existing & committed multi-modal transportation network
The first step in conducting the analysis of the existing and committed multi-modal transportation network is inventorying
activity centers and determining whether or not these locations are transit supportive.    The City will utilize previous reports
generated by the MPO and Charlotte County regarding this data collection.       After these locations have been identified, the
transportation network should be overlaid on a map of the City that identifies the activity centers. Because the City is entirely
surrounded by Charlotte County, consideration should be given to activity centers located in the County which are of significant
magnitude and proximate to transportation facilities which connect to the City within the average commute time as defined by
the US Census Bureau.

This will provide important background data and a better understanding of connectivity and distance separating activity centers
and land uses.   Areas determined to have sufficient magnitude (densities and intensities), an appropriate mix of land uses,
transportation network connectivity, and transportation infrastructure which supports modal choice will be considered for future
designation as a Transportation Concurrency Exception Area. This exercise should be performed in conjunction with the update
of the Five-Year Alternative Transportation Capital Improvement Program.

Study Existing development pattern & coordinate with FLU
As a part of the last round of comprehensive plan amendments, the City of Punta Gorda determined maximum commercial
intensity levels through the establishment of floor area ratio (FAR) for every mixed use and nonresidential Future Land Use
category. Baseline data is essential in establishing a benchmark from which to measure future advancement toward established
goals.   Further analysis of the City’s existing land uses will refine base densities and intensities that are minimally transit
supportive. Analysis of the City’s existing land uses may lead to land use revisions or new ideas about better connecting land
uses.
Land use connectivity goals should also be established. The City will seek to increase the connectivity of parcels with adjacent
parcels where appropriate. The City shall also seek to strengthen connections between neighborhood goods and services and
proximate residential land uses. Connectivity goals will provide guidance for new development and redevelopment activities and
further solidify the City’s desire to promote modal choice through a high degree of connectivity between nonresidential and
residential land uses (jobs and housing).

Connectivity should consider specific measures of transportation infrastructure by mode including lane miles of roadways, linear
feet of sidewalks, linear feet of bikeways, width of travel ways, intersection spacing, number of intersections per square mile,
future fixed route transit routes and transfer facilities and rail lines and terminals.       Operational characteristics of the
transportation infrastructure should also be analyzed including volumes and level of service standards. The City will continue to
encourage an appropriate mix of residential and nonresidential land uses which support transportation investment decisions.

Coordinate w/Charlotte County in the definition of the Transportation Concurrency Area boundary.
To establish a TCEA, the logical geographic boundaries must be determined.            As stated previously, TCEAs are typically
established where appropriate transportation infrastructure already exists and where travelers can reasonably use a variety of
travel modes. Modal and/or transportation network connectivity, land use densities and intensities and proximity of residential
and nonresidential land uses may also be considered in the establishment of a TCEA’s logical geographic boundaries. It may be
helpful to establish zones within the TCEA based upon activity centers, nodes, CRAs, major employment centers, large shopping
districts and/or major transportation terminals or hubs.    This will serve to align TCEA implementation with goals related to
economic development, affordable housing, energy efficiency, sustainability and livability.

Due to the relatively small land area of the City it is possible that this analysis will recommend a TCEA boundary that would
include portions of unincorporated Charlotte County and properties controlled by the Airport Authority.       In this case close
coordination with both of these entities through the Charlotte County-Punta Gorda MPO or some other appropriate venue will be
required for successful implementation. Close coordination amongst stakeholders may be required for decisions related to the



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following:   land use planning, transportation planning including fixed route transit planning and waterborne transportation
planning, corridor preservation, the Punta Gorda Airport, multi-modal transfer facilities, rail and freight planning, future
annexation areas, the Charlotte Harbor CRA, and the proposed Medical District CRA located in Charlotte County.


Analysis of the Energy Efficiency Alternatives
During the 2008 legislative session, the Florida Legislature passed HB 697. A part of HB 697 addressed the need to consider
energy uses and greenhouse gas emissions resulting from land development decisions.           This new addition to the statutes
requires the City to introduce new language related to energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions in the Future Land Use,
Conservation, Housing, and Transportation Elements of the Comprehensive Plan.

The City may be able to address this new requirement through the strengthening of existing policies which support compact,
contiguous development with appropriate densities and intensities that incorporate a high degree of connectivity. Strengthened
policies will provide support for City’s goal of establishing a TCEA.   The establishment of a TCEA further supports HB 697’s
requirement to address energy efficiency by the creation of a geographic area within the City that will encourage multi-modal
transportation.   The creation of a mobility plan will provide the guidelines for implementing the TCEA and measurement
techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Together the TCEA and mobility plan address the statutory requirement
to “incorporate transportation strategies to address reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector.”


Proximity of Daily Needs and Workplaces to Residential
An analysis of the proximity of daily needs and major employers to residential developments will be a major component of the
Mobility Plan. The City recognizes the impact scattered low density residential developments have on energy consumption and
the ability of the City to provide services efficiently and economically. Once the analysis of the proximity of daily needs and
workplaces to residential has been completed as a part of the Mobility Plan, the City can take appropriate steps to strengthen
policies which encourage the development of proximate land uses and discourage energy intensive low density residential
developments. Coordinated land use and transportation decisions that promote compact vertically and/or horizontally mixed
use development reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT) thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions. To encourage coordinated
decisions which prioritize land use decisions that reduce VMT and are consistent with the intent of the HB 697 legislation, the
City will analyze geographic areas to determine the logical extents of a Transportation Concurrency Exception Area (TCEA),
eventual designation of a TCEA, and the development of the TCEA implementing tool, the mobility plan.


Study Optimal Commercial Intensity/Residential Densities that are Walkable, Bicycle Friendly, and Transit
Supportive
This effort will address requirements of HB 697 including the discouragement of suburban sprawl through energy efficient land
use patterns. These land use patterns will be energy efficient primarily due to residential and non-residential land uses being
located in close proximity to one another and benefitting from excellent multi-modal connectivity.

The City evaluated nonresidential intensities during their last update to the Comprehensive Plan. Moving forward, it is necessary
to evaluate the City’s residential densities in terms of scale and proximity to existing intensities in the built environment and
commercial intensity maximums established in the Future Land Use Element. As identified in the review of the Future Land Use
Element, the successful implementation of a TCEA strategy will require establishing greater residential densities more consistent
with those of a less auto-centric city. The City continues to support densities which will encourage walking and bicycling. These
enhanced densities support place making and provide sufficient magnitude to support transit/circulator services through
pedestrian trip generation. Once comparisons have been made, the City can further refine existing strategies which foster the
continued transition from existing densities to densities and intensities which are more supportive of modal choice.




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Sustainable Food Production
The City of Punta Gorda recognizes a citizen driven
desire for local food. Three farmer’s markets operating
on three separate market days have been established in
the past 3 years.      Despite the fact that Florida’s
agricultural industry represents a close to 7 billion
dollars (2006) annually of the State’s economy second
only to tourism, there are a small number of locally
produced   products    available.      Across     the   State
agricultural and rural lands have been under intense
pressure   from   suburban    sprawl   and      international
competition. Fallow fields and abandoned citrus groves
are found throughout Southwest Florida including areas
immediately outside the current City Limits. These areas
represent a tremendous opportunity to reduce our
regional greenhouse gas emissions by balancing the
                                                                     MAP 18 – EXISTING CHARLOTTE COUNTY ARGICULTURE ZONING MAP
local economy with agricultural jobs by incentivizing
local food production. Once upon a time in Florida citrus
and truck farms supplied the coastal population centers with all the fresh produce while cattle and poultry supplemented seafood
as the primary protein source for the population. The land for agriculture is largely intact in South Charlotte County. Unlike our
regional neighbors this land has not as yet been planted with the final crop of tract homes and strip malls. These lands therefore
represent an economic opportunity in the long term for a regionally significant local food production reserve area in South
Charlotte County as shown on Map 18.          The challenge is to find
ways to discourage suburban sprawl in the short term and provide
viable incentives for the productive use of these lands.


Develop Future Land Use Category Suitable for Local
Food Production
City Punta Gorda has not had an Agricultural Future Land Use
Category as evidenced by Map 19. This has been appropriate as the
City is primarily focused on infill and redevelopment to maximize
the utilization of existing infrastructure.    However, over the past
few years there has been a growing interest in local food and local
food production at the national level.        This national interest is
evident in the City of Punta Gorda by the success of the three
Farmers Markets that operate in the City and the growing interest in
community gardening.      The development of a Future Land Use
Category suitable for local food production will provide greater
flexibility for the City to meet citizen needs, as well as a method for
preserving adjacent rural lands from suburban sprawl. In order to
craft an effective new land use category the City needs to analyze
the existing future land uses within the City and the surrounding
South Charlotte County area.      Additionally, the City will explore
policies to support the creation of community gardens within the
City.                                                                     MAP 19 – FUTURE LAND USE MAP




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Support Creation of Community Gardens
In the past few years a number of organizations have approached the City about
the creation of community gardens. The most recent effort has been spearheaded
by the grassroots community group TEAM Punta Gorda.            TEAM Punta Gorda
performed an exhaustive search for a suitable location within the City for available
land for a community garden.      In the end TEAM Punta Gorda partnered with
Charlotte County Community Services Department at South County Regional Park
for the location for the first community garden, literally right across the street
from the City Limits. The City needs to explore its existing Comprehensive Plan,
Land Development Regulations, and other regulations to ensure that there are no
regulatory impediments to the future creation of community gardens. Additionally            WEEKEND FARMER'S MARKET IN DOWNTOWN

the City will explore policies that support or incentivize local food production in
general and community gardens in particular.


Study existing and potential food production areas in all of South Charlotte County
While the interest in local food production may be strong, opportunities to produce food within the existing City Limits may be
quite limited. As evidenced by the recent TEAM Punta Gorda experience with creating the first community garden, finding land
that is available and suitable for food production is quite challenging within the City Limits. There are large areas just outside
the current City Limits of undeveloped land that may be suitable for local food production. The City will study existing food
production areas in South Charlotte County. This data will provide the basis for identifying additional lands that may be suitable
for local food production.   The end result should be a map which will provide an additional layer of information for the
community serving potential of future annexations.
Analyze Climate Adaptation/Sea Level Rise Strategies
Climate change is caused by the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the lower atmosphere. The global concentration of these
gases is increasing, in large part due to human activities, such as the combustion of fossil fuels (which release carbon dioxide)
and deforestation (because forests remove carbon from the atmosphere). The atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide, the
main greenhouse gas, has increased by 30 percent since preindustrial times. Greater energy efficiency and new technologies may
hold the answer to reducing greenhouse gases and mitigating effects of this global challenge.


Many scientists estimate that global mean surface temperature will continue to rise by 2100. The actual amount of increase,
however, is dependent on the modeling used. In the 2009 Comprehensive Southwest Florida/Charlotte Harbor Climate Change
Vulnerability Assessment, Technical Report 09-3 focuses on literature from Stanton and Ackerman (2007) which show a set of
future climate extremes. The first is a response by humans (Rapid stabilization case) to reduce greenhouse gases and the second
is a no response scenario (Business-as-usual case). Table 18 identifies the scenario changes.


Two Other Alternate Future Climate Scenarios for Florida
                                                                     2025          2050             2075            2100

Annual Average Temperature (in degrees Fahrenheit above year 2000 temperature)

Rapid Stabilization Case                                              0.6           1.1             1.7              2.2

Business-as-Usual Case                                                2.4           4.9             7.3              9.7

Sea Level Rise in Florida (in inches above year 2000 elevation)

Rapid Stabilization Case                                              1.8           3.5             5.3              7.1

Business-as-Usual Case                                               11.3           22.6             34             45.3
TABLE 18 – SOURCE: STANTON & ACKERMAN 2007 TABLES ES-2




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                                                          Also reviewed in the 2009 Comprehensive Southwest Florida/Charlotte
                                                          Harbor Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment were with projections of
                                                          the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), an organization
                                                          established by the United Nations Environment Program and the United
                                                          Nation’s World Meteorological Organization.        Because the scenario’s
                                                          presented in the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report (2007) exclude some of
                                                          the key facts, “feedback mechanisms that could accelerate the melting of
                                                          the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets”, these projections are thought to
                                                          be conservative.   The same report states that with “Large changes in
      TIDAL FLAP ON STORMDRAIN PITFALL IN A TIDAL CANAL
                                                          precipitation, both increases and decreases are forecast, largely in the
                                                          tropics. Climate change is very likely to affect the frequency and intensity
of weather events, such as storms and floods, around the world. Climate change will also cause sea level rise due to the thermal
expansion of the oceans and the melting of the mountain glaciers and other land based ice masses. Global mean sea level is
anticipated to rise by 6 inches (15 centimeters) to 3 feet (95 centimeters) by 2100. Sea level rise will increase vulnerability to
coastal flooding and storm surges. The faster the climate change the greater the risk of damage to the environment. Climatic
zones (and thus ecosystems and agricultural zones) could shift toward the poles by 150 to 550 kilometers by 2100. Many
ecosystems may decline or fragment and individual species may become extinct. The IPCC Second Assessment, 2007, report
concludes that climate change has probably already begun.”

Regardless of the forecasts, the fact remains that Southwest Florida is one of the most vulnerable areas in the world to the
consequences of climate change especially sea level rise and increased tropical storm activity and severity. Some degree of future
climate change will occur regardless of future greenhouse gas emissions.            Adapting to or coping with climate change will
therefore become necessary in certain regions and for certain socioeconomic and environmental systems. The need for
adaptation may be increased by growing populations in areas vulnerable to extreme events. However, according to the IPCC,
“adaptation alone is not expected to cope with all the projected effects of
climate change, and especially not over the long term as most impacts
increase in magnitude.”

The City, consisting of approximately thirty (30) square miles of land and
water, is surrounded by Charlotte Harbor and the Peace River to the
north and northwest. Its’ western boundary is protected by the Charlotte
Harbor State Buffer Preserves.      South and east the City abuts the
Charlotte County South Planning District which consists of a variety of
land uses. Flat with natural elevations between 4 and 10 feet above sea
level, the City is subject to periodic flooding which can result from
tropical storm events, and from prolonged periods of heavy rains. This
low elevation and proximity to the Charlotte Harbor make the City
vulnerable to sea level rise. Given these conditions particular attention is
necessary in managing the City’s coastal attributes.
                                                                                                 CITY OF PUNTA GORDA

Realizing the potential impacts from high tides and heavy rainfall events,
the City began planning for climate adaptation changes and sea level rise during the last EAR based amendment cycle. To begin
proactively planning for potential impacts of sea level rise and to enhance the City’s resiliency to tropical storm and other flood
events, the City adopted Comprehensive Plan language directly related to Sea Level Rise. Objective 2.4.2 of the Conservation and
Coastal Management Element of the City of Punta Gorda’s Comprehensive Plan 2025 states that the City “Address the impacts of
sea level rise, and seeks strategies to combat its effects on the shoreline of the City” Policy (2.4.2.1) requires that “The City will
work with the SWFRPC to determine potential sea level rise impacts on the Coastal Planning Area”. With the entire City within the
coastal planning area as defined by the state, a large portion of City’s existing infrastructure network of roads and bridges, water
lines, and sewer lines occur within the Coastal High Hazard Area (CHHA).              This is consistent with the City’s historical



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development      and   platting   patterns   which   tended   to   locate
communities near the coastline and major surface water bodies (a
practice in common throughout history of human habitation in
Florida.)   Because of this, most of the City’s other forms of critical
infrastructure facilities such as schools, fire stations, libraries,
government buildings, and hospitals, also occur in this area.

Maps 20, 21, & 22 illustrate the location of such infrastructure
relative to the hurricane vulnerability zones established by the
Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council.         Since there are no
options for the City to relocate these infrastructure elements, the
City remains committed to improving and maintaining the level of
service and implementing the best building, management and
technological principles when improvements are required to mitigate
vulnerability.




                                                                            MAP 20 – PORTABLE WATER INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE CHHA MAP
MAP 22 – ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE CHHA MAP   MAP 21 – SANITARY SEWER IN THE CHHA MAP




                                                                                         139
City of Punta Gorda Adaptation Plan
Adoption of a comprehensive plan policy (2.4.2.1) which requires “The City will work with the SWFRPC to determine potential sea
level rise impacts on the Coastal Planning Area”, enabled the City to partner with the Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program
(CHNEP) and the Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council (SWFRPC) on a Climate Adaptation Plan specific to Punta Gorda.
CHNEP is one of six National Estuary Programs selected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the Climate Ready
Estuaries program. This program focuses on “how changes to the climate could impact local environment and what adaptations
are available to minimize or avoid negative effects of these climatological changes.”      The grant received by the CHNEP was
specific to a Vulnerability Assessment and an Adaptation Plan. Both are explained below.


Vulnerability:
The Vulnerability Assessment, completed in 2009, examined current climate and ongoing climate change for the Charlotte
Harbor region. Five future scenarios of climate change were studied for the area, which included the City of Punta Gorda. The
scenarios ranged from no action taken to address climate change to
mitigation options utilized to reduce the human influence on climate change
(Stanton and Ackerman 2007) and a 5%, 50% and 90% probable future
predicted by the IPCC.   This report assessed potential climate changes and
their effects of those changes on things such as sea level, hydrology, land use
changes, infrastructure and the economy.


Adaptation:
After the Vulnerability Assessment was completed for the Charlotte Harbor
Region, CHNEP had to identify a partner to develop a specific Adaptation Plan.
With an adopted policy in place to examine the potential risks of sea level
rise, the City of Punta Gorda became the natural partner for CHNEP and the
Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council (SWFRPC).      On December 17, 2008, the Punta
Gorda City Council voted unanimously to participate in this project.       The CHNEP Staff
conducted three (3) workshops to establish a community dialog about adaptation to the
climate change scenarios. The workshops consisted of brief presentations and a series of
interactive public participation games designed by CHNEP to draw out citizen input in an
effort to derive vulnerabilities, adaptation options, and priorities specific to the citizens
concerns and needs.     The top vulnerability results from the participants are listed below.
These are the areas the CHNEP and SWFRPC focused on resulting in the City of Punta Gorda
Adaptation Plan.


         Seagrass protection and restoration;
         Xeriscaping/native plant landscaping;
         Comprehensive plan to show which areas will retain natural shorelines;                         CITY OF PUNTA GORDA
         Constrain locations for certain high risk infrastructure;                                  CLIMATE ADAPTATIONPLAN

         Restrict fertilizer use;
         Promote green building alternatives through education, taxing incentives, green lending; and
         Drought preparedness planning.


As described in the completed document, climate change may include changes, which may include more drought, less availability
of potable water, sea level rise, shorter winter seasons, higher humidity, higher maximum temperatures, more hot days and heat
waves, and increased precipitation including heavy and extreme precipitation events, and increased tropical cyclonic storm
frequency and intensity, all of which may have an effect on the City.

It is important to re-iterate, although the science involved in climate change is still evolving, proactive adaptation planning
represents the conservative approach to mitigate the potential effects of climate change. The City’s adaptation planning can




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include preventative measures that allow the City to do its part to slow the progression of and to proactively pursue mitigation
measures to reduce the local effects of climate change.    The Plan underwent public, City staff, and City Council member review
and was accepted by Council on November 18, 2009.


Review & Evaluate the Recommended Adaptation Strategies with Regard to HB697
The Florida Legislature enacted House Bill 697 (HB697) in the 2008 session. HB697 established new local planning requirements
relating to energy efficient land use patterns, transportation strategies to address greenhouse gas reductions, energy
conservation, and energy efficient housing. These new requirements became effective on July 1, 2008. Local governments need
to address the connection among land use, transportation, energy, and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions; however,
with ongoing delays in the adoption of changes to 9-J5 Florida Administrative Code, there is no clear guidance as to how local
governments are expected to comply with the legislation at this time. Although specific requirements for implementation have
not been developed by the state, the City’s current planning efforts already include encouraging more compact development,
creating multimodal transportation opportunities, encouraging less dependence on the use of the automobile, and promoting
transit supportive development patterns. In addition the City already encourages management and conservation of natural
resources in their continuing efforts to promote a walkable and long-term sustainable community, which efficiently uses its
natural resources. The existing Comprehensive Plan contains many policies promoting and requiring the City to implement
energy efficient directives.   As the requirements become more defined, the City will incorporate and address those that
specifically apply and are financially feasible to the City of Punta Gorda’s long-term sustainable growth.

Land Use
Through the updating of the Future Land Use Element, the City will be reviewing land use pattern with transportation strategies
to address greenhouse gas reductions in preparation of a Mobility Plan. Through the element policies, the City will continue to
promote compact development in close proximity to existing development, high density land uses to create pedestrian and
bicycle friendly environments. These higher densities, infill, redeveloped and mixed use walkable areas will be transit supportive.
As the Land Use strategies and policies increase the attractiveness of alternative modes of travel a decline in energy consumption
should be realized through a reduction in per capita vehicle miles traveled.

With the City’s location to Charlotte Harbor, development away from the water is challenging. A large percentage of the City lies
within Coastal High Hazard Area. With average natural elevations ranging between 4 and 8 feet above current sea level the City’s
must proactively plan for sea level rise.

Transportation
Through the updating of the Transportation Element, the City will be reviewing land use pattern and transportation strategies to
address greenhouse gas reductions in preparation of a Mobility Plan. Through the element policies, the City will continue to
promote compact development in close proximity to existing development, high density land uses encouraging pedestrian
friendly strategies, bicycle use and potential transit use by promoting higher
densities, transit oriented and development of mixed use and clustering of uses.
Through these strategies and policies a decline in energy consumption reduction of
vehicle miles travelled and its associated greenhouse emissions should occur.

The City is also exploring the use of Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEV’s) as an
alternative mode of transportation. NEVs have four wheels, a top speed of no more
than 25 miles per hour and a gross vehicle weight rating of less than 3,000 pounds.
While these vehicles are seldom observed in Punta Gorda, the street network and
speed limit of most streets present an almost ideal environment for the operation of
these vehicles.   Widespread adoption of these vehicles could provide a local, short
trip alternative to the private automobile, enhance tourism and provide much                        UTILITIES DEPARTMENT:
                                                                                                 NEV USED FOR METER READING
notoriety for the City.   The City may consider future ordinances which align speed
requirements of transportation facilities in the CRA and other areas as appropriate



                                                                                                                              143
with NEV requirements. Designation of a TCEA and implementation of a comprehensive mobility plan will increase the need for
collaboration between the MPO, FDOT and other stakeholders and the City’s planning and transportation staff regarding public
investment and safety concerns related to NEVs.

The City is utilizing centralized facilities to videoconference a number of their IT meetings as well as planning conferences when
available. The City also utilizes opportunities with the Charlotte County Building and Growth Management Departments when the
opportunities present themselves.   This method of conducting business through the use of improved technologies allows for
both residents and employees minimize travel and thereby reduce the total number of vehicle miles traveled.     This concept may
be utilized to develop planning strategies to reduce travel demand and shift travel demand to transportation modes that have the
lowest carbon output.

Energy Conservation
The City utilizes the Florida Building Code Standards and support the LEED Rating System and other similar systems that show
proven results in energy conservation compared to conventional methods and codes.

Energy Efficient Housing
The Housing Element provides a range of housing development opportunities throughout the City.             Increased densities in
appropriate locations within specific zoning designations decrease commuting time thereby decreasing greenhouse gas
emissions. As the City’s population increases, the need for private vehicle trips associated with job commute will be reduced.


Explore City's Future Directions Regarding Sea Level Rise, & Emission of Greenhouse Gases
The City is reviewing the sea level rise (SLR) data, associated impacts, and possible adaptation strategies prepared by Charlotte
Harbor National Estuary Preserve (CHNEP) and Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council (SWFRPC) in the City of Punta Gorda
Adaptation Plan. The next step is to develop the spatial and temporal context for sea-level rise adaptation planning in the City
based on the City’s relative vulnerability to SLR. This will then establish a “Vulnerability Area”. This area will be divided into
three (3) zones each identifying an appropriate set of strategies based on existing conditions and anticipated SLR impacts. These
zones will generally be defined as: protection, accommodation and managed relocation.

Protection
Protection refers to shoreline stabilizing of hardening techniques, such as seawalls and riprap that attempt to maintain a static
shoreline position. In a sea level rise (SLR)
scenario this may also include diking and/or
filling keep pace with SLR. Protection may be
financially feasible in the short-term for areas
with    highly     developed      infrastructure      and
extensive private development which would
carry prohibitively expensive relocation and/or
rebuild costs.

Accommodation
Accommodation considers a range of policy
tools that emphasize maintaining and adapting
components       of    the    built    environment     to
periodic and permanent inundation over time.
An     accommodation         policy    may    emphasize
retention    and      expansion       of   existing   and
potential floodways to manage flooding and to
facilitate coastal ecosystem migration through
                                                                     POTENTIAL ADAPTATION STRATEGIES FOR CITY REVIEW
and around the built environment.




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Managed Relocation
Managed Relocation reduces vulnerability in the built environment and preserves coastal ecosystems through changes in land use
and the orderly abandonment and/or landward relocation of structures and associated infrastructure. There are both advantages
and disadvantages with this goal. Advantages include promotion of ecosystem migration; minimization of threats to humans;
and long term financial sustainability. However, these recommendations may be politically problematic to implement; maybe
subject to legal challenges and may bring up relocation issues.         Under each of these any of the proposed actions could be
evaluated for cost and effectiveness in a matrix similar to Table 19.


In order to designate appropriate areas for each of the three strategy zones a “planning risk” must be identified. The planning
risk will be the anticipated Sea Level Rise for the 2110 planning horizon. Given the current science and the efforts of other
planning entities including the Charlotte County-Punta Gorda MPO a planning risk of 1 meter of SLR over a 100-year horizon
would be the most likely scenario. An assessment of the areas at risk from this level of SLR will need to be compared to existing
and committed public infrastructure and private investments in the built environment as well as to natural habitats that serve a
mitigating or otherwise beneficial function for the built environment. From this analysis the three major strategy categories will
be applied to defined geographies and the appropriate polices can be implemented within these areas. It is important to re-
iterate although the science involved in climate change is still evolving, proactive adaptation planning represents the conservative
approach to mitigate the potential effects of climate change.      These changes may have extreme adverse impacts on coastal
communities like Punta Gorda on a long term basis, and it is critical to monitor these changes over time.          Since the City’s
Comprehensive Plan is reviewed on a seven (7) year cycle, it would be reasonable to include a Climate Adaptation review within
the cycle.   The City will be utilizing the Vulnerability Assessment report settings resiliency goals, and developing plans that
integrate into existing hazard and comprehensive planning efforts.
 Adaptation Strategy Evaluation Example

 Punta Gorda                                          Protection          Accommodation            Managed Relocation
 Adaptation

 Natural Habitat Protections

 Seagrass protection and restoration                     Yes                    Yes                       Yes

 Mangrove Protection                                     No                     Yes                       Yes

 Wetlands protection                                    Maybe                   Yes                       Yes

 Water Conservation/ Drought Preparedness

 Xeriscaping/native plant landscaping                    Yes                    Yes                       No

 Infrastructure

 No new capital investment policy for public             N/A                    Yes                       Yes

 Build to defined SLR risk                               Yes                    Yes                      Maybe

 Remove and relocate public infrastructure               N/A                    N/A                       Yes
TABLE 19 – SOURCE: PUNTA GORDA ADAPTATION PLAN 2009


Declining Tax Revenues and Budget Cutbacks
No level of government has been immune from the effects of the current recession. Most of the effects of this recession are
stemming from markedly decreased revenues, leading to major budget shortfalls.    The Charlotte County Property Appraiser
reported that taxable property values decreased Citywide by 13% and in the Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) by 6.3% from
the previous year.




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New construction in the City slowed once again during 2009 compared to the previous two years - $55 million down from $168
million in 2007 and $115 million in 2008. The housing bust has had a severe impact on the City’s economy in ways that are
beyond the effect on property taxes. With less net migration into the City, a corresponding drop in sales of furniture, building
materials, etc. is causing a spillover effect into the broader economy and also with direct effects in the form of declining sales
tax revenues.

The City’s General Fund will be operating with approximately $1 million less in property tax revenues in the current fiscal year. A
decrease in taxable property values in the range of 10% next year will result in approximately $650,000 less revenues for FY
2011.


Other Identified Issues
As previously mentioned the City of Punta Gorda’s held public workshops to discuss changes to the Comprehensive Plan, in
addition to the major issues previously identified, the issues identified on Table 20 are not classified as “major issues” but are
concerns of our citizens and need to be addressed.



City of Punta Gorda Evaluation and Appraisal Report Identified Other Issues

Issue                        Source      Major Issue   Related Element & Comments

1) Water Supply Facilities   SWFWMD      No            Infrastructure Element: Update as necessary to continue to provide for
Planning                                               necessary public facilities & services correlated to the future land use
                                                       projections
   a) Look at run-off &      SWFWMD      No            Infrastructure Element: Currently being reviewed by the Utility Department
TDS w/Water Quality
     b) 18 Month WSP is          SWFWMD          No                Infrastructure Element: Review Draft data on Commercial Sheet data to see
expected after adoption of                                         what if any new strategies need to be in place over the next planning decade
the EAR
2)     Development     of    a   City   Staff,   Yes, locally      Citizens and staff believe this element will be an important component in
Historical Element               Citizen         this     is   a   preserving   and    protecting   historic,    archaeological   and   paleontological
                                 Concern         major             resources within the City.        Future Land Use Element: Ensure land use
                                                 issue.            designations and overlay districts are identified for historical preservation
                                                                   Recreation & Open Space Element:       Enhances the City's recreation facilities by
                                                                   incorporating it's historic districts & structures and the multi-use recreational
                                                                   trails into the overall park system. Housing Element: Maintain policies that
                                                                   continue to promote and protect the historic resources of the City
3) Annexation                    City Staff      Yes               Future   Land Use Element:       Ensure      land   use   designations   and   zoning
                                                                   designations are in place to support any annexation properties
4)   Analysis    &   Updates     City Staff      No                All Elements: Uncertainty of the availability of the decennial data may require
based on the 2010 Census                                           text amendment updates
Data
5) Divide the Conservation       City Staff      No                Conservation & Coastal Management Elements: Staff believes the division of
& Coastal Management                                               this element will allow for better implementation of the GOP's
6) Aging in Place                Charlotte       Yes, locally      Housing Element:     Given the economic forecast and the anticipated and the
                                 County,         this     is   a   anticipated aging of the City's population, attention needs to be directed
                                 City Staff      major             toward elderly housing.     Future Land Use Element: Review and develop if
                                                 issue.            necessary policies relating to aging in place strategies.            Transportation
                                                                   Element: Review & develop if necessary policies relating to aging in place
7) Inclusion of Legislative      City Staff      Yes               All Elements:      Review of all elements to ensure legislative changes are
Updates                                                            included in all policies
8) Correction of Scrivener       City Staff      No                All Elements: Review of all elements to correct spelling mistakes and other
Errors                                                             "Housekeeping” issues
TABLE 20 – SOURCE CITY OF PUNTA GORDA URBAN DESIGN 2010




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Water Supply Facilities Planning

Look at run-off & TDS w/ Water Quality
The City will need to seek additional water sources in an effort to meet the water quality standards for total dissolved solids
(TDS).   The elevated levels of dissolved solids in Shell Creek exceed secondary drinking water standards. The current treatment
process at Shell Creek WTP does not remove TDS, which results in finished water that does not meet the secondary standard
during some months of the year. Secondary standards are set for aesthetic water quality purposes only. A timetable for meeting
the regulatory standard is under review with the FDEP.

The City currently has a variance from FDEP to exceed the secondary TDS standard. Because the City’s existing surface water
treatment plant has sufficient capacity to meet the City’s water demand needs until 2018, the City has applied for an exemption
to the existing TDS variance. A timeline for a 5-year extension to the variance may be necessary if the groundwater treatment
plant is required for water quality purposes prior to 2016.

18 Month WSP is expected after adoption of the EAR
The Southwest Water Management District will be completing their Regional Water Supply Plan shortly after the City adopts their
Comprehensive Plan. The City will update its Water Supply Plan within 18 months of the latest approval of the Districts’ regional
plans.

Future Potable Water System Expansions
The City will continue to utilize its existing water supply source, Shell Creek, to meet most of its future potable water demands.
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) 2010 Draft Regional Water Supply Plan (RWSP) was developed to
assess projected water demand within its jurisdiction and potential sources of water to meet those demands through the 20-year
period. The RWSP provides a framework for future water management decisions and identifies potential options and associated
costs for developing those supplies. Based on the RWSP, available flow in Shell Creek is approximately 14.6 mgd in addition to
the City’s existing withdrawals. The existing Shell Creek Water Treatment Plant is permitted for 10 mgd, which will satisfy the
projected peak day demand of the City through approximately 2018.

The RWSP also identifies a need for a recovery strategy for Shell Creek since actual withdrawals are greater than proposed
Minimum Flow and Levels (MFL) during certain times of the year (typically during low flow conditions). The recovery strategy will
require the City to use an alternative water supply source conjunctively with the existing Shell Creek source in order to satisfy
City water demands while also complying with the MFL.

Look at run-off & TDS w/Water Quality
A new water source is also needed to enable the City to meet water quality standards for total dissolved solids (TDS). Shell Creek
experiences elevated levels of dissolved solids that exceed secondary drinking water standards. The current treatment process at
Shell Creek Water Treatment Plant does not remove TDS, which results in finished water that does not meet the secondary
standard during some months of the year. Secondary standards are set for aesthetic water quality purposes only; therefore,
exceeding this standard does not present a concern for health or well-being.

The City evaluated a number of future water supply sources in its most recent Water Supply Master Plan Update (2009). A
brackish groundwater plant with reverse osmosis treatment was selected as the City’s future alternative water supply source. This
project will allow the City to comply with proposed MFL regulations, satisfy future water demands, and meet TDS standards by
blending treated groundwater (low in TDS) with treated water from Shell Creek to provide a blended finished water product within
the TDS limit. This project is identified in SWFWMD’s 2010 Draft RWSP, which states that once the City’s brackish groundwater
supply is completed the “reduced TDS levels achieved by blending and potentially contribute to a recovery strategy for proposed
MFLs on Shell Creek.”

The City currently has a variance from Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) to exceed the secondary TDS
standard. Because the City’s existing surface water treatment plant has sufficient capacity to meet the City’s water demand needs
until 2018, the City plans to apply for an extension to the existing TDS variance, allowing them to delay the construction of a



                                                                                                                         151
brackish groundwater plant until needed to meet water demands and/or MFL rules. If the City is granted a 5-year extension, the
groundwater treatment plant would not be required for water quality purposes until 2016. The City has been given verbal FDEP
approval for the extension; therefore, this EAR provides a water system expansion schedule reflecting approval of the variance.

The City will also continue to maintain and expand its water distribution system infrastructure, mainly transmission pipelines, as
needed to meet future development needs, replace aging infrastructure, and increase reliability through looping and increased
diameter pipelines for additional capacity.

To increase the reliability of its water supply, the City is partnering with Charlotte County and the Peace River/Manasota Regional
Water Supply Authority (Authority) to create a “regional loop” between individual water utility facilities in Charlotte, Manatee,
Desoto, and Sarasota Counties. The Authority is an independent special district and a regional water supply authority under the
laws of the State of Florida. The Authority’s chief purpose is to provide water supply to the region and to develop, recover, and
supply water sources for municipalities and counties in a manner that will encourage water conservation and minimize adverse
environmental impacts. Several regional loop transmission pipelines are currently in preliminary design phases under
coordination by the Authority and the local utilities. These projects are being developed and managed under the direction of the
Authority and SWFWMD.


Development of a Historical Element
                      Under F.S.Chapter 163.3177 (7) (i) the Historical Element is identified as an optional element to the
                      Comprehensive Plan. The purpose of this element is to set out plans and programs for those structures or
                      lands in the area having historical, archeological, architectural scenic or similar significance.   Through the
                      Growth Management Act, historically significant properties and resources are required to be addressed by
                      the Future Land Use and Housing Elements. The new element would meet the requirements of these rules,
                      fulfill a desire of the citizens to set in place policies that will strengthen and enforce our historical
                      preservation efforts and preserve and protect historic and archaeological resources within the City. Historic
preservation enhances community pride and strengthens the partnership among the past present and future providing for orderly
growth in the life and appearance of the community.

Historical structures, sites monuments streets, areas, and neighborhoods serve as visible reminders of the history and cultural
heritage of the City, the State and the Nation.
The City of Punta Gorda possesses a number of
those    reminders,        mainly   in    the     form     of
structures.    The preservation of such structures
enhances community pride and strengthens the
partnership among the past present and future
while providing for the potential of economic
development through heritage tourism and the
general establishment of a since of place.

The City initiated efforts to protect significant
resources     in    1987    when    the    City    hired   a
consultant     to   prepare    a    historic      properties
survey. The survey identified and documented a
total   of    252    properties     in    the     downtown
commercial and residential areas. As a result of
that effort, a National Register District and two
local historic districts were created.

In an effort to preserve and enhance these
                                                                         MAP 23 – HISTORIC OVERLAY DISTRICT MAP
historic districts and properties, the City hired a




                                                                                                                      153
consultant to prepare the document City of Punta Gorda Historic District Design Guidelines.        This effort is part of a wider scope
which also included an update of the 1987 property survey to document all properties located within and around the existing
historic districts. During the 2002 – 2003 survey, over 100 properties were added to the list.

It is nearing 10 years since the last survey was completed.     As part of this Element, a policy to update the survey would be
necessary       as   a     basis     to     continue     our
preservation efforts.         Also, intergovernmental
coordination with Charlotte County regarding
historically    significant    areas       and   structures
within the Annexation Study Areas will also be
recommended.

Historical Overview
The City of Punta Gorda is the only incorporated
city   in      Charlotte    County,        and    currently
encompasses slightly more than 32 square miles
of land and water with approximately 17,500
residents.      Located on the south shore of the
Peace River, Punta Gorda platted as the Town of
Trabue in 1884 and incorporated in 1887 has a
rich history that dates back to Calusa habitation
over 400 years ago. The City is eager to
continue       encouraging     the        preservation    of
historical     and   architectural        resources      that
                                                                     MAP 24 – TRABUE WOODS HISTORIC OVERLAY DISTRICT MAP
provide a unique sense of place and a tangible link to its rich and colorful history (See Map 23).

Most of the significant architectural and historical resources of the City are concentrated in the 1884 Town of Trabue plat and
adjacent areas and generally encompassed by the current Community Redevelopment Area.                This area has three designated
historic districts the National Register Historic District located west of Tamiami Trail, the Downtown Commercial Historic District
encompassing the traditional commercial core of downtown, and the Trabue Woods Historic District, depicted on Map 24, is a
historically African-American neighborhood. The report entitled City of Punta Gorda Architectural Resources Survey 2002-2003
offers a brief overview of the City’s history, highlighting those events and figures that shaped the City into what it is today.

Currently there are a variety of groups working to maintain and celebrate Punta Gorda’s history and historic resources. The City
will be working with members from the Historical Preservation Advisory Board, the Punta Gorda Historical Society, Charlotte
County Historical Center Society, Main Street Punta Gorda, TEAM Punta Gorda, and Florida Gulf Coast University as well as
citizens in the development of this element.

Historical Preservation Advisory Board (HPAB)
The HPAB is an official Board of the City of Punta Gorda whose primary responsibility is to advise City Council on all matters of
historic significance to the City. One of the primary roles of the HPAB is to identify for the City Council historically significant
structures and sites that should be considered for designation as “Local Historic Landmark” or be nominated for listing on the
Florida Master File and the National Register of Historic Places.     In addition the Board promotes public awareness of historic
preservation and its community benefits.         The Board also carries the responsibility under the City’s Land Development
Regulations for recommendations to staff regarding certificates of appropriateness for any relocation of structure, demolition,
variance, or sign on any historic property.

Punta Gorda Historical Society
The Punta Gorda Historical Society has been working for over 20 years to educate the general public about Punta Gorda’s




                                                                                                                              155
history. Through the efforts of its members the Society has provided information on local history. Their past efforts have
included preserving historic building, authoring books, writing and directing plays and creating slide presentations. They also
regularly sponsor tours of the area historic buildings and the Punta Gorda Historic District.


In addition to its educational role the Punta Gorda Historic Society has engaged in numerous projects to maintain the
architectural and other tangible artifacts of Punta Gorda’s past. Some examples include:


      Re-bricking streets in the Historic Districts                         Preserving the Cigar Cottage
      Restoration of the Punta Gorda Train Depot                            Restoring the Trabue Land Sales Office
      Establishing the Punta Gorda History Park                             Raising Funds to build the Gilchrist Park Gazebo

Charlotte County Historical Center Society (CCHC Society)
The Charlotte County Historical Center Society is a local non-profit organization associated with the Charlotte County owned
Charlotte County Historical Center. The CCHC Society's purpose is (1) to further the historical and educational programs and
purposes of the Historical Center; (2) to raise and receive funds for the benefit of the Historical Center and its programs; (3) to
organize volunteers to meet the goals of CCHC Society; and (4) to promote and encourage public interest in and support for the
Historical Center and its programs. The CCHC was instrumental in bringing the Charlotte County Historic Advisory Committee
and the City Historic Preservation Advisory Board for a joint historical marker program within the City of Punta Gorda. These
historical markers add to the area’s heritage tourism amenities.

Main Street Punta Gorda
Main Street Punta Gorda is an entirely volunteer driven group that promotes, encourages, facilitates and enhances growth, vitality
and prosperity in downtown Punta Gorda while preserving its historic character to benefit the entire community.
TEAM Punta Gorda
TEAM Punta Gorda was created in 2004 in the wake of the devastation caused by Hurricane Charley. A grassroots entity, their
purpose is to: Bring together residents, business and property owners, and government officials to rebuild and revitalize greater
Punta Gorda.

Florida Gulf Coast University
Florida Gulf Coast University's Quality Enhancement Plan focuses on the development of ecological perspective, sense of place,
and community awareness and involvement.          To this end, students are encouraged to become involved in faculty-led service
projects of reciprocal benefit to both student and place.      A University satellite campus is located in the center of the city.
Students enrolled in credit courses on this campus have been involved for the past several years in projects that benefit our
community, including work with the Punta Gorda Historical Society and the Urban Planning Department. Their participation in
the development of an Historical Element to the City's Comprehensive Plan brings a fresh new perspective to the table, and an
opportunity for FGCU students to actively participate in planning their own future.

The Goal of developing a Historic Element is to highlight the importance of Punta Gorda’s rich and colorful history. This history
imbues Punta Gorda with a unique image within the context of Southwest Florida.         The City’s historic resources provide the
community with a tangible link to the past and represent an opportunity to enhance the economic sustainability through increase
heritage tourism. The Historic Element will enable the City to set specific goals, objectives, and policies to ensure that Punta
Gorda’s past is preserved as key to its future.




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Annexation
Typically land area changes because of annexation (increases the
City area and decreases the County area). Annexations can produce
alterations in anticipated development patterns. As identified in the
existing Plan, as the community matures and approaches build-out,
annexations will become increasingly more important to continue
economic viability.          In 2006 the City Council requested staff study
potential areas of annexation. The resulting study, Annexation Study
of 2006, identified fourteen (14) areas for annexation and defined
criteria to be used for consideration.

After reviewing the analysis of the study, City Council provided staff
with a direction for a strategy to pursue annexations based on an
established set of goals. It is anticipated that annexations will be an
ongoing effort of the City of Punta Gorda. Future growth and other
conditions will impact any specific actions.                   However, the overall
policy     is     to      examine      annexation      based    on      the    economic
opportunities presented by annexations.                   In accordance with the
2006 Annexation Area Study (Map 25), the City of Punta Gorda
actively pursues annexations in areas based on location within the
existing        Utility     Services     Area,   the     availability     of    existing
infrastructure, and the potential for development that is supportive
of the community vision.                                                                   MAP 25 – ANNEXATION STUDY AREA MAP
Analysis & Updates Based on the 2010 Census Data
Given the short time period which has elapsed since the City’s adoption of the 2025 Comprehensive Plan, no 2010 Census Data
is available for reliable analysis. When Census data for 2010 becomes available the City shall provide an analysis and update to
the Comprehensive Plan.


Divide the Conservation & Coastal Management
                  As part of the Evaluation and Appraisal Report process, staff found it necessary to divide the Conservation and
                  Coastal Management Element into two separate elements each focusing on particular goals and objectives.
                  The purpose of the Conservation and Coastal Management Element is to plan, promote and manage the
                  conservation and protection of the City’s natural resources.    This element addresses measures to protect
                  human life and limit public expenditures in areas that are subject to destruction by natural disaster, while
                  developing and promoting the City’s economic engine. Each element will better reflect the data and analysis
                  outlined in 9J-5. The elements will be separated as follows:

The Conservation Element will focus on:                            The Coastal Management Element will focus on
         Greenhouse gas emissions and pollution reduction                    Land use connection of the waterfront to our
         Native habitat and community protection measures                    downtown and CRA area & Future CRA Projects
         Wildlife corridor connections with the County                       Economic viability
         Land Acquisition                                                    Regional impacts on our water quality
         Groundwater protection                                              Residential Education Regarding Fertilizer Use
         Surface water protection                                            Public water access and facilities
         Residential Education Regarding Fertilizer Use                      Sea level rise impacts/coastal high hazard area
                                                                             planning
                                                                             Natural Disaster and Evacuation Planning



                                                                                                                        159
Staff plans to include the existing goals, objectives and policies within the specific elements as they relate the major focus of the
individual elements.   In addition, new goals, objectives and policies will be provided for new legislative requirements and
planning strategies (greenhouse gas emissions and sea level rise adaptation plans)


Aging in Place
The Journal of Housing for the Elderly states that aging in place does not have to move from one’s present residence in order to
secure necessary support services in response to changing needs. Historically, “Aging in Place” meant multiple level of services
provided within one central area, i.e., independent living facilities, assisted living facilities and nursing homes.      Today the
concept also includes decentralized provision of services to the elderly individual’s current residence.

Elderly persons are defined here as those persons sixty-two (62) years of age or older. Based on population projections by the
Shimberg Center, Table 21 shows the City’s elderly population will more than double between the years 2005 and the plan
horizon of 2025 to 9,790 elderly households. Financially, by 2025 the Shimberg Center projects that there will be approximately
4,416 of the City’s total elderly population will be low-income and 1,929 will be cost burdened. It is anticipated, that as the
elderly live longer, they will need special housing assistance to enable them to remain at home longer. The City of Punta Gorda
Housing Authority currently has a backlog/waiting list of elderly seeking housing assistance of 166 individuals and is currently
working towards securing federal funding to develop an “Aging in Place” complex at the corner of Airport Road and Cooper
Street. Based on the fact that the percentage of the elderly population in the City of Punta Gorda is expected to increase by
4,921households by 2025 and in unincorporated Charlotte County by 19,408, it can be assumed that there will be a need for
additional housing facilities for the elderly.   Partnerships between the City, County, Punta Gorda Housing Authority, medical
community and housing providers should be encouraged to ensure that any new facilities will be individually small in scale,
located within residential or mixed-use areas in close proximity to shopping and essential services, and have a residential
character.
Low-Income and Cost Burdened Elderly Households, 2005-2020

                                                                        Punta Gorda
                               Total Elderly Households                              Low-Income                                 Cost Burdened

      2005                                4,869                                          1,854                                        659

      2008                                5,545                                          2,150                                        767

      2013                                6,671                                          2,643                                        946

      2018                                7,798                                          3,137                                       1,126

      2020                                8,248                                          3,334                                       1,198

      2025                                9,790                                          4,416                                       1,929

                                                           Charlotte County (unincorporated)

                               Total Elderly Households                              Low-Income                                 Cost Burdened

      2005                               26,846                                         10,658                                       3,842

      2008                               28,745                                         11,272                                       4,082

      2013                               31,909                                         12,296                                       4,483

      2018                               35,074                                         13,320                                       4,883

      2020                               36,340                                         13,730                                       5,043

      2025                               46,254                                         20,740                                       9,396
TABLE 21 – SOURCES: SHIMBERG CENTER FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, URBAN DESIGN 2008, CHARLOTTE COUNTY, AND PMG ASSOCIATES, INC.


Unforeseen changes in circumstances [163.3191(2)(g)]
The City has not experienced any unforeseen circumstances that need to be addressed.




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EVALUATING SPECIAL TOPICS

Coordination of Land Use Planning and School Planning [163.3191(2)(k)]
The adoption of the Public Schools Facility Element formally linked the City, the County and the School Board in a structured
environment for the planning of school capacity based on changes to Future Land Use and other major development activities.
The three (3) entities actively engage through monthly meetings in coordinating proposed Future Land Use changes with school
planning. These meetings serve as a focused forum for tracking capacity and development trends in concert to anticipate
potential issues and opportunities ensuring that the result of development is stronger communities.


This EAR is to include the coordination of the comprehensive plan with existing public schools and those identified in the
applicable educational facilities plan adopted pursuant to s. 1013.35.    Pursuant to 163.3191(2)(k) F.S., the assessment must
address, where relevant, the success or failure of the coordination of the future land use map and associated planned residential
development with public schools and their capacities, as well as the joint decision-making processes engaged in by the local
government and the school board in regard to establishing appropriate population projections and the planning and sitting of
public school facilities. However, the timeframe associated with adopted element and the implementation of school concurrency
in 2009 is very short and no major residential development was proposed within the City during this period. At this time the City
continues to participate in regularly scheduled meetings with the County and the School Board regarding implementation of
concurrency.


Exemption From School Concurrency [163.3191(2)(k) and 163.31777(7)]
In accordance with Chapter 163.3191(2)(k), the City of Punta Gorda adopted a Public School Facilities Element and the City of
Punta Gorda is not exempt from school concurrency as identified Chapter 163.3177(12). Therefore, no assessment of such
exemption, as required by Chapter 163.31777(7), is necessary.
Implementation of the 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Work Plan [163.3191(2)(l)]
Recognizing the importance of an adequate water supply to Florida's future, the Legislature has established a process for water
supply planning through Florida's Growth Management Act (Chapter 163, Part II, Florida Statutes) and the Water Protection and
Sustainability Program (Chapter 373, Florida Statutes). Under this system, the state's five water management districts must
periodically evaluate whether adequate water supplies exist to meet the needs of their areas. The Southwest Florida Water
Management District will be completing their regional water supply plans for their basin, which includes the City, which will
identify how water supply needs may be met for the next 20 years.


The City’s 10-year Water Supply Plan, updated in 2009, ensures that adequate water supplies are available to meet future
demands through 2027. The City continues to put conservation programs and initiatives into practice and will update the 2009
Plan within 18 months of the completion of the SWFWMD Regional Plan.
Any changes in alternative water supplies, water reuse and conservation
programs will be incorporated into the City's comprehensive plan.

The City Utilities Department provides water and wastewater services to
approximately 35,800 and 26,000 residents, respectively, within the City’s
utility service area. The City initiates planning studies to assist in
developing the most reliable, cost-effective strategy for supplying potable
water and sewer service to its customers. Since its conception in 1965,
the City’s water utility has taken a proactive approach to water supply
planning, design, and construction.

The City considers conservation a beneficial method to reduce total water
                                                                                          WATER SUPPLY MASTER PLAN:
demand. Although the City currently meets the water demand goal of the                 PUNTA GORDA UTILITY SERVICE AREA




                                                                                                                          163
Southern Water Use Caution Area (SWUCA), additional conservation measures could further decrease potable demand. Previous
conservation efforts by the City have decreased from 145 gallons per capita per day (gcpd) in 1990 to 129, and113 gpcd in 2007
and 2009, respectively. These values do not include treatment losses or losses accrued in the Aquifer Storage Recovery (ASR)
system, in which water is treated, injected into the aquifer and not fully recovered.

State legislation mandates local governments ensure that public utilities are available at the time of new development. The City’s
concurrency management system, outlined in Chapter 26 of the City Code of Ordinances, ensures that the impact of new
development will not reduce the City’s utility services below the established levels of service. The Potable Water & Sanitary Sewer
Section contains a 10-year plan, which addresses future capital improvements necessary to meet the established level of service
(LOS) standards.

Senate Bills 360 and 444 and most recently House Bill 7203 contained significant modifications with regard to water supply. This
legislation further strengthened the statutory linkage between the regional water supply plans prepared by the water
management districts and the local government’s comprehensive plans. Under the new legislation, local governments subject to
a regional water supply plan must identify alternative water supply projects necessary to meet existing and future development
needs.

As a result of these legislative changes, five water supply rules have been adopted within the past three years that affect local
government    comprehensive     planning   programs.    These   requirements    relate   to   water   supply   concurrency,   ensuring
intergovernmental coordination with regional water supply authorities and that the local government's future land use plan
(Future Land Use Element and Future Land Use Map) is based upon the availability of adequate water supplies, and inclusion of
selected alternative water supply projects in the local comprehensive plan. Comprehensive plan evaluation and appraisal reports
(EARs) are required to include a review of progress made in implementing the alternative water supply projects selected by the
local government.
The City works with the jurisdictional agencies to provide the adopted level of service standards to its customers.    Levels of
service (LOS) standards are used to determine capacity needs necessary to meet existing and future development. The City’s
most recent Comprehensive Plan update evaluated historical data to determine average per capita factors needed to update the
City’s LOS value. One of the City’s policies as a result of that Comprehensive Plan update was to modify the City’s LOS standard
ordinance from which to base future development decisions. The updated LOS values were adopted into the City’s Code of
Ordinances, and the City is planning for facility expansions to meet projected future build-out conditions.

The City also initiates planning studies to assist in developing water system master planning based on the most reliable, cost-
effective strategy for supplying potable water to its customers. The City’s most recent efforts for water supply planning are
described below.

Water Supply Master Plan (WSMP) and Update (WSMPU)
In October 2006, the City completed a Water Supply Master Plan (WSMP), which addressed the potable water needs of the City
through the year 2050. The WSMP met the following objectives:

      Compiled water demand projections through 2050.
      Investigated and defined a proactive strategy for influencing the development of
      minimum      flows and levels (MFLs) for Shell Creek.
      Identified evaluation criteria for preliminary assessment of potential water supply
      projects and screened potential projects according to those criteria.
      Investigated the feasibility, advantages, and disadvantages of the most promising
      water supply projects based on sustainability, capital and lifecycle costs, and potential
      capacity.
      Provided planning scenarios for the City to meet projected future water demands
      through 2050, while considering both self-sufficient supply and regional issues.
      Prepared and submitted the City’s water use permit renewal application.




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The City completed an update to this Plan in 2009.       The WSMP Update (WSMPU) addresses changes in regional water supply
issues, grant funding opportunities, and proposed minimum flow level regulations. Because circumstances surrounding water
supply are continually changing, the City will continue to update the WSMPU in the future to maintain the most cost effective and
reliable approach for the City’s water supply.

Reuse Feasibility Study
The City completed a Reuse Feasibility Study in 2008 to investigate the feasibility of implementing a reuse system to deliver
reclaimed water for beneficial reuse as landscape irrigation. Due to the City’s coastal location most private irrigation wells are
prohibited, therefore most irrigation systems use a potable water source.     A reuse water system would help to optimize the
management of water resources by offsetting a portion of potable water demand, thereby increasing the sustainability of the
current potable water system.

Water System Master Plan
The City also completed a Water System Master Plan and hydraulic water distribution system model in 2008.            The project’s
primary goal was to provide hydraulic modeling analyses to determine pipeline infrastructure requirements for areas without
water service and to serve new development.        The Water System Master Plan also documented conditions to improve system
efficiency and eliminate hydraulic bottle necks.


The City’s overall master planning efforts for both water supply and water distribution will allow the City to coordinate, plan and
meet the needs of future development in a cost effective and sustainable manner.


Coastal High-Hazard Areas [163.3191(2)(m)]
Chapter 163.3191(2)(m) requires if any of the jurisdiction of a local government is located within the coastal high-hazard area,
an evaluation of whether any past reduction in land use density impairs the property rights of current residents when
redevelopment occurs, including, but not limited to, redevelopment following a natural disaster. As there has been no reduction
in land use density within the City during this planning timeframe, the property rights of property owners have not been impaired
by any governmental action.


Land Use Compatibility Near Military Installations [163.3191(2)(n]
As required by 163.3191(2)(n) F.S., the following statement summarizes        the City of Punta Gorda’s assessment of military
installation compatibility with adjacent land uses.   According to the DCA website listing of military installations, there are no
military bases located in the City of Punta Gorda or in Unincorporated Charlotte County. Therefore, this section is not applicable
in our community.


Evaluation of Concurrency Exception Areas [163.3191(2)(o)]
The City acknowledges the statutory requirements to analyze the effectiveness of alternative concurrency areas. Currently, the
City does not have any defined Concurrency Exception Areas, Concurrency Management Areas, Multi-Modal Transportation
Districts, or Transportation Concurrency Exception Areas (TCEA). However, the City has previously addressed these designations
in the last revision to the comprehensive plan.       The City is actively exploring the steps necessary to establish a TCEA.
Establishment of such an area fits within the City’s desire for continued infill and redevelopment, as traditional concurrency
trends to incentivize Greenfield development and suburban sprawl. The future development of a mobility plan will be necessary
to appropriately direct funding for transportation improvements under a TCEA.


Evaluation of Long-Term Concurrency Management Systems [163.3180(9)(d)]
The City of Punta Gorda does not currently have a long term concurrency management system.           There are no transportation
system deficiencies noted in the current management program for the City. Within deficiencies or backlogs of deficiencies there
is no projected need for a long term concurrency management system.




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Evaluation of Roadway Impact Methodology [163.3191(2)(p)]
Currently, the City of Punta Gorda coordinates with Charlotte County mainly through the Metropolitan Planning Organization.
The City also meets with the County to discuss transportation and concurrency related issues. The topic of land use decision
making is frequently integrated into discussions at these meetings. Further coordination may be required based on the analysis
for a TCEA which may recommend the extents of a TCEA which encompasses some unincorporated areas of Charlotte County. If
the analysis illustrates a need for a multi-jurisdictional TCEA then the City and Charlotte County will need to work closely
together during the drafting of a Mobility Plan and the establishment of a TCEA.           Intergovernmental Coordination efforts
between all agencies should continue


Evaluation of Urban Infill and Redevelopment Areas [163.2517(6)]
The City of Punta Gorda does not have an established Urban Infill and Redevelopment Area under the statute and therefore, will
not need to address this section.


Comprehensive Planning Certification Program [163.3246(12)]
At this time the City has not opted to participate in the Comprehensive Certification Program as outlined in the statute.
RECOMMENDATIONS / PROPOSED CHANGES [163.3191(2)(I)]

Plan Amendments Needed to Address Major Issues
The City will of Punta Gorda will transmit the adopted EAR to FDCA in time to meet the December 1, 2011 due date. Following a
Finding of Sufficiency the City will have 18 months to amend its Comprehensive Plan to make the changes recommended below.
An additional 6 months may be requested if necessary for the adoption of such amendments.



Recommended Policy Changes
                             Policy #                                                Issue                        Recommendation to address Issue

Future Land Use Element
Policy 1.1.14.8: Public lands are lands owned by the                                                       Modify Floor Area Ratio to accurately account
public   and     used    for    public     purposes     such     as                                        for the existing City, County, and School Board
governmental       offices      and      operational     facilities.   The FAR in the existing Comp        facilities found on these lands.        Associated
Recreational uses may be permitted, but such uses are                  Plan does not account for           with this modification a changes to the Future
generally classified as “recreation-Public” on the FLUM.               existing Public facility sites      Land Use Map will be required to separate City
These areas may allow development so as the intensity                                                      Parks from City, County and School Board
shall not exceed a Floor Area Ratio of .05                                                                 Facilities
Policy   1.1.15.2:      Punta    Gorda      will     adopt    other
appropriate land development regulations should they                   Currently no existing Future
become necessary to address issues not currently                       Land Use Designation exists         Develop      a   FLU   category   for   local   food
germane     to     Punta     Gorda       (wellhead     protection,     for Agriculture or local food       production
groundwater aquifer recharge areas, agricultural lands,                production
etc.)
Policy1.1.17.2:     Where      Punta     Gorda     develops    and     2009 adoption of the City of        Continue policy, update Recreation and Open
implements        special      purpose      plans,     such      as    Punta    Gorda        Parks   and   Spaces Element to maintain consistency with




                                                                                                                                                       169
neighborhood plans, the consistency of these plans with      Recreation Master Plan              this policy
the comprehensive plan will be documented
                                                             The   provisions    of   SB   360   Craft new policies which call for the study of
                                                             (2008)    and    HB697    (2008)    land use patterns and         the transportation
                                                             imply major changes to Future       network in order to justify         major policy
No specific policy citation
                                                             Land Use Element which must         changes       implied   by   the   legislation   as
                                                             be supported with appropriate       supported by existing City of Punta Gorda
                                                             data and analysis                   planning activities over the past two decades
Conservation & Coastal Management Element
Policy 2.1.2.5:    Punta Gorda will undertake public
education activities involving a variety of environmental
issues where alteration of public behavior can have          Examples in the policy are not
important environmental benefits (e.g., judicious use of     current   with     environmental    Modify policy to eliminate lists
fertilizers, operation of boats in appropriate channels at   issues relevant to our area
appropriate speeds, use of native plants and other water
conservation measures, etc.)
Policy 2.1.3.1: Punta Gorda will actively participate with
                                                                                                 Will review this policy with the recent Charlotte
Charlotte County and DeSoto County to encourage their
                                                                                                 County & Desoto land use & development
adoption and in the enforcement of an appropriate            Intergovernmental
                                                                                                 policies within the Shell & Prairie Creeks
Special Surface Water Protection Overlay District which      Coordination efforts
                                                                                                 watershed of the Hendrickson Dam Reservoir
controls land use and development practices within the
                                                                                                 and change & enhance accordingly
Shell Creek and Prairie Creek watershed
                                                             Implementation                 of
Policy 2.4.2.1:   The City will work with the Southwest      appropriate              climate
Florida Regional Planning Council to determine the           adaptation strategies of the        Maintain existing policy and develop policies
potential sea level rise impacts on the Coastal Planning     recently developed Charlotte        that address HB697
Area                                                         Harbor     National      Estuary
                                                             Program and the Southwest
                                                                Florida    Regional         Planning
                                                                Council
Policy     2.5.1.2:      The   City   shall   encourage   the
construction of an open air market at Park to facilitate
                                                                                                       Modify policy to include the viability of the
the sales of locally produced goods which will benefit          Policy Enhancement
                                                                                                       market of locally produced goods
residents, local business’, commercial fishermen and
visitors
                                                                                                       Separate existing Conservation and Coastal
                                                                Simplification         of     goals,
No specific policy citation                                                                            Management Element into two separate and
                                                                objections and policies
                                                                                                       distinct Comprehensive Plan Elements
Infrastructure Element
Policy 3.1.1.2: The City of Punta Gorda will construct an
                                                                Development of an alternative
off stream reservoir as an alternative water supply
                                                                water supply source.            This   Modify policy to identify the new alternative
project as identified in the Southwest Florida Water
                                                                project    is     identified      in   water supply project
Management District (SWFWMD) Regional Water Supply
                                                                SWFWMD 2010 Draft RSWP
Plan
                                                                Review of the high levels of
                                                                chloride   in    the    wastewater     Modify policy to identify the Infiltration Study
Policy 3.3.1.1: The City will evaluate the feasibility of
                                                                due to infiltration of brackish        recommendations need to be meet prior to re-
developing a reuse system as outlined in the existing
                                                                groundwater        making        the   evaluation   of   reuse   water   for   irrigation
water use permit
                                                                reuse water unacceptable for           purposes
                                                                landscape irrigation
                                                                                                       The updated Regional Water Supply Plan will be
                                                                SWFWMD is currently updating
No specific policy                                                                                     included, if completed and adopted, in the EAR
                                                                the Regional Supply Plan
                                                                                                       based amendments
Housing Element
Policy 4.1.2.3:       Punta Gorda will adopt and enforce the    This is an improper citation.          Modify policy to maintain Unsafe Building
Standard Unsafe Building Abatement Code of the                  The City utilizes the 2007             Abatement regulations within the City Code of



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Southern Building Code Congress                             Florida Building Code now for         Ordinances
                                                            unsafe building abatement
                                                                                                  Review   and   develop     strategies   for   future
No specific policies                                                                              housing to include energy resources based on
                                                                                                  energy efficient design and construction
                                                            2010 US Census data was not           Upon availability of the 2010 U.S. Census data,
No specific policy                                          available during the writing of       the City will provide analysis and update the
                                                            this EAR.                             Plan accordingly
Recreation & Open Space Element
                                                            Modify to reference the 2009
                                                                                                  Development of a Parks & Recreation Master
Development of a Parks & Recreation Master Plan             Park and Recreation Master
                                                                                                  Plan
                                                            Plan
                                                            In 2006 the City adopted the
                                                            Alternative        Transportation     Modify    policy      to   reference    Alternative
In 2006 the City adopted the Alternative Transportation
                                                            Plan 2030 which covered the           Transportation Plan as the guiding document,
Plan 2030 which covered the bicycle/sidewalk,     passive
                                                            bicycle/sidewalk,           passive   and remove references to specific stakeholder
recreation and pedestrian facilities
                                                            recreation       and    pedestrian    "Charlotte Harbor Environmental Center"
                                                            facilities
Community Facilities Element
                                                                                                  Modify policy to pre-establish the locational
Policy 6.1.4.1: The City of Punta Gorda will coordinate     No     current     Public    Safety
                                                                                                  needs for public safety stations relative to the
the Five Year Stations Location and Master Plan with this   Station Location and Master
                                                                                                  annexation areas established in the Future
comprehensive plan and its urban service area strategy      Plan exists
                                                                                                  Land Use Element
                                                            The City continues to work
                                                            with   the    Charlotte     County    Modify   existing     policy   to   reference   the
Policy 6.1.5.2: The City of Punta Gorda will develop a
                                                            Emergency              Management     Charlotte County-City of Punta Gorda Local
mitigation plan to reduce the effects of natural hazards
                                                            Office, the RPC and DCA on            Mitigation Strategy
                                                            improving,       updating      and
                                                             completing mitigation plans

Transportation Element
Policy 7.1.1.5:   The City will modify the future land use
designations to include and support a mixed use land         Need        higher      residential   Modify Future Land Use designations where
use designation which provides for compact and               densities        to        achieve    appropriate to allow a more transit supportive
contiguous growth patterns that will reduce automobile       appropriate                           mix     of    residential    and     commercial
trips and promote alternative modes of transportation,       residential/commercial mix            development
land use mixes, urban design, connectivity
Policy 7.1.2.1:   To enhance accessibility, Punta Gorda
will incorporate two curb ramps, pedestrian demand
                                                             Projects    designed     to   meet
signals, audio and tactile pedestrian signal systems                                               Modify to be less perspective to account for
                                                             minimum ADA, City or FDOT
while meeting Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and                                            changes in best practices in facility design
                                                             standards as appropriate
American     Association    of    State   Highway     and
Transportation Officials (AASHTO) standards
Policy 7.1.2.2: Punta Gorda shall limit intersection radii
associated with bicycle/pedestrian facilities so as to
reduce road crossing distances for pedestrians and to        Projects    designed     to   meet
                                                                                                   Modify, to reference ITE Context Sensitive
slow motor vehicle traffic for turns (10 to 20 mph).         minimum ADA, City or FDOT
                                                                                                   Solutions Standards
Where this policy contradicts freight policies, Punta        standards as appropriate
Gorda will seek to accommodate all modes through the
use of median refuges and other innovative techniques
Policy 7.1.5.4: The City will continue implementing best
practices in access management standards for arterial,                                             Additional     policies     regarding     access
                                                             Policy does not account for
collector, and local streets to maintain an appropriate                                            management and alternative strategies for
                                                             the US 41 Corridor Access
balance for site access and safe and efficient multi-                                              efficiency and safety are recommended for
                                                             Management Plan
modal transportation function through the planning and                                             constrained corridors
development review processes
Policy 7.2.1.5:     Utilize the Florida Standard Urban       Policy     references    outdated     Update policy to eliminate model reference



                                                                                                                                             173
Transportation      Model    Structure     (FSUTMS)   or   its   model
replacement       to    coordinate       road   and   transit
improvements with existing and proposed population
densities, housing, employment patterns, and land uses
Policy 7. 2.1.6:       The City will initiate and support
                                                                                                        Update   policy   to    account   for   legislation
strategies which promotes development towards a TCMS             Legislation update
                                                                                                        requirement
or a TCEA
Policy 7.2.3.1: Playing an important role in the present
and future economy of the City, Punta Gorda will assist                                                 Additional policies clarifying, appropriate land
and support efforts to expand aviation facilities, surface       Local policy update                    uses, surface transportation linkages including
access, and land use compatibility on Development                                                       transit as appropriate are necessary
Authority Land
Policy   7.2.4.1:       Railroad   crossing     improvements     Identified    need       regarding
                                                                                                        Update to reflect pedestrian and bicycle safety
(signage, warnings, and pavement) will be included in            pedestrian         crossings      to
                                                                                                        and mobility
City capital improvement priorities                              facilitate safe routes to school
                                                                 MPO      2035       Long       Range
Policy 7.2.5.1:     Punta Gorda will continue to cooperate
                                                                 Transportation Plan policies           Modify policies to ensure consistency with MPO
with Amtrak toward providing access to the nation’s
                                                                 updates      due    in   December      planning activities
passenger rail service
                                                                 2010
Policy 7.2.5.2: Punta Gorda will participate in MPO and          MPO      2035       Long       Range
Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) studies              Transportation Plan policies
evaluating improvements to freight rail service in Punta         updates      due    in   December
                                                                                                        Modify policy to include cooperation with
Gorda and Charlotte County. These improvements may               2010, additionally Lee County
                                                                                                        regional entities like the Lee County MPO
include a regional facility to transfer goods between rail       MPO moving forward on rail
and truck and provision of industrial-zoned land with            system    assessment        to   the
access to rail                                                   south
Policy 7.2.6.1:     Punta Gorda will evaluate intermodal         MPO           Long             Range   Modify   policy   for   consistency     with   MPO
connections, including surface transportation access to          Transportation       Plan   update     guidance regarding freight and intermodal
aviation, rail and seaport facilities                                may       include             additional    connectivity
                                                                     information/guidance
                                                                     regarding                        freight
                                                                     movement/intermodal
                                                                     connectivity in Dec 2010


Policy 7.2.7.1: The City of Punta Gorda will remain open
                                                                     Consideration of appropriate                Clarify water dependent transportation services
to the development of privately owned and operated
                                                                     water                        dependent      that meet the community vision-Water Taxi
water dependant transportation services compliant with
                                                                     transportation                              and/or Passenger Ferry Services
local land use and community visioning
Policy 7.3.1.2:      The MPO Board shall consist of three
                                                                     Policy       is         unnecessarily       Modify policy to eliminate the composition of
County Commissioners, one City Council member, and
                                                                     detailed in regards to road                 the   Board,   referring   only     to   the    MPO
one Airport Authority Commissioner, or as provided by
                                                                     composition                                 Apportionment Plan
an adopted revised MPO Apportionment Plan
                                                                     City is currently working with
                                                                     MPO       Staff          and       LRTP
Policy 7.3.3.4: Punta Gorda will continue to coordinate                                                          Revise policy to reference new 2035 Long
                                                                     consultant             on       revising
with the MPO concerning the analysis of and need for                                                             Range    Transportation      Plan        Congestion
                                                                     Congestion               Management
Congestion Management Strategies                                                                                 Management System
                                                                     Strategies              to        fulfill
                                                                     requirements under SAFET-LU
Policy 7.3.3.5: Punta Gorda will implement congestion
management        strategies    to   address       transportation
                                                                     Revisions         to         Congestion
demand     management          (TDM),     including    commuter                                                  Revise policy to reference new 2035 Long
                                                                     Management                    Strategies
assistance,    the    county-wide       traffic   signal   system,                                               Range    Transportation      Plan        Congestion
                                                                     expected in the 2010 update
intersection      improvements,         possible      para-transit                                               Management System
                                                                     of the LRTP
improvements,            sidewalks/bikeways,                access
management, and growth management strategies
Policy 7.3.4.5: The City will monitor level of service               Changes            in           Growth      Modify   policy   to   account    for     legislative




                                                                                                                                                                175
conditions      to    determine        when     a   Transportation        Management             legislation   changes, including provisions for studies of
Concurrency          Management        System       (TCMS)      or   a    require the implementation of        the   transportation   network   and   land   use
Transportation Concurrency Exemption Area (TCEA)                          a TCEA or alternative strategy       patterns to support future substantive changes
needs to be established                                                                                        to Transportation Goals, Objective, and Policies
Policy 7.3.6.1: Criteria to rank new projects for funding
under Federal, State and local capital improvements
programs in Punta Gorda include
* Project preserves/improves highway pavement (~10
points)
* Project preserves/improves bridges (~10 points)
*     Project   improves     highway       safety     (~10      points)
* Project reduces congestion, particularly where levels of
service do not meet adopted standards (~10 points)
* Project addresses public transportation (~10 points)
* Project improves an intermodal facility (~10 points)
                                                                          New      projects   ranked     by
* Project improves hurricane evacuation and recovery                                                           Modify policy to incorporate provisions of
                                                                          weighted      points      criteria
(~10                                                            points)                                        existing Policy 7.3.8.1
                                                                          system
* Project supports urban service strategies (~10 points)


Criteria with half the importance of the above include
the                                                         following:
* Project improves or provides alternatives to the Florida
Intrastate        Highway          System           (~5         points)
*   Project     improves     traffic    circulation    (~5      points)
* Project has limited environmental impact (~5 points)
*   Project     improves     freight    movement          (~5   points)
*     Project     protects     rights-of-way          (~5       points)
* Project provides continuity of capital programming (~5
points)

Policy 7.3.8.1:     Roadway widening projects, on local
residential streets and/or on streets with existing
houses      and   driveways,    will    be     avoided,   unless    New projects assessed under             Eliminate policy and include these provisions in
alternative solutions are determined to be worse overall            this policy                             Policy 7.3.6.1
because of their relative impact on other policies, such
as natural resource protection
Policy 7.3.10.2:      Other routes, not designated as
                                                                    Evaluation        of        potential
hurricane    evacuation   routes       in   the    Transportation                                           Modify policy to require the establishment of a
                                                                    hurricane               evacuation
Element, may be considered for improvement for                                                              local hurricane evacuation route map
                                                                    alternatives
hurricane evacuation purposes
                                                                    The    provisions      of   SB   360    Analyze      land     use      patterns     and   the
                                                                    (2008)      and   HB697       (2008)    transportation network in order to validate
                                                                    imply major changes to Future           major     policy    changes     necessary    by   the
No specific policy citation
                                                                    Land Use Element which must             legislation and as supported by existing City of
                                                                    be supported with appropriate           Punta Gorda planning activities over the past
                                                                    data and analysis                       two decades
Policy 7.1.1.5:   The City will modify the future land use
designations to include and support a mixed use land                Need        higher      residential     Modify Future Land Use designations where
use   designation    which     provide       for   compact   and    densities         to         achieve    appropriate to allow a more transit supportive
contiguous growth patterns that will reduce automobile              appropriate                             mix     of       residential     and      commercial
trips and promote alternative modes of transportation,              residential/commercial mix              development
land use mixes, urban design, connectivity
Public School Facilities Element
Policy 8.1.1.2:     The City hereby adopts less than                Several scenarios have been
                                                                                                            Need to change policy to reflect elementary
district-wide Concurrency Service Areas (CSA’s) through             reviewed and the City, County
                                                                                                            school boundaries as individual attendance
the merger elementary school boundaries, and the use                and School Board agree that
                                                                                                            boundaries
of individual attendance boundaries to establish middle             all    individual       attendance



                                                                                                                                                          177
school and high school CSAs in which to measure the            boundaries will be used to
level of service standard. [9J-5.025(3)(c)(1)]                 establish CSAs in which to
                                                               measure the level of service
                                                               standard. [9J-5.025(3)(c)(1)]
                                                               School concurrency provisions
Policy 8.1.2.7: No later than March 1, 2009, the City                                               Modify policy to maintain school concurrency
                                                               incorporated into existing City
shall adopt school concurrency provisions into its Land                                             provisions currently adopted       in    the   Land
                                                               Land                Development
Development Regulations (LDR)                                                                       Development Regulations
                                                               Regulations
Intergovernmental Coordination Element
Policy 9.1.1.7: When and if the City implements local
                                                               The      Charlotte        County
plans and projects consistent with the Comprehensive
                                                               Development        Authority   has
Plan (e.g., street beautification, economic development,
                                                               changed their name.            The
tourism development, etc.), it will consider possibilities
                                                               Board is now known as the            Update the policy to eliminate the examples of
for coordination with other entities which have related
                                                               Charlotte     County      Airport    the entities
plans and purposes (e.g., Charlotte County Development
                                                               Authority.    Over the years
Authority, Charlotte County Economic Development
                                                               other entities have changed
Council,    Charlotte    County      Tourism     Development
                                                               names
Council, etc.)
Capital Improvements Element

No policies changes are anticipated

Historic Element
                                                                                                    Develop        policies   to   further    existing
                                                                                                    preservation, archeological, and architectural
                                                               Need    policies     to   support
No policies exist                                                                                   efforts, to strengthen preservation of existing
                                                               historical document
                                                                                                    structures, to enforce historical preservation
                                                                                                    efforts
TABLE 22 - URBAN DESIGN STAFF 2010
CONCLUSION

The Comprehensive Plan more closely reflects the intensive vision planning that has occurred since Hurricane Charlie. The 2005
CRA Charrette, the 2005 Citizen’s Master Plan and various other
planning documents served a blueprint for the 2008 updates to the
Comprehensive Plan.       While the City has seen great success in
implementing this plan more work needs to be done.                   Given the
downturn   in   the   economy    and    substantial    legislative    changes,
substantive amendments to the current Plan are in order. However, far
from changing the current course of the City, these changes will serve
to the further the City of Punta Gorda’s community vision as the
economic, cultural, and historic hub of an economically vibrant
Charlotte County. The implementation of the Evaluation and Appraisal
Report amendments will further the pattern for continued growth and
development in accordance with the State of Florida Comprehensive
Plan.

The logical pattern of development for the City including the protection
of important historical, environmental, and neighborhood resources,
will continue to fulfill and promote the citizen’s vision of the
community. The development pattern, called for in the Plan will serve
to minimize the cost of delivery of services and increases quality of life
by   maximizing    the   utilization   of   existing   infrastructure    while
decreasing development pressure on environmentally sensitive and



                                                                                                                      179
rural lands. In order to effectively and efficiently achieve this vision higher densities and intensities of new development need to
occur in close proximity to existing infrastructure. As the only City in Charlotte County, Punta Gorda is in the unique position to
deliver the logical locations for these various types of development.

The Goals, Objectives, and Policies (GOPs) of the Future Land Use Element that guide growth must encourage a pattern of
development supportive of all transportation modes.        Implementation of the Comprehensive Plan GOP’s are an important
component in preserving and reinforcing the City’s urban form, pattern of development, prevention of urban sprawl, and
preservation of historic and natural resources in order to create a more sustainable urban environment.             Therefore, the
proposed changes to the GOPs must be far-reaching enough to encompass the full range of community vision, while allowing
the necessary flexibility required by the rapidly changing social, economic, and technological landscape. Balancing growth with
economic sustainability will become paramount in a time of increasingly limited resources.

This logical development pattern serves as the primary inducement for developing supportive policies for a functional
Transportation Concurrency Exemption Area and the future development of a Mobility Plan. These policies in concert with the
Future Land Use policies will assist the City in developing strategies to increase pedestrian safety, improve pedestrian
connections, promote traffic calming strategies, and create a transit supportive environment which will all serve to increase
economic vitality of the City’s core commercial areas.

In concert Future Land Use and Transportation policy changes will support greenhouse gas emission reductions as outlined in
House Bill 697. The balance of residential units to retail/workplace will address a portion of the HB697 requirements as well as
issues discussed in the climate adaptation and energy conservation of this document.

Along with the compact and contiguous development pattern of the City, comes the need to review strategies to assist the City
in preparation for future climate changes. The goal is for the City to develop an action plan preparing the City for future
adaptation to such issues as sea level rise, drought and other extreme weather conditions.     Potential adaptation strategies for
City review will include those outlined in the Punta Gorda Adaptation Plan. The City will utilize a Vulnerability Assessment
Report in establishing resiliency goals that integrate into existing hazard and comprehensive planning efforts.

An important component of ensuring a logical development pattern is the preservation and promotion of historic resources.
These resources define the character of the community giving it a connection to the past and helping to define its unique sense
of place. The City therefore seeks to document, protect, and enhance these resources through the development of a Historic
Element.

The separation of the Conservation and Coastal Management Element will assist the City in continuing to protect important
environmental resources. Protection of these resources is especially important given Punta Gorda’s location on the beautiful and
nearly pristine Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Preserve. The protection of salt marshes, mangrove forests and other wetlands
serves not only the natural world, but also the built environment through the mitigation of risk from natural disasters.

In accordance with Section 163.3191(6), F.S. the City will be adopting The City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive Plan Evaluation
and Appraisal Report - 2011by Resolution by December 1, 2011. Following a Finding of Sufficiency by the FDCA, the City will
have 18 months to amend its Comprehensive Plan. The City may request an extension of an additional six (6) months to make
significant changes as recommended in this EAR should it be necessary.




                                                                                                                           181
MAP SERIES

Map 1    City Limits Map                                  Map 14   Potential NEV's Map

Map 2    City Market Place Parcels Map                             Proposed Charlotte County Fixed Route Transit
                                                          Map 15
                                                                   (2009)
Map 3    Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Map
                                                          Map 16   Ring Around the City Map
Map 4    Annexation 2004-2010 Map                                  Charlotte County Punta Gorda MPO Long Range
                                                          Map 17
Map 5    Existing Land Use Map                                     Transportation Plan Transit Needs Map
                                                          Map 18   Existing Charlotte County Agriculture Zoning Map
Map 6    Future Land Use Map Amendments
                                                          Map 19   Future Land Use Map
Map 7    Vacant Land Use Map
                                                          Map 20   Portable Water Infrastructure in the CHHA Map
Map 8    Preservation Land Use Map
                                                          Map 21   Road Infrastructure in the CHHA Map
Map 9    Administrative Facilities Map
         Charlotte County Elementary School Concurrency   Map 22   Sanitary Sewer in the CHHA Map
Map 10
         Service Area Map                                 Map 23   Historic Overlay District Map
Map 11   Freight Network Map
                                                          Map 24   Trabue Woods Historic Overlay District Map
Map 12   Bicycle Route Map
                                                          Map 25   Annexation Study Area Map
Map 13   Pedestrian Map
ACRONYMS


ASR       Aquifer Storage Recovery                         LEED     Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
BEBR      Bureau of Economic and Business Research         LOS      Level of Service
BSM       Burnt Store Meadow                               LSV      Low Speed Vehicles
CIE       Capital Improvement Element                      MPO      Metropolitan Planning Organization
CIP       Capital Improvement Program                      MFL      Minimum Flow and Levels
CCHC      Charlotte County Historical Center Society       MMTD     Multi-Mode Transportation Districts
Society                                                    NEV      Neighborhood Electric Vehicles
CHNEP     Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program        gcpd     per capita per day
CHS       Charlotte High School                            PSFE     Public School Facilities Element
CRA       Community Redevelopment Agency                   PGD      Punta Gorda Airport
CSA       Concurrency Service Area                         PGMS     Punta Gorda Middle School
CHHA      Costal High Hazard Area                          RWSP     Regional Water Supply Plan
DULA      Dense Urban Land Areas                           SLR      Sea Level Rise
DRI       Department of Regional Impact                    SWUCA    Southern Water Use Caution Area
EPA       Environmental Protection Agency                  SWFRPC   Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
EAR       Evaluation and Appraisal Report                  SWFWMD   Southwest Florida Water Management District
FAR       Floor to Area Ratios                             TDS      Total Dissolved Solids
F.A.C.    Florida Administrative Code                      TCEA     Transportation Concurrency Exemption Area
FDEP      Florida Department of Environmental Protection   TCMA     Transportation Concurrency Management Area
FLUE      Future Land Use Element                          USGBC    United States Green Building Council
FLUM      Future Land Use Map                              VMT      Vehicle Miles Traveled
HPAB      Historic Preservation Advisory Board             WSMP     Water Supply Management Plan
HB        House Bill                                       WSMPU    Water Supply Management Plan Update
IPCC      International Panel on Climate Change



                                                                                                              183
REFERENCE


2005 Citizen’s Master Plan                                  Community Redevelopment Area Redevelopment Plan

2010 Draft Regional Water Supply Plan                       Downtown Community Redevelopment Plan

2035 Long Range Transportation Plan Update                  Downtown Parking & Traffic Circulation Study

2035 Long Range Transportation Plan Update Congestion       Eastside & Downtown Planning Study
Management Plan                                             Five Year Alternative Transportation Plan
Annexation Study of 2006
                                                            Florida Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Alternative Transportation Plan 2030
                                                            Florida’s Growth Management Laws
City Code of Ordinance (Chapter 26)
                                                            Florida Master File
City of Punta Gorda Adaptation Plan
                                                            Inflow and Infiltration Study (2008)
(Technical Report 09-4)
City of Punta Gorda Architectural Resources Survey 2002 –   IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report (2007)
2003                                                        IPCC’s Second Assessment Report (2007)
City of Punta Gorda’s Demographic & Housing
                                                            Journal of Housing for the Elderly
Characteristics 2006 – 2030
City of Punta Gorda Historical Guidelines                   National Register of Historic Places

City of Punta Gorda’s 1997 Comprehensive Plan               Southwest Florida Water Management District Draft
                                                            Regional Water Supply Plan
City of Punta Gorda Comprehensive Plan 2025
                                                            State of Florida Comprehensive Plan
Comprehensive Southwest Florida/Charlotte Harbor
                                                            The City of Punta Gorda’s Climate Adaptation Plan
Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment (Technical
Report 09-3)                                                The City of Punta Gorda’s Parks & Recreation Master Plan
United States Census Bureau                Water Supply Master Plan (2006)
Wastewater Collection System Master Plan   Water Supply Master Plan Update (2009)




                                                                                    185
APPENDIX 1


EAR Process

   Date(s)                     Action                                         Explanation of Activities/Events
                                                        The City of Punta Gorda's EAR was prepared by staff and input was
              Step 1: IDENTIFY WHO WILL PREPARE
 01-Dec-09                                              provided by the Planning Commission, the Local Planning Agency, as well
              THE EAR
                                                        as Citizen Groups and local residents.
              Step 2: INTERDEPARTMENTAL MEETING         The City's Chief planner coordinated meetings with Public Works,
 01-Feb-10    TO IDENTIFY AND DISCUSS                   Sanitation, Parks & Ground, Police, Fire, Utilities, and Finance to discuss
              ISSUES, ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES        the City's major issues.
              Step 3: IDENTIFY AND CLARIFY ISSUES       Workshops were held to discuss & clarify major issues.          Display ad in
              THROUGH A WORKSHOP WITH ELECTED           local newspaper run dates of 7/7/2010 & 7/11/2010; Posting dates on
  15-Jul-10
              BODY, PLANNING COMMISSION, AND            City's website, invitations emailed to local stakeholders and homeowner
              GENERAL PUBLIC [s.163.3191(1)(c), F.S.]   associations; notification of Citizen Committee members.
                                                        After the July 15, 2010 Public Workshop all of the major issues were
              Step 4: PREPARE A LIST OF THE ISSUES
                                                        compiled by staff and subsequently presented at the August 23, 2010
 22-Jul-10    AGREED UPON IN THE LOCAL
                                                        Planning Commission Meeting.       Additional comments and suggestions
              WORKSHOP OR IDENTIFIED BY STAFF
                                                        were collected to use in the preparation of the final list of major issues.
              Step 5: HOLD A SCOPING MEETING            On August 10, 2010 the City of Punta Gorda held a scoping meeting with
 10-Aug-10
              [s.163.3191(3), F.S.]                     the State Agencies to review the City's list of major issues.
              Step 6: FINALIZE MAJOR ISSUES LIST        On September 2, 2010 the City of Punta Gorda submitted its letter of
  2-Sep-10    AND REQUEST LETTER OF                     understanding to the Department of Community Affairs (DCA).               On
              UNDERSTANDING FROM DCA                    October 8, 2010 the DCA accepted the City's letter of understanding.
 08-Oct-10    Steps 7 & 8: COLLECT AND ANALYZE          After receiving the DCA’s acceptance letter, staff began preparing
            DATA AND PREPARE A DRAFT OF THE       the first draft of the EAR. Data sources are listed in the Reference
            EAR [s.163.3191(2), F.S.]             Section of this document.
            Steps 9 & 10: HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING
            TO DISCUSS RESULTS OF THE
                                                  The LPA held the Public Hearing to consider the 1st draft of the City
            EVALUATION AS DESCRIBED IN THE
                                                  of Punta Gorda’s Evaluation and Appraisal Report, 2011. The LPA
28-Mar-11   DRAFT EAR [s.163.3191(4), F.S.] AND
                                                  makes recommendation for adoption to the Punta Gorda City
            REVISE THE EAR, IF NEEDED, BASED ON
            THE COMMENTS RECEIVED IN THE
                                                  Council.
            PUBLIC HEARING
            Steps 11 & 12: LOCAL GOVERNMENT       City of Punta Gorda City Council held the 1st Public Hearing meeting for
20-Apr-11
            PUBLIC HEARING AND TRANSMITTAL OF     the transmittal and adoption of the City of Punta Gorda EAR 2011.
            THE PROPOSED EAR [ss.163.3191(5)      City of Punta Gorda City Council held the 2nd Public Hearing meeting for
4-May-11
            AND (6), F.S.]                        the transmittal and adoption of the City of Punta Gorda EAR 2011.
            Step 13a: TRANSMIT THE ADOPTED EAR
            TO DCA AND STATE AND REGIONAL         The City of Punta Gorda's adopted EAR was sent via certified mail to DCA
9-May-11
            AGENCIES FOR REVIEW [s.163.3191(6),   and all required Local, State and Regional Agencies.
            F.S.]
                                                  The DCA and all required Local, State and Regional Agencies have 60
            Step 13b: AGENCY REVIEW               days to review the adopted report and make a preliminary sufficiency
9-May-11
            [s.163.3191(6), F.S.]                 determination.    This preliminary sufficiency determination will be
                                                  forwarded to the local government for its consideration.
            Step 13c: STEP 13c: IF THE EAR IS     Within 90 days after the receipt of the adopted EAR, the DCA shall
9-Jul-11
            SUFFICIENT [s.163.3191(6), F.S.]      issue a final sufficiency determination.
                                                  If the DCA determines the report is insufficient, the City will need
            Step 13d: IF THE EAR IS NOT
9-Jul-11                                          to adopt a revision of the report and submit the revised report
            SUFFICIENT [s.163.3191(6), F.S.]
                                                  pursuant to subsection (6).



                                                                                                                  187
                                              The City will begin the EAR based amendments once the EAR is
           Step 14: STEP 14: BEGIN THE EAR-
                                              determined to be sufficient and will have 18 months to complete
9-Aug-11   BASED AMENDMENT PROCESS
                                              the EAR based amendment process provided not extensions are
           [s.163.3191(10), F.S.]
                                              necessary.
EAR Contents

 Page #                Statute       Description

                                     Preliminary Pages

5         [s.163.3191(4), F.S.]      Table of Contents.

7         [s.163.3191(4), F.S.]      Lists of tables, maps, and figures. If the EAR contains maps, other figures, or tables,
                                     the table of contents should have a separate page to list these items.
                                     Introduction Section

9-12                                 Brief description of the community, the goals of the community as expressed in the
                                     comprehensive plan, and the purpose of the EAR.
12-19     [s.163.3191(2)(j), F.S.]   Brief description of the process used to prepare and adopt the EAR, including the
                                     public participation activities.
                                     Subject Matter for the EAR

23        [s.163.3191(2)(a), F.S.]   Discuss changes in land area, including annexation, since the plan was adopted or
                                     updated by the most recent EAR-based amendment.
20-23     [s.163.3191(2)(a), F.S.]   Discuss changes in population since the plan was adopted or last amended; compare
                                     actual changes with changes projected by the plan.
38, 32    [s.163.3191(2)(d), F.S.]   Discuss whether development has located where it was anticipated in the plan as
                                     originally adopted or last amended.
25,30     [s.163.3191(2)(b), F.S.]   Identify the amount and location of vacant land and its suitability and availability for
                                     development.
31        [s.163.3191(2)(c), F.S.]   Discuss the extent to which the community has been able to meet the demands of
                                     growth    on   infrastructure      and   maintain   level-of   service   standards   through
                                     implementation of a financially feasible capital improvements element.




                                                                                                                          189
38-76      [s.163.3191(2)(h), F.S.]   Briefly assess successes or shortcomings of each element.

76         [s.163.3191(2)(f), F.S.]   List of changes to the State Comprehensive Plan applicable to the community.

77         [s.163.3191(2)(f), F.S.]   List of changes to the Strategic Regional Policy Plan that apply to the community.

77         [s.163.3191(2)(f), F.S.)   List of changes to Chapter 163, Part 2, F.S., applicable to the community.

76         [s.163.3191(2)(f), F.S.]   List of changes to Chapter 9J-5, F.A.C., applicable to the community.

108        [s.163.3191(2)(e), F.S.]   Identify and evaluate major issues. Refer to Section 3 for assistance on writing about
                                      issues in the EAR.
                                      For each issue, whether listed below or identified as a major issue by the community,
                                      the discussion must include the following:
108 -162   [s.163.3191(2)(e), F.S.]   Where pertinent, identify the social, economic and environmental impacts of the issue.

108 -162   [s.163.3191(2)(g), F.S.]   Assess whether the objectives of the plan that relate to the issue have been achieved.

162        [s.163.3191(2)(g), F.S.]   Discuss whether there have been changes in circumstances that were not anticipated.

162        [s.163.3191(2)(g), F.S.]   Discuss whether these changes resulted in either problems or opportunities for the
                                      community.
170        [s.163.3191(2)(i), F.S.]   Identify actions, including plan amendments, which are needed to address the issue.

163        [s.163.3191(2)(k), F.S.]   Assess success of coordinating land use and school facilities planning, including use of
           [s.163.31777(7), F.S.]     joint population projections.
164        [s.163.3191(2)(l), F.S.]   Evaluate plan with respect to the water management district’s regional water supply
                                      plan.
167        [s.163.3191(2)(m), F.S.]   In coastal high-hazard areas, evaluate whether past reduction in land use density
                                      impairs the property rights of current residents when redevelopment occurs.
168        [s.163.3191(2)(n), F.S.]   Assess whether compatible land uses have been permitted proximate to military
                                      installations.
168      [s.163.3191(2)(o), F.S.]   Assess   whether    transportation      concurrency   exception   areas,   transportation
                                    concurrency management areas or multi-modal transportation districts have achieved
                                    the purpose for which it was created.
168      [s.163.3180(9)(d), F.S.]   Evaluate the extent to which progress has been in improving the level-of-service within
                                    the school and/or transportation long-term concurrency management area.
169      [s.163.3191(2)(p), F.S.]   Assess need for a common method for measuring impacts on roadways as part of the
                                    local concurrency management system.
25, 33   [s.163.2517(6)(a), F.S.]   Evaluation of new development within the designated urban infill and redevelopment
                                    area.
16-19    [163.3177(13), F.S.]       Evaluate progress in achieving community development goals

                                    Appendix
185      References/Appendix        List of reports, studies, and other documents used as data and analysis for the EAR.




                                                                                                                    191
Adoption Procedures

             Date            Action
                             Step 1: Decide on date for consideration by LPA. Insert this date before the EAR due date. It is the
           1-Feb-11          date identified on line 9 in the in step 6 below. Note: This table in sub-section 1.6 (Timeline for
                             Preparing the EAR).date is approximately five months
                             Step 2: Determine the date that notice must appear in the newspaper. Also, find out the deadline
           1-Feb-11          for providing the notice to the newspaper in order to appear by the required date. The newspaper
                             must be a newspaper of general circulation for the area

                             Step 3: Prepare the notice. The notice must include the following:

                                 • date of the public hearings (one for LPA and one for governing body)

                                 • time of the hearings
           1-Mar-11
                                 • place of the hearings

                                 • title of the resolution or ordinance

                                 • statement about where the public may inspect the resolution or ordinance, including the EAR
           4-Mar-11          Step 4: Deadline to provide notice to newspaper.
     18-Mar-11 & 25-Mar-11   Step 5: Notice appears in the newspaper.
          28-Mar-11          Step 6: Public hearing before the LPA.
     20-Apr-11 & 4-May-11    Step 7: Public hearing before the local governing body.

				
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