BASMAA_Trash by BayAreaNewsGroup

VIEWS: 120 PAGES: 109

									February 1, 2012
Bruce Wolfe, Executive Officer
California Regional Water Quality Control Board
San Francisco Bay Region
1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400
Oakland, CA 94612
Subject: MRP Provision C.10.a(ii) Reports Transmittal
Dear Mr. Wolfe:
This letter and two attachments are submitted on behalf of all 76 permittees subject to
the requirements of the Municipal Regional Stormwater NPDES Permit (MRP)
(NPDES Permit No. CAS612008) in compliance with MRP Provision C.10.a(ii) -
 Baseline Trash Load and Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method.
Provision C.10.a(ii) requires in part that each Permittee, “working collaboratively or
individually, shall determine the baseline trash load from its MS4 to establish the
basis for trash load reductions and submit the determined load level to the Water
Board by February 1, 2012, along with documentation of methodology used to
determine the load level. The submittal shall also include a description of the trash
load reduction tracking method that will be used to account for trash load reduction
actions and to demonstrate progress and attainment of trash load reduction levels.”
We expect MRP Permittees will be using baseline trash generation rates and load
reduction tracking methods developed collaboratively through BASMAA. These
rates and methods are presented in the attached reports and were created under the
oversight of the BASMAA Trash Committee in coordination with Permittees. The
BASMAA Trash Committee serves under the oversight of the BASMAA Board of
Directors and has active participation of staff from Permittees and Stormwater
Programs.
The Permittees have worked diligently since the MRP was adopted in October 2009
to develop this information. The work has been carried out collaboratively among
the Permittees and in cooperation with your staff. We thank your staff for their
helpful and attentive participation in the BASMAA Trash Committee and other
discussions leading to this submittal.
We certify under penalty of law that this document was prepared under our direction
or supervision in accordance with a system designed to assure that qualified
personnel properly gather and evaluate the information submitted. Based on our
inquiry of the person or persons who manage the system, or those persons directly
responsible for gathering the information, the information submitted is, to the best of
our knowledge and belief, true, accurate, and complete. We are aware that there are
significant penalties for submitting false information, including the possibility of fine
and imprisonment for knowing violations.
MRP Provision C.10.a(ii) Reports Transmittal




James Scanlin, Alameda Countywide Clean Water Program




Tom Dalziel, Contra Costa Clean Water Program




Kevin Cullen, Fairfield-Suisun Urban Runoff Management Program




Matt Fabry, San Mateo Countywide Water Pollution Prevention Program




Adam Olivieri, Santa Clara Valley Urban Runoff Pollution Prevention Program




Lance Barnett, Vallejo Sanitation and Flood Control District

Attachments: Preliminary Baseline Trash Generation Rates for San Francisco Bay Area MS4s
             – Technical Memorandum (February 1, 2012)
             Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method – Technical Report (version 1.0)
             (February 1, 2012)

cc: Tom Mumley, Regional Water Board
    Dale Bowyer, Regional Water Board
    BASMAA Board of Directors
    Chris Sommers, BASMAA Trash Committee


February 1, 2012                                                                           2
 
Preliminary Baseline Trash 
Generation Rates for San Francisco 
Bay Area MS4s 
 
Technical Memorandum 
 
 

 
Submitted in Compliance with Provision C.10.a(ii) of Order R2‐2009‐0074 
 
 
 
 
 
Prepared for:  
Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Association (BASMAA) 
 
Prepared by:  
EOA, Inc. 
1410 Jackson Street 
Oakland, CA 94612 
 
                                                                                    
                                                                                    
                                                                February 1, 2012
                                          
 
                                                                                                                            Baseline Trash Generation Rates 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
LIST OF TABLES  ................................................................................................................................................. III 
              .
LIST OF FIGURES ................................................................................................................................................ III 
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS  ................................................................................................................................... IV 
                     .
1.0  INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................................... 1 
   1.1.  REGULATORY BACKGROUND ................................................................................................................................   
                                                                                                                                                               1
   1.2.  SUMMARY OF TRASH BASELINE GENERATION RATES PROJECT ....................................................................................               1
   1.3.  TRASH BASELINE LOADS CONCEPTUAL MODEL ........................................................................................................        2
2.0  METHODS ................................................................................................................................................. 3 
   2.1     MONITORING DESIGN ........................................................................................................................................   
                                                                                                                                                                     3
      2.1.1.   Monitoring Strata ................................................................................................................................    4
      2.1.2.   Monitoring Sites ..................................................................................................................................   5
      2.1.3.   Trash Full Capture Devices ..................................................................................................................         6
      2.1.4.   Monitoring Site Loading Areas ............................................................................................................            7
      2.1.5.   Tracking of Important Factors .............................................................................................................           7
   2.2.  MONITORING AND CHARACTERIZATION EVENTS ......................................................................................................               8
      2.2.1.   Trash Monitoring .................................................................................................................................    8
      2.2.2.   Trash Characterization ........................................................................................................................       8
   2.3.  QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CONTROL PROCEDURES ..................................................................................................                 9
3.0  MONITORING AND CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS  ....................................................................................  0 
                                                                        .                                                                                          1
   3.1.  MATERIAL COMPOSITION AND TRASH TYPES ........................................................................................................  0   1
      3.1.1.  Monitoring Event #1 ..........................................................................................................................  0 
                                                                                                                                                            1
      3.1.2.  Monitoring Event #2 ..........................................................................................................................  0 
                                                                                                                                                            1
   3.2.  CALCULATION OF GENERATION RATES .................................................................................................................  1 
                                                                                                                                                            1
      3.2.1.  Individual Site Generation Rate Calculations ....................................................................................  1          1
      3.2.2.  Comparison to Explanatory Factors ..................................................................................................  3       1
      3.2.3.  Baseline Generation Rates ................................................................................................................  4 1
4.0  DEVELOPING TRASH BASELINE LOADING RATES AND LOADS ....................................................................  5                              1
   4.1.  BASELINE TRASH LOADING EQUATION .................................................................................................................  5 
                                                                                                                                                             1
   4.2.  JURISDICTIONAL AND EFFECTIVE LOADING AREAS ..................................................................................................  6    1
   4.3.  ACCOUNTING FOR BASELINE CONTROL PROGRAMS ................................................................................................  7        1
      4.3.1.   Baseline Street Sweeping ..................................................................................................................  7 
                                                                                                                                                             1
      4.3.2.   Baseline Storm Drain Inlet Cleaning ..................................................................................................  8     1
      4.3.3.   Baseline Stormwater Pump Station Maintenance ............................................................................  8                  1
   4.4.  REPORTING OF TRASH BASELINE LOADS ...............................................................................................................  9 
                                                                                                                                                             1
5.0  REFERENCES .............................................................................................................................................  9 
                                                                                                                                                             1
 
GLOSSARY .........................................................................................................................................................  0 
                                                                                                                                                                  2
APPENDIX A ......................................................................................................................................................  2 
                                                                                                                                                                 2
APPENDIX B ......................................................................................................................................................  0 
                                                                                                                                                                 3
APPENDIX C ......................................................................................................................................................  2 
                                                                                                                                                                 3
 

 


                                                                                  ii 
                                                                                                                                                         2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 



LIST OF TABLES 
Table 2.1. Reclassified ABAG land use categories that were utilized during the project. ............................................. 4 
Table 2.2. Baseline Trash Generation Rate Project monitoring site goals. ................................................................... 5 
Table 4.1. Number of monitoring sites and percentages of trash in each land use 
           category. .................................................................................................................................................... 13 
Table 4.2. Preliminary Trash Generation Rates by Land Use Category. ...................................................................... 15 
 

 
LIST OF FIGURES 
Figure 1.1. Conceptual model of trash baseline loads from Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems 
             (MS4s) ...................................................................................................................................................... 3 
Figure 2.1. Monitoring sites included in the Baseline Trash Generation Rates Project. ............................................. 6 
                                                                   .
Figure 3.1.  Trash types characterized in monitoring events 1 and 2  ....................................................................... 11 
Figure 4.1. Street sweeping effectiveness curve based on level of parking enforcement and the ratio of 
             street sweeping frequency to storm frequency (adapted from Armitage 2001). ................................. 12 
Figure 4.2. Comparison of generation rates by land use class .................................................................................. 14 
Figure 5.1. Example of an effective trash loading area ............................................................................................. 17 
Figure 5.2. Baseline ceilings for street sweeping frequencies in retail/wholesale and other land uses ..................  18 

 




                                                                                     iii 
                                                                                                                                                               2/1/2012 
                                                                       Baseline Trash Generation Rates 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 
ABAG        Association of Bay Area Governments 
BASMAA      Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Association  
BMP         Best Management Practice 
CRV         California Redemption Value 
DU          Dwelling Unit 
gal         Gallon 
GIS         Geographic Information System  
HDR         High Density Residential 
LDR         Low Density Residential 
mm          millimeter  
MRP         Municipal Regional Stormwater NPDES Permit 
MS4s        Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems  
NPDES       National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System  
NWS         National Weather Service 
PG&E        Pacific Gas and Electric 
RPD         Relative Percent Difference 
SCVURPPP    Santa Clara Valley Urban Runoff Pollutant Prevention Program 
SMCWPPP     San Mateo Countywide Water Pollution Prevention Program 
yr          Year   




                                              iv 
                                                                                            2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 



1.0 INTRODUCTION 
1.1.         Regulatory Background 
The Municipal Regional Stormwater NPDES Permit for Phase I communities in the San Francisco Bay 
(Order R2‐2009‐0074), also known as the Municipal Regional Permit (MRP), became effective on 
December 1, 2009. The MRP applies to 76 large, medium and small municipalities (cities, towns and 
counties) and flood control agencies in the San Francisco Bay Region, collectively referred to as 
Permittees. Provision C.10 of the MRP (Trash Load Reduction) requires Permittees to reduce trash from 
their Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s) by 40 percent before July 1, 2014.  
Required submittals to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board (Water Board) by 
February 1, 2012 under MRP provision C.10.a (Short Term Plan) include: 
      1. (a) A baseline trash1 load estimate and (b) description of the methodology used to 
         determine the load level; and 
      2. A description of the Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method that will be used to account 
         for trash load reduction actions and to demonstrate progress and attainment of trash 
         load reduction levels. 
      3. A Short‐Term Trash Loading Reduction Plan that describes control measures and best 
         management practices that will be implemented to attain a 40 percent trash load 
         reduction from its MS4 by July 1, 2014; 
 
Short Term Trash Loading Reduction Plans (Short‐Term Plans) submitted by Permittees are intended to 
comply with submittals #1(a) and #3 listed above. The BASMAA Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method 
Technical Report was developed and submitted in compliance with submittal #2. This technical 
memorandum describes the methodology used to develop trash baseline loads and the results of the 
BASMAA Baseline Trash Generation Rates Project, which provided information needed to calculate 
baseline loads. This Technical Memorandum is intended to comply with submittal #1(b) above required 
by Provision C.10.a(ii) of the MRP. 

1.2.         Summary of Trash Baseline Generation Rates Project 
To assess progress towards trash load reduction goals in the MRP, each Permittee is required to 
determine the baseline trash load from its MS4. A baseline trash load must be submitted to the San 
Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board (Water Board) by February 1, 2012. Through the 
approval of a regional project by the Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Association 
(BASMAA), Permittees agreed to work collaboratively to develop a regionally consistent method to 
establish baseline trash generation rates.  

The purpose of the regional project described in this Technical Memorandum is to assist Permittees in 
establishing a baseline for which to demonstrate progress towards MRP trash load reduction goals (i.e., 
40%, 70% and 100%). The Baseline Trash Generation Rates Project incorporates a technically‐sound 
method for developing (default) baseline trash generation rates that can be adjusted based on 
Permittee/site specific conditions and baseline control measure implementation to develop a baseline 
trash load estimate.  


                                                       
1
  Litter is all human‐made materials (as defined by California Code Section 68055.1g), excluding sediments, sand, 
vegetation, oil and grease, and exotic species, that cannot pass through a 5 mm mesh screen. 

                                                          1 
                                                                                                          2/1/2012 
                                                                              Baseline Trash Generation Rates 



The approach was intended to be cost‐effective and consistent, but still provide an adequate level of 
confidence in estimating trash loads from MS4s, while acknowledging that uncertainty in trash loads still 
exists. The collaborative project was managed through the BASMAA Trash Committee and included the 
following steps: 

        1.   Conduct literature review;  
        2.   Develop conceptual model;   
        3.   Develop and implement sampling and analysis plan; 
        4.   Test conceptual model; 
        5.   Develop default trash generation rates that may be adjusted by Permittees based on 
             baseline levels of control measure implementation to calculate trash baseline loading rates; 
             and, 
         6. Report trash baseline loads to the Water Board in Permittee Short‐Term Trash Load 
             Reduction Plans. 
              
This Technical Memorandum documents the initial results of the collaborative project that is currently 
underway and presents the most current understanding of stormwater trash generation in the San 
Francisco Bay Area.  Based on the results of additional trash characterization work planned in 2011‐12 as 
part of the generation rates project, this Technical Memorandum will be superseded by a Technical 
Report that more fully describes methods and includes all results from all data collected during the 
project. The anticipated submittal date of the final Technical Report to the Water Board is September 
15, 2012. Therefore, generation rates presented in this technical memorandum should be considered 
preliminary and are subject to revision. 

1.3.    Trash Baseline Loads Conceptual Model  
To assist Permittees in developing a baseline trash load estimation method, BASMAA (2011b) developed 
a conceptual model of trash loading to MS4s. The conceptual model was built off of information derived 
from a comprehensive review of available literature regarding baseline trash loads entering stormwater 
conveyance systems from urban areas. Based on the conceptual model (and literature review), it is 
apparent that baseline trash loads from MS4s in urbanized areas are dependent upon: 

       Trash Generation ‐ the volume of trash that is generated by (i.e., deposited onto the urban 
        landscape) in a specific geographical area; and,  
       Trash Interception – the volume of trash that is intercepted through control measures (e.g., 
        street sweeping) prior to being discharged via MS4s.   

The conceptual model shown in Figure 1.1 identifies eight factors, both anthropogenic and natural, that 
are believed to be the most influential and governing of trash discharged from MS4s. This conceptual 
model serves as the foundation for developing trash baseline load estimates from Bay Area MS4s.  




                                                    2 
                                                                                                   2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 




                                                                     Rainfall


                                                           Antecedent Dry Weather Days

    Figure 1.1. Conceptual model of trash baseline loads from Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s)

 

It is important to note that two important and distinct terms will be used throughout this report:  

       Baseline Generation Rate ‐ the rate at which trash is generated onto the urban watershed 
        under a “no interception” scenario (e.g., no street sweeping).  

       Baseline Loading Rate ‐ the rate at which trash is discharged from an MS4 under a “baseline” 
        control measure implementation scenario (e.g., baseline street sweeping). 

The difference between generation rates and baseline loading rates is the amount of trash intercepted 
by street sweeping, storm drain inlet maintenance, and stormwater pump station at baseline 
implementation levels. This Technical Memorandum reports on Baseline Generation Rates developed 
through the BASMAA Regional Project. These generation rates were used by Permittees to develop 
baseline loading estimates required by the MRP and described in Permittee‐specific Short‐Term Trash 
Load Reduction Plans.   

2.0  METHODS 
2.1     Monitoring Design 
Sampling and analysis methods employed by BASMAA to develop trash generation rates are fully 
described in BASMAA (2011b). Methods were followed to provide reasonable estimates of trash 
generation rates from San Francisco Bay Area MS4s. Baseline generation rates are the rate at which 
trash deposits onto the environment and provide the starting point for establishing baseline loads from 
MS4s. Baseline trash generation rates should ideally be based on those factors that most influence and 
govern trash generation. That said, not all factors that influence the amount of trash discharged from an 



                                                      3 
                                                                                                     2/1/2012 
                                                                                       Baseline Trash Generation Rates 



MS4 can be assessed, and therefore generation rates presented in this Technical Memorandum should 
be considered preliminary first order estimates that have a moderate level of confidence.  

2.1.1. Monitoring Strata  
To test and adapt the conceptual model presented in Figure 1.1, 27 monitoring categories were 
developed apriori based on combination of land use and economic profile (i.e., Household Median 
Income) categories (Table 2.1). To the extent possible, land use categories were selected to closely 
resemble those chosen by the County of Los Angeles for its Trash Baseline Monitoring Study conducted 
in the Los Angeles River and Ballona Creek watersheds, and subsequently used for Total Maximum Daily 
Load (TMDL) development. That said, the BASMAA regional project provided a higher resolution for 
some land use categories (e.g., retail/wholesale and industrial) compared to studies conducted in Los 
Angeles County (Table 2.1). Furthermore, economic profiles and population densities were included in 
the BASMAA project, but were not in County of Los Angeles studies. 

          Table 2.1. Reclassified ABAG land use categories that were utilized during the project.

        Monitoring Category                                    Category Description 

    Land Use 
    High Density Residential       > 8 dwelling per acre 
    Low Density Residential        1 to 8 DUs per acre 
    Rural Residential              >1 to 5 acre lots 
    Retail and Wholesale         Retail and Wholesale (may include post offices and hotels) 
                                 Combines 30 ABAG land use categories that include local government, 
    Commercial and Services  
                                 education, research centers, offices, churches, hospitals, and military. 
                                 Combines 4 ABAG land use categories, including light and unspecified 
    Light and Other Industrial 
                                 industrial, warehousing and food processing 
                                 Activities are devoted to heavy fabrication, making and assembling parts 
                                 which are, in themselves, large and heavy, or to the processing of basic 
    Heavy Industrial 
                                 raw materials. Most industries in this category involve mechanical, 
                                 chemical or heat processing. 
                                 All leisure, ornamental, zoological and botanical parks.  Cemeteries, golf 
    Urban Parks 
                                 courses, and regional parks are not included. 
    K‐12 Schools                 Elementary and secondary schools
    Other                        All land use categories not included above
    Economic Profile (Household Median Income) 
    High Income                  Annual household median income of greater than $100,000  
    Moderate Income              Annual household median income between $50,000 and $100,000 
    Low Income                   Annual household median income less than $50,000  
    *DU = dwelling unit 
 
Land use data were acquired from the 2005 Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) Geographic 
Information System (GIS) land use layer for the Bay Area. Land uses depicted in the ABAG land use 
datalayer were field verified for all monitoring sites. Major errors in land use classifications in ABAG 
2005 were corrected from information gained through field visits and Permittee staff knowledge of the 
sites.   


                                                          4 
                                                                                                            2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 


Economic profile categories selected to test the importance of household incomes are presented in 
Table 2.1. U.S. Census data were used to identify economic profiles and population densities within 2‐
acre buffer of each site monitored in this project. The most current Census was conducted in 2010, but 
was unavailable for this analysis.  Therefore, this project utilized the Census data from 2000.  

2.1.2. Monitoring Sites 
A total of 149 sites located in four Bay Area counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, San Mateo, and Santa 
Clara) were monitored during the project (Figure 2.1). Each site was a storm drain inlet that was 
equipped with Water Board recognized trash full capture device.2 Attempts were made to spatially 
balance sites throughout the Bay Area while maintaining a homogenous land use for each site and a 
range economic profiles. The total number of sites included in the project and their associated land use 
and economic profile category are presented in Table 2.2.  

 

                        Table 2.2. Baseline Trash Generation Rate Project monitoring site categories.

                                                                              Median Household Income 
                             Land Use 

                                                          Low (<$50K)           Medium ($50‐100K)        High (>$100K) 

              High Density Residential                         9                        14                     7 
              Low Density Residential                          4                         7                     7 
              Rural Residential                                0                         0                     1 
              Commercial and Services                          5                         5                     2 
              Retail and Wholesale                            25                        22                    12 
              Light Industrial                                                          10 
              Heavy Industrial                                                           5 
              Urban Parks                                                                5 
              K‐12 Schools                                                               9 
              Total # of Sites                                                          149 
 
Requirements for inclusion of a monitoring site in the project included the following: 

            A correctly installed, Permittee‐owned full‐capture device (as defined by the MRP); 
            Known installation and past maintenance dates; 
            Willingness of the Permittee to cleanout and transport material from the site to a central 
             characterization site when indicated by the Project Manager;  
            Homogenous land use within and directly outside of the site drainage area; and,  
            Limited to no contribution of trash to the site that originates from areas outside of a Permittee’s 
             jurisdiction (e.g., no trash from State or Federally owned freeways or highways). 
              

                                                       
2
  A device or series of devices that traps all particles retained by a 5 mm mesh screen and has a design capacity of 
not less than the peak flow rate resulting from a one‐year, one‐hour, storm in the sub‐drainage area. 

                                                                         5 
                                                                                                                          2/1/2012 
                                                                               Baseline Trash Generation Rates 




                                                                                               
        Figure 2.1. Monitoring sites included in the Baseline Trash Generation Rates Project. 
 

2.1.3. Trash Full Capture Devices 
To effectively capture trash at each monitoring site, storm drains were equipped with storm drain 
inserts recognized by the Water Board as full capture devices. All full capture devices installed at 
monitoring sites were 5mm screen‐type devices installed in storm drain inlets. Specific types of storm 
drain inlet screens installed included: 

        Stormtek™ Catchbasin Connector Pipe Screens (Advanced Solutions, Inc.) 
        Connector Pipe Screens (West Coast Storm, Inc.) 
        Triton Bioflex Drop Inlet Trash Guard (Revel Environmental Manufacturing, Inc.)   
          


                                                     6 
                                                                                                    2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 


2.1.4. Monitoring Site Loading Areas 
For each monitoring site, the geographical area that contributes trash to each storm drain inlet was 
delineated using a standardized method. First, experienced field survey staff reviewed available site 
drainage maps and conducted field visits to each monitoring site. Hydrological drainage areas were 
delineated based on topography and the storm drainage system flow directions using the best available 
information. Once developed, hydrologic drainage areas were adjusted to conform with effective trash 
loading area definitions described in Section 5.2. Adjustments were made to provide consistency 
between trash baseline loading estimates and the maximum geographical extent of control measure 
implementation. 

2.1.5. Tracking of Important Factors 
Accumulation Periods 
Trash accumulation periods for each sampling event were defined for each monitoring site.  
Accumulation periods were defined as the number of days between the previous cleanout (or 
installation) date and the monitoring (cleanout) date. Installation and cleanout dates were provided by 
Permittees or third party contractors responsible for installation and/or cleanout of devices. 
Accumulation periods for each site and sampling event combination are included in Appendix C. 

Rainfall and Antecedent Dry Weather Days 
Data from rainfall gages located in as close proximity to each monitoring site as possible were identified. 
As a result, there were a variety of sources that provided precipitation data for this project.  Flood 
control districts in Alameda, Contra Costa and Santa Clara Counties and the National Weather Service 
(NWS) provided precipitation data, in addition to rainfall data collected at regional airports. Rainfall 
totals for 24‐hour periods and rainfall intensity3, as well as antecedent dry weather days4 were 
determined from these records for each site during each accumulation period. 

Street Sweeping Frequency and Parking Enforcement Data  
For each monitoring site, street sweeping frequency and parking enforcement data were obtained 
through a combination of municipal staff queries, observations of signs posted at sites, and municipality 
websites.  Parking enforcement, or the equivalent, was defined as the ability of a street sweeper to 
sweep to the curb.  Measures that constituted parking enforcement or equivalent included the 
following: 

            Posted signs restricting parking during sweeping times; 
            Parking enforcement and citations by local law enforcement; 
            Sweeping prior to the arrival of cars on the street; 
            Absence of parking on the street; and 
            Available, but unused street parking due to alternate and/or preferred parking areas (e.g., 
             driveways and garages in residential areas). 

                                                      




                                                       
3
     Greatest rainfall intensity in a 24 hour period 
4
     Days with less than 0.2 inches per day 

                                                          7 
                                                                                                      2/1/2012 
                                                                                      Baseline Trash Generation Rates 



2.2.         Monitoring and Characterization Events 
2.2.1. Trash Monitoring  
Three monitoring (cleanout) events were scheduled as part of this BASMAA Regional Project. The first 
two are pertinent to this Technical Memorandum.  

To ensure monitoring occurred during similar timeframes, the project manager scheduled cleanout 
events for all sites during the same week. Exact cleanout dates were provided by municipal staff, or third 
party contractors responsible for cleaning of the devices. Permittees were responsible for cleaning of 
sites and transporting all material to the centralized characterization location during the project. For all 
sites, trash and debris (e.g., dirt, leaves, rocks, bugs, etc.) were removed and placed in large, plastic 
garbage bags and transported to the central characterization site located at the City of San Jose’s 
Mabury Corporation Yard. 

The first monitoring event was timed to encompass the 2010‐2011 wet weather season (November 
through April).  A total of 71 monitoring sites were cleaned between May 16‐18, 2011 for this event. The 
trash accumulation period for the first event ranged between 66 to 257 days for each site.  During these 
site accumulation periods, between 3 and 14 inches of rainfall was observed at gages. The number of 
wet weather days5 during these accumulation periods was between 5 and 22 days, depending on the 
site.  

The second monitoring event was conducted between September 8 and 15, 2011 and designed to depict 
trash generation during the dry weather season (May through October). In addition to sites monitored 
during the first event, several additional sites were included in the second event, bringing the total 
number of sites to 149.  Again, the trash and debris captured by the devices was transported to the 
central characterization location by Permittees or contractors. For the second event, the accumulation 
periods at sites ranged from 36 to 355 days. Though this monitoring event occurred during the dry 
season, two unseasonable storms in early and late June resulted in rainfall at all sites installed prior to 
June 2011.  In addition, sites installed prior to the start of the second event, but not identified before 
the first event included rainfall from the previous wet season.  As a result rainfall totals at gages near 
the 149 monitoring sites ranged from 0 to 15 inches over 0 to 24 wet weather days during the 
accumulation periods. Rainfall was not observed during accumulation periods for those sites where 
devices were installed after June 2011. 

2.2.2. Trash Characterization 
Once material cleaned from storm drain inlets was received at the centralized characterization site, 
trash was separated from other debris using standard operating procedures outline by BASMAA 
(2011b). A third party contractor, Cascadia Consulting Group, Inc., was employed to conduct all trash 
characterization activities (Figure 2‐2).  Cascadia staff characterized all trash into the following 
categories: 

            Recyclable beverage containers labeled with a California Redemption Value (CRV); 
            Single‐use, plastic grocery bags; 
            Polystyrene foam; 
            Other plastic material; 
            Paper; 

                                                       
5
     A wet day is defined as a 24‐hour period with greater than 0.2 inches of rain 

                                                             8 
                                                                                                           2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 


       Metal; and, 
       Miscellaneous trash. 

Material from individual trash categories and other debris were weighed and the volume was measured 
for each site during each event. Material was placed in containers between 32 ounces and 5 gallons 
(depending on the volume). Weights and volumes were recorded on standardized field data sheets. 
Following the completion of measurements, all trash and debris were disposed of properly.   

All data recorded on field data sheets were transferred into a project database. To ensure that all data 
were transferred correctly, quality assurance and control checks were performed throughout and 
following data entry.   

2.3.    Quality Assurance and Control Procedures 
Quality assurance procedures were implemented throughout the project to ensure that high quality 
data were obtained. Field forms and monitoring procedures developed by BASMAA (2011b) were used 
by all individuals monitoring (cleaning) material from sites. The procedures included specified labeling of 
bags of material collected from sites and mandatory cleaning instructions. A training event was also 
conducted for field crews to ensure proper understanding of field monitoring and quality control 
procedures.  

For the vast majority of sites/events, field monitoring procedures were followed and no issues were 
observed. However, of the 149 monitoring sites, data from 12 sites were removed from the project due 
to one or more of the following issues: 

       Installation Errors – device was installed incorrectly or in the wrong location; 
       Maintenance Errors – monitoring occurred at the incorrect site and as a result a storm drain 
        inlet without a device was cleaned; 
       Book‐keeping Errors – the location of the device that was cleaned or cleanout date could not be 
        confirmed; 
       Land Use Errors – following delineation of the site drainage area and land use analysis, the site 
        could not be defined as depicting a single land use category. 
       Jurisdictional Errors – sites included streets swept by the California Department of 
        Transportation and not a Permittee. 

Quality assurance procedures performed during trash characterization included oversight by two project 
managers, and reweighing/measurements of material to ensure consistency, accuracy and 
completeness. Material from 8 and 19 sites was reweighed and measured during the first and second 
characterization events, respectively. Relative percent difference (RPD) calculations were used to assess 
the accuracy of measurements. These results are presented in Appendix B. 

                                  




                                                     9 
                                                                                                  2/1/2012 
                                                                              Baseline Trash Generation Rates 



3.0 MONITORING AND CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS 
The results of the first two characterization events are described below. Though both weights and 
volumes were measured, only trash volumes are discussed in this technical memorandum. Volume was 
chosen as the standard measurement unit because weights are not representative of lighter more 
prevalent trash categories, such as Styrofoam, paper, and single use plastic grocery bags; and weight 
measurements can be biased by the moisture content of the material, which varies based on site and 
event. Results for both weight and volume measurements will be presented in the Final Technical 
Report anticipated for completion in 2012. 

3.1.    Material Composition and Trash Types  
3.1.1. Monitoring Event #1 
A total of 626 gallons of material was removed and characterized from 71 sites during the first 
monitoring/characterization event. On average (mean), trash represented 22% (by volume) of all 
material removed and characterized. Plastic material (other than CRV‐labeled containers and plastic 
grocery bags) comprised the largest percentage (54%) of trash characterized during the first event. Trash 
identified as CRV‐labeled containers (14%) and paper (12%) made up the next most prevalent trash 
types. Plastic grocery bags and polystyrene foam accounted for 7% and 6% of the trash volume 
characterized, respectively.  Trash percentages in each category are shown in Figure 3.1. 

3.1.2. Monitoring Event #2 
A total of 1,353 gallons of material was removed and characterized from 149 sites during the second 
monitoring/characterization event. Similar to Event #1, on average, trash represented 27% (by volume) 
of all material removed and characterized. Plastic material (other than CRV‐labeled containers and 
plastic grocery bags) again comprised the largest percentage (47%) of trash characterized. Paper items 
were the second most prevalent trash category, comprising 25% of the trash volume. Plastic grocery 
bags and polystyrene foam accounted for 8% and 7% of the trash volume, respectively.  The percentages 
of trash in each category are shown in Figure 3.1. 

 




                                                   10 
                                                                                                   2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 


                                                                                Metal
       Event #1                                                                  0%
                                                                        Paper           Miscellaneous
                                                                         12%                 7%


                                                                                             Recyclable 
                                                                                              Beverage 
                                                                                           Containers (CRV‐
       Debris                       Trash
                                                                                               labeled)
        78%                         22%               Other Plastic                              14%
                                                         54%



                                                                                      Plastic Grocery 
                                                                                            Bags
                                                                                             7%
                                                                                  Polystyrene Foam
                                                                                         6%



       Event #2                                                                           Metal
                                                                                           1%
                                                                      Paper
                                                                       25%                         Miscellaneous
                                                                                                        9%

                                                                                                 Recyclable 
                                   Trash                                                         Beverage 
                                   27%                                                           Containers 
       Debris                                                                                  (CRV‐labeled)
                                                      Other Plastic
        73%                                              47%
                                                                                                    3%

                                                                                              Plastic Grocery 
                                                                                                   Bags
                                                                                                     8%


                                                                                    Polystyrene Foam
                                                                                           7%


   Figure 3.1. Trash types characterized in monitoring events 1 and 2.



3.2.    Calculation of Generation Rates 
All existing data and associated information on trash captured via monitored full capture treatment 
devices at project monitoring sites were compiled into a simple Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. Data 
underwent quality assurance checks prior to being utilized for generation rate calculation. Any data 
deemed suspect was checked and either corrected or removed from the dataset if the data quality could 
not be verified. The following sections briefly describe the preliminary data analysis and calculation 
methods that were used in developing the preliminary trash generation rates presented in this section. 

3.2.1. Individual Site Generation Rate Calculations 
Data from 137 sites collected during monitoring events 1 and 2 were used to calculate preliminary trash 
generation rates.  A site‐specific trash generation rate was developed for each site by performing the 
following steps:  
 
     1. For both events, the total volume of trash observed and the total accumulation period for each 
        site were calculated. The result was a total volume of trash collected to‐date at each site and a 
        total accumulation period (i.e., number of days trash accumulated). 


                                                    11 
                                                                                                                 2/1/2012 
                                                                                                                                                                                                 Baseline Trash Generation Rates 



       2. For each site, the total number of wet weather days (i.e., days with >0.2 inches of rain observed 
          in the nearest rainfall gage) during the total accumulation period was calculated. 
       3. The street sweeping effectiveness for each monitoring site was then estimated using the 
          effectiveness curve presented in Figure 3.2 and based on storm frequency (i.e., number of wet 
          weather days) during the accumulation period, parking enforcement and street sweeping 
          frequency.  
       4. A generation rate (volume per day) was then calculated by dividing the total trash volume by the 
          product of the total accumulation period and the inverse of the street sweeping effectiveness, 
          as shown in Equation 1.   
 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    (1) 
where: 

             R            =                                             site‐specific trash generation rate (gal/day) 
             V            =                                             total trash volume for a site during the monitoring period(s)6 (gallons) 
             D            =                                             total accumulation period for a site (days) 
             E            =                                             the street sweeping effectiveness for a site (fraction), as determined from Figure 3.2. 


 
 
                                                                                          Effectiveness with Parking Enforcement                             Effectiveness With No Parking Enforcement
                                                           100%
                                                           95%
                                                           90%
                                                           85%
                                                           80%
                                                           75%
                           Street Sweeping Effectiveness




                                                           70%
                                                           65%
                                                           60%
                                                           55%
                                                           50%
                                                           45%
                                                           40%
                                                           35%
                                                           30%
                                                           25%
                                                           20%
                                                           15%
                                                           10%
                                                            5%
                                                            0%
                                                                  0.0
                                                                        0.2
                                                                              0.4
                                                                                    0.6
                                                                                           0.8
                                                                                                 1.0
                                                                                                       1.2
                                                                                                             1.4
                                                                                                                   1.6
                                                                                                                         1.8
                                                                                                                               2.0
                                                                                                                                     2.2
                                                                                                                                           2.4
                                                                                                                                                 2.6
                                                                                                                                                       2.8
                                                                                                                                                             3.0
                                                                                                                                                                   3.2
                                                                                                                                                                         3.4
                                                                                                                                                                               3.6
                                                                                                                                                                                     3.8
                                                                                                                                                                                           4.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                 4.2
                                                                                                                                                                                                       4.4
                                                                                                                                                                                                             4.6
                                                                                                                                                                                                                   4.8
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         5.0




                                                                                                   Street Sweeping Frequency/Storm Frequency
                                                                                                
        Figure 3.2. Street sweeping effectiveness curve based on level of parking enforcement and the ratio
        of street sweeping frequency to storm frequency (adapted from Armitage 2001).



                                                       
6
     For sites monitored during both events, the sum of the volume for the two events was used. 

                                                                                                                                     12 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 


3.2.2. Comparison to Explanatory Factors 
Based on the conceptual model of trash baseline loads from MS4s (see Figure 2‐1), a number of factors 
(e.g., land use, economic profile, rainfall) may affect trash baseline generation and loading. Preliminary 
comparisons were made to evaluate the potential relationships between calculated generation rates 
and these factors. The results of these comparisons are presented in the following sections.  

Land Use 
The average percentage of material identified as trash, varied by site and land use. As illustrated in Table 
3.1, the lowest average percentages of trash were observed at sites with land uses classified as rural, 
low density residential, or urban parks. The highest percentages were observed in sites with industrial, 
high density residential and retail/wholesale land uses. Variations in trash percentages are likely due to 
both variations in trash generation (i.e., sources) and sources of vegetation (e.g., deciduous trees).  


                         Table 3.1. Number of monitoring sites and percentages of
                         trash in each land use category.

                                      Land use               # of sites    % Trash 
                          Rural Residential                      1            1
                          Low Density Residential               17            6
                          Urban Parks                            5            6
                          K‐12 Schools                           9           14
                          Commercial and Services                8           21
                          Retail and Wholesale                  52           28
                          High Density Residential              28           30
                          Light and Other Industrial             9           31
                          Heavy Industrial                       4           33
                          Total                                 137
 
 
To assess relationships between trash generation rates and land use, sites were grouped into their 
specific land use classes and box‐plots were created (Figure 3.3). Visual comparisons of plots suggest 
that land use appears to play an important factor in trash generation, and therefore generation rates 
were developed for seven land use class categories. Due to the limited number of sites and lack of 
differentiation in generation rates, sites depicting light industrial, heavy industrial and 
commercial/services were grouped together.  
 
Once additional data are obtained via the third monitoring event, more robust statistical comparisons 
between land uses will be conducted to further assess the relationships and differences in generation 
rates between land uses.  
 




                                                       13 
                                                                                                   2/1/2012 
                                                                                                                                                                                                               Baseline Trash Generation Rates 



                                                     10000




              Generation Rates (gallons/acre/year)
                                                     1000


                                                       100


                                                        10


                                                         1


                                                       0.1


                                                      0.01




                                                                                                                       K-12 Schools




                                                                                                                                                                       Urban Parks
                                                                     Retail and Wholesale




                                                                                            High Density Residential




                                                                                                                                            Commercial and Services/




                                                                                                                                                                                     Low Density Residential




                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Rural Residential
                                                                                                                                                Heavy, Light and
                                                                                                                                                Other Industrial
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
                                                             Figure 3.3. Comparison of generation rates by land use class.
 

Economic Profile and Population Density 
Sites monitored to‐date represent a range of economic profiles (i.e., household median incomes) and 
population densities. These factors may affect trash generation and further explain variability within 
each land use class. However, due to the limited timeframe available to complete this portion of the 
project and knowing that additional data collected via event #3 would soon be available, statistical tests 
of correlations between these potentially important factors and generation rates have not yet been 
conducted. As part of the Final Technical Report development in 2012, statistical analyses will be 
conducted on the entire trash generation rate dataset (including data from event #3) to better assess 
the importance of economic profiles and population densities in trash generation. 

3.2.3. Baseline Generation Rates  
Based on the initial analyses described in the previous sections, preliminary trash generation rates were 
developed for seven land use classes. An average generation rate for each land use class was developed 
by simply dividing the sum of the site‐specific daily generation rates for sites within that class, by the 
sum of the effective loading areas for those set of sites. Then, the average daily generation rate for each 
land use category was simply multiplied by 365 days to estimate the preliminary annual baseline trash 
generation rate for each land use class. These preliminary generation rates are illustrated in Table 3.2.   
 
 




                                                                                                                                      14 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 


                              Table 3.2. Preliminary Trash Generation Rates by Land Use Category.
                                                                                    Annual
                                                          Land Use              Generation Rate 
                                                                                 (gal/acre/yr) 
                                    Retail and Wholesale                              29.99 
                                    High Density Residential                          17.04 
                                    K‐12 Schools                                      13.14 
                                    Commercial/Services and
                                                                                      7.08 
                                    Heavy, Light and Other Industrial 
                                    Urban Parks                                       2.14 
                                    Low Density Residential                           1.25 
                                                              7
                                    Rural Residential                                 0.17 
 

4.0 DEVELOPING TRASH BASELINE LOADING RATES AND 
    LOADS  
Provisions C.10.a(ii) of the MRP requires Permittees to develop and submit a baseline trash load to the 
Water Board. The following sections describe the methods and equation used to convert generation 
rates into baseline loads. In summary, Permittees first applied these rates to their effective loading 
areas within the their jurisdictional areas. The result was a generated load that did not account for key 
baseline control measures implemented by a Permittee. The generated load, therefore, must be 
adjusted based on the estimated effectiveness of these baseline control measures. The result of these 
adjustments is a baseline load. 

4.1.         Baseline Trash Loading Equation 
Based on the MS4 trash loads equation presented in Armitage and Rooseboom (2000), Equation 2 was 
developed to establish the annual trash baseline load from MS4s. This equation is based on the factors 
described in the previous section and methods described in the project sampling and analysis plan (EOA 
2011b).  
                                                                                                                            
                                                          ∑                                                             (2) 
where: 

                         =              preliminary baseline trash load from MS4 (gal/year) 
             i           =              land use category 
             n           =              total number of land use categories (7) 
             Ri          =              average annual trash generation rate for land use category i (gal/acre) from 
                                        Table 4.2 
             Ai           =             total effective loading area in land use category i (acre) 

                                                       
7
  Due to the limited sample size in the rural residential land use class, low density residential sites with generation 
rates in the bottom quartile were included in this calculation. 

                                                                      15 
                                                                                                                2/1/2012 
                                                                                  Baseline Trash Generation Rates 



        S i      =       Estimated baseline street sweeping effectiveness for an effective loading area 
                         with land use i (dimensionless) based on Figure 3.2 
        Pi       =       Estimated effectiveness of baseline maintenance conducted at a pump station 
                         with a trash rack (0.25) draining an effective loading area with land use i 
                         (dimensionless)  
        D        =       Estimated effectiveness of baseline storm drain inlet maintenance (0.05) 
         

4.2.    Jurisdictional and Effective Loading Areas 
For the purpose for developing baseline trash loads, a Permittee’s jurisdictional area was defined as all 
urban land areas within its geographical boundaries that are directly subject to MRP requirements. Land 
use areas identified by a Permittee that were not included within a Permittee’s jurisdictional area 
include:  
 
     Federal and State of California Facilities and Roads (e.g., Interstates, State Highways, Military 
        Bases, Prisons); 
     Roads Owned and Maintained by other municipalities (e.g., Unincorporated Counties); 
     Public and Private Colleges and Universities; 
     Non‐urban Land Uses (e.g., agriculture, forest, rangeland, open space, wetlands, water); 
     Communication or Power Facilities (e.g., PG & E Substations); 
     Water and Wastewater Treatment Facilities; and, 
     Other Transportation Facilities (e.g., airports, railroads, and maritime shipping ports). 
 
Permittee jurisdictional areas were further delineated into effective trash loading areas in an attempt 
to represent the land areas that are believed to generate the vast majority of trash that could reach an 
MS4. The goal was to eliminate land areas not directly connected to the MS4 or contributing trash to a 
Permittee’s MS4 (e.g., large backyards and rooftops), while providing consistency with areas affected by 
control measure implementation. Effective trash loading areas obviously vary between sites and 
sources, making delineation challenging. As a first order approximation, effective loading areas were 
developed by creating a 200‐foot buffer that extends from either side of street center lines within 
Permittee jurisdictional areas (i.e., 400‐foot total). This effective loading area serves as the land area for 
which generation and baseline loading rates are applied to develop a baseline load. An illustration of an 
example effective loading area is presented in Figure 4.1. 
 




                                                      16 
                                                                                                       2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 




                             Street 
                             Center 
                              lines 




                                             Effective Loading Area 
                                                 (400 ft buffer)




                                                                                        
                          Figure 4.1 Example of effective trash loading areas.
 

4.3.    Accounting for Baseline Control Programs  
To account for current load reductions due to baseline control measures, trash generation rates were 
adjusted based on the estimated effectiveness (i.e., percent removal) of three key control measures. 
These control measures are described in the following sections. 

4.3.1. Baseline Street Sweeping 
Street sweeping programs can substantially affect trash loads to MS4s (BASMAA 2011a). Specifically, the 
effectiveness of a sweeping program in reducing trash is governed by the frequency of sweeping and the 
ability of a sweeper to reach the curb, as a result of parking enforcement or the lack of parked during 
sweeping hours. A "baseline" street sweeping program is defined as the sweeping frequency and 
parking enforcement (or equivalent) implemented by Permitee prior to effective date of the MRP. To 
not penalize implementers of effective street sweeping programs prior to the effective date of the MRP, 
however, a baseline street sweeping frequency ceiling was established. The baseline frequency ceiling 
was defined as once per week for retail land uses and twice per month for all other land uses. These 
sweeping frequencies represent the average frequency currently implemented by Permittees.  

For those Permittees that currently sweep at an enhanced level (i.e., at a frequency greater than the 
baseline ceiling), only trash load reductions up to the baseline ceiling level are accounted for in a 
Permittee’s baseline trash load (Figure 4.2). Consistent with the Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method, 
load reductions associated with implementation levels greater than the baseline ceiling are accounted 
for as “enhanced” control measures (i.e., toward load reduction goals). For those Permittees that sweep 
less frequent than the baseline ceiling, sweeping frequencies currently implemented by a Permittee 
serve as the baseline level of implementation.  




                                                    17 
                                                                                               2/1/2012 
                                                                                                                   Baseline Trash Generation Rates 




                                                                  Baseline Ceiling     Enhanced (Existing or Future)

                                                             12




                         Sweeping Frequency (times/month) 
                           Monthly Sweeping Frequency
                                                             10

                                                              8

                                                              6

                                                              4

                                                              2

                                                              0
                                                                   Retail/Wholesale              Other Land Uses
                                                                                      Land Use
                                                                                                                           
    Figure 4.2. Baseline ceilings for street sweeping frequencies in retail/wholesale and other land uses.
                                                                                        

4.3.2. Baseline Storm Drain Inlet Cleaning 
In addition to street sweeping, baseline storm drain inlet maintenance (cleaning) can also remove trash 
that would have otherwise entered an MS4. Based on a review of annual reports and queries of 
Permittee staff, a baseline ceiling for storm drain inlet maintenance was established at an average 
frequency of once per year. For those Permittees that currently maintain their storm drain inlets at an 
enhanced level (i.e., at a frequency greater than the baseline ceiling), only trash load reductions up to 
the baseline ceiling level are accounted for in a Permittee’s baseline trash load. Consistent with the 
Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method, load reductions associated with implementation levels greater 
than the baseline ceiling are accounted for as “enhanced” control measures (i.e., toward load reduction 
goals). For those Permittees that maintain less frequent than the baseline ceiling, the current frequency 
implemented by a Permittee serve as the baseline level of implementation.  

Based on the literature review conducted by BASMAA (2011a), maintaining an annual maintenance 
frequency provides a reduction of 5% of the trash load remaining after accounting for the load removed 
via baseline sweeping. 

4.3.3. Baseline Stormwater Pump Station Maintenance 
For Permittees that maintain pump stations with trash racks, the estimated volume of trash removed 
annually from each pump station prior to the effective date of the MRP is considered the baseline level 
of implementation. Baseline pump station maintenance was assumed to capture roughly 25% of the 
trash draining to the pump station. This effectiveness rating was based on the review of control measure 
effectiveness conducted by BASMAA (2011a).  

 


                                                                                      18 
                                                                                                                                        2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 


4.4.    Reporting of Trash Baseline Loads 
Preliminary estimates of trash baseline loads from Bay Area MS4s are reported in Permittee‐specific 
Short‐Term Trash Load Reduction Plans submitted to the Water Board on February 1, 2012. Baseline 
trash loads were developed consistently among all Permittees and are based on the best available 
information. As additional information becomes available and knowledge is gained through the 
development process, methods described in this technical memorandum to develop baseline loading 
rates may be revised. Additionally, trash generation and baseline loading rates and loads may be revised 
based on new information. 

         
5.0 REFERENCES 
Armitage, N., & Rooseboom, A. (2000). The removal of urban litter from stormwater conduits and 
streams: Paper 1 ‐ The quantities involved and catchment litter management options. Water SA , 26 (2), 
181‐187. 

Armitage, N. (2001). The removal of Urban Litter from Stormwater Drainage Systems.  Ch 19 in 
Stormwater Collection Systems Design Handbook. L.W. Mays, Ed., McGraw‐Hill Companies, Inc. ISBN 0‐
07‐1354471‐9, New York, USA, 2001, 35 pp. 

BASMAA (2011a). Methods to Estimate Baseline Trash Loads from Bay Area Municipal Stormwater 
Systems: Technical Memorandum #1. Prepared for the Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies 
Association (BASMAA). Oakland. Prepared by Eisenberg, Olivieri and Associates (EOA). 

BASMAA (2011b). Baseline Trash Loading Rates from Bay Area Municipal Stormwater Systems: Sampling 
and Analysis Plan.  Prepared for the Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Association (BASMAA). 
Oakland. Prepared by Eisenberg, Olivieri and Associates (EOA). 

 

 




                                                   19 
                                                                                                2/1/2012 
                                                                                   Baseline Trash Generation Rates 



GLOSSARY 
 
Baseline Implementation: The level of implementation for a specific trash control measure that forms 
the starting point for tracking progress toward trash load reduction. 
Baseline Load: the sum of the pollutant loads from a Permittee’s effective loading area, adjusted for 
baseline implementation of street sweeping, storm drain inlet maintenance, and pump station 
maintenance.   
Best Management Practice (BMP): Any activity, technology, process, operational method or measure, 
or engineered system, which when implemented prevents, controls, removes, or reduces pollution. A 
BMP is also referred to as a control measure. 
Conceptual Model: A model that explicitly describes and graphically represents all existing knowledge 
on the sources of a pollutant, its fate and transport, and/or its effects in the ecosystem. 
Control Measure: See Best Management Practice. 
Discharge: A release or flow of stormwater or other substance from a stormwater conveyance system. 
Effectiveness (with regard to Control Measures): A measure of how well a control measure reduces 
trash from entering the MS4. 

Effective Loading Area: The land area that directly contributes trash to a Permittee’s MS4. Operationally 
defined as a 200‐foot buffer outward from street centerlines within a Permittee's jurisdictional area.  
Full Capture Device: A single device or series of devices that can trap all particles retained by a 5 mm 
mesh screen, and has a treatment capacity that exceeds the peak flow rate resulting from a one‐year, 
one‐hour storm in the subdrainage area treated by the BMP. 
Generated Load:  The load (volume) of trash that is available to an MS4 under a no street sweeping, 
storm drain inlet and pump station maintenance scenario. 
Generation Rate: The rate (expressed as volume/acre/year) for specific land areas at which trash is 
available to an MS4 under a no street sweeping, storm drain inlet and pump station maintenance 
scenario.  
Jurisdictional Area: All urban land areas within a Permittee's boundaries that are subject to the 
requirements in the MRP and for which a municipality has oversight. 
Litter: As defined by California Code Section 68055.1(g), litter means all improperly discarded waste 
material, including, but not limited to, convenience food, beverage, and other product packages or 
containers constructed of steel, aluminum, glass, paper, plastic, and other natural and synthetic 
materials, thrown or deposited on the lands and water. 
Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4): "a conveyance or system of conveyances (including 
roads with drainage systems, municipal streets, catch basins, curbs, gutters, ditches, man‐made 
channels, or storm drains): (i) Owned or operated by a state, city, town, borough, county, parish, district, 
association, or other public body (created to or pursuant to state law) including special districts under 
state law such as a sewer district, flood control district or drainage district, or similar entity, or an Indian 
tribe or an authorized Indian tribal organization, or a designated and approved management agency 
under section 208 of the Clean Water Act that discharges into waters of the United States. (ii) Designed 
or used for collecting or conveying stormwater; (iii) Which is not a combined sewer; and (iv) Which is not 
part of a Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW) as defined at 40 CFR 122.2." (40 CFR 122.26(b)(8)) 

                                                      20 
                                                                                                        2/1/2012 
Technical Memorandum 


Receiving Waters: Natural water bodies (e.g., creeks, lakes, bays, estuaries) 
Stormwater: Runoff from roofs, roads and other surfaces that is generated during rainfall and snow 
events and flows into a stormwater conveyance system. 
Storm Drain Inlet: Part of the stormwater drainage system where surface runoff enters the 
underground conveyance system. Includes side inlets located adjacent to curbs and grate inlets located 
on the surface of a street or parking lot. 
Storm Drain Insert: A device (e.g., screen or basket) designed to capture trash capture within a storm 
drain inlet. 
Stormwater Conveyance System: Any pipe, ditch or gully, or system of pipes, ditches, or gullies, that is 
owned or operated by a governmental entity and used for collecting and conveying stormwater. 
Trash: Litter (as defined by California Code Section 68055.1g), excluding sediments, sand, vegetation, oil 
and grease, and exotic species, that cannot pass through a 5 mm mesh screen. 
Urban Runoff: All flows in a stormwater drainage system and consists stormwater (wet weather flows) 
and non‐storm water illicit discharges (dry weather flows). 
 

 

 

 

 

 




                                                    21 
                                                                                                  2/1/2012 
                                Baseline Trash Generation Rates 



             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
       APPENDIX A 
Monitoring Site Descriptions 




             22 
                                                     2/1/2012 
 
      Appendix A ‐ Monitoring Site Descriptions 

                                                                        Dominant Land Use            Days                          Average Median 
                                                                                                                   Parking                             Pop Density‐within 2‐acre 
    BASMAA                                                               within Hydrologic         Between                        Household Income 
                   City        County        Latitude    Longitude                                             Enforcement (or                            buffer around site 
     Site ID                                                            Drainage Area and 2‐        Street                         in 2‐acre buffer 
                                                                                                                 Equivalent)                              (Individuals/acre) 
                                                                       acre buffer around site     Sweeping                          around site 

     BE01        Brisbane     San Mateo      37.68004    ‐122.39849    High Density Residential      none            no                $58,600                   15.56 

     BK01        Berkeley     Alameda        37.85756    ‐122.26772     Retail and Wholesale         3.5             yes               $35,300                   20.12 

     BK02        Berkeley     Alameda        37.86734    ‐122.27033         K‐12 Schools             none            yes               $13,100                   30.03 

     BK03        Berkeley     Alameda        37.87002    ‐122.28412     Retail and Wholesale         1.4             yes               $27,800                   23.74 

     BK04        Berkeley     Alameda        37.85653    ‐122.29489        Heavy Industrial           15             no                $33,800                   0.43 

     BR01       Brentwood    Contra Costa    37.9618     ‐121.73534     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $98,300                    6.3 

     BR02       Brentwood    Contra Costa    37.93997    ‐121.73777     Retail and Wholesale          14             yes              $141,600                   5.44 

     BR04       Brentwood    Contra Costa    37.93134    ‐121.69672     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $54,600                   8.88 

     DN01         Dublin      Alameda        37.70407    ‐121.91489          Urban Parks              7              yes               $72,100                   4.67 

     DN02         Dublin      Alameda        37.70386     ‐121.914           Urban Parks              7              yes               $72,100                   4.67 

     DN03         Dublin      Alameda        37.71684    ‐121.92666    Low Density Residential        7              yes               $76,700                   9.32 

     DN04         Dublin      Alameda        37.71481    ‐121.92721    Low Density Residential        15             yes               $73,900                   10.5 

     FR01        Fremont      Alameda        37.57133    ‐122.03228     Retail and Wholesale          30             yes               $73,200                   12.8 

     FR02        Fremont      Alameda        37.56358    ‐122.01732         K‐12 Schools              30             yes               $66,700                   12.39 

     FR03        Fremont      Alameda        37.53444    ‐121.96659     Retail and Wholesale          30             yes               $35,000                   28.05 

     FR04        Fremont      Alameda        37.53171    ‐121.95881     Retail and Wholesale          30             yes               $52,700                   14.31 

     LV01       Livermore     Alameda        37.7015     ‐121.81461    Commercial and Services        7              yes              $199,100                   1.21 

     LV02       Livermore     Alameda        37.69917    ‐121.77336     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes              $107,800                   3.54 

     OK01        Oakland      Alameda        37.77387    ‐122.22911     Retail and Wholesale         none            yes               $30,200                   8.01 

                                                                                       23 
                                                                                                                                                                         2/1/2012 
 
                                                                         Dominant Land Use            Days                          Average Median 
                                                                                                                    Parking                             Pop Density‐within 2‐acre 
    BASMAA                                                                within Hydrologic         Between                        Household Income 
                   City         County        Latitude    Longitude                                             Enforcement (or                            buffer around site 
     Site ID                                                             Drainage Area and 2‐        Street                         in 2‐acre buffer 
                                                                                                                  Equivalent)                              (Individuals/acre) 
                                                                        acre buffer around site     Sweeping                          around site 

     OK02        Oakland       Alameda        37.76932    ‐122.2291         Heavy Industrial          none            yes               $37,500                   4.97 

     OK04        Oakland       Alameda        37.80312    ‐122.28091     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $13,700                   14.62 

     OR01         Orinda      Contra Costa    37.87842    ‐122.18295     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes              $103,900                   0.97 

      PL01      Pleasanton     Alameda        37.70028    ‐121.87022     Retail and Wholesale          15             yes               $99,300                   8.19 

      PL02      Pleasanton     Alameda        37.69915    ‐121.89833    Commercial and Services        7              yes               $71,100                   1.64 

      RI01      Richmond      Contra Costa    37.93302    ‐122.32921     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $40,200                   13.96 

      RI02      Richmond      Contra Costa    37.92248    ‐122.34367    High Density Residential       30             yes               $14,400                    1.6 

      RI03      Richmond      Contra Costa    37.9241     ‐122.3478     High Density Residential       7              yes               $14,400                    1.6 

      SJ01       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.36732    ‐121.86348        Light Industrial           30             no                $54,800                   14.23 

      SJ03       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.36713    ‐121.86334        Light Industrial           30             no                $54,800                   14.23 

      SJ04       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.36661    ‐121.86423        Light Industrial           30             no                $54,800                   14.23 

      SJ05       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.36611    ‐121.8652         Light Industrial           30             no                $54,800                   14.23 

      SJ06       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.36483    ‐121.86717        Light Industrial           30             no                $49,600                   11.35 

      SJ07       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.36437    ‐121.87085        Light Industrial           7              yes               $39,000                   4.07 

      SJ08       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.36299    ‐121.86952        Light Industrial           7              no                $39,000                   4.07 

      SJ09       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.35981    ‐121.86945        Heavy Industrial           7              yes               $39,000                   4.07 

      SJ10       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.35989    ‐121.86932        Heavy Industrial           7              yes               $39,000                   4.07 

      SJ11       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.36332    ‐121.86296    High Density Residential       30             yes               $54,800                   14.23 

      SJ12       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.36332    ‐121.86279    High Density Residential       30             yes               $54,800                   14.23 

      SJ15       San Jose     Santa Clara     37.34758    ‐121.82962    High Density Residential       30             yes               $39,500                   29.4 

                                                                                        24 
                                                                                                                                                                          2/1/2012 
 
                                                                      Dominant Land Use            Days                          Average Median 
                                                                                                                 Parking                             Pop Density‐within 2‐acre 
    BASMAA                                                             within Hydrologic         Between                        Household Income 
                  City        County       Latitude    Longitude                                             Enforcement (or                            buffer around site 
     Site ID                                                          Drainage Area and 2‐        Street                         in 2‐acre buffer 
                                                                                                               Equivalent)                              (Individuals/acre) 
                                                                     acre buffer around site     Sweeping                          around site 

      SJ16      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.3469     ‐121.82911    High Density Residential       30             yes               $39,500                   29.4 

      SJ17      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.34649    ‐121.82872    High Density Residential       30             yes               $39,500                   29.4 

      SJ19      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.35354    ‐121.82326     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $74,600                   19.31 

      SJ20      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.35593    ‐121.81929     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $66,700                   20.65 

      SJ21      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.35635    ‐121.81903     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $66,200                   19.42 

      SJ22      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.35018    ‐121.81949    High Density Residential       30             no                $63,800                   21.97 

      SJ23      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.35009    ‐121.8192     High Density Residential       30             yes               $71,000                   21.76 

      SJ24      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.35158    ‐121.81481    High Density Residential       22             yes               $75,700                   22.59 

      SJ25      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.35165    ‐121.81287    High Density Residential       30             yes               $73,300                   26.52 

      SJ26      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.35168    ‐121.81274    High Density Residential       30             yes               $72,900                   26.82 

      SJ27      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.31965    ‐121.82803     Retail and Wholesale          30             yes               $43,000                   20.91 

      SJ28      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.31951    ‐121.82705     Retail and Wholesale          30             yes               $43,000                   20.91 

      SJ29      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.31884    ‐121.82336    Commercial and Services        30             yes               $43,000                   20.91 

      SJ30      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.32169    ‐121.82715     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $50,800                   25.63 

      SJ31      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.32269    ‐121.82606     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $55,900                   24.45 

      SJ32      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.32282    ‐121.82496     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $62,800                   13.66 

      SJ33      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.32402    ‐121.82375     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $58,800                   19.87 

      SJ34      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.32645    ‐121.82018     Retail and Wholesale          7              no                $63,100                   5.77 

      SJ35      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.31279    ‐121.8524         Light Industrial           19             yes               $42,100                    3.1 

      SJ36      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.2981     ‐121.83446    Low Density Residential        30             yes               $45,100                   26.32 

                                                                                     25 
                                                                                                                                                                       2/1/2012 
 
                                                                      Dominant Land Use            Days                          Average Median 
                                                                                                                 Parking                             Pop Density‐within 2‐acre 
    BASMAA                                                             within Hydrologic         Between                        Household Income 
                  City        County       Latitude    Longitude                                             Enforcement (or                            buffer around site 
     Site ID                                                          Drainage Area and 2‐        Street                         in 2‐acre buffer 
                                                                                                               Equivalent)                              (Individuals/acre) 
                                                                     acre buffer around site     Sweeping                          around site 

      SJ37      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.29903    ‐121.82384     Retail and Wholesale          30             yes               $93,200                   10.03 

      SJ38      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.29407    ‐121.83206         K‐12 Schools              30             yes               $60,300                   11.19 

      SJ39      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.31618    ‐121.78791    High Density Residential       30             yes               $91,500                   18.62 

      SJ40      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.31412    ‐121.77331     Retail and Wholesale          30             no               $151,100                   2.72 

      SJ41      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.30691    ‐121.76065    High Density Residential       30             yes              $151,100                   22.84 

      SJ42      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.30727    ‐121.76765    High Density Residential       30             yes              $151,100                   10.72 

      SJ43      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.30241    ‐121.77415          Urban Parks              7              yes              $134,500                   2.99 

      SJ44      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.29503    ‐121.77499       Rural Residential           30             yes              $133,800                   3.43 

      SJ46      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.24728    ‐121.7758     Commercial and Services        7              yes              $123,200                   0.79 

      SJ47      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.23881    ‐121.77704        Light Industrial           7              yes               $91,000                   1.77 

      SJ48      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.23055    ‐121.82958    Low Density Residential        30             yes              $104,100                   7.93 

      SJ49      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.20577    ‐121.83005    Low Density Residential        30             yes              $200,000                   10.37 

      SJ50      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.19833    ‐121.83663    Low Density Residential        30             yes              $122,000                   0.61 

      SJ51      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.24086    ‐121.87439          Urban Parks              30             yes              $189,800                   5.18 

      SJ52      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.25049    ‐121.85738     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes              $146,900                   12.35 

      SJ53      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.25258    ‐121.85863     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes              $159,800                   10.37 

      SJ54      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.24645    ‐121.9148     Low Density Residential        30             yes               $81,400                   10.82 

      SJ55      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.26037    ‐121.93147     Retail and Wholesale         none            yes               $95,600                   8.47 

      SJ56      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.27349    ‐121.93459     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes              $113,800                   9.47 

      SJ58      San Jose    Santa Clara    37.30137    ‐121.95665    High Density Residential       30             yes              $135,000                   36.06 

                                                                                     26 
                                                                                                                                                                       2/1/2012 
 
                                                                         Dominant Land Use            Days                          Average Median 
                                                                                                                    Parking                             Pop Density‐within 2‐acre 
    BASMAA                                                                within Hydrologic         Between                        Household Income 
                   City          County       Latitude    Longitude                                             Enforcement (or                            buffer around site 
     Site ID                                                             Drainage Area and 2‐        Street                         in 2‐acre buffer 
                                                                                                                  Equivalent)                              (Individuals/acre) 
                                                                        acre buffer around site     Sweeping                          around site 

      SJ59       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.30102    ‐121.95654    High Density Residential       30             yes              $150,400                   44.47 

      SJ61       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.29803    ‐122.00955    Low Density Residential        30             yes              $110,700                   13.69 

      SJ64       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.34276    ‐121.84025    High Density Residential       30             yes               $48,600                   33.11 

      SJ65       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.36837    ‐121.91488    Commercial and Services        7              yes               $60,100                   5.76 

      SJ66       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.37709    ‐121.90272    Commercial and Services        7              yes               $59,900                   4.55 

      SJ69       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.38494    ‐121.89051    High Density Residential       7              yes               $87,300                   20.98 

      SJ70       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.39061    ‐121.86838    Low Density Residential        30             yes               $67,000                   12.44 

      SJ71       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.38723    ‐121.8483     High Density Residential       30             yes              $112,900                   19.38 

      SJ72       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.40462    ‐121.84836    High Density Residential       30             yes              $183,500                   0.67 

      SJ74       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.36014    ‐121.85287    High Density Residential       30             yes               $53,500                   45.31 

      SJ75       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.36017     ‐121.853     High Density Residential       30             yes               $53,300                   45.51 

      SJ76       San Jose      Santa Clara    37.3594     ‐121.84981    High Density Residential       30             yes               $55,500                   42.52 

      SL01      San Leandro     Alameda       37.72223    ‐122.15454     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $41,700                   11.89 

      SL02      San Leandro     Alameda       37.72278    ‐122.15629     Retail and Wholesale         2.3             yes               $42,400                    8.4 

      SL03      San Leandro     Alameda       37.70068    ‐122.14023     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $43,500                   20.99 

      SL04      San Leandro     Alameda       37.69638    ‐122.13911     Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $46,700                   20.93 

      SL05      San Leandro     Alameda       37.72063    ‐122.15486    Low Density Residential        30             no                $39,800                    22 

      SL06      San Leandro     Alameda       37.72227    ‐122.15397     Retail and Wholesale         none            no                $41,300                   13.86 

      SL07      San Leandro     Alameda       37.72223    ‐122.15371     Retail and Wholesale         none            no                $40,900                   15.85 

      SL08      San Leandro     Alameda       37.72218    ‐122.15189    Low Density Residential        30             no                $41,200                   17.84 

                                                                                        27 
                                                                                                                                                                          2/1/2012 
 
                                                                           Dominant Land Use            Days                          Average Median 
                                                                                                                      Parking                             Pop Density‐within 2‐acre 
    BASMAA                                                                  within Hydrologic         Between                        Household Income 
                   City         County        Latitude      Longitude                                             Enforcement (or                            buffer around site 
     Site ID                                                               Drainage Area and 2‐        Street                         in 2‐acre buffer 
                                                                                                                    Equivalent)                              (Individuals/acre) 
                                                                          acre buffer around site     Sweeping                          around site 

      SL09      San Leandro    Alameda       37.72256      ‐122.15269      Retail and Wholesale         2.3             yes               $41,000                   17.74 

      SL10      San Leandro    Alameda      37.72288977    ‐122.152863     Retail and Wholesale         2.3             no                $42,000                   16.1 

      SL11      San Leandro    Alameda       37.72362       ‐122.1538      Retail and Wholesale         2.3             no                $42,600                   15.52 

      SL12      San Leandro    Alameda       37.72303       ‐122.1549      Retail and Wholesale         2.3             yes               $42,400                    8.4 

      SL13      San Leandro    Alameda       37.72434      ‐122.15504      Retail and Wholesale         2.3             yes               $42,500                   12.97 

      SL14      San Leandro    Alameda       37.72449       ‐122.1574      Retail and Wholesale         2.3             yes               $42,400                    8.4 

      SL15      San Leandro    Alameda       37.72501      ‐122.15565     Commercial and Services        7              yes               $41,000                   17.63 

      SL16      San Leandro    Alameda       37.72544      ‐122.15455     Commercial and Services        7              yes               $39,800                   22.97 

      SL17      San Leandro    Alameda       37.72616      ‐122.15451     Commercial and Services       2.3             yes               $37,900                   24.13 

      SL18      San Leandro    Alameda       37.72693       ‐122.1561     High Density Residential       30             yes               $37,900                   24.13 

      SL19      San Leandro    Alameda        37.7175      ‐122.14295          K‐12 Schools              7              yes               $43,100                   13.27 

      SL20      San Leandro    Alameda       37.71527      ‐122.13972     High Density Residential       19             no                $42,900                   15.53 

      SL21      San Leandro    Alameda        37.7134      ‐122.13728     Low Density Residential        25             no                $42,800                   18.64 

      SL22      San Leandro    Alameda       37.71283      ‐122.13644          K‐12 Schools              19             yes               $45,500                   17.7 

      SL23      San Leandro    Alameda       37.71211      ‐122.16221      Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $57,700                   6.15 

      SL24      San Leandro    Alameda       37.68676      ‐122.13872      Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $42,200                   10.9 

      SL25      San Leandro    Alameda      37.68674207  ‐122.1370364      Retail and Wholesale          7              yes               $45,000                   10.07 

     SM01       San Mateo      San Mateo     37.53978      ‐122.31383          K‐12 Schools              15             yes               $74,800                   9.09 

     SM02       San Mateo      San Mateo     37.54567      ‐122.32826     Low Density Residential        15             yes              $119,500                    9.8 

     SM03       San Mateo      San Mateo     37.53572      ‐122.31082     Low Density Residential        15             yes               $87,600                   10.61 

                                                                                          28 
                                                                                                                                                                            2/1/2012 
 
                                                                          Dominant Land Use            Days                          Average Median 
                                                                                                                     Parking                             Pop Density‐within 2‐acre 
    BASMAA                                                                 within Hydrologic         Between                        Household Income 
                    City         County       Latitude     Longitude                                             Enforcement (or                            buffer around site 
     Site ID                                                              Drainage Area and 2‐        Street                         in 2‐acre buffer 
                                                                                                                   Equivalent)                              (Individuals/acre) 
                                                                         acre buffer around site     Sweeping                          around site 

     SM04        San Mateo     San Mateo      37.53647    ‐122.30906     Low Density Residential        15             yes               $77,700                   13.11 

     SM05        San Mateo     San Mateo      37.55487    ‐122.32848     Low Density Residential        15             yes              $119,100                   9.46 

     SM06        San Mateo     San Mateo      37.55719    ‐122.33249     Low Density Residential        15             yes              $122,500                   9.07 

     SM07        San Mateo     San Mateo      37.56544    ‐122.32262      Retail and Wholesale         none            yes               $47,000                   15.13 

     SM08        San Mateo     San Mateo      37.56728    ‐122.32005      Retail and Wholesale          15             yes               $54,100                   20.32 

     SM09        San Mateo     San Mateo      37.55509    ‐122.30704      Retail and Wholesale          15             yes               $61,300                   12.59 

     SM10        San Mateo     San Mateo      37.55388    ‐122.30559      Retail and Wholesale          15             yes               $60,000                   5.44 

     SM11        San Mateo     San Mateo      37.52993    ‐122.28971      Retail and Wholesale         2.3             yes               $47,400                   13.38 

     SM12        San Mateo     San Mateo      37.53267    ‐122.31431          K‐12 Schools              15             no                $90,000                   7.63 

     SP01        San Pablo    Contra Costa    37.95202    ‐122.33293      Retail and Wholesale         7.5             yes               $33,700                   14.3 

     SU01        Sunnyvale     Santa Clara    37.41715    ‐122.01632           Urban Parks              14             yes               $59,100                   0.14 

     SU02        Sunnyvale     Santa Clara    37.38306    ‐122.05709     High Density Residential       14             no                $67,900                   46.17 

     SU03        Sunnyvale     Santa Clara    37.39502    ‐122.01828          K‐12 Schools              14             yes               $56,500                   20.46 

     SU04        Sunnyvale     Santa Clara    37.39301    ‐122.01894          K‐12 Schools              14             no                $56,700                   20.83 

     WC01       Walnut Creek  Contra Costa  37.92923912  ‐122.0160505     Retail and Wholesale          15             yes               $96,600                   6.28 

     WC02       Walnut Creek  Contra Costa    37.91897    ‐122.03771      Retail and Wholesale          7              yes              $120,500                   8.53 

     WC03       Walnut Creek  Contra Costa    37.89737    ‐122.06758      Retail and Wholesale         2.3             yes               $48,700                   9.94 

     WC04       Walnut Creek  Contra Costa    37.87905    ‐122.07484      Retail and Wholesale          30             yes              $105,100                   6.38 

 


                                                                                         29 
                                                                                                                                                                           2/1/2012 
 
                        

 

 
                        

 

 

 

 

                 APPENDIX B 
              Quality Assurance 
    Relative Percent Reduction Calculations 
        




                      30 
                                               2/1/2012 
 
Event 1 

                                                    Duplicate 
                         Sample Total                              Relative Percent 
           BASMAA ID                              Total Volume 
                        Volume (gallons)                              Difference 
                                                    (gallons) 
              SJ05              9.36                   8.96             ‐4.3% 
              SJ20             32.72                  29.72             ‐9.2% 
              SJ25             19.28                  18.94             ‐1.8% 
              SJ31             11.34                  10.49             ‐7.5% 
             SM01              20.79                  19.50             ‐6.2% 
             OK02               8.87                   8.15             ‐8.1% 
             SL02               6.50                   6.80              4.5% 
             SL03               9.34                   9.58              2.5% 
             SL04              20.91                  19.65             ‐6.0% 
             Mean                                                       ‐4.0% 
 

Event 2 

                                                    Duplicate  
                         Sample Total                              Relative Percent 
       BASMAA ID                                  Total Volume  
                        Volume (gallons)                              Difference 
                                                    (gallons) 
            OK02               18.52                  17.99             ‐2.90% 
            OK04                9.44                  8.87              ‐6.00% 
             RI01              72.84                  72.77             ‐0.10% 
             RI02              21.19                  20.04             ‐5.40% 
             SJ11               7.73                  5.71             ‐26.20% 
             SJ12               4.81                  5.01               4.20% 
             SJ29               8.91                  7.16             ‐19.60% 
             SJ30              11.51                  10.66             ‐7.40% 
             SJ31              11.04                  9.35             ‐15.20% 
             SJ51               8.91                  8.23              ‐7.60% 
             SJ74               6.15                  5.96              ‐3.10% 
            SL09               12.52                  11.39             ‐9.00% 
            SL11               11.16                  10.61             ‐4.90% 
            SL23               15.91                  15.59             ‐2.00% 
            SL25               25.42                  25.35             ‐0.30% 
            SM12               23.89                  22.37             ‐6.40% 
            SP01               42.38                  38.37             ‐9.50% 
            SU03               23.84                  22.51             ‐5.60% 
            WC01                28.2                  27.73             ‐1.70% 
            Mean                                                        ‐6.80% 
                            
                                            31 
                                                                                   2/1/2012 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

                  
            APPENDIX C 
          Monitoring Results  

    Trash Characterization Volumes 




                  32 
                                      2/1/2012 
 

Appendix C ‐ Monitoring Results Trash Characterization Volumes (gallons) 

Event 1 (May 2011) 

                                                                         Trash Types 

    BASMAA      Total     Trash      Recyclable                Styrofoam                                                   Grand 
     Site ID    Debris    Total                     Plastic                                                                Total 
                                      Beverage                  Food and      Other 
                                                    Grocery                              Paper    Metal    Miscellaneous
                                     Containers                 Beverage      Plastic 
                                                     Bags 
                                   (CRV‐labeled)                  Ware 
     BK01        1.07     0.00         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.00      0.00     0.00         0.00          1.07
     BK02        0.54     0.00         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.00      0.00     0.00         0.00          0.54
     BK03        4.64     0.00         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.00      0.00     0.00         0.00          4.64
     BK04        2.14     0.05         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.05      0.00     0.00         0.00          2.19
     DN01        1.07     0.05         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.05      0.00     0.00         0.00          1.12
     DN02        2.14     0.13         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.08      0.05     0.00         0.00          2.27
     DN03       11.61     0.17         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.17      0.00     0.00         0.00         11.78
     DN04        0.71     0.20         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.20      0.00     0.00         0.00          0.91
     FR01       18.57     0.22         0.06          0.00         0.00         0.10      0.04     0.00         0.03         18.80
     FR02        4.11     0.25         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.17      0.08     0.00         0.00          4.35
     FR03        2.14     0.26         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.15      0.11     0.00         0.00          2.41
     FR04        5.71     0.28         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.11      0.11     0.05         0.00          5.99
     LV01        5.00     0.34         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.23      0.11     0.00         0.00          5.34
     LV02        2.14     0.36         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.11      0.17     0.00         0.08          2.50
     OK01        7.32     0.37         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.28      0.05     0.00         0.04          7.69
     OK02        5.00     0.39         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.34      0.05     0.00         0.00          5.39
     OK04        1.07     0.45         0.00          0.00         0.06         0.28      0.08     0.00         0.04          1.52
     PL01        3.75     0.50         0.00          0.17         0.00         0.23      0.10     0.00         0.00          4.25
     PL02        1.79     0.54         0.00          0.15         0.00         0.34      0.00     0.00         0.05          2.33
     SJ01        2.86     0.63         0.00          0.00         0.17         0.45      0.00     0.00         0.00          3.48
     SJ03        0.00     0.67         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.23      0.44     0.00         0.00          0.67
     SJ04        1.43     0.83         0.00          0.00         0.00         0.67      0.05     0.00         0.11          2.26

                                                                33 
                                                                                                                           2/1/2012 
 


                                                                        Trash Types 

    BASMAA      Total     Trash      Recyclable                Styrofoam                                                  Grand 
     Site ID    Debris    Total                     Plastic                                                               Total 
                                      Beverage                  Food and     Other 
                                                    Grocery                             Paper    Metal    Miscellaneous
                                     Containers                 Beverage     Plastic 
                                                     Bags 
                                   (CRV‐labeled)                  Ware 
      SJ05       2.50     0.87         0.00          0.00        0.00         0.54      0.22     0.00         0.11          3.37
      SJ06      17.14     0.87         0.13          0.00        0.00         0.54      0.11     0.00         0.10         18.01
      SJ07       3.93     0.89         0.00          0.00        0.00         0.67      0.17     0.00         0.06          4.82
      SJ08      24.64     0.94         0.00          0.00        0.00         0.89      0.05     0.00         0.00         25.59
      SJ09       1.79     0.98         0.26          0.00        0.00         0.71      0.00     0.00         0.00          2.76
      SJ10       2.86     1.01         0.00          0.00        0.00         0.34      0.67     0.00         0.00          3.86
      SJ11       3.93     1.07         0.00          0.17        0.34         0.56      0.00     0.00         0.00          5.00
      SJ12       5.36     1.09         0.47          0.15        0.00         0.40      0.08     0.00         0.00          6.45
      SJ15       2.50     1.18         0.13          0.00        0.00         0.71      0.17     0.00         0.17          3.68
      SJ16       8.04     1.42         0.00          0.28        0.17         0.11      0.83     0.00         0.03          9.46
      SJ17      18.75     1.53         0.00          0.00        0.00         0.67      0.14     0.11         0.61         20.28
      SJ19       9.11     1.60         0.00          0.00        0.06         0.89      0.10     0.00         0.56         10.71
      SJ20      10.00     1.67         0.09          0.23        0.00         1.25      0.05     0.00         0.05         11.67
      SJ21       8.57     1.73         0.00          0.44        0.07         1.07      0.05     0.00         0.10         10.30
      SJ22       5.00     1.76         0.00          0.23        0.00         0.89      0.56     0.00         0.09          6.76
      SJ23       3.93     1.85         0.00          0.15        0.00         1.07      0.45     0.00         0.18          5.78
      SJ24      18.26     1.89         0.00          0.67        0.00         0.94      0.14     0.00         0.14         20.15
      SJ25       7.50     1.94         0.00          0.00        0.00         1.61      0.11     0.00         0.22          9.44
      SJ26       8.66     1.95         0.13          0.28        0.13         1.16      0.17     0.00         0.09         10.61
      SJ27       3.75     1.95         0.00          0.11        0.00         1.61      0.17     0.00         0.06          5.70
      SJ28       7.50     2.25         0.00          0.56        0.00         1.25      0.33     0.00         0.11          9.75
      SJ29       1.61     2.34         0.22          0.17        0.11         1.43      0.33     0.00         0.08          3.95
      SJ30       6.16     2.35         0.00          0.00        0.00         1.61      0.61     0.03         0.11          8.51
      SJ31       8.39     2.41         0.16          0.28        0.00         1.43      0.26     0.00         0.28         10.80
      SJ32      10.36     2.43         0.20          0.00        0.00         1.00      0.13     0.00         1.11         12.79

                                                               34 
                                                                                                                          2/1/2012 
 


                                                                        Trash Types 

    BASMAA      Total     Trash      Recyclable                Styrofoam                                                  Grand 
     Site ID    Debris    Total                     Plastic                                                               Total 
                                      Beverage                  Food and     Other 
                                                    Grocery                             Paper    Metal    Miscellaneous
                                     Containers                 Beverage     Plastic 
                                                     Bags 
                                   (CRV‐labeled)                  Ware 
      SJ33       2.68     2.56         0.00          0.13        0.67         1.43      0.28     0.00         0.06          5.24
      SJ34      10.18     2.58         0.00          0.06        0.22         1.25      1.00     0.00         0.06         12.76
     SL01       13.57     2.67         0.11          0.11        0.11         1.79      0.22     0.00         0.33         16.25
     SL02        1.79     2.79         0.00          0.44        0.06         1.79      0.33     0.06         0.11          4.58
     SL03        6.96     2.98         0.00          0.00        0.17         2.14      0.44     0.00         0.22          9.94
     SL04        5.36     3.07         0.34          0.22        0.44         1.79      0.28     0.00         0.00          8.43
     SM01        1.43     3.20         0.69          0.28        0.28         1.43      0.34     0.00         0.17          4.62
     SM02        5.54     3.41         0.64          0.00        0.10         2.05      0.44     0.00         0.17          8.94
     SM03        5.71     3.44         0.09          0.00        0.44         2.68      0.16     0.00         0.07          9.16
     SM04       15.40     3.71         0.19          0.72        0.20         1.79      0.44     0.00         0.36         19.11
     SM05        7.41     3.72         0.16          0.22        0.20         2.41      0.50     0.00         0.23         11.13
     SM06        2.59     4.06         0.09          0.00        0.26         3.21      0.23     0.07         0.20          6.65
     SM07        3.93     4.34         1.00          0.45        0.00         2.14      0.45     0.00         0.28          8.26
     SM08       29.64     4.48         0.50          0.00        0.33         2.86      0.34     0.00         0.44         34.12
     SM09        7.32     4.84         0.09          0.67        0.56         2.86      0.44     0.00         0.22         12.16
     SM10        7.68     4.85         0.89          0.00        0.78         2.50      0.40     0.00         0.28         12.53
     SM11        6.07     4.87         1.33          0.89        0.44         1.79      0.08     0.00         0.34         10.94
     SM12        3.21     6.04         0.19          1.33        0.08         2.50      1.78     0.00         0.17          9.26
     SU01       25.00     6.22         1.94          0.00        0.39         2.95      0.44     0.00         0.50         31.22
     SU02       28.57     12.15        7.51          0.44        0.67         2.86      0.23     0.00         0.44         40.72
 

 

 


                                                               35 
                                                                                                                          2/1/2012 
 

Appendix C ‐ Monitoring Results Trash Characterization Volumes (gallons) 

Event 2 (September 2011) 

                                                                         Trash Types 
                                   Recyclable 
                                                            Styrofoam 
    BASMAA      Total     Trash     Beverage     Plastic                                                                   Grand 
                                                             Food and       Other 
     Site ID    Debris    Total    Containers    Grocery                                Paper    Metal    Miscellaneous    Total 
                                                             Beverage       Plastic 
                                      (CRV‐       Bags 
                                                               Ware 
                                    labeled)
    BE01        11.07     0.50         0.00       0.00        0.22           0.17       0.00     0.00         0.11         11.57
    BK01         2.68     0.78         0.00       0.00        0.00           0.44       0.22     0.00         0.11         3.46
    BK02        15.36     4.67         0.00       0.67        0.00           2.00       1.67     0.00         0.33         20.02
    BK03        11.25     2.77         0.00       0.00        0.11           1.33       1.22     0.03         0.08         14.02
    BK04         6.61     1.89         0.00       0.22        0.00           0.56       0.89     0.00         0.22         8.50
    BR01         5.18     2.19         0.00       0.56        0.05           0.67       0.67     0.03         0.22         7.36
    BR02        11.43     2.41         0.13       0.00        0.44           1.44       0.22     0.00         0.17         13.84
    BR03         6.43     0.92         0.25       0.00        0.00           0.22       0.33     0.00         0.11         7.35
    BR04         6.43     3.09         0.09       0.33        1.00           1.33       0.00     0.00         0.33         9.52
    DN01         5.00     0.00         0.00       0.00        0.00           0.00       0.00     0.00         0.00         5.00
    DN02        10.89     0.77         0.00       0.00        0.00           0.44       0.22     0.00         0.10         11.66
    DN03        12.68     1.89         0.00       0.22        0.00           1.33       0.22     0.00         0.11         14.57
    DN04         6.25     0.41         0.00       0.00        0.03           0.33       0.03     0.00         0.03         6.66
    FR01         2.14     0.33         0.00       0.00        0.00           0.06       0.22     0.03         0.03         2.47
    FR02        10.54     0.86         0.00       0.11        0.06           0.33       0.33     0.00         0.03         11.39
    FR03         3.39     0.94         0.00       0.00        0.00           0.78       0.00     0.00         0.17         4.34
    FR04         6.61     2.89         0.00       0.00        0.11           2.50       0.06     0.00         0.22         9.50
    LV01        16.61     0.17         0.00       0.00        0.00           0.11       0.03     0.00         0.04         16.78
    LV02         2.14     0.78         0.00       0.00        0.00           0.44       0.22     0.11         0.00         2.92
    OK01         1.96     2.68         0.00       0.67        0.22           1.33       0.22     0.01         0.22         4.64
    OK02        10.36     8.17         0.05       1.00        1.00           2.50       3.39     0.00         0.22         18.52
    OK03         3.57     0.77         0.00       0.00        0.05           0.44       0.22     0.00         0.05         4.34
    OK04         5.71     3.72         0.00       0.22        0.17           1.44       1.67     0.00         0.22         9.44
    OR01         0.20     0.30         0.00       0.00        0.00           0.17       0.11     0.03         0.00         0.50

                                                                36 
                                                                                                                           2/1/2012 
 

                                                                         Trash Types 
                                   Recyclable 
                                                            Styrofoam 
    BASMAA      Total     Trash     Beverage     Plastic                                                                   Grand 
                                                             Food and      Other 
     Site ID    Debris    Total    Containers    Grocery                                Paper    Metal    Miscellaneous    Total 
                                                             Beverage      Plastic 
                                      (CRV‐       Bags 
                                                               Ware 
                                    labeled)
    OR02         1.61      0.30        0.00       0.00        0.00          0.22        0.05     0.00         0.03         1.90
    PL01         2.32      0.88        0.00       0.00        0.05          0.44        0.11     0.05         0.22         3.20
    PL02         3.57      0.21        0.00       0.00        0.00          0.11        0.05     0.00         0.05         3.78
    RI01        30.00     42.84        0.13       4.00        3.56         25.00        9.37     0.00         0.78         72.84
    RI02        11.07     10.12        1.34       0.67        0.22          5.00        1.44     0.00         1.44         21.19
    RI03         3.93      7.15        0.68       0.22        1.33          1.78        1.78     0.03         1.33         11.08
    SC01         3.21      8.74        0.00       0.22        0.78          3.75        3.39     0.04         0.56         11.95
    SJ01         3.39      0.87        0.09       0.00        0.00          0.67        0.11     0.00         0.00         4.26
    SJ03         3.39      2.73        0.26       0.22        0.11          1.89        0.22     0.00         0.03         6.13
    SJ04         8.75      1.03        0.29       0.00        0.05          0.56        0.11     0.00         0.03         9.78
    SJ05         7.68      0.33        0.00       0.00        0.00          0.11        0.22     0.00         0.00         8.01
    SJ06         1.07      4.10        0.55       0.00        0.22          1.56        1.78     0.00         0.00         5.17
    SJ07         3.75      2.26        0.26       0.00        0.00          1.56        0.22     0.11         0.11         6.01
    SJ08         6.79      4.79        0.00       1.11        0.67          1.78        1.11     0.00         0.13         11.58
    SJ09         0.71      0.15        0.00       0.00        0.00          0.03        0.10     0.00         0.03         0.86
    SJ10         0.71      1.11        0.00       0.00        0.00          1.00        0.00     0.00         0.11         1.83
    SJ11         5.18      2.56        0.00       0.22        0.67          1.00        0.22     0.00         0.44         7.73
    SJ12         1.43      3.38        0.00       0.44        0.03          1.11        0.22     0.36         1.22         4.81
    SJ13         6.96      4.56        0.00       0.00        0.56          2.00        1.56     0.00         0.44         11.52
    SJ14         6.07      3.03        0.09       0.22        0.05          0.67        0.22     0.00         1.78         9.10
    SJ15         0.89      3.00        0.00       0.56        0.33          1.67        0.33     0.00         0.11         3.89
    SJ16         1.07      6.73        0.36       0.11        0.89          3.93        0.78     0.00         0.67         7.80
    SJ17         1.61      1.61        0.00       0.00        0.22          1.11        0.22     0.00         0.05         3.21
    SJ19         4.11      3.07        0.18       0.00        0.67          0.89        1.00     0.00         0.33         7.18
    SJ20        13.04      2.78        0.00       0.11        0.22          1.72        0.33     0.06         0.33         15.81
    SJ21         3.04      2.48        0.37       0.00        0.11          1.56        0.22     0.00         0.22         5.51
    SJ22         7.68      5.04        0.00       1.11        0.00          3.04        0.44     0.00         0.44         12.71


                                                                37 
                                                                                                                           2/1/2012 
 

                                                                         Trash Types 
                                   Recyclable 
                                                            Styrofoam 
    BASMAA      Total     Trash     Beverage     Plastic                                                                   Grand 
                                                             Food and      Other 
     Site ID    Debris    Total    Containers    Grocery                                Paper    Metal    Miscellaneous    Total 
                                                             Beverage      Plastic 
                                      (CRV‐       Bags 
                                                               Ware 
                                    labeled)
    SJ23         4.82     1.78         0.00       0.11        0.00          0.44        0.11     0.00         1.11         6.60
    SJ24         1.96     2.84         0.40       0.56        0.22          0.89        0.33     0.00         0.44         4.80
    SJ25         6.96     2.89         0.89       0.00        0.22          1.33        0.22     0.00         0.22         9.85
    SJ26         7.32     2.35         0.00       0.44        0.00          1.78        0.08     0.00         0.05         9.67
    SJ27         1.79     2.56         0.00       0.11        0.00          1.44        0.89     0.00         0.11         4.34
    SJ28         5.36     2.24         0.13       0.00        0.56          1.22        0.22     0.00         0.11         7.60
    SJ29         5.00     3.91         0.13       0.89        0.11          2.00        0.56     0.00         0.22         8.91
    SJ30         8.21     3.30         0.00       0.11        0.00          1.22        1.89     0.00         0.08         11.51
    SJ31         3.75     7.29         0.00       0.22        0.56          2.00        4.29     0.00         0.22         11.04
    SJ32         6.43     1.74         0.25       0.00        0.05          0.78        0.44     0.00         0.22         8.17
    SJ33         4.64     3.00         0.00       0.11        0.00          1.33        1.44     0.00         0.11         7.64
    SJ34         3.93     1.74         0.13       0.00        0.05          1.44        0.00     0.00         0.11         5.67
    SJ35         3.39     2.51         0.00       0.00        0.33          1.67        0.22     0.06         0.22         5.90
    SJ36         6.96     1.38         0.00       0.22        0.44          0.56        0.05     0.00         0.11         8.35
    SJ37         4.64     1.11         0.00       0.33        0.11          0.56        0.00     0.00         0.11         5.75
    SJ38         6.25     9.92         0.00       1.11        0.22          3.04        5.00     0.00         0.56         16.17
    SJ39         2.14     1.78         0.00       0.67        0.11          0.89        0.00     0.00         0.11         3.92
    SJ40         1.25     1.83         0.00       0.00        0.11          0.44        1.22     0.00         0.05         3.08
    SJ41         2.68     0.02         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.03        0.00     0.00         0.00         2.70
    SJ42         3.04     0.00         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.00        0.00     0.00         0.00         3.04
    SJ43         3.04     0.48         0.09       0.00        0.00          0.22        0.11     0.00         0.05         3.51
    SJ44         1.07     0.10         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.00        0.00     0.00         0.10         1.17
    SJ46         1.43     0.44         0.00       0.44        0.00          0.00        0.00     0.00         0.00         1.87
    SJ47         3.93     0.00         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.00        0.00     0.00         0.00         3.93
    SJ48         3.93     0.00         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.00        0.00     0.00         0.00         3.93
    SJ49         3.21     0.05         0.00       0.00        0.05          0.00        0.00     0.00         0.00         3.26
    SJ50         3.21     0.22         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.22        0.00     0.00         0.00         3.44


                                                                38 
                                                                                                                           2/1/2012 
 

                                                                         Trash Types 
                                   Recyclable 
                                                            Styrofoam 
    BASMAA      Total     Trash     Beverage     Plastic                                                                   Grand 
                                                             Food and      Other 
     Site ID    Debris    Total    Containers    Grocery                                Paper    Metal    Miscellaneous    Total 
                                                             Beverage      Plastic 
                                      (CRV‐       Bags 
                                                               Ware 
                                    labeled)
    SJ51         8.57     0.34         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.00        0.22     0.00         0.11         8.91
    SJ52         2.50     0.78         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.67        0.00     0.00         0.11         3.28
    SJ53         2.86     2.22         0.00       0.00        0.11          1.67        0.33     0.00         0.11         5.08
    SJ54         4.82     0.00         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.00        0.00     0.00         0.00         4.82
    SJ55         0.71     1.28         0.06       0.00        0.00          0.44        0.33     0.00         0.44         2.00
    SJ56         6.43     2.33         0.00       0.00        0.11          1.44        0.33     0.00         0.44         8.76
    SJ57         3.57     0.11         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.11        0.00     0.00         0.00         3.68
    SJ58         2.50     1.00         0.00       0.11        0.00          0.67        0.22     0.00         0.00         3.50
    SJ59         4.11     1.00         0.00       0.22        0.00          0.78        0.00     0.00         0.00         5.11
    SJ60         1.96     0.28         0.00       0.22        0.00          0.06        0.00     0.00         0.00         2.24
    SJ61         4.29     0.25         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.22        0.00     0.00         0.03         4.53
    SJ62         2.86     0.67         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.56        0.00     0.00         0.11         3.52
    SJ64         4.11     2.34         0.23       0.11        0.00          1.11        0.78     0.00         0.11         6.44
    SJ65         5.36     0.89         0.00       0.00        0.44          0.44        0.00     0.00         0.00         6.25
    SJ66         1.79     0.33         0.00       0.11        0.00          0.11        0.11     0.00         0.00         2.12
    SJ67         4.29     1.23         0.00       0.00        0.03          0.33        0.78     0.00         0.09         5.51
    SJ68         0.89     0.11         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.11        0.00     0.00         0.00         1.00
    SJ69         1.79     1.11         0.00       0.22        0.00          0.89        0.00     0.00         0.00         2.90
    SJ70         2.32     0.00         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.00        0.00     0.00         0.00         2.32
    SJ71         2.50     0.11         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.00        0.00     0.00         0.11         2.61
    SJ72         5.71     0.89         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.78        0.11     0.00         0.00         6.60
    SJ73         5.71     1.24         0.00       0.00        0.11          1.00        0.13     0.00         0.00         6.95
    SJ74         5.00     1.15         0.26       0.11        0.11          0.44        0.11     0.00         0.11         6.15
    SJ75         4.82     0.58         0.00       0.00        0.11          0.44        0.00     0.00         0.03         5.40
    SJ76         5.36     3.62         0.40       0.33        1.00          1.78        0.11     0.00         0.00         8.98
    SL01         4.64     1.22         0.00       0.00        0.05          0.50        0.56     0.00         0.11         5.86
    SL02         4.82     1.67         0.00       0.00        0.44          0.56        0.56     0.00         0.11         6.49


                                                                39 
                                                                                                                           2/1/2012 
 

                                                                         Trash Types 
                                   Recyclable 
                                                            Styrofoam 
    BASMAA      Total     Trash     Beverage     Plastic                                                                   Grand 
                                                             Food and      Other 
     Site ID    Debris    Total    Containers    Grocery                                Paper    Metal    Miscellaneous    Total 
                                                             Beverage      Plastic 
                                      (CRV‐       Bags 
                                                               Ware 
                                    labeled)
    SL03        11.79     3.28         0.00       0.33        0.33          1.67        0.78     0.00         0.17         15.06
    SL04        10.89     2.36         0.00       0.22        0.22          1.33        0.33     0.03         0.22         13.25
    SL05         1.43     1.27         0.00       0.00        0.00          1.11        0.11     0.00         0.05         2.70
    SL06        11.79     2.33         0.00       0.00        0.05          1.22        1.00     0.00         0.06         14.11
    SL07         6.96     1.59         0.09       0.78        0.00          0.44        0.22     0.00         0.05         8.55
    SL08         5.36     0.16         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.11        0.05     0.00         0.00         5.52
    SL09         8.39     4.13         0.13       0.89        0.00          1.22        1.67     0.00         0.22         12.52
    SL10         6.43     0.89         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.44        0.33     0.00         0.11         7.32
    SL11         9.11     2.05         0.00       0.33        0.00          0.56        1.11     0.00         0.05         11.16
    SL12         3.04     1.36         0.00       0.00        0.11          0.67        0.56     0.00         0.03         4.39
    SL13        25.71     2.53         0.00       0.00        0.00          1.00        1.33     0.03         0.17         28.24
    SL14         3.75     1.38         0.00       0.00        0.05          0.67        0.44     0.00         0.22         5.13
    SL15         4.11     2.78         0.00       0.33        0.00          0.33        2.00     0.00         0.11         6.88
    SL16         1.43     0.49         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.44        0.05     0.00         0.00         1.92
    SL17         0.54     0.23         0.07       0.00        0.00          0.11        0.03     0.00         0.03         0.76
    SL18         8.57     8.06         0.00       0.67        0.44          1.00        1.33     0.00         4.62         16.63
    SL19        10.18     2.01         0.00       0.00        0.05          1.11        0.78     0.03         0.05         12.19
    SL20         9.46     2.44         0.00       0.33        0.11          1.33        0.56     0.00         0.11         11.91
    SL21         4.29     0.59         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.17        0.33     0.00         0.09         4.88
    SL22         1.96     3.03         0.00       0.00        0.03          0.78        2.00     0.00         0.22         4.99
    SL23        13.66     2.25         0.13       0.00        0.04          1.67        0.17     0.03         0.22         15.91
    SL24         5.18     1.89         0.00       0.00        0.11          1.22        0.22     0.00         0.33         7.07
    SL25        18.75     6.67         0.26       0.78        1.22          3.04        1.00     0.04         0.33         25.42
    SM01        10.36     2.72         0.00       0.11        0.05          1.78        0.67     0.00         0.11         13.07
    SM02        20.54     0.58         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.44        0.11     0.00         0.03         21.12
    SM03         8.93     0.58         0.00       0.00        0.00          0.33        0.22     0.00         0.03         9.51
    SM04         4.64     0.70         0.00       0.22        0.00          0.44        0.00     0.00         0.04         5.35


                                                                40 
                                                                                                                           2/1/2012 
 

                                                                         Trash Types 
                                   Recyclable 
                                                            Styrofoam 
    BASMAA      Total     Trash     Beverage     Plastic                                                                   Grand 
                                                             Food and      Other 
     Site ID    Debris    Total    Containers    Grocery                                Paper    Metal    Miscellaneous    Total 
                                                             Beverage      Plastic 
                                      (CRV‐       Bags 
                                                               Ware 
                                    labeled)
    SM05        18.04      0.50        0.00       0.00        0.17          0.28        0.06     0.00         0.00         18.54
    SM06        11.96      0.58        0.00       0.00        0.00          0.56        0.03     0.00         0.00         12.54
    SM07         8.21      7.65        0.20       0.89        1.67          2.68        1.67     0.00         0.56         15.87
    SM08         2.32      1.64        0.00       0.00        0.03          0.78        0.17     0.00         0.67         3.96
    SM09         9.29      0.39        0.00       0.00        0.06          0.33        0.00     0.00         0.00         9.68
    SM10         5.71      0.56        0.00       0.00        0.00          0.44        0.00     0.00         0.11         6.27
    SM11        16.25      0.98        0.00       0.22        0.05          0.22        0.44     0.00         0.04         17.23
    SM12        20.89      3.00        0.00       0.33        0.22          2.06        0.17     0.00         0.22         23.89
    SP01        24.11     18.27        0.33       1.11        0.89          6.06        8.21     0.00         1.67         42.38
    SU01         4.82      1.11        0.00       0.00        0.00          1.11        0.00     0.00         0.00         5.93
    SU02        11.43      3.23        0.23       0.56        0.00          1.33        0.22     0.11         0.78         14.65
    SU03        19.64      4.20        0.31       0.78        0.11          1.89        0.78     0.11         0.22         23.84
    SU04        16.07      2.13        0.13       0.44        0.11          1.22        0.00     0.00         0.22         18.20
    WC01        26.34      1.86        0.00       0.22        0.03          0.61        0.33     0.00         0.67         28.20
    WC02         9.11      0.88        0.25       0.22        0.00          0.33        0.03     0.03         0.03         9.99
    WC03         2.32      1.14        0.00       0.22        0.11          0.44        0.33     0.00         0.03         3.46
    WC04        28.04      0.33        0.00       0.00        0.01          0.28        0.00     0.00         0.04         28.36
 




                                                                41 
                                                                                                                           2/1/2012 
Trash Load Reduction Tracking 
Method 
 
Assessing the Progress of San Francisco Bay Area MS4s 
Towards Stormwater Trash Load Reduction Goals 
 
Technical Report (Version 1.0) 
 
 
 
Submitted in Compliance with Provision C.10.a(ii) of Order R2‐2009‐0074 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Prepared for:  
Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Association (BASMAA) 

 
Prepared by:  
EOA, Inc. 
1410 Jackson Street 
Oakland, CA 94612 
                                                                February 1, 2012 
                                                                                                 Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
LIST OF TABLES  ................................................................................................................................................. III 
              .
LIST OF FIGURES ................................................................................................................................................ III 
PREFACE ............................................................................................................................................................ V 
TERMINOLOGY  ................................................................................................................................................. VI 
           .
1.0      INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................................ 1 
    1.1     TRASH LOAD REDUCTION TRACKING METHOD SUMMARY ............................................................................................            1
    1.2     APPLICABLE TRASH CONTROL MEASURES ..................................................................................................................   
                                                                                                                                                                 2
    1.3     BASELINE TRASH GENERATION RATES PROJECT ..........................................................................................................   3
    1.4     PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF TECHNICAL REPORT .............................................................................................................   
                                                                                                                                                                 3
    1.5     MEMORANDUM ORGANIZATION .............................................................................................................................   
                                                                                                                                                                 3
2.0      METHODS OVERVIEW AND TRACKING PROCESS ....................................................................................... 4 
    2.1.  METHODS OVERVIEW ...........................................................................................................................................   
                                                                                                                                                                      4
    2.2.  GUIDING PRINCIPLES AND ASSUMPTIONS ..................................................................................................................       4
    2.3.  LOAD REDUCTION CALCULATION PROCESS ................................................................................................................         6
          Step #1: Existing Enhanced Street Sweeping ...................................................................................................              7
          Step #2: Trash Generation Reduction Control Measures  ................................................................................   
                                                                                     .                                                                                7
          Step #3: On‐land Interception Control Measures ............................................................................................                 7
          Step #4: Control Measures that Intercept Trash in the MS4 ...........................................................................                       8
          Step #5: Control Measures that Intercept Trash in Waterways ......................................................................                          8
          Step #6: Comparison to Baseline Trash Load ..................................................................................................               8
3.0      LOADS REDUCED CREDIT FACT SHEETS ....................................................................................................  0 
                                                                                                                                              1
    CR‐1: Single‐use Carryout Plastic Bag Policies (Area‐wide) ....................................................................................  1 
                                                                                                                                                   1
    CR‐2: Polystyrene Foam Food Service Ware Policies (Area‐wide) ..........................................................................  4    1
    CR‐3: Public Education and Outreach Programs (Area‐wide)  ................................................................................  6 
                                                                  .                                                                                1
    CR‐4: Reduction of Trash from Uncovered Loads (Area‐wide) ...............................................................................  9   1
    CR‐5: Anti‐Littering and Illegal Dumping Enforcement (Area‐wide).......................................................................  1     2
    CR‐6: Improved Trash Bin/Container Management (Area‐wide) ...........................................................................  3       2
    CR‐7: Single‐Use Food and Beverage Ware Ordinances (Area‐wide) .....................................................................  5        2
4.0      LOADS REDUCED QUANTIFICATION FACT SHEETS ....................................................................................  8 
                                                                                                                                      2
    QF‐1: On‐land Trash Cleanups (Area‐wide) ............................................................................................................  9 
                                                                                                                                                         2
    QF‐2: Enhanced Street Sweeping (Area‐specific) ...................................................................................................  2 
                                                                                                                                                         3
    QF‐3: Partial‐Capture Treatment Devices (Area‐wide & Area‐specific)  .................................................................  9 
                                                                                       .                                                                 3
    QF‐4: Enhanced Storm Drain Inlet Maintenance (Area‐specific) ............................................................................  3         4
    QF‐5: Full‐Capture Treatment Devices (Area‐Specific) ...........................................................................................  5  4
    QF‐6: Creek/Channel/Shoreline Cleanups (Volunteer and/or Municipal)(Area‐wide) ............................................  8                       4
5.0      LOAD REDUCTION REPORTING AND VERIFICATION ..................................................................................  1 
                                                                                                                                     5
    5.1  ANNUAL REPORTING ...........................................................................................................................................  1 
                                                                                                                                                                     5
    5.2  VERIFICATION OF TRASH LOAD REDUCTIONS ............................................................................................................  1       5
6.0      REFERENCES  ...........................................................................................................................................  2 
                   .                                                                                                                                            5




                                                                                   ii 
                                                                                                                                                              2/1/12 
Technical Report 



LIST OF TABLES 
Table 1.1.           Trash control measures for which load reduction credits or load reduction quantification 
                                                                                                   .
                     formulas were developed to track progress towards trash load reduction goals.  ................................ 2 
Table 3.1.           Trash control measure for which load reduction credits were developed to track progress 
                     towards trash load reduction goals ...................................................................................................... 10             
Table CR‐1.1.  Summary of single‐use carryout plastic bag ordinance load reduction credits ................................... 12 
Table CR‐2.1.  Summary of polystyrene foam food service ware ordinance load reduction credits .......................... 15 
Table CR‐3.1.  Minimum number of school‐age children/youth outreach events by Permittee population. ............ 17 
Table CR‐3.2.  Minimum number of community outreach events by Permittee population ..................................... 17 
Table CR‐3.3.  Summary of trash load reduction credits for public education and outreach program control 
               measures .............................................................................................................................................. 18 
Table CR‐4.1.  Summary of trash load reduction credits for activities to reduce trash from uncovered loads .......... 20 
Table CR‐5.1.  Summary of trash load reduction credits for implementing anti‐littering and illegal dumping  
               enforcement activities .......................................................................................................................... 22   
Table CR‐6.1.  Summary of trash load reduction credits for improved trash bin/container management 
               control measures .................................................................................................................................. 24    
Table CR‐7.1.  Summary of trash reduction credits for adopting and enforcing single‐use food and 
               beverage ware reduction ordinances ................................................................................................... 26 
Table 4.1.           Trash control measure for which load reduction quantification formulas were developed to 
                     track progress towards trash load reduction goals .............................................................................. 28 
Table QF‐2.1. Street sweeping effectiveness (H) equations during dry and wet seasons and parking and no 
              parking enforcement scenarios (based on Figure QF‐2.1) ................................................................... 35 
Table QF‐4.1   Percent increase above baseline in volume removed from storm drain inlets due to an 
               increase in storm drain inlet maintenance ........................................................................................... 44 
Table QF‐5.1.  Devices recognized by the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board as 
               meeting the trash full‐capture definition ............................................................................................. 46 



 

LIST OF FIGURES 
Figure 2.1.           Trash Load Reduction Calculation Process and Outputs ...................................................................... 9 
Figure QF‐2.1.  Street sweeping effectiveness curve based on sweeping frequency, storm frequency and 
                level of parking enforcement (Adapted from Armitage 2001) ........................................................... 34 




                                                                                   iii 
                                                                                                                                                               2/1/12 
                                                         Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



LIST OF ACRONYMS 
 
BASMAA         Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Association  
BID            Business Improvement District 
CalRecycle     California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery 
Caltrans       California Department of Transportation 
CASQA          California Stormwater Quality Association  
CDS            Continuous Deflection Separator 
CEQA           California Environmental Quality Act 
CIWMB          California Integrated Waste Management Board 
CY             Cubic Yards 
EIR            Environmental Impact Report 
EPA            Environmental Protection Agency 
GIS            Geographic Information System 
MRP            Municipal Regional Stormwater NPDES Permit for the San Francisco Bay Area 
MS4            Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System 
NGO            Non‐Governmental Organization 
NPDES          National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System  
Q              Flow 
SFRWQCB        San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board  
SWRCB          State Water Resource Control Board 
TMDL           Total Maximum Daily Load  
USEPA          United States Environmental Protection Agency 
Water Board    San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board  
WDR            Waste Discharge Requirements 




                                                iv 
                                                                                                    2/1/12 
Technical Report 




PREFACE 
This Technical Report was prepared under the guidance of cities, towns, counties and flood control 
districts (i.e., Permittees) subject to requirements in Provision C.10.a.i of the Municipal Regional 
Stormwater NPDES Permit (MRP) for Phase I communities in the San Francisco Bay (Order R2‐2009‐
0074). The tracking methods included within are intended to establish a consistent framework for 
Permittees to track progress towards trash load reduction goals included in the MRP. The use of this 
document is done so under the discretion of each Permittee. Based on the experiences of Permittees in 
implementing trash control measures, Permittees may chose to supplement the methods described in 
this Technical Report with additional credits and quantifications to account for load reductions 
associated with enhanced control measure implementation. Additionally, based on experiences 
implementing trash control measures and assessing effectiveness, methods contained herein may be 
modified overtime. Therefore, this document serves as Version 1.0 of the Trash Load Reduction Tracking 
Method. 
 




                                                  v 
                                                                                                2/1/12 
                                                               Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 




TERMINOLOGY 
 
Area‐specific (with regard to control measures or reductions): Control measures or reductions which 
are implemented or applied within defined or limited areas within a Permittee’s jurisdictional area (e.g., 
full‐capture treatment devices or enhanced street sweeping).    
Area‐wide (with regard to control measures or reductions): Control measures or reductions which are 
implemented or applied throughout a Permittee’s jurisdictional area (e.g., region‐wide public education 
strategy).    
Baseline Implementation: The level of implementation for a specific trash control measure that forms 
the starting point for tracking progress toward trash load reduction. 
Baseline Load: the sum of the trash loads from a Permittee’s effective loading area, adjusted for 
baseline implementation of street sweeping, storm drain inlet maintenance, and pump station 
maintenance.   
Baseline Loading Rate: The rate (expressed as volume/acre/year) at which trash is discharged onto 
effective loading areas, taking into account baseline control measure implementation.  
Best Management Practice (BMP): Any activity, technology, process, operational method or measure, 
or engineered system, which when implemented prevents, controls, removes, or reduces pollution. A 
BMP is also referred to as a control measure. 
Bypass: The intentional diversion of water and its constituents from any portion of a treatment 
measure. 
Conceptual Model: A model that explicitly describes and graphically represents all existing knowledge 
on the sources of a pollutant, its fate and transport, and/or its effects in the ecosystem. 
Conveyance System Load: The volume of trash estimated to enter the stormwater conveyance system 
(e.g., storm drain inlets). 
Conveyance System Loading Rates: The annual rates (volume/acre) at which trash enters a stormwater 
conveyance system (e.g., storm drain inlets) from a particular land area that is associated with a specific 
trash loading rate category. 
Control Measure: See Best Management Practice. 
Current Load: The difference between a baseline load and the load removed via existing enhanced 
street sweeping.   
Current Loading Rate: The rate (expressed as volume/acre/year) at which trash is discharged onto 
effective loading areas, taking into account baseline control measure implementation.  
Discharge: A release or flow of stormwater or other substance from a stormwater conveyance system. 
Effectiveness (with regard to Control Measures): A measure of how well a control measure reduces 
trash from entering the MS4. 
Enhanced (with regard to control measures): New or expanded control measures that have been 
implemented after the effective date of the MRP (i.e., December 1, 2009).  
Existing Enhanced Street Sweeping: Street sweeping conducted by a Permittee on February 1, 2012 at a 
frequency greater than the baseline street sweeping ceiling. 

                                                     vi 
                                                                                                          2/1/12 
Technical Report 



Full‐Capture Device: A single device or series of devices that can trap all particles retained by a 5 mm 
mesh screen, and has a treatment capacity that exceeds the peak flow rate resulting from a one‐year, 
one‐hour storm in the subdrainage area treated by the device. 
Generated Load: The load (volume) of trash that is available to an MS4 under a no street sweeping, 
storm drain inlet and pump station maintenance scenario.  
Generation Rate: The rate (expressed as volume/acre/year) for specific land areas at which trash is 
available to an MS4 under a no street sweeping, storm drain inlet and pump station maintenance 
scenario.  
Geographical Information System (GIS): A system designed to capture, store, analyze, manage, and 
display all forms of geographically referenced data. GIS is the merging of cartography, statistical analysis, 
and database technology. 
Interception (with regard to control measures): The process of removing trash from proceeding within 
an area‐specific or area‐wide control measure. 
Litter: As defined by California Code Section 68055.1(g), litter means all improperly discarded waste 
material, including, but not limited to, convenience food, beverage, and other product packages or 
containers constructed of steel, aluminum, glass, paper, plastic, and other natural and synthetic 
materials, thrown or deposited on the lands and water. 
Load Reduction: The estimated or quantified decrease in the amount of trash discharged from a 
stormwater conveyance system or removed from a receiving water. 
Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4): "a conveyance or system of conveyances (including 
roads with drainage systems, municipal streets, catch basins, curbs, gutters, ditches, man‐made 
channels, or storm drains): (i) Owned or operated by a state, city, town, borough, county, parish, district, 
association, or other public body (created to or pursuant to state law) including special districts under 
state law such as a sewer district, flood control district or drainage district, or similar entity, or an Indian 
tribe or an authorized Indian tribal organization, or a designated and approved management agency 
under section 208 of the Clean Water Act that discharges into waters of the United States. (ii) Designed 
or used for collecting or conveying stormwater; (iii) Which is not a combined sewer; and (iv) Which is not 
part of a Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW) as defined at 40 CFR 122.2." (40 CFR 122.26(b)(8)) 
Partial‐capture Device: Treatment devices that have not been recognized as full‐capture devices by the 
San Francisco Bay Regional Water Board, but capture trash (e.g., trash booms or retractable curb inlet 
screens). Partial‐capture devices may be similar to full‐capture devices, but do not meet the full‐capture 
definition due to engineering challenges, or they may be completely different types of devices. 
Receiving Waters: Natural water bodies (e.g., creeks, lakes, bays, estuaries) 
Stormwater: Runoff from roofs, roads and other surfaces that is generated from rainfall and snow 
events and flows into a stormwater conveyance system. 
Storm Drain Inlet: Part of the stormwater conveyance system where surface runoff enters the 
underground conveyance system. Includes side inlets located adjacent to curbs and grate inlets located 
on the surface of a street or parking lot. 
Storm Drain Insert: A device (e.g., screen or basket) designed to capture trash capture within a storm 
drain inlet. 
Stormwater Conveyance System: Any pipe, ditch or gully, or system of pipes, ditches, or gullies, that is 
owned or operated by a governmental entity and used for collecting and conveying stormwater. 

                                                       vii 
                                                                                                         2/1/12 
                                                              Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



Street Load: Volume of trash estimated to enter the environment and available for interception via on‐
land trash cleanups and enhanced street sweeping, following the implementation of trash generation 
reduction control measures. 
Street Loading Rates: The annual rates (volume/acre) at which trash enters the environment within a 
land area and is available for interception via on‐land trash cleanups and enhanced street sweeping, 
following the implementation of trash generation reduction control measures. 
Trash: Litter (as defined by California Code Section 68055.1g), excluding sediments, sand, vegetation, oil 
and grease, and exotic species, that cannot pass through a 5 mm mesh screen. 
Trash Generation Reduction: The implementation of control measures which prevent or greatly reduce 
the likelihood of trash from being deposited onto the urban landscape. 
Trash Loading Rate Category: A specific combination of important trash generation factors (e.g., land 
use, population density, economic profile) and control measures in an applicable land area that affect a 
trash generation rate.  
Urban Runoff: All flows within a stormwater conveyance system which consist of stormwater (wet 
weather flows) and non‐stormwater illicit discharges (dry weather flows). 
Watershed: A defined area of land that catches rain and snow; and drains or seeps into a marsh, stream, 
river, lake or groundwater. 
Waterway: a receiving water or manmade channel. 
Waterway Load: The estimated load (volume) of trash discharge to a receiving water via an MS4.  
Waterway Loading Rates: The annual rates (volume/acre/year) at which trash is discharged via an MS4. 
 




                                                    viii 
                                                                                                         2/1/12 
Technical Report 




1.0 INTRODUCTION 
The Municipal Regional Stormwater NPDES Permit for Phase I communities in the San Francisco Bay 
(Order R2‐2009‐0074), also known as the Municipal Regional Permit (MRP), became effective on 
December 1, 2009. The MRP applies to 76 large, medium and small municipalities (cities, towns and 
counties) and flood control agencies in the San Francisco Bay Region, collectively referred to as 
Permittees. Provision C.10 of the MRP (Trash Load Reduction) requires Permittees to reduce trash from 
their Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s) by 40 percent before July 1, 2014.  
Required submittals to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board (Water Board) by 
February 1, 2012 under MRP provision C.10.a (Short‐ Term Plan) include: 
      1. A baseline trash load estimate and description of the methodology used to determine 
         the load level; and 
      2. A description of the Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method that will be used to account 
         for trash load reduction actions and to demonstrate progress and attainment of trash 
         load reduction levels. 
      3. A Short‐Term Trash Loading Reduction Plan that describes control measures and best 
         management practices that will be implemented to attain a 40 percent trash load 
         reduction from its MS4 by July 1, 2014; 
 
This Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method Technical Report (Technical Report) was developed in 
compliance with submittal #2. To comply with required submittals #1 and #3, each Permittee has 
developed an individual Short Term Trash Loading Reduction Plan (Short‐Term Plan) using a template 
developed by BASMAA to ensure consistency. Each Short‐Term Plan includes the Permittee’s current 
trash baseline load estimate and descriptions of actions that will be implemented to reach a 40% 
reduction in their estimated baseline trash load. Baseline trash loads were developed through the 
BASMAA Baseline Trash Generation Rates Project described in Section 1.4 (BASMAA 2011a, 2011b, 
2012).  
 
1.1      Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method Summary  
The trash load reduction tracking method described in this Technical Report is intended to assist 
Permittees in demonstrating progress towards reaching trash load reduction goals defined in the MRP 
(e.g., 40 percent). The tracking method is based on information gained through an extensive literature 
review and Permittee experiences in implementing stormwater control measures in the San Francisco 
Bay Area (BASMAA 2011c). The literature review was conducted to evaluate quantification methods 
used by other agencies to assess control measure effectiveness or progress towards quantitative goals.  
Methods to track load reductions attributable trash control measures described in this Technical Report 
fall into two categories: 1) trash load reduction quantification formulas; and 2) load reduction credits. 
Quantification formulas were developed for those trash control measures that were deemed feasible 
and practical to quantify load reductions overtime. Load reduction credits were developed for all other 
control measures included in this Technical Report.  Both categories of methods assume that as new or 
enhanced trash control measures are implemented by Permittees, a commensurate trash load reduction 
will occur. Progress towards load reduction goals will be demonstrated through comparisons between 
load reduction credits and quantifications, and established trash baseline load estimates. Additionally, 



                                                    1 
                                                                                                   2/1/12 
                                                                           Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



as practicable, load reductions will also be measured empirically overtime through MS4 and/or receiving 
water monitoring and characterization studies (see Section 5.0). 

1.2        Applicable Trash Control Measures  
Permittees may choose to implement any number of trash control measures to reach MRP trash load 
reduction goals. Prior to conducting the literature review, BASMAA member agencies identified a list of 
trash control measures for which trash load reduction methods should be developed. This list was 
developed collaboratively through the BASMAA Trash Committee, which included participation from 
Permittee, stormwater program, Water Board and non‐governmental organization (NGO) staff, and is 
based on: 1) the potential for Permittees to implement; 2) the availability of information required to 
populate formulas and develop credits; and 3) the expected benefit of implementation. Trash control 
measures for which quantification formulas and credits were developed, are described included Table 
1.1.  
 
It is important to note that in an effort to reduce trash discharged from MS4s, Permittees may choose to 
implement other types of control measures that are not included on this list. If a Permittee chooses to 
do so, methods specific to calculating trash load reductions for that control measure would need to be 
developed. These methods may be proposed by Permittees via their Short‐Term Plans or subsequent 
Annual Reports. As additional methods are developed, consideration should be given to updating this 
Technical Report to incorporate these methods. 
 
                      Table 1.1. Trash control measures for which load reduction credits or load reduction
                      quantification formulas were developed to track progress towards trash load
                      reduction goals. 

                      Load Reduction Credits
                      Single-use Carryout Plastic Bag Ordinances
                      Polystyrene Foam Food Service Ware Ordinances
                      Public Education and Outreach Programs
                      Activities to Reduce Trash from Uncovered Loads
                      Anti-Littering and Illegal Dumping Enforcement Activities
                      Improved Trash Bin/Container Management Activities
                      Single-use Food and Beverage Ware Ordinances
                      Quantification Formulas
                      On-land Trash Cleanups (Volunteer and/or Municipal)
                      Enhanced Street Sweeping
                      Partial-Capture Treatment Devices
                      Enhanced Storm Drain Inlet Maintenance
                      Full-Capture Treatment Devices
                      Creek/Channel/Shoreline Cleanups (Volunteer and/or Municipal)
       
        




                                                              2 
                                                                                                                      2/1/12 
Technical Report 



1.3       Baseline Trash Generation Rates Project  
Through the approval of a BASMAA regional project, Permittees agreed to work collaboratively to 
develop a regionally consistent method to establish baseline trash loads from their MS4s. The project, 
also known as the BASMAA Baseline Trash Generation Rates Project assisted Permittees in establishing a 
baseline by which to demonstrate progress towards MRP trash load reduction goals (e.g., 40 percent). 
The project was intended to provide a scientifically‐sound method for developing trash generation rates 
that can be adjusted, based on Permittee/site specific conditions; and used to develop baseline loading 
rates and loads. Baseline loads form the reference point for comparing trash load reductions achieved 
through control measure implementation.  
 
Trash generation rates are estimates of trash loads (volumes) per unit area and are fully described in 
BASMAA (2012a).  Generation rates are based on factors that significantly affect trash generation (e.g., 
land use) in the urbanized watersheds of the San Francisco Bay area. The method used to establish 
baseline trash loads for each Permittee builds off “lessons learned” from previous trash loading studies 
conducted in urban areas (Allison and Chiew 1995; Allison et al. 1998; Armitage et al. 1998; Armitage 
and Rooseboom 2000; Lippner et al. 2001; Armitage 2003; Kim et al. 2004; County of Los Angeles 2002, 
2004a, 2004b; Armitage 2007). It uses the conceptual model presented in the BASMAA Sampling and 
Analysis Plan (BASMAA 2011b), which is based off of the results of the studies cited above and described 
by BASMAA (2011a). Baseline trash loading rates were developed through the quantification and 
characterization of trash captured in Water Board recognized full‐capture treatment devices installed in 
the San Francisco Bay area. 

1.4       Purpose and Scope of Technical Report 
Methodologies presented in this Technical Report should be considered preliminary and are subject to 
revision based on additional information and implementation experiences. The primary purpose of this 
Technical Report is to assist Permittees in complying with Permit Provision C.10.a.ii of the MRP. 
Additionally, information and methods described in this report:  
         Provide a preliminary trash load reduction tracking method that is consistent with concepts 
          incorporated into the Trash Baseline Generation Rates Project and avoids double‐counting of 
          water quality benefits expected from the implementation of specific control measures;  
         Provide initial concepts of relative water quality benefits associated with specific trash control 
          measures, which can assist Permittees in directing control measure implementation and be 
          improved upon over time through Permittee experiences with implementation; and, 
         Assist Permittees and other stakeholders in identifying data needs associated with load 
          reduction quantification and crediting (i.e., identification of information needed to populate or 
          formulas and credits). 

1.5       Memorandum Organization 
This Technical Report is organized into the following sections: 
         Section 1: Introduction 
         Section 2: Methods Overview and Tracking Process 
         Section 3: Loads Reduced Credit Fact Sheets 
         Section 4: Loads Reduced Quantification Fact Sheets  
         Section 5: Empirical Load Reduction Measurements 
         Section 6: References 

                                                       3 
                                                                                                        2/1/12 
                                                             Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 




2.0 METHODS OVERVIEW AND TRACKING PROCESS 
This section provides an overview of the trash load reduction tracking methods described in Sections 3.0 
and 4.0. The overview describes the guiding principles and key assumptions used to develop these 
methods. It also describes the process and steps that Permittees will take to calculate trash load 
reductions associated with control measures and demonstrate progress towards trash load reduction 
goals.    

2.1.    Methods Overview 
The primary goal of the tracking methods development project was to assist Permittees in developing a 
method to demonstrate progress toward load reduction goals required by the MRP. To form a 
foundation based on existing knowledge base, a considerable amount of information on the 
demonstrated effectiveness of trash controls measures and trash load reduction tracking was reviewed 
and summarized by BASMAA (2011c). The results of the literature review were presented, reviewed and 
discussed via the BASMAA Trash Committee, which includes participation by Permittees, Water Board 
and NGO staff.  The information gained through this review forms the foundation for tracking methods, 
formulas and credits described in this technical report.  
 
As a secondary goal, the project also aimed to create a forum for dialogue among interested 
stakeholders to discuss their perspectives on the most effective and ineffective ways to reduce trash 
discharged from MS4s. To the extent possible, the methods described in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 attempts 
to incorporate these perspectives and prioritize the implementation of control measures that 
stakeholders generally feel are the most effective in reducing trash. This is most pertinent to control 
measures that have load reduction “credits," where effectiveness data are lacking or load reductions are 
difficult to quantify.  

2.2.    Guiding Principles and Assumptions 
Based on the results of the literature review and discussions with Permittees, Water Board staff and 
participating NGOs, trash load reductions resulting from the implementation of specific control 
measures can be quantified and credited in many ways. To better understand the thought process used 
to develop quantification formulas and load reduction credits presented in Sections 3.0 and 4.0, the 
following guiding principles and assumptions were used in the development of methods described 
below.  
      Need for a Combination of Quantification Formulas and Credits – Based on the results of the 
         literature review and considerable discussions, stakeholder preference was to quantify trash 
         load reductions associated with the enhanced implementation of specific control measures. 
         Additionally, stakeholders agreed that the results of quantifications should ideally have a high 
         degree of certainty that the trash load reduction actually takes place. For some control 
         measures, preliminary quantification of load reductions is possible based on existing data 
         collection schemes and control measure effectiveness values identified during the literature 
         review. For other control measures, stakeholders agreed that load reduction quantification is 
         either infeasible or impractical, and other tracking methods (i.e., credits) should be pursued. 
         Therefore, a combination of trash load reduction quantification formulas and credits are used to 
         demonstrate trash load reductions attributable to specific control measures. For load reduction 
         credits, the recommended percent reductions are based on discussions among BASMAA Trash 
         Committee members.  

                                                    4 
                                                                                                        2/1/12 
Technical Report 



             Load Reduction Quantification is Constrained by Available Data – Only the information readily 
              available on the degree of control measure implementation, volume of trash removed by the 
              control measure, effectiveness, baseline loads (if available) and loads reduced can be used to 
              develop quantification formulas and track annual load reductions. In some cases, information is 
              very limited and assumptions have to be made. Although assumptions create uncertainties in 
              load reduction calculations, if stated clearly and transparently, assumptions can be tested and 
              revised accordingly as methods evolve.  
             Maximize Simplicity in Quantification Formulas – As a general principle when creating the loads 
              reduced formulas presented in section 4.0, the amount of information that Permittees are 
              required to track as inputs to formulas was considered. In some cases, data that Permittees or 
              stormwater programs will need to track and input into formulas consists of information already 
              collected and submitted to the Water Board as part of their Annual Reports. In other cases, 
              additional information tracked by other public agencies or private entities (e.g., volunteer 
              groups) may need to be obtained to provide a complete picture of loads reduced from urban 
              stormwater runoff during a given year. In limited cases, Permittees will have to begin tracking 
              data needed to populate formulas. Specific control measures in which Permittees should begin 
              tracking or collecting data from others are identified in fact sheets presented in Section 4.0. 
             Baseline vs. New and Enhanced Control Measures – In most cases, Permittees may only count 
              trash loads reduced that are associated with the implementation of new or enhanced control 
              measures. As a general rule, control measures that were implemented prior to the MRP 
              effective date are considered baseline and associated load reductions are included in each 
              Permittee’s baseline load. That said, to avoid penalizing early implementers, load reductions 
              associated with some control measures (e.g., full‐capture treatment devices, polystyrene foam 
              food ware bans, and single‐use carryout plastic grocery ordinances) implemented prior to the 
              MRP effective date1 can be used towards trash load reduction goals. The definition of “baseline 
              implementation” is included in the fact sheets for each control measure presented in Sections 
              3.0 and 4.0.  
             Permittee Jurisdictional Areas – Consistent with the BASMAA Baseline Trash Generation Rates 
              Project, Permittees will likely be responsible for reducing loads to their MS4 that originate from 
              public or private properties that do not have or are not anticipated to have waste discharge 
              requirements (WDRs). As such, quantification formulas and load reduction credits presented in 
              Sections. 3.0 and 4.0 include actions taken by public agencies and private entities (without 
              WDRs) that are within their jurisdictional boundaries. In certain cases, Permittees may receive 
              loads reduced credit for the countywide implementation of certain control measures since they 
              directly impact trash loads across jurisdictional areas. These measures include certain public 
              education and outreach programs. Control measures implemented directly by California 
              Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and other state agencies are not attributable to load 
              reduction tracking methods described in this Technical Report. 
             No Double‐Counting – In some cases, Permittees may be implementing multiple control 
              measures within the same geographical area. In these instances, the trash loads reduced by one 
              control measure must be accounted for in the trash loads reduction quantification/crediting 
              method applied to the other control measure. For example, a Permittee chooses to implement 
              enhanced street sweeping in areas also served by full‐capture treatment devices. In this 
              scenario, the volume of trash reduced from implementing enhanced street sweeping cannot 
              also be claimed for implementing full‐capture treatment devices. Safeguards to prohibit 
                                                            
1
  December 1, 2009. 

                                                               5 
                                                                                                          2/1/12 
                                                              Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



        Permittees from doing so are incorporated into the Load Reduction Calculation Process 
        described in the next section. The goal is to avoid double‐counting. 
       Geographical Uniformity – Conditions vary among the various geographical areas that 
        contribute trash to local creeks and San Francisco Bay. Thus, projecting results obtained by 
        studies conducted at specific locations may not be representative of all areas. As a practical 
        matter, however, one must assume that projections to the whole watershed, based on area, 
        land use, or other important factors identified in the BASMAA Baseline Trash Generation Rates 
        Project are adequate for the development of the proposed methods. As data are collected to 
        populate formulas presented in Section 4.0, considerations should be given to the spatial 
        representativeness of data. As a result, data should be disaggregated or aggregated, as needed.  

2.3.    Load Reduction Calculation Process 
Using the guiding principles and assumptions described in the previous section, a stepwise process for 
calculating trash load reductions was developed and is presented in this section (Figure 2‐1). The 
process takes into account the trash generation and transport process; and at what point a trash control 
measure prevents trash generation, intercepts trash in the environment prior to reaching a water body, 
or removes trash that has reached a water body. In doing so, it also avoids double‐counting of load 
reductions. 
 
A key component of the trash load reduction tracking method is the development of Permittee‐specific 
baseline trash loading rates that were used to establish baseline trash loads. Baseline trash loading rates 
will be adjusted downward based on trash load reductions applicable to enhanced/new control 
measures using the following process:  
 
     Step #1: Existing Enhanced Street Sweeping 
     Step#2:  Trash Generation Reduction  
     Step #3: On‐land Interception 
     Step #4: Trash Interception in the Stormwater Conveyance System 
     Step #5: Trash Interception in Waterways 
     Step #6: Comparison to Baseline Trash Load 
      
Reductions calculated in Steps 2 and 5 are assumed to be implemented at a constant rate on an “area‐
wide” basis. For example, if a new region‐wide public education strategy is implemented within the San 
Francisco Bay area, all Permittees can apply load reduction credits associated with this control measure. 
These area‐wide load reduction credits are not site‐specific and therefore load reductions are applied to 
entire effective loading area within a Permittee’s jurisdictional area. In contrast, Steps  1, 3 and 4 are 
“area‐specific” reductions that only apply to specific areas within a Permittee’s jurisdictional area. Area‐
specific control measures include full‐capture treatment devices and enhanced street sweeping. Area‐
specific reductions may require the use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) to calculate.   
 
Reductions are generally applied in the sequence as presented in Figure 2‐1 and described below, 
although some reductions may be applied “in‐parallel” and calculated during the same sub‐step in the 
process.  

 

                                                     6 
                                                                                                         2/1/12 
Technical Report 



Step #1: Existing Enhanced Street Sweeping  
Trash load reductions due to existing enhanced street sweeping implemented prior to the effective date 
of the MRP and conducted at levels above baseline levels are not incorporated into each Permittee’s 
trash baseline load. Therefore, load reductions associated with existing enhanced  are accounted for 
first in the trash load reduction calculation process. Existing enhanced street sweeping includes street 
sweeping conducted at a frequency greater than 1x/week for streets within retail land use areas or 
greater than 2x/month for streets in all other land use areas. The result of adjustments made to trash 
baseline loads due to the implementation of existing enhanced street sweeping is a set of current 
baseline loading rates and a current baseline load. 

Step #2: Trash Generation Reduction Control Measures 
Trash generation reduction control measures prevent or greatly reduce the likelihood of trash from 
being deposited onto the urban landscape. They include the following area‐wide control measures:  
       CR‐1:  Single‐Use Carryout Plastic Bag Ordinances 
       CR‐2:   Polystyrene Foam Food Service Ware Ordinances  
       CR‐3:   Public Education and Outreach Programs  
       CR‐4:    Reduction of Trash from Uncovered Loads  
       CR‐5:  Anti‐Littering and Illegal Dumping Enforcement  
       CR‐6:  Improved Trash Bin/Container Management  
   CR‐7:  Single‐Use Food and Beverage Ware Ordinances  
    
Load reductions associated with trash generation reduction control measures are applied on an area‐
wide basis.2 Therefore, reductions in current baseline loading rates are adjusted uniformly based on the 
implementation of the control measure and the associated credit claimed.  
Baseline loading rate adjustments for all generation reduction controls measures implemented may be 
applied in‐parallel, but should be applied prior to calculating on‐land interception measures discussed in 
Step #3. The result of adjustments to trash baseline loading rates due to the implementation of these 
enhanced control measures will be a set of street loading rates. The street load is the volume of trash 
estimated to enter the environment and available for transport to the MS4 if not intercepted via on‐land 
control measures described in Step #3. 

Step #3: On‐land Interception Control Measures 
Once trash enters the environment, it may be intercepted and removed through the following control 
measures prior to reaching the stormwater conveyance system: 
    QF‐1:  On‐land Trash Cleanups (Volunteer and/or Municipal) (Area‐wide) 
    QF‐2:  Enhanced Street Sweeping (Area‐specific) 
     
Since on‐land trash cleanups can affect the amount of trash available to street sweepers, load 
reductions associated with their implementation will be quantified first, followed by street sweeping 
enhancements.  On‐land trash cleanups will be applied as an area‐wide reduction and all effective 
                                                            
2
  The only exception to this statement are load reductions associated with the establishment of Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) or 
equivalent, which are specific to geographic areas and considered “area‐specific”. 

                                                                       7 
                                                                                                                                       2/1/12 
                                                                Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



loading rates will be adjusted equally. Enhanced street sweeping, however, is an area‐specific control 
measure and only those effective loading rates associated with areas receiving enhancements will be 
adjusted. Due to the spatial nature of enhanced street sweeping, GIS may be needed to conduct this 
step.   
 
The result of adjustments to effective loading rates due to the implementation of these enhanced 
control measures will be a set of conveyance system loading rates. The conveyance load is the volume 
of trash estimated to enter the stormwater conveyance system (e.g., storm drain inlets). 

Step #4: Control Measures that Intercept Trash in the MS4  
Control measures that intercept trash in the stormwater conveyance system are area‐specific. 
Therefore, they only apply to land areas and associated trash loads reduced. Conveyance system loading 
rates developed as a result of Step #3 should be adjusted in‐parallel for the following control measures: 
    QF‐3a:  Partial‐capture Treatment Device: Curb Inlet Screens (Area‐specific) 
    QF‐3b:  Partial‐capture Treatment Device: Stormwater Pump Station Trash Racks Enhancements 
             (Area‐specific) 
    QF‐4:  Enhanced Storm Drain Inlet Maintenance (Area‐specific) 
    QF‐5:  Full‐Capture Treatment Devices (Area‐specific) 
     
Load reductions for these control measures are calculated in‐parallel because they are applied to 
independent geographical areas.  Reductions from all control measures described in this step are area‐
specific and may require the use of GIS to calculate a set of waterway loading rates.  Once waterway 
loading rates have been determined, a waterway load will be developed and used as a starting point for 
calculating load reductions associated with trash interception in waterways discussed in Step #5. 

Step #5: Control Measures that Intercept Trash in Waterways 
The load of trash that passes through the stormwater conveyance system without being intercepted 
may still be removed through interception in waterways. There are two control measures associated 
with interception in waterways:   
    QF‐3c:     Partial‐capture Treatment Device: Litter Booms/Curtains (Area‐wide) 
    QF‐7:      Creek/Channel/Shoreline Cleanups (Volunteer and/or Municipal) (Area‐wide) 
     
As these control measures are implemented, load reduction estimates can be calculated in‐parallel for 
these two measures.  

Step #6: Comparison to Baseline Trash Load 
Applying the four steps described in the processes above will provide an estimated trash load (volume) 
remaining after trash control measures are implemented.  As depicted in the following equation, the 
relative percent difference between the baseline load and the load remaining after control measures are 
implemented is the percent reduction that will be used to assess progress towards MRP trash load 
reduction goals.  
 
                                                
                   Baseline Load – Remaining Load
                                                           •100  = % Reduction
                             Baseline Load                                                                    


                                                      8 
                                                                                                           2/1/12 
Technical Report 




                                                                           

  Figure 2.1. Trash Load Reduction Calculation Process and Outputs

                                                                     9 
                                                                          2/1/12 
                                                                                   Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 




3.0 LOADS REDUCED CREDIT FACT SHEETS  
This section includes a series of fact sheets that describe trash load reduction credits for control 
measures that were deemed as infeasible or impractical to quantify at this time. Fact sheets presented 
in this section are listed in Table 3.1. Trash load reduction credits were developed based on information 
reviewed and summarized in BASMAA (2011c); and discussions between stakeholders at BASMAA Trash 
Committee meetings and Permittee meetings and communications. Each fact sheet in this section 
includes: 1) an introduction; 2) summary of applicable control measures; 3) load reduction crediting 
method; and 4) references used to develop the method.  
 
Table 3.1. Trash control measure for which load reduction credits were developed to track progress towards trash load reduction goals. 

  Fact Sheet
                                Control Measure                                                      Description
   Number
 CR-1             Single-use Carryout Bag Ordinance                Area-wide credit that is based on the adoption of local, countywide
                                                                   ordinances or implementation of statewide actions that prohibit or
                                                                   significantly reduce the distribution of single-use plastic carryout bags.
                                                                   Additional credit is also available for the implementation of fees for all other
                                                                   types of single-use carryout bags (paper et al.).

 CR-2             Polystyrene Foam Food Service Ware               Area-wide credit based on the adoption of local, countywide ordinances or
                  Ordinance                                        implementation of statewide actions that reduce the distribution of
                                                                   polystyrene foam food ware by vendors. Prohibitions can be implemented at
                                                                   two tiers: Permittee-owned properties/events and at all food service vendors.
                                                                   Control measures must include an active enforcement program.
 CR-3             Public Education and Outreach Programs           Area-wide credit based on the implementation of advertising campaigns,
                                                                   outreach to school-aged children/youth, the use of media, and community
                                                                   outreach events, consistent with the MRP. Public education programs must
                                                                   include an effectiveness evaluation component to evaluate an increase in the
                                                                   awareness or a behavior change in the public.
 CR-4             Activities to Reduce Trash from Uncovered        Area-wide credit that is based on implementation of prescriptive language in
                  Loads                                            Permittee trash and/or construction debris hauling contracts, and actively
                                                                   working with local law enforcement to establish an enhanced enforcement
                                                                   program for vehicles with uncovered loads.
 CR-5             Anti-littering and Illegal Dumping Enforcement   Area-wide credit is based on the implementation of active compliance and
                  Activities                                       enforcement programs, and use of surveillance cameras and physical
                                                                   barriers to reduce dumping.

 CR-6             Improved Trash Bins/Container Management         Area-wide credit that is based on the development and implementation of an
                                                                   outreach and enforcement program to identify private properties with
                                                                   inadequate trash service, implementation of a strategic plan for public area
                                                                   trash containers, and the successful establishment of business improvement
                                                                   districts or equivalent.
 CR-7             Single-use Food and Beverage Ware                Area-wide credit based on the adoption of local, countywide ordinances or
                  Ordinance                                        implementation of statewide actions that reduce the distribution of single-use
                                                                   food and beverage ware. Prohibitions can be implemented at multiple tiers.
                                                                   Control measures must include an active enforcement program.




                                                                     10 
                                                                                                                                         2/1/12 
Technical Report 



CR‐1: SINGLE‐USE CARRYOUT PLASTIC BAG POLICIES (AREA‐WIDE) 
 
Single‐use carryout bags have been found to contribute substantially to the litter stream and to have 
adverse effects on marine wildlife (United Nations 2009, CIWMB 2007, County of Los Angeles 2007). The 
prevalence of litter from plastic bags in the urban environment also compromises the efficiency of 
systems designed to channel stormwater runoff. Furthermore, plastic bag litter leads to increased clean‐
up costs for the Permittees and other public agencies.  
 
As a result, Permittees have adopted municipal ordinances or equivalent policies that are designed to 
significantly reduce environmental impacts of single use bags, while reducing cleanup costs. Ordinances 
can vary in scope and therefore a tiered load reduction credit system based on the anticipated 
magnitude of reduction was developed. For those Permittees that implement an ordinance designed to 
significantly reduce the use of all types of single‐use carryout bags (e.g., plastic and paper) an additional 
load reduction credit is available.  
 
Based on the recent experience of municipalities throughout the State, the process Permittees must 
undertake to enact a single‐use carryout plastic bag ordinance is very challenging due to intense scrutiny 
and opposition from not only public interest groups and lobbyists, but also merchants and community 
members. In most cases, most opposition groups are pressing for the development of Environmental 
Impact Reports (EIRs) in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). Credits 
presented in this fact sheet take into account the level of effort needed to enact an ordinance for single‐
use plastic bags. 

Applicable Control Measures 
Methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban stormwater runoff control 
measures implemented by Permittees at the local, countywide or regional scales. Methods described 
are intended to demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from implementation of one or more of 
these control measures within an individual Permittee’s jurisdiction.  
        Adoption of an ordinance (or equivalent policy) at the local, countywide, or regional level to 
         prohibit or reduce the sale and/or distribution of single‐use carryout plastic bags 
        Implementation of statewide actions to prohibit or reduce the sale and/or distribution of single‐
         use carryout plastic bags 
Please Note: To avoid penalizing early implementers, applicable control measures implemented by a 
Permittee prior to MRP adoption will be credited equally to control measures implemented after the 
adoption of the MRP. Load reduction credits associated with the implementation of these control 
measures may be used to demonstrate progress towards trash load reduction goals. 

Load Reduction Credits 
Permittees will receive trash load reduction credits for implementing the following control measures: 
        Tier 1 – Prohibit Distribution at Large Supermarkets – Adoption of a local ordinance or 
         implementation of a statewide or countywide action that prohibits large supermarkets from 
         distributing single‐use carryout plastic bags within their jurisdictional boundaries shall receive a 
         trash load reduction credit of 6 percent. 
        Tier 2 – Prohibit Distribution at Retail Establishments that Sell Packaged Foods – Adoption of a 
         local ordinance or implementation of a statewide or countywide action that prohibits retail 

                                                      11 
                                                                                                        2/1/12 
                                                                                     Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



          establishments that sell packaged foods from distributing single‐use carryout plastic bags within 
          their jurisdictional boundaries shall receive a trash load reduction credit of 8 percent.   
         Tier 3 – Prohibit Distribution at All Retail Establishments (with the Exception of Restaurants) – 
          Adoption of a local ordinance or implementation of a statewide or countywide action that 
          prohibits ALL retail establishments (with the exception of restaurants) from distributing single‐
          use carryout plastic bags within their jurisdictional boundaries shall receive a trash load 
          reduction credit of 10 percent.   
         Additional Credit – In addition to the adoption of an ordinance (or equivalent) described in Tiers 
          1‐3, Permittees shall receive an additional load reduction credit for implementing a more far‐
          reaching ordinance that significantly reduces the distribution and usage of ALL types of single‐
          use carryout bags (plastic et al.). Actions may include banning the distribution of or charging a 
          fee for, single use paper bags in retail establishments.  
 
Please Note: To receive the trash load reduction credits described above, Permittees must implement in 
parallel with the ordinance/action a basic public education/outreach actions focused on reducing the 
distribution of single‐use plastic bags, and enforcement actions designed to ensure compliance with the 
ordinance. Additionally, if a control measure does not fit within one of the two tiers described above, a 
Permittee may propose a credit commensurate with the extent of the ordinance.   
 
A summary of trash load reductions credits available to Permittees implementing these control 
measures is provided in Table CR‐1.1.   
 
Table CR-1.1. Summary of single-use carryout plastic bag ordinance load reduction credits.

                                                                                                      Load Reduction Credit (%)
                                      Control Measure                                                                Ordinance Covering
                                                                                                Ordinance Covering
                                                                                                                        ALL Types of
                                                                                                Plastic Bags ONLY
                                                                                                                      Single-Use Bags
 Tier 1 – Ordinance (or Equivalent) that Prohibits the Distribution of Single-use Bags at a
                                                                                                        6                     8
 Subset of Retail Establishments – Large Supermarkets

 Tier 2 – Ordinance (or Equivalent) that Prohibits the Distribution of Single-use Bags at
                                                                                                        8                    10
 Retail Establishments that Sell Packaged Foods

 Tier 3 – Ordinance (or Equivalent) that Prohibits the Distribution of Single-use Bags at all
                                                                                                       10                    12
 Retail Establishments (with the exception of restaurants)

 Total Possible Load Reduction Credits                                                                 10                    12


References 
California Integrated Waste Management Board (CIWMB). 2007. Board Meeting Agenda, Resolution: Agenda Item 14. 
Sacramento, CA. June 12, 2007. 
CalRecycle. 2010. At‐Store Recycling Program: 2009 Statewide Recycling Rate for Plastic Carryout Bags. Available at 
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/Plastics/AtStore/AnnualRate/2009Rate.htm#Rate. Accessed June 22, 2011. 
CalRecycle. 2011. Earth Day 2011: Being Green, Living Green. Available at 
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/PublicEd/EarthDay/How.htm. Accessed March 17, 2011. 
City of San Jose. 2010. Environmental Impact Report: Single‐Use Carryout Bag Ordinance File No. PP09‐194 SCH #2009102095. 




                                                                        12 
                                                                                                                                  2/1/12 
Technical Report 



County of Los Angeles, Department of Public Works, Environmental Programs Division. 2007. An Overview of Carryout Bags in 
Los Angeles County: A Staff Report to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. Alhambra, CA. 
http://dpw.lacounty.gov/epd/PlasticBags/PDF/PlasticBagReport_08‐2007.pdf. August 2007. 
United Nations Environment Programme. 2009. Marine Litter: A Global Challenge. Nairobi, Kenya. Available at 
http://www.unep.org/regionalseas/marinelitter/publications/docs/Marine_Litter_A_Global_Challenge.pdf .April 2009. 

 




                                                            13 
                                                                                                                     2/1/12 
                                                             Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



CR‐2: POLYSTYRENE FOAM FOOD SERVICE WARE POLICIES (AREA‐WIDE) 
 
Polystyrene foam is used as food ware in the food service industry. According to the USEPA (2002), 
floatable debris in waterways, such as products made of polystyrene, is persistent in the environment 
and has physical properties that can have serious impacts on human health, wildlife, the aquatic 
environment and the economy (USEPA 2002).  Because of its detrimental impacts on aquatic ecosystems 
and difficulty in removing once in the environment, polystyrene is a material of interest to Permittees 
and stakeholders. Due to its properties, polystyrene foam used as food ware is typically not recycled.  
 
Since 1990, over 100 government agencies within the United States, including over 20 within the San 
Francisco Bay area have enacted municipal ordinances/policies prohibiting the distribution of 
polystyrene foam food ware in at municipally‐sponsored events and/or retail establishments. 
Ordinances vary in scope and therefore a tiered load reduction credit system based on the anticipated 
magnitude of reduction was developed. For those Permittees that demonstrate a high level of 
compliance with the ordinance, additional load reduction credits are available. Credits presented in this 
fact sheet take into account the level of effort needed to enact an ordinance prohibiting the distribution 
of polystyrene foam food ware. 

Applicable Control Measures 
Methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban stormwater runoff control 
measures implemented by Permittees at the local, countywide or regional scales. Methods described 
are intended to demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from implementation of one or more of 
these control measures within an individual Permittee’s jurisdiction.  
       Ordinances or policies adopted at local or countywide level which prohibits the distribution of 
        polystyrene foam food ware; and/or 
       Statewide actions that prohibit the distribution of polystyrene foam food ware. 
 
Please Note: To avoid penalizing early implementers, applicable control measures implemented by a 
Permittee prior to MRP adoption will be credited equally to control measures implemented after the 
adoption of the MRP. Load reduction credits associated with the implementation of these control 
measures may be used to demonstrate progress towards trash load reduction goals. 

Load Reduction Credits 
Permittees will receive trash load reduction credits for implementing the following control measures: 
       Tier 1 – Prohibit Distribution at Permittee‐sponsored Events and Permittee‐owned Property – 
        Adoption of a local ordinance or implementation of actions that prohibit food vendors from 
        distributing polystyrene foam food ware at Permittee‐sponsored events and on Permittee‐
        owned property will receive a trash load reduction credit of 2 percent.  
        Tier 2 –Prohibit Distribution by Food Service Vendors – Adoption of a local ordinance or 
         implementation of an action that prohibits food vendors from distributing polystyrene foam 
         food ware within their jurisdictional boundaries will receive a trash load reduction credit of 8 
         percent. 
          
Please Note: To receive the trash load reduction credits described above, Permittees must implement in 
parallel with the ordinance or action a public education/outreach actions focused on food service 

                                                    14 
                                                                                                        2/1/12 
Technical Report 



vendors, and enforcement actions designed to ensure compliance with the ordinance/action. 
Additionally, if a control measure does not fit within one of the two tiers described above, a Permittee 
may propose a credit commensurate with the extent of the ordinance/action.   
 
A summary of trash load reductions credits available to Permittees implementing these control 
measures is provided in Table CR‐2.1.   
 
          Table CR-2.1. Summary of polystyrene foam food service ware ordinance load reduction credits.



                                           Control Measure                                     Load Reduction Credit (%)



           Tier 1 – Ordinance (or Equivalent) that Prohibits the Distribution of Polystyrene
           Foam Food Ware at Permittee-sponsored Events or on Permittee-owned                             2
           Property

           Tier 2 – Ordinance (or Equivalent) that Prohibits the Distribution of Polystyrene
                                                                                                          8
           Foam Food Ware at all food service vendors

           Total Possible Load Reduction Credits                                                          8


References 
USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency). 2002. Assessing and Monitoring Floatable Debris. August 2002. 
Available at http://water.epa.gov/type/oceb/marinedebris/upload/2006_10_6_oceans_debris_floatingdebris_debris‐final.pdf. 
 




                                                                    15 
                                                                                                                           2/1/12 
                                                                                    Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



CR‐3: PUBLIC EDUCATION AND OUTREACH PROGRAMS (AREA‐WIDE) 
 
Permittees in the San Francisco Bay Area have implemented public education and outreach programs to 
inform residents about stormwater issues related to pollutants of concern, watershed awareness and 
pollution prevention.  Public education and outreach efforts include developing and distributing 
brochures and other print media, posting messages on websites and social networking media (e.g., 
Facebook, Twitter, etc.), attending community events, and conducting media advertising. In recent 
years, some municipal agencies have implemented anti‐litter campaigns to increase public awareness 
about the impacts of trash on their communities and water quality, and to encourage the public to stop 
littering. Additionally, consistent with Provision C.7 of the MRP, the main focus of current stormwater 
public education and outreach efforts in the Bay Area are associated with trash reduction. The effects 
associated with public education and outreach programs are long‐term and are partially determined by 
long‐term commitments by agencies implementing these programs.  

Applicable Control Measures 
Methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following new or enhanced urban stormwater 
runoff control measures implemented by Permittees at the local, countywide or regional scales. 
Applicable control measures are consistent with the requirements in MRP provision C.7. Credits 
associated with these control measures are commensurate with the trash load reduction anticipated to 
occur overtime.  

             Advertising Campaigns – Participation in or contribution to advertising campaign(s) on 
              trash/litter in waterways with the goal of significantly increasing overall awareness of 
              stormwater runoff pollution prevention messages and behavior changes in a target audience.3 
              Advertising campaigns must include the following attributes: 
                     Specific anti‐littering messages for reducing litter; 
                     A comprehensive advertising plan designed to reach the target audience; and 
                     Pre and post‐campaign surveys which identify and quantify the audiences’ knowledge, 
                      trends and attitudes and/or practices; and measures the overall population’s awareness of 
                      the messages and behavior changes achieved by the campaign.  

             Outreach to School‐age Children or Youth – Active implementation of outreach programs (e.g., 
              assemblies, presentations, etc.) designed to promote anti‐littering behavior in school‐age 
              children (K through 12) at an implementation level listed in Table CR‐3.1. Outreach programs 
              must include an evaluation component (e.g., teacher or student feedback) to determine 
              effectiveness.  
               




                                                            
3
  A specific group of people within the target market at which the marketing message is aimed (e.g., 16‐24 year old males) (Kotler 1999) 

                                                                       16 
                                                                                                                                        2/1/12 
Technical Report 


                          Table CR-3.1. Minimum number of school-age children/youth outreach events by Permittee population.

                                                   Permittee Population              # of Outreach Events

                                                               <10,000                        2

                                                        10,001 – 40,000                       3

                                                       40,001 – 100,000                       4

                                                      101,001 – 175,000                       5

                                                      175,001 – 250,000                       6

                                                               > 250,000                      8

               
             Media Relations (Use of Free Media) – Participation in or contribution to a media relations 
              campaign which uses free media/media coverage (i.e., public service announcements and free 
              advertising spots) focusing on litter issues (e.g., publicity of local creek/neighborhood cleanups, 
              outreach promoting product bans, steps initiated to alleviate trash from homeless 
              encampments, etc.). The media relations campaign must be designed to significantly increase 
              the overall awareness of anti‐litter messages and associated behavior change in target 
              audiences.   
             Community Outreach Events – Organization of and participation in focused outreach and 
              education programs at an implementation level listed in Table CR‐3.2 in high priority 
              communities where litter is prevalent. Outreach programs must include an evaluation 
              component (e.g., participant feedback) to determine effectiveness. 
               
                                    Table CR-3.2. Minimum number of community outreach events by Permittee population.

                                                   Permittee Population              # of Outreach Events

                                                               <10,000                        2

                                                        10,001 – 40,000                       3

                                                       40,001 – 100,000                       4

                                                      101,001 – 175,000                       5

                                                      175,001 – 250,000                       6

                                                               > 250,000                      8

 

Crediting Approach 
Water quality outcomes4 associated with public education and outreach control measures are incredibly 
difficult and costly to measure with confidence. Therefore, the crediting methods used for public 
education and outreach control measures will be based on the documented implementation of the 
control measure and attempts to measure the effectiveness of such actions through assessment. For all 
public education and outreach control measures described in this fact sheet, with the exception of 

                                                            
4
     Outcomes are the results of implementing a stormwater control measure, program element or overall program (CASQA 2007).

                                                                           17 
                                                                                                                               2/1/12 
                                                                             Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



media relations, effectiveness assessments designed to measure increased awareness and/or behavior 
change must be conducted by Permittees to claim the load reduction credits described below.  

Load Reduction Credits 
Permittees will receive load reduction credits presented in Table CR‐3.3 for the implementation of new 
or enhanced control measures described in this fact sheet. To receive credit, control measures must be 
directed at the appropriate, target audience (i.e., litterers) or potential future litterers (i.e., children). 
Because public education and outreach activities typically require a significant period time to achieve 
desired outcomes, a long‐term commitment by Permittees towards implementation is assumed in the 
credits described in Table CR‐3.3. 
 
Please Note: To avoid penalizing early implementers, applicable control measures implemented by a 
Permittee prior to MRP adoption and continued through the term of the MRP will be credited equally to 
new or enhanced control measures implemented after the adoption of the MRP. Load reduction credits 
associated with the implementation of these control measures may be used to demonstrate progress 
towards trash load reduction goals. 
 
                     Table CR-3.3. Summary of trash load reduction credits for public education and outreach
                     program control measures.


                                    Control Measures                         Load Reduction Credit (%)


                       Advertising Campaigns                                              3

                       Outreach to School-age Children or Youth                           2

                       Media Relations (Use of free media)                                1

                       Community Outreach Events                                          2

                       Total Possible Load Reduction Credits (%)                          8
 

References 
CASQA (California Stormwater Quality Association). 2007. Municipal Stormwater Program Effectiveness Assessment Guidance. 
May 2007. 
Kotler, P. 1999. Kotler on Marketing: How to Create, Win, and Dominate Markets. New York: Free Press.  
 




                                                                  18 
                                                                                                                        2/1/12 
Technical Report 



CR‐4: REDUCTION OF TRASH FROM UNCOVERED LOADS (AREA‐WIDE) 
 
Although it is currently illegal to operate a vehicle that is improperly covered and which its’ contents 
escapes5, vehicles remain an important trash source to MS4s and local waterways. Specifically, vehicles 
that do not secure or cover their loads when transporting trash and debris have a high risk of 
contributing trash to MS4s. Land areas that generate trash from vehicles include roads, highways (on/off 
ramps, shoulders or median strips) and parking lots. To help address the dispersion of trash from 
unsecured or uncovered vehicles destined for landfills and transfer stations, Permittees may require 
municipally‐contracted trash haulers to cover or secure loads or work with municipal or private landfill 
and transfer station operators to educate waste haulers on securing loads and/or to enhance 
enforcement of existing regulations. 

Applicable Control Measures 
Load reduction tracking methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban 
stormwater runoff control measures implemented by Permittees at the local, countywide or regional 
scales. These crediting methods are intended to demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from 
implementation of these control measures within an individual Permittee’s jurisdictional area. 

             Require Municipal Trash Haulers to Cover Loads – development and inclusion of language in a 
              Permittee’s hauling service contract(s) that requires contracted trash and construction debris 
              haulers to cover loads when transporting trash and debris to municipally or privately‐owned 
              landfills and transfer stations.  
             Implement an Enhanced Enforcement Program for Vehicles with Uncovered Loads – 
              Permittees actively working with local law enforcement to establish an enhanced enforcement 
              program for vehicles with uncovered loads.  Enhanced enforcement programs may include the 
              following: 
                   o Adoption of an ordinance prohibiting the transportation of trash or debris without a 
                      cover; 
                   o Citations and fines for vehicles spotted on roads in an individual Permittee’s 
                      jurisdictional area with uncovered loads; or, 
                   o Distribution of tarps for a fee to haulers or other vehicles that arrive at landfills and 
                      transfer stations with uncovered loads. Each subsequent visit without a tarp will result 
                      in an additional fee for a tarp, prompting haulers to bring their own tarp. 

Load Reduction Credits  
Permittees will receive load reduction credits presented in Table CR‐4.1 for the implementation of 
control measures described in this fact sheet. Each control measure and associated credit is considered 
to be mutually exclusive of the other.  
  
 
                                                            
5
  In accordance with the California Vehicle Code Sections 23114 and 23115, it is against the law to operate a vehicle on the 
highway which is improperly covered, constructed, or loaded so that any part of its contents or loads spills, drops, leaks, blows, 
or otherwise escapes from the vehicle. Exempted materials include hay and straw, clear water and feathers from live birds. 
Additionally, any vehicle transporting garbage, trash, or rubbish, used cans or bottles, waste papers, waste cardboard, etc. must 
have the load covered to prevent any part of the load from spilling on the highway (CVC 2011). Significant fines are possible for 
non‐compliance. 

                                                               19 
                                                                                                                          2/1/12 
                                                                                 Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



Please Note: To avoid penalizing early implementers, applicable control measures implemented by a 
Permittee prior to MRP adoption and continued in a given year of interest will be credited equally to 
new or enhanced control measures implemented after the adoption of the MRP. Load reduction credits 
associated with the implementation of these control measures may be used to demonstrate progress 
towards trash load reduction goals. 
 
Table CR‐4.1. Summary of trash load reduction credits for activities to reduce trash from uncovered loads. 

                                                                                                              Load Reduction Credit
                                                Control Measure
                                                                                                                      (%)

    Prescriptive Language in Municipal Contracts for Trash and Debris Haulers                                          1

    Implementation of an Enhanced Enforcement Program for Vehicles with Uncovered Loads                                4

    Total Possible Load Reduction Credits (%)                                                                          5


References 
CVC (California Vehicle Code). 2011. California Vehicle Code Sections 23114 and 23115. 




                                                                      20 
                                                                                                                              2/1/12 
Technical Report 



CR‐5: ANTI‐LITTERING AND ILLEGAL DUMPING ENFORCEMENT (AREA‐WIDE) 
 
Successful anti‐littering and illegal dumping enforcement activities include laws and ordinances that 
prohibit littering or dumping. Laws are enforced by various municipal agency staff (e.g., police, sheriff 
and public works department staff) who issue citations in response to citizen complaints or other 
enforcement methods (e.g., surveillance cameras, signage and/or physical barriers installed at illegal 
dumping hot spots). In some California jurisdictions, the minimum fine for littering is $500 and the 
maximum penalty for highway littering is $1000 (City of San Francisco 2001). However, it is difficult to 
enforce small littering events unless they are witnessed or solid proof exists linking the offender to the 
litter. As a result, enforcement tends to focus on larger scale illegal dumping activities.  

Applicable Control Measures 
Methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban stormwater runoff control 
measure enhancements implemented by Permittees. These crediting methods are intended to 
demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from implementation within an individual Permittee’s 
jurisdiction. 

        Anti‐Littering and Illegal Dumping Enforcement Program – Implementation of an active anti‐
         littering and illegal dumping enforcement program in the year of interest that includes all of the 
         following: 
         o    Thorough investigations of complaints received from an illegal dumping hotline;  
         o    The implementation of enforcement procedures including citations (as warranted); and, 
         o    The collection of evidence (e.g., names, addresses, etc.) from illegal dump sites (i.e., public 
              and private) in an attempt to identify offenders. 
        Use of Surveillance Cameras – Installation and use of surveillance cameras to deter and 
         prosecute illegal dumping at high priority sites identified within a Permittee’s jurisdictional area.   
        Use of Physical Barriers or Improvements – Installation and use of physical barriers (e.g., 
         fences, walls) or physical improvements (e.g., maintenance) which eliminate or deter illegal 
         dumping at high priority sites identified within a Permittee’s jurisdictional area.  

Load Reduction Credits  
Permittees will receive load reduction credits presented in Table CR‐5.1 for the implementation of 
control measures described in this fact sheet. Each control measure and associated credit is considered 
to be mutually exclusive of the other.  
  
Please Note: To avoid penalizing early implementers, applicable control measures implemented by a 
Permittee prior to MRP adoption and continued in a given year of interest will be credited equally to 
new or enhanced control measures implemented after the adoption of the MRP. Load reduction credits 
associated with the implementation of these control measures may be used to demonstrate progress 
towards trash load reduction goals. 
 
 
 



                                                       21 
                                                                                                         2/1/12 
                                                                                  Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 




               Table CR-5.1. Summary of trash load reduction credits for implementing anti-littering and illegal dumping
               enforcement activities.
                                                                                                        Load Reduction
                Control Measure
                                                                                                          Credit (%)
                Anti-Littering and Illegal Dumping Investigation and Enforcement Program                        2

                Use of Surveillance Cameras or Other Deterrents

                  Tier 1 – 20-50% of identified hot spots under surveillance                                    1

                  Tier 2 – >50% of identified hot spots under surveillance                                      2

                Use of Physical Barriers/Improvements at a percentage of hotspots

                  Tier 1 – Implemented at 20-50% of identified hot spots                                        1

                  Tier 2 – Implemented at >50% of identified hot spots                                          2

                Total Possible Load Reduction Credit                                                            6


References 
City of San Francisco. 2001. Litter and Graffiti. Report of the 2000‐2001 San Francisco Civil Grand Jury. Available at 
     http:/www.sfsuperiorcourt.org/index.aspx?page=242. Accessed November 12, 2010.  
      




                                                                    22 
                                                                                                                             2/1/12 
Technical Report 



CR‐6: IMPROVED TRASH BIN/CONTAINER MANAGEMENT (AREA‐WIDE) 
 
Receptacles used to place/store trash or recyclables prior to collection by a public agency or private 
waste hauler reduce the potential for littering and trash loading to stormwater conveyance systems and 
receiving waters (City of Los Angeles 2004). For the purposes of assigning trash load reduction credits, 
receptacles fall into the following two categories:  
        Private Trash/Recycling Bins: A receptacle for placing trash or recyclables generated from a 
         household, business, or other location that is serviced by a trash hauler. Bins are specifically‐
         designed, heavy‐duty plastic wheeled containers with hinged lids; or large multi‐yard metal or 
         plastic containers rectangular in shape. 
        Public Area Trash Containers: A receptacle for placing incidental trash generated in public 
         spaces that provides people with a convenient and appropriate place to dispose of trash. The 
         design and size of public area trash containers vary widely, depending on their setting and use. 
     
The effectiveness of bins/containers and bins in reducing trash in the environment is likely dependent 
upon: the location and density of the receptacles, size of the bin/container in relationship to the size 
needed to service users, frequency of maintenance, and the ability of the bin/container to capture and 
contain the trash deposited.  

Applicable Control Measures 
Methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban stormwater runoff control 
measure enhancements implemented by Permittees. These crediting methods are intended to 
demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from implementation within an individual Permittee’s 
jurisdictional area.  
        Ensuring Adequate Private Trash Service – Implementation of a program that identifies 
         businesses or households that have inadequate trash service (i.e., insufficient trash collection or 
         use of bins which are too small); and through municipal code enforcement or other authorities 
         requiring businesses/households to sufficiently remedy the issue will receive a load reduction 
         credit based on the extent of the program. Permittees may choose to coordinate with waste 
         haulers to assist with the identification of subject households/businesses. Implemented 
         programs may receive up to 3 percent load reduction credit (if Tier 2 is implemented). 
        Implementation of Strategic Plan for Public Area Trash Containers – Development and 
         implementation of a strategic plan that: 
         o Identifies whether public area trash containers are sufficiently located in high trash 
            generating areas and are adequately designed to manage trash types that typically are 
            generated from activities occurring at these areas (e.g., containers with larger openings 
            designed to accommodate larger trash items (e.g., pizza boxes) are in locations where 
            people dispose of these items (e.g., near schools or parks). 
         o Identifies an increased level of inspection and maintenance of public area trash containers is 
            needed at high trash generating sites. 
         o Includes the installation of specialty trash bins/containers (e.g., bins for cigarette butts, 
            sharps, etc.) in specific locations to eliminate or reduce the prevalence of these items in 
            stormwater.  
         o Includes the installation of new technologies (e.g., Big Belly Solar Trash Compactors) to 
            reduce trash in stormwater and reduce the cost of adding public area trash containers. 

                                                     23 
                                                                                                      2/1/12 
                                                                                       Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



                   
              The strategic plan should provide recommendations on how the system of public area trash 
              containers within the Permittee’s jurisdictional area may be enhanced to reduce the volume of 
              trash in streets, the stormwater conveyance system and waterways. The recommendations in 
              the plan should begin to be implemented prior to receiving trash reduction credits associated 
              with this control measure.  Implemented plans will receive a 3 percent load reduction credit. 
             Successful Establishment of Business Improvement Districts with Trash Reduction Control 
              Measures – Provide support toward the successful establishment of Business Improvement 
              Districts (BIDs)6 or equivalent entity/actions that incorporates sidewalk sweeping, litter pickup 
              and/or maintenance of public area trash containers at least once per week in retail/wholesale or 
              commercial areas. Area‐specific credit will be given for each BID successfully established within 
              a Permittee’s jurisdictional area that has specific trash reduction language in the agreement or 
              actions that are equivalent to establishing a BID. The successful establishment of each BID or 
              equivalent actions that include trash reduction control measures will receive a load reduction 
              credit of 50% of its baseline load.    

Load Reduction Credits  
Permittees will receive load reduction credits presented in Table CR‐6.1 for the implementation of trash 
generation reduction7 control measures described in this fact sheet. Please Note: To avoid penalizing 
early implementers, applicable control measures implemented by a Permittee prior to MRP adoption 
and continued in a given year of interest will be credited equally to new or enhanced control measures 
implemented after the adoption of the MRP. Load reduction credits associated with the implementation 
of these control measures may be used to demonstrate progress towards trash load reduction goals. 
         
         Table CR-6.1. Summary of trash load reduction credits for improved trash bin/container management control measures

                                                                                                                  Load Reduction Credit
            Control Measure
                                                                                                                          (%)
            Ensuring Adequate Private Trash Service and Enclosures
              Tier 1 – Development and Approval of Ordinance (or equivalent) for Appropriate Trash
                                                                                                                              1
              Services (Bin/Enclosure Design) for Private Properties
              Tier 2 – Development and Approval of Ordinance (or equivalent) AND Identification and
                                                                                                                              3
              Enforcement of Inadequate Trash Service for Private Trash and Recycling Bins/Containers
            Implementation of Strategic Plan for Public Area Trash Containers                                                3
            Successful Establishment of Each Business Improvement District (BID) that Includes Trash              50% of Baseline Load in
            Reduction Control Measures                                                                                   Each BID
            Total Possible Load Reduction Credit                                                                            6+


References 
City of Los Angeles 2004. Technical Report: Best Management Practices for Implementing the Trash Total Maximum Daily 
Loads, January 2004.  
Newman, T.L., W.M. Leo, J.A. Mueller, and R. Gaffoglio 1996.  Effectiveness of Street Sweeping for Floatables Control.  
Proceedings for Urban Wet Weather Pollution: Controlling Sewer Overflows and Stormwater Pollution. Quebec. June 16‐19, 
1996. 


                                                            
6
  BIDs are districts or areas in central cities in which the private sector delivers services for revitalization beyond what the local government can 
reasonably be expected to provide. The property or business owner within the BID pays a special tax or assessment to cover the cost of 
services. Cities provide some oversight but  the BID controls its finances.  
7
  Only trash generation reduction control measures are included in this fact sheet.  On‐land and creek cleanups are addressed in Fact Sheets QF‐
1 and QF‐6.

                                                                         24 
                                                                                                                                             2/1/12 
Technical Report 



                                                                                                                                            8
CR‐7: SINGLE‐USE FOOD AND BEVERAGE WARE ORDINANCES (AREA‐WIDE)  
 
Single‐use food and beverage ware have been found to contribute substantially to the litter stream (City 
of Oxnard 2004, City of San Francisco 2008, City of San Jose 2009, Clean Water Action 2011) and can 
cause adverse environmental impacts throughout their lifecycles (Ackerman 1997, Alliance for 
Environmental Innovation 2000, EPA 2009). The prevalence of litter from single‐use food and beverage 
ware in the urban environment also compromises the efficiency of systems designed to convey 
stormwater runoff. Furthermore, food and beverage container litter leads to increased clean‐up costs 
for MRP Permittees and other public agencies.   
 
Due to the magnitude of food and beverage packaging litter emanating from commercial business 
districts, many California municipalities have take action to eliminate the distribution of polystyrene 
foam food and beverage ware (See Fact Sheet CR‐2). In addition to polystyrene, municipalities may also 
consider actions to reduce the quantity of all single‐use disposable food and/or beverage ware through 
measures that promote the use of reusable containers. If enacted and enforced, such ordinances are 
expected to significantly trash available to MS4s and local water bodies that is comprised of single‐use 
food and beverage ware (San Francisco 2008, Clean Water Action 2011).  
 
Based on the recent experience of municipalities throughout the State of California, a process 
Permittees must undertake to enact a food and/or beverage containers ordinance could be very 
challenging due to intense scrutiny and opposition from not only public interest groups and lobbyists, 
but also merchants and community members. For example, opposition groups have pressed for the 
development of Environmental Impact Reports (EIRs) in accordance with the California Environmental 
Quality Act (CEQA) when developing ordinances banning certain food related bags and ware. Load 
reduction credits presented in this fact sheet take into account the level of effort needed to enact an 
ordinance for reducing litter associated with single‐use food and beverage ware. 

Applicable Control Measures 
Load reduction tracking methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban 
stormwater runoff control measures implemented by Permittees at the local, countywide or regional 
scales. Methods described are intended to demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from 
implementation of one or more of these control measures within an individual Permittee’s jurisdiction.  
          Adoption of an ordinance or equivalent action at the local, countywide, or regional level to 
           reduce the use of all single‐use food and/or beverage ware from food service vendors 

Load Reduction Credits 
Permittees shall receive trash load reduction credits that may be applied towards MRP trash reduction 
goals for implementing the following control measures: 
              Tier 1a – Require all food service vendors to: 1) provide consumers a discount for “bringing 
               their own” reusable beverage ware, or 2) charge consumers a fee for using single‐use 
               beverage containers – Adoption of a local ordinance or implementation of a statewide or 
               countywide action that requires ALL food service establishments within their jurisdictional 
                                                            
8
  Please note that based on the literature review conducted by BASMAA (2011c), no municipality in the United States has yet attempted to 
formally adopt an ordinance such as that described in this factsheet. No model/example ordinance associated with charging mandatory fees or 
requiring discounts currently exist. Therefore, the control measures presented in this factsheet should be considered draft and conceptual in 
nature. Additionally, based on municipal experience in adopting ordinances for single‐use bags and polystyrene food ware, it is highly likely that 
considerable time and resources would be needed to respond to stakeholder comments and concerns. 

                                                                       25 
                                                                                                                                          2/1/12 
                                                                                   Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0) 



          boundaries that sell take‐out beverages to provide a discount to consumers on the sale of 
          beverages when a re‐usable container is used, shall receive a trash load reduction credit of 8 
          percent.  Adoption of a local ordinance or implementation of a statewide or countywide action 
          that requires ALL food service establishments within their jurisdictional boundaries that serve 
          take‐out beverages to charge the consumer a fee for each take‐out beverage container used, 
          shall receive a trash load reduction credit of 12 percent.  
         Tier 1b – Mandatory Fee for single‐use disposable food and/or beverage containers – 
          Adoption of a local ordinance or implementation of a statewide or countywide action that 
          requires ALL food service establishments within their jurisdictional boundaries that sell take‐out 
          beverages and/or food to provide a discount to consumers on the sale of food and beverages 
          when a re‐usable container is used, shall receive a trash load reduction credit of 20 percent.  
          Adoption of a local ordinance or implementation of a statewide or countywide action that 
          requires ALL food service establishments within their jurisdictional boundaries that serve take‐
          out food and/or beverages to charge the consumer a fee for each take‐out food or beverage 
          container used, shall receive a trash load reduction credit of 24 percent.  
 
Please Note: To receive the trash load reduction credits described above, Permittees must implement in 
parallel with the ordinance/action: 1) public education/outreach actions focused on educating 
consumers and food service vendors on the implementation the ordinance; and 2) an active 
enforcement program that includes inspections of food service vendors to ensure compliance. 
Additionally, if a control measure does not fit within one of the tiers described above, a Permittee may 
propose a credit commensurate with the nature and intent of the similar action.   
 
A summary of trash load reductions credits available to Permittees implementing these control 
measures is provided in Table CR‐7.1.   
 
Table CR-7.1. Summary of trash reduction credits for adopting and enforcing single-use food and beverage ware reduction ordinances.

                                                                                                    Load Reduction Credit (%)
                                    Control Measure
                                                                                            Mandatory Discount        Mandatory Fee


 Tier 1a – Ordinance (or Equivalent) that requires food service vendors to provide a
                                                                                                     8                       12
 discount for “Bring Your Own” or a fee on single use beverage ware

 Tier 1b – Ordinance (or Equivalent) that requires food service vendors to provide a
                                                                                                    20                       24
 discount for “Bring Your Own” or a fee on single use food and beverage ware

 Total Possible Load Reduction Credits                                                              20                       24


References 
Ackerman, F. (1997). Environmental Impacts of Packaging in the U.S. and Mexico. Tufts University, PHIL and TECH 2.2. 
Alliance for Environmental Innovation (2000). Report of the Starbucks Coffee Company / Alliance for Innovation Joint Task 
Force.  http://business.edf.org/sites/business.edf.org/files/starbucks‐report‐april2000.pdf 
City of Oxnard (2004). Storm Drain Sampling Results. Presentation at plastic debris conference.  
conference.plasticdebris.org/whitepapers/Mark_Pumford.doc 
City of San Francisco (2008). City of san Francisco Streets Litter Re‐Audit. Prepared by HDR, Brown, Vence and Assocaites, and 
MGM Management. http://www.sfenvironment.org/downloads/library/2008_litter_audit.pdf 


                                                                     26 
                                                                                                                                  2/1/12 
Technical Report 



City of San Jose (2009). San Jose Targeted Litter Assessment. Prepared by MGM Management. 
Clean Water Action (2011). Taking Out the Trash Draft Report. http://www.cleanwater.org/programinitiative/taking‐out‐trash‐
california‐0. 
US EPA (2009). Opportunities to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Materials and Land Management Practices. 
September. http://www.epa.gov/oswer/docs/ghg_land_and_materials_management.pdf. 
 




 




                                                            27 
                                                                                                                    2/1/12 
                                                                           Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)




4.0 LOADS REDUCED QUANTIFICATION FACT SHEETS  
This section includes a series of fact sheets that describe trash load reduction quantification 
formulas for control measures that were deemed feasible and practical by the BASMAA Trash 
Committee to quantify load reductions at this time. Fact sheets presented in this section are listed in 
Table 4.1. Quantification formulas presented in the fact sheets are based on the most currently 
available information and will require specific data inputs to be tracked or collected by applicable 
Permittees.  Each fact sheet in this section includes: 1) an introduction; 2) a summary of applicable 
control measures; 3) a loads reduced formula; 4) assumptions and data inputs needed to calculate 
loads reduced; and, 5) references for all citations. 
 
Table 4.1. Trash control measure for which load reduction quantification formulas were developed to track progress towards trash load
reduction goals.

     Fact Sheet
                                Control Measure                                                 Description
      Number
    QF-1            On-land Trash Cleanups (Volunteer            Area-wide quantification formula that is based on the total volume of
                    and/or Municipal)                            trash removed by volunteers and/or municipal and flood control agency
                                                                 staff conducting enhanced single-day or on-going, on-land cleanups.

    QF-2            Enhanced Street Sweeping                     Area-specific quantification formula that is based on the effectiveness of
                                                                 street sweeping during dry and wet weather, which is affected by parking
                                                                 enforcement, street sweeping frequency, and storm frequency.

    QF-3            Partial-Capture Treatment Devices            Area-specific quantification formula that is based on the volume of trash
                                                                 removed by each partial-capture devices (curb inlet screens, enhanced
                                                                 pump station trash rack cleaning, and litter booms), which is dependent
                                                                 on the demonstrated effectiveness. The formula for litter booms is area-
                                                                 wide while the other two are area-specific.
    QF-4            Enhanced Storm Drain Inlet Maintenance       Area-specific quantification formula that is based on the increased load
                                                                 reduced due to increased storm drain inlet maintenance, which is
                                                                 dependent on the number of inlets maintained at higher frequencies and
                                                                 the anticipated increase in load reduced due to that particular enhanced
                                                                 frequency.

    QF-5            Full-Capture Treatment Devices               Area-specific quantification formula that is based on the volume of trash
                                                                 removed from full-capture devices, which is dependent on the area
                                                                 treated by the device.



    QF-6            Creek/Channel/Shoreline Cleanups             Area-wide quantification formula that includes the total volume of trash
                    (Volunteer and/or Municipal)                 removed by MRP-required and other creek, channel or shoreline
                                                                 cleanups.

 

 
 



                                                                  28 
                                                                                                                                 2/1/12 
Technical Report 



QF‐1: ON‐LAND TRASH CLEANUPS (AREA‐WIDE)  
 
On‐land cleanups conducted by Permittees and volunteers have been successful in removing trash 
from identified trash hot spots and engaging local citizenry in improving their communities. 
Permittees have several programs in place to address on‐land trash. Municipal efforts relate to 
ongoing beautification of impacted areas and coordination of cleanup events. Volunteer on‐land 
cleanups involve the meeting of individuals, creek and watershed groups, civic organizations, 
businesses and others at designated or adopted on‐land sites to remove trash. On‐land cleanups are 
conducted as single‐day events or throughout the year.  

Applicable Control Measures 
Methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban stormwater runoff control 
measure enhancements implemented by Permittees. Quantification methods described are 
intended to demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from implementation of one or more of 
these control measures within an individual Permittee’s jurisdictional area:  
        Enhanced Permittee‐led On‐land Cleanups – On‐land cleanup activities led by Permittees 
         on publicly‐owned property that are conducted as part of routine or regularly scheduled 
         cleanups, homeless encampment removal and illegal dumping response and abatement, 
         and began after the effective date of the MRP.  
        Enhanced Volunteer‐led On‐land Cleanups – On‐land cleanup activities led by volunteer 
         organizations but coordinated with Permittees, including adopt‐a‐highway/street/park/trail 
         programs that began after the effective date of the MRP.   
 
Please Note: On‐land cleanup activities are differentiated from creek/channel/shoreline cleanup 
activities, which are accounted for under fact sheet QF‐6. Additionally, on‐going on‐land cleanup 
activities conducted prior to the adoption of the MRP and continued through MRP term are 
assumed to be accounted for in the generation rates developed through the BASMAA Baseline Trash 
Generation Rates Project. Therefore, on‐land cleanup programs that were implemented prior to the 
adoption of the MRP and continued after MRP adoption are assumed to be baseline and cannot be 
used to demonstrate progress towards load reduction goals.  

Loads Reduced Formula 
Based on a review of available data and information gained through literature reviews and 
discussions with stakeholders, the following formula provides Permittees a method to estimate the 
volume of trash removed from all applicable on‐land cleanup activities conducted in a given year. 
This load reduction variable is signified as ReductionCleanups in the following formulas. 
Please note that trash removed from on‐land cleanups should be tracked as a volume, as opposed to 
mass; and only trash that has the potential of entering an MS4 should be counted towards load 
reductions. As a result, large items (e.g., appliances, furniture, mattresses, shopping carts, 
televisions, tires, lumber, etc.) removed during on‐land cleanups should not be part of the volume 
determination since they do not have the potential of entering the MS4.   
 
                                                   
                                                   


                                                 29 
                                                                                              2/1/12 
                                                                                   Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)




                                ReductionCleanups = BaselineCleanups ‐ EnhancedCleanups  
where:  
              BaselineCleanups                   =        Volume of trash or removed from all applicable on‐land cleanup 
                                                          activities prior to the effective date of the MRP 
              EnhancedCleanups                   =        Volume of trash removed from all applicable on‐land cleanup 
                                                          activities in year of interest 
and; 
                                        BaselineCleanups = MunicipalBaselineVol  + VolunteerBaselineVol  
                                        EnhancedCleanups = MunicipalEnhancedVol  + VolunteerEnhancedVol  
                                         
where:  
              MunicipalBselineVol                =        Total volume of trash removed by municipal and flood control agency staff 
                                                          conducting on‐going, on‐land cleanups prior to the effective date of the 
                                                          MRP 
              VolunteerBselineVol                =        Total volume of trash removed by volunteers conducting single‐
                                                          day and on‐going, on‐land cleanups prior to the effective date of 
                                                          the MRP 
              MunicipalEnhancedVol  =                     Total volume of trash removed by municipal and flood control agency staff 
                                                          conducting on‐going, on‐land cleanups in year of interest  
              VolunteerEnhancedVol  =                     Total volume of trash removed by volunteers conducting single‐
                                                          day and on‐going, on‐land cleanups in year of interest 
               

Assumptions and Data Inputs 
       MunicipalBaselineVol  or MunicipalEnhancedVol –To account for the total volume of trash removed 
        as a result of on‐land cleanups in a year of interest, Permittees may choose to track the 
        volume of trash removed from:  
            o Routine or Regularly Scheduled Litter Pickup and Removal; 
            o Removal of Homeless Encampments; 
            o Illegal Dump Site Responses and Abatement; 
            o Interagency Cleanup Coordination and Cleanups9; and, 
            o Litter Pickup Event Coordination and Cleanups.10 
              
To assist Permittees in tracking trash removed via on‐land cleanups, BASMAA intends to develop a 
standardized data collection form for use by Permittees.  
 
             VolunteerBaselineVol  or VolunteerEnhancedVol – To account for the total volume of trash removed 
              as a result of on‐land cleanups in a year of interest, Permittees may choose to track the 
              volume of trash removed by volunteer activities, such as: 
               
                                                            
9
  Interagency Cleanup Coordination and Cleanup ‐ On‐land cleanups coordinated with other departments or programs within a 
municipality or countywide agency. Other department, programs or agencies include roads, streets and highways department, 
Department or Transportation, Anti‐litter and graffiti programs, Department of Corrections and others that may conduct on‐land trash 
cleanups. 
10
   Litter Pickup Event Coordination and Cleanup ‐ On‐land cleanups coordinated and publicized by the municipality but conducted by 
volunteers and/or adult/juvenile offenders. The municipality provides trash bags and disposes of collected trash. Examples include the 
annual Great American Pickup Event and other one‐day or on‐going cleanup events.    


                                                                            30 
                                                                                                                                 2/1/12 
Technical Report 



              o Single‐day Efforts 
                    
                   Organized Single‐day Cleanup Events 
              o On‐going Efforts 
                 Keep America Beautiful  
                 Adopt‐a‐Spot, Adopt‐a‐Highway, Adopt‐a‐Trail and Other “Adoption” Programs 
                 Other Organized Cleanup Events 
                 Routine Cleanups of Selected On‐land Hot Spots   
      
Since quantification is viewed as unnecessary since trash is removed for aesthetic reasons, volumes 
of trash removed by volunteers have not been and are not currently tracked in most cases.  To assist 
Permittees in tracking trash removed via on‐land cleanups, BASMAA intends to develop a 
standardized data collection form for use by Permittees.  




                                                 31 
                                                                                              2/1/12 
                                                                               Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)




QF‐2: ENHANCED STREET SWEEPING (AREA‐SPECIFIC) 
 
To some extent, street sweeping is conducted by most, if not all, Permittees. Street sweeping is 
either implemented by Permittees via agency staff, or through contractual agreements with private 
companies. The traditional purpose of street sweeping is to remove trash and debris that collect on 
the margins of streets and may contribute to unsightly conditions and/or reductions in the capacity 
of stormwater conveyance systems.   
 
Trash removal effectiveness of street sweeping may be directly affected by sweeper operation (e.g., 
speed of operation), sweeping frequency, and the inability to sweep near curbs due to parked 
vehicles. Additionally, runoff producing storms can also impact the effectiveness of street sweepers 
by transporting trash to the stormwater conveyance system prior to being intercepted by street 
sweepers (Sartor et al 1974, Sartor and Gaboury 1984, Walker and Wong 1999, Armitage 2001). 
Based on the findings of the literature review conducted to support tracking method development 
(BASMAA 2011c), the effectiveness of a street sweeper to remove trash from streets does not 
appear to be heavily influenced by sweeper type (e.g., mechanical broom, regenerative air, or 
vacuum assisted).11  Therefore, changes in sweeper type were not included as an applicable trash 
control measure enhancement.  

Applicable Control Measures 
Methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban stormwater runoff control 
measure enhancements implemented by Permittees. These quantification methods are intended to 
demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from implementation within an individual Permittee’s 
jurisdiction.  
             Increased Street Sweeping Frequency – Increases in street sweeping frequency in priority 
              trash generating areas as determined by a Permittee.  
             Enhanced Parking Enforcement – Actions that significantly increase the removal of vehicles 
              from streets during street sweeping to allow sweepers to reach the curb. Actions include 
              increases in the level of parking enforcement and introducing no‐parking signage on streets.  

Loads Reduced Formula 
Based on a review of available data and information gained through literature reviews, the following 
formulas will allow Permittees to estimate the volume of trash removed annually (ReductionStreet) 
from conducting street sweeping during the dry season (ReductionStreetDry) and wet season 
(ReductionStreetWet) in a year of interest. Stratification of wet and dry seasons is important when 
calculating trash loads reduced due to the Mediterranean climate in the San Francisco Bay area 
where distinct wet and dry seasons create different timescales for the transport of trash to MS4s. 12 
 
Additionally, as illustrated in the BASMAA Trash Baseline Generation Rates Project Technical 
Memorandum and Permittee‐specific Short‐Term Trash Loading Reduction Plans, trash load 
reductions due to street sweeping implemented prior to the effective date of the MRP and 
conducted at baseline levels are incorporated into each Permittee’s trash baseline load and are 
therefore not included in the formulas described below. Baseline implementation levels for street 
                                                            
11
   Trash defined is all manmade materials greater than 5 mm in size and the removal efficiency for particles > 2 mm in size is similar for all 
sweeper types (Sutherland 2008).   
12
   In the Bay Area, the dry season is defined as May through October and the wet season if November through April.  


                                                                      32 
                                                                                                                                      2/1/12 
Technical Report 



sweeping are assumed to be: 1) at a sweeping frequency of 1x/week or less for streets within retail 
land use areas, and 2x/month or less for streets in all other land use areas; and 2) consistent with 
existing levels of parking enforcement or equivalent actions in place at the time the MRP became 
effective that allow a sweeper to reach the curb. Trash loads reduced associated with street 
sweeping frequencies that are implemented at a higher level than these baseline levels, whether 
implemented prior to the MRP effective date (and continued) or after the MRP effective date, are 
considered enhancements and included in the formulas described below. 
 
                       ReductionStreet = ReductionStreetDry + ReductionStreetWet 
                                           ReductionStreetDry = Σ EnhancedStreetDry‐i 
                                          ReductionStreetWet = Σ EnhancedStreetWet‐i 
where: 
          EnhancedStreetDry‐I  =  Volume of trash reduced due to enhanced street sweeping or parking 
                                   enforcement during the dry season in all trash loading categories “i”. 
           EnhancedStreetWet‐I  =  Volume of trash reduced due to enhanced street sweeping or parking 
                                   enforcement during the wet season in all trash loading categories “i”. 
           
and: 
                              EnhancedStreetDry‐i = Σ SLoadStreetDry‐i • (ηStreetDryEnhanced‐i – ηStreetDryBase‐i) 

                          EnhancedStreetWet‐i = Σ SloadStreetWet‐i • (ηStreetWetEnhanced‐i – ηStreetWetBase‐i) 
                                                                 
where: 
          SLoadStreetDry‐i           =  Dry season trash load (volume) available to the street sweepers in area “i” 
          ηStreetDryEnhanced‐i       =   Effectiveness (fraction) of enhanced street sweeping in area “i" during the year 
                                         of interest dry season as determined by Figure QF‐3.1 
          ηStreetDryBase‐i           =   Effectiveness (fraction) of street sweeping in area “i" during the baseline year 
                                         dry season as determined by Figure QF‐3.1 
          SloadStreetWet‐i           =  Wet season trash load available to the street sweepers in area “i” 
          ηStreetWetEnhanced‐i       =   Effectiveness (fraction) of enhanced street sweeping in area “i" during the year 
                                         of interest wet season as determined by Figure QF‐3.1. 
          ηStreetWetBase‐i           =   Effectiveness (fraction) of enhanced street sweeping in area “i" during baseline 
                                         year wet season as determined by Figure QF‐3.1. 
           
Based on the findings of the literature review, the effectiveness of a street sweeping program is 
highly dependent upon three factors: 1) frequency of sweeping (average number of days between 
sweeping), 2) storm frequency (average number of days between runoff‐producing storms), and 3) 
level of parking enforcement (Armitage 2001). As illustrated in Figure QF‐2.1, effectiveness is 
correlated with street sweeping frequency and inversely related to storm frequency. Therefore, due 
to the increased frequency in storm events that transport trash to the stormwater conveyance 
system and make it unavailable for interception on the streets, sweeping effectiveness decreases 
substantially during the wet weather season.  
 
To determine the effectiveness of street sweeping conducted by Permittees, Figure QF‐2.1 was 
created based on Armitage (2001) and data from the City of Palo Alto’s “No Parking on Sweep Day” 
Program (Teresi 2008).  The upper curve on the figure depicts the maximum effectiveness of street 
sweeping under a high level of parking enforcement (or equivalent) scenario, which includes signage 
and ticketing. The lower curve depicts effectiveness under a no parking enforcement (or equivalent) 
scenario.   

                                                                      33 
                                                                                                                      2/1/12 
                                                                                                                                                        Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)



                                                                   Effectiveness with Parking Enforcement                             Effectiveness With No Parking Enforcement
                                    100%
                                    95%
                                    90%
                                    85%
                                    80%
                                    75%
    Street Sweeping Effectiveness



                                    70%
                                    65%
                                    60%
                                    55%
                                    50%
                                    45%
                                    40%
                                    35%
                                    30%
                                    25%
                                    20%
                                    15%
                                    10%
                                     5%
                                     0%
                                           0.0
                                                 0.2
                                                       0.4
                                                             0.6
                                                                    0.8
                                                                          1.0
                                                                                1.2
                                                                                      1.4
                                                                                            1.6
                                                                                                  1.8
                                                                                                        2.0
                                                                                                              2.2
                                                                                                                    2.4
                                                                                                                          2.6
                                                                                                                                2.8
                                                                                                                                      3.0
                                                                                                                                            3.2
                                                                                                                                                  3.4
                                                                                                                                                         3.6
                                                                                                                                                               3.8
                                                                                                                                                                     4.0
                                                                                                                                                                           4.2
                                                                                                                                                                                 4.4
                                                                                                                                                                                       4.6
                                                                                                                                                                                             4.8
                                                                                                                                                                                                   5.0
                                                                                             Street Sweeping Frequency
                                                                                                  Storm Frequency                                                                                         
 
    Figure QF-2.1. Street sweeping effectiveness curve based on sweeping frequency, storm frequency and level of parking enforcement (Adapted from Armitage 2001). 




                                                                                                              34 
                                                                                                                                                                                                         2/1/12 
Technical Report 



Figure 2‐1 is provided for illustrative purposes only. Equations derived from Figure QF‐2.1 are 
presented in Table QF‐2.1. These equations should be used to calculate baseline, existing enhanced 
and future enhanced street sweeping effectiveness during wet and dry seasons .  
 
Table QF-2.1. Street sweeping effectiveness (H) equations during dry and wet seasons and parking and no parking enforcement
scenarios (based on Figure QF-2.1). 

                      Parking Enforcement 
     Season                                                    Average Frequency                      Equation 
                         (or Equivalent) 
 
                                                               > every 103 days 
Dry                                                                                                                
Season                               Yes 
                                                               < every 103 days 
                                                                                                                           
                                                               > every 51.5 days                                                          
                                     No 
                                                               < every 51.5 days 
                                                                                                                       
 
Wet                                                            > every 9 days 
                                                                                                                  
Season                               Yes 
                                                               < every 9 days 
                                                                                                                       
                                                               > every 4.5 days                                                           
                                     No 
                                                               < every 4.5 days 
                                                                                                                       
H = Street Sweeping Effectiveness (% Reduction of Street Load) 
S = Street Sweeping Frequency (Number of days between street sweeping) 
 

Assumptions and Data Inputs  
             SloadStreetDry – The street trash load available to street sweepers during the dry season is 
              determined on an area‐by‐area basis.13 This load is derived by subtracting the trash load 
              removed via generation reduction activities (Step #1)14 and on‐land trash cleanup activities 
              (Step #2) from the dry season baseline trash load for each area. Alternatively, Permittees 
              may quantify the amount of trash removed in a year of interest and compare that amount 
              to the amount collected by street sweeping activities in a baseline year during the same 
              time period, if that data point was collected. 
             SloadStreetWet – The street trash load available to street sweepers during the wet season is 
              determined on an area‐by‐area basis.3 This load is derived by subtracting the trash load 
              removed via generation reduction activities (Step #2) and on‐land trash cleanup activities 
              (Step #3) from the wet season baseline trash load for each area. Alternatively, Permittees 
              may quantify the amount of trash removed in a year of interest and compare that amount 
              to the amount collected by street sweeping activities in a baseline year during the same 
              time period, if that data point was collected. 
                                                            
13
   Trash baseline loading rates associated with these areas, depicted as “i” in the formula, will be partially developed through the BASMAA 
baseline trash generation rates development process and will be defined by those factors (e.g., land use, population density, economic 
profile) that most affect trash loading. 
14
   Single‐use carryout bag ordinances, polystyrene foam food service ware ordinances, public education and outreach programs, activities 
to reduce trash from uncovered loads, anti‐littering and illegal dumping enforcement activities, improved trash bin/container 
management (municipally or privately owned). 


                                                                                 35 
                                                                                                                                   2/1/12 
                                                                              Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)



             Dry Season Effectiveness (ηStreetDryEnhanced‐i and  ηStreetDryBase‐i) – The effectiveness of baseline and 
              enhanced street sweeping during the dry season is estimated on an area‐by‐area basis 
              based on three variables: 1) average storm frequency during the dry season; 2) street 
              sweeping frequency in the area of interest; and 3) level of parking enforcement within the 
              area of interest. Each of these variables is further described below.    
              o Dry Season Storm Frequency – The average number of days between runoff‐generating 
                  storms in the Bay Area during the dry season was calculated using the 2000‐2010 
                  precipitation data from weather stations located at the San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose 
                  and Concord airports. Based on these data, the average number of days between 
                  storms during the dry season  in the Bay Area is 103 days.15 This average dry season 
                  storm frequency is used with the equations presented in QF 2.1 and is assumed to be 
                  relevant to all MRP Permittees. 
              o Baseline Dry Season Street Sweeping Frequency – Baseline dry season street sweeping 
                  frequencies are those implemented during May through October by a Permittee prior to 
                  the MRP effective date. For many Permittees, baseline frequencies are area‐specific, 
                  typically varying by land use category. Trash load reductions that are attributable to 
                  baseline street sweeping frequencies were incorporated into baseline load estimates 
                  and therefore are not a primary input to this formula. That said, to determine the 
                  increase in load reductions that are attributable to increases in street sweeping 
                  frequencies for particular geographical areas of interest, information on baseline 
                  sweeping frequencies for those areas is also needed. Baseline frequencies were mapped 
                  via GIS to calculate baseline rates and loads (See Section 2.3).  
              o Increased Street Sweeping Frequency in Year of Interest Dry Season ‐ Enhanced dry 
                  season street sweeping frequencies are those that a Permittee implemented during the 
                  year of interest in the months of May through October. Trash loads reduced associated 
                  with increased frequencies are area‐specific and, similar to baseline frequencies, should 
                  be mapped in GIS. Only the increase in effectiveness associated with increased 
                  sweeping frequencies (i.e., difference between baseline and enhanced effectiveness) 
                  can be used in the formula.   
              o Enhanced Dry Season Parking Enforcement – Enhanced parking enforcement during 
                  the dry season is defined as those enforcement activities in place during a year of 
                  interest in the months of May through October, but initiated after the effective date of 
                  the MRP. Parking enforcement may be area‐specific. If so, then enhancements 
                  pertaining to different geographical areas within a Permittee’s jurisdictional area must 
                  be identified, again via GIS (See Section 2.3). Trash loads reduced that are associated 
                  with baseline enforcement were incorporated into baseline load estimates and 
                  therefore are not a necessary input to this formula. That said, to determine the loads 
                  reduced that are associated with enhanced enforcement in a particular area of interest, 
                  baseline levels of enforcement are needed.  
             Wet Season Effectiveness (ηStreetWetEnhanced‐i and  ηStreetWetBase‐i) ‐ The effectiveness of baseline 
              and enhanced street sweeping during the wet season will be estimated on an area‐by‐area 
              basis using three variables: 1) average storm frequency during the wet season; 2) street 
              sweeping frequency in the area of interest; and 3) level of parking enforcement within the 
              area of interest. Each of these variables is further described below.    

                                                            
15 
      Average dry season storm frequencies for the four weather stations ranged between 77 and 131 days. 


                                                                     36 
                                                                                                                         2/1/12 
Technical Report 



               o      Wet Season Storm Frequency – The average number of days between runoff‐
                      generating storms in the Bay Area during the wet season was calculated using the 2000‐
                      2010 precipitation data from weather stations located at the San Francisco, Oakland, 
                      San Jose and Concord airports. Based on these data, the average number of days 
                      between storms during the wet season (i.e., first seasonal flush through the last storm 
                      event of the water year) in the Bay Area is 9 days.16 This average wet season storm 
                      frequency is used with the equations presented in QF 2.1 and is assumed to be relevant 
                      to all MRP Permittees. 
               o      Baseline Wet Season Street Sweeping Frequency – Baseline wet season street 
                      sweeping frequencies are those implemented during November through April by a 
                      Permittee prior to the effective date of the MRP. For many Permittees, baseline 
                      frequencies are area‐specific, typically varying by land use category. Trash load 
                      reductions that are attributable to baseline street sweeping frequencies were 
                      incorporated into baseline load estimates and therefore are not a primary input to this 
                      formula. That said, to determine the increase in load reductions that are attributable to 
                      increases in street sweeping frequencies for particular geographical areas of interest, 
                      information on baseline sweeping frequencies for those areas is also needed. Baseline 
                      frequencies were mapped via GIS when calculating baseline rates and loads (See Section 
                      2.3). 
               o      Increased Street Sweeping Frequency in Year of Interest Wet Season ‐ Enhanced wet 
                      season street sweeping frequencies are those that a Permittee implemented during the 
                      year of interest in the months of November through April. Trash loads reduced 
                      associated with increased frequencies are area‐specific and, similar to baseline 
                      frequencies, and were mapped in GIS. Only the increase in effectiveness associated with 
                      increased sweeping frequencies (i.e., difference between baseline and enhanced 
                      effectiveness) can be used in the formula.   
               o      Enhanced Wet Season Parking Enforcement – Enhanced parking enforcement during 
                      the dry season is defined as those enforcement activities in place during a year of 
                      interest in the months of November through April, but initiated after the effective date 
                      of the MRP. Parking enforcement may be area‐specific. If so, then enhancements 
                      pertaining to different geographical areas within a Permittee’s jurisdictional area must 
                      be identified, again via GIS (See Section 2.3). Trash loads reduced that are associated 
                      with baseline enforcement were incorporated into baseline load estimates and 
                      therefore are not a necessary input to this formula. That said, to determine the loads 
                      reduced that are associated with enhanced enforcement in a particular area of interest, 
                      baseline levels of enforcement should be known.  
References 
Armitage, Neil. 2001. The removal of Urban Litter from Stormwater Drainage Systems. Ch. 19 in Stormwater Collection 
    Systems Design Handbook. L. W. Mays, Ed., McGraw‐Hill Companies, Inc. ISBN 0‐07‐135471‐9, New York, USA, 2001, 
    35 pp. 
Sartor, J.D., G. B. Boyd, and F.J. Argardy 1974. Water pollution aspects of street surface contaminants. Journal Water 
     Pollution Control Federation: 46, 458‐467. March 1974. 
Sartor, J.D and D.R Gaboury 1984. Street sweeping as a water pollution control measure: lessons learned over the past ten 
     years. The Science of the Total Environment: 33, 171‐183. 


                                                            
16
   Average wet season storm frequencies for the four weather stations ranged between 7 an 10 days. 


                                                                  37 
                                                                                                                     2/1/12 
                                                                     Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)



 Teresi, J., 2008.  Enhanced Street Sweeping: The City of Palo Alto Experience.  Presented at the California Stormwater 
     Quality Association Pre‐conference workshop on Trash.  Oakland, CA. October. 
 Walker, T.A. and T.H.F. Wong 1999. Effectiveness of Street Sweeping for Stormwater Pollution Control. Technical Report 
    99/8. Cooperative Research Centre for Catchment Hydrology, Victoria, Australia. December 1999. 
 
 




                                                             38 
                                                                                                                     2/1/12 
Technical Report 



QF‐3: PARTIAL‐CAPTURE TREATMENT DEVICES (AREA‐WIDE & AREA‐SPECIFIC) 
 
Partial‐capture devices are treatment devices that have not been recognized as full‐capture devices 
by the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Board, but capture trash at a known level of effectiveness. 
Partial‐capture devices may be similar to full‐capture devices, but do not meet the full‐capture 
definition due to engineering challenges, or they may be completely different types of devices. For 
the purposes of this load reduction quantification formula, partial‐capture devices include curb inlet 
screens (e.g., automated retractable screens), litter booms/curtains and pump station track racks. 
Additional treatment types such as low impact development measures are not included in this fact 
sheet at this time, but may also be considered partial‐capture devices in the future. Based on the 
literature review, the design and effectiveness of partial‐capture devices in intercepting trash varies 
among device type and application, suggesting that each device should have a separate associated 
effectiveness value.  

Applicable Control Measures 
Methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban stormwater runoff control 
measure enhancements implemented by Permittees. These quantification methods are intended to 
demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from implementation within an individual Permittee’s 
jurisdiction.  

             QF‐3a: Curb Inlet Screens (Step #3; Area‐specific) ‐ devices that were installed prior to or 
              after the MRP effective date that block trash from entering a storm drain inlet at a known 
              effectiveness level, allow the trash to be picked up via street sweeping, and are not 
              associated with other full‐capture devices.17  
             QF‐3b: Litter Booms/Curtains (Step #3; Area‐specific) – devices that were installed prior to 
              or after the MRP effective date that block and retain trash in waterways. 
             QF‐3c: Enhancement to Stormwater Pump Station Track Racks (Step #4; Area‐wide) – 
              enhancements to existing pump station structures that were installed after the MRP 
              effective date to increase the effectiveness of trash removal. 
 
Loads Reduced Formulas 
Based on a review of available data and information gained through literature reviews, the following 
formulas will allow Permittees to estimate the trash load reduced via partial‐capture devices in a 
given year (i.e., ReductionScreens and ReductionBooms and ReductionRacks). As with all control measures, 
the trash load reduced from partial‐capture devices should be tracked as a volume, as opposed to 
mass. 
 




                                                            
17
  Those curb inlet screens associated with full capture devices are NOT an applicable control measure to these formulas. Loads reduced 
associated with these curb inlets are incorporated into the formulas for full capture devices.


                                                                  39 
                                                                                                                                2/1/12 
                                                                               Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)




A.  Curb Inlet Screens (e.g., Automated Retractable Screens) 
 
                                                     ReductionScreens = EnhancedScreens  
where:  
              EnhancedScreens               =   Volume of trash removed by curb inlet screen in municipality in year 
                                                of interest  
and;                       
                                            EnhancedScreens = CLoadCurbInlet • EffectEnhanced 
where:  
               
              CLoadScreens                  =   Annual conveyance load18 for the land areas (i) treated by the partial‐capture 
                                                device  
              EffectEnhanced                =   percent of trash in the applicable conveyance load that is captured by the 
                                                partial‐capture device  

Assumptions and Data Inputs 
             CLoad Screens – The conveyance load applicable to the area treated by a partial‐capture device 
              will be determined through data collected via the BASMAA Baseline Trash Generation Rates 
              Project; load reductions via trash generation reduction control measures, on‐land trash 
              cleanups and street sweeping; and the delineation of the area treated by the partial‐capture 
              device. Baseline loading rates are discussed in Section 1.0 and load reductions via the three 
              categories of control measures listed above are described in other fact sheets. To delineate 
              the drainage area served by a partial‐capture device, BASMAA has developed two 
              approaches. The first approach involves determining the inlet drainage area through GIS 
              evaluation and field measurement for each specific device. The second approach entails 
              calculating the average inlet drainage area by dividing the total number of Permittee‐owned 
              storm drain inlets into the total urban (developed) area within a Permittees jurisdiction. 
              Either approach is assumed to be valid for the purposes of calculating loads reduced for curb 
              inlet screens. 
             EffectEnhanced – The City of Los Angeles, Department of Public Works, Bureau of Sanitation, 
              Watershed Protection Division conducted a comprehensive Storm Drain Inlet Opening 
              Screen Covers Study during FY 2005‐2006 to assess the effectiveness and/or performance of 
              curb inlet screens. Results suggest that the average trash capture effectiveness of curb inlet 
              screens is between 83.2 to 84.6 percent (City of Los Angeles 2006b). Effectiveness is based 
              on the volume of trash captured by the curb inlet screen, compared to the trash that 
              bypassed the screen. Based on this information, BASMAA recommends that the average 
              effectiveness rating for curb inlet screens is 84 percent. 
 




                                                            
18
   The “conveyance load” is defined as the baseline trash load minus the loads reduced via generation reduction control measures, on‐
land removal and street sweeping.


                                                                        40 
                                                                                                                                2/1/12 
Technical Report 




B.  Stormwater Pump Station Trash Rack Enhancements 
 
                                        ReductionRacks= EnhancedRacks – BaselineRacks  
where:  
                EnhancedRack                =   Volume of trash removed by pump station trash racks in the 
                                                Permittee’s jurisdictional area in year of interest  
                BaselineRack                =   Volume of trash removed by pump station trash racks in the 
                                                Permittee’s jurisdictional area in baseline year(s)  
and; 
                                                       EnhancedRacks = CLoadRacks • EffectEnhanced 
                                                         BaselineRacks = CLoadRacks • EffectBaseline 
where:  
               
              WLoadRacks                    =   Annual waterway load19 for the land areas (i) treated by pump station trash 
                                                racks  
                EffectEnhanced              =   percent of trash in the applicable waterway load that is captured by the 
                                                enhanced stormwater pump station trash rack in year of interest. 
                EffectBaseline              =   percent of trash in the applicable waterway load that is captured by the 
                                                baseline stormwater pump station trash rack in the baseline year(s). 
             

Assumptions and Data Inputs 
               CLoadRacks – see CLoadScreens 
               EffectEnhanced –The effectiveness of pump station structure enhancements designed to 
                remove trash will be enhancement‐specific. No information is currently available regarding 
                the “average” effectiveness of such enhancements, and therefore effectiveness ratings 
                should be determined by Permittees that choose to implement this control measure. 
               EffectBaseline– Typical (baseline) trash racks consist of steel bars spaced 4 to 10 centimeters 
                apart (Allison et al. 1998) and provide a physical barrier to floating and submerged 
                pollutants. The effectiveness of baseline trash racks varies widely (5‐100%) based on studies 
                conducted to‐date. For the purposes of establishing the trash removal effectiveness for 
                baseline trash racks, a default effectiveness rating of 25% is recommended until additional 
                information is available. 




                                                            
19
   The “waterway load” is defined as volume of trash estimated to pass through the stormwater conveyance system without being 
intercepted by control measures. 




                                                                             41 
                                                                                                                             2/1/12 
                                                                                Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)




C.  Litter Booms/Curtains 
Based on a review of available data and information gained through literature reviews, the following 
formula will allow MRP Permittees to estimate the volume of trash load reduced from installation 
and maintenance of trash booms and curtains in a Permittee’s jurisdictional area20 in a given year 
(ReductionBooms). Please note that trash load reductions are tracked as a volume, as opposed to 
mass. 
 
                                                       ReductionBooms = EnhancedBooms 
where:  
        EnhancedBooms                        =     Volume of trash removed from a trash boom or curtain within a 
                                                   Permittee’s jurisdictional area in the year of interest 

Assumptions and Data Inputs 
             EnhancedBooms – All trash loads in a year of interest that are removed via trash booms and 
              curtains installed prior to or after the MRP effective date may be tracked and used by 
              Permittees to assess progress towards trash load reduction goals. Permittees will need to 
              quantify the volume of trash removed by each boom/curtain in the year of interest.  
        

References 
 Allison, R.A., T.A. Walker, F.H.S. Chiew, I.C. O’Neill and T.A McMahon 1998. From Roads to rivers: Gross pollutant removal 
       from urban waterways.  Report 98/6.  Cooperative Research Centre for Catchment Hydrology.  Victoria, Australia. 
       May 1998.  

City of Los Angeles. 2006b. Technical Report: Assessment of Storm drain inlet Opening Screen Covers. City of Los Angeles 
     Department of Public Works, Watershed Protection Division. June 2006. 26 pgs 




                                                            
20
   A Permittee may take loads reduced credit for litter booms/curtains installed by other agencies within their jurisdictions.   


                                                                         42 
                                                                                                                                    2/1/12 
Technical Report 



QF‐4: ENHANCED STORM DRAIN INLET MAINTENANCE (AREA‐SPECIFIC) 
 
The stormwater conveyance system refers to the constructed drainage system designed to transport 
water to waterways during runoff events, and includes storm drain inlets, underground 
pipes/drainage lines, culverts, V‐ditches, pump stations and open channels. Storm drain inlets serve 
as the entry point to the underground stormwater conveyance system and are generally designed to 
reduce flood risks and convey flows. During storm flows, trash on street surfaces is washed into the 
stormwater conveyance system and some portion is transported to waterways. Trash can be 
intercepted during this transport process through routine maintenance and cleaning of the 
conveyance system. Currently, most Permittees maintain and clean components of their stormwater 
conveyance system on an annual basis in accordance with countywide Stormwater Drainage System 
Operating and Maintenance Performance Standards.   

Applicable Control Measures  
Methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban stormwater runoff control 
measure enhancements implemented by Permittees. These quantification methods are intended to 
demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from implementation within an individual Permittee’s 
jurisdiction.  
          Increased Frequency of Storm Drain Inlet Maintenance ‐ Permittees may choose to 
           enhance trash load reductions by increasing the cleaning frequency of storm drain inlets 
           from baseline (i.e., annually) to semiannually, quarterly or monthly. Increases in cleanout 
           frequencies may occur in storm drain inlets throughout a Permittees jurisdiction or within 
           targeted areas. 

Loads Reduced Formula 
Based on a review of available data and information gained through literature reviews, the following 
formulas will allow Permittees to estimate the trash load reduced via increased frequency of storm 
drain inlet maintenance in a given year (i.e., ReductionDrains). As with all control measures, the trash 
load reduced from this control measure should be tracked as a volume, as opposed to mass. 
 
                                      ReductionDrain = Σ EnhancedDrain‐ij 
where:  
           EnhancedDrain‐ij    =   Trash load reduction attributable to an increased frequency of storm 
                                   drain inlet maintenance “j” (semi‐annually, quarterly, or monthly) at a 
                                   storm drain located in a trash loading category “i”. 
and; 
                                    EnhancedDrain‐ij = NDrains‐ij • CLoadDrainBase‐ix • PDrain‐j 
where:  
           NDrain‐ij           =    Number of storm drain inlets within a Permittee’s jurisdiction where 
                                    increased cleaning occurred in the year of interest and whose 
                                    drainage areas are classified in the trash loading category “i” and are 
                                    cleaned at an increased frequency “j”.  
           CLoadDrainBase‐i    =    Trash conveyance load for a storm drain inlet whose drainage area is 
                                    classified in the trash loading category “i” and has a trash reduction 
                                    rate “x” at a baseline (annual) cleaning frequency. 




                                                                43 
                                                                                                               2/1/12 
                                                                     Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)



        PDrain‐j         =     Percent increase in volume of trash removed annually (above 
                               baseline) due to increased maintenance at frequency, “j”. 

Assumptions and Data Inputs 
       NDrain‐ij – Storm drain inlets are typically cleaned annually by Permittees and therefore an 
        annual maintenance frequency is identified as baseline.  The trash load reduced via annual 
        cleaning is incorporated into the baseline trash load, and therefore is not included as a 
        variable in this formula. That said, this variable is assumed the number or inlets cleaned at 
        each frequency and their associated land use is needed. 
       CLoadDrainBase‐ix – The trash conveyance load applicable a storm drain inlet will be determined 
        through: 1) the trash baseline generation rate developed via the BASMAA Baseline Trash 
        Generation Rates Project for loading rate category “i” and the application of this rate using 
        the load reduction tracking process described in Section 2.3 to develop a Permittee‐specific 
        conveyance loading rate; 2) the area within a Permittee’s jurisdiction that is associated with 
        loading rate category “i”; 3) the number of storm drain inlets in a Permittee’s jurisdiction 
        and associated with loading rate category “i”; and 4) the percent of trash removed from an 
        inlet under a baseline (annual) cleaning frequency.  
       PDrain‐j – There are limited data available on the reductions of trash associated with different 
        storm drain inlet maintenance frequencies. Through the literature review associated with 
        this project, one Bay Area study was found that assessed the effectiveness of storm drain 
        maintenance frequencies on debris (i.e., trash and other materials) removal. Data from the 
        Storm Inlet Pilot Study in Alameda County (Woodward Clyde 1994) listed in Table QF‐4.1 are 
        recommended for use as inputs to this variable. These data are assumed to be applicable to 
        the entire San Francisco Bay area.  
 
                       Table QF-4.1 Percent increase above baseline in volume removed from
                       storm drain inlets due to an increase in storm drain inlet maintenance. 
                                                   Percent Increase Above Baseline  
                       Frequency 
                                                             (by Volume) 
                       Monthly                                   215 
                       Quarterly                                  50 
                       Semi‐annually                              22 
                       Annually                                Baseline 

References 
Woodward‐Clyde. 1994. Storm Inlet Pilot Study. Prepared for the Alameda County Urban Runoff Clean Water 
   Program.  
 




                                                            44 
                                                                                                                2/1/12 
Technical Report 



QF‐5: FULL‐CAPTURE TREATMENT DEVICES (AREA‐SPECIFIC) 
 
As defined by the Municipal Regional Stormwater Permit (MRP), a full‐capture system or device is 
any single device or series of devices that traps all particles retained by a 5 mm mesh screen and has 
a design treatment capacity of not less than the peak flow rate (Q) resulting from a one‐year, one‐
hour, storm in the sub‐drainage area. The MRP requires population‐based Permittees to install and 
maintain a minimum number of full‐capture devices by July 1, 2014 to treat runoff from an area 
equivalent to 30 percent of retail/wholesale land that drains to MS4s within their jurisdictions21. In 
addition, full‐capture systems or devices may have been installed by Permittees or private entities 
prior to the adoption of the MRP, and in the future Permittees may choose to install additional 
devices. A list of full‐capture systems and devices that are recognized by the San Francisco Bay 
Regional Water Quality Control Board (Water Board) is included as Table QF‐5.1 (SFEP 2010).  

Applicable Control Measures 
Methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban stormwater runoff control 
measure enhancements implemented by Permittees. These quantification methods are intended to 
demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from implementation within an individual Permittee’s 
jurisdiction.  
      Trash Full‐Capture Treatment Devices – Trash capture devices recognized by the Water 
         Board as meeting the “full‐capture” definition (see Table QF‐5.1 for examples) that are 
         located in a Permittees jurisdictional area, installed prior to or after the effective date of the 
         MRP, and are adequately maintained by the Permittee or a private entity. 

Loads Reduced Formula 
Based on a review of available data and information gained through literature reviews, the following 
formula will allow MRP Permittees to estimate the volume of trash load reduced from all full‐ 
capture devices in a Permittee’s jurisdictional area in a given year (ReductionFullCap Devices). Please 
note that trash load reduced from full‐capture devices is tracked as a volume, as opposed to mass. 
 
                                                    ReductionFullCap = Σ EnhancedFullCap  
where:  
        EnhancedFullCap                      =     Volume of trash removed from a full‐capture device within a 
                                                   Permittee’s jurisdictional area in the year of interest 
and; 
                                                        EnhancedFull Cap Devices = CRatei • AreaTreati 
where:  
         
        CRatei                              =   Conveyance loading rate (volume/acre/year) for areas associated with trash 
                                                loading category “i” and are being treated by a full‐capture device in the year 
                                                of interest 
            AreaTreati                      =   Area (acres) associated with trash loading category “i” that are being treated by 
                                                a full‐capture device in the year of interest  
             


                                                            
21
   A population‐based Permittee with a population less than 12,000 and retail/wholesale land less than 40 acres, or population less than 
2,000, is exempt from installing and maintaining a minimum number of full capture devices.   


                                                                             45 
                                                                                                                                  2/1/12 
                                                                              Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)



Table QF-5.1. Devices recognized by the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board as meeting the trash full-capture definition.
Storm Drain Inserts                                                             Hydrodynamic Separators
Advanced Solutions                                                              Contech Construction Products
AS-1    Stormtek ST3                                                            CCP-1HF Continuous Deflective Separator (CDS)
AS-2    Stormtek ST3-G
                                                                                KriStar Enterprises, Inc.
Bio Clean Environmental Services, Inc.                                          KS-6HF      Downstream Defender
BC-1      Grate Inlet Skimmer Box (square design)                               KS-7HF      FloGard Dual-Vortex Hydrodynamic Separator
BC-2      High Capacity Round Grate Inlet Skimmer Box
BC-3      Modular Connector Pipe Screen                                         In-line Netting
BC-4      Trash Guard
                                                                                Fresh Creek Technologies, Inc.
                                                                                FCT-1HF Inline Netting Trash Trap
Ecology Control Industries (American Stormwater)
ECI-1    Debris Dam
                                                                                KriStar Enterprises, Inc.
                                                                                KS-10HF     Nettech Gross Pollutant Trap - In Line
G2 Construction, Inc.
G2-1     Collector Pipe Screen
                                                                                End-of-Pipe Netting
G2-1R    Collector Pipe Screen Removable
                                                                                Fresh Creek Technologies, Inc.
Gentile Family Industries (Waterway Solutions)                                  FCT-2HF End of Pipe Netting Trash Trap
GFI-1     WAVY GRATE Trash Catcher
                                                                                KriStar Enterprises, Inc.
KriStar Enterprises, Inc.                                                       KS-11HF     Nettech Gross Pollutant Trap- End of Line
KS-1      Flo Gard Plus Storm drain inlet Filter Insert, combination
          inlet style – C3 (stainless steel)                                    Other In-line Devices
KS-2      Flo Gard Plus Storm drain inlet Filter Inserts, flat grated
          inlet style, rectangular or round – C3 (stainless steel)              Bio Clean Environmental Services, Inc.
KS-3      FloGard Storm drain inlet Outlet Screen Insert                        BC-5HF      Nutrient Separating Baffle Box

Revel Environmental Manufacturing, Inc.                                         KriStar Enterprises, Inc.
REM-1 Triton Bioflex Drop Inlet Trash Guard                                     KS-5HF      CleansAll
                                                                                KS-8HF      FloGard Perk Filter
United Stormwater, Inc.                                                         KS-9HF      FloGard Swirl-Flo Screen Separator
USW-1 Connector Pipe Screen                                                     Roscoe Moss Company
                                                                                RMC-1HF Storm Flo Screen
West Coast Storm, Inc.
WCS-1 Connector Pipe Screen


Assumptions and Data Inputs 
          CRatei –Permittee‐specific conveyance loading rates will be used to calculate load reduction 
           credits for installation and maintenance of full‐capture devices. Conveyance rates are 
           Permittee‐specific and are based on trash baseline generation rates developed via the 
           BASMAA Baseline Trash Generation Rates Project and implementation of trash generation 
           reduction activities in the year of interest, on‐land trash cleanups and street sweeping 
           programs by the Permittee. Conveyances rates will vary by loading category “i”.  
          AreaTreatI – To delineate the drainage area served by a full‐capture device, BASMAA has 
           developed three approaches that a Permittee may choose to use: 
              1. Field Survey and Map Review ‐ Applicable to all full‐capture devices listed in Table 
                  QF‐5.1, involves the delineation of the geographical area treated through field 
                  surveys and/or the review of maps of the stormwater conveyance network.   
              2. Permittee Average ‐ Only applicable to storm drain inserts listed in Table QF‐5.1, 
                  entails calculating the average drainage area treated by a storm drain insert by 
                  dividing the total number of Permittee‐owned storm drain inlets into the total 



                                                                        46 
                                                                                                                                 2/1/12 
Technical Report 



                 urban (developed) area within a Permittee’s jurisdictional area that is served by the 
                 MS4.  
              3. Regional Average ‐ average drainage area (1.75 acres per inlet) for ~160 storm drain 
                 inserts calculated as part of the BASMAA Baseline Trash Generation Rates Project 
                 (BASMAA 2011d).   
         For the purposes of defining average drainage area, either approach is assumed to be valid 
         for storm drain inserts. Regardless of the approach chosen, the geographical areas treated 
         by full‐capture devices should be mapped using GIS to allow for trash load reduction 
         quantification to occur. 

References  
SFEP (San Francisco Estuary Partnership).2010. Bay Area‐wide Trash Capture Demonstration Project: Vendors 
    and Devices approved March 18, 2010. 2pgs. 




                                                    47 
                                                                                                    2/1/12 
                                                                   Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)




QF‐6: CREEK/CHANNEL/SHORELINE CLEANUPS (VOLUNTEER AND/OR 
MUNICIPAL)(AREA‐WIDE)  
 
Creek cleanups have been successful in removing large amounts of trash from San Francisco Bay 
area creeks and waterways, and increasing citizen's awareness of trash issues within their 
communities. Creek cleanups are conducted as single‐day events or throughout the year by 
volunteers and Permittees. Since volunteers and municipal agencies have the common goal of clean 
creeks and waterways, their efforts sometimes overlap. This is apparent in Permittees coordinating 
with volunteers to help assess and clean designated trash hot spots during single‐day volunteer 
events. In most cases, creek cleanups are an effort of “last resort” due to the increased expense and 
difficulty of removing trash in creeks, compared to long‐term solutions such control measures that 
fall under the trash generation reduction . 

Applicable Control Measures 
Methods described in this fact sheet are applicable to the following urban stormwater runoff control 
measure enhancements implemented by Permittees. These quantification methods are intended to 
demonstrate trash load reductions resulting from implementation within or “downstream” of an 
individual Permittee’s jurisdictional area.  

          MRP‐required Creek/Channel/Shoreline Cleanups ‐ In accordance with the Permit Provision 
           C.10.b., Permittees are required to annually assess and clean a number of trash hot spots to 
           a level of “no visual impact”. Through these efforts, total volumes of trash removed from 
           this effort are estimated. MRP‐required creek/channel/shoreline cleanups are mostly 
           conducted by Permittee staff, but in some instances volunteers assist Permittees.   
          Non MRP‐required Creek/Channel/Shoreline Cleanups ‐ In addition to MRP‐required 
           cleanups, some Permittees conduct or actively support creek/channel/shoreline cleanups as 
           part of volunteer events, routine maintenance, homeless encampment removal and illegal 
           dumping response and abatement.  

Loads Reduced Formula 
Based on a review of available data and information gained through literature reviews and 
personnel interviews, the following formula will allow MRP Permittees to estimate the volume of 
trash load reduced from all applicable creek/channel/shoreline cleanup activities in a year of 
interest (ReductionCreekCleanups). Please note that trash loads removed from creek/channel/shoreline 
cleanups should be tracked as a volume, as opposed to mass.  
 
                              ReductionCreekCleanups = EnhancedCreekCleanups 
where:  
           EnhancedCreekCleanups   =     Volume of trash removed from all applicable 
                                         creek/channel/shoreline cleanup activities in year of interest 
and; 
                               EnhancedCreekCleanups = MRP‐RequiredEnhanced + OtherEnhanced 
where:  
           MRP‐RequiredEnhanced  =       Volume of trash removed by Permittee staff and volunteers conducting 
                                         MRP‐required creek/channel/shoreline trash hot spot cleanups in year of 
                                         interest 


                                                            48 
                                                                                                              2/1/12 
Technical Report 



         OtherEnhanced        =     Volume of trash removed via all other (i.e., non MRP‐required) 
                                    creek/channel/shoreline cleanups in year of interest 

Assumptions and Data Inputs 
        MRP‐RequiredEnhanced – All trash loads reduced via hot spot cleanups required by MRP 
         Provision C.10.b. during the year of interest may be tracked and used by Permittees to 
         assess progress towards trash load reduction goals. Consistent with established tracking 
         methods, Permittees will quantify the volume of trash removed from each trash hot spot 
         cleanup during each annual hot spot cleanup event and identify the dominant types of trash 
         (e.g., glass, plastics, paper) removed and their sources to the extent possible. In some 
         instances, volunteers may assist agencies with these cleanups. This information will be 
         reported in Permittee Annual Reports submitted to the Water Board each year by 
         September 15.  
        OtherEnhanced – Similar to MRP‐required hot spot cleanups, all trash loads reduced via 
         creek/channel/shoreline cleanups during the year of interest that are outside of those 
         required by the MRP may be tracked and used by Permittees to assess progress towards 
         trash load reduction goals. These cleanups include but are not limited to: 

             Permittee & Volunteer Collaborative Activities 
              o     Single‐day Efforts 
                     National River Cleanup Day (third Saturday in May) 
                     Coastal Cleanup Day (third Saturday in September) 
                     Other Organized Single‐day Events 
              o     On‐going Efforts 
                     Adopt‐a‐Creek and Other “Adoption” Programs  
                     Other Organized Cleanup Efforts 
                        – Individuals or Organized Groups 
                        – Creek/Watershed Group 
                        – Non‐governmental Organizations (e.g., Save the Bay, etc.) 

             Permittee‐led Cleanup Activities 
              o     On‐going Efforts 
                     Removal of Homeless Encampments 
                     Routine or Regularly Scheduled Creek Maintenance 
                     Illegal Dump Site Correction 
                     Measure‐funded Programs 
                     Other On‐going Cleanup Efforts 
             
    To determine the total volume of trash removed from all non MRP‐required cleanups, 
    volunteers and Permittees will need to track the volume of trash removed from these efforts as 
    accurately as feasible. Data types need to calculate loads removed may include the number of 
    cleanups conducted, number of locations cleaned and the number and size of trash bags filled.  




                                                      49 
                                                                                                      2/1/12 
                                                        Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)



    In most cases, however, volunteer groups do not quantify the volume of trash removed since 
    they are most interested in improving creek conditions, estimating volumes. Therefore, 
    Permittees may not be able to track the trash loads removed from all non MRP‐related cleanups 
    conducted within their jurisdictions. It is recommended that Permittees identify which 
    creek/channel/shoreline cleanups they conduct and want to demonstrate trash loads reduced, 
    and track the volumes of trash removed from these efforts. In addition, it is recommended that 
    Permittees identify which volunteer creek/channel/shoreline cleanups conducted that they 
    want to demonstrate trash loads reduced, and establish relationships with volunteers regarding 
    data collection and submittal of cleanup data to Permittees. To assist Permittees in tracking the 
    volume of trash removed from all non MRP‐related cleanups, BASMAA plans to develop a 
    standardized data collection form for Permittee and volunteer use.  
 




                                                 50 
                                                                                                   2/1/12 
Technical Report 




5.0 LOAD REDUCTION REPORTING AND VERIFICATION  
5.1      Annual Reporting 
Consistent with MRP Provision C.10.d (i), Permittees will report on progress towards MRP trash load 
reduction goals on an annual basis beginning with their Fiscal Year 2011‐2012 Annual Reports. 
Annual reports will include: 
 
    1. A brief summary of all enhanced trash load reduction control measures implemented to‐
         date; 
    2. The dominant types of trash likely removed via these control measures; 
    3. Total trash loads removed (credits and quantifications) via each control measure 
         implementation; and  
    4. A summary and quantification of progress towards trash load reduction goals. 
 
Similar to other MRP provision, annual reporting formats will be consistent region‐wide and each 
Permittee will submit a completed annual report to the Water Board by September 15 of each year. 
Annual reports are intended to provide a summary of control measure implementation and 
demonstrate progress toward MRP trash reduction goals. For more detailed information on specific 
control measures, Permittees will retain supporting documentation on trash load reduction control 
measure implementation. These records should have a level of specificity consistent with the trash 
load reduction tracking methods described in this Technical Report. 

5.2      Verification of Trash Load Reductions 
Measuring trends in stormwater runoff quality via empirical monitoring is incredibly challenging due 
to the inherent temporal and spatial variability in sources, transport processes and deposition rates 
in water bodies. These inherent challenges make it difficult to detect if differences (increases or 
decreases) in stormwater quality (e.g., trash loads) are due to natural variability, or as a result of 
changes in sources and associated loadings. Therefore, any stormwater runoff or receiving water 
monitoring conducted in an attempt to detect trends in trash loading to receiving waters should be 
well thought‐out and statistically based. If Permittees choose to conduct such monitoring, the 
development a monitoring (verification) plan will take time and require the input of a number of 
stakeholders (e.g., scientists, Permittee and Water Board staff, NGOs). 
 
Verification monitoring is not required by the MRP, but is currently under consideration by BASMAA. 
Due to the compliance schedules set forth in the MRP and the focus on implementation during the 
Permit term, a monitoring (verification) plan is not included in this version of the Technical Report. 
However, MRP Permittees will consider the development of a load reduction monitoring 
(verification) plan prior to July 1, 2014. A combination of BMP effectiveness, stormwater discharge, 
and receiving water monitoring, assessments and studies should be considered during the plan 
development. Once a plan is finalized, it should be incorporated into this Technical Report. 
Implementation of the plan is subject to available funding. 
 
 




                                                 51 
                                                                                                2/1/12 
                                                              Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)




6.0 REFERENCES 
 
Ackerman, F. (1997). Environmental Impacts of Packaging in the U.S. and Mexico. Tufts University, PHIL and 
    TECH 2.2. 
Alliance for Environmental Innovation (2000). Report of the Starbucks Coffee Company / Alliance for 
     Innovation Joint Task Force.  http://business.edf.org/sites/business.edf.org/files/starbucks‐report‐
     april2000.pdf 

Allison R.A. and F.H.S. Chiew 1995. Monitoring stormwater pollution from various land uses in an urban 
     catchment. Proceedings from the 2nd International Symposium on Urban Stormwater Management, 
     Melbourne, 551‐516. 

Allison, R.A., T.A. Walker, F.H.S. Chiew, I.C. O’Neill and T.A McMahon 1998. From Roads to rivers: Gross 
     pollutant removal from urban waterways.  Report 98/6.  Cooperative Research Centre for Catchment 
     Hydrology.  Victoria, Australia. May 1998.  

Armitage, N. 2001. The removal of Urban Litter from Stormwater Drainage Systems. Ch. 19 in Stormwater 
   Collection Systems Design Handbook. L. W. Mays, Ed., McGraw‐Hill Companies, Inc. ISBN 0‐07‐135471‐9, 
   New York, USA, 2001, 35 pp. 
Armitage, N. 2003. The removal of urban solid waste from stormwater drains. Prepared for the International 
   Workshop on Global Developments in Urban Drainage Management, Indian Institute of Technology, 
   Bombay, Mumbai India. 5‐7 February 2003. 

Armitage, N. 2007. The reduction of urban litter in the stormwater drains of South Africa. Urban Water Journal 
   Vol. 4, No. 3: 151‐172. September 2007. 

Armitage N., A.  Rooseboom, C.  Nel, and P. Townshend  1998. “The removal of Urban Litter from Stormwater 
   Conduits and Streams. Water Research Commission (South Africa) Report No. TT 95/98, Prestoria. 

Armitage, N. and A. Rooseboom 2000. The removal of urban litter from stormwater conduits and streams:  
   Paper 1 – The quantities involved and catchment litter management options.  Water S.A. Vol. 26. No. 2: 
   181‐187. 

BASMAA (Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Association). 2011a. Method to Estimate Baseline 
   Trash Loads from Bay Area Municipal Stormwater Systems: Technical Memorandum #1. Prepared by EOA, 
   Inc. April. 

BASMAA (Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Association). 2011b. Sampling and Analysis Plan. 
   Prepared by EOA, Inc. April. 

BASMAA (Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Association). 2011c. Trash Load Reduction Tracking 
   Method: Technical Memorandum #1 – Literature Review. Prepared by EOA, Inc. May. 

BASMAA (Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Association). 2012. Preliminary Baseline Trash 
   Generation Rates for San Francisco Bay Area MS4s ‐ Technical Memorandum. Prepared by EOA, Inc. 
   February. 

 California Integrated Waste Management Board (CIWMB). 2007. Board Meeting Agenda, Resolution: Agenda 
     Item 14. Sacramento, CA. June 12, 2007. 

CalRecycle. 2010. At‐Store Recycling Program: 2009 Statewide Recycling Rate for Plastic Carryout Bags. Available at 
    http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/Plastics/AtStore/AnnualRate/2009Rate.htm#Rate. Accessed June 22, 2011. 


                                                       52 
                                                                                                            2/1/12 
Technical Report 



CalRecycle. 2011. Earth Day 2011: Being Green, Living Green. Available at 
    http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/PublicEd/EarthDay/How.htm. Accessed March 17, 2011. 

CASQA (California Stormwater Quality Association). 2007. Municipal Stormwater Program Effectiveness 
   Assessment Guidance. May 2007. 

CVC (California Vehicle Code). 2011. California Vehicle Code Sections 23114 and 23115. 
City of Los Angeles 2004. Technical Report: Best Management Practices for Implementing the Trash Total 
     Maximum Daily Loads, January 2004. Watershed Protection Division, Department of Public Works, Bureau 
     of Sanitation. cited in Gordon, M., and R. Zamist. 2006. Municipal Best Management Practices for 
     Controlling Trash and Debris in Stormwater and Urban Runoff.  
City of Los Angeles. 2006b. Technical Report: Assessment of Storm drain inlet Opening Screen Covers. City of 
     Los Angeles Department of Public Works, Watershed Protection Division. June 2006. 26 pgs. 

City of Oxnard (2004). Storm Drain Sampling Results. Presentation at plastic debris conference.  
     conference.plasticdebris.org/whitepapers/Mark_Pumford.doc 
City of San Francisco 2001. Litter and Graffiti. Report of the 2000‐2001 San Francisco Civil Grand Jury. Available 
     at http:/www.sfsuperiorcourt.org/index.aspx?page=242. Accessed November 12, 2010.  
City of San Francisco (2008). City of san Francisco Streets Litter Re‐Audit. Prepared by HDR, Brown, Vence and 
     Assocaites, and MGM Management. 
     http://www.sfenvironment.org/downloads/library/2008_litter_audit.pdf 
City of San Jose (2009). San Jose Targeted Litter Assessment. Prepared by MGM Management. 
City of San Jose. 2010. Draft Environmental Impact Report: Single‐Use Carryout Bag Ordinance File No. PP09‐
     194 SCH #2009102095. July 2010. 
Clean Water Action (2011). Taking Out the Trash Draft Report. 
    http://www.cleanwater.org/programinitiative/taking‐out‐trash‐california‐0. 

County of Los Angeles. 2002. Los Angeles County Litter Monitoring Plan for the Los Angeles River and Ballona 
   Creek Trash Total Maximum Daily Load. May 30, 2002. 

County of Los Angeles. 2004a. Trash Baseline Monitoring Results Los Angles River and Ballona Creek 
   Watershed. Los Angeles County Department of Public Works. February 17, 2004. 

County of Los Angeles 2004b. Trash Baseline Monitoring for Los Angles River and Ballona Creek Watersheds. 
   Los Angeles County Department of Public Works. May 6, 2004. 

County of Los Angeles, Department of Public Works, Environmental Programs Division. 2007. An Overview of 
   Carryout Bags in Los Angeles County: A Staff Report to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. 
   Alhambra, CA. http://dpw.lacounty.gov/epd/PlasticBags/PDF/PlasticBagReport_08‐2007.pdf. August 
   2007. 
Kim, L.H, M. Kayhanian, M.K. Stenstrom 2004. Event mean concentration and loading of litter from highways 
    during storms. Science of the Total Environment Vol 330: 101‐113. 

Kotler, P. Kotler on Marketing: How to Create, Win, and Dominate Markets. New York: Free Press, 1999. Print. 

Lippner, G., R.  Churchwell, R. Allison, G.  Moeller, and J. Johnston 2001. A Scientific Approach to Evaluating 
    Storm Water Best Management Practices for Litter. Transportation Research Record .  TTR 1743, 10‐15. 

Sartor, J.D., G. B. Boyd, and F.J. Argardy 1974. Water pollution aspects of street surface contaminants. Journal 
    Water Pollution Control Federation: 46, 458‐467. March 1974. 



                                                       53 
                                                                                                           2/1/12 
                                                              Trash Load Reduction Tracking Method (Version 1.0)



Sartor, J.D and D.R Gaboury 1984. Street sweeping as a water pollution control measure: lessons learned over 
    the past ten years. The Science of the Total Environment: 33, 171‐183. 

SFEP (San Francisco Estuary Partnership).2010. Bay Area‐wide Trash Capture Demonstration Project: Vendors 
    and Devices approved March 18, 2010. 2pgs. 

Teresi, J., 2008.  Enhanced Street Sweeping: The City of Palo Alto Experience.  Presented at the California 
    Stormwater Quality Association Pre‐conference workshop on Trash.  Oakland, CA. September 2008. 
United Nations Environment Programme. 2009. Marine Litter: A Global Challenge. Nairobi, Kenya. Available at 
    http://www.unep.org/regionalseas/marinelitter/publications/docs/Marine_Litter_A_Global_Challenge.pd
    f April 2009. 
USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency). 2002. Assessing and Monitoring Floatable Debris. 
   August 2002. Available at 
   http://water.epa.gov/type/oceb/marinedebris/upload/2006_10_6_oceans_debris_floatingdebris_debris‐
   final.pdf 

USEPA (2009). Opportunities to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Materials and Land Management 
Practices. September. http://www.epa.gov/oswer/docs/ghg_land_and_materials_management.pdf. 
Walker, T.A. and T.H.F. Wong 1999. Effectiveness of Street Sweeping for Stormwater Pollution Control. 
   Technical Report 99/8. Cooperative Research Centre for Catchment Hydrology, Victoria, Australia. 
   December 1999. 
Woodward‐Clyde. 1994. Storm Inlet Pilot Study. Prepared for the Alameda County Urban Runoff Clean Water 
   Program.  

 

 
 




                                                       54 
                                                                                                          2/1/12 

								
To top