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Poetry and Figurative Language (PowerPoint)

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					  Poetry and Figurative Language

Miss Gay
English 8
    Poetry and Figurative Language
– Poetry is rhythmic, compressed language that uses
  figurative language and imagery to appeal to
  emotion and imagination.

– One type of poetry is free verse poetry.

– Free verse poetry has no set number of lines or no
  rhyme scheme. (it does not have to rhyme)

– Free verse, like most poetry, uses imagery and
  figurative language.
    Poetry and Figurative Language

– Figurative language means more than what is on the
  surface.
– Ex: The store was bursting at the seams with
  shoppers.
– (The store was not actually bursting at the seams; it
  was just really crowded)
     Types of Figurative Language
Simile
Metaphor
Alliteration
Onomatopoeia
Personification
Hyperbole
Idiom
                       Simile

A simile is a comparison of two different things
using “like” or “as”.

Ex: The witch screeched like an angry owl every
time someone passed her house.
Ex: Her hair is as soft as fine-woven silk.
                     Metaphor

A metaphor is a comparison between two
objects that DOES NOT use “like” or “as”.

Ex: Her eyes are stars!
Ex: Blazing and burning, the sun a ball of fire.
                    Alliteration

Alliteration is the repeating sound at the
beginning of two or more words.

Ex: Studious students always study hard.
Ex: Like loads of laundry lying on the floor, I
collapsed on the sofa.
               Onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeia words are sound words.

Ex: “Whoosh! Nothing but nets,” the conceited
ball player bragged.
Ex: The coiled snake hissed venomously.
                Personification

Personification is a type of metaphor that gives
nonhuman things qualities or human
characteristics.

Ex: The stuffed bear smiled as the boy hugged
him to his chin.
The sun peeked over the mountaintops.
                    Hyperbole

An exaggerated statement used to heighten
effect. It is not used to mislead the reader, but to
emphasize a point.
Ex: She’s said so on several million occasions.
Ex: His backpack weighed a ton.
                        Idiom

Idioms are phrases which people use in
everyday language which do not make sense
literally but we understand what they mean

Ex: I was upset at his behavior because I went
out on a limb for him.
Ex: “Come on, let’s get busy! Get the ball rolling,”
Miss Gay instructed the class.
    Identifying Figurative Language

The wind sung her mournful song through the
falling leaves.




PERSONIFICATION
    Identifying Figurative Language

The road was a ribbon of moonlight.




METAPHOR
     Identifying Figurative Language

I introduced myself first to break the ice.




IDIOM
     Identifying Figurative Language

He ran down the field like a freight train.




SIMILE
    Identifying Figurative Language

“Abracadabra! And now for the magic. Whoosh!”




ONOMATOPOEIA
    Identifying Figurative Language

My mother yelled so loudly, she burst my
eardrum.




HYPERBOLE
     Identifying Figurative Language

Those creepy crawly critters ruined our picnic.




ALLITERATION
      Figurative Language Step Books

Flap 1- Title and name
Flaps 2- 8 should have the following:
Type of Figurative Language at the bottom of flap
Definition at the top
A paragraph where you underline examples of
selected figurative language.
A picture or drawing
Due- Friday (will count as Study Skills project grade)

				
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posted:2/15/2012
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