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					                                   FIREFIGHTING POLICY MANUAL

                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS



NOTICE OF REVISION OF POLICIES

INTRODUCTION

MISSION STATEMENT

OPERATIONS POLICY AND PROCEDURES

Abandon Building
Annual Hose Testing
Automobile Accident Response Procedures
Automobile Fire Response Procedures
Citizen Owned CO Detectors
Emergency Medical/Rehabilitation Unit
Emergency Procedures for Chevron Park
Ground Ladder Inspection and Maintenance
Ground Ladder Markings
Ground Ladder Replacement
Hydrant Inspection Program
Incident Command
Incident Risk Assessment
Life Safety Hazard Marking
Mini Max XT Carbon Monoxide Monitor Use
Personnel Accountability While Working in the Hazard Zone
Rapid Intervention Crew
Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector Activations
Rules of Engagement Structural Firefighting
San Ramon Regional Medical Center Fire Response Procedures
SCBA Company Identifiers
SCBA Use
Sprinklered Buildings Response
Structural Firefighting - 2 in / 2 out Requirement
Structure Fire Response Procedures
Vehicle Lockouts
Walk Around Size Up
Wildland Access Plan
Wildland Fire Response Procedures


TRAINING BULLETINS

2800 Gallon Water Tender Unit 658
AIM 450 (CO) Carbon Monoxide Gas Detector
Air Operations
Aqueous Film Forming Foam
Backpack Pumps
Carbon Monoxide Detector Activations
TRAINING BULLETINS (CONTINUED)

Chainsaws
Come ALong Pull Chains
Drip Torches
Emergency Key System
Fire Attack Shuttle Supply
Fire Attack Shuttle Supply Porta Tank
Fires Involving Alternate Fuels
Forestry Hose Rollers
Four Wheel Drive Operations -Type IV Engines
Hand Signals Fire Ground Operations
Hand Tool Maintenance and Use
Helitack/Operations Bouywall Portable Water Tank
High Pressure By-Pass Type IV Engines
High Rise Pack Loading Instructions
Honda Transfer Pump on Water Tender 678
Hose Loads
Hurst Extension Rams
Hydrant Flow Testing Water Treatment
Hydrant Program - Blue Dot Markers
Hydrant Program - Hill Mutual Pressure Zone
Hydrant Program - Private Fire System - 18868 Bollinger Canyon
Hydrant Program - Private Fire System - Country Oak Ln
Hydrant Program - Private Fire System - Paulanella Pl
Hydrant Program - Red Hydrant Emergency Supply System
Incident Command System (ICS) Level One Staging
Loading Live Lines
Loss Recovery Kit
Luminite Telescopic Light Tower
Making Decisions at Tank Fires
Marking of Searched Buildings or Areas
Master Stream Foam Eductor
Master Streams During FireFighting Evolutions
Maxi Force Airbag Equipment
Mobile Attack
National Foam JS-10 Series Foam Nozzle
Nozzles
Operating Procedures for Electric Winch On Type IV Units
Operating Procedures for Lights, Siren, Pump Start and Stop for Type IV Units
Operating Procedures for Water Tender 615
Operation of Waterous/Hale Floto Pump
Opticom Traffic Control System
Otterbine Float Pump
Piston Intake Relief Valve
Portable Air Chisel
Positive Pressure Ventilation
Progressive Hose Lay Gnass Bkpacks
Recycled Water
Sand Bags Flood Protection
Search Guidelines
Small Engine Fuel Maintenance
Spotting of Ladder Trucks at Working Fires
Starting the Diesel Engine - Type IV Engines
TRAINING BULLETINS (CONTINUED)

Structure Protection in Wildland Urban Interfaces Fires
Thermal Imaging Camera Use
Timberline Hose Clamp
Type III Engines (Unit 602-603-604-605)
Type III Engines (Unit 659-660-661-662)
Use and Care Reciprocating Saws
Utility Salvage Bag
WYE Bag Flat Hose Load on Type III Engines
                        NOTICE OF REVISION OF POLICIES

                             Application and Revision of Policies

This manual identifies the District’s policies and procedures which are presently in effect. As
policies and benefits are revised, changes will be communicated through standard
communication channels. Advance notice may not always be possible.

The District and representatives from San Ramon Valley Firefighters Association, Local 3546
have met and through collective bargaining have signed a Memorandum of Understanding. The
Memorandum of Understanding supersedes any previous policy or procedure covering any
subject areas identified in the Memorandum of Understanding.

This Administrative Policy Manual is a living document that augments the Memorandum of
Understanding and the Non-Represented Employee Handbook as appropriate. Various policies,
procedures and practices may change from time to time and the appropriate notification will be
provided.

Suppression personnel should refer to the Memorandum of Understanding for specific questions
and interpretations related to policies and procedures.

Non-Represented personnel will initially defer to the Non-Represented Employee Handbook for
clarification on applicable policies and procedures.
INTRODUCTION

The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District encompasses an area of approximately 160 square
miles and provides vital services to the communities of Alamo, Diablo, Blackhawk, Tassajara, Town
of Danville, City of San Ramon, as well as the unincorporated areas within district boundaries,
including the most active portion of the Mt. Diablo State Park. The legal function and authority for
existence is described in the State of California Health and Safety Code under the Local Fire District
Law of 1961. The primary function of the district is the protection of Life and Property from Fire
and Panic. The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District had its beginning in the Danville Fire
Protection District which had the distinction of being the second oldest Fire District in Contra Costa
County. The Danville Fire Protection District was organized on September 6, 1921.

The responsibilities of the employees of this District is a serious one. To discharge such
responsibility properly requires a thorough knowledge of the objectives and standards of the District,
its organization and of all its services provided to the public.

Therefore, this manual is intended to fulfill three purposes: (1) To outline the organization and
functions of the District; (2) To describe in detail the duties and responsibilities of its employees;
(3) To establish policy, procedures and standards of conduct that will assist the employees in the
full performance of their duties. In addition, this information will aid in governing the relationships
of employees to each other, the Administrative Personnel appointed by the Board of Directors, the
Board of Directors and with the public during routine and emergency situations.

SUPERVISION

The Board of Directors of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District shall exercise complete
authority and supervision over the District. The Chief of the District shall be directly responsible to
the Board of Directors in all matters pertaining to the District's functions and operations in his
capacity as Chief Administrative and Operational Officer of the District.

FUNCTIONS OF THE DISTRICT

The functions of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District shall be:

1.     To extinguish all fires within the jurisdiction of the District.
2.     To assist other fire agencies as defined in the Mutual Aid and Automatic Aid Agreements.
3.     To maintain all property of the District in serviceable condition.
4.     To enforce all laws and rules governing the Prevention and Suppression of hazardous
       conditions related to Fire and Panic, specified in the Adopted Fire Prevention Code, as
       amended.
5.     To investigate the cause of all fires.
6.     To provide fire protection facilities in accordance with the growth and populations changes
       within the District.
7.     To provide rescue and emergency medical aid to all persons confronted with a life or safety
       hazard within the District.
    MISSION STATEMENT

   In the spirit of our tradition,
we strive for excellence, respectfully
 serving all with pride, honor and
             compassion
                            OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Abandon Building
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:              02/15/2005       DOC NO:              FF045
                            CROSS REF:



PURPOSE

To provide a procedure for immediate and orderly evacuation of an emergency scene work area.


POLICY

It is the policy of the District that the Abandon Building procedure shall be utilized whenever
emergency personnel are in imminent danger of injury because of structure collapse, potential
explosion, extremely hazardous atmosphere, backdraft or flashover condition or immediate
change of tactical conditions.


PROCEDURE

    A. Incident Commander
         1. Gives command to “ABANDON BUILDING” over the radio
         2. IC re-transmits “ABANDON BUILDING”, as needed, and states the nature of the
            emergency (i.e.: structure collapse, explosion potential, hazardous atmosphere,
            backdraft condition, flashover condition, changing tactics to defensive, etc.).

    B. Apparatus Operators – if directed by the IC
         •    Sound Air Horn and Siren
         •    Continuously for 5 seconds, pausing for 5 seconds, repeating procedure

    C. Fire Personnel upon hearing Radio Communications, Air Horns and Sirens
         1. Immediately exit the emergency work area, keeping only the tools and equipment that
            may be needed for a safe exit.
         2. Company Officers shall assemble crews as soon as possible and proceed to a safe
            open area where a roll call or Personal Accountability Report (PAR Check) can be
            conducted.

    D. Supervisors
         All Supervisors shall take a "Roll Call"(PAR) for assigned personnel. When contacted,
         the officer in charge shall report status of assigned personnel after making visual or radio
         contact with personnel.

 AUTHOR:      Steven Hart, Assistant Chief                                               Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Steven Hart, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         01/99       REVISED DATE:   02/05
                           OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Abandon Building
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:              02/15/2005       DOC NO:          FF045
                           CROSS REF:



   E. Incident Status Report
        1. When all personnel are accounted for, the Incident Commander shall announce over
           the radio that a roll call (PAR) was completed and all personnel are accounted for.
        2. Communications Center alerts all scene units when all personnel are accounted for.
             a. Transmitting on all channels assigned to incident.
             b. Transmitting any safety announcements proceeded by 3 alert beeps.

   F. Lost or Missing Personnel
        If any member(s) are not accounted for, the Incident Commander will implement the
        RIC. Simultaneously, on-scene priorities should be adjusted to search and rescue.




AUTHOR:      Steven Hart, Assistant Chief                                           Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:         Steven Hart, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         01/99       REVISED DATE:   02/05
                            OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Annual Hose Testing
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      04/05       DOC NO:            FF051
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

Insurance Service Office (I.S.O.) requires an annual service test for all fire hose and also requires
hose to be assigned to apparatus. Testing also serves to keep the District’s inventory updated.
NFPA 1962 recommends testing large diameter hose (3½ - 6”) at 200 psi. Double-Jacketed
hose, less than 3½” is recommended to be tested at 250 psi. Most new hose is factory tested at
600 psi. Experience has shown that some types of defects will show up only after prolonged
application of water and will not be apparent if the pressure is immediately released after 250 psi
has been reached. Most authorities recommend that the length of hose line to be tested should not
exceed 300 feet/discharge.

POLICY

It is the policy of the District to perform annual service tests on fire hose and also assign specific
hose to each apparatus. Large diameter hose (4 inch), is to be tested at 200 psi for 5 minutes.
All other double-jacketed hose is to be tested at 250 psi for 5 minutes. This testing is to include
hose in storage racks.

PROCEDURE

    A. All air in the hose should be expelled before pressure is applied. When conducting hose
       testing, remember that under normal conditions air is compressible and water is generally
       not. Should a hose burst under pressure, the sudden release of expanding air can cause
       serious injury.

    B. A modified gate valve, with a ¼” hole drilled in the gate, is provided for your safety and
       must be used at all times. The modification to the gate valve allows application of full
       test pressure (250 psi) with diminished volume. Using the modified valve negates the
       effects of hose or coupling failure during testing. Because the modified valve has a
       special application, it will not be carried or stored on apparatus. One modified gate valve
       will be kept at each station for use only for testing hose. Note that the valve has a
       threaded shaft, is color-coded white, and chain tagged to each station (a picture of the
       valve is attached as an identification aid).

    C. MATERIALS NEEDED FOR HOSE TESTING

          •   One 2 1/2" Gate Valve, painted white and modified with 1/4" hole drilled in the gate.
          •   Silicone spray
          •   Marking pens
 AUTHOR:      James Colon, Captain                                                        Page 1 of 5
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                        REVISED DATE:   04/05
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Annual Hose Testing
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      04/05       DOC NO:             FF051
                           CROSS REF:



         •   Paint pens for color coding
         •   Test results/recording sheets
         •   Assorted hose gaskets (found on apparatus)
         •   Tags for marking hose which fails testing

   D. CONDUCTING THE TEST:

        1. Connect pump to a source of water.

        2. Lay out all hose to be tested in lines not more than 300 feet long. Record identifying
           numbers and the length of each section of hose to be tested. Mark the end of the
           coupling shank to check for slippage of the coupling during the test.

        3. Connect the modified 2½” gated valve to pump discharge.

        4. Attach a shut-off type nozzle to the end of each line.

        5. Fill each hose line with water and make sure that each nozzle is open and elevated
           during the filling process. Exhaust all air from each line by permitting normal water
           flow.

        6. After all air has been expelled, leave each nozzle open. Gradually raise the pressure
           at the nozzle to approximately 50 psi for solid streams or 100 psi for fog streams.
           This procedure can identify defective hose lining, which is more likely to pull loose
           during a flow of water under pressure than under static pressure.

        7. Reduce the pump pressure, close each nozzle slowly, and place each nozzle on an
           elevated block or on the ground. Check and tighten all hose couplings.

        8. Close the gated 2 ½” valve. Gradually raise pump pressure to appropriate pressure
           and maintain for 5 minutes (200 psi for 4 inch hose and 250 psi for smaller diameter
           double-jacketed hose).

        9. After 5 minutes reduce pressure slowly, close discharges, disengage pump and open
           each nozzle.

        10. Observe all marks on the hose behind the coupling shanks. If any of the couplings
            have moved (slight movement is normal), or if any section develops leaks, record and
            tag as failed. If a section bursts during the test, all other sections in the line must be
            tested again. Record results on the Hose Test Report Worksheet (an example of the
            worksheet is attached).
AUTHOR:      James Colon, Captain                                                         Page 2 of 5
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                                        REVISED DATE:   04/05
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Annual Hose Testing
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      04/05       DOC NO:            FF051
                           CROSS REF:



        11. Drain all water from the hose to prevent formation of sulfuric acid, which is
            particularly corrosive to cotton and Dacron surfaces. Damage from sulfuric acid
            accounts for a large number of test failures.

        12. When putting hose away, be sure it does not come into contact with oil, grease or
            solvents, which can cause damage and result in test failures. Wash the hose with soap
            and water if contact occurs. Before putting hose away, check threads for damage.
            Bent or mashed threads can be straightened with a small piece of triangular file.
            Inspect all rubber gaskets and replace if necessary. Use silicone spray to lubricate all
            swivels as necessary.

        13. "C" Shift Captains will be in charge of dividing up the work equally, overseeing the
            hose testing process, and making sure it is completed. Collect and forward all results
            to the Captain who has been assigned to oversee hose testing.

        14. All new hose must be engraved with a date and number. Contact the Captain
            overseeing the hose testing project for appropriate hose numbers. Hose will be
            assigned to specific vehicles by use of hose numbers.

        15. All hose is to be color coded so that the hose is tied to the unit. Color code the female
            coupling of each section of hose. Each color should be 1” Length x ½” Width.

        16. When hose testing is completed, log the records in the computer system.




AUTHOR:      James Colon, Captain                                                        Page 3 of 5
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                                        REVISED DATE:   04/05
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Annual Hose Testing
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      04/05       DOC NO:         FF051
                           CROSS REF:




                                    AKRON STYLE 285 AND 2285
                                                    GATE VALVE




AUTHOR:      James Colon, Captain                                                     Page 4 of 5
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                                        REVISED DATE:   04/05
                            OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Annual Hose Testing
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                       04/05              DOC NO:                FF051
                            CROSS REF:



                               HOSE TEST REPORT WORKSHEET
VEHICLE/APPARATUS IDENTIFICATION NUMBER:_______ COLOR CODE:______

STATION # (IF HOSE IS IN STORAGE):________

TEST ALL HOSE FOR 5 MINUTES (4” at 200 psi & all other double-jacketed at 250 psi)

Hose # Size          Length        Pass/Fail         Date             Hose #       Size   Length   Pass/Fail        Date
                                                     Tested                                                         Tested




Signature:                                                                      Date Completed:

 AUTHOR:      James Colon, Captain                                                                    Page 5 of 5
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                         REVISED DATE:     04/05
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Automobile Accident Response Procedures
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                         1/08            DOC NO:         FF008
                            CROSS REF:




POLICY

The District provides a standard (VA) or expanded (VAE) response to vehicle accidents. The
standard response, primarily used for surface street collisions including those involving
pedestrians and bicycles, contains one engine and one Rescue/Medic or Paramedic Unit.
Expanded assignments contain one Engine, one Rescue/Medic or Paramedic Unit, one Truck and
a Battalion Chief. Expanded assignments are sent to more demanding environments including:
    •    Freeway locations
    •    Involved vehicle on fire
    •    Vehicle into a structure
    •    Trapped occupant
    •    Vehicle overturned
    •    Leaking fuel or other hazardous material involved
    •    Vehicle significantly off the roadway (through a bridge guardrail, over an embankment,
         etc.)

PROCEDURE

The first arriving unit will assess the situation and cancel or redeploy incoming units as needed.
The first arriving officer shall give a clear concise condition report and establish Command. Unit
placement so as to provide the best scene protection demands first consideration. Protection of the
scene from the threat of fire shall be the responsibility of the Engine or appropriate truck company
on the scene. Charged hose lines, dry chemical extinguishers or foam, along with containment of
hazardous materials, and the disabling of electrical systems should be accomplished as soon as
possible.

Treatment of any injuries should be initiated as soon as possible, but only when crew and patient
safety is assured. The standard procedure with regard to patient care and transportation shall follow
District Policy and the Contra Costa County Health Services EMS Policies and Procedures.




 AUTHOR:      Richard Price, Assistant Chief                                                  Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                       REVISED DATE:     11/00, 05/05, 11/07
                            OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:          Automobile Fire Response Procedures
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                     11/05       DOC NO:              FF009
                            CROSS REF:




POLICY

The standard response to a report of an Auto Fire will consist of one engine. A plan must be
initiated considering the priorities of life safety, the environment, and property conservation.

PROCEDURE

The arriving officer's first responsibility is to protect the scene. Most auto fires occur where vehicle
traffic poses a serious threat to the fire fighting crew and equipment. Rescue, along with the
protection of nearby exposures, should occur as priority. Fire control is to be accomplished with an
aggressive attack with the use of an appropriate hand line. A dry chemical extinguisher can be used
as a back up. Personnel must maintain close observation for special hazards, such as non-vented
fuel tanks and impact bumpers. The assistance of law enforcement may be needed for traffic
control and/or removal of the damaged vehicle. Fire cause investigation should be initiated as soon
as possible.




 AUTHOR:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                              Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                       REVISED DATE:   05/05
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:
                                              Citizen-Owned Carbon Monoxide
                                              Detectors
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                      05/06              DOC NO:         FF020
                             CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

Many citizens are purchasing Carbon Monoxide detectors for home use to guard against potentially
fatal occurrences. The detectors are designed to mimic the body's response to accumulation of this
highly toxic, tasteless and odorless gas.

POLICY

It is the policy of the District to manage incidents involving citizen-owned Carbon Monoxide
detectors to provide the highest level of safety for District personnel as well as the public.

PROCEDURE

The management of Carbon Monoxide incidents begins at the Communications Center level as the
Dispatcher attempts to ascertain whether the alarm sounding is a Carbon Monoxide detector, smoke
detector, or other type of alarm. If the Dispatcher or first arriving company determines that a
Carbon Monoxide alarm has sounded, the following sequence of events should be followed:

SEQUENCE OF EVENTS:

    1. SCENE ARRIVAL. Look for flu-like symptoms, disorientation, and red coloring of the
       skin and lips, all signs of Carbon Monoxide poisoning. If symptoms are noted, immediately
       request a full medical emergency response. Evacuate the residence. Provide patient care as
       necessary.

    2. VENTILATION. In proper protective clothing, use natural ventilation by opening doors,
       windows, and screens as soon as possible.

    3. CONTROL UTILITIES. Once the residence has been evacuated and ventilation
       operations initiated, shut off the gas appliance suspected of leaking Carbon Monoxide and
       attempt to shut off the source of gas to the appliance. Check for other possible sources of
       Carbon Monoxide, including:
         •    Obstructed fireplaces, wood burning stoves
         •    Charcoal BBQ's used indoors
         •    Vehicle exhaust
         •    Malfunctioning appliances, i.e., stoves, ovens, furnaces, and water heaters that operate
              by fuels such as natural or liquefied petroleum, oil, wood, or coal
 AUTHOR:      Scott Fulwood, Engineer                                                          Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         08/95           REVISED DATE:   09/95, 05/06
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:
                                              Citizen-Owned Carbon Monoxide
                                              Detectors
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                      05/06              DOC NO:         FF020
                             CROSS REF:



         •    Misused gas appliances
         •    Separated/damaged vents
         •    Fire

    4. CONTACT PG&E. Request that PG&E respond and provide additional information
       regarding the condition of the appliance (i.e., heater, water heater, etc.) and the possibility of
       a Carbon Monoxide leak. If the installation of the appliance appears to be improper and
       could lead to a fire, request a Fire Inspector. If the problem appears to result from a
       construction issue, notify the appropriate building official.

District personnel are not responsible for repairs to faulty appliances. The homeowner should be
advised not to occupy the residence until the exact source of the Carbon Monoxide is determined
and appropriate repairs have been made, or the detector proven to be defective. Until these
verifications have been performed, all sources which could provide Carbon Monoxide should be
eliminated. Bear in mind that this could create an uncomfortable situation for the occupant;
however, it is the safest approach when handling this deadly gas.




 AUTHOR:      Scott Fulwood, Engineer                                                          Page 2 of 2
 REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         08/95           REVISED DATE:   09/95, 05/06
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:         Emergency Medical / Rehabilitation Unit
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:       09/07/2008       DOC NO:                     FF012
                           CROSS REF:     NFPA 1584; USFA Emergency Incident Rehabilitation




INTRODUCTION

On-scene emergency operations and training exercises can create situations in which there is a
potential for occurrence of injuries, strenuous physical activity and/or prolonged exposure to heat
or cold. Personnel involved in these activities may require rest, re-hydration, nourishment and/or
medical treatment.

PURPOSE
To establish a policy/procedure to ensure that personnel who may be suffering from the ill
effects of sustained physical exertion or injury receive rapid treatment, re-hydration and medical
monitoring during emergency operations or training exercises.


POLICY
This policy/procedure shall apply to all emergency personnel involved in on-scene emergency
operations and training exercises where there is a potential for injury, strenuous physical activity
or prolonged exposure to heat or cold.

There are two levels of Medical Rehabilitation; Informal Rehabilitation and Formal Medical
Rehabilitation. It will be up to the discretion of the Incident Commander to select the
appropriate level of rehabilitation for any given incident or exercise.

RESPONSIBILITIES

        A. Incident Commander:

             The Incident Commander shall consider the circumstances of each incident and make
             provisions early in the incident for the rest and rehabilitation for all members
             operating at the scene. These provisions shall include: medical evaluation, treatment
             and monitoring; food and fluid replenishment; mental rest; and relief from extreme
             climatic conditions and the other environmental parameters of the incident. The
             rehabilitation shall include the provision of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) at
             the Basic Life Support (BLS) level or higher.

        B. Supervisors:
           All supervisors shall maintain an awareness of the condition of each member
           operating within their span of control and ensure that adequate steps are taken to

 AUTHOR:      Debbie Meier, EMS Coordinator                                             Page 1 of 12
 REVIEWED:        Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/07           REVISED DATE:   09/06/2008
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:         Emergency Medical / Rehabilitation Unit
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:       09/07/2008       DOC NO:                     FF012
                           CROSS REF:     NFPA 1584; USFA Emergency Incident Rehabilitation



             provide for each member’s safety and health. The command structure shall be
             utilized to request relief and the reassignment of fatigued crews.

        C. Personnel:
           During periods of hot weather, members shall be encouraged to drink water and
           activity beverages throughout the work day. During any emergency incident or
           training evolution, all members shall advise their supervisor when they believe that
           their level of fatigue or exposure to heat or cold is approaching a level that could
           affect themselves, their crew, or the operation in which they are involved. Members
           shall also remain aware of the health and safety of other members of their crew.

        D. Medical Rehab Unit Leader:
           The Medical Rehab Unit Leader is responsible for the supervision of the
           Rehabilitation and Treatment Area and its primary mission of on-scene prevention,
           detection, and treatment of incident related illness or injury. The EMS Coordinator or
           the EMS QI Coordinator should be considered for this position.

DEFINITIONS
     A. Informal Rehabilitation is for when the firefighting activity at an incident or
        training exercise is not considered heavy or prolonged and is without elevated
        environmental or ambient temperatures.

        B. Formal Rehabilitation is for when the firefighting activity at an incident or training
           exercise is considered to have heavy physical exertion, extended operations or
           elevated environmental or ambient temperatures.

PROCEDURE
  A. INFORMAL REHABILITATION
     The Incident Commander has the option to establish an Informal Rehabilitation area on
     smaller incidents or training exercises where firefighting activity is not considered heavy
     or prolonged. An Informal Rehabilitation area is an area where personnel are assigned to
     rest and re-hydrate.

        Guidelines for Informal Rehabilitation procedures are:
        1. All personnel shall make every attempt to report to the Informal Rehabilitation area
           as an intact company.
        2. Remove heavy equipment and turnout clothing.
        3. Personnel may re-hydrate with drinking fluids from the on-scene apparatus or from
           what is provided on scene.
 AUTHOR:      Debbie Meier, EMS Coordinator                                             Page 2 of 12
 REVIEWED:        Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/07           REVISED DATE:   09/06/2008
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:         Emergency Medical / Rehabilitation Unit
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:       09/07/2008       DOC NO:                     FF012
                          CROSS REF:     NFPA 1584; USFA Emergency Incident Rehabilitation



       4. Each Company should rest and relax for a minimum of 10 minutes, preferably 20
          minutes.
       5. The Company Officer shall notify the Incident Commander or Operations, when the
          company is available to be reassigned to the incident.
       6. Although medical monitoring is normally not provided in the Informal Rehabilitation
          area, it shall be the responsibility of each Company Officer to monitor their crew
          members for signs of fatigue or other symptoms indicating adverse health affects. If
          medical monitoring is indicated, personnel shall be medically evaluated following the
          guidelines set forth in the Formal Medical Rehabilitation protocol.

   B. FORMAL MEDICAL REHABILITATION
      In the Incident Command System, the Responder Rehabilitation is a group under the
      Medical Unit. The Medical Unit and Responder Rehabilitation group will be combined
      unless the size or the complexity of the incident requires the Unit/group to be split.

       The Incident Commander should consider the establishment of a Formal Medical
       Rehabilitation Unit on incidents that are a Second Alarm or greater, large training
       exercises, and/or when initial alarm assignments will involve any of the following
       conditions:
       •    Heavy physical exertion.
       •    Extended operations.
       •    Elevated environmental or ambient temperatures.

       1. The Incident Commander shall assign the EMS Officers, if available, and/or an
          Engine Company to set up and staff the Medical Rehab Unit.

       2. Location:
          a. The Medical Rehab Unit Leader shall select a site, unless otherwise directed by
             the Incident Commander.
                 •   The site should be located in an area outside of the operational activity area
                     where protective clothing and equipment may be removed.
                 •   It should provide suitable protection from the prevailing environmental
                     conditions such as heat and cold.
                 •   Adjacent to the Breathing Support apparatus but far enough away to avoid
                     excessive noise.
                 •   In a high rise incident, it should be located with Staging.

AUTHOR:      Debbie Meier, EMS Coordinator                                             Page 3 of 12
REVIEWED:        Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        01/07           REVISED DATE:   09/06/2008
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:         Emergency Medical / Rehabilitation Unit
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:       09/07/2008       DOC NO:                       FF012
                          CROSS REF:     NFPA 1584; USFA Emergency Incident Rehabilitation



                 •   Use existing structures, classrooms or offices, to protect from the climate, if
                     appropriate. If no suitable facilities or natural shelter is available, consider
                     using a pop-up shelter or using salvage covers stretched between two engines.
                 •   Tape off around the perimeter using fire line tape, if necessary, to keep
                     bystanders away and to establish control points for entrance and exit.
            b. The Medical Rehab area should provide the following features:
                 •   Area to remove breathing apparatus for refilling adjacent to but separate from
                     the Medical Rehab Unit.
                 •   Area to remove turnouts/safety equipment close to but separate from the
                     Medical Rehab Unit.
                 •   Provide a controlled entrance into the Medical Rehab area.
                 •   Provide a controlled exit from the Medical Rehab area.

       3. The Medical Rehab Unit Leader shall provide the Incident Commander with the
          following information:
          a. Location of the Medical Rehab Unit.
            b. When the Medical Rehab Unit is fully operational.
            c. The need for additional or special resources.

       4. Staffing
          The number of personnel required to successfully operate the Medical Rehabilitation
          area will vary depending on the size of the incident; however, the following staffing
          matrix should be considered:
            a. Medical Rehab Unit Leader
                 •   Supervise the actions of the Medical Rehab Unit and maintenance of the
                     Rehabilitation area.
                 •   Coordinate the function of the Medical Rehab Unit and carries out
                     assignments within the Incident Command System.
                 •   Reports directly to the Logistics Officer, if established, or the supervising
                     Incident Command System position.
            b. Medical Rehab Unit Personnel
                 •   Optimally the Medical Rehab Unit personnel should consist of a minimum of
                     3 people with at least one being a paramedic.
                 •   These personnel shall:
AUTHOR:      Debbie Meier, EMS Coordinator                                               Page 4 of 12
REVIEWED:        Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        01/07           REVISED DATE:   09/06/2008
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:         Emergency Medical / Rehabilitation Unit
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:       09/07/2008       DOC NO:                     FF012
                          CROSS REF:     NFPA 1584; USFA Emergency Incident Rehabilitation



                    Assist with recording and time keeping.
                     -
                    Assist with entrance and exit controls.
                     -
                    Assist with evaluations and re-hydration.
                     -
                    Obtain vital signs and record them on the Medical Rehabilitation Unit
                     -
                    Log.
                - Observe and assess personnel for signs of fatigue, or medical emergencies.
                - Advise the Medical Rehab Unit Leader when personnel have been
                    rehabilitated and can be reassigned.
       - Continue to evaluate personnel showing signs of fatigue or illness and begin field
         treatment or transport to definitive care.

       5. Criteria for Entry into the Medical Rehab Unit:
          The company or crew must enter a formal rehab area, drink appropriate fluids, be
          medically evaluated, and rest for a minimum of 20 minutes after any of the following:
                      a. Depletion of two 30-minute SCBA cylinders;
                      b. Depletion of one 45 or 60-minute ACBA cylinder;
                      c. Whenever encapsulating chemical protective clothing is worn; and
                      d. Following 40 minutes of intense work without an SCBA.
       6. Medical Rehab Unit Entry and Exit Procedures
          a. Remove breathing apparatus at the equipment staging area or Breathing Support
             Unit.
            b. Remove safety equipment, including turnout coat, helmet, hood, or wildland
               clothing, prior to entry into the Medical Rehab area. Keep safety equipment
               together by the unit (available for response), adjacent to the rehab area.
            c. All personnel shall make every attempt to report to the Medical Rehab area as a
               company.

            d. Upon entry into the Formal Medical Rehab area, Medical Rehab Unit Staff shall
               adhere to the following guidelines:
                 i. Collect the company personnel accountability tags.
                 ii. Document personnel entering the Rehab Unit (as a company preferred).
                 iii. Have baseline vitals taken by the Medical Rehab Unit staff and follow up
                      vitals after 20 minutes of rest.
AUTHOR:      Debbie Meier, EMS Coordinator                                             Page 5 of 12
REVIEWED:        Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        01/07           REVISED DATE:   09/06/2008
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:         Emergency Medical / Rehabilitation Unit
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:       09/07/2008       DOC NO:                     FF012
                          CROSS REF:     NFPA 1584; USFA Emergency Incident Rehabilitation



                 iv. Document all findings on the Medical Rehab Unit Log.
                 v. Vital signs within normal limits qualify personnel for release from the
                       Medical Rehab Unit upon completion of standard rehabilitation.
                 vi. Personnel experiencing vital signs that are not within normal range will
                       remain in the Medical Unit for further evaluation.
                 vii. Personnel shall attempt to remain seated and relaxed for a minimum of ten
                       (10) minutes while drinking fluids.
                 viii. Document personnel exiting the Rehab Unit (as a Company preferred).
                 ix. Upon exiting give the Company Officer the Company Personnel Passport.
            e. All personnel/companies recovering and exiting the Medical/Rehabilitation Unit
               shall be documented and reassigned to the incident as a Company or unit.
                 i.   The Medical/Rehab Unit Leader shall notify the Operations Chief when the
                      companies are available to be reassigned to the incident.
                 ii. Personnel released from Rehabilitation will usually be directed to a staging
                      area to wait for an assignment.
                 iii. Personnel not recovering with rest and fluid replenishment within 20
                      minutes, shall remain in the Medical Unit for further evaluation, or be
                      transported to definitive care facility as per Contra Costa County EMS
                      Policies and treatment guidelines.

       7. Accountability
          In order to assure accountability of all personnel and to keep accurate records of all
          personnel seen or treated by the Medical/Rehabilitation Unit, the following
          procedures should be followed:
          a. The Entrance and Exit of the Medical/Rehabilitation Area shall be clearly marked
              and staffed by Unit personnel. Personnel assigned to the Entrance and Exit
              positions will be responsible for the documentation of each company’s arrival and
              departure time.
            b. All personnel reporting to the Medical/Rehabilitation Unit shall enter and, when
               released to service by Medical Rehab Unit Leader, exit as a crew.
            c. The crew designation, number of crew members, the time of entry and the time of
               exit from the Medical Rehabilitation Unit shall be documented on the
               Medical/Rehabilitation Unit Log.
            d. Crews shall not leave the Medical/Rehabilitation Unit until authorized by the
               Medical Rehab Unit Leader or designee.

AUTHOR:      Debbie Meier, EMS Coordinator                                             Page 6 of 12
REVIEWED:        Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        01/07           REVISED DATE:   09/06/2008
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:         Emergency Medical / Rehabilitation Unit
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:       09/07/2008       DOC NO:                     FF012
                          CROSS REF:     NFPA 1584; USFA Emergency Incident Rehabilitation



            e. A Patient Care Record shall be completed for each patient that received ALS
               medical treatment or is transported via ambulance.
            f. When leaving the Medical/Rehabilitation area the Company Officer shall obtain
               the personnel accountability tags.
            g. The Medical/Rehabilitation Unit shall utilize the appropriate ICS forms (206 and
               214).
            h. The Medical/Rehabilitation Unit log shall be given to the Incident Commander at
               the end of the incident. The Incident Commander shall forward the log to the
               EMS Division for record keeping purposes.
                 Reminder: The Medical Rehabilitation Unit Log is a confidential document.

       8. Additional Resources
          The following items are a guideline and may need to be adjusted depending on the
          size of the incident:
          a. One transport unit shall be available to the Medical/Rehabilitation Unit at all
              times.
            b. One command type vehicle equipped with common communication equipment.
            c. Medical Supplies, both BLS and ALS equipment.
            d. Water and sports drink.
            e. Salvage cover (20’X 20’).
            f. Chairs, fans and a portable cover for shade.
            g. Barrier tape and traffic cones.
            h. Clipboards and pens with the Rehabilitation packet, complete with all forms and
               needed information.
            i. ICS Vest and ICS Forms 214 and 206.


*** APPENDICES attached on the following pages. ***




AUTHOR:      Debbie Meier, EMS Coordinator                                             Page 7 of 12
REVIEWED:        Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        01/07           REVISED DATE:   09/06/2008
MEDICAL PROTOCOLS/GUIDELINES
All medical treatment administered by the Medical Unit shall comply with all Contra
Costa County EMS Policies and treatment guidelines. Formal rehabilitation shall consist
of a minimum of ten minutes, preferably 20 minutes, of rest, nourishment, and fluid
replenishment. The following guidelines have been established to help identify and
prevent any significant injuries and/or illness:

Initial Vital Signs:
       1. If personnel display any of the following vital signs, they are to be transferred
          to the Medical Treatment Area for further evaluation.
              a. Pulse Rate:        <60 and >140/min or irregular.
              b. Blood Pressure: Systolic <100 or >180
                                    Diastolic <70 or >110
              c. Respirations:      <10 or >28/min
              d. Mental Status:     Slow response to verbal stimuli
                                    Not articulate
                                    Disoriented
                                    Dizziness
              e. Skin:              Cool, clammy, red coloration or white chalky.
              f. Pupils:            Abnormal
              g. Chest Pain
              h. Vomiting/Nausea
              i. Any vision abnormalities

Follow-up Vital Signs:
       1. Follow-up vital signs shall be taken within 20 minutes, or prior to release, of
          initial vital signs. If personnel display any of the following vital signs after
          the initial rest period, they are to be transferred to the Medical Treatment Area
          immediately for further evaluation and shall be transported to definitive care
          facility as per Contra Costa County EMS Policies and treatment guidelines.

              a. Pulse Rate:         <50 and >100/min or irregular.
              b. Blood Pressure:     Systolic <100 or >150
                                     Diastolic <60 or >110
              c. Respirations:       <10 or >28/min
              d. Mental Status:      Slow response to verbal stimuli
                                     Not articulate
                                     Disoriented
                                     Dizziness
              e.   Skin:             Cool, clammy, red coloration or white chalky.
              f.   Pupils:           Abnormal
              g.   Chest Pain
              h.   Vomiting/Nausea
              i.   Any vision abnormalities
              j.   Muscle pain, cramping or excess fatigue
         SAN RAMON VALLEY FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT
               Rehab Unit Company Check-in/out Sheet

Date:             Incident Name or #
Type of Incident:
Crews on Scene:




Unit #    #Persons Time In   Time      Unit #   #Persons Time In   Time
                             Out                                   Out
                                       San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District Rehabilitation Log
Date:                  Incident Name or #:                                      Type of Incident                              Humiture:
Unit    Personnel   Entry            Initial Vitals          Complaint   Exit              Release Vitals                      Disposition
ID#     Last Name   Time    Pulse   Resp      BP      Temp    & Skin     Time     Pulse   Resp      BP      Temp   Assigned     Medical      Transp
                                                                                                                                  Unit




Completed by:
                San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District
                 Medical/Rehab Unit Leader Check List


□   Don position ID vest

□   Read entire checklist

□   Obtain briefing from Operations, (if not established IC)
    o Anticipated duration of incident
    o Number of personnel

□   Identify radio channel (frequency) for
    o                        Command Net
    o                        Tactical Net
    o                        Coordination Net

□   Identify site for Rehab area that provides the following features:
    o Area to remove breathing apparatus.
    o Area to remove turnouts/safety equipment.
    o A controlled entrance and exit.
    o Protection from heat or cold.

□   Identify need for additional resources:
    o Personnel and/or Medical treatment personnel
    o Additional medical supplies
    o Transport Ambulance
    o Water/Fluid replacement
    o Food
    o Cooling fans (misters)
    o Heaters/blankets
    o Sanitation

□   Provide the Incident Commander with the following information:
    o Location of the Medical Rehab Unit
    o When the Medical Rehab unit is fully operational
    o Need for additional or special resources
HEAT STRESS INDEX

                                      RELATIVE HUMIDITY

                          10%   20%   30%    40%   50%   60%   70%   80%   90%
                    104   98    104   110    120   132
   TEMPERATURE ºF




                    102   97    101   108    117   125
                    100   95    99    105    110   120   132
                    98    93    97    101    106   110   125
                    96    91    95    98     104   108   120   128
                    94    89    93    95     100   105   111   122
                    92    87    90    92     96    100   106   115   122
                    90    85    88    90     92    96    100   106   114   122
                    88    82    86    87     89    93    95    100   106   115
                    86    80    84    85     87    90    92    96    100   109
                    84    78    81    83     85    86    89    91    95    99
                    82    77    79    80     81    84    86    89    91    95
                    80    75    77    78     79    81    83    85    86    89
                    78    72    75    77     78    79    80    81    83    85
                    76    70    72    75     76    77    77    77    78    79
                    74    68    70    73     74    75    75    75    76    77

NOTE: Add 10ºF when protective clothing is worn and add 10ºF when in direct sunlight.




HUMITURE ºF                       DANGER                               INJURY THREAT
                                 CATEGORY

  BELOW 60º                           NONE           LITTLE OR NO DANGER UNDER NORMAL
                                                     CIRCUMSTANCES

        80º - 90º                 CAUTION            FATIQUE POSSIBLE IF EXPOSURE IS PROLONGED AND
                                                     THERE IS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

      90º - 105º                  EXTREME            HEAT CRAMPS AND HEAT ESHAUSTION POSSIBLE IF
                                  CAUTION            EXPOSURE IS PROLONGED AND THERE IS PHYSICAL
                                                     ACTIVITY

   105º - 130º                    DANGER             HEAT CRAMPS OR EXHAUSTION LIKELY, HEAT
                                                     STROKE POSSIBLE IF EXPOSURE IS PROLONGED AND
                                                     THERE IS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

 ABOVE 130º                       EXTREME            HEAT STROKE IMMINENT!
                                  DANGER
                         OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                         TOPIC:            Emergency Procedures for Chevron Park
                         EFFECTIVE DATE:                        08/06       DOC NO:             FF002
                         CROSS REF:


INTRODUCTION

Chevron Park offers a variety of firefighting problems, not the least of which is the ability to locate
the origin of the fire. As means of assisting District crews, Chevron Park Safety personnel have
established emergency response procedures. These procedures are intended to assist personnel in
the location of the incident in the least amount of time. These procedures are very specific,
primarily because of the personnel turnover in Chevron Park Security.

PURPOSE
This policy outlines procedures District personnel can expect Chevron employees to perform.

POLICY

It is the District’s policy to follow, as much as possible, the procedures that will align with Chevron
employee training.

PROCEDURE

   A. IN THE EVENT OF A FIRE
       1. Upon the Fire District receiving a call for emergency service from Chevron Park, the
          Fire District dispatches the appropriate emergency response units and confirms the
          incident by using the direct ring-down line to the Chevron Park security control room.
       2. Once the Fire District has been notified, the Chevron Security notifies its security units.
       3. Upon hearing the emergency announcement, the actions listed below shall
          simultaneously be carried out:
           •    Security member responds to the affected building Fireman Remote Annunciator
                Panel (F.R.A.P.) and makes the necessary emergency evacuation announcement.
           •    Main gate officer, if available, prepares the emergency plot plan by marking the
                building in which the emergency is located and prepares the emergency keys and
                plot plan to give to the Rover Officer, and/or the District crews.
                NOTE: Should an emergency vehicle arrive before the Rover Officer, the main gate
                     officer shall ride with or direct the first arriving emergency vehicle to the
                     emergency location.
           •    Security Rover responds to the main gate to assist in directing the Fire District
                emergency vehicles. The Rover shall pick up the emergency pass keys and plot plan
                from the main gate officer for use by the Fire District. The Rover shall ride in or
                direct the first arriving emergency vehicle to the site of the emergency or assume the
                main gate post if the first vehicle is being directed in by the main gate officer.
 AUTHOR:                                                                                  Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       04/86           REVISED DATE:   07/06
                        OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                        TOPIC:            Emergency Procedures for Chevron Park
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                        08/06       DOC NO:             FF002
                        CROSS REF:



      4. After the security team has been notified over the radio network, the control room
         operator is supposed to notify the building engineers.
      5. Chevron Park “Floor Wardens” are activated and assist in the evacuation of Chevron
         Park employees.

  B. IN THE EVENT OF A MEDICAL EMERGENCY
      1. Upon the Fire District receiving a call for emergency service from Chevron Park, the
         Fire District dispatches the appropriate emergency response units and confirms the
         incident by using the direct ring-down line to the Chevron Park security control room.
      2. Once the Fire District has been notified, the Chevron Security notifies its security units.
      3. Upon hearing the emergency announcement, the actions listed below shall be
         simultaneously carried out by Chevron Security personnel:
          •    Security member responds to the location of the victim and assists the victim until
               the emergency units arrive.
          •    Main gate officer, if available, prepares the emergency plot plan by marking the
               building in which the emergency is located and prepares the emergency keys and
               plot plan to give to the Rover Officer, and/or the responding District crews.
               NOTE: Should an emergency vehicle arrive prior to the Rover Officer, the main gate
                    officer shall ride with or direct the first arriving emergency vehicle to the
                    emergency location.
          •    Security Rover responds to the main gate to assist in directing the emergency
               vehicles on site. The Rover shall pick up the emergency pass keys and plot plan
               from the main gate officer for use by the Fire District. The Rover shall ride in or
               direct the first arriving emergency vehicle to the site of the emergency. The Rover
               shall take the emergency team to the location of the emergency and then return to
               the area outside the building to help direct any other arriving emergency vehicles.
      4. The control room operator notifies the main gate of the incident, as a confirmation call
         only. The main gate is expected to have been alerted to the call.




AUTHOR:                                                                                  Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                       04/86           REVISED DATE:   07/06
                             OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:           Ground Ladder Inspection and
                                              Maintenance
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:        06/22/09             DOC NO:      FF
                             CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Replacement, Ground Ladder
                                            Markings


INTRODUCTION

Fire service ladders are essential in the performance of many fireground and rescue scene functions.
The lives of firefighters and the citizens we protect rely on dependable, safe, functional San Ramon
Valley Fire Protection District (SRVFPD) ground ladders. This policy outlines procedures to follow
during inspection and maintenance of SRVFPD ground ladders to ensure their safe and reliable
operation.
NFPA 1932: Standard on Use, Maintenance, and Service Testing of In-Service Fire Department
Ground Ladders requires ladders to be inspected after each use and on a monthly basis.

POLICY


Company Officers are responsible for the completion of an inspection, regular maintenance, and
monthly safety checks of SRVFPD ground ladders.


PROCEDURES


    A. INSPECTION

         1. In conjunction with the monthly apparatus maintenance service schedule, ground ladders
            are to be visually inspected and cleaned each month. A more thorough inspection,
            followed by required maintenance as outlined in A-2 through B-7 below, shall be
            conducted annually, scheduled in a six-month offset from the annual ladder testing.

         2. All ground ladders shall be inspected after each use. This is to include, but not limited
            to:
              a. Heat sensor labels for a color change indicating heat exposure (Note: if any heat
                 sensor label becomes black, remove the ladder from service at once)
              b. Rungs for snugness and tightness
              c. Bolts and rivets for tightness
              d. Welds for any cracks or apparent defects
              e. Beams and rungs for cracks, breaks, gouges, wavy conditions or deformation

 AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                             Page 1 of 3
 REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:          6/1/09           REVISION DATES:
                            OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Ground Ladder Inspection and
                                             Maintenance
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:        06/22/09             DOC NO:      FF
                            CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Replacement, Ground Ladder
                                           Markings

             f. Check for snugness of the halyard/cable when ladder is in the bedded position
             g. Assure dog assemblies work properly
             h. Assure pulleys turn freely
             i. Check the condition of the ladder guides and for free movement of the fly section
             j. Check the halyard/cable for fraying, burns, kinks, uneven wear, or other condition
                requiring replacement

        3. Whenever a ladder is suspected of being unsafe, it should be tested in accordance
           with NFPA 1932: Standard on Use, Maintenance, and Service Testing of In-Service
           Fire Department Ground Ladders. Refer to Operations Policy “Ground Ladder
           Replacement”.

   B. MAINTENANCE

        1. Ladders shall be kept free of moisture and dirt as much as possible.

        2. Ladder parts are to be wiped with candle wax/paraffin. Use wax at contact points
           between rungs, guides and rails, particularly in the fly sections. Add additional wax as
           needed on the bottom side of lock fingers to allow them to slide easily over the rungs.

             a. Candle wax/paraffin is the only lubricant to be used on moving parts of a ladder
             (i.e.: no oil or silicone spray lubricant).

        4. For cleaning purposes, use only a mild detergent to wash ladders. It is permissible to
           use brake cleaner on stubborn, oily and greasy areas. Once the ladder is inspected,
           cleaned and dried thoroughly, apply wax to all parts of the ladder following
           instructions for application. On extension ladders, the areas that the guides slide over
           should be double checked to be sure they are clean.

        5. Extension ladders with ropes and/or wire cables that become frayed or kinked shall be
           removed from service and replaced in accordance with Operations Policy “Ground
           Ladder Replacement”.

        6. All ladders have identification numbers attached. Extension and single ladders will
           have reflective tape on the top potion of the rails to assist with visibility during the
           night and/or smoky conditions. If reflective tape is damaged or missing, replace in
           accordance with Operations Policy “Ground Ladder Markings”.

AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                             Page 2 of 3
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:          6/1/09           REVISION DATES:
                            OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Ground Ladder Inspection and
                                             Maintenance
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:        06/22/09             DOC NO:      FF
                            CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Replacement, Ground Ladder
                                           Markings

        7. A permanent record shall be kept on ladder testing and when an inspection is
           conducted and damage is found.

   C. TESTING

        1. SRVFPD ground ladders shall be tested annually. Test procedures must meet NFPA
           Standard 1932, Fire Service Ground Ladders in order to be kept in operation. In
           addition to annual testing, any ladder meeting the following criteria shall be removed
           from service and tested:

                      At any time a ladder is suspected of being unsafe

                      After the ladder has been subjected to overloading

                      After the ladder has been subjected to impact loading or unusual conditions of
                       use

                      After heat exposure

        2. All ladder testing and repair will be conducted under the direction of the designated
           “Ladder Program Coordinator”. The ladders shall be prepared in accordance with
           Operations Policy “Ground Ladder Inspection and Maintenance” prior to the testing
           date.

        3. Significant findings from testing and inspections shall be documented and records
           maintained through the SRVFPD Record Management System.




AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                             Page 3 of 3
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:          6/1/09           REVISION DATES:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:          Ground Ladder Markings
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:        6/22/09             DOC NO:       FF
                           CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Maintenance and Testing, Ground
                                          Ladder Replacement



INTRODUCTION


The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection Disitrict (SRVFPD) has developed a ladder marking
policy to help identify and track SRVFPD ladders and to assure that they are tested in accordance
with NFPA 1932: Standards on Use, Maintenance, and Service Testing of In-Service Fire
Department Ground Ladders. In addition to the ladder being given an identification number, it is
marked to aid in carrying, deploying, and to increase visibility.


POLICY


It is the responsibility of each Company Officer to assure the readiness of all equipment assigned
to their station. It is the duty of each employee to notify his/her supervisor of any damaged or
broken equipment found.


PROCEDURES

       A. Inspection

             1. All ground ladders shall be inspected at least once a month, and after each use.

                  (Refer to Operations Policy “Ground Ladder Inspection and Maintenance”)

       B. Marking Placement (see corresponding diagrams that follow)

             1. Tip- Each beam will have 24” white reflective rectangular stickers, within 5” of
                the tip (on the fore, aft, and outward facing planes of the beam) to increase
                visibility for anyone approaching the ladder.

             2. Butt- Each beam will have 24” black reflective rectangular stickers, within 5” of
                the butt (on the fore, aft, and outward facing planes of the beam) to increase
                visibility for anyone approaching the ladder.

             3. Balancing Point- (single and the 24’ extension ladders) Each rail of each beam,
                (base section only of extension ladder), will have a 2” black rectangular sticker
                (on the fore, aft, and outward facing planes of the beam) identifying the
                approximate balance point of the ladder.

 AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                                Page 1 of 9
 REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                 6/1/09                  REVISED DATE:
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Ground Ladder Markings
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:        6/22/09             DOC NO:       FF
                          CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Maintenance and Testing, Ground
                                         Ladder Replacement


            4. Carrying Points- (24’, 28’ & 35’ extension ladders) At both ends of the ladder,
               each rail of each beam (base section), will have a 2” red rectangular sticker,
               designating where the firefighter’s arm should be inserted for carrying. The
               firefighter’s arm should be inserted between the second and third rungs from the
               butt and the tip.

            5. Ladder Length- The outside of each beam, within 12” of the butt, as well as on
               the bottom of the beams between the spurs, will have stickers with the ladder
               length identified.

            6. Ladder Identification Number- On the outside of one beam, within 36” of the
               butt, a sticker will designate the 4-digit identification number of the ladder.

            7. Heat Sensor- Below the second rung from the top of each section, on the inside
               of each beam, between both rails, a heat sensor label will indicate exposure to
               potentially damaging levels of heat. Another pair of heat sensor labels, (one with
               an instruction label), will be placed at the middle of each ladder section, on the
               inside of each beam, between both rails.

            8. Danger/Electrical/Angle Label- On the base section of the ladder, a label will be
               placed on the outside of each beam, between the 4th and 5th rungs indicating the
               dangers of ladder use, the danger of ladder contact with energized electrical
               components, and how to determine the correct ladder angle.

      C. Sticker Replacement

            1. All ground ladder marking replacement stickers, with the exception of heat
               sensors and Ladder Identification Number, can be obtained from Station 33. Prior
               to attaching stickers, assure the ladder is clean in accordance with Operations
               Policy “Ground Ladder Inspection and Maintenance”.

            2. See attached photos and diagrams for sticker locations.

            3. If heat sensor labels are missing or indicate exposure to potentially damaging
               levels of heat, the ladder should be taken out of service in accordance with
               Operations Policy “Ground Ladder Replacement”.




AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                                Page 2 of 9
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                 6/1/09                  REVISED DATE:
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Ground Ladder Markings
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:        6/22/09             DOC NO:       FF
                          CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Maintenance and Testing, Ground
                                         Ladder Replacement




                                     28’/ 35’ Extension Ladder



                                                                         Butt Carrying Point
                                                                         (red rectangle 1”x 2”)




                                                                         Tip Carrying Point
                                                                         (red rectangle 1”x 2”)



                                                                         Reflective Tip
                                                                         (white rectangle 1”x 12”)




AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                                Page 3 of 9
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                 6/1/09                  REVISED DATE:
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Ground Ladder Markings
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:        6/22/09             DOC NO:       FF
                          CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Maintenance and Testing, Ground
                                         Ladder Replacement




              Reflective Tip
     All Extension & Single Ladders
         (white rectangle 1”x 12”)




                                            Tip Carrying Points
                                          All Two Person Ladders
                                           (red rectangle 1”x 2”)




AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                                Page 4 of 9
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                 6/1/09                  REVISED DATE:
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Ground Ladder Markings
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:        6/22/09             DOC NO:       FF
                          CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Maintenance and Testing, Ground
                                         Ladder Replacement




                                                                      Butt Carrying Points
                                                                     All Two Person Ladders
                                                                      (red rectangle 1”x 2”)




AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                                   Page 5 of 9
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                 6/1/09                  REVISED DATE:
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Ground Ladder Markings
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:        6/22/09             DOC NO:       FF
                          CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Maintenance and Testing, Ground
                                         Ladder Replacement




                                         All One-Person Ladders




                                                                          Balance Point
                                                                          (black rectangle 1”x 2”)




AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                                Page 6 of 9
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                 6/1/09                  REVISED DATE:
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Ground Ladder Markings
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:        6/22/09             DOC NO:       FF
                          CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Maintenance and Testing, Ground
                                         Ladder Replacement




                                                Balance Point
                                           All One-Person Ladders
                                           (black rectangle 1” x 2”)




AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                                Page 7 of 9
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                 6/1/09                  REVISED DATE:
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Ground Ladder Markings
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:        6/22/09             DOC NO:       FF
                          CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Maintenance and Testing, Ground
                                         Ladder Replacement




                                                                 Heat Sensor Label




                                                                 Heat Sensor with Color Change
                                                                 Indicating Heat Exposure




AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                                 Page 8 of 9
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                 6/1/09                  REVISED DATE:
                          OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Ground Ladder Markings
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:        6/22/09             DOC NO:       FF
                          CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Maintenance and Testing, Ground
                                         Ladder Replacement




                                                              Ladder Identification Number




                                                              Danger/Electrical/Angle Label




AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                                  Page 9 of 9
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                 6/1/09                  REVISED DATE:
                               OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                               TOPIC:         Ground Ladder Replacement

                               EFFECTIVE DATE:        06/22/09            DOC NO:       FF
                               CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Markings, Ground Ladder
                                              Maintenance and Testing



INTRODUCTION

The replacement of damaged or otherwise inoperable ladders as soon as possible is necessary to
ensure the readiness of San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District (SRVFPD) engine and truck
companies. The following policy has been adopted to ensure the timely replacement of ground
ladders.

POLICY


It is the responsibility of each Company Officer to assure the readiness of all equipment assigned
to their station. It is the duty of each employee to notify his/her supervisor of any damaged or
broken equipment found.


PROCEDURES

       A. INSPECTION

              1. All ground ladders shall be inspected at least once a month, and after each use.

                   (Refer to Operations Policy “Ground Ladder Inspection and Maintenance”)

       B. REPLACEMENT

              1. Ground ladders are considered essential to the equipment complement of an engine
                 or truck and defective ladders must be replaced immediately, or the apparatus taken
                 out of service. In addition to defects, any time the following criteria are met, the
                 ladder shall be taken out of service for testing if:

                                At any time a ladder is suspected of being unsafe

                                After the ladder has been subjected to overloading

                                After the ladder has been subjected to impact loading or unusual conditions
                                 of use

                                After heat exposure


 AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                               Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:              6/1/09       REVISION DATES:
                              OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                              TOPIC:         Ground Ladder Replacement

                              EFFECTIVE DATE:        06/22/09            DOC NO:       FF
                              CROSS REF:     OPS Policies: Ground Ladder Markings, Ground Ladder
                                             Maintenance and Testing

             2. Replacement ladders can be obtained from Old Station #36 using the following
                procedure:

                               Prior to taking a replacement ladder from the spare ladder cache, fill out
                                and attach a yellow out-of-service tag to the ladder in need of repair,
                                detailing the reason the ladder is considered out of service. Defects
                                should be clearly marked on the ladder

                               Fill out all requested information on the clipboard attached to the ladder
                                rack in the storage container

                               Take ladder from the cache to replace the damaged ladder

                               Send E-Mail to the “Ladder Group” detailing the actions taken and any
                                additional needs




AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                               Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:              6/1/09       REVISION DATES:
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Hydrant Inspection Program
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                  07/01/09                  DOC NO:       FF036
                          CROSS REF:             Usage of Recycled Water During Emergency Operations (FF
                                                 TB)




 INTRODUCTION

 The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District (SRVFPD) has implemented a fire hydrant
 inspection program that ensures hydrants are inspected semi- annually. The inspection process
 assures the SRVFPD that hydrants are inspected and work correctly.

 The SRVFPD Hydrant Inspection Program benefits the SRVFPD by enabling suppression crews
 to maintain and improve their knowledge of their first due areas in regards to hydrant
 locations and specific infrastructure intricacies, as well as ensuring hydrants are easy to locate
 and able to be accessed and opened when needed.

 East Bay Municipal Utilities District:

 East Bay Municipal Utilities District (EBMUD) provides a domestic water system, including fire
 hydrants, within District boundaries.

 EBMUD operates a fire hydrant Flow Test Program within the SRVFPD service area. The basis
 of the program is to measure water flow. Each EBMUD maintenance yard is responsible for flow
 testing a given number of hydrants annually and assists in updating the EBMUD flow test data.
 The SRVFPD uses this hydrant program to obtain accurate flow test data when determining fire
 flow requirements.

 EBMUD also provides supplies and, when needed, expertise and manpower to repair or improve
 hydrants that are defective due to conditions found which are beyond the scope of the inspection
 program.


 Dublin San Ramon Services District:

 The Dublin San Ramon Services District (DSRSD) provides a domestic water system, and a
 reclaimed/recycled water system, including fire hydrants within SRVFPD boundaries for the
 homes in the Dougherty Valley.

 PURPOSE

 The SRVFPD Hydrant Inspection Program helps to ensure that hydrants function in an adequate
 and reliable manner. The Inspection Program also meets the requirements of the Insurance

AUTHOR:      Darren Olguin, Captain                                                                        Page 1 of 6
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:         04/94                           REVISED DATE:    02/03, 03/06, 02/09, 07/09
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Hydrant Inspection Program
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                  07/01/09                  DOC NO:       FF036
                          CROSS REF:             Usage of Recycled Water During Emergency Operations (FF
                                                 TB)



 Services Organization (ISO) Grading Schedule which evaluates and rates an area’s water system,
 including hydrant inspection programs.

 POLICY

 It is SRVFPD policy to inspect fire hydrants semi-annually, utilizing methods that meet National
 Fire Protection Association (NFPA) guidelines as well as ISO grading criteria.


 PROCEDURE

       A. Hydrant Inspection Program:

          1. Approximately 6,000 hydrants are inspected semi-annually, excluding private
             hydrants. The Inspection Program consists of the following four priorities:

                   Fire Prevention requiring hydrant testing as a condition of “tentative tract
                    approval”

                   Reviewing of reports by the Hydrant Program Coordinator, from EBMUD and
                    from DSRSD regarding flow-testing in the SRVFPD

                   Annually, flow-testing a certain amount of randomly chosen hydrants throughout
                    the SRVFPD

                   Semi-annually, physically inspecting fire hydrants in the SRVFPD

          2. Quarterly, each officer will receive a packet with one or more maps. The maps
             contain hydrants within an area that are to be inspected. The packet also contains an
             index listing all of the hydrants on each map page. The index allows the officer to
             keep track of inspected hydrants as well as to keep notes regarding specific hydrants.
             A completed index must accompany the maps when turned in to Operations.

          3. The following tasks are performed during the first inspection:
                   Check for caps and chains
                   Ensure that the threads are brushed clean and are not burred. Do not use oils or
                    silicones of any kind on threads
                   Check to ensure the stem is operational and the hydrant body is not cracked

AUTHOR:      Darren Olguin, Captain                                                                        Page 2 of 6
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:         04/94                           REVISED DATE:    02/03, 03/06, 02/09, 07/09
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Hydrant Inspection Program
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                  07/01/09                  DOC NO:       FF036
                          CROSS REF:             Usage of Recycled Water During Emergency Operations (FF
                                                 TB)



                   Check for leaking around the flange stems that are stiff and/or will not turn
                    without force
                   Observe for missing flange bolts
                   Open the stem enough to ensure the hydrant is charged with water ("cracking the
                    stem")
                   Check hydrant isolation valve. Ensuring the street valve is open is the decision of
                    the officer if he/she determines there is a question whether the valve is completely
                    open

          4. The second inspection will focus on removal of weeds, access and blue dot
             replacement. The following tasks are to be performed during the second inspection:
                Clean and remove landscaping and dirt that impedes hydrant access
                Ensure that all hydrants meet SRVFPD Ordinance #22, Hydrant Obstruction
                 Notice Requirements

       B. Inspection Kit
          Captains are responsible for the proper equipment needed to maintain the hydrants. The
          following equipment must be carried in order to properly maintain a hydrant: loppers,
          hedge trimmers, hydrant wrench, metal wire bush, propane/MAPP® gas torch, reflector
          pads, & blue reflectors. This equipment is kept at the supply station and is requested as
          needed.

       C. Defects
          When hydrants are found with defects that are beyond the scope of maintenance as
          defined in this policy, officers shall note the defect(s) on the SRVFPD Hydrant Service
          Request form. The form shall be faxed to Support Services at the number indicated on the
          form. Defects will be assigned to SRVFPD Aides and scheduled for repair. Upon
          completion of repairs, officers will be notified of their completion. When noting defects,
          officers should attempt to describe the defect(s) as accurately as possible.

          If problems are discovered that need immediate attention, the SRVFPD will notify
          EBMUD or the DSRSD, depending upon hydrant location, via the Communications
          Center.




AUTHOR:      Darren Olguin, Captain                                                                        Page 3 of 6
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:         04/94                           REVISED DATE:    02/03, 03/06, 02/09, 07/09
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Hydrant Inspection Program
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                  07/01/09                  DOC NO:       FF036
                          CROSS REF:             Usage of Recycled Water During Emergency Operations (FF
                                                 TB)



       D. Flow Testing

          The SRVFPD flow-tests randomly selected hydrants as part of the Hydrant Inspection
          Program. Anyone requesting a hydrant flow test in addition to what the SRVFPD
          performs should be directed to the appropriate water provider, who will make the
          necessary arrangements to follow through on the test.

       E. Hydrant Data
          When a hydrant page is completed, the Assignment sheet shall be forwarded to the shift
          Battalion Chief. Battalion Chiefs will log it as received and forward it to the Operations
          Chief. Operations will then distribute to Geographic Information System (GIS) and data
          entry. All data gathered from the hydrant inspection records will be maintained in the
          Hydrant Records Management System.

       F. Mapping
          Hydrant maps are created in the SRVFPD GIS Mapping Division. The map pages are
          updated on a continuous basis and sent out quarterly. Any updates to maps will be used
          as a basis to make corrections on maps for the entire SRVFPD. EBMUD also provides
          the SRVFPD with hydrant maps which describe pipelines, hydrant numbers, and
          locations of valves and pressure zones.

       G. Hydrant Obstruction Ordinance
          Under the California Fire Code and SRVFPD Ordinance 22, the SRVFPD requires a
          homeowner to maintain a clearance of three feet around the circumference of a fire
          hydrant, except as otherwise required or approved by the Fire Chief.

          When the officer feels that landscaping may impede the use of the hydrant, the officer
          shall record the information and provide the homeowner with documentation of the
          violation. This information is provided on a Hydrant Obstruction Notice, which is a door
          hanger. The door hanger explains the ordinance and how to bring the hydrant area into
          correct compliance. Officers should insert their business card into the hanger to allow the
          homeowner to make contact with the SRVFPD, specifically the officer, who then can
          explain the obstruction and how best to mitigate the problem.

          Discretion should be used in the enforcement of the ordinance. Removal of weeds and
          minor pruning of non-ornamental plants can be done by the crews. Large-scale pruning or
          shrubbery that is obviously maintained in a professional manner should be referred to the
AUTHOR:      Darren Olguin, Captain                                                                        Page 4 of 6
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:         04/94                           REVISED DATE:    02/03, 03/06, 02/09, 07/09
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Hydrant Inspection Program
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                  07/01/09                  DOC NO:       FF036
                          CROSS REF:             Usage of Recycled Water During Emergency Operations (FF
                                                 TB)



          homeowner for correction. This may require the officer to follow up at a later date to
          verify compliance.

          The SRVFPD Hydrant Inspection Program provides an accurate process by which all
          hydrants within SRVFPD boundaries are inspected and are maintained in working order.
          The system also provides the SRVFPD with an inspection program that exhibits a
          commitment to the citizens by meeting the criteria within a level of service as designated
          by ISO and the NFPA.

          The SRVFPD Hydrant Inspection program explains the process of the hydrant inspection
          and the enforcement of District Ordinance 22. The SRVFPD works with the two water
          purveyors, and is committed to nurturing a productive relationship with the agencies.

       H. Recycled Water Systems

          Both EBMUD and DSRSD participate in the San Ramon Valley Recycled Water
          Program (SRVRWP) designated by purple hydrants, pumps, and piping. Recycled water
          is not drinkable, but it provides customers an alternative for construction and landscaping
          projects versus using more expensive potable water. The SRVRWP is in use in Danville,
          San Ramon, and Dublin. The entire system will eventually loop, encompassing San
          Ramon south back to the treatment center in Pleasanton. The entire system, which
          includes a treatment center, pump stations, piping and hydrants, is completely separate of
          the potable systems employed by both purveyors.

          The SRVFPD will not use the Recycled Water System for normal operations, which
          include training, hydrant inspection, placing blue dots, or flow testing.

          The SRVFPD will use the system only in the event of an emergency, and as a last
          resort. An example of emergency would be a fire with no other means of available water
          except the recycled water supply. The SRVFPD will rely on an officer’s experience and
          decision making ability to determine whether the recycled water system is needed. At no
          time can the recycled and domestic systems become interconnected.

       I. Exposure to Recycled Water

          Refer to FF Training Bulletin Usage of Recycled Water During Emergency Operations
          for more information on the Recycled Water System, including exposure reporting and
          decontamination of personnel and equipment.


AUTHOR:      Darren Olguin, Captain                                                                        Page 5 of 6
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:         04/94                           REVISED DATE:    02/03, 03/06, 02/09, 07/09
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                          TOPIC:          Hydrant Inspection Program
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                  07/01/09                  DOC NO:       FF036
                          CROSS REF:             Usage of Recycled Water During Emergency Operations (FF
                                                 TB)



                                                  GLOSSARY OF TERMS


 EBMUD - East Bay Municipal Utilities District is the water purveyor for the communities of
 Danville, San Ramon (except Dougherty Valley), Alamo, and Diablo.

 DSRSD - Dublin San Ramon Services District is the water purveyor for the Dougherty Valley
 and, specifically, the Windemere development area.

 Flushing Program/Unidirectional Flushing - A process in which the water supplier flushes
 underground water mains within a pressure zone. Unidirectional flushing is measured in miles of
 pipeline. Only state certified personnel may perform flushing and manipulate pressure zones,
 because of water quality and reliability issues.

 Flowing Hydrant - A term used by SRVFPD personnel meaning to remove the hydrant cap and
 open the stem slightly to ensure the hydrant is charged. The meaning is not actually accurate in
 that the hydrant does not flow large amounts of water because water suppliers and state water
 resources organizations prohibit untreated water from entering creeks and storm drains, except in
 firefighting conditions.

 Flow Testing -A program by which water suppliers and fire agencies obtain a measurable flow
 within a pressure zone. Flow testing hydrants is also performed to measure the capability of the
 water distribution system. Flow testing is restricted by clearance, landscape, and runoff issues
 related to the testing process.

 Exercising the Stem - To open and close hydrant valve stems to ensure they operate properly.

 Cracking the Stem - A term sometimes confused with flowing hydrants. Cracking the stem of
 the hydrant is a step in the inspection process in which the cap is removed from the outlet and the
 stem is cracked open enough to open the outlet. Water is expelled from the outlet, ensuring that
 the hydrant street valve (hydrant isolation valve) is open.




AUTHOR:      Darren Olguin, Captain                                                                        Page 6 of 6
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:         04/94                           REVISED DATE:    02/03, 03/06, 02/09, 07/09
                            OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Incident Command
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:             FF049
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District responds to a wide range of emergency incidents.
In order to effectively manage personnel and resources, as well as to provide for the safety and
welfare of personnel, we will operate within the Incident Command System (ICS) during the
following responses: fires, alarm soundings, auto accidents, and hazardous conditions. The
Incident Command System will also be used on medical emergencies and public service calls
when the response exceeds the first alarm assignment. Single Unit responses may not necessitate
the use of ICS (Captain’s discretion).

This procedure identifies the Standard Operating Procedures to be used in the Incident Command
System.

The purpose of the Incident Command System is to:
    •   Fix the responsibility for Command on a certain individual through a standard
        identification system, depending on the arrival sequence of members, companies, and
        Chief Officers.
    •   Ensure that a strong, direct, and visible Command will be established from the onset of the
        incident.
    •   Establish an effective incident organization defining the activities and responsibilities
        assigned to the IC and the other individuals operating within the ICS.
    •   Provide a system to process information to support incident management, planning, and
        decision-making.
    •   Provide a system for the orderly transfer of Command to subsequent arriving Officers.

The Incident Command System will address the following:
    •   Incident Command Responsibilities
    •   Incident Priorities
    •   Functions of Command
    •   Personnel Accountability
    •   Condition Reports
    •   Command Options
    •   Command Posts

 AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                              Page 1 of 13
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:                 FF049
                           CROSS REF:



   •   Transfer of Command
   •   IC and Operations Section Chief Roles and Responsibilities
   •   Radio Discipline
   •   Proper PPE

PROCEDURE

   A. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE INCIDENT COMMANDER

        The Incident Commander (IC) is responsible for safely managing the incident. The IC has
        the authority to turn their decisions into actions by using the ICS to formulate the
        Incident Objectives, Strategy(s) and Tactical Direction to those companies assigned to the
        incident.

        Incident Priorities:
             1. Remove endangered person(s) and treat the injured.
             2. Stabilize the incident and provide for life safety.
             3. Provide for the safety, accountability, and welfare of personnel (this priority is
                  on-going throughout the incident).
             4. Protect the environment.
             5. Property conservation.

   B. FUNCTIONS OF COMMAND

        The Functions of Command define standard activities that are performed by the IC to
        achieve the tactical objectives. The Functions of Command include:
             1. Establishing IC as named by Dispatch (and, if appropriate, a Command Post).
             2. Rapidly evaluate the situation (size-up) and provide a “Condition Report”.
             3. Initiate, maintain, and control the communications process.
             4. Identify the overall incident objectives and strategy.
             5. Assign companies and personnel consistent with incident priorities, plans, and
                standard operating procedures.

AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                  Page 2 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:                   FF049
                           CROSS REF:



             6. Request additional resources based on anticipated need.
             7. Establish and maintain personnel accountability.
             8. Develop an effective ICS organization that meets the needs of the incident
                (expand system to fill positions as needed).
             9. Review, evaluate, and revise (as needed) the incident objectives and plans.
             10. Provide for the continuity, transfer (as necessary), and termination of Command.

   C. ESTABLISHING COMMAND AND CONDITION REPORTS

        The radio designation "IC" will be used along with the assigned incident name (i.e.
        "Bollinger IC"). The first SRM member or unit to arrive at the scene shall establish
        Command. The initial IC shall remain in Command until the Command is transferred or
        the incident is stabilized and Command is terminated.

        As Command is established, an “Initial Condition Report” will be broadcast over the
        radio. This report will include:
             1. A brief description of the incident situation (i.e. building size, occupancy, hazmat,
                multi-vehicle accident, etc.).
             2. Obvious conditions (working fire, hazmat spill, multiple patients, etc.).
             3. Any obvious incident priorities (safety, rescue, exposures).
             4. Establishing IC and verbalizing they are switching to the assigned tactical channel
                (i.e. “Establishing Bollinger IC; switching to Tac 24).
             5. Additional resources needed (alarms or special resource requests).

        An “Updated Condition Report” will be provided based on further size-up, determination
        of necessary action, and any need for additional resources/alarms.

        “Enroute Condition Report(s)” are sometimes needed to update Dispatch report(s), based
        on observations while enroute to the incident. This may include a description of
        observations/conditions and any need for additional resources/alarms.

   D. COMMAND OPTIONS

        The first arriving SRM unit or member to establish Command of the incident has several
        options, depending on the situation.

AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                    Page 3 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:                   FF049
                           CROSS REF:




        One of the following Command Options will be used:

             1. Nothing Showing--Investigative Mode
                  These situations generally require investigation by the initial arriving Company
                  while other units hold at Level I Staging.

             2. Fast Attack Mode
                  These situations require the immediate action of the initial arriving Company and
                  require the Company Officer's involvement in the action. In these situations the
                  Company Officer leads their crew, to provide the appropriate level of supervision,
                  while utilizing a portable radio to remain in Command of the incident (Command
                  may be passed at the appropriate time).

                  Examples are as follows:
                       •   Critical life safety situations must be addressed immediately (i.e. rescue).
                       •   Offensive fire attacks.
                       •   Defensive fire attacks with immediate exposure threats.
                       •   Any incident where the safety and welfare of firefighters is a major
                           concern.
                       •   Obvious working incidents that require further investigation by the
                           Company Officer.

                  The Fast Attack Mode should not last more than a few minutes and will end with
                  one of the following:
                       •   Situation is stabilized.
                       •   Situation is not stabilized and the Company Officer must withdraw to the
                           exterior.
                       •   Command is transferred to another on-scene Company or Chief Officer
                           (who confirms the acceptance of IC).

             3. Command Mode

                  Certain incidents, by virtue of their size, complexity, or potential for rapid
                  expansion, require immediate strong, direct, overall Command. In such cases, the
AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                    Page 4 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:               FF049
                           CROSS REF:



                  Company Officer will initially establish an exterior, safe, and effective Command
                  Post, initiate the Command Mode and maintain in that position until Command is
                  transferred or terminated. If possible, an ICS 201 form should be initiated and
                  utilized to assist in managing these types of incidents.

                  If the Company Officer utilizes the Command Mode, the following options are
                  available with regards to the assignment of their remaining crew members:
                       •   The Officer may place their Company into action with its remaining
                           members. One of the crew members will serve as the acting Company
                           Officer. The collective and individual capabilities and experience of the
                           remaining crew will regulate this action.
                       •   The Officer may assign the crew members to work under the supervision
                           of another Company Officer.
                       •   The Officer may elect to assign the crew members to perform staff
                           functions to assist with Command, such as gathering information, filling
                           out the ICS 201, etc.


   E. ESTABLISHING THE COMMAND POST

        The first Chief Officer on the scene of an escalating incident should also establish a
        Command Post (CP). A CP in a vehicle, equipped for this purpose, provides appropriate
        work space for the IC and staff personnel, lighting, communications equipment, supply
        items, and some isolation from external distractions will make the Command more
        effective and enhance safety for the on-scene members.

        In the case of wildland fires, it may be necessary for the IC to initially remain mobile in
        order to determine the most effective strategies and develop the tactics needed to control
        the incident.

   F. COMMUNICATION GUIDELINES

        All members should eliminate all unnecessary radio traffic while responding to an
        incident, unless such communications are required to ensure that Command functions are
        initiated and completed. This requires the initial IC to give a clear condition report, as
        well as appropriate updates and resource requests. Minimizing radio traffic provides
        open radio time for potential critical situations.


AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                Page 5 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:                 FF049
                           CROSS REF:



        All personnel assigned to the incident shall use the designated Tactical Channel on their
        portable radio upon arrival at the incident (it is advantageous to monitor on the portable
        radio while enroute).

        On structure fires, the IC will request a “Personnel Accountability Report” (PAR) at 15-
        minute intervals to maintain accountability of companies operating at the scene. This is
        not required once the scene is stabilized. Dispatch is to prompt the IC to conduct these
        PAR Checks at these time intervals.

        A Primary and Secondary Search – “All Clear” on structure fires will be provided by the
        Company assigned to the search at the conclusions of the primary and secondary
        searches.

        “Contained” and “Under Control” fire progress conditions should be identified over the
        radio to Dispatch for time recording. “Contained” is when there is no forward progress
        of fire and “Under Control” is when the fire is extinguished and operations are shifted to
        overhaul.


   G. TRANSFER OF COMMAND

        1. Command is transferred to improve the quality of the Incident Command System and
           enhance the safety of the members assigned to the incident.

             The following guidelines outline the Transfer of Command:
                  •    The first SRM member arriving on the scene will automatically establish
                       Command. This will normally be a Company Officer, but could be any
                       member up to and including the Fire Chief.
                  •    The first arriving Chief Officer should assume Command, if they determine it
                       appropriate for the incident (after following the Transfer of Command
                       procedures).
                  •    Subsequent arriving personnel shall report to the IC for assignments.

             In certain situations, it may be advantageous for the initial IC (i.e. Company Officer)
             to transfer Command to the next Company or Chief Officer on the scene. In these
             instances, the first-in Company Officer (IC) should transmit over the radio their intent
             to have the next-in arriving Officer assume command upon their arrival. However,
             Incident Command must not be passed to an Officer who is not on-scene. The initial
             IC will retain command until the next-in Officer arrives and assumes command (i.e.
AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                  Page 6 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:                  FF049
                           CROSS REF:



             First-in Officer (IC) going inside a structure for fire attack/search & rescue and
             indicating their intent to pass command to next-in Officer, since it is difficult to fully
             manage a fire situation while engaged in an interior fire attack).

             When a Chief Officer arrives at the scene at the same time as the initial arriving
             Company Officer, the Chief Officer should assume IC of the incident, allowing the
             first-in Officer to work with their crew (providing the incident warrants it).

             The arrival of a ranking Officer on the incident scene does not mean that Command
             will automatically be transferred to that Officer. Command is only transferred when
             the outlined Transfer of Command process has been completed.

             Should a situation occur where a later arriving Company or Chief Officer cannot
             locate or communicate with the IC (after making radio attempts) and they determine
             appropriate, they should assume Command and announce the Transfer of Command
             (efforts must continue to be made to determine the status of initial IC).

        2. Transfer of Command will be regulated by the following procedure:
             a. The Officer assuming Command will communicate with the person being relieved
                by radio or face-to-face (face-to-face is the preferred method).
             b. The person being relieved will brief the Officer assuming Command indicating at
                least the following:
                  •    Conditions – general situation status, significant events, plan (IAP),
                       completed objectives, safety considerations.
                  •    Actions – assignments of companies and personnel.
                  •    Needs – for additional resources.
             c. A ranking Officer may elect to have a subordinate Officer continue the role of IC
                in cases where an individual is effectively managing an incident and satisfactory
                progress is being made to bring the incident under control. It may be desirable for
                that person to continue in an active IC role. In these cases, the arriving ranking
                Officer should assume a specific ICS supportive role in the overall Incident
                Command Structure by taking an assignment.
             d. The officer assuming command should broadcast over the radio of the transfer of
                command and provide an updated condition report as necessary.



AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                   Page 7 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:                 FF049
                           CROSS REF:



   H. CHIEF OFFICER RESPONSIBILITIES

        The response and arrival of additional Chief Officers on the incident scene strengthens
        the overall ICS. As the incident escalates, the IC should use these Chief Officers to fill
        various ICS positions. The priorities to fill these positions include: Operations, Safety,
        Divisions/Groups, Information Officer (IO), Plans, the task of Personnel Accountability
        etc. It is important the ICS expand as necessary to accomplish the overall objectives and
        the positions filled are done by need of the incident.

        In general, the first Chief Officer position to be filled after IC is the Operations Section
        Chief. The Chief Officer originally managing the incident as IC should assume the
        Operations Section Chief. This allows them to continue with their operational plan. The
        Chief Officer assuming IC will additionally be responsible for addressing District
        coverage issues and Personnel Accountability (unless delegated to someone else).

        Chief Officer’s assignments will be based on incident need, priority, and District
        coverage issues. Each incident is unique, therefore needs and priorities change. The
        flexibility in the use of Chief Officers is critical to appropriate resolution of the incident.

        All personnel assigned to the incident are to be in the appropriate Personal Protective
        Equipment (per Policy - Safety 6). An exception to the requirement of PPE would be if
        assigned/positioned at a Command Post remote from the incident.

   I. FIRE PREVENTION RESPONSIBILITIES

        On duty Fire Prevention Safety personnel upon the initiation of a second alarm wildland
        or third alarm structure fire, or when requested by a Chief Officer, or when Chief Officer
        staffing is reduced, may be utilized to fill various overhead and support positions. These
        positions will be determined by the incident IC, based on need and qualifications.

        The assigned on-duty Fire Prevention Inspector will respond upon request of the IC or
        Chief Officer.

   J. COMMAND TEAMS

        If an incident is expected to potentially exceed District Command resources and/or
        expected to last longer than one operational period, a Contra Costa County Incident
        Management Team (IMT) should be requested.

AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                  Page 8 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:               FF049
                           CROSS REF:



   K. BASIC LEVELS OF RESPONSIBILITY

        The basic ICS structure includes three levels:
             1. Strategic Level – Responsibility of the Incident Commander who has overall
                direction of the incident (if an Operations Section Chief is assigned, they are
                responsible for the management of all operations directly applicable to the
                primary mission).
             2. Tactical Level – Responsibility of Divisions/Groups to carry out the Tactical
                Directives issued by the IC or Operations.
             3. Task Level – Responsibility of Companies with assigned Task Objectives.

        The Strategic Level – involves the overall Command of the incident. The IC or
        Operations Section Chief (if established) is responsible for the Strategic Level of the
        Command structure. The strategic decisions are the basis for developing the Incident
        Action Plan (IAP), Command Organization, assigning all resources and establishing
        tactical priorities. The Strategic Level responsibilities include:
                  •    Determining the appropriate strategy – Offensive or Defensive.
                  •    Establishing an IAP for the incident.
                  •    Setting priorities.
                  •    Ordering and allocating resources.
                  •    Predicting/anticipating outcomes and planning.

        The Tactical Level – directs activities toward specific objectives. Tactical level Officers
        include Division and Group Supervisors, who are in charge of groups of resources.
        Tactical Level Officers are responsible for specific geographic areas or functions and
        supervising personnel assigned to them.

        The Task Level – refers to those activities normally accomplished by individual
        companies or specific personnel. The task level is where the work is actually done. Task
        level activities are routinely supervised by Company Officers.

   L.



AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                Page 9 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:                  FF049
                           CROSS REF:



        ICS - ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

        It is the responsibility of the IC to develop an organizational structure, using the ICS and
        standard operating procedures, to effectively manage the incident scene. The
        development of the organizational structure should begin with deployment of the first
        arriving SRM unit and continue through a number of phases, depending on the size and
        complexity of the incident. The ICS organization must develop at a pace which stays
        ahead of the tactical deployment of personnel and resources. In order for the IC or
        Operations (if established) to manage the incident, they must first be able to direct,
        control, and track the position and function of all operating companies. Building an ICS
        organization is the best support mechanism the IC can utilize to achieve the necessary
        balance between managing personnel and incident needs.

        1. Company Level
           On small incidents, the most basic Command structure combines all three levels of
           the Command structure: Strategic, Tactical and Task. For example, the Company
           Officer on a single engine response to a dumpster fire determines the strategy and
           tactics, and supervises the crew doing the task.
             The basic structure for a "routine" incident, involving a small number of companies,
             requires only two levels of the ICS structure. The role of the IC combines the
             strategic and tactical levels. Companies report directly to the IC and operate at the
             task level.

        2. Command Level
           As a small incident escalates, additional organizational support will be required. As
           additional ranking Officers arrive on the scene, the ICS organization may be
           expanded through the involvement of Chief Officers to fill Command and General
           Staff positions. Section Chiefs assist the IC with the overall management of the
           incident scene and operate at the Strategic Level (some Tactical Level for
           Operations). The IC implements Sections as needed, depending on the situation, and
           priority of needs.
             a. General Staff Positions:
                  •    Operations Section – is responsible for the management of all operations
                       directly applicable to the primary mission (implementing Incident Objectives,
                       Strategy and Tactical Directives).
                  •    Logistics Section – is the support mechanism for the organization. Logistics
                       provides facilities, services, and material in support to all the organizational
                       components involved in the incident.
AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                   Page 10 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:                 FF049
                           CROSS REF:



                  •    Planning Section – responsible for collection, evaluation, dissemination, and
                       use of information needed for effective decision making.
                  •    Finance Section – evaluates and manages the risk and financial requirements
                       for the Fire District's involvement in the incident.

             b. Command Staff Positions:
                  •    Safety Officer – to develop and recommend measures for assuring personnel
                       safety, and to assess and/or anticipate hazardous and unsafe conditions and/or
                       tactics.
                  •    Information Officer – responsible for developing and releasing information
                       about the incident to the news media, incident personnel, other appropriate
                       agencies, organizations, and the public on scene.
                  •    Liaison Officer – may be used in incidents that are multi-jurisdictional to
                       communicate needs and concerns among participating agencies.

        3. Division & Group Supervisors
           The IC or Operation Section Chief (if established), should begin to assign
           Divisions/Groups in establishing a manageable span of control of the incident, based
           on the following factors:
                  •    Situations which will eventually involve a number of companies or functions,
                       beyond the capability of IC or Operations to directly control. ICs should
                       initially assign Division and Group responsibilities to the first companies
                       assigned to a geographic area or function.
                  •    When the IC or Operations can no longer effectively manage the number of
                       companies currently involved in the operation.
                  •    When companies are operating from tactical positions which the IC or
                       Operations has little or no direct control over (i.e. out of sight).
                  •    When the situation presents specials hazards and close control is required over
                       operating companies for safety purposes (i.e., unstable structural conditions,
                       hazardous materials, technical rescues, etc.).
                  •    When establishing a Division or Group, the IC or Operations will assign each
                       a Division or Group Supervisor and provide them with: Tactical Directives, a
                       radio designation (Division A, Vent Group, etc.), the identity of resources
                       assigned to the Division and Group.


AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                  Page 11 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:             FF049
                           CROSS REF:



             Generally, Division and Group Supervisor responsibilities should be assigned early in
             the incident, typically to the first Company assigned to a geographic area such as
             Interior, Division A; or function such as RIC, Ventilation Group. This early
             establishment of Divisions or Groups provides an effective ICS organization on
             which the operation can be built and expanded.
             Normally, at this type of incident, a Company Officer can effectively supervise their
             own crew and direct and coordinate the efforts of one or two additional companies
             assigned to their Division or Group. As operations expand in complexity and size,
             and as additional Chief Officers become available, the IC or Operations should assign
             them to relieve Company Officers and assume Division and Group Supervisor
             responsibilities.

             The number of Division and Groups that can be effectively managed by the IC or
             Operations varies. In fast moving complex operations, a span of control of no more
             than five is appropriate. In slower moving less complex operations, the
             commander/supervisor may effectively manage more than five. If the number of
             Groups and Divisions are exceeding the span of control, Branches can be established.

             Division and Group Supervisor Officers are also responsible for communicating
             conditions, actions, and needs to the IC or Operations. Divisions and Groups reduce
             the overall amount of radio communications. Most routine communications within a
             Division or Group should be conducted in a face-to-face manner between Company
             Officers and their Division or Group Supervisor. This process reduces unnecessary
             radio traffic and increases ability to transmit critical radio communications.

             The safety of firefighting personnel represents the major reason for establishing
             Divisions and Groups. Each Division and Group Supervisor must maintain
             communication with assigned companies to control both their position and function.
             The Division and Group Supervisor must constantly monitor all hazardous situations
             and risks to personnel. The Division and Group Supervisor must take appropriate
             action to ensure that companies are operating in a safe and effective manner.

             Division and Group Supervisors can be Chief Officers, Company Officers, or any
             other qualified SRV member designated by the IC or Operations. The Division or
             Group Supervisor must be in a position to directly supervise and monitor operations.
             This will require the Division or Group Supervisor to be equipped with the
             appropriate protective clothing, portable radio(s) and equipment for their area of
             responsibility.

   M.
AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                              Page 12 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Incident Command
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05   DOC NO:               FF049
                           CROSS REF:



        EXPANDING THE ORGANIZATION

        1. Branch Directors
           Where the number of Division and Groups exceed the span of control that the IC or
           Operations (if established) can effectively manage or when incidents involve two or
           more distinctly different major management components (i.e. a large fire with a major
           evacuation, a large fire with a large number of patients). The IC may elect to assign
           Branch Directors as forward positions to coordinate the activities between Divisions
           and Groups. The Branch level of the organization is designed to provide coordination
           between the Divisions/Groups and Operations. Branch Directors supervise and
           manage a number of Division and Group Supervisors, and report directly to
           Operations.

             The following types of incidents are examples where Branch Directors should be
             utilized:
                  •  A Hazmat incident that requires a major evacuation.
                  •    A large scale incident spread over a wide geographic area.
                  •    An incident with mass casualties and a significant hazard (i.e. fire, Hazmat,
                       plane crash, floods, etc.).
                  •    Any incident where the number of Divisions/Groups exceed the span of
                       control that can be effectively managed by the IC.

             The radio designation of Branch Directors should reflect the function or geographic
             area of the Branch (i.e. Medical Branch, Law Enforcement Branch, Branch I, Branch
             II, etc.).




AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                Page 13 of 13
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      01/13/05          REVISED DATE:
                             OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:           Incident Risk Assessment

                             EFFECTIVE DATE:      03/26/09              DOC NO:
                             CROSS REF:     Rules of Engagement for Structural Firefighting (OPS FF
                                            Policy)



INTRODUCTION:

All emergency scene operations involve an inherent level of risk to firefighters. A basic level of
risk is recognized and accepted, in a measured and controlled manner, in efforts that are
routinely employed to save lives and property. These risks are not acceptable in situations
where there is no potential to save lives or property.
A higher level of risk is acceptable only in situations where there is a realistic potential to save
known endangered lives. This elevated risk must be limited to operations that are specifically
directed toward rescue and where there is a realistic potential to save the person(s) known to be
in danger.


A.     PURPOSE

       1.     The purpose of conducting a Risk Assessment is to identify scene hazards, evaluate
              “risk versus gain”, and limit the risk to personnel safety as much as possible.
              Strategic, tactical, and task level decisions will be based on the following objectives
              listed in order of importance:
                     life safety
                     incident stabilization
                     property and environmental conservation


B.     POLICY

       1.     All personnel shall make decisions at all incidents with these three priorities in order.
              To help assure that our personnel do not needlessly risk life or injury, the following
              three criteria shall be utilized to guide decision-making by all personnel on the
              emergency scene.
                     We will risk a lot to protect savable lives.
                     We will risk a little to protect savable property.
                     We will risk nothing to protect life and property already lost.




 AUTHOR:      Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations                                 Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         02/01/2009        REVISION DATES:
                            OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Incident Risk Assessment

                            EFFECTIVE DATE:      03/26/09              DOC NO:
                            CROSS REF:     Rules of Engagement for Structural Firefighting (OPS FF
                                           Policy)

      2.     No property is worth the life of a firefighter.

      3.     No risk to the safety of firefighters is acceptable in situations where there is no
             possibility to save lives or property.

      4.     The IC shall continually address Risk Assessment throughout all scene operations.
             This assessment shall include:
             a.      Ensuring that all hazards are identified and reevaluated on an ongoing basis.
             b.      Prioritizing the hazards in terms of severity and likelihood.
             c.      Communicating the hazards to all on scene personnel.
             d.      Taking measures to either mitigate the hazards and/or, where possible, prevent
                     personnel from being placed at undue risk/exposure to the hazards.




AUTHOR:      Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations                                 Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:         02/01/2009        REVISION DATES:
                             OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:           LIFE SAFETY HAZARD MARKING

                             EFFECTIVE DATE:     04/01/09               DOC NO:
                             CROSS REF:     ICS 420-1 Chapter 21 – Procedures for the Identification and
                                            Management of Life Hazard Zones



INTRODUCTION

Emergency personnel operating at emergency scenes continue to be injured or killed due to
insufficient marking of dangerous life safety hazards.

PURPOSE

This policy will help ensure the safety of emergency personnel while operating at the scene of an
emergency by providing a means of life safety hazard marking and abatement, as well as
emphasize the difference between Red or Red/White stripe “DANGER “ / “LIFE SAFETY
HAZARD” Tape compared to Yellow “CAUTION” / “FIRE LINE – DO NOT CROSS” Tape.

POLICY

Red “DANGER, or LIFE SAFETY HAZARD” Tape shall be used to mark LIFE SAFETY
HAZARDS. Emergency personnel ARE NOT to cross this Red tape barrier at emergency
incidents.

Red “DANGER or LIFE SAFETY HAZARD” Tape
is to be used only to identify LIFE SAFETY
HAZARDS.

Both the Incident Commander and the
Communications Center shall be notified when a
LIFE SAFETY HAZARD is found.

Personnel shall not breach, alter, or remove any
LIFE SAFETY HAZARD ZONE measures until
the hazard has been abated and approval granted by the Incident Commander.

PROCEDURE

1. The difference between Yellow “CAUTION” Tape and Red “DANGER / LIFE SAFETY
   HAZARD” Tape:

           Yellow “CAUTION” Tape shall be used to establish a “Public Exclusion Zone”



 AUTHOR:      Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations                                  Page 1 of 3
 REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         12/01/08          REVISION DATES:
                             OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:           LIFE SAFETY HAZARD MARKING

                             EFFECTIVE DATE:     04/01/09               DOC NO:
                             CROSS REF:     ICS 420-1 Chapter 21 – Procedures for the Identification and
                                            Management of Life Hazard Zones

Three (3) Horizontal Strands of Red “DANGER / LIFE SAFETY HAZARD” Tape shall be
used to establish a “LIFE SAFETY HAZARD Zone” where NO PERSONNEL may enter due to
imminent hazard(s).

2. Items that are considered “LIFE SAFETY HAZARDS” found on emergency scenes can
   include, but are not limited to:
           a. Ruptured gas lines
           b. Downed power lines
           c. Uncontrolled animals
           d. Hazardous materials
           e. Large holes (swimming pools, trenches, etc.)
           f. Unstable / uneven terrain
           g. Structural compromise
           h. Overhaul refuse area

3. Information to include regarding the LIFE SAFETY HAZARD when relaying the
   “EMERGENCY TRAFFIC” broadcast to the IC:
          a. Type / Nature of Life Safety Hazard
          b. Specific Location (Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, etc. side of the incident.)
          c. Additional resources needed (PG&E, PD, Animal Control, etc.)

4. When a LIFE SAFETY HAZARD is present at an incident, contact the Incident Commander
   (IC) and advise of the situation.
          a. The IC will inform the Communications Center of the life safety hazard.
          b. Communications will announce the hazardous condition to the responding units.
          c. Communications or the IC will obtain acknowledgement from the crews at the
              emergency scene.

5. Anyone finding a LIFE SAFETY HAZARD shall inform the IC and isolate and deny entry.

6. Red “DANGER / LIFE SAFETY HAZARD” Tape shall be used around the LIFE SAFETY
   HAZARD. The area around the hazard shall be of sufficient size to provide complete
   isolation, distance and protection from the hazard.

7. When staffing allows, place a sentry (i.e. Safety Officer, Firefighter, PD, PG&E, etc.) at the
   hazard.




 AUTHOR:      Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations                                  Page 2 of 3
 REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         12/01/08          REVISION DATES:
                             OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:           LIFE SAFETY HAZARD MARKING

                             EFFECTIVE DATE:     04/01/09               DOC NO:
                             CROSS REF:     ICS 420-1 Chapter 21 – Procedures for the Identification and
                                            Management of Life Hazard Zones



8. Red “DANGER / LIFE SAFETY HAZARD” Tape Removal
         a. Maintain the Life Safety Hazard Tape for the duration of the incident or hazard.
            Approval from the IC is required prior to the removal of the Life Safety Hazard
            Tape.

Notes:

    1. General Tape Placement Guidelines:

              a. When possible, tape should be fastened securely at a height of 36 – 48 inches
                 above ground level surrounding the hazard area.

              b. Three (3) Stripes of tape should be placed at 18 to 24 inch intervals for complete
                 exclusion from hazard area per FIRESCOPE ICS 420 (July 2007)

              c. Where possible (especially in low light situations) place cones, chemical lights,
                 and / or flashing strobe lights on the ground near the hazard area.

      2. Examples of Possible Uses:

              a. Ruptured gas line
                      Consider wind direction and low-lying areas
              b. Downed power line
                      Keep vehicles, equipment, and people at a safe distance with consideration
                        given to the potential of live wires recoiling and whipping.
              c. Uncontrolled animal
                      Place on fences or doors leading to animal location
              d. Large hole (swimming pool, trench, etc.)
                      Consider loose dirt or edge compromise
              e. Unstable / uneven terrain
                      Use to divert vehicles from traveling in particular areas
              f. Structure Compromise
                      1 ½ times the height of the structure
              g. Overhaul refuse area
                      Consider what will be thrown from elevation




 AUTHOR:      Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations                                  Page 3 of 3
 REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         12/01/08          REVISION DATES:
                            OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:
                                              Personnel Accountability – While Working
                                              in the Hazard Zone
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                        12/05              DOC NO:         FF043
                            CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District has adopted a Personnel Accountability Program
that utilizes a T-Card System and Personal Accountability Tags to account for personnel and
apparatus operating in the hazard zone. The hazard zone is defined as any area that requires an
SCBA, or in which a firefighter is at risk of becoming lost, trapped, injured, or when the Incident
Commander deems necessary. These tracking and control systems are divided into two levels:

       Level 1 – the basic system of using T-Cards.
       Level 2 – an enhanced system using both T-Cards and Personal Accountability Tags (PAT)
              (provides an additional level of accountability safety for the individual firefighter).

It is also important that there be an established standard operating procedure for firefighting
personnel working in the hazard zone as to how and when to conduct a Personnel Accountability
Report (PAR Check).


POLICY

   A. All Fire District Officers in the role of Incident Commander at a major incident are
      responsible for including accountability as a major element in strategy and attack planning
      and must maintain an accurate tracking and awareness of all personnel at the emergency
      scene. T-Cards will be utilized by the Incident Commander (IC) as soon as practical at
      multiple alarm incidents where personnel are operating in the hazard zone. All command
      vehicles will carry the T-Card nylon “sorter”.

   B. All Safety Personnel within the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District (career, as well
      as volunteer members) are responsible for their own personal safety and the safety of their
      assigned personnel. Each member shall maintain a constant awareness of the position and
      function of all personnel working with him or her, and inform their immediate supervisor of
      any situation(s) that could endanger them, violate policies or procedures, or endanger the
      public we serve.

   C. All staffed Fire District vehicles/apparatus subject to responding to emergencies within the
      San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District will carry an accurately completed T-Card at all
      times. It is the responsibility of the particular apparatus Captain or Staff vehicle driver to
      ensure that the T-Card which identifies them and their crew be kept accurate, complete, and
      in the proper location in their assigned vehicle at all times.

 AUTHOR:        Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                     Page 1 of 7
 REVIEWED:           Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:           Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                          01/99           REVISED DATE:   04/05, 12/05
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:
                                             Personnel Accountability – While Working
                                             in the Hazard Zone
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                        12/05              DOC NO:         FF043
                           CROSS REF:



  D. All fire suppression personnel within the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District will be
     issued two Personal Accountability Tags (PAT’s) to be utilized in Level 2 Accountability
     operations.

  E. Personal Accountability Reports (PAR Checks) will be conducted through the Incident
     Commander whenever one or more of the following situations occurs:
          •     At 15-minute elapsed time intervals, beginning with the initial “smoke or flames
                showing” report.
          •     A change from offensive to defensive operations.
          •     Any sudden hazardous event at the scene (e.g. flashover, partial collapses).
          •     Report of missing firefighters.
          •     At the time search and rescue teams report assignments complete (at this point, only
                take roll call and determine status of the search and rescue teams).
          •     At the time the Incident Commander reports the fire or situation under control.
          •     Anytime the Incident Commander initiates the call for a PAR.


LEVEL 1 ACCOUNTABILITY - PROCEDURES

  A. T-Card Completion and Placement:
      T-Cards will be carried in the plastic holder located on the Officer side of each apparatus.
      Stations with two companies or multiple vehicles will complete a T-Card for each apparatus
      and in some cases two cards may be completed for apparatus where cross-staffing occurs.
      All personnel changes require immediate updating, even if the change is only for a short
      duration. In the event that a reserve unit is put into service, or recall personnel staff a
      reserve apparatus, the cards will be completed as described. A supply of blank T-Cards
      should be maintained at all fire stations.

                T-Cards will be changed daily by the on-coming shift at shift change or
                whenever a personnel change occurs. T-Cards not used at emergencies and
                with no personnel changes, may be reused. It is imperative that these cards are
                completely filled out, legible and completed at 0730 hours.



AUTHOR:        Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                     Page 2 of 7
REVIEWED:           Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:           Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          01/99           REVISED DATE:   04/05, 12/05
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:
                                             Personnel Accountability – While Working
                                             in the Hazard Zone
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                        12/05              DOC NO:         FF043
                           CROSS REF:



  B. Operations and Use:
      At multiple alarm incidents, the Incident Commander is responsible for the tracking of
      personnel working in the hazard zone. Once a Battalion Chief assigned to the incident
      arrives and assumes command, the initial tracking of personnel will be done with the aid of
      the daily SunPro Roster. A written tracking system is important for ensured accountability.
      The IC will assign the collection of T-Cards as soon as practical. The IC may name this
      assigned person as an “Accountability Officer” or assign to the ICS position of Plans.
      Subsequent alarm units reporting to an established staging area or base will provide T-Cards
      to the Staging or Base Manager. It will be the responsibility of the Incident Commander
      or designate to verify the information completed on the T-Card(s).

  C. Organizing T-Cards:
      The nylon “sorters” may be used by Fireground Commanders to organize and secure the
      cards. T-Cards should be sorted by functional unit or by the location the resource is
      working. Location/functions are marked and separated by the gray header card.

  D. T-Card Types:

      Pink (ICS Form 219-3) One fully completed T-Card is required for each engine and truck
      company.

      Tan (ICS Form 219-8) T-Card is required for "miscellaneous equipment/task force": Also
      use the Tan T-Card for support equipment such as Rescue Medics, Water Tenders,
      Hazardous Materials, USAR, Breathing Support, Salvage, and Communications Support
      Units.

      White (ICS Form 219-5) T-Card is required for each person responding to an incident who
      is not assigned a primary resource such as an engine or truck company. These are overhead
      personnel such as Chief Officers, Training Officers, Inspectors or Administration.

      Gray (ICS Form 219-1) T-Cards are carried in all staff vehicles for the purpose of
      organizing the nylon T-Card sorter. These header cards are marked to reflect the different
      components of the scene organization. All four types of T-Cards will be carried in all
      Command vehicles.



AUTHOR:        Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                     Page 3 of 7
REVIEWED:           Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:           Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          01/99           REVISED DATE:   04/05, 12/05
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:
                                             Personnel Accountability – While Working
                                             in the Hazard Zone
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                        12/05              DOC NO:         FF043
                           CROSS REF:



  E. Pink and Tan Card Instructions:

      1. Agency: Enter "SRM" (the State designator for San Ramon Valley Fire District).

      2. ST and TF: Leave blank.

      3. Kind: (Pink) Enter "E" for Engine
               (Tan) Enter "T" for Truck; "R" for Rescue; "WT” for Water Tenders; "HM" for
                      Haz Mat, “USAR” for Urban Search & Rescue, “BS” for Breathing
                      Support, and “COMM” for Communications Support Units.

      4. Type: (Pink) Enter "1" for Type 1 Engines, etc.
               (Tan) Enter "1" for Type 1 Trucks, etc. (or leave blank if typing doesn't apply
                      to your apparatus).
               For "Type" descriptions of miscellaneous equipment, refer to ICS-420 Manual
                      (Field Operations Guide).

      5. ID No.: Enter Company/Apparatus I.D. Number (E-31).

      6. Order/Request No.: Enter "Order Request Number". This number should be given by
         Communications at the time of dispatch on mutual aid requests (if applicable).

      7. Day/Time Check-In: Leave blank (To be filled out by Check-In Recorder).
      8. Home Base: Enter "San Ramon FPD.”

      9. Departure Point: Enter "San Ramon" “Danville”, “Alamo.” and your station number.
         If you are dispatched to a rendezvous point as part of a Strike Team or Task Force, then
         enter that location in this space.

      10. Leader Name: Leave blank (Used for Strike Team assignments only).

      11. Resource I.D. Numbers/Names: Enter your Resource ID (examples: SRM, E31; and
          list personnel resources by rank, first initial, and last name).

  Note: Leave the rest of the card blank. Part of the front and part of the back will then be filled
  out on arrival at Base or Staging.



AUTHOR:        Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                     Page 4 of 7
REVIEWED:           Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:           Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          01/99           REVISED DATE:   04/05, 12/05
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:
                                             Personnel Accountability – While Working
                                             in the Hazard Zone
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                        12/05              DOC NO:         FF043
                           CROSS REF:



  F. White Card Instructions:
      1. Agency: Enter "SRM" (the State designator for the San Ramon Valley Fire).

      2. Name: Enter rank, first initial, and complete last name.

      3. Incident Assignment: Leave blank (To be filled out by Staging Manager).

      4. Order/Request No.: Enter "Order Request" number. This number should be given by
         Communications at the time of dispatch on Mutual Aid requests (if applicable).

      5. Day/Time Check-In: Leave blank (To be filled out by Check-In Recorder).

      6. Home Base: Enter "San Ramon”

      7. Departure Point: Enter "San Ramon" and your station number or bureau assignment. If
          you are dispatched to a rendezvous point as part of a Strike Team or Task Force, then
          enter that location in this space.

      Note: Leave the rest of the card blank. Part of the front and part of the back will then be
      filled out on arrival at Base or Staging.


LEVEL 2 ACCOUNTABILITY – PROCEDURES

  A. Implementation:
      The Level 2 Accountability procedures provide enhanced safety for the personnel operating
      within the hazard zone, and will provide the Incident Command a method to track and
      account for all personnel working within the hazard zone. When implementing the Level 2
      Accountability procedures, all personnel will be required to use a Personal Accountability
      Tag (PAT). (All personnel will also have a completed T-Card available.)

  B. PAT Placement - Apparatus and Turnout Jacket:
      All personnel riding on an apparatus will clip one of their PATs to the vehicle identification
      ring on the dashboard. The second PAT will remain on the split ring on the SCBA mask
      pouch.

AUTHOR:        Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                     Page 5 of 7
REVIEWED:           Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:           Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          01/99           REVISED DATE:   04/05, 12/05
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:
                                             Personnel Accountability – While Working
                                             in the Hazard Zone
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                        12/05              DOC NO:         FF043
                           CROSS REF:



  C. PAT Placement - Incidents:

      For a single company incident, the PATs are to remain on the apparatus dashboard and the
      Captain assumes crew accountability responsibilities. As the incident escalates, and after a
      Level 2 Accountability is implemented, all PATs will be delivered to the IC or
      Accountability Officer or Plans (if established), prior to entry into the hazard zone.

  D. Point of Entry Control:

      PATs will remain with the assigned officer who tracks personnel (IC, Accountability
      Officer, Plans) near the “Point of Entry” to the hazard zone. Upon entry, crews will turn in
      their PATs. Upon exit, the crew must retrieve their PATs. The assigned tracking officer
      will have in their possession only the PATs of those crews in the hazard zone.

  E. Rules of Thumb:
      Personal Accountability Tag implementation should consider the following basic rules of
      thumb:
      •   PATs must be maintained at the point of entry to the hazard zone.
      •   PATs must reflect only those personnel presently in the hazard zone.
      •   KNOW - Who went in, who came out.
      •   Crews must turn in their PATs upon entering and must retrieve their PATs upon exit
          from the hazard zone.



PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT (PAR CHECKS) – PROCEDURES

  A. Conducting PAR Checks:
      Are to be conducted at 15-minute intervals, for personnel accountability, of firefighters
      working in the hazard zone.

  B. Incident Commander (or Operations, if established):
      Responsible to account for all personnel. Contact by radio or face-to-face, each crew or
      division/group supervisor to account for their crews. After they account for all personnel,
      report the results of the Personnel Accountability Report (PAR Check) and provide a
      progress report of the incident to the Communications Center.

AUTHOR:        Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                     Page 6 of 7
REVIEWED:           Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:           Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          01/99           REVISED DATE:   04/05, 12/05
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:
                                             Personnel Accountability – While Working
                                             in the Hazard Zone
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                        12/05              DOC NO:         FF043
                           CROSS REF:



  C. Company Officers:
      Are to account for their crews visually, to make sure they are all safe and report to their
      immediate supervisor (IC, Operations, or Division/Group Supervisor) of their status, stating,
      “All personnel accounted for” (when PAR Checks requested).

  D. Communications Center:
      Notify the Incident Commander (IC) every 15-minutes, stating "Your incident has
      progressed fifteen minutes”.




AUTHOR:        Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                     Page 7 of 7
REVIEWED:           Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:           Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          01/99           REVISED DATE:   04/05, 12/05
                             OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Rapid Intervention Crew (RIC)
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                     01/08             DOC NO:         FF041
                            CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

Due to the risk of injury during structure fire operations, it has been recognized that a standard
procedure for the rescue of members operating at emergency incidents is necessary. This
procedure is intended to increase the overall level of safety for firefighters.

POLICY

It is the policy of the District that the Rapid Intervention Crew operational procedure establish a
standard procedure for deploying a fully equipped rescue crew (or crews) on-site, in a ready
state, to immediately react and respond to rescue injured or trapped firefighters. It meets the
requirements of 29 CFR 1910.134 and CCR, Title 8, Section 5144.

This crew shall be called “RIC” (Rapid Intervention Crew). They are generally put in place after
an initial 2-out crew (I-RIC) and provide an enhanced level of expertise, rescue equipment and
resources. Under normal circumstances, the second-due truck on the first alarm will provide the
RIC function. However, any company may be assigned as the RIC utilizing necessary equipment
from on scene units.

DEFINITIONS

    •   IDLH Environment (Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health) – An atmosphere that
        poses an immediate threat to life, would cause irreversible adverse health effects, or would
        impair an individual’s ability to escape from a dangerous atmosphere. Any structural fire
        beyond the incipient stage is presumed to be an IDLH atmosphere by OSHA.

    •   Interior Structural Firefighting – the physical activity of fire suppression, rescue or
        both, inside of buildings or enclosed structures which are involved in a fire situation
        beyond the incipient stage.

    •   Incipient Fire – The initial or beginning stage of a fire which can be controlled by
        portable fire extinguishers, Class II standpipe, or small hose systems without the need for
        protective clothing or SCBA.

    •   Two-In Crew (“Interior” Group) – A crew of two or more firefighters who enter an
        IDLH or potential IDLH environment to conduct firefighting operations wearing full PPE
        with SCBA.

    •   Two-Out Crew (“I-RIC” – Initial Rapid Intervention Crew) – A crew of two
        firefighters present outside the IDLH atmosphere in the initial stage of a structural fire
 AUTHOR:      Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                                  Page 1 of 5
 REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         05/98         REVISED DATE:   10/04, 02/05, 01/08
                            OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Rapid Intervention Crew (RIC)
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     01/08             DOC NO:         FF041
                           CROSS REF:



       attack; required to be established prior to interior operations by the Entry Crew in an
       IDLH atmosphere or potentially an IDLH atmosphere. The I-RIC must be properly
       equipped to initiate rescue and wearing full PPE with SCBA.

   •   Rapid Intervention Crew (“RIC”) – A dedicated crew of three or more firefighters
       deployed in a ready state, to immediately react and respond to rescue injured or trapped
       firefighters. They shall be equipped with the appropriate PPE, SCBA, and any specialized
       rescue equipment that might be needed, given the specifics of the incident.

PROCEDURE

   A. ESTABLISHING A RAPID INTERVENTION CREW (RIC)

        1. RIC Establishment: A RIC shall be established, as soon as possible and practical, on
           all working structure fires.

        2. IC Responsible: The IC shall be responsible for establishing a RIC.

        3. I-RIC, RIC Transition: On incidents where an I-RIC (Two-Out Crew) has been
           established, the IC or designee shall transition from the I-RIC to a full RIC as soon as
           possible and practical. All pertinent information shall be passed on to the RIC.

        4. Identifying and Communicating RIC: The IC shall assign and identify the “RIC”.
           This is to be communicated to Dispatch (i.e. “Podva IC, Truck 34 is RIC”).

        5. Multiple RICs: Additional Rapid Intervention Crews (RICs) may be added, due to
           the size of the building or complexity of the incident (i.e. “Division B RIC”, Division
           1 RIC”).

        6. Terminating RIC: The RIC function will continue until the incident has concluded
           or the IC determines that a RIC is no longer needed based on a hazard assessment.
           Consideration should be given to keeping the RIC operational in cases where active
           fire suppression operation have ceased, yet overhaul operations or other activities are
           being conducted in areas with potential hazards.


   B. RIC OPERATIONS

        1. PPE and SCBA: RIC shall wear full PPE with SCBA, and be prepared to affect
           rescue.
AUTHOR:      Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                                  Page 2 of 5
REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         05/98         REVISED DATE:   10/04, 02/05, 01/08
                            OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Rapid Intervention Crew (RIC)
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     01/08             DOC NO:         FF041
                           CROSS REF:




        2. RIC Briefing: The RIC Officer shall report to the IC or designated supervisor for a
           briefing on the incident. The briefing should include:
           • Incident objectives, strategy, and tactics
           • Current assignment of crews and their probable location
           • Building information
           • Known hazards


        3. Transfer from I-RIC: If an I-RIC (2-Out Crew) has been established prior to the
           RIC, the RIC Officer shall contact the I-RIC for a transfer of responsibilities and
           pertinent information.

        4. RIC Size-up: The RIC shall conduct a size-up of the structure/incident, to identify
           construction features, areas of involvement, potential hazards, location of personnel,
           and other relevant information. Immediate or subsequent actions may include:
           • Requesting additional resources and/or equipment
           • Identifying all hazards or potential hazards
           • Locate and secure all possible means of egress/ingress of structure.
           • Providing ladders needed for emergency egress from windows and/or roof
           • Removal of any barriers/obstacles to allow for rapid egress
           • Illuminating entrance and exits


        5. Equipment Assembly: The following equipment should be assembled and ready for
           immediate use by the RIC:
           • (2) RIC packs
           • (2) spare SCBA bottles
           • SCBA (complete pack)
           • Thermal Imaging Camera (with spare battery)
           • Hoseline
           • Chain saw
           • Circular saw (metal cutting capability)
           • Irons – Halligan/Flathead axe
           • (2) light boxes
           • Flashlights
           • Sledgehammer
           • Bolt cutters
           • Wire cutters
           • Trauma scissors
           • Door wedges
           • Any other necessary equipment

AUTHOR:      Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                                  Page 3 of 5
REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         05/98         REVISED DATE:   10/04, 02/05, 01/08
                            OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Rapid Intervention Crew (RIC)
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     01/08             DOC NO:         FF041
                           CROSS REF:




        6. Rescue Plan: Following the RIC size-up and equipment assembly, initial rescue
           concerns should be identified and an incident specific rapid intervention plan shall be
           developed.

        7. Accountability:
           • All RIC members shall have a portable radio and will carefully monitor the
             assigned tactical channel. One member of RIT has the dedicated responsibility to
             monitor all tactical radio traffic.
             •   A command staff person or designee will maintain personal accountability,
                 allowing the RIC to prepare for a rescue. Personnel accountability information
                 shall be given to RIC when necessary.


   C. ACTIVATION OF THE RIC FOR A RESCUE

        1. “Emergency Traffic” Transmission: The IC, designee, or interior crew needing
           assistance, should clear the tactical channel by announcing “Emergency Traffic”.

        2. Emergency Briefing: The IC or designee with the RIC Officer shall determine the
           fireground emergency, location, and number of firefighters before the RIC is
           activated.

        3. Radio Communications: The RIC shall utilize the original tactical radio channel to
           communicate directly with firefighters who may be trapped or injured and were
           already using that channel. An additional tactical channel should be implemented for
           other fireground operations. The IC will ensure that all tactical channels utilized at the
           incident are being monitored at the Incident Command Post.

        4. Additional Resources: The IC shall evaluate the need for additional resources based
           on the needs to mitigate both the fireground emergency and initial incident.
           Consideration should be given to requesting additional alarms and an ambulance for
           each firefighter who is trapped or missing.

        5. PAR Check: A PAR shall be conducted.

        6. Additional RIC(s): Additional RIC(s) shall be established and ready to relieve
           and/or augment the initial RIC. These additional RIC(s) may initiate rescue

AUTHOR:      Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                                  Page 4 of 5
REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         05/98         REVISED DATE:   10/04, 02/05, 01/08
                            OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Rapid Intervention Crew (RIC)
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     01/08             DOC NO:         FF041
                           CROSS REF:



             operations from a secondary means of egress and/or assist in removal of downed
             firefighters. One RIC must be available for deployment at all times.

        7. RIC Search Techniques: When searching for lost or trapped firefighters, the
           following should be considered:
             •   Knowledge of their last known location.
             •   Tracing attack hose lines into the area the firefighters were known to be.
             •   Evidence of building structures or locations that were last described by lost or
                 trapped firefighters.
             •   Listening for the sound of PDL and/or SCBA whistle.
             •   Sounds of shouts for help, tapping sounds, sounds of breathing, etc.
             •   Sounds of portable radio.
             •   Flashlight beam.
             •   Thermal Imaging Camera use.


   D. DOCUMENTATION AND INCIDENT REVIEW

        1. All circumstances related to RIC assignments shall be documented in the narrative
           portion of the incident report.

        2. The Operations Chief shall be responsible for conducting a post incident analysis with
           personnel involved when a RIC was activated for a firefighter rescue.




AUTHOR:      Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                                  Page 5 of 5
REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         05/98         REVISED DATE:   10/04, 02/05, 01/08
                             OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:           Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector
                                              Activations
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:               07/08         DOC NO:
                                            TB- Guidance for Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector
                             CROSS REF:
                                            Activations; TB- MiniMax XT Carbon Monoxide Monitor Use



INTRODUCTION

As emergency service providers, San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District (District) personnel may
encounter incidents involving carbon monoxide detector activations. A standardized procedure for
response to such incidents can provide for increased safety for both response personnel and the
community at large.

PURPOSE

To establish a guideline for the safe handling of a carbon monoxide detector activation incident.

POLICY

The specific actions taken by District personnel on a carbon monoxide detector activation should be
based upon the priorities of life/health, environment and property and within the training, capabilities
and the resources available for the incident.

PROCEDURE

Any units responding to a carbon monoxide alarm sounding should provide for their own safety
and the safety of civilians at the incident. Evaluation of the incident should be initiated to
determine the nature and severity of the incident. District personnel should determine if any
occupants are in need of medical care and take appropriate action. If possible District personnel
may further assess the situation using equipment that may be available to increase the overall
safety of the incident. District personnel should advise occupants of their findings. Regardless of
findings District personnel cannot “clear” a building for occupancy. Occupants should always be
advised to contact PG&E or the appropriate gas provider for follow-up if needed.




 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Captain – Haz Mat Specialist                                Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Michael Picard, Battalion Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         5/1/08           REVISION DATES:
                             OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:           Rules of Engagement for Structural
                                              Firefighting
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:           03/26/09         DOC NO:
                             CROSS REF:     Incident Risk Assessment (OPS FF Policy)




INTRODUCTION:

The District’s Policy on Operational Philosophy: Incident Risk Assessment addresses general
operations in an “All Risk” environment. This policy is specific to structural firefighting.
Remember, we will risk a lot to protect savable lives. We will risk a little to protect savable
property. We will risk nothing to protect life and property already lost.
Operations in abandoned and derelict buildings have proven to be particularly hazardous to
firefighters over many years. Unapproved modifications to the structure, removal and/or
disabling of built-in protection systems, and the potential impact from people occupying or using
the building without permission can result in increases to the fire load, significantly delayed
alarms, and the potential for catastrophic fire and structural conditions.


A.     POLICY

       1.     It is the responsibility of the IC to evaluate the level of risk in every situation.
              a. This risk evaluation shall include an assessment of the presence, survivability and
                 potential to rescue occupants.
              b. When there is no potential to save lives, firefighters shall not be committed to
                 operations that present an elevated level of risk.

       2.     All structural firefighting operations involve an inherent level of risk to firefighters.
              a. All feasible measures shall be taken to limit or avoid these risks through risk
                 assessment, constant vigilance and the conscientious application of safety policies
                 and procedures.

       3.     An incident command system shall be established, beginning with the arrival of the
              first Fire District Safety member at the scene of every structure fire.
              a. The IC must conduct an initial risk analysis to consider the risk to firefighters in
                 order to determine the strategy and tactics that will be employed.

         4. The responsibility for risk assessment is a continuous process for the entire duration
            of each incident.
            a. The IC shall continually reevaluate conditions to determine if the level of risk has
                changed and a change in strategy or tactics is necessary.
 AUTHOR:      Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations                                 Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         02/01/2009        REVISION DATES:
                            OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Rules of Engagement for Structural
                                             Firefighting
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:           03/26/09         DOC NO:
                            CROSS REF:     Incident Risk Assessment (OPS FF Policy)

             b. The IC shall assign one or more safety officers to monitor and evaluate conditions
                to support this risk analysis as soon as practicable.

      5.     It is accepted that firefighting has inherent risks; however, the exposure of firefighters
             to an elevated level of risk is acceptable only in situations where there is a realistic
             potential to save known endangered lives.

      6.     Firefighters shall not be committed to interior offensive firefighting operations in
             abandoned or derelict buildings that are known or reasonably believed to be
             unoccupied.
             a.       Exception: When a thorough size-up and a Risk Assessment have been
                     conducted and a determination has been made that the hazards from the building
                     contents and the condition of the structure are minimal and manageable, interior
                     operations may be conducted.
             b.       Most vacant buildings are not “abandoned or derelict.”
             c.       Station personnel should submit information regarding abandoned or derelict
                      buildings for inclusion in the CAD database.

      7.     A Risk Assessment shall occur in every incident and shall include at a minimum:
             a.        Building Characteristics:
                         Construction type and size
                         Structural condition
                         Occupancy and contents
             b.          Fire Factors
                            Location and extent of the fire
                            Estimated time of involvement
                            What are the smoke conditions telling us
                         Risk to Building Occupants
                           Known or probable occupants
                           Occupant survival assessment
             c.        Firefighting Capabilities
                          Available resources
                          Operational capabilities and limitations




AUTHOR:      Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations                               Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:         02/01/2009        REVISION DATES:
                            OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:
                                            San Ramon Regional Medical Center Fire
                                            Response Procedures
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:             05/06                    DOC NO:           FF016
                            CROSS REF:     FF049, FF052



INTRODUCTION

The San Ramon Regional Medical Center (SRRMC) is a fully sprinklered facility with Type I
construction. Historical information on fire incidents in modern medical care facilities and response
levels from other fire agencies indicate there are no major life safety issues in medical facilities built
to modern fire and building codes and ordinances. Built-in mitigation and detection systems coupled
with Type I construction serve to both check and contain fires. While fire is still an issue, the major
focus is on life safety.


PURPOSE

This document provides information that outlines procedures implemented to address the unique
aspects of responding to SRRMC.


POLICY

The District provides a well-coordinated response to incidents at SRRMC.


PROCEDURE

Alarms may be silenced but not reset before District personnel investigate and visually inspect the
zone in which the alarm is sounding. Hospital staff shall not be allowed to reset the alarm until
District personnel have completed their investigation.

District personnel must determine that there is no fire or other emergency prior to declaring the
situation under control and turning the facility over to hospital staff.

Due to the complex nature of this building and the elevated life safety issues, the first-in
Captain/Incident Commander must provide a clear condition report and implement the Incident
Command System. As a building engineer is not always on site to assist in quickly locating problem
area(s), it is imperative that the first-in officer aggressively attempt to locate the problem area(s) and
determine resource needs.

The first arriving crew in full protective clothing and air packs will report to the emergency room
entrance, which is the closest entry to the location of the Fire Control Panel. They will then proceed
to the annunciator panel at the admitting clerk's desk in the emergency room and determine the
location of the reported fire.
 AUTHOR:      Mike Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                                   Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Mike Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         07/93       REVISED DATE:   10/95, 03/06
                            OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:
                                            San Ramon Regional Medical Center Fire
                                            Response Procedures
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:             05/06                    DOC NO:         FF016
                            CROSS REF:     FF049, FF052




The crew will then:
  A. Communicate the information to the Communications Center and give a brief, updated
      condition report.

   B. Open the Medco box located near the annunciator panel to obtain the hospital master and
      elevator keys contained inside the lock box. The incident commander shall maintain custody
      of these keys and distribute as necessary.

   C. Captain/Incident Commander and firefighter meet with a representative from the hospital
      whose assignment is to act as the crew's guide and proceed to the reported alarm location.

   D. The engineer relocates the apparatus to the closest exterior door to the reported incident and
      stands by for future instructions.

   E. Second arriving unit, Captain and Firefighter, will proceed to the annunciator panel to
      provide support and feedback to the crews investigating the alarm.

   F. Upon arrival, all other units will level one stage.

   G. When the Captain/Incident Commander and crew arrive at the reported location, an updated
      report on conditions will be given.

   H. Contact will be established with the duty-building engineer and charge nurse, if available.

   I. Based on the extent of the fire, and in conjunction with the building engineer and charge
      nurse, the Captain/Incident Commander will determine the need for patient movement.

   J. If patient(s) must be moved, the Captain/Incident Commander will work with the building
      engineer and charge nurse to develop a plan to move the effected patient(s).

   K. The plan and resource requirements will be communicated to all personnel assigned to the
      response.

   L. Fire control and extinguishment measures may also take place during this time period.

   M. Additional units and resources will be assigned as necessary. This may be in the form of
      personnel for evacuation, hose lays, smoke removal, or control of the sprinkler systems.

   N. When appropriate, transfer of the Incident Command may take place.
 AUTHOR:      Mike Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                                 Page 2 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Mike Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         07/93       REVISED DATE:   10/95, 03/06
                             OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:           SCBA Company Identifiers

                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                      8/19/09   DOC NO:
                             CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION
Personnel accountability on the emergency scene is vital to ensure the safety and well being of
each person on an incident as well as an entire fire company. This policy outlines an
accountability aid that provides a universal and clear method of identifying San Ramon Valley
Fire Protection District (SRVFPD) members wearing a self-contained breathing apparatus
(SCBA).

INFORMATION

There are numerous methods and procedures available for individual personnel to identify
themselves and their company assignment: name on the lower rear panel of turnout jacket, name
on the back of helmet, employee number on helmet shield, removable apparatus identifiers
attached to the shield of the helmet. History has proven that these identifiers are not always the
best method for accountability in that their visibility is hampered by distance or position of the
person or that the proper identifier has not been applied or changed.

POLICY

All in-service self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBAs) shall be equipped with accurate
company or radio call number identifiers visible on the front and rear of the SCBA.

RESPONSIBILITY

Each person using an SCBA shall ensure that the SCBA assigned to them on the vehicle has the
proper color and numbered identifier correctly installed at the start of each shift, during a
replacement of a vehicle, and any time after the SCBA has been used and is being returned to
service.

PROCEDURE

A. IDENTIFIER PLACEMENT
     1. Two small SCBA identifier bands shall be
        attached with Velcro® in a wrap around fashion
        on the right and left front shoulder straps (one
        identifier per shoulder strap).




 AUTHOR:      Mike Picard, Battalion Chief – Special Operations                       Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         6/26/09           REVISION DATES:
                             OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:           SCBA Company Identifiers

                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                      8/19/09   DOC NO:
                             CROSS REF:

         2. One large SCBA identifier shall be attached to the rear
            adjustable SCBA cylinder strap.
                  a. Loosen cylinder strap and slip back side of
                     identifier down to the fold between the cylinder
                     and the strap, fold front of the identifier over the
                     strap and attach with Velcro® below the strap.

B. IDENTIFIER CONSTRUCTION
     1. Material is black Kevlar®/Nomex® with Velcro® for attachment. Stripes, letters and
        numbers are highly reflective bright color against black background.

C. IDENTIFIER FORMAT AND COLOR CODE
     1. For vehicles with >1 SCBA, the identifiers are labeled with the identifying letter and
        number of the vehicle to which the SCBA is assigned (Example E31 for Engine 31,
        or HM35 for the HazMat vehicle). For single resources, the identifier is labeled with
        the person’s radio call number (Example: 3100 for the Fire Chief).
     2. SCBA identifiers have reflective stripes, letters, and numbers which are color coded
        by rank:
              a. Chief Officer: White
              b. Company Officer: Red
              c. Engineer, Firefighter: Yellow

D. VEHICLE OUT OF SERVICE
     1. If a vehicle is removed from service for maintenance, training or other reason and is
        replaced with a reserve vehicle, remove the identifier(s) from the SCBA(s) on the out
        of service vehicle and place them on the SCBA(s) of the in service vehicle to
        maintain appropriate company/resource identification.

E. SCBA OUT OF SERVICE
      1. If an SCBA is damaged and/or removed from service and a replacement SCBA is
         placed in service on the vehicle, remove the identifiers from the out of service SCBA
         and place them on the replacement SCBA as described in Procedure A, 1 - 2.

F. LOST OR DAMAGED IDENTIFIER
      1. If an identifier is soiled or damaged, care shall be taken to properly clean it or have it
         repaired. If unable to accomplish this or if the identifier is missing from the SCBA,
         notify the on duty Battalion Chief (BC) who shall make arrangements to have the
         identifier(s) replaced. The SCBA may remain in service until the identifier is
         replaced; however, if a vehicle has an extra SCBA with all three identifiers, that
         SCBA or its identifiers will be used until replacement identifier(s) are supplied.

 AUTHOR:      Mike Picard, Battalion Chief – Special Operations                       Page 2 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         6/26/09           REVISION DATES:
                            OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Sprinklered Buildings Response
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                    8/05/05          DOC NO:         FF024
                            CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

The following procedures are to be followed when responding to reported fires or alarms at
sprinklered buildings.

PROCEDURE

    A. Upon arrival at a sprinklered building, if there is smoke showing, the first in engine will
       spot for best access and an engine from the first alarm shall be assigned by the IC to locate
       and respond to the fire department connection (refer to Target Information plan).

    B. If BASE is established, the engine may be directed to offload equipment first. Once the
       assigned engine arrives at the fire department connection, the engineer will establish a
       supply, connect one 2 ½” line to the fire department connection, and ensure that the post
       indicator valve is in the open position. The line will not be charged until the order is given
       by the Incident Commander. The remainder of the engine crew will report to the Incident
       Commander for assignment with SCBA’s and appropriate equipment. The engineer at the
       fire department connection will inform the Incident Commander when ready to supplement
       sprinkler systems.

    C. The Incident Commander, after conferring with Operations, Interior, or Fire Attack, will
       determine the necessity of charging the sprinkler system.

    D. Once the order is given to charge the fire department connection, the engineer will pump the
       single 2 ½” line at 150 psi. An additional 2 ½” line will then be connected to the fire
       department connection and charged as necessary. (Some locations, such as the SBC
       building, use a single 4” fire department connection.) Operations will monitor effectiveness
       of sprinklers/standpipes and direct the adjustment of pump pressure as necessary (elevation,
       etc.).

    E. The fire department connection will be shut down only upon the order of the Incident
       Commander.

Note: It has been discovered that post indicator valves controlling fire department connections
may also control (near- by) private hydrants. Attack lines should not be supplied by the same
hydrant as the fire department connection unless necessary. Make all attempts to use EBMUD
hydrants to supply attack lines.




 AUTHOR:      Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                                Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      03/28/01          REVISED DATE:   07/22/05
                            OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:
                                            Structural Firefighting – 2 in / 2 out
                                            Requirement
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                     10/04       DOC NO:           FF042
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The safety of Firefighters is a primary concern at all incidents. The rescue of trapped, injured,
and/or lost firefighters is especially time sensitive. An immediate and organized response must
be implemented to take advantage of the very limited survivable time element.

The Code of Federal Regulations (29 CFR 1910.134; www.osha.gov) and the California Code of
Regulations (CCR, Title 8, Section 5144; www.dir.ca.gov) specifically address the use of
respirators in Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) atmospheres, including interior
structural firefighting. In these atmospheres, it requires that firefighters use a Self Contained
Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) and that a minimum of two firefighters work as a team inside the
structure with a minimum of two firefighters on standby outside the IDLH atmosphere to provide
assistance or initiate rescue. This is known as the “2-In/2-Out” Regulation.

Standard Exceptions to the requirement of having a 2-Out crew are:

    1. When there is a reported or suspected life hazard where immediate action could prevent
       the loss of life (defined as a “known rescue”).

    2. When the fire is in an incipient stage that could be controlled by a portable fire
       extinguisher, without the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) or SCBA.


DEFINITIONS

    •   IDLH Environment (Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health) – An atmosphere that
        poses an immediate threat to life, would cause irreversible adverse health effects, or would
        impair an individual’s ability to escape from a dangerous atmosphere. Any structural fire
        beyond the incipient stage is presumed to be an IDLH atmosphere by OSHA. Attic Fires
        can potentially cause an IDLH atmosphere even though the building may initially be clear
        of smoke. If it is beyond the incipient stage, it is presumed to be IDLH and therefore
        appropriate PPE with SCBA and a 2-Out crew (I-RIC) are required.

    •   Interior Structural Firefighting – the physical activity of fire suppression, rescue or
        both, inside of buildings or enclosed structures which are involved in a fire situation
        beyond the incipient stage.



 AUTHOR:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                           Page 1 of 5
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         12/98         REVISED DATE:   10/04
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:
                                           Structural Firefighting – 2 in / 2 out
                                           Requirement
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     10/04       DOC NO:          FF042
                           CROSS REF:



   •   Incipient Fire – The initial or beginning stage of a fire which can be controlled by
       portable fire extinguishers, Class II standpipe, or small hose systems without the need for
       protective clothing or SCBA.

   •   Two-In or Entry Crew (“Interior” Group) – A crew of two or more firefighters who
       enter an IDLH or potential IDLH environment to conduct firefighting operations wearing
       full PPE with SCBA.

   •   Two-Out Crew (“I-RIC” – Initial Rapid Intervention Crew) – A crew of two
       firefighters present outside the IDLH atmosphere in the initial stage of a structural fire
       attack; required to be established prior to interior operations by the “2-In Crew” in an
       IDLH atmosphere or potentially an IDLH atmosphere. The I-RIC must be properly
       equipped to initiate rescue, wearing full PPE with SCBA.

   •   Rapid Intervention Crew (RIC) – A dedicated company of two or three personnel, with
       specialty training and specialty equipment, assigned to an incident to relieve the I-RIC,
       while maintaining “2-In/2-Out” requirements.

   •   Known Rescue – If, based on Dispatch reports, scene reports, and/or size-up indicators,
       there is reason to believe an imminent life-threatening situation exists, where immediate
       action may prevent the loss of life or serious injury, the requirements for the 2-Out crew
       (I-RIC) may be suspended. This exception is based on a reasonable belief of a probable
       rescue, not for standard search and rescue activities. Deviations from the requirements of
       a 2-Out crew must be exceptions and not standard practices (interpretation from
       IAFF/IAFC 2 In/2 Out Questions and Answers document, IAFC July 14, 2002 and OSHA
       Standard Interpretations, letter dated December 15, 1998, titled “Respiratory Protection
       Standard Two-In/Two Out”).

PROCEDURE

   A. ENTRY INTO IDLH ENVIRONMENTS (2-IN CREW)

        1. PPE & SCBA: All firefighters entering an IDLH environment or potential IDLH
           atmosphere, shall wear the appropriate PPE with SCBA.

        2. Buddy System: Anytime personnel enter an IDLH environment, there shall be two
           or more firefighters working together as a crew.


AUTHOR:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                          Page 2 of 5
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         12/98         REVISED DATE:   10/04
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:
                                           Structural Firefighting – 2 in / 2 out
                                           Requirement
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     10/04       DOC NO:           FF042
                           CROSS REF:



        3. Crew Contact: Entry Crew firefighters must maintain voice, physical or visual
           contact between each other at all times when in an IDLH environment. Radio
           communication cannot be used as the primary method of communicating between
           Entry Crew members.

        4. Tac Radio: Each Entry Crew firefighter shall have a portable radio that is set on the
           designated Tactical Channel for the incident.

        5. 2-Out Crew (I-RIC) Present: Before an Entry Crew enters into an IDLH
           environment, there must be at least two firefighters, wearing full PPE with SCBA,
           positioned outside the IDLH atmosphere to provide “2-Out” coverage (designated I-
           RIC).

        6. Identifying and Communicating I-RIC: The IC shall assign and identify the I-RIC.
           This is to be communicated to the Communications Center (i.e. “Podva IC, E38 is I-
           RIC”), or to a Chief Officer on scene who will be assuming IC.

        7. Outside Operations: If there is initially only one engine on scene and therefore no
           2-Out crew, operations outside of the IDLH atmosphere shall begin immediately.
           Such operations may include, “walk-around” for size up, deployment of hoseline,
           control of utilities, ladder placement, exposure protection, other exterior fire control
           efforts, etc.

   B. I-RIC (2-OUT CREW)

        1. PPE and SCBA: I-RIC shall wear full PPE with SCBA, and be prepared to affect
           rescue. A hoseline, flashlights, and a Thermal Image Camera should be deployed as
           minimal equipment. Other equipment may include miscellaneous forcible entry tools,
           rope bag, etc.

        2. Monitoring: At least one member of I-RIC shall be responsible for monitoring and
           accounting for the status of the Entry Team operating in an IDLH atmosphere. They
           shall remain in radio, visual, voice, or lifeline communications with the Entry Team
           at all times when they are in an IDLH atmosphere (until reassigned by the IC).

        3. Other Roles: Another member of I-RIC is permitted to function in other roles or
           complete other tasks, however the assigned task must be of such nature that it can be
           abandoned without placing any other firefighters at additional risk if rescue or other
AUTHOR:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                           Page 3 of 5
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         12/98         REVISED DATE:   10/04
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:
                                           Structural Firefighting – 2 in / 2 out
                                           Requirement
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     10/04       DOC NO:           FF042
                           CROSS REF:



            assistance is needed. These roles may include utilities, pulling back-up lines, setting
            blowers, ladders, etc. An Engineer on the Attack Engine is a critical role and should
            not be used to fill an I-RIC position.

        4. Objective: The objective of I-RIC is to provide for firefighter accountability and
           rescue from the time of initial deployment of firefighters into the IDLH atmosphere
           until a more fully equipped RIC is established. A RIC will be implemented on all
           working structure fires as soon as practical.

        5. I-RIC to RIC Transfer: Once RIC has been assigned, a transfer of responsibility
           between I-RIC and RIC must occur. This transfer shall also include providing all
           pertinent information to the RIC. The Incident Commander will be notified of the
           transfer of responsibility and may reassign the I-RIC to another mission.

   C. VICTIM RESCUE

        1. Rescue Action: If, based on Dispatch reports, scene reports, and/or size-up
           indicators, there is reason to believe an imminent life-threatening situation exists,
           where immediate action may prevent the loss of life or serious injury, the
           requirements for the 2-Out crew (I-RIC) may be suspended.

        2. Communications Center Notification: Whenever an Entry Team enters into an
           IDLH atmosphere without an I-RIC, the Communications Center shall be notified
           prior to entry. The Entry Team shall report to the Communications Center that they
           are making an entry for “Rescue.”

        3. No Rescue Indicators: If, based on dispatch reports, scene reports, and/or size up
           indicators, there is no reason to believe an imminent life-threatening situation exists,
           I-RIC shall be initiated prior to entry.

   D. DOCUMENTATION AND INCIDENT REVIEW

        1. Memorandum: Whenever entries into IDLH atmospheres are done without the
           assignment of I-RIC, the officer making the decision shall include sufficient detail in
           his/her incident narrative explaining the circumstances and justification for such
           action.


AUTHOR:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                           Page 4 of 5
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         12/98         REVISED DATE:   10/04
                           OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:
                                           Structural Firefighting – 2 in / 2 out
                                           Requirement
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     10/04       DOC NO:         FF042
                           CROSS REF:



        2. Investigation: The Operations Assistant Chief shall conduct an After Action Review
           whenever an Entry Crew enters into an IDLH atmosphere prior to the arrival and
           assignment of I-RIC. The findings will be provided to the Fire Chief.

        3. Record Keeping: The Operations Assistant Chief shall maintain all records relating
           to incidents where an Entry Crew made entry prior to establishing an I-RIC. These
           records will be used to review policy effectiveness and compliance.




AUTHOR:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                         Page 5 of 5
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         12/98         REVISED DATE:   10/04
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Structure Fire Response Procedures
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                     01/08              DOC NO:         FF005
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

Organizing individual fire companies into grouped, tactical units, provides for the more efficient
and effective use of personnel and equipment on structure fire incidents.


POLICY

The standard operation of these tactical units includes placing one engine at the hydrant to provide
the maximum volume of water flow (water supply engine). Another engine (attack engine) and
truck are positioned at the fireground. The attack engine and truck must be positioned or spotted
with consideration of providing for actual or potential tactical advantage. Companies operating in
this manner can quickly apply 1000 gpm or more to the fire. An additional engine is provided for
the initial Rapid Intervention Crew (2-In, 2-Out).

Once the attack engine is in position on the fire ground, the supply engine proceeds to lay a four
inch line from the attack engine to the primary hydrant, which will provide an adequate volume of
water supply (reverse lay). The truck company is supplied by the attack engine with its role
primarily being defensive.

This policy does not preclude the attack engine from obtaining their own water supply, when
appropriate, or from extending a forward lay when conditions or circumstances dictate.

Upon arrival at the scene, the first in officer shall provide an “Initial Report on Conditions” and
establish Command. Tactical priorities are based on life safety, fire control, and property
conservation. The order of priorities is Rescue, Exposures, Confinement, Extinguishment, and
Overhaul; supported by Ventilation and Salvage Operations.




 AUTHOR:      Bert Byers, Battalion Chief                                                    Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      06/10/03         REVISED DATE:   04/05, 11/07
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Vegetation Fire Response Procedures
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                     11/07       DOC NO:             FF007
                            CROSS REF:     GenOPS009



INTRODUCTION

San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District is located in a part of the world that has experienced
some of the most devastating vegetation fires in history. For that reason, the philosophy of the San
Ramon Valley Fire Protection District is to fight vegetation fires aggressively, while providing for
the highest degree of safety for our personnel and the community that we serve. The protection of
life and prioritizing values at risk are the primary goals when immediate control is not possible.

PURPOSE

It is the purpose of this document to state the policy and the guidelines to assist District personnel
in preparing for and responding to vegetation fires.

POLICY

Upon a report of a vegetation fire, the appropriate apparatus will be dispatched to the reported
location (refer to policy Gen Ops 009 -Apparatus by Call Type).
Upon the need for additional resources, alarms may be added. Also, CALFIRE shall be notified
and response requested on all second alarm vegetation fires.

PROCEDURE

    A. The first arriving officer has certain responsibilities. The officer must complete the following:
         1. Establish Incident Command;
         2. Give a clear/ concise condition report, which consists of the following:
              a.   size of area involved,
              b.   type of fuel burning,
              c.   slope of terrain,
              d.   rate of spread,
              e.   any exposure problems present or projected;
         3. Formulate an action plan, which considers the following key factors: FUEL,
            WEATHER, TOPOGRAPHY, and VALUES at RISK;
         4. Call for additional resources, as needed, and give assignments to the incoming units.

    B. All personnel must exercise the Look out, Communication, Escape routes, Safety zones
       (LCES) guidelines to provide for safety and maintain a high state of situational awareness
 AUTHOR:      Mike Brown, Battalion Chief                                                 Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        04/06          REVISED DATE:   11/07
                            OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                           TOPIC:           Vegetation Fire Response Procedures
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     11/07       DOC NO:              FF007
                           CROSS REF:     GenOPS009



        while on the fire line. Personnel should frequently assess the current and expected fire
        behavior and be prepared to react quickly and decisively. Also, a high level of
        communication shall be maintained between all personnel assigned to the fire.

   C. Whenever possible a direct attack is the best tactic used for vegetation firefighting, if
      conditions allow. By using the direct application of water and/or a wetting agent to the
      burning material on the perimeter, control can be accomplished quickly on the average fire.

   D. The type 1 engine’s primary responsibility is the protection of exposures (structures, heavy
      growth, etc.). This may be accomplished using a mobile attack or by establishing a
      progressive hose line on the perimeter of the fire. When an indirect attack or structure
      protection tactics are used (when direct control is not immediately possible), a type 1 engine
      should locate as close to the exposure as safety dictates and then deploy protection lines to
      direct the fire around the value at risk.

   E. The type 3 engine’s responsibilities include all of those stated for the type 1 engine. With the
      added benefit of 4-wheel drive and higher ground clearance, type 3 engines will be the
      primary engines used for a mobile attack when off road driving is necessary.

   F. A fire is not considered out or under control until overhaul is complete. Standard overhaul on
      a vegetation fire is 100 yards inside the burn or as designated by the IC.




AUTHOR:      Mike Brown, Battalion Chief                                                  Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        04/06          REVISED DATE:   11/07
                         COMMUNICATION – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Vehicle Lockouts
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                         7/06            DOC NO:         FF047
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District strives to provide the highest level of service possible
to its citizens; however, when providing services to gain entry into locked cars, as a convenience
rather than for medical or fire issues, the best course of action may be that of a support role until
a tow company or locksmith can arrive. The risks and liabilities involved in damaging air bag
systems and locking mechanisms need to be considered when determining if entry by Fire
District personnel is the best course of action.

PURPOSE

Due to the increased use of side-impact airbags and the increasing use of sophisticated locking
mechanisms, the District has established policies regarding vehicle lockouts that separate
convenience issues from medical emergency issues. Medical emergency issues require
intervention. Convenience issues necessitate a careful, methodical approach.

POLICY

If the District receives a call for a vehicle lockout and responders arriving on scene discover a
child or pet locked in a vehicle exhibiting any signs of distress, forcible entry should be made
IMMEDIATELY. This should be done by breaking out a side window.

Fire officers on scene should consider such things as outside air temperature, does the child or
pet appear lethargic, is the vehicle running, how long has the child or pet been in the locked
vehicle, and how long will it take for the locksmith, tow, extra set of keys to arrive, etc. When
these circumstances are presented to the Dispatcher, while taking the call, a rescue-medic unit
will be sent, in addition to the first due Engine company.

If, on the other hand, there is only inconvenience to a citizen due to the lockout, District
employees can provide assistance to the citizen via Valley Fire Dispatch in contacting a
locksmith, tow company, or car dealership to remedy the situation. If possible, this choice
should be made by the owner of the vehicle.

If the owner of the vehicle would prefer us to attempt entry, a waiver of liability needs to be
completed. Slim-Jim type tools, as well as a lockout service manual, have been provided to
assist on those occasions. Fire personnel should consider the model and year of the vehicle prior
to using a Slim-Jim tool, to avoid damage to side impact airbags.

Per Police policy, the Police will respond on ALL calls involving a child locked in a vehicle.
 AUTHOR:      Stacy Rowan, Dispatcher                                                         Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Chris Suter, Deputy Fire Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                          4/99         REVISED DATE:     11/99, 7/06
                              OPERATIONS - POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           “Walk-Around Size-Up”
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      11/05   DOC NO:             FF052
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

As stated in the District’s Operations Policy and Procedure – Incident Command, “an ‘Initial
Condition Report’ will be broadcast over the radio.” This report provides a “brief description of
the situation” and any obvious conditions and priorities. Further size-up and communication
intended actions and assignments are to be provided in the “Updated Condition Report.”
Visualizing all sides of a building on fire is essential in making the observations necessary to
provide this information. A “Walk-Around Size-Up” is the preferred method of ensuring all sides
of a building are observed.

POLICY

It is the policy of the District that all sides of any building with visible smoke and/or fire
conditions be visualized by the IC or his/her designee. This should be performed by the first-in
officer, but may be assigned to another if conditions dictate. Some conditions that preclude the
immediate observation of all sides of the building may include immediate life-safety priorities
and building size or access problems.

PROCEDURE

    A. During the “Walk-Around Size-Up” the following information is to be gathered:
         1. Existence and location of any obvious persons needing rescue.
         2. Probable location of the fire.
         3. Existence of any hazards that may impact fire ground safety.
         4. Building layout (with emphasis on means of entry and exit).
         5. Location of utilities. (Officer should attempt to secure utilities if time and incident
            priorities permit).

    B. An “Updated Condition Report” confirming mode (Investigative, Fast Attack, or
       Command), strategy (Rescue, Offensive, Defensive), tactical priorities, and initial
       assignments should be made immediately after completing the “Walk-Around Size-Up.”

    C. If conditions or incident priorities preclude the completion of the “Walk-Around Size-
       Up,” the first-in officer should relay such to the next-due officer to ensure the items
       above are communicated and addressed.


 AUTHOR       Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                             Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         10/05          REVISED DATE:
                             OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                             TOPIC:           Wildland Access Plan
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05              DOC NO:         FF018
                             CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The San Ramon Valley is situated in the area surrounded by a number of hill ranges and
designated open space areas. Throughout these hills is a network of dirt surfaced roads or "fire
trails.” Fire trails provide access into remote or "wildland" areas and also through right-of-way
easements near subdivisions. The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District (the District or
SRVFPD) and East Bay Regional Parks District (EBRPD) maintain approximately 20 to 25
miles of these trails which wind throughout our jurisdiction. Housing developments emerging in
these once, wildland, open areas pose a serious fire loss risk to the District and are referred to in
firefighting circles as the "urban interface" problem. This name implies that structures closely
bordered by wildland areas may possibly lie in the path of an approaching brush or grass fire. It
is extremely important that the District and EBRPD maintain vehicle access into and around
these areas for our firefighting units.


POLICY

East Bay Regional Parks District maintains its own trails and allows SRVFPD access to its trails
only for fire suppression and emergency purposes. SRVFPD works with EBRPD to implement
an on-going fire trail program which includes mapping, seasonal inspection, brush clearing, and
grading of the trails and access right-of-ways within our jurisdiction.


DEFINITIONS

Through special arrangement, the fire trails within the District are featured in the Thomas
Brothers Map Guide.

“Head”: The point at which the trail intersects a surface street is known as the trail "head.”
    •    The trail “head” is assigned a number corresponding with the Fire Station's number in
         that area.
    •    For example, a trail with its street access nearest to Station 31 will appear as trail number
         31-1 in the guide. The next closest trail "head" will be trail number 31-2 etc.

This mapping system requires points. The Thomas Brothers Guide was selected to feature our
fire trail system because it is carried by neighboring fire agencies in their emergency vehicles
thereby beneficial for mutual aid response.



 AUTHOR:      Jeff Fagundes, Captain                                                           Page 1 of 6
 REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                         REVISED DATE:   12/00, 12/05
                            OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                            TOPIC:           Wildland Access Plan
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      01/05              DOC NO:           FF018
                            CROSS REF:



PROCEDURE

   A. Each year in early spring, the District inspects all non-EBRPD fire trails and access right-of-
      way for obstructions, erosion, washed out culverts and landslides. When necessary, the
      District dispatches firefighters to clear downed tree limbs, remove brush and check for
      presence of our padlocks and numerable trail signs replacing those that are missing.

   B. Weather and soil moisture permitting, the trail grading begins in June and usually takes
      fourteen working days to complete.
        1. The District contracts a motor grader and operator from an outside agency. Ruts are
           filled, landslides, boulders and other obstructions are removed.
             a. This operation serves the following purposes:
                  •    It facilitates safer travel for responding units which often include ambulances not
                       designed for off road travel.
                  •    Graded fire trails and access right-of-ways are more readily distinguishable from
                       abandoned trail dead end segments once used for agricultural purposes.
                  •    Graded fire trails will in many cases serve as a temporary fire break.

   C. Many of the District fire trail accesses are controlled by the use of Medeco key lock system.
      Many of the trail heads intersect private driveways and the Medeco key must be used on the
      gate touch tone pad.
        1. In recent years, the District has replaced many of the Medeco padlocks with Master
           Lock Co. X-2319 padlocks.
        2. There are two reasons for this.
             a. The Master locks are much less expensive, reducing replacement cost if the padlock
                is lost or vandalized.
             b. The X-2319 is the exact same lock used by the East Bay Regional Park District on
                their many fire trail gates in our jurisdiction. A common lock reduces the number of
                keys to search through in an emergency situation.




AUTHOR:      Jeff Fagundes, Captain                                                             Page 2 of 6
REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                                         REVISED DATE:   12/00, 12/05
                                    OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                                    TOPIC:           Wildland Access Plan
                                    EFFECTIVE DATE:                        01/05             DOC NO:              FF018
                                    CROSS REF:




SRVFPD                                TRAIL NAME & LOCATION                                      MAP   COORD.           THOM
TRAIL #                                                                                          PG.                    BROS.

31-1           Elworthy Trail                     Rear of 1411 SRV Blvd.                        U-16   476-1570         653 A5
31-2           Midland Trail                      Midland Way (End)                             U-16   478-1569         653 A4
31-3           Cliffside Trail                    Cliffside Drive (End)                         U-16   479-1566         652 J4
31-4           Otto Trail                         Next to 246 Remington Loop                    T-16   481-1566         652 J3
31-5           Corduroy Hills Trail               Kuss Road (End)                               T-15   486-1560         652 G1
31-6           Campbell Trail                     Across from #4 Campbell Place                 T-17   482-1579         653 E3

32-1           Ball Trail                         Camille Ave. (End, Rear of Ball Estate)       S-15   489-1559         632 G7
32-2           Las Trampas Road                   Las Trampas Road (500’ past pump plant)       R-14   494-1554         632 E6
32-3           Las Trampas Trail                  Las Trampas Road (near 2130)                  R-14   494-1552         632 D5
32-4           Ridgewood Road                     Ridgewood Road (West of #2031)                R-14   497-1553         632 D4
32-5           Ridgewood Trail                    Ridgewood Road @ 2600                         R-14   496-1554         632 E5
32-6           Alamo Ranch Trail                  Alamo Ranch Road (End)                        R-15   495-1560         632 G5
32-7           Sugarloaf Trail                    Sugarloaf Drive (End)                         Q-15   501-1557         632 F3
32-9           High Eagle Trail                   High Eagle Court (End)                        R-15   494-1564         632 H5
32-10          Oakshire Place                     Oakshire Place (End)                          Q-16   499-1571         633 B4
32-11          Stone Valley Trail                 Stone Valley Road (West of 2689)              R-16   494-1570         633 A5
32-12          Las Quebradas Trail                Las Quebradas Lane (End)                      Q-15   501-1565         632 H3
32-13          Livorna Road Trail                 Livorna Road @ Stonegate Drive                Q-15   503-1564         632 J2
32-14          Stonegate Drive Trail              Stonegate Drive (next to 3100)                P-16   505-1567         632 J1
32-15          Dorchester Trail                   Dorchester Lane (next to 320)                 P-15   505-1566         632 J1

33-1           La Gonda Trail                     La Gonda Way (End)                            R-15   494-1563         632 J7
33-2           Humphrey Trail                     Rear of Humphrey Ranch                        R-16   494-1571         633 B6
                                                  (2900 Stone Valley Road)
33-3           Green Valley Trail                 Golden Meadow Lane (End)                      R-16   497-1572         633 B4
33-4           Pine Canyon Trail                  Green Valley Road (End)                       Q-16   499-1574         633 C3


        AUTHOR:      Jeff Fagundes, Captain                                                               Page 3 of 6
        REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
        APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
        ORIGIN DATE:                                         REVISED DATE:    12/00, 12/05
                                    OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                                    TOPIC:           Wildland Access Plan
                                    EFFECTIVE DATE:                        01/05             DOC NO:              FF018
                                    CROSS REF:




SRVFPD                                TRAIL NAME & LOCATION                                      MAP   COORD.           THOM
TRAIL #                                                                                          PG.                    BROS.

33-5           Merano Trail                       Merano Street (End)                           S-17   488-1578         653 E1
33-6           Emmons Canyon Trail                Left @ Pumphouse, Emmons Cyn Dr. @            R-17   498-1577         633 D4
                                                  Country Oak Lane
33-7           White Gate Trail                   Lackland Drive (End)                          R-17   494-1577         633 E5
33-8           Dan Cook Canyon Trail              Via Diablo (near 2401)                        R-17   495-1580         633 E6
33-9           McCauley Trail                     McCauley Road (End)                           T-17   485-1578         653 E2
33-10          Watertank Trail                    Diablo Rd. (west of Fairway Drive)            S-17   489-1575         633 D7
33-11          Diablo Road                        Diablo Road (east of Alameda Diablo)          S-17   489-1578         633 D7
33-12          Diablo Road                        Diablo Road (near ent. to Avenue Nueva)       S-17   488-1579         653 E1
33-13          Alameda Diablo                     Diablo Lakes Lane (@ 2406)                    R-17   494-1582         633 F5

34-1           Geldermann Trail                   Century Oaks Court                            X-17   456-1579         673 D6
34-2           Corey Trail                        Corey Place (@ 2731)                          X-17   456-1579         673 D5

35-1           Holbrook Drive                     End                                           U-17   479-1583         653 G4
35-2           Tuscany Way                        East End                                      U-18   477-1587         653 H5
35-3           DELETED – 12/2005
35-4           Windover Court                     End                                           T-17   484-1584         653 G2
35-5           Pepperwood Drive                   End                                           S-18   487-1591         654 A1
35-6           Eaglenest Place                    End                                           T-19   483-1595         654 B2
35-7           Lawrence Road                      End                                           V-19   471-1596         674 B1
35-8           Blackhawk Meadow Lane              End                                           T-19   485-1598         654 C2
35-9           Nottingham Place                   North of 4225                                 U-18   478-1592         654 A4
35-10          Cloverbrook                        @ Rassani Drive                               U-18   474-1593         654 A6
35-11          Laurelwood Drive                   Across from Goldstone Court                   U-18   474-1593         653 H4
35-12          Laurelwood Drive                   End                                           U-18   479-1588         653 H4
35-13          Sunhaven Road                      @ 132                                         T-18   483-1585         653 H3
35-14          Blackhawk Road                     Parking lot east of Tennis Club Drive         T-18   486-1588         653 J2

        AUTHOR:      Jeff Fagundes, Captain                                                               Page 4 of 6
        REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
        APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
        ORIGIN DATE:                                         REVISED DATE:    12/00, 12/05
                                    OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                                    TOPIC:           Wildland Access Plan
                                    EFFECTIVE DATE:                       01/05              DOC NO:                FF018
                                    CROSS REF:



SRVFPD                                TRAIL NAME & LOCATION                                      MAP     COORD.           THOM
TRAIL #                                                                                          PG.                      BROS.

35-15          Dougherty Road                     100’ south of Red Willow Drive                V-18     469-1587         653 J6
35-16          Northview Court                    End                                           U-18     475-1586         653 H6
35-17          Rio Grande Place                   End                                           V-17     472-1584         653 G7
35-18          Wild Oak Lane                      End                                           T-19     482-1594         654 B3
35-19          Cheshire Circle                    @ 1118                                        U-19     478-1595         654 B5

36-1           Finley Road                        Across from 1700                              U-20     478-1606         654 G5
36-2           Finley Road                        Behind 3100 left turn off driveway            T-20     484-1609         654 G4
36-3           Johnston Road                      West of 6923                                  V-21     474-1614         654 J6
36-4           Johnston Road                      @ 7191                                        V-21     474-1618         654 J7
36-5           Camino Tassajara                   South of 6100                                 V-20     469-1606         674 F1
36-6           Marciel Road                       End                                           No Map                    655 C7
36-7           Victorine Road                     @ 2000                                        No Map                    675 D1
36-8           Victorine Road                     @ 1059                                        No Map                    675 D2

37-1           Story Book Lane                    End                                           No Map                    655 E5
37-2           Morgan Territory Road              Across from 10961                             No Map                    655 F5
37-3           Morgan Territory Road              Across from 11625                             No Map                    655 G6
37-4           Morgan Territory Road              .5 mile north east of 11625 “s” turn          No Map                    655 G6
37-5           Morgan Territory Road              @ 11625                                       No Map                    655 G6
37-6           Morgan Territory Road              Across from 12001                             No Map                    655 H7
37-7           Morgan Territory Road              Across from 12601                             No Map                    675 G2

38-1           Derby Drive                        Next to 2622                                  X-16     461-1570         673 B4
38-2           Fostoria Parkway                   @ Deerwood                                    V-16     469-1571         673 B1
38-3           Crow Canyon                        Near side 500’ east of County line            W-16     467-1567         672 J2
38-4           Pradera Way                        Between 760, 762                              W-16     466-1567         673 A2
38-5           Lyndhurst Place                    @ EBMUD                                       X-16     459-1568         672 J5
38-6           Norris Canyon Road                 Driveway east of 2805                         W-16     462-1568         672 J5

        AUTHOR:      Jeff Fagundes, Captain                                                                 Page 5 of 6
        REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
        APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
        ORIGIN DATE:                                         REVISED DATE:    12/00, 12/05
                                    OPERATIONS – POLICY AND PROCEDURE
                                    TOPIC:           Wildland Access Plan
                                    EFFECTIVE DATE:                       01/05              DOC NO:              FF018
                                    CROSS REF:



SRVFPD                                TRAIL NAME & LOCATION                                      MAP   COORD.           THOM
TRAIL #                                                                                          PG.                    BROS.

38-7           Ashbourne Drive                    End                                           X-16   457-1569         672 J4
38-8           Bollinger Canyon Road              Across from 18722                             V-16   470-1567         652 H7
38-9           Bollinger Canyon Road              @ 18311                                       V-16   471-1567         652 F5
38-10          Bollinger Canyon Road              @ 18320                                       V-16   471-1567         652 F5
38-11          Bollinger Canyon Road              End                                           V-16   471-1568         652 F4
38-12          Bollinger Canyon Road              @ 18181                                       V-16   471-1566         652 E4
38-13          Bollinger Canyon Road              North of 18103 @ EBRPD gate                   V-16   471-1566         652 A3
38-14          Bollinger Canyon Road              North terminus, turn left                     V-16   471-1566         652 D3
38-15          Bollinger Canyon Road              North terminus thru gate                      V-16   471-1566         652 D2
38-16          Bollinger Canyon Road              Across from 18869                             V-16   469-1567         652 A1
38-17          Bollinger Canyon Road              Across from 18475                             V-16   469-1567         652 A2
38-18          Derby Drive                        End                                           X-16   461-1570         673 B4
38-19          Morgan Drive                       EBRPD parking lot                             X-17   458-1577         673 D5




        AUTHOR:      Jeff Fagundes, Captain                                                               Page 6 of 6
        REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
        APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
        ORIGIN DATE:                                         REVISED DATE:    12/00, 12/05
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:            2800 Gallon Water Tender Unit 658
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:         TB111
                       CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

A Peterbilt/Hi-Tech water tender is an apparatus that can shuttle water and deploy the 3000
gallon portable folding tank for supply purposes, or it can operate as a standard 1000 GPM
supply pumper. It also has limited attack capabilities.


INFORMATION

   Features/Equipment:

   •   1991 Peterbilt, Model 377
   •   HT741 Allison Automatic Transmission
   •   Caterpillar 3406-B Engine
   •   6 Cylinder, 425 HP @ 2100 RPM
   •   255" Wheelbase
   •   4.33 Gear Ratio
   •   1000 GPM Hale Pump, Midship Mounted
   •   2800 Gallon Stainless Steel Tank
   •   3000 Gallon Portable Folding Tank
   •   300 GPM Float Pump
   •   400 Ft. 2½" Hose
   •   200 Ft. 1½" Preconnect Live Line
   •   33 Ft. 1½" Protection Line
   •   14 Gallon Class "A" Foam Tank
   •   Class "A" Foam pre-plumbed to 1½" Live Line
   •   10 Gallons AFFF/ATC Foam W/Eductor, along with a full complement of fittings, nozzles,
       and other equipment.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                     08/92           REVISED DATE:   11/00, 05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:
                                            AIM 450 (CO) Carbon Monoxide Gas
                                            Detector
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                    05/06              DOC NO:           TB159
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

With the increasing awareness of the effects of Carbon Monoxide Gas during fire operations and in
conjunction with providing the safest working environment possible, the district has provided the
AIM 450 Personal CO Gas detectors on Type I units. The monitor is to be used to protect Fire
District personnel from explosive and health affects of the CO and is not intended to authorize other
agencies/businesses or the general public to reoccupy structures where CO was or potentially had
been present.


CARBON MONOXIDE AND ITS EFFECTS

CO, a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas is lighter than air with a specific gravity of 0.97 and an
explosive range of 12.5% to 74%. Exposure to CO of 800 ppm for 45 minutes can cause flu-like
symptoms, while exposure to the same 800 ppm for 3 hours can cause death.

Symptoms of CO poisoning include flu-like symptoms, slight headache, nausea, vomiting, fatigue,
confusion, and/or fast heart rate. CO affects the elderly, children, individuals with medical
conditions, and pregnant women more adversely than a healthy adult.


INFORMATION

This tool, called the AIM 450 Personal CO Gas Detector, is a hand held, battery-powered
monitoring instrument. The units are carried on Type 1 engines and trucks.

If it is believed that Carbon Monoxide exists and monitoring of the atmosphere is going to take
place, the personnel doing so must be in full protection clothing and all safety precautions followed.

The AIM 450 CO displays CO in ppm only; it signals with an audible alarm beep and flashing
hazard light.

The AIM 450 Personal CO Gas Detector should be activated in clean, breathable air. Allow unit to
warm up and stabilize for 30 seconds prior to use. It is also important to shut off the unit in clean
breathable air.

The unit should be used anytime the presence of CO may exist and to determine the appropriate
safety equipment and precautions necessary to be taken to mitigate the situation.
 AUTHOR:                                                                                  Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       09/96      REVISED DATE:   12/00, 05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:
                                           AIM 450 (CO) Carbon Monoxide Gas
                                           Detector
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                    05/06              DOC NO:              TB159
                       CROSS REF:



CO gas level responses chart:

 0 - 35 ppm                      indicates CO in ppm (Full Protection Clothing)
 35 - 900 ppm                    indicates CO in ppm, the audible alarm beeps and hazard light
                                 flashes (Full Protection Clothing)
 above 900 ppm                   display goes blank, audible alarm beeps, hazard light flashes (Full
                                 Protection Clothing)


A detector’s alarm indicates the presence of Carbon Monoxide in excess of 35 PPM. Should the
alarm sound, all personnel must immediately exit the area. The Incident Commander will then
be notified and personnel will be instructed to use air packs or take other action deemed
necessary for optimum safety. If, at any time, a question arises as to the safety of personnel
working in an area in which Carbon Monoxide or any other toxic gases may be present, FULL
SAFETY CLOTHING AND SELF-CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS MUST BE
WORN. Always err on the high side of safety.

Maintenance:

All detectors must be checked on the first tour of each shift. The 30-second self-check should be
conducted in clean air away from running apparatus. If a detector is found to be defective, label
it clearly as to the type of problem and forward it to Station 33. Station 33 has one spare detector
that can act as a back-up unit while the defective detector is being repaired.

The AIM 450 CO Carbon Monoxide Gas Detector is to be calibrated and serviced by District
personnel who are Aim trained and authorized.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                    Page 2 of 2
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      09/96      REVISED DATE:   12/00, 05/06
                                           TRAINING BULLETIN
                               TOPIC:           Air Operations
                               EFFECTIVE DATE:                      04/06       DOC NO:           TB047
                               CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

District personnel may be required to work with or near helicopters or fixed wing aircraft during
wildland fire fighting or on medical/rescue situations.

Airtankers and helicopters are tools to be considered in wildland fire fighting. In a rescue situation
or medical emergency, a helicopter can be very beneficial.

The purpose of this Training Bulletin is to outline the precautions and procedures for working
with aircraft.


INFORMATION

Airtankers and helicopters can provide excellent tactical support for ground fires. They deliver
retardant or suppressant drops to knock down the fire so ground forces can safely advance.
Airtankers are most effective during the initial attack phase when the fire is small.

Airtankers

The sole purpose of airtankers is to deliver retardant. Because newer model aircraft are quiet and
difficult to hear, personnel must be alert when aircraft are on scene. Airtankers can drop several
tons of retardant, which can result in critical injury to a firefighter or severe damage to apparatus. If
you find yourself in the drop zone:
•      Move out of the target area, if there is time.
•      Avoid larger old trees (limbs could break off).
•      Never stand up in the path of a drop.
•      Get behind something solid, like rocks or your engine. Lie down on your stomach facing the
       incoming drop, helmet and goggles on, feet spread apart for stability, cover face, and hold tools
       to your side, away from your body.

After drop, continue firefighting actions, watch footing as area will be slippery.




    AUTHOR:      Steve Cochran, Captain                                                     Page 1 of 7
    REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
    APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
    ORIGIN DATE:                        11/01           REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Air Operations
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      04/06       DOC NO:                 TB047
                            CROSS REF:




Helicopters

Helicopters can provide close-in tactical support. Usually fitted with either a bucket or fixed tank
for firefighting operations. Buckets range from 100 to 2,000 gallons suspended by cables from the
cargo hook. Fixed tanks are attached directly to the frame and have similar capacities. Down draft
from low-flying helicopters can cause erratic fire behavior. Be aware that your fire may flare up
and jump lines if a helicopter is working in your area.

For ICS Type Classification for airtankers and helicopters, refer to Incident Command field guides
for specific information pertaining to aircraft typing, gallons of delivery, etc..


APPROACHING OR DEPARTING

    •    Follow all direction of the Flight Crew

    •    Don't approach the helicopter until directed by the Flight Crew.

    •    Never go behind the passenger door towards the rear of the helicopter.

    •    No smoking/running, no IV poles, and no vehicles within 50 feet of the helicopter.

    •    Be sure hats, helmets, turnouts, etc. are secured to your body.

    •    Strip gurneys of all removable objects (sheet, mattresses, etc.) when brought near the
         helicopter.

    •    DO NOT raise your hands above your head.

    •    DO NOT assist flight crews in opening or closing doors.

    •    While helicopter is landing or taking off, don't shine artificial lights at or on the helicopter.

    •    Protect your eyes and ears from rotor wash when helicopter is landing or taking off, stay in a
         crouched position.

    •    Whenever the helicopter is on an incline, approach or depart on the downhill side.
    •    Tools or other long items should be carried horizontally or at waist level.
 AUTHOR:      Steve Cochran, Captain                                                           Page 2 of 7
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        11/01           REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Air Operations
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      04/06       DOC NO:             TB047
                           CROSS REF:



LANDING ZONE

   •    Select an area at least 100' x 100'. At night or when windy enlarge the size of the area to
        125' x 125'.

   •    The landing zone should:
           a. be free of obstructions - wires, posts, stumps, high grass, etc.
           b. be as level as possible not over an 8 degree slope.
           c. offer a choice of helicopter approach or departure paths.
           d. never require a vertical landing or take off.

   •    Do not select landing zones that are located in canyon bottoms because of possible
        downdrafts from nearby ridges.

   •    Never request a helicopter into an area where utility power lines are in close proximity to the
        landing zone or helicopter working area.

   •    Always assign a person with a portable radio to direct helicopter landing from the landing
        zone perimeter.

   •    The person assigned to the landing zone should focus on landing zone safety and not be
        involved in other incident activities.

   •    The person assigned to direct the helicopter landing should remain in a position facing the
        front of the helicopter (within pilot's view) as long as the helicopter is operating.

   •    If a landing zone is extremely dusty, wet down area, if possible.

   •    Always inform pilot of power lines or other overhead obstructions in vicinity of landing
        zone.


LANDING PROCEDURES

   •    The person assigned to direct the helicopter from landing is to:
           a. take a position in the landing zone perimeter
             b. wind to back
             c. arms extended parallel to ground
AUTHOR:      Steve Cochran, Captain                                                       Page 3 of 7
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        11/01           REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Air Operations
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      04/06       DOC NO:                 TB047
                           CROSS REF:




   •    Establish direct radio contact with the helicopter utilizing the incident IC designation.

   •    Provide the helicopter with the following information:
           a. location of landing zone -- landmarks, etc. (Pilot must see you and the designated
               landing zone.
             b. obstructions around or near landing zone - type of landing surface.
             c. basic patient problem. (Example - chest pain, conscious and trapped, unconscious,
                multiple fractures, etc.)


NIGHT LANDINGS

   •    Establish landing zone 125' x 125':
            a. designate corners by portable lights;
                        OR
                designate landing zone by aiming white lights at the center of the zone.

             b. designate wind direction with portable light or headlights on windward side of
                landing zone.

   •    Turn off non-essential white lights, keeping vehicle headlights in low beam.

   •    When possible, light up area around the landing zone, directing spot lights on obstructions -
        trees, poles, etc.

   •    leave emergency lights on.

   •    Do not direct spotlights floodlights at helicopter.



LANDING ZONE SAFETY

   •    Keep emergency personnel and vehicles at least 100 feet away from operating helicopters on
        the ground.

   •    Establish outer security perimeter at least 200 feet away from landing zone perimeter.
AUTHOR:      Steve Cochran, Captain                                                         Page 4 of 7
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        11/01           REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Air Operations
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      04/06       DOC NO:            TB047
                           CROSS REF:




   •    Assign personnel (fire or law enforcement) if needed, to enforce outer security perimeter.




   •    Wear a helmet with tightened chin-strap and goggles when in the immediate area of a
        helicopter taking off, landing or hovering.

   •    Keep landing zone clear of unauthorized personnel, equipment and loose objects.

   •    If blinded by swirling dust or grit, stop - sit down and wait for assistance.


RADIO COMMUNICATION

   •    The dispatch center will designate the radio channel to be used for communicating with the
        helicopter. Always verify with dispatch what channel to use if not specified.

   •    Maintain portable radio at maximum volume and hold in a vertical position while talking to
        the helicopter.

   •    To improve radio communications to the helicopter when they are not in sight consider the
        use of the engine radio because of its higher power and better antenna. when the helicopter
        is insight, use the portable radio.




AUTHOR:      Steve Cochran, Captain                                                      Page 5 of 7
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        11/01           REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Air Operations
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      04/06       DOC NO:             TB047
                           CROSS REF:



PROVIDING INFORMATION/INSTRUCTIONS

   •    When informing the helicopter of obstructions, provide estimated height of obstructions and
        distance from landing zone.

        Example:           • 60 foot tower, 100 feet from landing zone
                           • 40 foot telephone poles, 150 feet from landing zone

   •    When the helicopter is in sight, instructions given on where the landing zone is located is to
        be done by the clock reference method.




        The nose of the helicopter is always at 12 o'clock. As the helicopter is sighted, the
        helicopter will be traveling toward 12 o'clock. The location of the landing zone will be your
        position in relation to the helicopter's position. This information is to be relayed to the
        helicopter - Example: "CALSTAR 1, we are at your 8 o'clock position".


HELICOPTER HAND SIGNALS FOR USE BY DISTRICT PERSONNEL




AUTHOR:      Steve Cochran, Captain                                                       Page 6 of 7
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        11/01           REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Air Operations
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      04/06       DOC NO:             TB047
                           CROSS REF:



GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS

   •    When working with helicopters that are using their search light, do not look up, as you can
        be temporarily blinded by the brightness of the light.

   •    Helicopters with external speaker systems may be capable of providing evacuation
        information to citizens.

   •    In general, the backboard is the preferred device for patient transportation when utilizing a
        helicopter.

   •    The use of flares to designate a landing zone should be minimized unless there is a method
        of keeping the flare from possibly being blown into combustible or grass.


LOCAL AIR RESOURCES (as of 10/4/01)

   CALSTAR:            Fully equipped ALS helicopter staffed with two flight nurses. The aircraft is
                       capable of carrying two patients.

   REACH:              Fully equipped ALS helicopter staffed with a flight nurse and paramedic. The
                       aircraft is capable of carrying one patient.

   EAST BAY REGIONAL PARKS: Staffed with volunteer flight nurses, paramedic or EMT.
             Can be used to transport one patient. However, the observer will need
             transportation. They may also be used as a reconnaissance tool.

   CHP:                Staffed with 2 officers which are EMT 1A certified. Capable of transporting one
                       patient. They may also be used as a reconnaissance tool.

   COAST GUARD: Staffed with one EMT. Capable of carrying one critical patient or up to four
             walking wounded. Aircraft is hoist capable.

   •    Out of area Air Ambulance may be available through San Ramon Valley Fire Protection
        District Communications Center.




AUTHOR:      Steve Cochran, Captain                                                       Page 7 of 7
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        11/01           REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                                TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF)
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      06/05       DOC NO:           TB001
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The District often responds to fires involving flammable liquids (Class B fires). These Class B fires
present certain challenges for extinguishment since conventional methods may not be effective due
the properties of flammable liquids. One tactic at the District’s disposal is the use of Aqueous Film
Forming Foam (AFFF).


INFORMATION

The foam currently in use is Ansulite 3x3. This is an alcohol-resistant foam designed to be used
at a concentration of 3% for both hydrocarbon fuels and polar solvents. All District Type 1
Engines and Trucks 31 and 34 are equipped with 15 gallons of class B foam in five-gallon
containers and a 95 GPM foam eductor. Water Tender 238 carries 60 gallons in a fixed tank which
is pre-plumbed to the pump. Additional foam is stored at Station 33.

The foam eductor may be installed directly at the pump panel or at a coupling within a hose line.
For proper foam application, the foam eductor must be placed 150 feet away from the nozzle
with a pressure at the eductor of 200 PSI; and the nozzle must be set at 95 GPM. If the eductor
is placed away from the pump panel, calculate the friction loss at 11 PSI. per 50’ section of 1.5”
hose to ensure 200 PSI. at the eductor.

Foam may be applied with the Akron turbo jet fog nozzle or the air-aspirating foam nozzle (see
Information Sheet #161). This foam may also be used with the Master Stream Foam Eductor. (see
Information Sheet #174).

** There may still be some 1% and 3/6% class B foam on some apparatus and in storage.
   This foam is OK to use. Please make the necessary foam proportioning adjustments per
   each type.




 AUTHOR:      Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                               Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                        REVISED DATE:   03/05
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                          TOPIC:        Backpack Pumps
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:               TB157
                          CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

Tremendous strides have been made in combating wildland fires; however, the use of the backpack
pump has not lost its value as an integral tool in controlling these incidents.

As with any valued tool, keeping it in top mechanical condition is of utmost importance. All
backpack pumps should be inspected at least once a year (to coincide with wildland hose testing),
after every use, or whenever necessary.

INFORMATION

Following are the steps necessary to properly inspect the backpack pump units and document their
inspection:

    1. Check the overall condition of the pump:
        a. Complete bladder clean and check for grease and holes (repair if necessary).
        b. Check straps are in good shape and properly adjusted.
        c. Bend hose and check for cracks.
        d. Check quick-connect coupling for proper operation.
        e. Check that nozzle tip and chain are present.

    2. Fill pump with water:
        a. Check bladder cap seal; it should be intact, clean and pliable.
        b. Check bladder for leakage, other damage or wear which would develop into a leak.

    3. Place pump on back:
        a. Attack straight stream tip to nozzle and check water pattern for adequate flow.
        b. Switch tip to fog pattern. Flow water through tip and check pattern. Pattern should have
           adequate flow and not be broken.
        c. Check hose and nozzle for leaks or leaks around any coupling.

    4. Empty water and return unit to proper storage cabinet on fire unit.

If any component is in need of replacement or repair, immediately contact the Supply Station and
arrange to have a spare backpack pump placed on the unit. Forward the damaged backpack pump
to the Supply Station.

 AUTHOR:      Dan McNamara, Firefighter/Paramedic                                         Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       05/96         REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:          Blue Dot Markers
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                   04/06       DOC NO:              TB091
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION


The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District utilizes the Blue Dot system to identify hydrants
during night hours or in cases of inclement weather and limited visibility periods.
A system has been devised for affixing blue dots, using a clean process. This system is to be used by
all engine companies for any dots that need to be replaced or installed.


INFORMATION

    A. EPOXY APPLICATION

         •    Adhere blue dot per manufacturer’s standard.


    B. BLUE DOT PLACEMENT

         1. Center of the road not marked with a center line.



         2. Two inches to the hydrant side of the center line.


         3. No more than six inches from the curb face of the
            center divider.


         4. Two inches to the hydrant side of the center line.



         5. Use two dots to mark a hydrant close to the corner.



         6. Two inches to the hydrant side of the center double line.



 AUTHOR:      Mike Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                               Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Mike Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         02/91       REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:          Blue Dot Markers
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                   04/06       DOC NO:                TB091
                           CROSS REF:



   C. DOT INSTALLATION

        1. Sweep off the area.

        2. Position adhesive mat on the street, per placement diagrams above.

        3. Use map gas torch to heat pad. The pad needs to be heated until soft and bubbly.

        4. Apply blue dot onto heated pad.

        5. Depress the dot in the proper spot, making sure the reflective sides are facing the traffic
           flow.




AUTHOR:      Mike Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                                 Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:         Mike Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         02/91       REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:            Chainsaws
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                  05/06              DOC NO:          TB037
                           CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

The following information explains the types of chainsaws and their locations.


INFORMATION

All Trucks, Type I Engines, Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) Unit, and Type III Engines carry
chainsaws. Rescue saws (Circular) are carried on all trucks.

Chainsaws:

Stihl 024       --      18" hardnose bar, 325 pitch, non-carbide wood-chip chain

Stihl 044       --      20" rollomatic bar, 3/8 pitch, 72 drive carbide chain
and 440

McCullough 805 -- 20" hardnose bar, 404 pitch, 72 drive carbide chain
                  (Kept at the Supply Station as spares)

Rescue saws:

Homelite XL-88 with three circular blades (Carbide, Steel, and Masonry)

Homelite MP-38 and MP-88 with three circular blades (Carbide, Steel, and Masonry)

Partner rescue saw with three circular blades (Carbide, Steel, and Masonry)


All chainsaws and rescue saws have a tool pouch equipped with spare chains, plug wrenches, and
spark plugs. In addition, for the rescue saws, there are three circular (cut off) blades.

When using any of the saws, always use protective clothing, eye protection, and a charged hand line
when ventilating.

The carbide chainsaw can cut effectively with up to three carbide cutters missing on one side or a
total of six throughout the chain. If this occurs, tag and replace the chain. The wood chipper chain
(non-carbide), when dull or not cutting effectively, should be tagged and sent in for re-sharpening of
the cutters. Replace cracked or worn pulley belts on Rescue saws.

 AUTHOR:      Jack Sheppard, Engineer                                                     Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        02/96      REVISED DATE:   07/96, 05/06
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:            Chainsaws
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                  05/06              DOC NO:         TB037
                           CROSS REF:



A non-carbide chain kept in the saw bag for the purpose of tree removal or training is more effective
and economical to use. The carbide chain is to be on all 044 and 440 saws to be used on structure
fires.

During tour inspection, all chainsaws and rescue saws should be checked for fuel and bar oil levels,
proper chain tension, the condition of the rescue wheel, and the belt tension. In addition, all saws
should be warmed -up for at least three minutes.

After using the saws, they should be cleaned, refueled, and checked for overall condition of the
chain, bar, spark plug, air filter, and belt. Use solvent for cleaning the chainsaw, chain, and bar.
After cleaning, start chainsaw to make sure saw is in good running condition.

When repairs are needed for all saws, fill out a yellow repair tag and apparatus request form and
send to Jack Sheppard. Major repairs are done at Diamond Sharp Saw Shop, in Danville.




 AUTHOR:      Jack Sheppard, Engineer                                                    Page 2 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        02/96      REVISED DATE:   07/96, 05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:            Come-A-Long Pull Chains
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06       DOC NO:             TB097
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The District uses Come-a-long pull chains to assist in rescue operations. These pull chains allow for
the total independent use of the Come-a-long, while leaving all other rescue equipment components
with their respective equipment. The use of these pull chains enhances the overall operation of the
Come-a-long.


INFORMATION

The pull chain set consists of two chains. One chain is five feet long and the other is twelve feet
long. Both chains have clip hooks on one end. The five foot chain has a round steel ring with a
grab hook attached to it by one chain link.

OPERATIONAL USE

   The proper use of the pull chains will ensure that the safety factor is at its maximum. Like every
   situation that may be encountered, some diversion from the "normal" operation may be
   necessary, but only if it is conceptually correct.

       1. The Come-a-long will need to be extended to its maximum needed length, but not
          further than is operationally safe (three full wraps of cable remaining on drum).

       2. The proper "wrap" method shall be used (single or double wrap method) to attach to
          both anchor points, using the slip hook end of both chains.

       3. The steel rings (either round or oblong) are to be attached to the hooks on the Come-a-
          long (one on each end).

       4. Pull all slack out of chains to shorten up system and achieve desired placement of
          Come-a-long by attaching chains to grab hooks attached at steel rings.

       5. Continue with normal operation of Come-a-long. (For operational procedures refer to
          department handbook.)




 AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:       Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      10/91           REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:            Come-A-Long Pull Chains
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06       DOC NO:            TB097
                       CROSS REF:




INSPECTION PROCEDURES

  Chains should be clean and free from rust. Visual inspection should include checking all links
  for stretching or elongating of chain links, hooks and steel rings. All welds should be inspected
  visually for cracking.


SPECIFICATIONS

  Length:      5 foot and 12 foot
  Strength:    8,200 pound test rating




AUTHOR:                                                                                Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:       Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      10/91           REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                          TOPIC:        Drip Torches
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:              TB156
                          CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

Tremendous strides have been made in combating wildland fires; however, the use of the drip torch
has not lost its value as an integral tool in controlling these incidents.

As with any valued tool, keeping it in top mechanical condition is of utmost importance. All torches
should be inspected at least once a year (to coincide with wildland hose testing), after every use, or
whenever necessary.


INFORMATION

Following are the steps necessary to properly inspect drip torch units and document their inspection.

    1. Disassemble unit.

    2. Unscrew tank cover lockring, and remove fuel spout.
        a. Unscrew discharge sealing plug, and check for presence of plug gasket and outlet screen.
        b. Check for presence of discharge plug chain.
        c. Check and tighten screws attaching igniter to fuel spout. Igniter should be adjusted so
           that nozzle tip is at bottom edge of igniter. Adjust as necessary.

    3. Check condition of fuel tank:
        a. Check welds for cracks.
        b. Check for presence of gasket at neck of tank.
        c. Operate breather valve, and check for presence of gasket. Store in closed position.
        d. Reassemble the unit.
        e. Refuel to ¾ full, and place torch back on the fire unit.

    4. Fuel two (2) parts Diesel and one (1) part gasoline.

If any component is in need of replacement or repair, immediately contact the Supply Station and
arrange to have a spare torch placed on the unit. Forward the damaged torch to the Supply Station for
repair.



 AUTHOR:      Dan McNamara, Firefighter/Paramedic                                        Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       05/96         REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Emergency Key System
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      06/06              DOC NO:         TB140
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

Fire companies are frequently dispatched to emergencies in areas which are closed, or locked to
the general public. Emergency crews do not have time to wait for an employee or other
responsible person to arrive and unlock a door or a gate. It is for this reason District vehicles
carry a set of high security keys which allow access to many of the buildings and areas where
fire personnel frequently respond or have occasion to go during off hours.

All emergency response vehicles are equipped with a Knox box and a set of high security keys
located below the Captain’s seat. Because of the secure nature of these keys, it is critical that
they be accounted for daily during morning equipment check (Captain’s responsibility). The
five types of key rings are:

              1.   San Ramon Valley - MEDECO and KNOX BOX high security keys
              2.   San Ramon Valley Unified School District
              3.   Fire trails in and around the District
              4.   Vehicle Locks
              5.   Miscellaneous Keys

INFORMATION

The concept of the emergency key system is to provide all District vehicles with a standard set of
keys, eliminating keys not applicable to that vehicle’s response needs.

The following is a list of the keys carried by District vehicles and what they unlock:

    1. MEDECO AND KNOX BOX KEYS - All District suppression vehicles carry MEDECO
       and KNOX BOX keys, providing high security access to businesses, electrical gates, private
       access roads, and a limited number of fire trails.

    2. SAN RAMON VALLEY UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT KEYS – Most emergency
       response vehicles carry a Master pad lock key (4E78). This key will access low security
       gates and padlocks within the school grounds.

         To access any high secure areas, such as; Administrative buildings, class rooms, gymnasium
         etc, the Engine Company must access the School Districts Knox Box which is located in the
         front of the school. It contains the Primus Master Key used to open these high secure
         buildings.
 AUTHOR:      Brent Shaffer, Engineer                                                         Page 1 of 3
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         02/95          REVISED DATE:   09/04, 05/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Emergency Key System
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      06/06              DOC NO:         TB140
                           CROSS REF:




        PLEASE NOTE: Due to recent security issues, the schools listed below will also require the
        use of a high security key to open some gates other than the 4E78. Use a SRV Medeco key
        or a Primus high security key on these gates. To open the Primus pad lock, secure the key
        from the School District Knox Box on the front of the building.

                  San Ramon High @ 140 Love Lane, Danville
                  Monte Vista High @ 3131 Stone Valley Road, Danville
                  Cal High @ 9870 Broadmoor Drive, San Ramon
                  El Cerro Middle School @ 968 Blemer Road, Danville
                  Charlotte Wood Middle School @ 600 El Capitan Drive, Danville

   3. FIRE TRAILS - Fire trail keys are broken down into two groups: East Bay Regional Park
      District and Mount Diablo State Park.

        A. The East Bay Regional Park District now utilizes 3 keys.
             1. The “G” key is a high security gate key.
             2. The “0838” is the new pad lock key.
             3. The X2319 is being phased out by the Regional Park; although, it is still used
                as a general lock by S.R.V.F.P.D.

        B. Mount Diablo State Park utilizes 2 keys.
             1. The perimeter key is labeled MD1C288 and is used mainly on the North and
                South Gate.
             2. The second key is labeled M.D.V. and is an interior key used throughout the
                park.

   4. VEHICLE LOCK - Keys used to open locks specific to that vehicle.

        •    Compartment locks (i.e.; 1250)
        •    Medic drug box (blue plastic cover)
        •    Mobil Data Terminal (barrel key)


AUTHOR:      Brent Shaffer, Engineer                                                         Page 2 of 3
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         02/95          REVISED DATE:   09/04, 05/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Emergency Key System
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      06/06              DOC NO:           TB140
                            CROSS REF:



    5. MISCELLANEOUS KEYS

         •    Cal Trans (Freeway access door)
         •    FC (Flood Control)


NOTE: To maintain continuity throughout the District vehicles, it is imperative that no additional
     keys are added to the “Emergency Key System.” In the event that an additional key needs
     to be added, it is mandatory that the Officer contact the Operations Chief to consider an
     alternative method (i.e. Knox Box).


Key’s that have been removed:

Danville Parks and Rec.                         All keys returned. X2319 lock daisy chained.

Athenian School                                 All keys returned. Our X2319 Master lock has been daisy
                                                chained with their locks.

Alamo Medical Group                             All keys returned. A Knox Box has been installed securing
                                                the Alarm panel door and the front door.

Pine Canyon                                     A redundant key. The Mount Diablo/EBRPD locks should
                                                be daisy chained.

PG&E                                            All keys returned. Used in MDRP area. All PG&E locks
                                                are daisy chained with MDRP locks.

Mauzy School                                    Both gates have a Medeco Lock daisy chained.


Crow Canyon Country Club                        The silver magnetic tag used to enter the Crow Canyon
                                                Country Club from Crow Canyon Road & St. George and
                                                from Silver Lake & EL Capitan have been REMOVED.
                                                Please use your Medeco key to enter these gates. When
                                                returning to your Station, please be sure to reset the gates
                                                so they will close.



 AUTHOR:      Brent Shaffer, Engineer                                                           Page 3 of 3
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         02/95          REVISED DATE:   09/04, 05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:              Fire Attack Shuttle Supply / Porta-Tank
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06              DOC NO:           TB214
                        CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District provides fire protection to large rural areas where
hydrant systems are non-existent. Temporary portable water reservoirs can be set up and supplied
from a remote water source by Water Tenders. An effective water shuttle is essential to the overall
success of the fire ground operations.
The first arriving officer must decide the type of water supply operation based on the ability to gain
access to the property.


INFORMATION

   A. Attack Engine, Supply Engine, Porta-Tank, Water Tender Shuttle

       If the first arriving company chooses to access the scene, it lays a supply line from the street,
       positions itself at the fire ground, and attacks with tank water. The second arriving engine
       then supplies the attack engine with the supply line by using its tank water. The first
       arriving Water Tender sets up its porta-tank in a position where the supply engine can draft
       and then empties its tank into the reservoir. The supply pumper can now begin drafting
       from the porta-tank to supply the attack engine.

       All Water Tenders are equipped with large volume float pumps. These must be dropped off
       with fuel and hose, as back up.

       The supply engine has the responsibility of supplying a continuous water supply to the
       attack engine. The supply Engineer needs to evaluate the water supply from the porta-tank,
       the supply engine tank, and the "turn around" time of the Water Tenders to determine the
       ability to supply water. This must be relayed to the attack engine so tactical decisions can
       be made.

       Subsequent arriving Water Tenders dump into the porta-tank, proceed to the water source to
       refill, and return to supply the porta-tank.

       Supply and attack engines should try to keep their tanks full, in case of emergencies, but not
       at the expense of a continuous water supply.

   B. Single Attack Engine, Porta-Tank, Water Tender Shuttle

       If a weak bridge, muddy road, or other circumstances causes the first arriving company to
       spot in the street, then hose lines must be manually extended to the fire ground. Tank water
 AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                   REVISED DATE:   11/92, 05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              Fire Attack Shuttle Supply / Porta-Tank
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06              DOC NO:          TB214
                       CROSS REF:



       from the first pumper is used to initial attack. Once a Water Tender arrives, its porta-tank is
       set up at a location from which the attack engine can draft. The Water Tender then empties
       its tank into the porta-tank.

       All Water Tenders are equipped with large volume float pumps. These must be dropped off
       with fuel and hose to serve as a back up.

       Supply and attack engines should try to keep their tanks full, in case of emergencies, but not
       at the expense of a continuous water supply.

   C. General Guidelines
           1. Leave approximately 100 feet to the front of the engine to set up the porta-tank and
              allow Water Tenders maneuvering room.
           2. Place the porta-tank drain on the down slope.
           3. Position strainer at the low point of the tank.
           4. Whenever possible, use two tanks connected with a siphon.
           5. Drafting from the front suction is preferred. Side suction may be used, if absolutely
              necessary.

The water supply/shuttle operation is managed by the Water Supply Supervisor. Water Supply
Supervisor responsibilities include routing Water Tenders to minimize maneuvering, establishing a
staging area for waiting Water Tenders, estimating the current water supply, requesting additional
Water Tenders to meet fire flow needs, and determining the maximum sustained fire flow. To
calculate the maximum sustained fire flow, divide the turnaround time of the Water Tender to the
water source (in minutes) by the total capacity (in gallons) of assigned Water Tenders.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 2 of 2
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                  REVISED DATE:   11/92, 05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              Fire Attack Shuttle Supply
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:                   TB213
                       CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The San Ramon Valley water system, for the most part, is able to provide the water and delivery
system to match fire needs. However, there still exists the need to be able to provide water for
firefighting by shuttling with fire apparatus.

This may be accomplished by several different methods. Most common is the use of pumpers. The
second method is a combination of pumpers and water tenders.

INFORMATION

The following procedure incorporates using two pumpers and one water tender.

FIRST-IN COMPANY

   1. Spot unit providing an escape route.
   2. Rescue/Attack/Investigate.
   3. Attack with 1/2" lines/conserve water.
   4. Engineer hand lays 2 1/2" supply line to a location accessible to second due unit.
   5. Attach 2 1/2" clapper siamese to end furthermost from the unit. Connect opposite end to
      2 1/2" side suction.

SECOND-IN COMPANY

   6. Spot unit in a position so as to supply 2 1/2" supply line from first-in company.
   7. Officer/Firefighter receives directions from Incident Commander.
   8. Engineer hooks up to supply line with 2 1/2" hose with engine pressure of 125 psi.

THIRD-IN COMPANY (Pumper/Water Tender)

   1. Spots units as close as practical to supply line while still allowing room for units to
      maneuver.
   2. Attach a supply line to the second side of the siamese and supply at a pressure 10 psi less
      than second unit.
 AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                  REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              Fire Attack Shuttle Supply
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:                TB213
                       CROSS REF:




The principle behind this method of supply is to utilize the clappered siamese as a pressure-
activated valve. When the pressure in the supply line of the second unit drops, because of low tank
water, the third unit’s higher pressure activates the valve. This ensures a continued water flow.

At this point, the second-in company breaks his line at the pump panel and responds to the nearest
water source. This must be done as fast as possible in order to maintain a continuous flow of water.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                Page 2 of 2
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                  REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Fires Involving Alternate Fuels
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                           06/06         DOC NO:         TB211
                             CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The demand for alternative to petroleum-based fuels has driven the creation of a variety of
alternative fuel types, including a mixture of ethanol and gasoline commonly referred to as
“E85.” E85 is a substantially different chemical than gasoline; as such, the tactics used for an
emergency involving E85 are different than the tactics used for an emergency involving gasoline.
Responder safety may depend upon recognition of these differences and the initiation of
appropriate actions as dictated by the needs of the incident.


INFORMATION

E85 is a term used to describe a fuel mixture composed of 85% ethanol (ethyl alcohol) and 15%
gasoline. Although this is the most common mixture, there are various mixtures utilized in
different areas and at different times of the year. For purposes of emergency response, E85 and
any methanol/gasoline fuel mixture containing greater than 10% ethanol can be treated similarly.

E85 is used as an alternative fuel for use in many newer model gasoline engines. It is
increasingly likely that E85 may be a chemical that is encountered by emergency responders. It
is transported via truck, in the familiar MC306/DOT406 tankers that gasoline is transported in. It
is transported on the Interstate 680 corridor, and it is available at a limited number of filling
stations in Contra Costa County.

An issue related to emergency response is the method in which E85 is referenced by the U.S.
Department of Transportation (DOT). The common shipping name for E85 is “Flammable
Liquid, n.o.s. (ethanol, gasoline),” and its corresponding placard is UN 1993, which is a Class 3
“Flammable” placard. A substantial problem arises in that the compliant shipping name and UN
number, when referenced in the Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG), result in an erroneous
guide. The ERG lists “Flammable liquid, n.o.s.” and UN 1993 as correlating to guide of 128.
Guide 128 is for “Flammable Liquids (Non-Polar / Water Immiscible).” E85 is polar/water
miscible and, as such, guide 128 is not the most appropriate guidance. The most appropriate
guide in the ERG for E85, per the U.S. DOT, is guide 127, “Flammable Liquids (Polar / Water
Miscible).” However, it should be noted that not all products placarded with UN1993 will be
E85; therefore, it is important that caution and common sense be applied to all decisions.

Because E85 is water miscible, a 6% Class-B foam solution should be used for fire and vapor
suppression. Additionally, due to the ethanol content, the foam must be alcohol resistant to
prevent foam degradation.

 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Firefighter/Paramedic – Hazardous Materials Specialist             Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         05/06          REVISED DATE:
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Fires Involving Alternate Fuels
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                           06/06         DOC NO:         TB211
                             CROSS REF:



In addition to being polar/water miscible, E85 has several properties that differ from gasoline
that may be of interest to responders:

    •    Like gasoline, ethanol vapor is denser than air; however, the ethanol vapor disperses
         more rapidly than gasoline.
    •    E85 flame is primarily blue and less bright than gasoline flame but is still easily visible in
         daylight; this is not the “invisible flame” associated with “alcohol” fires.
    •    E85 at low temperatures (near 32° F) is more flammable than gasoline vapor. At normal
         temperatures, however, E85 is less flammable than gasoline due to higher auto ignition
         temperatures.
    •    Securing ignition sources is important on all incidents involving flammable liquids. E85
         varies from gasoline in its properties related to electricity. Gasoline is an electrical
         insulator, meaning it does not conduct electricity. However, E85, due to its ethanol
         content, is an electrical conductor; it does conduct electricity. This means that E85 is
         capable of conducting an ignition source to a location that is within flammable range.


REFERENCES

U.S. Department of Transportation, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Safety
Alert “Responding to Incidents Involving Ethanol and Gasoline Fuel Mixes” April 26, 2006




 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Firefighter/Paramedic – Hazardous Materials Specialist             Page 2 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         05/06          REVISED DATE:
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Forestry Hose Rollers
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      06/06              DOC NO:         TB177
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The District has portable forestry hose rollers. These hose rollers will assist with picking up used
1” and 1 ½”hose at the scene.


INFORMATION

    A. LOCATIONS
         The hose rollers are on E31, E32, E35, E39, all type 3 engines and all water tenders. They
         are stored in the engineer’s compartment on type 3 engines and water tenders. They are
         stored in the forestry hose compartment on the type 1 engines.

    B. OPERATION
         To make a doughnut roll:
              •    Separate hose roller by sliding the 2 pieces of square tubing in opposite directions.
              •    Insert base of the hose roller into the bumper mounted receiver and tighten knob
                   to secure.
              •    Adjust hose guide to desired width
              •    Place handle portion of hose roller onto center shaft
              •    Take hose to be rolled and fold in half.
              •    Position female coupling 4 feet past the male coupling and on top of the 2
                   sections of hose.
              •    Place the fold of the hose through the hose guide and onto the pin.
              •    Turn hose roller so the hose enters the roll on the topside of the roll.
              •    To enlarge the hole in the center of the doughnut roll, grasp the roll and turn the
                   hose roller in the opposite direction the hose was rolled up.
              •    To remove, grasp the doughnut roll and handle and pull away from the base.




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                             Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        07/99           REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                         TOPIC:
                                             Four Wheel Drive Operations – Type IV
                                             Engines
                         EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:             TB009
                         CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The transfer case for four-wheel drive vehicles provides that the driver may select two-wheel or
four-wheel drive. Automatic hub locks are used with this system to enable maximum fuel economy.
Shift lever positions as shown on the shifter knob are:




Do not operate on dry pavement while in 4-wheel drive. Driving under this condition will result in
increased tire wear, hard transfer case shifting and reduced fuel economy.


INFORMATION

Transfer Case Shifting Procedure
Four Wheel Drive

•         The transfer case selector is placed in 2H (2 wheel drive High Range) position for normal
          driving.

•         Incomplete shift from 2WD to 4WD or disengagement of only one hub lock may cause an
          abnormal sound from the front axle. Shift to 4WD, then unlock hubs as described below.


    AUTHOR:                                                                            Page 1 of 2
    REVIEWED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
    APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
    ORIGIN DATE:                     11/00       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                             TRAINING BULLETIN
                                TOPIC:
                                                    Four Wheel Drive Operations – Type IV
                                                    Engines
                                EFFECTIVE DATE:                       05/06          DOC NO:                       TB009
                                CROSS REF:



•          If you cannot shift transfer case because of driveline wind-up, which may be caused by
           driving on dry, hard-surfaced roads, back up the vehicle a few feet, shift the transmission to
           "N" and vigorously shift the transfer case. Vigorous effort may be required. If the transfer
           case still resists shifting, move the vehicle forward a few feet, shift the transmission to "N"
           and shift the transfer case to the desired position.


         TO SHIFT                             TO                                   PROCEDURE
      TRANSFER CASE
          FROM

     2H                           4H                        1. May be made at any speed up to 25 mph (40 km/hr)*
     (Rear-Wheel Drive)           (All-Wheel Drive)
                                                            2. Move transfer case shift lever into position
                                                            3. Hubs lock automatically.

     2H or 4H**                   4L                        1. Stop vehicle, place transmission in "N" (Neutral)
                                  (Low Range)               2. Move transfer case shift lever to 4L.
     (High Range)
                                  (Used on low traction     3. Hubs lock automatically - do not exceed 40 mph
     **(Do not use on dry         road surfaces only.          (65 km/hr).
     pavement)                    Do not use on dry
                                  pavement.)
     4L                           2H or 4H                  1. Stop vehicle, place transmission in "N" (Neutral)
     (Low Range)                  (High Range)              2. Move transfer case shift lever from low range to neutral,
     (Do not use on dry           (Use 4H on low               then to 4H (high range) or 2H
     pavement)                    traction road surfaces    3. When shifting transfer case lever to 2H, unlock (Free
                                  only. Do not use on          Wheel) hubs by shifting transmission to reverse and
                                  dry pavement)                back-up slowly (approximately ten feet)
     4H                           2H                        1.   May be made at any vehicle speed.
     (All-Wheel Drive)            (Rear-Wheel Drive)        2.   Release accelerator pedal momentarily
     (Do not use on dry                                     3.   Move transfer case shift lever into position
     pavement)                                              4.   Unlock (Free Wheel) hubs by shifting transmission to
                                                                 reverse and back-up slowly (approximately ten feet)


      * In cold weather, if difficulty is encountered in shifting from 2H to 4H while vehicle is
        moving at 25 mph (40 km/h), it may be necessary to reduce speed or stop the vehicle.




    AUTHOR:                                                                                                  Page 2 of 2
    REVIEWED:             Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
    APPROVED:             Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
    ORIGIN DATE:                            11/00       REVISED DATE:     05/06
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Guidance for Response to Carbon
                                              Monoxide Detector Activations
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:               7/08         DOC NO:
                                            TB- MiniMax XT Carbon Monoxide Monitor Use; OPS Policy-
                             CROSS REF:
                                            Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector Activations



INTRODUCTION

The combination of the serious threat posed by carbon monoxide releases and the prevalence of
District responses for carbon monoxide detector alarms sounding make guidance for such
incidents essential for emergency response personnel.

INFORMATION

Background:

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas that is produced by the incomplete
burning of solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels. Appliances fueled with natural gas, liquefied
petroleum (LP gas), oil, kerosene, coal, or wood may produce CO. Burning charcoal and running
cars produce CO. Essentially all combustion produces some amount of CO.

Every year, over 200 people in the United States die from CO produced by fuel-burning
appliances (furnaces, ranges, water heaters, room heaters). Others die from CO produced while
burning charcoal inside a home, garage, vehicle or tent. Still others die from CO produced by
cars left running in attached garages. Several thousand people go to hospital emergency rooms
for treatment for CO poisoning.
The initial symptoms of CO poisoning are similar to the flu (but without the fever). They
include:
    • Headache
    • Fatigue
    • Shortness of breath
    • Nausea
    • Dizziness

Many people with CO poisoning mistake their symptoms for the flu or are misdiagnosed by
physicians, which sometimes results in tragic deaths.

The danger that CO presents is related to both the concentration and time of exposure. The
longer and/or higher the concentration of exposure the more severe the symptoms.




 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Captain – Hazmat Specialist                                 Page 1 of 6
 REVIEWED:         Michael Picard, Battalion Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         5/1/08           REVISION DATES:
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Guidance for Response to Carbon
                                              Monoxide Detector Activations
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:               7/08         DOC NO:
                                            TB- MiniMax XT Carbon Monoxide Monitor Use; OPS Policy-
                             CROSS REF:
                                            Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector Activations



The following is a general correlation of symptoms to time and concentration (PPM = parts per
million):


PPM                                  Time                                  Symptoms

25 PPM                               8 hours                      Maximum exposure allowed by Cal-OSHA in
                                                                  the workplace over an eight hour period
                                                                  (Fed-OSHA is 35 ppm).

200 PPM                              2-3 hours                    Mild headache, fatigue, nausea and
                                                                  dizziness.

400 PPM                              1-2 hours                    Serious headache- other symptoms intensify.
                                                                  Life threatening after 3 hours.

800 PPM                              45 minutes                   Dizziness, nausea and convulsions.
                                                                  Unconscious within 2 hours. Death within 2-3
                                                                  hours.

1600 PPM                             20 minutes                   Headache, dizziness and nausea. Death
                                                                  within 1 hour.

3200 PPM                             5-10 minutes                 Headache, dizziness and nausea. Death
                                                                  within 1 hour.

6400 PPM                             1-2 minutes                  Headache, dizziness and nausea. Death
                                                                  within 25-30 minutes.

12,800 PPM                           1-3 minutes                  Death.




 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Captain – Hazmat Specialist                                            Page 2 of 6
 REVIEWED:         Michael Picard, Battalion Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         5/1/08           REVISION DATES:
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Guidance for Response to Carbon
                                              Monoxide Detector Activations
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:               7/08         DOC NO:
                                            TB- MiniMax XT Carbon Monoxide Monitor Use; OPS Policy-
                             CROSS REF:
                                            Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector Activations



Prevention:

Prevention of CO poisoning is accomplished through a combination of proper appliance
installation and maintenance, avoiding introduction of CO from external sources and using a CO
detection device in every occupancy. The following are some of the recommended prevention
practices:

    •    Make sure appliances are installed according to manufacturer's instructions and local
         building codes. Most appliances should be installed by professionals. Have the heating
         system (including chimneys and vents) inspected and serviced annually. The inspector
         should also check chimneys and flues for blockages, corrosion, partial and complete
         disconnections, and loose connections.
    •    Install a CO detector/alarm that meets the requirements of the current UL standard 2034
         or the requirements of the IAS 6-96 standard. A carbon monoxide detector/alarm can
         provide added protection, but is no substitute for proper use and upkeep of appliances
         that can produce CO. Install a CO detector/alarm in the hallway near every separate
         sleeping area of the home. Make sure the detector cannot be covered up by furniture or
         draperies.
    •    Never burn charcoal inside a home, garage, vehicle, or tent.
    •    Never use portable fuel-burning camping equipment inside a home, garage, vehicle, or
         tent.
    •    Never leave a car running in an attached garage, even with the garage door open.
    •    Never service fuel-burning appliances without proper knowledge, skills, and tools.
         Always refer to the owner's manual when performing minor adjustments or servicing
         fuel-burning appliances.
    •    Never use gas appliances such as ranges, ovens, or clothes dryers for heating your home.
    •    Never operate unvented fuel-burning appliances in any room with closed doors or
         windows or in any room where people are sleeping.
    •    Do not use gasoline-powered tools and engines indoors.




 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Captain – Hazmat Specialist                                 Page 3 of 6
 REVIEWED:         Michael Picard, Battalion Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         5/1/08           REVISION DATES:
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Guidance for Response to Carbon
                                              Monoxide Detector Activations
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:               7/08         DOC NO:
                                            TB- MiniMax XT Carbon Monoxide Monitor Use; OPS Policy-
                             CROSS REF:
                                            Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector Activations



CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR BASICS:

Carbon monoxide detectors come in a wide variety of types with a number of power options (all
or some of battery, hardwire and plug-in). Despite the variation they all generally work on the
same principle. CO detectors do not operate in the same fashion as smoke detectors. While a
smoke alarm triggers an alarm when it detects particles of smoke, a CO alarm triggers an alarm
based on exposure to CO over time. It is designed to sound an alarm before an average, healthy
adult may experience symptoms. Current UL Standard 2034 limits for CO alarms to sound are:

    •    30ppm for 30 days
    •    70ppm for 60-240 minutes
    •    150ppm for 10-50 minutes
    •    400ppm for 4-15 minutes

The manufacturer’s recommendations should be adhered to for placement and use. As a general
although not universal rule batteries should be replaced annually and the entire unit every five
years. The alerting method for low batteries and end-of-shelf-life vary from manufacturer to
manufacturer and can be a cause of a true “false” call in which no CO is present and the alert is
misinterpreted as an alarm.

Carbon monoxide detectors are not especially prone to false activations. Activations can occur
do to transient events that subside or due to improper placement but in both cases the detector
was operating properly in an improper environment. As an example a CO detector placed in a
garage will be prone to alarm due to normal CO emissions from vehicles in or near the garage.


RESPONSE GUIDELINES:

Although there is significant scientific data on carbon monoxide emergencies there is no
universal standard for acceptable versus unacceptable levels. This training bulletin is designed to
be reasonable based upon nationally recognized recommendations. If any error is to be made it
should be toward the side of public and responder safety.

The actions taken on any CO alarm incident will depend upon the specific nature of the incident,
the tools and information available to responders and the discretion of the incident commander.


 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Captain – Hazmat Specialist                                 Page 4 of 6
 REVIEWED:         Michael Picard, Battalion Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         5/1/08           REVISION DATES:
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Guidance for Response to Carbon
                                              Monoxide Detector Activations
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:               7/08         DOC NO:
                                            TB- MiniMax XT Carbon Monoxide Monitor Use; OPS Policy-
                             CROSS REF:
                                            Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector Activations



The following is a recommended outline of operations that can be used at a CO alarm incident:

    1. Determine if occupants are in need of medical attention
       • If occupants are feeling ill including a complaint of chest pain, shortness of breath,
          dizziness, headache, or nausea appropriate immediate action should be taken to treat
          them.
       • This may require removing occupants from the area which may require the use of
          self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) by responders.
       • Where CO exposure is suspected a carboxyhemoglobin-oximeter should be requested,
          if appropriate, for non-invasive measurement of CO levels in the potentially exposed.

    2. Activate a CO monitor and ensure that it zeroes or “clears” in clean outside air.
       • Take a baseline CO reading outside
       • Take a CO reading at the entrance to the structure
       • Continue reading throughout the structure

    3. Actions based on readings. There are no universal standards for acceptable levels of CO
       within a structure. Age, health and other factors may cause susceptibility to CO at
       varying levels. The following levels represent best practices based upon consensus levels.

         •    CO readings above 70 ppm are potentially lethal, CO readings between 25 and 70
              ppm are dangerous and CO readings between 9 and 25 ppm have an unclear risk but
              as they exceed the EPA outdoor air quality ceiling they should be considered
              potentially dangerous. The recommendation for any reading above 9 ppm is the same:
                  o All people should evacuate the structure and the power and gas to potential
                      sources should be disconnected. If in doubt gas to the structure should be
                      disconnected. Windows and doors should be opened as available to facilitate
                      the CO clearing the structure. PG&E or the appropriate gas distributor should
                      be contacted for follow-up. The structure should not be reoccupied until
                      evaluated by the gas distributor. The incident commander should consider
                      requesting a hazardous materials response for further detection capabilities if
                      CO readings are persistently above 25 ppm as this represents the Cal-OSHA
                      Time Weighted Average (TWA) for exposure of District personnel.
 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Captain – Hazmat Specialist                                 Page 5 of 6
 REVIEWED:         Michael Picard, Battalion Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         5/1/08           REVISION DATES:
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Guidance for Response to Carbon
                                              Monoxide Detector Activations
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:               7/08         DOC NO:
                                            TB- MiniMax XT Carbon Monoxide Monitor Use; OPS Policy-
                             CROSS REF:
                                            Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector Activations




         •    No CO readings or CO readings of less than 9 ppm do not indicate an emergency
              although District personnel cannot ensure that it is safe to reoccupy the structure. The
              occupants should be advised to contact PG&E or the appropriate gas distributor to
              evaluate the structure. It is not uncommon for residential CO alarms to activate but
              for the activation to have ceased prior to the arrival of responders and for no
              detectable levels of CO to be found.

         •    If CO levels decrease while District personnel are present this information should be
              relayed to the occupant but reduction of CO levels does not ensure resolution of the
              cause. PG&E or the appropriate gas distributor should be contacted for follow-up.
              The structure should not be reoccupied until evaluated by the gas distributor.


Use of CO monitors and information gathered by District personnel should not be considered
definitive. In all cases the occupants should be advised that the only way to verify that the
occupants will not be exposed to CO is for the building to be evacuated and gas disconnected
until reactivated by PG&E or other appropriate gas distributor personnel.

Regardless of readings or findings the situation should be explained to the occupants of the
structure. The occupants should be advised that the battery and device should be replaced at
manufacturer’s recommended intervals.

REFERENCES:

Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Document #466

Responding to Residential Carbon Monoxide Incidents – Guidelines for Fire and Other
Emergency Response Personnel

Underwriter’s Laboratory Product Safety Tips: CO Alarms




 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Captain – Hazmat Specialist                                 Page 6 of 6
 REVIEWED:         Michael Picard, Battalion Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         5/1/08           REVISION DATES:
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                         TOPIC:        Hand Signals – Fire Ground Operations
                         EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06       DOC NO:            TB092
                         CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The difficulties experienced in getting lines into place after they are charged, or in kinking broken
lines, or in extending and reducing lines are well known in the fire service. No matter how quickly
a line is placed in position for service, some delay will be experienced in getting water, if
messengers must be relied on to carry messages to the pump operator.

If the fire engineer turns water into the line before it is in place and ready for action, delay will
inevitably occur. The voice is not a dependable method of telling the fire engineer what is wanted
because of the noise of the motors and other distractions always present on the fire ground.

Even though other means of communication, such as radios or portables exist, these are not always
reliable or available. To offset such handicaps, a series of hand signals can be used on the fire
ground.

These hand signals are also applicable when moving apparatus or driving under any circumstances,
regardless of whether or not it is during fire ground operations.


INFORMATION

The following pages illustrate the standard hand signals for moving apparatus and pump operations.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 1 of 8
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       04/91           REVISED DATE:   05/06
STANDARD HAND SIGNALS


  A. Backing Up Fire Apparatus


     1. Start Backing Up

        a. With arms extended bring them towards you repeatedly.

        b. Use slow motions to have driver back up slowly, and faster motion if you want
           driver to back up faster.




     2. Slow Down Prepare to Stop

        a. Extend arms to the front with your hands open and palms toward the driver.
3. Diminishing Clearance to Stopping Point

   a. Hold your open hands to your side, palms apart towards each other the approximate
      distance to the obstacle or stopping point.

   b. Close hands as the distance left to go reduces until you indicate an immediate stop
      when you hands touch. ALWAYS ALLOW FOR DRIVER'S REACTION TIME.




4. Stop

   a. Extend arms to front with palms toward the driver and close hands to a fist.
      This signal should follow the "slow down prepare to stop” signal.
5. Backing Apparatus to the Right

   a. With right arm extended to the right side at a 45 degree angle and pointing at the
      ground.

   b. And left arm extended to the front, bring hand back to body and repeat the motion.




6. Backing Apparatus to the Left

   a. With left arm extended to the left side at a 45 degree angle and pointing at the
      ground.

   b. And right arm extended to the front, bring hand back to body and repeat the motion.
7. Straighten Vehicle.

   a. While backing a vehicle at an angle, sometimes the driver needs to straighten out his
      wheels and proceed back in a straight line.

   b. To give this command, place both hands in front with palms facing about six inches
      apart.
B. Pump Operation Signals


   1. Charge Line, Charge Hydrant

      a. One arm above the head with one finger pointing upwards.

      b. Rotate hand and arm from the elbow until signal is received.




   2. Shut Water Off or Close Discharge

      a. Bring open palm face down, across throat, several times.
C. Other Hand Signals


   1. Come Here

      a. Point at person and then to ground at your side. Repeat until desired action occurs.




   2. I Need Help

      a. Both hands placed on top of the head.
3. Increase nozzle pressure 10 psi

   a. Extend both arms horizontally at shoulder height, palms forward and thumbs up.

   b. Raise arms to approximately 45 degrees and repeat until signal is received.




4. Decrease nozzle pressure 10 psi

   a. Extend both arms horizontally at shoulder height, palms back and thumbs down.

   b. Lower arms to approximately 45 degrees and repeat until signal is received.

   c. Note: Pressure signals do not mean 10 psi for each sweep of the arm. A separate
      signal must be made after each pressure change.
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:              Hand Tool Maintenance and Use
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                    06/06              DOC NO:            TB082
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The providing of pre-maintenance and quality care of all hand tools effectively extends the life of
the tool and lessens the chance of injuries to personnel.


INFORMATION

All hand tools including McLeods, shovels, Pulaskis, axes, sledge hammers, and pike poles should
be maintained and repaired when need arises. Such maintenance and repairs may include:
sharpening the cutting edge of the tool with a flat file, then applying a strip of masking tape over the
cutting edge for protection. Sand out rough dry wood handles by using 80 to 120 grain sandpaper.
After wooden handle is sanded down to a smooth finish, spray paint a two inch orange band just
below the metal portion of the tool near the shaft of the wood handle. Spray paint the tool head
according to proper color. After tool is dry, apply identifying color coding tape approximately one
inch away from orange band. The wood handle is now ready to be coated with a fine film of linseed
oil. Apply linseed oil by using a rag until the handle is fully coated; then let tool dry. For cracked
or damaged tool heads, tag and replace. For damaged handles replace with a new handle.

Each station should have hand tool maintenance supplies which include: spray paint, metal wedges,
flat file, masking tape, linseed oil, and 80 to 120 grain sandpaper.


                MCLEOD                             -FLAT BLACK
                PULASKI                            -FLAT BLACK
                SQ. SHOVEL                         -FLAT BLACK
                SLEDGE HAMMER                      -FLAT BLACK
                PIKE POLE                          -FLAT BLACK
                PICK POINTED AXES                  -CHERRY RED
                SCOOP SHOVEL                       -N/A
                TWO INCH BAND                      -FLORESCENT
                                                    ORANGE



** FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION SEE ATTACHED PAGES.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 1 of 12
 REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       04/89      REVISED DATE:   11/00, 05/06
TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT #1


                                INSPECT HAND TOOLS


CONDITIONS:       Given fire tools commonly used in the District.

STANDARDS:        Check condition of each tool and identify those which need
                  replacement or repair.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

     A.   Inspect tool for serviceability.

          1.      Tool Head

                  a.      Cracked heads should be discarded.

                  b.      Check for damaged cutting edge (chips, etc.).

                  c.      Clean off rust and apply and oil coating.

                  d.      Safety guards (manufactured metal, plastic, or made from
                          old fire hose) should be installed or available.

          2.      Tool Handle

                  a.      Check alignment of the handle to insure it is not warped.
                          Axes and Pulaskis with warped or improperly aligned handles
                          must be rejected and tagged so handles will be replaced.

                  b.      Check for cracks, splintering and other indications of unsoundness.

                  c.      Make sure the handle is smooth, sandpaper rough spots, and
                          remove pitch or sticky spots by scraping off with pocket knife.

                  d.      Check to ensure that the head is securely attached to the handle;
                          loose heads should be rewedged or rejected as unsafe.
TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT #2


                                                  SHARPEN HAND TOOLS


CONDITIONS:                   Given a file and hand tools (Pulaski, shovel, axe, McLeod).

STANDARDS:                    Safely sharpen the tools to standards identified in the performance measures.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

     A.          Sharpen a Pulaski axe.

                 1.           Steady the tool.

                              a.          In the field - Lodge the grubbing end into a stump or put the
                                          Pulaski into any position where the whole tool is stable and the
                                          axe edge is in a comfortable position to sharpen.

                              b.          At the shop - Secure the handle of the Pulaski in a vise.

                 2.           Outfit the file (10" flat mill bastard).

                              a.          Install safety file guard.

                              b.          Put file handle on pointed end of the file.

                 3.           Place side of file against one side of the beveled blade.

                 4.           Push the file one direction only (and away from you) along the edge of the
                              bevel as you apply pressure.

                 5.           File both sides to a bevel of approximately 30 degrees and until
                              all nicks are gone.

     B.          Sharpen a Pulaski hoe edge.

                 1.           Same as “Sharpen a Pulaski axe” as outlined above.

                 2.           File bevel to 45 degrees until all nicks are gone.


     ........................................................................................................................................
     CAUTION - Always wear gloves and use guard and handle when sharpening tools.
     ........................................................................................................................................
     3.     Drag a file or a wire brush back away from the bevel, on the back side
            of the hoe to remove burrs.

C.   Sharpen an axe - follow same procedure as for the Pulaski axe head.

D.   Sharpen a shovel.

     1.     Steady the tool.

            a.      In the field - Sit on the handle with the scoop side up.

            b.      At the shop - Put the sleeve in a vise with the scoop side up.




     2.     Push and press the file in one direction only up against and along the blade
            until the point is reached.

     3.     Do not round-off the point.

     4.     Repeat the action for the other side of the face.

     5.     Continue sharpening until there are no more nicks and the blade is
            sharp.

     6.     Remove burrs with a wire brush or reverse file action on the underside of
            the blade.

E.   McLeod sharpening specifications are essentially the same as they are for the hoe
     side of the Pulaski. The rake side is not sharpened.
TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT #3


                                  USE A PULASKI OR AXE


CONDITIONS:           Given a Pulaski or axe, properly maintained, and a fireline to be constructed.

STANDARDS:            Use the Pulaski and axe properly as a cutting tool and the Pulaski as a
                      grubbing tool to construct 20 feet of fireline within five minutes in the safest
                      manner.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

Cutting tools (axes and Pulaskis) are used to remove difficult woody fuels like roots, branches,
brush and some logs from the designated fireline. The Pulaski can also be used to grub-out and
scrape burning and unburned fuels.

       A.     Use a Pulaski or axe for fireline construction and mop-up.

              1.      Chop with a double-bitted axe or with the cutting
                      edge of a Pulaski.

                      a.      Grip the tool securely, keep your feet apart
                              maintain solid footing.

                      b.      Control your swing to keep cutting edges out
                              of the ground and rocks.

                      c.      Check the arc of the swing for clearance.

                      d.      Swing the axe downward and at a 45 degree angle.

                      e.     Move loose material out of the way so you won't
                             trip on it or get tangled up while swinging.

                      f.      Watch out for other workers. Maintain 10 foot spacing.

                      NEVER CHOP TOWARD YOUR FEET OR LEGS.

              2.      Grub with a Pulaski grubbing edge.

                      a.      Grip the handle securely and keep your feet apart, and
                              on solid footing.

                      b.      Chop straight downward into the target in a way that the
                    hoe hits at a 45 degree angle. Short chopping strokes are
                    safer than long full strength strokes.

            c.      Wear goggles. Rock chips, wood chips, dirt, etc. can fly
                    into your eye.

     3.     Trench with a Pulaski tool.

            a.      Loosen the soil with the grubbing edge of the Pulaski by
                    swinging the tool parallel to body.

            b.      Pull the soil back toward the unburned area.

     4.     Scrape char off logs, etc., with a Pulaski grubbing edge.

            a.      Lightly scrape char off the log. This separates possible
                    burning char from the logs.

            b.      Do not chop; it will splatter embers over a wide area.

B.   Safely carry your Pulaski or axe.
     Cutting tools are dangerous. They must be handled carefully. There is a safe,
     proper, and comfortable way to carry them.

     1.     Find the balance point of the Axe or Pulaski (just behind the
            shoulder or the handle).

     2.     Keep cutting edges sheathed when walking or transporting tools.

     3.     When using a Pulaski, carry the cutting edge away from the body
            and pointing downward - the grubbing head up.

     4.     Carry the tool on the downhill side of you. The tool can more
            easily and safely be released out of the way, where you won't fall
            on it.

     5.     Maintain ten foot spacing from other personnel while working
            or walking.
     6.     Place the Pulaski or axe in a safe place when it is not being used.
            Lean the tool against an object where it will stand upright and be
            out of the way of passing personnel.

     7.     Transfer the tool safely from one person to another - handle first;
            never hand the sharp edge of a tool to someone.
TOOL AND EQUIPMENT #4


                                           USE A SHOVEL


CONDITIONS:             Given a properly maintained shovel and a fireline to be constructed.

STANDARDS :             Use the shovel as a scraping and cutting tool to construct a section
                        of fireline 20 feet long within five minutes in the safest manner.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

The shovel is the most versatile of all hand tools used in fire suppression. It is used for light cutting,
digging, scraping, and throwing dirt.

        A.      Use a shovel for all fireline construction phases.

                1.      Digging.

                        a.      Have shovel in hand.

                        b.      Stand on one foot.

                        c.      Place other foot on top of shovel blade.

                        e.      Pry back soil by pulling back handle.

                        f.      Lift shovel blade full of soil by lifting with handle.

                        g.      Turn soil over.

                2.      Scraping.

                        a.      Put one hand just above the sleeve of the blade on the handle
                                and the other hand near the end of the handle.

                        b.      Place the outside of one elbow (elbow of hand on sleeve) on
                                inside of knee.

                        c.      Place shovel blade on area or section of line to be scraped.

                        d.      Use your knee as a fulcrum in the movement of the shovel, as
                                it is less tiring.
                        e.      Scrape by moving knee and arms sideways.
3.   Throwing dirt.

     a.     Hold the shovel firmly in your hand and aim at your target,
            before throwing the dirt with you shovel. The throw should be
            parallel with the fire and directed at base of the flame for
            maximum effectiveness.




     b.     Throw the dirt with force in a sideways spreading motion. This
            technique is particularly effective in running grass and other
            surface fuel fires.
     c.      The overhead method of throwing dirt with a shovel is particularly
             effective for knocking down isolated hot spots in heavy cover
             (foliage). Grasp the handle firmly, estimate distance of throw, line
             up the shovel handle with your target, and prepare to throw, and keep
             your legs spread and body balanced.




     d.      Throw the dirt directly over your shoulder at your target. The
             forward hand slides down the handle while the other hand stabilizes
             tool and helps guide it.

             Dirt should drop into the base of the fire to reduce heat and prevent
             the fire from crowning into upper foliage. Continue throwing dirt
             until flames have been knocked down.




4.   Cutting light fuels and roots.

     Even though there are better tools for cutting, the shovel is capable of doing
     a surprisingly good job in cutting ground fuels, roots of less that about two
     inches in diameter, sod, and limbing small branches from trees.
            a.      Cutting a trench in sod or heavy turf and moss.

                    (1)     Use a sharp shovel to cut a continuous line for whatever
                            distance.

                    (2)     Cut another line - parallel within about one foot of the
                            previously cut line.

                    (3)     Come back and cut sections the length of the designated
                            trench.

                    (4)     Remove the sections from the trench.

            b.      Chopping roots with a shovel - some roots cannot be readily cut
                    with spading and digging.

                    (1)     Aim the shovel blade at the target root.

                    (2)     Raise shovel back into the air.

                    (3)     Chop down with sharp edge of the blade at a 45 degree
                            angle to the root.

B.   Safely carry your shovel.

     The shovel might seem like a relatively safe tool; even so, there is a proper and
     comfortable way to carry the shovel.

     1.     Find the balance point of the shovel (usually just behind the sleeve).

     2.     Carry the shovel on the downhill side of you. Should you trip; you
            won't fall on it.

     3.     Always maintain a spacing of ten feet from another firefighter when
            you are working or walking.

     4.     Carry the shovel backside up (scoop side down).

     5.     Place the shovel in a safe place when not in use. Shovels should be stuck in
            the ground and out of the way where passing personnel won't walk into or
            trip over them.

     6.     Pass your shovel safely from one person to another. Pass it by the handle.
            Never point a sharp edge at someone.

     7.     Do not run with any tool.
TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT #5


                                                            USE A MCLEOD


CONDITIONS:                    Given a properly maintained McLeod and a fireline to be constructed.

STANDARDS:                     Use the McLeod tool as a scraping tool to construct a section of fireline 20
                               feet long within three minutes in the safest manner.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

The McLeod tool is used as a scraping tool in light ground fuels. One side of the blade is for raking
and the other side is for scraping and light chopping.

       A.          Use a McLeod for fireline construction.

                   1.          Scraping.

                               a.           Scrape with the scraping blade by pulling backwards toward yourself
                                            with desired pressure.

                               b.           If there are too many heavy roots or rocks in the line, use a Pulaski or
                                            shovel to cut or pry them loose.

                   2.          Raking.

                               a.           Rake with the raking side of the blade by pulling back toward
                                            yourself.

                   3.          Chop with a McLeod in light fuels that will yield easily to the stroke of the
                               cut.

       B.          Safely carry your McLeod

                   1.          Find the balance point of the McLeod (on the handle just behind the sleeve).

                   2.          Put a sheath on you McLeod blade and rake if available.

       ...........................................................................................................................................
       CAUTION: Never use any tool in a way which causes the end of the handle to come
                              up between your legs.
       ...........................................................................................................................................
3.   Carry the McLeod on the downhill side of you.

4.   Maintain a spacing of ten feet from the other firefighters when you are
     walking or working.

5.   When not in use, stand the tool on the flat side of the blade where it will not
     be in the way of any passing personnel.

6.   Pass your tool safely from one person to another - pass the handle, not the
     blade.

7.   Do not run with any tool.
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:
                                            Helitack/Operations
                                            Bouywall Portable Water Tank
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                    06/06              DOC NO:            TB212
                        CROSS REF:

INTRODUCTION

The California Department of Forestry Helitack Units, use large portable water tanks. The San
Ramon Valley Fire Protection District has a 6,000 gallon water tank designed specifically to be
used by the California Department of Forestry Helitack and its Bambi Bucket.

INFORMATION

The tank is available to any agency in Contra Costa County. Requests for its use should come
through Contra Costa Fire. This is necessary to ensure that an adequate number of water tenders are
dispatched for a successful operation. The tank is stored on WT-615 and will respond upon request.
Upon dispatch, the location of the incident will be given along with its name, tactical channel, and
staging area.

Upon arrival at the designated Helispot, the Captain on the water tender will coordinate the
placement of the tank according to the attached diagrams and the Helitack Captain. The Captain has
the ultimate responsibility for the safe use of the water tank, water tender, and personnel. If, at any
time, the Captain does not have the resources to supply water, provide scene protection, or if the
crew’s safety is in question, the Captain will take necessary actions and inform the Incident
Commander.

Deployment of a Bambi Bucket will be done by the Helitack crew. Hand signals and direction for
filling the bucket from the tank will be done by a Helitack crew member.

It will be necessary for Firefighters to guide the bucket into and out of the water tank. This is due to
the air movement caused by the rotors and the space restrictions.

Attached are the layouts, safety requirements, and diagrams which, if followed, will ensure a safe
operation.

It should also be noted that the water tank is not limited to Helitack use only. It may be deployed and
used as any auxiliary water source to supply Type I, Type III, and Type IV engines.

HELISPOT LOCATION

Possibly the most important consideration in helicopter operations is the selection of areas in which
to land the helicopter. You may have the finest helicopter on the commercial market, a good
Helitack crew, and the best helicopter accessories available, but you still need a network of landing
areas to fully utilize the machine. The types of activity and the volume of traffic will affect selection
and development of these landing areas.

 AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 1 of 13
 REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       08/88      REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:
                                            Helitack/Operations
                                            Bouywall Portable Water Tank
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                    06/06              DOC NO:          TB212
                        CROSS REF:



A Helispot manager needs to be aware of considerations in Helispot site selection to provide for
efficient operation during incident activities. A Captain could be directed to construct a Helispot in
an area as a part of the Incident Action Plan or to construct or modify an area for an emergency
evacuation of incident personnel.

Pilots can provide valuable assistance in selecting Helispot locations. Helispot location and
construction should accommodate the largest helicopter type on the incident. After completion of the
Helispot, it should be checked again prior to being used. Pilots have the final word on safety related
matters.

Situations to look for when site selecting:
    A. Areas that will require minimum labor to bring to proper standards.
    B. Practical location to the incident.
    C. Able to expand for future needs (extra landing pad).
    D. Good approach and departure paths for changing winds. The shallower and wider, the better.
    E. A level landing pad or soil that can easily be leveled.
    F. Natural dust abatement - ground cover.
    G. Terrain free of obstacles that will hinder walking to and from the landing pad. This will make
       loading and unloading of passenger/cargo safer and more efficient.
    H. Access for water tenders and engines to fill bladder and to provide scene protection for the air
       crews.

Situations to avoid:
    A. Freshly cut dozer lines (dust).
    B. Rocky landing pads (tank clearance, skid damage).
    C. Sloping landing pads (dynamic roll over).
    D. Wires, cables, antenna (cannot be seen from air).
    E. Steep approach and departure paths (height/velocity curve).
    F. Lee side turbulence (downdrafts, wind sheer).
    G. Trash and debris (foreign object damage).
    H. Tall grass (lessens ground effect, conceals hazards).

 AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 2 of 13
 REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       08/88      REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:
                                           Helitack/Operations
                                           Bouywall Portable Water Tank
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                    06/06              DOC NO:               TB212
                       CROSS REF:

   I. Tundra and boggy areas (dynamic roll over).
   J. Pinnacles requiring high power on landings (tailbooms become inaccessible for loading or
      unloading tools).

HELISPOT LAYOUT

A Helispot is a natural or improved takeoff and landing area intended for temporary helicopter
use. It may or may not have road access and should be located anywhere on any incident to
accommodate the best use of the helicopters.

Helispots have two major components; the landing pad and safety circle. The sizes of the landing
pad and safety circle vary with the size and needs of the types of helicopters being used. The size
should be based on the largest type helicopter using that Helispot. The following chart contains
landing pad and safety circle dimensions.

HELISPOT LAYOUT REQUIREMENTS

   A. Landing Zones

           1. Safety Circle - Minimum area required for take-off and landing.
                     a. Standards, all helicopters:
                             - There shall not be any obstacles other than brush (two foot high
                               maximum) in safety circle.
                             - Minimize foreign object damage: secure or eliminate loose objects
                               in vicinity, i.e., twigs, branches, trash. Stand-by engine with
                               charged line and dry chemical extinguisher.
                             - Dust abatement: dust should be kept to a minimum. Natural
                               grasses help reduce dust. As necessary, use soil stabilizers to reduce
                               dust in the safety circle.
                     b. Size - 110'.

           2. Landing Pad – Standards
                     a. Slope, maximum 10 percent.
                     b. Sufficiently free of large rocks so as to ensure a stable landing.
                     c. Size - 30' x 30'.

 AUTHOR:                                                                                     Page 3 of 13
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      08/88      REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:
                                          Helitack/Operations
                                          Bouywall Portable Water Tank
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                    06/06              DOC NO:           TB212
                      CROSS REF:



          3. Helispot with helitorch operations must meet all standards for helispot plus the
             following special limitations.
                    a. 100' separation from other operating helicopters.
                    b. Mixing area will be located a minimum of 50' from landing and parking
                       area.
                    c. No mixing during take-offs, landings or while helicopters are running on the
                       pad.

  B. Approach and Departure Paths

          1. Preferably, the approach and departure paths should not be the same. In fact, several
             approach and departure paths should be developed if possible. This will allow pilots
             to adjust to changing meteorological conditions.
          2. The minimum width of approach and departure paths should be same as the diameter
             of the corresponding safety circle.
          3. Curving paths are permissible in order to avoid major obstacles.
          4. The flight paths should have a maximum 20 percent clear slope, measured from the
             edge of the safety circle.
          5. No obstacle should penetrate that slope during the 20 degree spread for:
                    a. Approach path - 150 feet (48 meters).
                    b. Departure paths - 300 feet (95 meters).
                 Refer to diagram on following page.

          6. Areas suitable for landing the helicopter in the event of an emergency would be
             desirable along the paths.
          7. The paths may generally be aligned with the prevailing wing, but not always. Pilots
             will use such variables as velocity of the wing, turbulence, updrafts and downdrafts,
             in deciding the direction of their approach and departure; therefore, the importance of
             having several approach and departure paths available.
          8. Approach and departure routes should avoid areas where people are concentrated,
             such as eating and rest areas. Under no circumstances should routes for sling loading
             or helitorch-carrying helicopters overfly these areas.

AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 4 of 13
REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      08/88      REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:
                                          Helitack/Operations
                                          Bouywall Portable Water Tank
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                    06/06              DOC NO:         TB212
                      CROSS REF:

USING THE BOUYWALL

  A. UNPACKING

      CAUTION: Do not drag the BOUYWALL. Lift it or fold it up and roll it. Dragging
      abrades, and can rip the fabric. Place the BOUYWALL bag in the center of the area where
      it will be used. Unzip the bag and lift out the BOUYWALL. For large BOUYWALLS
      unzip the bag, roll the package over, and lift the bag off the BOUYWALL.

  B. DEPLOYMENT

          1. SURFACE: The BOUYWALL should be placed on a smooth surface free from
             sharp rocks, holes, sticks and brambles. The bottom of the BOUYWALL should be
             firmly supported, not bridging any holes. If the ground is rough or sharp, place a
             tarpaulin under the BOUYWALL to protect it.

          2. SLOPE: The ground should be as flat as possible. Slopes cause the BOUYWALL
             to assume an oval shape and reduce its capacity. If the slope is more than 1 in 15 or
             is slippery, tie the BOUYWALL handles (if equipped) to trees or pegs to prevent
             movement.

      CAUTION: Do not drag the BOUYWALL. Lift it or fold it up and roll it. Dragging
      abrades, and can rip the fabric.

          3. SETUP: Spread the BOUYWALL out flat with the valve on the low side. Inspect
             the bottom to be sure it is not wrinkled. Straighten out any wrinkles by pulling on
             the handles (if equipped) or the edge of the BOUYWALL. It may be necessary to
             dig a small hole in front of the outlet fitting to accommodate your hose.

          4. INFLATING TOP RINGS: The inflatable top ring is fitted with a tire valve, a
             fill/dump valve (usable with a foot pump), and the ring with an air hose, a tire pump
             or a foot pump until air escapes from the pressure relief valve.

  C. FILLING

      The BOUYWALL can be filled using a hose attached to the outlet fitting, by a hose draped
      over the top ring or by a helicopter using a BAMBI bucket. If the hose has a powerful jet of
      water, be sure the blast doesn't push the BOUYWALL out of shape.


AUTHOR:                                                                               Page 11 of 13
REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      08/88      REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:
                                          Helitack/Operations
                                          Bouywall Portable Water Tank
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                    06/06              DOC NO:          TB212
                      CROSS REF:

      If there is a hose and no valve attached to the outlet, raising the end of the hose above the
      water level can be used to control the outlet flow.

  D. EMPTYING

      Empty the BOUYWALL as much as possible through the drain fitting. Lift the side
      opposite the drain and roll the BOUYWALL up towards the drain. This will expel the
      remaining water.

      Remove the cap on the fill/dump valve to let the air out of the ring.

  E. REPACKING

      Fold the sides of the BOUYWALL towards the center then roll up towards the valve. Lift in
      to the storage bag. On big BOUYWALLS place the bag over the BOUYWALL, turn the
      package over and zip up.

  F. REPAIRS

      The BOUYWALL fabric can be repaired with the supplied patch kit or a repair kit for vinyl
      boats or swimming pool liners. Long cuts should have a 1/2" (12mm) diameter hole cut at
      each end to stop further ripping. This makes the rip a dumbbell shape. The patch should be
      2" (50mm) larger all around than the damage. Small punctures can be repaired with glue
      only. The fabric in BOUYWALLS that have been in use for some time may have cured on
      the surface. The surface may need scuffing and thorough cleaning to achieve a good glue
      bond.

               ON TOP OF 1500 GALLON TANK

      1 - 6000 Gallon "BOUYWALL" portable reservoir
      1 - Black carry bag for Bouywall
      1 - 10' of 2 1/2" hose
      2 - 2 1/2" gated valves
      4 - Ear protectors - headset type
      4 - Safety goggles
      1 - Red carry bag for Bouywall accessories
      2 - 4' of 2 1/2" hard suction hose
      1 - 14' x 18' salvage cover


AUTHOR:                                                                                Page 12 of 13
REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      08/88      REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                  TRAINING BULLETIN
                     TOPIC:
                                         Helitack/Operations
                                         Bouywall Portable Water Tank
                     EFFECTIVE DATE:                    06/06              DOC NO:         TB212
                     CROSS REF:




AUTHOR:                                                                              Page 13 of 13
REVIEWED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     08/88      REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:              High Pressure By-Pass Type IV Engines
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:                   TB011
                        CROSS REF:




INFORMATION


The pumps on the Type IV engines are equipped with a high pressure by-pass line. The purpose
of the high pressure by-pass line is to allow the pump to always circulate water, thus preventing
overheating of the pump when lines are shut down for any duration.

The valve controlling the high pressure by-pass line should never be shut off. Operators, when
doing their equipment check, should inspect the valve to make sure it is in the open position.

This valve is a small ¼" petcock style valve and is located next to the tank filler neck.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                    Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       11/00       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           High Rise Pack Loading Instructions
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:           TB137
                            CROSS REF:




INFORMATION


MATERIALS NEEDED

         ·1–100' 1¾' LIGHTWEIGHT DOUBLE JACKET HOSE
         ·1–HIGH RISE NOZZLE
         ·1–2½" TO 1½" REDUCER
         ·1–HIGH RISE PACK STRAP
         ·1–HIGH RISE PACK TEMPLATE
         ·1-FOLDING HOSE SPANNER

STEP 1

Begin with the template on the ground, red stripes up and the offset end to your left.

Lay the hose pack strap on top of the template between the red lines with the velcro facing down
and the straps pointing towards you.

Place the hose to be loaded on your left side to facilitate the packaging process.




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                        Page 1 of 10
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/95           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           High Rise Pack Loading Instructions
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:           TB137
                            CROSS REF:



STEP 2

Lay hose flat, red stripe down, on top of the template on the side closest to you. Place the female
coupling flush with the right end of the template.

Grab the hose at the point where it crosses the template on your left. This is the short side of the
template.

While holding on to the hose at this point, slide the hose to your right past the template, until the
point where you grabbed the hose is flush with the right side of the template.




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                        Page 2 of 10
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/95           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           High Rise Pack Loading Instructions
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:                TB137
                            CROSS REF:



STEP 3

Start with folding the hose on your left side, flush with the short side of the template.

Flat load the hose on top of itself, keeping the folds flush with the ends of the template.

Continue to flat load the hose on top of itself until there are 6 layers of hose. The red stripe will be
up.




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                             Page 3 of 10
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/95           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           High Rise Pack Loading Instructions
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:            TB137
                            CROSS REF:



STEP 4

After 6 layers of hose, roll hose 1 half turn and begin another stack of hose, on the far side of the
first stack. The red stripe will be down.

The hose should transfer to the next stack at the back of the pack. This transfer will be on the right
end of the template.




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                         Page 4 of 10
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/95           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           High Rise Pack Loading Instructions
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:            TB137
                            CROSS REF:



STEP 5

Begin the second stack with the first fold on your left side flush with the long side of the template.
This long loop will create a handle for the hose pack.

This loop will be the middle of the hose line.




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                         Page 5 of 10
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/95           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           High Rise Pack Loading Instructions
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:          TB137
                            CROSS REF:



STEP 6

Continue to flat load hose with the remainder of the folds even with the first stack.

The male coupling should end up just past the velcro strap on the left. (If necessary use a dutchman
to adjust hose length.)




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                       Page 6 of 10
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/95           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           High Rise Pack Loading Instructions
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:         TB137
                            CROSS REF:



STEP 7

Take the female coupling and fold it over the top of the hose pack so it is even with the male
coupling. Just past the Velcro strap on the left (If necessary use a dutchman to adjust the hose
length.)

Attach the 2½" to 1½" reducer to the female coupling.

Attach the high rise nozzle to the male coupling.




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                      Page 7 of 10
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/95           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           High Rise Pack Loading Instructions
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:         TB137
                            CROSS REF:



STEP 8

Fasten hose pack together with Velcro straps.

Place nozzle and coupling as close to the Velcro strap on the left as possible. This will hold the
couplings secure.

Attach the folding hose spanner to the female coupling with the nylon cord lanyard.




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                      Page 8 of 10
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/95           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           High Rise Pack Loading Instructions
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:              TB137
                            CROSS REF:



KEY POINTS
Load hose pack with gated wye and stinger on top in the hose bed so it is deployed first.
Overall length of hose pack should not exceed the length of the template.
The long loop can be used to pull hose pack forward.
Hose pack can then be shoulder loaded.




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                           Page 9 of 10
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/95           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           High Rise Pack Loading Instructions
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:         TB137
                            CROSS REF:



ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

All Type 1 Engines and Trucks have been equipped with two 100 foot 1¾ inch double-jacketed
High Rise Hose Packs with nozzles and fittings. Each pack consists of the following:

    •    100 feet of 1¾ inch Double-Jacketed Polyurethane Yellow with a Red Stripe, National Fire
         Hose.

    •    One 1 ½” Akron Wide Range 75 Psi Turbo Jet break away fog nozzle with red bale
         30, 95, 125, 150, 200 gpm and 7/8” integral smooth bore

    •    One 2½ x 1½ inch Aluminum Reducer.

    •    One Orange High Rise Pack Strap

    •    One Folding Hose Spanner

    •    One Plywood Hose Pack Gauge (stored in each station).


GATED WYE PACK

In addition to the items listed above, one hose pack on each apparatus is equipped with the
following:

    •    One 2 ½” x 1 ½” Gated wye

    •    One 2 ½” x 8’ stinger hose

    •    One Orange High Rise Pack Strap with 4 straps

This additional equipment allows one hose pack to be set up with the gated wye and stinger hose
attached and secured. This gated wye pack should be stored in the hose bed, so it is the first hose
pack to be deployed.




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                      Page 10 of 10
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        01/95           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:            Honda Transfer Pump on Water Tender 678
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:           TB117
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

Water Tenders 615 and 678 are equipped with a 132 GPM Honda pump. The pump has the
capability to be deployed as a District tool to increase pressure and GPM. This information sheet
will outline pump specifications and starting procedures.


INFORMATION

   A. Pump Specifications

           Honda 4 cycle engine                                    Oil 15-40
           132 GPM, 71 psi                                         Oil capacity 0.6 quarts
           5.5 HP                                                  1½" suction
           Self priming                                            1½" discharge

   B. Starting Procedures

       NOTE: Do not start unless pump has been primed.

           1. Connect garden hose to pump intake, utilizing 1 ½” to GHT (garden hose
              thread) reducer and GHT double female.
           2. Crack open gated wye.
           3. Make sure fuel valve is on.
           4. Close choke lever. - Do not use the choke if the engine is warm or the ambient high.
           5. Make sure engine switch is on.
           6. Move throttle to approximately midpoint.
           7. Pull starter grip.
           8. As engine warms up, gradually open choke.
           9. Set throttle to desired speed.
           10. When pumping from a draft, be sure to prime pump with hand priming pump. Be
               sure to close primer valve after prime is achieved.

           Procedures # 1 and 2 are only required for pump checking purposes.

 AUTHOR:                                                                                     Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:       Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      08/93           REVISED DATE:   11/00, 05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:            Honda Transfer Pump on Water Tender 678
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:          TB117
                        CROSS REF:




  C. Stopping and Storing

          1. Stopping the Engine
               a. Move throttle lever all the way to the right.
               b. Turn engine switch to off.
               c. Turn fuel valve off.

          2. Storing Pump
               a. Refill fuel level.
               b. Check oil level.




AUTHOR:                                                                                     Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                       08/93           REVISED DATE:   11/00, 05/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Hose Loads
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:            TB059
                            CROSS REF:




INFORMATION

The following is the minimum hose complement carried by each unit in the District:

TYPE 1 ENGINE                                                   TYPE 3 ENGINE

825 FT – 4" SUPPLY HOSE                                         625 FT – 2 ½" SUPPLY HOSE
825 FT – 2 ½" SUPPLY HOSE                                       200 FT – 1 ½" ATTACK HOSE - YELLOW
200 FT – 1 ¾” ATTACK HOSE - RED                                 200 FT – 1½”ATTACK HOSE - GREEN
200 FT – 1 ¾” ATTACK HOSE - BLUE                                600 FT – 1 ½" FORESTRY HOSE FLAT LOAD
200 FT – 1 ½” ATTACK HOSE - YELLOW                              800 FT – 1 ½" FORESTRY HOSE PACKS
200 FT – 1 ½” ATTACK HOSE - GREEN                               150 FT – 1” BOOSTER HOSE
200 FT – 1 ¾" HIGH RISE HOSE PACKS                              100 FT – 1 ½" FRONT BUMPER LINE 75’/25’
600 FT – 1 ½” FORESTRY HOSE PACKS                                25 FT – 1" REAR BUMPER LINE
300 FT – 1 ½” FORESTRY HOSE ROLLS                               1000FT – PENCIL LINE
150 FT – 1” BOOSTER HOSE                                          20FT – 2 ½” HARD SUCTION ( 3 x 7’)
100 FT – 1 ½” FRONT BUMPER LINE 75’/25’
500 FT – PENCIL LINE
 25 FT – 4 ½” SOFT SUCTION
 10 FT – 4 ½” HARD SUCTION


TYPE 1 TRUCK T31 / #512                                         TYPE 1 TRUCK T34 /#516

425 FT – 4” SUPPLY HOSE                                         525 FT – 4" SUPPLY HOSE
425 FT – 2 ½" SUPPLY HOSE                                       825 FT – 2 ½" SUPPLY HOSE
200 FT – 1 ½" ATTACK HOSE – YELLOW                              200 FT – 1 ½" ATTACK HOSE - YELLOW
200 FT – 1 ½” ATTACK HOSE – GREEN                               200 FT – 1 ½" ATTACK HOSE - GREEN
200 FT – 1 ¾" ATTACK HOSE – RED                                 200 FT – 1 ¾" ATTACK HOSE - RED
200 FT – 1 ¾" HIGH RISE HOSE PACKS                              200 FT – 1 ¾" HOSE HIGH RISE PACKS
100 FT – 1 ½” FRONT BUMPER LINE 75’/25’                          25 FT – 1 ¾" HOSE PRE-CONNECTED
 24 FT – 4 ½” SOFT SUCTION                                               (IN LADDER BUCKET)




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                         Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        06/98           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Hose Loads
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:            TB059
                           CROSS REF:




TYPE 1 TRUCK T35 / #501                                        WATER TENDER WT238 / #615 (Type 2-4WD)

825 FT – 4” SUPPLY HOSE                                        250 FT – 2 ½" SUPPLY HOSE
825 FT – 2 ½" SUPPLY HOSE                                      400 FT – 1 ½" FORESTRY HOSE PACK
200 FT – 1 ½" ATTACK HOSE – YELLOW                             350 FT – 1 ½" ATTACK HOSE
200 FT – 1 ½” ATTACK HOSE – GREEN                               50 FT – 1" RUBBER PROT. LINE DRIVER SIDE
200 FT – 1 ¾" ATTACK HOSE - RED                                 25FT – 1 ½” FRONT BUMPER LINE
200 FT – 1 ¾" HIGH RISE HOSE PACKS                              25FT – 1” FRONT BUMPER LINE
100 FT – 1 ½” FRONT BUMPER LINE 75’/25’                        500 FT – PENCIL LINE
 24 FT – 4 ½” SOFT SUCTION                                      20 FT – 4 ½” HARD SUCTION


WATER TENDER WT135 / #678 (Type 1-4WD) WATER TENDER WT130 / #658 (Type 1-2WD)

200 FT – 1 ½" ATTACK HOSE                                      200 FT – 1 ½" ATTACK HOSE
600 FT – 2 ½" SUPPLY HOSE                                      400 FT – 2 ½" SUPPLY HOSE
400 FT – 1 ½" FORESTRY HOSE PACK                                25 FT – 1 ½" RUBBER PROTECTION LINE
400 FT – 1 ½” FORESTRY FLAT LOAD                                20 FT – 4 ½” HARD SUCTION
 25 FT – 1 ½” FRONT BUMPER LINE
500 FT – PENCIL LINE
 20 FT – 4 ½” HARD SUCTION
 20 FT – 2 ½” HARD SUCTION


VOLUNTEER TYPE 1 ENGINE                                        TYPE 4 ENGINE

1600 FT – 2 ½" SUPPLY HOSE                                     200 FT – ¾"BOOSTER HOSE
 200 FT – 1 ¾" ATTACK HOSE                                     800 FT – 1" FORESTRY HOSE PACKS
 400 FT – 1 ½" ATTACK HOSE                                     100 FT – 1 ½" FORESTRY JUMP LINE
 400 FT – 1 ½" FORESTRY HOSE PACKS                             200 FT – 1 ½" FORESTRY HOSE PACK
 100 FT – 1 ½”FRONT BUMPER LINE 75’/25’                         25 FT – 1 ½" FORESTRY BLITZ LINE
 200 FT – ¾” BOOSTER HOSE                                       50 FT – 1" RUBBER PROTECTION LINE
 500 FT – PENCIL LINE                                           10 FT – 1 ½” HARD SUCTION
  18 FT – 4 ½” SOFT SUCTION
  20 FT – 4 ½” HARD SUCTION




AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                         Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        06/98           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:
                                          Hurst Extension Rams - 14” and 23”
                                          “V” Block and Faceplate Accessories
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06       DOC NO:           TB069
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

Hurst Extension Rams are an optional tool carried on all District rescue units that can be used for
pushing and pulling/shoring and supporting, with up to 16,000 pounds of pushing force and up to
10,000 pounds of pulling force. These tools may be used alone or in conjunction with each other
through a looped system with the Omni tools. To increase the ability of the extension rams, a “V”
block and faceplate accessories package is also provided. The “V” block or faceplate can increase
the purchase of the extension ram on uneven or round surfaces such as steering posts while pushing.


INFORMATION

    EQUIPMENT

   1. 14" Extension Ram
          •  Opening Force – 15,000 lbs
          •  Closing Force – 7,000 lbs
          •  Closed Length – 15.5 inches
          •  Open Length – 22.5 inches

   2. 23” Extension Ram (JL-30C Ram – Square Body)
         •   Opening Force – 16,000 lbs
         •   Closing Force – 10,000 lbs
         •   Closed Length – 23 inches
         •   Open Length – 36 inches

   3. JL Telescoping 30 – Round Body
         •   Opening Force – 21,500 lbs
                  First stage 18.1-30” 21,500 lbs
                  Second stage 30-40.6” 6,700 lbs
         •   Closing Force – N/A
         •   Closed Length – 18.1 inches
         •   Open Length – 40.6 inches

   4. “V” Block
         •   Serrated surface for grip
         •   V shaped for better purchase on uneven surfaces
         •   Attached to head of ram with lock pin
 AUTHOR:                                                                               Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:       Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      10/92           REVISED DATE:   06/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:
                                        Hurst Extension Rams - 14” and 23”
                                        “V” Block and Faceplate Accessories
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06       DOC NO:         TB069
                      CROSS REF:




  5. Faceplate
        •   Serrated surface for grip
        •   Non-slip wire surface
        •   Attached to head of ram with lock pin




AUTHOR:                                                                            Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     10/92           REVISED DATE:   06/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Hydrant Flow Testing Water Treatment
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      06/06   DOC NO:               TB218
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The Pollard Water LPD-250 De-chlorinating Diffuser will be used to flow and/or flow-test
selected hydrants throughout the district. The LPD-250’s functions are to diffuse and dissipate a
high velocity of water, neutralize chlorines or chloramines in the stream, and trap debris exiting
the hydrant.

INFORMATION

   A. The LPD-250 Diffuser meets all guidelines mandated by the State Board of Water Resources
      for water de-chlorination. The following instructions are to be closely followed in order to
      meet applicable laws related to water runoff and contamination.

   B. The following information describes the proper operation for flowing or flow-testing a
      hydrant:

             1. Remove the 2.5 hydrant cap and attach the diffuser to the hydrant. A hose can be
                used to allow for clearance away from a hydrant, if needed.

             2. Rotate the diffuser body to orient the tablet feed tube so that tablets properly drop
                as they dissolve during the flow.

             3. Remove the PVC caps from the tablet feed tube and insert no less than 10 tablets.
                Make sure they are stacked horizontally in the tube. Reinstall the PVC cap, hand-
                tight.

             4. Open the hydrant and flow water until all tablets are dissolved.

             5. When finished, leave diffuser on the hydrant, rotate the unit 180 degrees, and
                remove any remaining tablet pieces left in the feeder tube. Remove diffuser from
                hydrant and remove any remaining debris trapped by the diffuser screen.




 AUTHOR:      Darren Olguin, Captain                                                     Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        06/06           REVISED DATE:
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:
                                           Incident Command System – Level One
                                           Staging
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                    06/06       DOC NO:                  TB051
                       CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

With the use of the Incident Command System by the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District
and the need for organization and efficiency when responding units arrive on scene, Level One
Staging is used. The following information will explain the term, Level One Staging.

INFORMATION

The term, Level One Staging, when used in the Incident Command System, refers to the units
responding to an incident, holding one block away from the incident. Staging this short distance
from the scene allows the Incident Commander the time and space to properly deploy resources.
The orderly arrangement of resources can be accomplished without delays when the Incident
Commander determines Level One Staging should be implemented.

Level One Staging is used at the discretion of the Incident Commander. It is not an assigned area;
responding units hold one block away from the scene in their direction of travel. When the officer
reports to the Communications Center of the unit’s arrival, the officer simply states, "Engine ___ on
the scene, standing by.”




 AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      05/85      REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              Instructions for Loading of Live Lines
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:            TB021
                       CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

By using this simple method, all pumpers in the District will be the same. This makes loading
and pulling hose lines standard for all members of the Department. Attached is a drawing and
written information which gives, in detail, all the information necessary to accomplish the
loading of the hose.

INFORMATION

See diagrams on the following page.




 AUTHOR:                                                                            Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                  REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:            Loss Recovery Kit
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                   05/06       DOC NO:           TB180
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

In an effort to support victims of structure fires or other emergencies that damage personal
property, the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District has available a kit of basic supplies to
begin the recovery process.


INFORMATION

The loss recovery kits consist of the following inventory:

                  10 cardboard boxes
                  10 Zip lock bags
                  10 30-gallon garbage bags
                  20 cable ties
                  1 utility knife
                  1 roll duct tape

The purpose of this material is to enable occupants of damaged property to initially capture their
most valuable possessions for safe keeping. While District personnel may not need to package
personal property for the occupant, personnel on scene assist in recovery during the salvage and
overhaul phase of the incident. This kit becomes the property of the occupant; it is not recovered
and re-used by the District.

One kit will be kept on Breathing Support Units and 1 kit kept on Salvage 35. The remaining
kits are stored at Station 33.




 AUTHOR:      Steve Hart, Assistant Chief                                             Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         07/00       REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:          Luminite Telescopic Light Tower S120
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06   DOC NO:                 TB210
                            CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

Night operations create additional challenges for ensuring the safety of personnel; therefore, the
District has equipped Breathing Support 131 with two (2) portable telescopic light towers. These
compact units are extremely quiet and run on 120 volts. Each unit is capable of illuminating an
area the size of a football field. Details of operation, with pictures and specifications, can be found
in the Luminite Instruction Book on the District’s E-library. The following Figure (Fig.) notations
refer to this instruction book.

INFORMATION
    A. Installation and Start up Procedure

         1. Position the device close to the area that needs lighting. Make sure the area underneath
            the device is perfectly stable and level, and there is at least 16 feet of clearance above
            the case and around it on all sides (Fig. 1).
             NOTE: No person, animal or object (other than the operator) should come within 16
             feet of the device, as a power failure could cause it to collapse.

         2. Remove the top of the case, unlatching the side clips and lifting straight up (Fig. 2).

         3. Free the tube from any obstacles, making sure the tethers are moved to the side and
            won’t keep the tube from deploying properly.

         4. Make sure the “air” and “lamp” switches are off (“O”) (Fig. 3).

         5. Extend the power cord and plug it into a 120-Volt, 60 Hz outlet.
            WARNING: Check the power cable regularly to make sure it is in perfect condition. A
            worn, damaged or cut cable can damage the device or cause electric shock.

         6. Inflate the tube by switching the “air” switch (red) into the “On” position (“I”) (Fig. 4).
            WARNING: Always guide the tube as it inflates (Fig. 5).

             IMPORTANT: Secure the tethers to the ground to stabilize the device (Fig. 6).

         7. When the tube is entirely inflated, turn lamp switch (white or yellow) to the “On”
            position (“I”). The lamp will reach maximum brightness two to three minutes after
            being turned on.
             WARNING: Don’t turn the lamp off without a good reason. Once the lamp is turned
             off, there is a 12-minute wait time before it can be turned back on.
 AUTHOR:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                             Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         05/06         REVISED DATE:
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:          Luminite Telescopic Light Tower S120
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06   DOC NO:                 TB210
                           CROSS REF:



   B. Turning off the device

        1. Turn the lamp off by switching the lamp switch (white or yellow) into the “Off”
           position (“O”) (Fig. 7).
            NEVER turn the “air” switch off (“O”) when the lamp is on (“I”).

            The lamp must only be on when the tube is fully inflated and vertical.
            WARNING: As a safety measure, the operator must ensure that no other people,
            animals or objects are within a 16-foot radius of the device as the tube deflates, and
            must guide the tube as it comes down. Make sure to catch the top of the tube to avoid
            any hard impact with the ground, as any impact could break the lamp (Fig. 10).

            IMPORTANT: After turning off the lamp, allow it to cool for at least five minutes
            before turning off the “air” switch.

        2. Turn the inflator off by switching the “air” switch to “Off” (red switch). The tube will
           slowly deflate and collapse (Fig. 8).
            WARNING: Make sure you catch the top portion of the tube to prevent a hard landing
            on the ground. Any shock could break the lamp.

        3. Detach the tethers from the ground.

        4. Disconnect the power cord from the current.

        5. Pull and turn the air release lever, hooking it onto the edge of the case in the “open”
           position (Fig. 9).

        6. Roll the tube around the lamp casing as illustrated and insert the power cord (Fig. 10).

        7. Unhook the air release lever, replacing it in the “closed” position, to ensure good
           inflation the next time the device is used.

        8. Close the top of the case, placing it straight down and latching the side clips (Fig. 11).

   C. Replacing the lamp/Repairing the fabric/Troubleshooting

        1. For detailed information, see the Luminite Instruction Book, in the New Equipment
           folder of the District’s E-Library.


AUTHOR:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                             Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         05/06         REVISED DATE:
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              Making Decisions at Tank Fires
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:                   TB035
                       CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

When confronted with a tank fire, the decision to proceed by the officer in charge can be based on
the answers to a series of six questions. The firefighting operations MUST BE DISCONTINUED
for the safety of all involved WHENEVER ONE OF THESE QUESTIONS CANNOT BE
PROPERLY ANSWERED.


INFORMATION

   1. What Material is Involved?

       If products falling into the classifications of -- Class A Explosives, Class A Poisons,
       unstable or reactive materials -- are involved, there should be IMMEDIATE
       EVACUATION AND WITHDRAWAL.

       If the material is not known to be an explosive A, poison A, or an unstable or reactive
       material, proceed to the next question.

   2. How Long Has the Fire Been Burning?

       If the fire has been burning with direct flame impingement on a closed tank shell for more
       than 10 minutes, even with the relief valve operating, there should be IMMEDIATE
       EVACUATION AND WITHDRAWAL.

       If the flame impingement has been of less than 10 minutes duration, the next question
       should be considered.

   3. What Are the Exposures?

       If there are NO SEVERE LIFE OR PROPERTY EXPOSURES, WITHDRAW AND
       EVACUATE THE AREA.

       In situations with a large life or property risk, the next questions should be considered.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 1 of 3
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                  REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              Making Decisions at Tank Fires
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:                   TB035
                       CROSS REF:



   4. What is the Water Supply?

       A minimum consideration must be 500 GPM. If water quantities in this range ARE NOT
       READILY AVAILABLE, it is extremely unlikely that a fire can be controlled, and
       withdrawal and evacuation should begin immediately.

       If 500 GPM is available, the next question should be answered.

   5. Can Water be Applied to the Point of Impingement?

       If the tank or tanks are arranged in such a configuration that the water applied cannot reach
       the point of impingement, withdrawal and evacuation must be initiated.

       When water can be effectively applied, the last question should be answered.

   6. How Quickly Can Water be Applied?

       If effective streams cannot be applied in five minutes after arrival, or a total fire duration of
       15 minutes, the fire crews should be withdrawn and evacuation carried out.

       If effective fire operations can be started within this time frame, they should be set up under
       the cover of protective streams and then unmanned master stream devices or ground
       monitors used.

NOTE: In the event of high life risk, it will be necessary to utilize whatever water supplies are
available in a holding action during the evacuation, preferably with unmanned streams. After
evacuation of high life risk, total withdrawal is essential.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 2 of 3
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                  REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                  TRAINING BULLETIN
                     TOPIC:              Making Decisions at Tank Fires
                     EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:         TB035
                     CROSS REF:




AUTHOR:                                                                        Page 3 of 3
REVIEWED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                                 REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                          TOPIC:            Marking of Searched Buildings or Areas
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                        04/06       DOC NO:                TB084
                          CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION


This Training Bulletin describes where to locate the standard system for the marking of searched
buildings, structures, or other such areas. The guidelines are standard throughout Urban Search
and Rescue and Incident Command systems.



INFORMATION


Upon termination of a search, utilize the marking at the main entrance and/or at other points of
possible entry; but by all means, at the most likely point of encounter by other rescue parties.


The marking system is available from FIRESCOPE, Urban Search & Rescue Operational System
Description (ICS-US&R-120-1). The website is www.firescope.org; select ICS Documents.


Spray paint cans with highly visible paint shall be used to mark buildings after a search. Paint is carried
on all first-run Engines and Trucks; but, if not available, marking crayon, charcoal, paint with a brush,
etc, are acceptable.


Results of any search should be passed on to the Incident Commander or Division Leader in the event
of a major incident.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                      Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                        REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Master Stream Foam Eductor
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                 4/27/05             DOC NO:           TB174
                            CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

The master stream foam eductor is designed to apply Class A or Class B Foam through a deck
gun or portable ground monitor. It applies finished foam at a rate of 500 GPM. Master stream
foam eductors are on E31, E32, E33, E34, E35 and E39.

INFORMATION

    A. COMPONENTS
         The foam eductor consists of the following 3 components:
              •    Foam eductor with 4 proportioning disks
              •    Foam pick up tube
              •    Foam nozzle

         1. Eductor and proportioning disks
              The eductor flows 500 GPM with 100 PSI supplied at the eductor. The proportioning
              disks allow foam to be applied at 4 settings: 0.5%, 1%, 3%, and 6%. The disk is
              inserted into the seat that is in the male cam lock fitting at the end of the foam pick up
              tube. All proportioning disks are stored on a clip chained to the eductor.

         2. Foam pick up tube
              The foam pick up tube is a clear flexible suction hose with a Stinger (rigid PVC pipe)
              attached to it.

         3. Foam nozzle
              The foam nozzle is an air aspirating nozzle that expands the foam solution at a rate of
              12 to 1. It discharges 500 GPM at 100 PSI.

    B. LOCATIONS
         The foam eductor, disks, and pick up tube will be stored in a red bag in the right side
         lower front compartment with the other foam equipment. The nozzle and stinger will be
         stored in a red bag in the top compartment with the Floto Pump.

    C. OPERATING PRESSURE

         1. Ground Monitor Operation
               •   The eductor requires 100 PSI supplied to it.
 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                           Page 1 of 3
 REVIEWED:         Jack Barton, Battalion Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       3/01/99       REVISED DATE:   3/25/05, 4/27/05
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Master Stream Foam Eductor
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                 4/27/05             DOC NO:         TB174
                           CROSS REF:



              •   The monitor has a friction loss of 15 PSI.
              •   When operating as a ground monitor, add 5 PSI for every 100' of 4" hose
                  supplying the appliance.
              •   Adjust discharge pressure for elevation gain or loss at 0.5 PSI per foot.

        2. Deck Gun Operation
              •   When operating the foam eductor from the deck gun, the pump pressure is 115
                  PSI.

PROCEDURE

   A. OPERATION

        To place the master stream eductor into operation, the following steps are necessary:

        1. Locate the engine or ground monitor in a safe position uphill and upwind from the
           incident. Note: The master stream has an effective reach of 125 feet.
        2. Consider incoming units, water supply and foam supply.
        3. Remove the stream straightener and fog nozzle from the monitor/deck gun.
        4. Attach the eductor and foam nozzle to the monitor/deck gun base.
        5. Attach the stinger to the pick up tube.
        6. Determine the percentage of foam to be applied. Insert the correct proportioning disk
           in the pick up tube and connect to the eductor.
        7. Locate foam buckets (AFFF) within reach of the pick up tube. Class A Foam may be
           educted from the tank on top of the engine.
        8. Set the engine pressure to provide 115 PSI to the monitor.
        9. Insert pick up tube into foam buckets or tank.
        10. Adjust foam stream accordingly.

   B. CLASS A FOAM OPERATION

        The master stream foam eductor can be used for the application of Class A Foam for
        structure protection or fighting wildland fires. The steps for operation are the same with
        the exception that the foam pick up tube is placed in the Class A Foam tank mounted on
        top of the engine.

AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                         Page 2 of 3
REVIEWED:         Jack Barton, Battalion Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                       3/01/99       REVISED DATE:   3/25/05, 4/27/05
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Master Stream Foam Eductor
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                 4/27/05             DOC NO:         TB174
                           CROSS REF:



   C. FOAM PROPORTIONS AND USAGE

        Class A                      0.5% @ 500 GPM = 2.5 GPM concentrate
        Class A                      1% @ 500 GPM = 5 GPM concentrate

        For normal use of Class A Foam use 0.5%.

        For a heavy foam blanket with an extended life use 1%.

        The minimum size Class A Foam tank on the engines is 10 gallons. This will treat 2000
        gallons of water at 0.5% and 1000 gallons at 1%.


        Class B Ansulite 3x3(AFFF)                   3% @ 500 GPM = 15 GPM concentrate

        Ansulite 3x3 (AFFF) is designed to use for both hydrocarbon fuels and polar solvent
        fuels at 3%.

        15 gallons of concentrate will treat 500 gallons of water at 3%.

        For large or extended operations request additional foam from station 33 as early as
        possible. Use a clean garbage can or barrel to educt large quantities of foam.




AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                         Page 3 of 3
REVIEWED:         Jack Barton, Battalion Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                       3/01/99       REVISED DATE:   3/25/05, 4/27/05
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:
                                           Maxi Force Airbag Equipment
                                           and Operation
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                    06/06              DOC NO:         TB074
                       CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

The maxi force airbag system located on all trucks, Type I engines, and engines 333 and 336 is a
versatile tool for lifting and stabilizing heavy objects. This Training Bulletin describes the
safety, equipment attachment, and operation of the airbag system.


INFORMATION

   A. Equipment
       1. Airbags
           a. 31 ton, lifting height 13".
           b. 17 ton, lifting height 9".
           c. Use care with air supply nipple.

       2. Pressure Regulator with Shutoff
           a. To be stored at "0" psi. This will ensure proper operation of tension spring within
              unit.

       3. Dual Controller with Safety Relief Valves
           a. Operates both bags individually.
           b. Built in pressure relief valves set at 125 to 135 psi.

       4. Three Pressure Hoses for Air Supply
           a. One yellow.
           b. Two red.

   B. Equipment Attached
       1. Connect pressure regulator to air cylinder, making sure that regulator outlet valve is
          in "off" position.
           a. Open air cylinder valve.

       2. Set regulator to 118 psi.

       3. Select one of the red hoses and connect one end to the dual controller. Connect
          opposite end of hose to pressure regulator.

 AUTHOR:                                                                               Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                 REVISED DATE:   11/00, 05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:
                                          Maxi Force Airbag Equipment
                                          and Operation
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                    06/06              DOC NO:          TB074
                      CROSS REF:



      4. Make sure shutoff valve on dual controller is closed.

      5. Connect the yellow hose and the remaining red hose to the dual controller.

      6. Connect the hoses to the individual airbags at nipple.

      7. With the system assembled safety check each connection, making sure that locking
         collars on hose connectors are in correct position.

  C. Operation of Airbags
      1. Supply cribbing for base of airbag, leaving a minimum of one inch space for insertion
         of airbag.

      2. Place airbag in position with yellow "X" directly under lifting point.

      3. Open outlet valve on pressure regulator.

      4. Open shutoff valve on dual controller.

      5. To inflate bag, press button on controller showing curved lines.
          a. Left button = left bag, etc.
          b. Hoses are colored to reduce confusion.

      6. As airbag inflates, use shims to fill void spaces until enough of an opening is created to
         insert more cribble.

      7. Two bags can be stacked on top of each other for higher lifts. The smaller bag must be
         on top. Avoid over pressurizing.

      8. To deflate bag, ensure cribbing is stable. Press button on dual controller showing a
         straight line.

      9. Deflate one bag at a time watching for shifting loads.

IT MUST BE NOTED THAT ADEQUATE CRIBBING IS NECESSARY WHEN USING THE
AIRBAGS. EXTREME CAUTION NEEDS TO BE EXERCISED WHENEVER THIS TOOL IS
EMPLOYED.    A SAFETY OFFICER SHOULD BE PRESENT TO OVERSEE THE
OPERATION.
AUTHOR:                                                                                Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                                 REVISED DATE:   11/00, 05/06
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           MiniMax XT Carbon Monoxide Monitor
                                              Use
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:              07/08          DOC NO:
                                            OPS Policy- Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector Activations;
                             CROSS REF:     TB- Guidance for Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector
                                            Activations.



INTRODUCTION

Knowledge of the operation and proper use of carbon monoxide monitors can aid District
personnel in responding to carbon monoxide alarm soundings and other potential carbon
monoxide situations.

INFORMATION

The MiniMax XT is the carbon monoxide (CO) monitor available on type I engines and trucks in
the District.

FEATURES:

The MiniMax XT is an intrinsically safe CO monitor which has as simple display and only one-
button. It is designed for two-years of uninterrupted use during which it requires no calibration or
battery change. The monitor can be recycled at the end of its lifespan. The monitor is rugged but
is not waterproof.

         Display(s):




 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Captain – Hazmat Specialist                                    Page 1 of 3
 REVIEWED:         Michael Picard, Battalion Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         5/1/08           REVISION DATES:
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           MiniMax XT Carbon Monoxide Monitor
                                              Use
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:              07/08          DOC NO:
                                            OPS Policy- Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector Activations;
                             CROSS REF:     TB- Guidance for Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector
                                            Activations.




The monitor has preset alarms which provide audible, visible (flashing light), and vibration
warning at two levels. Level one is set at 35 ppm and level two at 100 ppm.




OPERATION:

Basic operation of the device requires two steps prior to use.

Step One (Self-Test) is performed by pressing the monitor’s only button once and then
immediately releasing it. The monitor will:
   • Turn on all the display elements
   • Tests the audible and visual alarms and vibrating alarm
   • Check the battery, electronic circuit and sensor
   • Perform a sensor test
   • Display the level 1 and level 2 alarm setpoints
   • Display the maximum (minimum for O2) gas reading (if such a reading has occurred)
   • If a gas alarm has occurred since the Test button was last pressed the relevant alarm level
      icon will be displayed
 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Captain – Hazmat Specialist                                    Page 2 of 3
 REVIEWED:         Michael Picard, Battalion Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         5/1/08           REVISION DATES:
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           MiniMax XT Carbon Monoxide Monitor
                                              Use
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:              07/08          DOC NO:
                                            OPS Policy- Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector Activations;
                             CROSS REF:     TB- Guidance for Response to Carbon Monoxide Detector
                                            Activations.

    •    Lifetime Remaining
    •    Display the results of the test




If a self-test is unsuccessful it should be repeated again. If the monitor continues to display fail
after three attempts it is out-of-service and should not be used.

Step Two (Zero Calibration) is performed in clean air by pressing and holding the monitor’s
button until the zero-calibration screen appears after which the button should be released.




When the zero calibration has been completed the XT will indicate a pass by beeping twice,
flashing twice, and the “check” symbol will flash for 5 seconds.




If the zero calibration is not OK then the XT will give a single beep and a single flash, the “X”
symbol will be displayed, and the zero calibration should be repeated.




If a zero calibration fails it should be repeated again. If the monitor continues to display fail after
three attempts it is out-of-service and should not be used.

For all operations and uses refer to the owner’s manual or operating instructions for the
device.

REFERENCE:

MiniMax XT Operating Instructions

 AUTHOR:      Sean Grayson, Captain – Hazmat Specialist                                    Page 3 of 3
 REVIEWED:         Michael Picard, Battalion Chief - Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:         5/1/08           REVISION DATES:
                                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Mobile Attack
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                10/01/05             DOC NO:         TB179
                            CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

Mobile Attack can be the most efficient method of combating grass fires. A Mobile Attack is
possible when the terrain allows the engine to be driven next to the perimeter of the fire. The
Mobile Attack is most efficient on grass fires for the following reasons:
   • Is the fastest method to attack the fire.
   • Creates less Firefighter fatigue when compared to other direct attack methods.
   • Keeps the crew in close proximity to the engine for safety and refuge.
   • Uses a minimal amount of equipment, which allows the engine to be reassigned or
       returned to service quickly both during and after an incident.

INFORMATION

Tactics utilizing Mobile Attack (see attached diagrams):
   • Pincer attack
       A direct attack around a fire by 2 or more engines in opposite directions from an anchor
       point. The fire can be anchored at the heel, head or other strategic location that will
       provide for safety of the crew and an effective fire attack.

    •   Tandem attack
        A direct attack along a part of the fire perimeter by engines following each other working
        together. Back up engines should be used only for breakouts or to replace the first engine
        when it is out of water. This will prevent all engines from running out of water at the
        same time.

    •   Envelopment attack
        Simultaneously attacking the fire with engines at key or critical points around the fire
        perimeter. This type of attack is the most effective for protecting multiple exposures that
        are threatened by the same fire.

PROCEDURES

    A. OPERATION
         To perform a Mobile Attack:
         1. Ensure the crew is in full wildland PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) and radio
            contact is established.
         2. Ensure headlights and code-three warning lights are on.
         3. Determine an anchor point.
 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                         Page 1 of 5
 REVIEWED:         Jack Barton, Battalion Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                     05/15/00        REVISED DATE:   03/23/05, 09/27/05
                                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Mobile Attack
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                10/01/05             DOC NO:          TB179
                           CROSS REF:



        4. Engage pump, charge hose lines and check nozzle pattern before reaching anchor
           point.
        5. Determine if Class A Foam is needed. If so, engage foam unit.
        6. If engine is 4-wheel drive, engage 4-wheel drive and place transfer case in low range.
        7. Put transmission in proper gear to maintain engine RPM and correct pump pressure
           for effective fire stream while driving.
        8. Use 1 1/2" hose for front attack line minimum 40 GPM.
        9. Use 1" or booster line for rear mop up line 10 to 30 GPM.
        10. Position Firefighter on the front attack line in front of and to the side of the engine
            closest to the fire line. Position Captain on the rear line to the rear of and to the side
            of the engine closest to the fire line. From this position the Captain is able to observe
            the entire operation and patrol the fire line that has already been extinguished. The
            Captain can modify these positions if the situation warrants. Additional
            firefighters supporting the mobile attack can be assigned to rear line or to patrol and
            mop up wet line with backpack pumps or hand tools, leaving the Captain free to
            visualize the overall operation.
        11. Crewmembers should always be in sight of the driver. If the driver loses sight of
            any crewmember, stop the engine.
        12. Drive the engine where the visibility is best. Out of the smoke if possible. Drive in
            the black when attacking the leading edge of a fire. Drive in the unburned area when
            attacking the backing edge of a fire.
        13. Engine speed is determined by the Firefighter on the front attack line
        14. When attacking the fire, direct a narrow fog stream from the unburned side at a 45-
            degree angle to the ground. Direct the stream from the unburned into the burned area.
            Hold the nozzle close to the ground to provide deep penetration and sweep the stream
            back and forth making a continuous wet line. Cool hot spots in front with a straight
            stream.
        15. Use the rear mop up line for hot spots or cold trailing.
        16. Be aggressive, but ensure the fire is completely out before moving forward.

   B. SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS
        1. Keep the engine on safe terrain. Do not follow the front nozzle person onto dangerous
           slopes. Stop if necessary and extend the hose to reach the fire.

AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                          Page 2 of 5
REVIEWED:         Jack Barton, Battalion Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     05/15/00        REVISED DATE:   03/23/05, 09/27/05
                                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Mobile Attack
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                10/01/05             DOC NO:         TB179
                           CROSS REF:



        2. In areas of obscured visibility or terrain, use a spotter.
        3. When operating in unburned fuels be aware of:
             •Wind shifts
             •Air turbulence created by aircraft
           • Obstacles hidden by vegetation – Use a spotter if necessary.
        4. If problems are encountered at the nozzle and the crew cannot see the driver, spray
           water on the windshield. It is the universal sign to stop.
        5. Stop the engine if Firefighters or Captain are out of sight of the driver.
        6. Watch for obstacles that could harm you or the engine.
        7. Move into burned area if safety conditions dictate.
        8. From the rear position, the Captain should always observe the effectiveness and
           safety of the operation and patrol the wet line for hot spots or rekindles.
        9. Do not get locked into attack positions. If the engine has to switch to the other side of
           the fire line to operate:
             a.   Stop
             b.   Extinguish the fire
             c.   Switch nozzle positions
             d.   And continue the mobile attack.




AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                         Page 3 of 5
REVIEWED:         Jack Barton, Battalion Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     05/15/00        REVISED DATE:   03/23/05, 09/27/05
                                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Mobile Attack
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                10/01/05             DOC NO:         TB179
                           CROSS REF:




AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                         Page 4 of 5
REVIEWED:         Jack Barton, Battalion Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     05/15/00        REVISED DATE:   03/23/05, 09/27/05
                                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Mobile Attack
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                10/01/05             DOC NO:         TB179
                           CROSS REF:




AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                         Page 5 of 5
REVIEWED:         Jack Barton, Battalion Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     05/15/00        REVISED DATE:   03/23/05, 09/27/05
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                         TOPIC:            National Foam JS-10 Series Foam Nozzle
                         EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:         TB161
                         CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

The District utilizes the national JS-10 foam nozzle. This nozzle is used extensively throughout the
oil industry and has been proven to be very effective.

INFORMATION

National Foam JS-10 Series Nozzles are designed to maximize the mobility and fire fighting
capability of one person on one hose line. Their rugged, lightweight construction allows foam
solution flows in excess of 100 gpm (378 lpm) at a nozzle pressure well within the control of a
single operator.

JS-10 Nozzles are air-aspirating type devices which are specially designed to aspirate (draw air into)
and mix air into the foam solution to generate foam. The manufacturer recommends the hose line
be no longer than 150 feet from the eductor and preferably 100 feet when using 1½" hose; 1¾" hose
will allow that distance to be extended to 300 feet. The District’s standard foam operation utilizes
150 feet of 1½" hose from the eductor.

Compact design and spray/straight stream capability allows the operator to change the nozzle
pattern from full flow spray to a straight stream, without shutting off flow. It has a maximum
straight stream still air range of 75 ft. (23m) @ 100 PSI (6.9 Bar). Increasing pressure will not
measurably increase range.

Foam concentrate pickup at the nozzle is not available. The ball shutoff valve used in conjunction
with the Akron 1½" turbojet nozzles on all the 1½" attack lines must be used in conjunction with the
JS-10 series foam nozzle. Performance characteristics are not affected by the addition of the ball
shutoff valve.

The JS-10 Series Nozzles are ideally suited for foam application with the District eductors and
attack lines. Optimum performance is produced at 75 to 125 psi (5.1 to 8.6 bar). These foam
nozzles are suitable for use with AFFF or protein type low expansion foam concentrates.

WARNING: The JS-10 Series Nozzles must not be operated at pressure below 50 psi (3.5
         Bar) or significant reduction in foam quality performance and firefighting
         effectiveness may result.

The foam nozzle consists of the following major components:
   1. Foam Maker - designed to entrain air into the foam solution stream.
   2. Foam Discharge Tube - designed to receive and uniformly mix the air and foam solution.
 AUTHOR:                                                                                     Page 1 of 5
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       10/96           REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:            National Foam JS-10 Series Foam Nozzle
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:         TB161
                        CROSS REF:




  3. Spray Deflector Operating Arm - used by operator to select or change the nozzle pattern
     (spray/straight stream).

  4. Deflector Disc and Swing Arm - a spray stream shaper used to produce a wide low velocity
     foam pattern when in the spray stream position. This component is especially useful on spill
     fires for the gentle application of foam.

OPERATION

 WARNING: Read all Operating Instructions before using equipment.

  1. Attach nozzle securely to discharge end of hose.

  2. Initiate solution flow to foam nozzle.

  3. Select desired foam pattern. Stream pattern is selected by twisting the spray deflector
     operating arm at the discharge end of the nozzle. Stream pattern can be changed without
     shutting off flow. Refer to enclosed - "Applying Foam with a Nozzle" - for proper foam
     application techniques.

 NOTE:         See enclosed “JS-10 Nozzle Discharge End View Illustration” for location of spray
               deflector operating arm and position of deflector disc and swing arm when in the
               spray stream mode and the straight stream mode.

  4. Flush the nozzle thoroughly after threat of re-ignition is mitigated.
          a. Allow water only to run through the nozzle until clear water issues from the nozzle.


MAINTENANCE

  1. Inspect the inlet gasket. Make sure it is in serviceable condition. Replace if necessary.

  2. Check the Spray Deflector Operating Arm and Deflector Swing Arm for freedom of
     movement. Apply Fluorglide #T-24015 or equal (Film bonding Teflon compound). Spray
     Deflector Operating Arm if needed.

  3. Check the general nozzle assembly for dents, cracks, loose parts or damage that would
     impair or prevent proper functioning and operation of the nozzle.

AUTHOR:                                                                                     Page 2 of 5
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                       10/96           REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:            National Foam JS-10 Series Foam Nozzle
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:         TB161
                      CROSS REF:




AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 3 of 5
REVIEWED:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     10/96           REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:            National Foam JS-10 Series Foam Nozzle
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:         TB161
                      CROSS REF:




AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 4 of 5
REVIEWED:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     10/96           REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:            National Foam JS-10 Series Foam Nozzle
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:         TB161
                      CROSS REF:




AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 5 of 5
REVIEWED:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     10/96           REVISED DATE:   02/01, 05/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Nozzles
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:               TB079
                            CROSS REF:




INFORMATION

The following is a standardized list of nozzles that are used in the District on all apparatus:

Mop Up Nozzle
Low gpm nozzle used with pencil line to perform mop up from GSA.

1” Fog Nozzle
Akron Assault Break Away Fog Nozzle 25 gpm @ 100 psi
Used on booster hose and 1” pre connects.

1 ½” Forestry Nozzle
GSA Break Away Fog Nozzle
20/75 gpm @ 100 psi
Used on front bumper lines and Progressive hoselays.

1 ½” Fog Nozzle
Akron Turbo Jet Break Away Fog Nozzle with black bale
30/60/95/125 gpm @ 100 psi
Used on 1 ½” pre-connects.

1 ¾” Fog Nozzle
Akron Wide Range Turbo Jet Break Away Fog Nozzle with red bale and pistol grip
30/95/125/150/200 gpm @ 75 psi
7/8” Integral Smooth Bore 160 gpm @ 50 psi
Used on 1 ¾” pre-connects.

1 ¾” High Rise Nozzle
Akron Wide Range Turbo Jet Break Away Fog Nozzle with red bale
30/95/125/150/200 gpm @ 75 psi
7/8” Integral Smooth Bore 160 gpm @ 50 psi
Used on High Rise Packs.

2 ½” Fog Nozzle
Akron Turbo Jet Break Away Fog Nozzle
125/150/200/250 gpm @ 100 psi
Nozzle with Playpipe is pre-connected to 2 ½” hose bed
Nozzle with standard bale is stored in engineer’s compartment.

 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                            Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        12/88           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Nozzles
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      08/06       DOC NO:         TB079
                            CROSS REF:



2 ½” Master Stream Fog Nozzle
Akron Akromatic Fog Nozzle
250 to 1250 gpm @ 80 psi
Used on Deck Guns, Ladder Pipes and Portable Ground Monitors

2 ½” Master Stream Smooth Bore Stacked Tips
1 3/8” – 500 gpm @ 80 psi   550 gpm @ 100 psi
1 ½” - 600 gpm @ 80 psi     675 gpm @ 100 psi
1 ¾” - 800 gpm @ 80 psi     900 gpm @ 100 psi
2”     -1000 gpm @ 80 psi 1200 gpm @ 100 psi
SMOOTH BORE NOZZLES SHOULD ONLY BE PUMPED AT 100 PSI WHEN
ATTACHED TO A DECK GUN OR LADDER PIPE. PORTABLE GROUND
MONITORS SHOULD BE PUMPED AT 80 PSI.
Used on Deck Guns, Ladder Pipes and Portable Ground Monitors
GPM data was provided by Akron Discharge chart and rounded to the nearest number for
hydraulics calculation.

Foam Nozzles:

  Class A Foam Nozzle
  Foam-Flo or Blizzard Wizard
  25 gpm @ 100 psi
  Air Aspirating Expansion Ratio of 10 to 1

  Class B Foam Nozzle
  National JS-10
  100 gpm @ 100 psi
  Air Aspirating

  Master Stream Foam Nozzle
  Akron Master Stream Foam Nozzle
  500 gpm @ 100 psi
  Expansion Ratio of 12 to 1




 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Captain                                                      Page 2 of 2
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        12/88           REVISED DATE:   08/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:
                                          Operating Procedures for Electric Winch
                                          on Type IV Units
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:                TB010
                      CROSS REF:




INFORMATION

  A. WINCHING UPHILL/DOWNHILL

          1. Put transmission in neutral.
             Apply park brake - check that park brake will hold vehicle on hill before leaving
             cab.

          2. Remove remote control switch from glovebox and place on bumper - do not connect
             until ready to winch.

          3. Put on gloves.

          4. Disengage clutch.
             Pull cable from drum to free hook from brush guard. If cable does not free spools,
             disengage manual brake, pull cable and free hook.
             Proceed to anchor point with hook and choker chain.

          5. Apply choker chain to anchor point.

          6. Engage clutch, connect remote control switch, pass remote control switch through
             driver's window.

          7. In cab - operate remote control switch to take up winch cable slack.

          8. With engine running, transmission in neutral, release park brake and operate winch
             in desired direction.

          9. After completion of winch operation, secure all equipment.

          10. Upon return to quarters - cable must be respooled under load to prevent mushing and
              kinking.

  B. WINCHING A SECOND VEHICLE

          1. Position winching vehicle next to a firm anchor point (front bumper to tree trunk).

          2. Put transmission in neutral, apply park brake.
AUTHOR:                                                                                Page 1 of 5
REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      11/00       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:
                                          Operating Procedures for Electric Winch
                                          on Type IV Units
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:                 TB010
                      CROSS REF:



          3. Attach choker chain and snatch block to second vehicle.

          4. Secure cable hook to winching vehicle - take up cable slack.

          5. Second vehicle - put transmission in neutral and release brake.

          6. Winch vehicle operates winch in desired direction.

          7. If second vehicle is "up to axles in mud," it may be helpful if second vehicle uses 1st
             gear to help get tires out of "mud holes."

          8. If no anchor point is available, it may be necessary for a third vehicle to chain up to
             the winching vehicle and both drivers apply their foot brake to lock up the front
             brakes.

          9. A pulling force equal to 60% of a vehicle's weight will cause winching vehicle to
             slide; therefore, a firm anchor point is necessary.




AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 2 of 5
REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      11/00       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                  TRAINING BULLETIN
                     TOPIC:
                                         Operating Procedures for Electric Winch
                                         on Type IV Units
                     EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:         TB010
                     CROSS REF:




AUTHOR:                                                                        Page 3 of 5
REVIEWED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     11/00       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                  TRAINING BULLETIN
                     TOPIC:
                                         Operating Procedures for Electric Winch
                                         on Type IV Units
                     EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:         TB010
                     CROSS REF:




AUTHOR:                                                                        Page 4 of 5
REVIEWED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     11/00       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                  TRAINING BULLETIN
                     TOPIC:
                                         Operating Procedures for Electric Winch
                                         on Type IV Units
                     EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:         TB010
                     CROSS REF:




AUTHOR:                                                                        Page 5 of 5
REVIEWED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     11/00       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:
                                         Operating Procedures for the Lights, Siren,
                                         Pump Start and Stop for Type IV Units
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                        04/06       DOC NO:           TB012
                       CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

  CONTROL BOX -- Bottom row of switches

      1. Operating Rotary and Forward Red Lights: Push the button marked "Emerg" - the
         letters should illuminate and you should hear a clunk noise from under the hood, this is
         normal.

      2. Operating the Rear Amber Lights: Push the button marked "Rear" - this will illuminate
         the letters again, but there should be only a slight clunk associated with this switch.

      3. Remote Pump Start: To start the pump from inside the cab, push the "Water" button -
         this button will not stay in, however the letters should illuminate as long as the button
         is depressed. The pump engine should turn over and start.

      4. Pump Stop: To stop the pump engine, depress the "Stop" switch, and hold it until the
         engine stops. This switch will not stay in and should return to the out position also.

      5. Blank: This switch has no function at this time.



  OPERATION OF THE SIREN -- Top row of switches

      1. Siren operating procedure is covered below.

      2. When the "Man" switch is depressed, it changes the horn over to the siren control
         mode. Also, there is a switch located to the right of the ash tray that when depressed
         will allow manual operation of the siren from the passenger side.




AUTHOR:                                                                               Page 1 of 4
REVIEWED:       Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                                      REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:
                                        Operating Procedures for the Lights, Siren,
                                        Pump Start and Stop for Type IV Units
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                        04/06       DOC NO:         TB012
                      CROSS REF:



INFORMATION

  A. OPERATOR'S INSTRUCTIONS




      1. OPERATING CONTROLS

          a. The siren operating controls consist of seven push-button switches and the PA
             volume control on the siren control module, and the vehicle horn ring or a foot
             switch. In general, an operating mode is selected by pressing the button labeled
             with that mode. When pushed, a mode selector button stays in. Except for the P.
             A. switch, all switches on the control head are mechanically interlocked. When a
             button is pressed any other depressed button pops out. The P.A. switch is a
             push-on, push-off type and operates independent of the other switches.

          b. The P.A. VOLUME control provides continuously variable control of the siren
             system audio output level in audio amplifier modes. The audio output level in
             siren modes is not variable.

AUTHOR:                                                                            Page 2 of 4
REVIEWED:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                                     REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:
                                          Operating Procedures for the Lights, Siren,
                                          Pump Start and Stop for Type IV Units
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                        04/06       DOC NO:           TB012
                        CROSS REF:



      2. OPERATING PROCEDURE

          a. Step 1. Set the on-off switch on the radio control head to the on position.

          b. Step 2. To turn the siren on, press any of the mode selector switches. The OFF
             button then pops out, and the siren operates in the selected mode, as follows:

               MANUAL mode -- Press the button marked MAN. When the foot switch (or horn
               ring) is pressed, the siren tone starts and rises toward a maximum pitch. When the
               foot switch (horn ring) is released, the siren pitch slowly descends. If the foot
               switch (horn ring) is not pressed again, the siren pitch reaches minimum and then
               the tone stops.

               WAIL mode -- Press the button marked WAIL. As soon as the button is pressed
               the siren tone pitch rises and then slowly descends. The pitch rises and falls about
               fifteen times per minute.

               WAIL OVERRIDE mode -- Press the WAIL switch button and then the foot
               switch (or horn ring). As long as the foot switch is released the siren pitch rises
               and falls at the WAIL rate. When the foot switch (horn ring) is pressed the pitch
               rise/fall rate increases to the warble rate; about 160 times per minute.

               YELP mode -- Press the switch marked YELP. The siren pitch then rises and falls
               about 160 times per minute.

               STEADY mode -- (HLN1026A Electronic Sirens only.) Press the button marked
               STDY. The siren tone then begins and continues at a steady pitch (about 1400 Hz)
               until the siren is turned off or another mode is selected.

               HI-LO mode -- (HLNIO26A Electronic Sirens only.) Press the button marked
               HI-LO. The siren produces alternating high and low-pitch tones; one at 400 Hz
               and the other at 550 Hz. The two tones alternate approximately 100 times per
               minute. This is the European two-tone siren sound.

               External Radio (EX RAD) mode -- Set the radio set volume control for a
               comfortable listening level. Then press the EX RAD button on the siren control
               module. Received radio messages are then heard in both the siren speaker and the
               radio speaker. Set the siren speaker volume to the desired level by adjusting the

AUTHOR:                                                                                Page 3 of 4
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                                       REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:
                                          Operating Procedures for the Lights, Siren,
                                          Pump Start and Stop for Type IV Units
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                        04/06       DOC NO:         TB012
                        CROSS REF:



               PA VOLUME control on the siren control module. Do not change the radio set
               volume control setting.

               P.A. mode -- Press the button marked P.A. The siren system now operates as a
               public-address system, using the radio microphone. Press the microphone P-T-T
               button and speak slowly and distinctly across the face of the microphone. Adjust
               the P. A. VOLUME control for the desired speaker volume. As long as the P. A.
               button is depressed, pushing the microphone P-T-T button will activate the PA
               system only and will not key the radio transmitter.

               A P.A. override feature is built into the siren system. If the P. A. button is
               depressed the siren system will operate in the PA mode whenever the radio
               microphone P-T-T button is pressed, regardless of any other selected mode
               (including OFF). The siren will revert to the other selected mode when the
               microphone P-T-T button is released.

               To turn off the PA mode, press the PA button a second time. The button will pop
               out to its normal position.

NOTE:          The radio microphone will not operate the radio transmitter when the PA mode is
               on.




AUTHOR:                                                                              Page 4 of 4
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                                       REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Operating Procedures for Water Tender 615
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:              06/06         DOC NO:                       TB006
                            CROSS REF:     TB212 – Helitack Operations



INTRODUCTION

The information below relates to the operation of Water Tender 615 (formerly 238). This vehicle,
due to its complexity, has very specific operational procedures. Transfer case shifting, axle shifting,
bladder, and foam operations are detailed.

INFORMATION

Water Tender 615 is designed to provide 1500 gallons of water or foam, either to supplement a
Tactical Unit or by itself, to control unusual fire situations.

The responsibility of the officer in charge of the unit is to place it in such a position as to utilize all
of its potential.
1.       Water supply 1500 gallons - 300 gpm's at 150 psi.
2.       Foam concentrate 60 gallons AFFF/ATC 3% 6%.
3.       Remote water supply 1340 gallons with pump 125 gpm at 5 psi.
4.       Float pump 100 gpm at 120 psi.
5.       Direct fire attack 400' 1/2 with 100 gpm nozzle at 150 psi.
6.       Direct fire attach 600" 1" with 12 gpm nozzle at 300 psi.
7.       250" of 2 1/2" hose with 160 gpm nozzle.
8.       1 - Medium range foam nozzle 15 to 1.
9.       1 - High expansion foam nozzle 64 to 1.
10.      2 - Low expansion foam nozzles 5 to 1 Akron Turbojets.
11.      1 - 6000 gallon Bouywall tank with accessories.
12.      1 – 425 gpm chief floating pump

This unit is a special call unit designed to supplement the needs of the Incident Commander. It is
also a vital element of the Twin Valley Mutual Aid Plan and is available to surrounding agencies.

PROCEDURES

      A. OFF ROAD OPERATION

      The controls for the Front Axle, Low/High Range, and Power Divider Lock are air
      switched located at the center of the dashboard.

         1. FRONT AXLE ENGAGEMENT
              Move the “Front Drive” control switch up to engage the front axle. Moving the control
              down disengages the front axle. Neutral position is locked between the engaged and
 AUTHOR:      Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                                    Page 1 of 4
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         01/89          REVISED DATE:   11/00, 04/05, 05/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Operating Procedures for Water Tender 615
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:              06/06         DOC NO:                      TB006
                           CROSS REF:     TB212 – Helitack Operations



             disengaged position. When the front axle is engaged, a light on the instrument panel
             will glow to alert the driver.

             Important - Do not keep the front axle engaged when operating on dry, hard surfaced
             roads except where it is absolutely necessary to operate with the transfer case in low
             range. Operating on hard, dry surfaces with both the front and rear axle engaged creates
             a build-up of torque between the axles resulting in excessive tire wear and strain on the
             entire drive unit.

             When operating with the transfer case in low range, the front axle must be engaged to
             avoid excessive torque load on the rear axle.

             The front axle can be engaged with the vehicle in motion by using the procedure written
             above. It is not necessary to stop the vehicle when engaging the front axle.

             Difficulty may be encountered while engaging the front axle when the vehicle is not in
             motion. Forcing the control will not aid in engaging, but may damage the control
             linkage. Shift the transmission into low gear and roll the vehicle forward while keeping
             pressure on the control. It is easier to engage the front axle with the vehicle in motion.

        2. FRONT AXLE DISENGAGEMENT

             The torque build-up between the front and rear axles sometimes makes it difficult to
             disengage the front axle while the vehicle is in motion.

             To disengage the front axle with the vehicle in motion, slack off abruptly on the
             accelerator and move the control lever down to the “disengage” position.

             In some instances, it may be necessary to stop the vehicle and move it slightly in the
             reverse direction to complete disengagement of the front axle.

        3. POWER DIVIDER LOCK CONTROL

             For normal driving on hard surface roads, the control should be in the "OUT" position.

             To increase traction at low speeds, move the control lever to the "IN" (locked) position.
             NEVER ATTEMPT TO ENGAGE THE POWER DIVIDER LOCK WHEN THE
             WHEELS ARE SLIPPING. Use this feature only when necessary.

             A warning light on the instrument panel indicates the control is in the locked position.
AUTHOR:      Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                                   Page 2 of 4
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         01/89          REVISED DATE:   11/00, 04/05, 05/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Operating Procedures for Water Tender 615
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:              06/06         DOC NO:                    TB006
                           CROSS REF:     TB212 – Helitack Operations




        4. GROUND CLEARANCE

             Due to the long wheel base, careful operation over uneven terrain is essential. Damage
             to the undercarriage or plumbing may result from high-centering.

   B. BLADDER OPERATION

        1. Select area to set up bladder - 10' x 15' minimum. As flat as possible.

        2. Remove bladder from compartment and position with filler neck up and 1½" outlet on
           the downhill side.

        3. Connect 1½" nipple and valve to bladder. Connect 1½" hose from valve to water supply
           (pump discharge). Open valve.

        4. Engage pump and slowly begin the fill bladder until water shows at filler neck. When
           full, shut off 1½" PVC valve and remove 1½" hose.

        5. Do not overfill bladder. Bladder capacity is 1340 gallons. WT 615 tank capacity is 1500
           gallons.

        6. Use 1½" hard suction hose to connect the PVC valve on the bladder to the portable
           pump. Open 1½" valve.

        7. Attach 1½" wye to portable pump discharge. Attach 1½" hoses to wye to fill patrols.

        8. Portable pump is rated at 132 gpm at 71 psi.

   C. FOAM OPERATION

        Water Tender 615 is equipped with a 60 plus gallon foam tank filled with Ansulite 3 x 3, a
        low viscosity foam concentrate that can be applied on hydrocarbon and polar solvent fuels.
        This foam should be used at 3% on both hydrocarbons (gasoline, etc.) and polar solvents
        (alcohol and other water-soluble).

        1. Engage pump.

        2. Pull left live line.

        3. Set foam selector for 3% foam.
AUTHOR:      Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                                 Page 3 of 4
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         01/89          REVISED DATE:   11/00, 04/05, 05/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:           Operating Procedures for Water Tender 615
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:              06/06         DOC NO:                    TB006
                           CROSS REF:     TB212 – Helitack Operations



        4. Pull water handle (left live line valve).

        5. Pull eductor handle.

        6. Pull foam handle.

        7. Pump at 200 psi.

   D. SHUTDOWN FOAM OPERATION

        1. Push in foam handle.

        2. Reduce pump pressure to 100 psi.

        3. Pull flush handle.

        4. Rotate foam selector.

        5. Pump for 3 minutes to flush system.

        6. Push in eductor handle.

        7. Push in water handle (left live line).

        8. Disengage pump.




AUTHOR:      Jack Barton, Battalion Chief                                                 Page 4 of 4
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         01/89          REVISED DATE:   11/00, 04/05, 05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                          TOPIC:            Operation of Waterous/Hale Floto Pump
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                   06/06              DOC NO:          TB067
                          CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The Waterous and Hale Floto Pumps enable firefighters to place hose lines into operations quickly
for direct fire attack or when preparing for structure protection ahead of a wildland fire, utilizing
available water supplies from pools, storage tanks, or other open waterways. The Pump has a 1½"
discharge, which is more than adequate for most wildland firefighting operations. The following
information gives steps for commencing operation, ceasing operation and performing checks on the
Waterous and Hale Floto Pumps.


INFORMATION

    A. STARTING

        1. Make sure there is fresh fuel in the tank with the proper oil mix. Wipe off spilled
           gasoline.

        2. Connect discharge hose to pump, laying hose out free of kinks and twists. Make sure
           nozzle is closed.

        3. The pressurized discharge hose will hold the running Floto Pump out from shore. A
           rope may be necessary to prevent wind or current from swinging Pump back.

        4. Start engine before placing the unit in water. Open vent in fuel tank cap by turning it
           counter-clockwise. Move ignition switch to RUN (on). Close choke by moving choke
           lever in direction of arrow. Grasp lifting handle on top of engine with one hand, and
           pull top of engine with the other. (The throttle is automatically held in the idle position
           until the unit is placed in the water.)

             WARNING:

                 a. Because of the high engine compression required to develop the needed pump
                    performance, the engine may "kick back" when you attempt to start it.

                 b. To make starting easier, pull starting rope part way through stroke to bleed off
                    some compression, then pull with a quick, continuous stroke. When engine
                    starts, open choke by moving choke lever toward engine.


 AUTHOR:      Michael Roeder, Engineer                                                    Page 1 of 3
 REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       01/88       REVISED DATE:   05/97, 05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                         TOPIC:            Operation of Waterous/Hale Floto Pump
                         EFFECTIVE DATE:                   06/06              DOC NO:         TB067
                         CROSS REF:




            CAUTION:

                Throttle may be opened manually for short "bursts" by lifting throttle control float
                assembly, but prolonged high-speed operation with the unit out of the water may
                damage it.

   B. OPERATION

       1. When engine is running smoothly, slowly place pump in water. If you set it in the water
          too fast, the engine may stall when it is too cold or the carburetor is not adjusted
          properly. (Throttle will automatically open wide.) Pump speed and capacity will
          depend upon the type of nozzle and hose used.

            WARNING:

                Do not refuel the Floto Pump with the engine running. Make sure the muffler is
                cool before refueling.

   C. STOPPING ENGINE

       1. Turn engine switch to STOP (off) position. (If more convenient, remove the pump from
          water before stopping.) Close fuel tank vent by turning it clockwise before transporting
          pump.

            WARNING:

                Because the muffler is very hot when the engine is running, be sure to avoid
                touching it. Use the handle on top of the starter to lift the unit.

   D. CHECKING THE FLOTO PUMP

       Checking the floto pumps can be a troublesome experience. A method for checking these
       units has been developed, which utilizes the floto pumps 1 1/2" cap with a 1/8" hole drilled
       in the center. This hole allows water to recirculate.

       All stations have galvanized stock tanks or blue plastic half-barrels with stands to perform
       this test. If any of these components are missing or damaged, please contact Station 33 for
       replacement items.
AUTHOR:      Michael Roeder, Engineer                                                   Page 2 of 3
REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                       01/88       REVISED DATE:   05/97, 05/06
                                           TRAINING BULLETIN
                               TOPIC:           Operation of Waterous/Hale Floto Pump
                               EFFECTIVE DATE:                            06/06              DOC NO:                           TB067
                               CROSS REF:



          STEPS FOR CHECKING THE FLOTO PUMP

               1. Make sure unit has fresh fuel.

               2. Open fuel cap vent.

               3. Close choke.

               4. Flip kill switch to on.

               5. Remove 1 1/2" cap. Place cap, with 1/8” drilled hole for water circulation, on to
                  discharge.

               6. Start pump.

               7. Submerge pump in half barrel, holding float down until pump is primed.

               8. Shut off pump.

               9. Reinstall 1 1/2" cap.

               10. Restart floto pump holding throttle float down.

               11. open throttle and let pump fully warm up making sure pump maintains its prime.

               12. Shut down, let pump cool, refuel, and close tank vent.


                    TOUR CHECK: At the beginning of each tour, Floto Pumps must be visually
                    checked for readiness. Do not run Waterous Floto Pumps out of water. Only
                    test pumps in the method described above.


............................................................ TROUBLESHOOTING ............................................................

        If pump won't start or has poor performance, first check the fuel condition, then the
        spark plug. If problems still persist, take the pump out of service. Station 33 has a
        spare pump that can be exchanged while the broken unit is repaired. Notify on duty
        Battalion Chief of tool being out of service.

 AUTHOR:      Michael Roeder, Engineer                                                                                   Page 3 of 3
 REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       01/88                REVISED DATE:        05/97, 05/06
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                         TOPIC:            Opticom Traffic Control System
                         EFFECTIVE DATE:                       11/05   DOC NO:                  TB014
                         CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

All San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District engines, trucks, ambulances and several other
vehicles are equipped with a Strobe Emitter to control traffic signals, making them turn green in the
vehicle’s direction of travel. These units consist of a strobe mounted on top of the vehicle and a
switch box located in the cab. The units work by the flashing strobe contacting an electronic eye on
certain traffic signals. At present, all signals are equipped with an electronic eye in San Ramon and,
except for older signals, most are equipped in Danville.


INFORMATION

When the system is operated, it will change the traffic light to green and keep it green in the
controlling vehicle’s direction of travel while stopping all other traffic in other directions.

   A. Operational Precaution
       1. The Emitter should be turned off at the completion of each run. This is to avoid the
          following consequences:
           •    Shortening the life of the Emitter, which needs a constant airflow over the active unit
                to cool it properly.
           •    Draining the vehicle's electrical system unnecessarily.
           •    Keeping a traffic signal green in one direction.

   B. Safety Precaution
       1. The unit should never be disassembled with the power cord connected. This is because
          the flashing of the unit without the Ultra Violet filter in place could cause permanent
          blindness.

Contact the Assistant Chief of Operations if you have any questions.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                  Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:        Chris Suter, Deputy Fire Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                      REVISED DATE:
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:            Otterbine Portable Float Pump
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:         TB089
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District utilizes Otterbine floto pumps. They are kept on
WT331, WT238, Support 35 and E-37. Additionally, Emergency Otterbine pumps are stored at
stations 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38 and 39. The Otterbine pumps that are stored at the stations
are for emergency use and are part of the District’s Disaster Cache.

Otterbine floto pumps enable firefighters to establish a supply of water to Engine Companies,
utilizing available water from pools, storage tanks, or other waterways. They may also be used to
control flooding or as a direct fire attack tool.

SPECIFICATIONS

The unit size is 30x30x22 and weighs 85 pounds. It has a Briggs and Stratton Series 190700, 8 HP
engine running at 3600 RPM, with a 19.44 cubic inch displacement. The four-cycle air-cooled
engine has a positive type rewind starter and high-tension magneto ignition system. The pump is
½" cast aluminum alloy with built-in suction screen and skids. Discharges are 2 ½" NHT (Refer to
accompanying specifications sheet).

INFORMATION

The Disaster Cache Otterbine pumps are to be stored with the fuel tank and the carburetor dry, to
prevent old fuel problems. The Otterbine pumps stored on apparatus are to be in ready condition,
with their fuel tanks full.

   A. STARTING

       1. Make sure there is fresh fuel in the tank. Wipe off spilled gasoline.

       2. Connect discharge hose to pump, and lay hose out so it will be free of kinks and twists.
          Make sure nozzle or valves are closed.

       3. The pressurized discharge hose will hold the running floating pump out from shore, but
          a rope may be needed to prevent a current of wind from swinging it.

       4. Close choke in direction of arrow.

       5. Open throttle half way.

 AUTHOR:                                                                                    Page 1 of 3
 REVIEWED:       Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      05/97           REVISED DATE:   11/00, 05/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:            Otterbine Portable Float Pump
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:         TB089
                           CROSS REF:



      6. Grasp lifting handle and pull starter cord with other hand.

          WARNING: To make starting easier, pull starting rope part way through stroke to
          bleed off some compression; then pull with a quick, continuous stroke. When engine
          starts, open choke by moving choke lever toward engine.

      7. Slowly close choke and open throttle to full position.

  B. OPERATION

      1. When engine is running smoothly, slowly place pump in water. If the pump is set in
         water too quickly, the engine may stall when it is cold or the carburetor is not adjusted
         properly. Pump speed and capacity will depend upon the type of nozzle and hose used.

          WARNING: Do not refuel the floating pump with the engine running.

  C. STOPPING/STORING PUMPS

      1. Close throttle to idle position and allow idling, momentarily.

      2. Close throttle all the way to kill engine.

          WARNING: Because the muffler is very hot when the engine is running, be sure to
          avoid touching it.

      3. Pumps kept on apparatus must be allowed to cool before refueling.

      4. Disaster Cache pumps.
               a.          Empty fuel tank.
               b.          Shut off carburetor fuel valve.
               c.          Run pump until engine dies. This will drain carburetor.


      NOTE: Step #4 is very important. If skipped, there is a very high chance of engine
      failure, and the pump may not start during an emergency.




AUTHOR:                                                                                        Page 2 of 3
REVIEWED:           Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:           Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          05/97           REVISED DATE:   11/00, 05/06
                                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Piston Intake Relief Valve
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      9/28/05        DOC NO:                TB194
                            CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

The new Piston Intake Relief Valve has replaced the intake valves on the type1 engines and
trucks that do not have internal electric butterfly valves. The benefits of this valve are that it
operates efficiently while under pressure, provides the added safety of an intake relief valve to
reduce supply line pressure surges, and has a smooth operating pressure drain valve.

INFORMATION

The Piston intake valve is located on the pump panel side intake. The captain’s side keystone
valve has been removed and replaced with a 6” to 4 ½” reducer and a 4 ½” cap. The Relief valve
is pre-set to dump intake pressure at approximately 150 psi. Operate the open and close valve
slowly when the valve is under pressure. To drain pressure off the line, turn the drain valve
located at the top of the valve body.



These units have been put on engines and trucks that do not already have electric intake
valves.


                                              Drain Valve




                                                   Turn Handle
                                                   Open/Close




                            Relief Valve
                            Pre-Set @ 150psi
                                                                                  4 ½ “ Intake

                                    Relief Valve
                                    Discharge




 AUTHOR:      Paul Taylor, Captain                                                               Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:         Jack Barton, Battalion Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       4/11/04          REVISED DATE:    9/28/05
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                         TOPIC:            Portable Air Chisel
                         EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:         TB093
                         CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

To help effectively rescue people trapped in structures or vehicles after a disaster, all San Ramon
Valley Fire Protection District trucks and Type I Engines, and Engines 333 and 336 carry
portable air chisels. The air chisels are retro-fitted with the same coupling as the air bags.


INFORMATION

Air chisels are stored in a small blue canvas bag. Inside the bag is the air chisel, assorted bits, and a
small bottle of lubricant.

AIR CHISEL OPERATIONS

Bring the blue bag containing the air chisel, SCBA 4500 PSI bottle, and the yellow canvas bag
containing the rescue bag gauges and hoses as close to you as is possible to operate it safely.

Put the 4500 PSI bottle on its side; open the bag containing the gauges and hoses. Pull out and open
the plastic box containing the gauges. Screw the black regulator onto the bottle and set the regulator
at 90 PSI. Open the bottle slowly. There are three hoses located in the yellow canvas bag. Hook
one end of the hose to the regulator and the other end to the air chisel. How many hoses you use
will depend on the length you need.

There are different air chisel bits to choose from. Once you have chosen the bit that will perform
the best, put the round end of the bit into the chuck of the air chisel and screw the safety clip (or
spring) back on the air chisel.

All operators of the air chisel will wear eye protection and gloves.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                     Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       03/91           REVISED DATE:   11/00, 05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:              Positive Pressure Ventilation
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:                    TB060
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

Positive pressure ventilation is a technique that can be implemented when it is determined removal
of smoke, by pressurizing a building, is appropriate. Benefits of this mechanical ventilation include
the following:

    1. Compared to negative pressure ventilation, positive pressure ventilation is superior in speed
       and efficiency.
    2. Doorways and halls are kept clear.
    3. The need to carry blowers upstairs or ladders is eliminated.
    4. Exterior gasoline driven blowers do not require additional equipment for setup.
    5. Air agitation within the structure is minimized.


INFORMATION

Positive pressure ventilation is accomplished by forcing exterior air into the structure (see Fig. 1).




                                                                                        Fig. 1




 AUTHOR:                                                                                    Page 1 of 5
 REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       12/95       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              Positive Pressure Ventilation
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:                  TB060
                       CROSS REF:




When a window is opened, the contents will exhaust to the exterior due to the pressure differential
between the outside and inside of the structure (see Fig. 2).




                                                                                     Fig. 2




Positive pressure ventilation is most effective when the following requirements are adhered to:

   1. The cone of air issued from the blower(s) must completely cover the entrance opening.
      Multiple blowers may be used to achieve complete coverage. Depending on the size of the
      door or other opening, blowers are usually placed 5-10 feet from entrance openings.

   2. The exhaust opening should be approximately three-fourths the size of the entrance opening.
      As the size of the exhaust opening approaches the size of the entrance opening, efficiency
      will increase. When the entrance and exhaust openings are equal, or the exhaust hole
      exceeds the size of the entrance hole, efficiency will decrease. However, tests have
      indicated that even though the exhaust opening is up to twice the size of the entrance
      opening, the positive pressure method will still exceed the capabilities of the negative
      pressure method.

   3. The key to the success of positive pressure ventilation is control of the openings. The
      tendency for firefighters to randomly "open up" the structure will not facilitate a positive
      pressure operation. Air flow and openings must be planned, controlled, and monitored.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 2 of 5
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      12/95       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              Positive Pressure Ventilation
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:              TB060
                       CROSS REF:




Two examples of using the positive pressure ventilation method are as follows:

   1. This is a four room structure charged with smoke (see Figs. 3, 4, 5).

          a. Cover the front door with air from the blower and close the doors to rooms 2, 3, and
             4. Open the window in room 1 (see Fig. 3).




                                                                                  Fig. 3




 AUTHOR:                                                                             Page 3 of 5
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      12/95       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:              Positive Pressure Ventilation
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:                   TB060
                      CROSS REF:




          b. Open the door and window in room 2 (see Fig. 4).

          c. When clear, continue in a like manner (see Fig. 5) with rooms 3 and 4.

          Remember - CONTROL YOUR OPENING!




                       Fig. 4                                                   Fig. 5




AUTHOR:                                                                                  Page 4 of 5
REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      12/95       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              Positive Pressure Ventilation
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:                   TB060
                       CROSS REF:



   2. Consider this structure as a center hallway, ten-story apartment house with an enclosed
      stairwell (see Fig. 6). A fire has occurred in the rear apartment of the fourth floor; the entire
      floor and stairwell is charged with smoke.

           a. Utilizing positive pressure, ensure that the stairwell doors on floors 1, 2, and 3 are
              closed (and stay closed) and cover the stairwell opening at ground level with an air
              cone from the blower. By opening the window at the end of the fourth floor hallway,
              smoke will be exhausted as illustrated. Depending on the size of the building, this
              process may require multiple blowers.




Training, practice, and controlled fireground application of this operation will verify its speed,
efficiency, and practical application.

 AUTHOR:                                                                                  Page 5 of 5
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      12/95       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:
                                          Private Fire System – 18868 Bollinger
                                          Canyon Road
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:            TB018
                      CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

A required fire service is in service at the above address. A 10,000 gallon tank supplies a 4 ½
wharf standpipe approximately 283 feet northeast of Bollinger Canyon Road. Response units in
this area should acquaint themselves when possible.




 AUTHOR:                                                                           Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:      Darren Olguin, Captain
 APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                     12/84       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:
                                           Private Fire System - Country Oak Lane,
                                           End of Emmons Canyon Drive
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:                 TB029
                       CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION


This system of steamer hydrants is supplied by two 15,000-gallon tanks.


INFORMATION


The hydrant at #10 Country Oak Lane was tested at 98 PSI (static), 98 psi (residual), 70 PSI (pitot),
and flows 1650 G.P.M.. The hydrant located after the security gate tested 120 PSI (static), 108 psi
(residual), 115 PSI (pitot), and flows 1740 G.P.M..

Two 4½-inch fire department connections are located at the North end of the Emmons Canyon
Drive bulb to enhance this system, which has been engineered to provide 25,000 gallons for 25
minutes, maintaining better than the minimum requirement of 1,000 G.P.M. at 20 PSI..




 AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:       Darren Olguin, Captain
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      06/83       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:
                                           Private Fire System – Paulanella Place (Off
                                           Bollinger Canyon Road)
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:                 TB032
                       CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION


A required fire service is installed on Paulanella Place with a single steamer hydrant, approximately
600 feet east of Bollinger Canyon Road, supplied by an 8,000-gallon tank.

Tests in the 1980’s produced 750 GPM at 20 PSI.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:       Darren Olguin, Captain
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      11/84       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:
                                             1-½” Progressive Hose Lay “Gnass
                                             Backpacks”
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                         05/06              DOC NO:         TB055
                             CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District extinguishes wildland fires aggressively and
safely by using a combination of either Type 1 or Type 3 Engines, Water Tenders, and other
resources. Whenever possible, mobile direct attack is utilized. However, when this is not
possible, a Direct Attack Progressive Hose Lay, in conjunction with fire breaks and natural
barriers, may be necessary to control the fire. The following provides information on Gnass
Backpacks used in the Direct Attack Progressive Hose Lay.

INFORMATION

The Direct Attack Progressive Hose Lay consists of:
•  1-½” pre-connected hose lines
•  Progressive Hose Lay Packs – Gnass Backpacks
•  Wildland Web Gear Harness

A. ELEMENTS OF THE 1-½” GNASS BACKPACK
         •    1 – Gnass Backpack
         •    2 – 100 foot lengths of 1-½” single jacket Forestry hose
         •    2 – 1-½” x 1-½” x 1” Forestry tees
         •    4 – Gnass Pack straps

When the hose is deployed from the pack, it does not need to be rolled out to be charged and
plays out with minimal effort. The time necessary to prepare these packs is minimal considering
the element of readiness gained.

In addition to the Gnass Packs, a Wildland Web Gear Harness is an essential element of the
Direct Attack Progressive Hose Lay. All fire suppression personnel carry and wear the Wildland
Web Gear Harness on all wildland fires.

B. ELEMENTS OF WILDLAND WEB GEAR HARNESS
         •    Web gear harness with waist belt and shoulder straps
         •    1 – Water bottle – pouch (Captain, Engineer, Firefighter)
         •    1 – Fire shelter (Captain, Engineer, Firefighter)
         •    1 – Forestry hose clamp – Timberline (Captain, Firefighter)
         •    Rear Pack (Captain, Engineer, Firefighter)
 AUTHOR:      Mike Picard, Captain, and Dan McNamara, Firefighter/Paramedic                       Page 1 of 7
 REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                          7/98        REVISED DATE:         05/01, 04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:
                                            1-½” Progressive Hose Lay “Gnass
                                            Backpacks”
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                         05/06              DOC NO:         TB055
                            CROSS REF:



        •    Pencil line – 50ft (Captain, Engineer, Firefighter)
        •    Garden hose adapter/NH tee (Captain, Engineer, Firefighter)
        •    Garden hose nozzle (Captain, Engineer, Firefighter)
        •    Fusee Holder (Captain)


C. ASSEMBLING AND LOADING THE GNASS BACKPACK (1-½” Forestry hose)

   Proper assembly and deployment of the Gnass Backpack is necessary for a direct attack on a
   wildland fire.

        Equipment needed to assemble a 1-½” Gnass Backpack
        • 1 – Gnass Backpack
        • 2 – 100 foot lengths of 1-½” single jacket Forestry hose (hose bundle)
        • 1 – 1-½” Forestry nozzle
        • 1 – Forestry hose clamp
        • 1 – Hose rolling device
        • 2 – 1-½” x 1-½” x 1” Forestry tee
        • 4 – Gnass Pack straps

   Each hose bundle is held together with two straps. Both bundles have a Forestry tee on the
   male end. The bundles are carried in the Gnass Backpack


   ASSEMBLE HORSESHOE ROLLS FOR GNASS BACKPACK

   1. For the first bundle, start with a dry 100’ section of 1-½” hose rolled into a “double
      donut” roll. This will remove air from the hose.

   2. Attach the 1 ½” nozzle to the male coupling.
      Make sure the nozzle is shut. Clamp the female
      end of the hose with the Forestry hose clamp.
      This will keep air from entering the hose.




AUTHOR:      Mike Picard, Captain, and Dan McNamara, Firefighter/Paramedic                       Page 2 of 7
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          7/98        REVISED DATE:         05/01, 04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:
                                            1-½” Progressive Hose Lay “Gnass
                                            Backpacks”
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                         05/06              DOC NO:         TB055
                            CROSS REF:



   3. Place the adjustable Gnass pack roller
      in the receiver, either apparatus mounted
      or permanently mounted at the fire station.
      Set the pins at the outermost pin setting
      (43 inch spread) for 1-½” Gnass Backpacks.


   4. Unroll the hose with clamp and nozzle attached.




   5. Place the male end of the hose between
      the two closely spaced pins and begin
      rotating the roller so the hose goes onto
      the top of the roll.




   6. Remove the hose from the Gnass pack
      roller, keeping hose roll intact. If possible,
      use two personnel to remove the hose, being
      careful not to pull the Gnass pack roller
      from the receiver.




   7. Remove the clamp and the nozzle.
      Form the roll into a horseshoe shape
      with the female coupling on the inside
      of the curve.



AUTHOR:      Mike Picard, Captain, and Dan McNamara, Firefighter/Paramedic                       Page 3 of 7
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          7/98        REVISED DATE:         05/01, 04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:
                                            1-½” Progressive Hose Lay “Gnass
                                            Backpacks”
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                         05/06              DOC NO:         TB055
                            CROSS REF:



   8. Attach the Forestry tee to the male
      coupling. Move the male end so the tee
      is tucked into the inside curve.

                                                      Forestry tee



   9. Use one strap for the first bundle.
      Buckle the strap at the upper fold where
      the hose is bent in half and tighten.

   10. Use a second strap to narrow the width of the
       bundle. Keep both buckles on the same side.



   11. For the second bundle, repeat steps 1 through 10.



   PREPARE GNASS BACKPACK FOR LOADING

   Gnass Backpacks can be loaded with hose in the horseshoe configuration or hose in a donut
   roll. For horseshoe pack loading, lengthen the blue and orange (or yellow) nylon straps that
   feed into the cam buckle to their maximum length. For donut roll loading, move the straps to
   their minimum adjustment. In either case, once the pack is fully loaded and tightened, a
   shorter tail fed through the cam buckle will make hose deployment quicker and easier since
   there is less webbing that must pass through the cam buckle.

   The yoke straps travel from the back of the pack under the hose and up toward the cam
   buckle, supporting the hose in the pack with thick straps and a clear polycarbonate bridge.
   Proper yoke strap adjustment positions the clear polycarbonate bridge along the bottom of
   the hose when tightened and should not exceed the top edge of the outside hose. The yoke
   straps should be lengthened for carrying horseshoe packs, and shortened to accommodate
   donut rolls.

   The side compression straps should be loosened for easier loading.

AUTHOR:      Mike Picard, Captain, and Dan McNamara, Firefighter/Paramedic                       Page 4 of 7
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          7/98        REVISED DATE:         05/01, 04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:
                                            1-½” Progressive Hose Lay “Gnass
                                            Backpacks”
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                         05/06              DOC NO:         TB055
                            CROSS REF:



   LOADING THE GNASS BACKPACK

   Slide the hose into the harness with the two bottom folds of the horseshoe going up toward
   the top of the backpack (upside down) and seat the bottom folds of the horseshoe under the
   top cover. Snug the side compression straps and center the hose within the pack. Feed the
   orange (or yellow) release strap through the cam buckle but do not tighten yet. Check for
   proper position of the yoke under the hose, as mentioned above. Tighten the compression
   straps, then fully tighten the main release strap. Repeat procedure for next pack, using the
   blue release strap. NOTE: the yoke straps should not need further adjustment if the same
   hose configuration is used repeatedly.




D. DIRECT ATTACK PROGRESSIVE HOSE LAY OPERATION

   1. FROM TYPE 1 OR TYPE 3 ENGINE, TRUCK, OR WATER TENDER:
        a. DEPLOY PRE-CONNECTED 1-½” HOSE LINE
             1.   All personnel in full protective clothing, including Forestry shelter and radio.
             2.   Engineer places pump in main pump.
             3.   Firefighter and Captain don Gnass Backpacks; Engineer, if necessary.
             4.   The live line is extended dry or charged, depending on conditions.

        NOTE: The Fire Officer may make variations of this evolution to suit the needs of the
        firefighting operation.
AUTHOR:      Mike Picard, Captain, and Dan McNamara, Firefighter/Paramedic                       Page 5 of 7
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          7/98        REVISED DATE:         05/01, 04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:
                                            1-½” Progressive Hose Lay “Gnass
                                            Backpacks”
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                         05/06              DOC NO:         TB055
                            CROSS REF:




        b. PROGRESSIVE LAY USING 1-½” GNASS BACKPACKS
             1.   Before the live line is fully extended and more hose is needed to extinguish the
                  fire, the Firefighter operating the nozzle releases the first horseshoe roll from the
                  Gnass backpack. Reach across the chest with the right hand and unsnap the
                  release tab on the left shoulder. Pull the tab in one long, steady motion until
                  resistance is met. Reset the pull cord and pull farther until the main release strap is
                  free of the cam buckle. If the hose pack does not drop out immediately, hop up
                  and down gently until the hose drops. After the first bundle drops, the Captain
                  opens the horseshoe shape, releases the straps, and spreads open the center of the
                  pack, forming a circle with the male end of the hose (with tee attached) in the
                  middle of the circle.
             2.   The Firefighter sprays water on the fire line and knocks down fire within reach of
                  the water stream. The Firefighter then shuts the hose line bale and disconnects the
                  nozzle (with bale) from the live line bale.
             3.   The Captain hands the male coupling (with tee) to the Firefighter, making sure the
                  hose will play out from the center of the hose roll.
             4.   The Firefighter connects the nozzle with bale to the male coupling (tee).
             5.   The Captain connects the female coupling to the live line bale.
             6.   The Firefighter calls for water when ready.
             7.   The Captain opens the live line bale and charges the hose line.
             8.   The Firefighter advances the charged line, fighting fire until the hose is fully
                  extended.
             9.   Before the hose is fully extended, the Captain may apply the Forestry hose clamp
                  to the hose line while helping advance the line. The Captain drops the first bundle
                  by pulling the left release tab and places it on the ground, buckles facing up.
                  When the line is fully extended, the Firefighter again knocks down fire within
                  reach of the water stream and tells the Captain to clamp the line.
             10. The Firefighter removes the nozzle with bale from the clamped hose line.
             11. The Captain releases the buckle from the second bundle and opens the horseshoe
                  into a circle. The Captain gives the Firefighter the male coupling, making sure the
                  hose will play out from the center of the hose roll.
             12. The Firefighter connects the nozzle with bale to the male coupling.

AUTHOR:      Mike Picard, Captain, and Dan McNamara, Firefighter/Paramedic                       Page 6 of 7
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          7/98        REVISED DATE:         05/01, 04/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:
                                            1-½” Progressive Hose Lay “Gnass
                                            Backpacks”
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                         05/06              DOC NO:         TB055
                            CROSS REF:



             13. The Captain connects the female coupling to the male coupling of the clamped
                  line and releases the clamp when the Firefighter is ready.
             14. More hose is deployed from the Gnass Backpacks as needed by reaching across
                  the chest with the left hand, unsnapping the right shoulder release tab, and pulling
                  the cord until the second horseshoe pack drops. Hose line is extended in the same
                  manner as described above.

        NOTE: The straps are not disposable and must be picked up during or after the evolution.


E. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

   •    The Captain may make variations of this evolution to suit the needs of the firefighting
        operation, such as with a three person crew; however, try to follow these guidelines so
        Firefighters from different stations and shifts can work as a team.
   •    All crewmembers watch the extinguished line for rekindle. Make sure it is out the first
        time.
   •    Communication between crewmembers during the progressive hose lay is vital.
        Verbalize all actions and needs, and watch for unsafe conditions.
   •    For storing extra 1-½” hose packs on storage racks, use a second strap around the legs of
        the horseshoe pack. Remove this strap when loading into Gnass Backpacks.
   •    Practice this evolution as a crew to ensure smooth and safe operation.




AUTHOR:      Mike Picard, Captain, and Dan McNamara, Firefighter/Paramedic                       Page 7 of 7
REVIEWED:         Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                          7/98        REVISED DATE:         05/01, 04/06
                                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Usage of Recycled Water During
                                              Emergency Operations
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:        07/03/09           DOC NO:   FF
                             CROSS REF:     FF036 – Hydrant Inspection Program



INTRODUCTION
Water recycling, practiced for decades in the arid regions of the United States, is becoming more
and more common throughout California. Dublin San Ramon Services District (DSRSD) has
joined hundreds of other agencies statewide in an effort to help better manage our water
resources through recycling.

The San Ramon Valley Recycled Water Program (SRVRWP) began in June 2008. When
completed, 6,500 feet of 16-inch transmission pipeline and an additional underground pump
station will complete a critical “loop” in the system that serves San Ramon. The new facilities
also expand East Bay Municipal Utility District’s (EBMUD) recycled water service area to
include the Bishop Ranch Business Park, the Chevron campus, and other sites in northern San
Ramon. EBMUD currently provides recycled water to 33 customer sites in San Ramon.

INFORMATION
Due to potential health risks, extended out of service time, and complexity of decontamination of
personnel and equipment/apparatus after exposure to recycled water, use of recycled water by
SRVFPD personnel should be avoided and considered a “last resort” source of water.

Recycled Water Identification

    A.     Always observe the fire hydrant color and any warning signs when operating in the
           Dublin, San Ramon, and Danville areas. Yellow or white hydrants are potable, and
           purple hydrants (see photo page 3) are non-potable (recycled). The two systems (yellow
           or white / purple) are not to be interconnected under any circumstances. Additionally,
           any SRVFPD apparatus or equipment (water tanks, hoses, fittings, nozzles, etc.)
           exposed to recycled water must not be interconnected to the potable water system
           until decontaminated. Look for purple valves, pumps, and reservoirs throughout the
           SRVRWP system. Purple hydrants are “dry barrel” style and only the 4-1/2” outlet is
           threaded for SRVFPD use. The smaller outlets are actually 2-3/8” outlets with non-
           standard thread only intended for use with water meters to fill commercial water
           tenders. Do not try to connect 2-1/2” appliances or hoses.

    B.     The recycled water (purple) fire hydrants in Dublin, San Ramon, and Danville areas can
           be utilized as a backup source of water only if unavoidable due to firefighting
           operational needs. This backup source can be used for all phases of firefighting except
           as interconnection to the potable water system. For hydrant/pipeline location see map
           on page 3 of this Training Bulletin.

 AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                         Page 1 of 3
 REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief – Operations
 APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:          04/01/09         REVISION DATES:
                                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                               TOPIC:           Usage of Recycled Water During
                                                Emergency Operations
                               EFFECTIVE DATE:        07/03/09           DOC NO:    FF
                               CROSS REF:     FF036 – Hydrant Inspection Program

      C.     If use of the recycled water is unavoidable, then follow the bacterial flush as outlined in
             the next section of this procedure.

  Unavoidable Use of Recycled Water

      A.     Recycled water from DSRSD should not be put in apparatus booster tanks or run though
             apparatus pumps unless absolutely unavoidable due to firefighting operations.

      B.     If recycled water is placed in a booster tank or through an apparatus pump, a bacterial
             flush must be conducted.
             1. Inform the on-duty Battalion Chief.
             2. Notify DSRSD Clean Water Section at (925) 846-4565 or (925) 875-2336 weekdays
                 and on-duty operator at (925) 872-5890 after hours and weekends.
             3. Take apparatus to 7399 Johnson Drive, Pleasanton, CA 94588.
             4. Fill the tank with a solution of 1 gallon of chlorine bleach per 300 gallons of water,
                 circulate to all portions of the system including all hoses and appliances that held
                 recycled water and allow to sit for at least one hour.
             5. Flush the tank and pump with plain water until no chlorine odor remains in the
                 discharge water.
                    a. Do not discharge water containing bleach into a storm drain or onto the
                        ground.
                    b. DSRSD personnel will provide direction concerning where to discharge the
                        water at their facility.
             6. The apparatus will return to service after the flush and soak is complete and a
                 bacteria test of the tank has been performed by DSRSD personnel. This test takes
                 24-48 hours to conduct. The Duty Battalion Chief will be notified of the results.
             7. Avoid exposure to recycled water via ingestion or bodily contact.
                    a. If PPE is contaminated, follow the procedures specified under NFPA 1500
                        section 5-1.
                    b. If SRVFPD personnel are exposed to recycled water, submit completed
                        SRVFPD Notification of Possible Communicable Disease Exposure form.

      C.     Always contact the DSRSD before connecting to any reclaimed water hydrant in
             the Dublin and San Ramon areas for non-emergency use.

Water Flow and Pressure Information

DSRSD data for the recycled water system reflects static pressures of 65-80 psi; residual pressures
of 27-60 psi at a flow of 2000 gpm. Actual water pressures may vary depending on delivery
pressures, system demands, and dynamic status of facilities.
   AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                          Page 2 of 3
   REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief – Operations
   APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
   ORIGIN DATE:          04/01/09         REVISION DATES:
                                                  TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Usage of Recycled Water During
                                             Emergency Operations
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:        07/03/09           DOC NO:   FF
                            CROSS REF:     FF036 – Hydrant Inspection Program




AUTHOR:      Jim Selover, Captain - Training                                         Page 3 of 3
REVIEWED:         Bryan Collins, Assistant Chief – Operations
APPROVED:         Richard Price, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:          04/01/09         REVISION DATES:
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              Red Hydrant Emergency Supply System
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                    05/06       DOC NO:                 TB034
                       CROSS REF:




INFORMATION


In reference to the Ridgewood emergency supply only: the pumping plant on Ridgewood Road
consists of two 85 GPM pumps which supply the pressure tank located on the top section of
Ridgewood Road. The two pumps operate at 175 PSI, allowing them to overcome 290 feet of head
and 125 PSI back pressure, and maintain approximately 50 PSI in the pressure tank.

Any working fire will require a pumper to be located at the pumping station to increase the pressure
at the top. The pumper will take water from the RED HYDRANT and will pump into the WHITE
HYDRANT. This hydrant is an EBMUD-style hydrant and no longer has a valve at the bottom of
the hydrant. The maximum discharge pressure should be 200 PSI from the pumper. Operating at
this pressure will supply a maximum of 350 GPM at the top hydrant located next to the pressure
tank. If another pumper is connected to any hydrant on the top, a lesser GPM can be expected.

Caution must be exercised when shutting down supply lines without notifying the unit at the pump
station, as the extreme high pressures may cause failure of the supply hoselines, creating a water
loss. Initial starting pressure should be at 150 PSI and increased as needed by the attack pumper.

The Ridgewood area, under normal conditions, is supplied by water stored in a smaller pressurized
water tank. During fire operations, caution must be exercised to prevent the tank from overflowing.
EBMUD must be notified immediately via the Communications Center, each time the District uses
a pumper to augment their systems. Advise EBMUD that a water sample will be required to ensure
that the system did not become contaminated.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:       Darren Olguin, Captain
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                 REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                                 TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Sand Bags for Flood Protection
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                      11/05              DOC NO:         TB197
                             CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The unusually wet winter of 1997 brought some citizen requests for sandbags and help with
flooding conditions. Because of this, a program was designed to make sandbags available to
suppression personnel as well as the public.
This program provides prefilled sandbags for our use on flooding calls (not to be handed out to
the public). The primary source for sandbags and sand for making up more bags will be at station
35. During winter months, station 35 will have a trailer loaded with approximately 100 made up
sandbags. In addition, they will have sand and bags for making up more as needed. An alternate
source of bags is San Ramon’s Corporation Yard at 5000 Crow Canyon Road, San Ramon. In
Danville, there are premade bags stored at the corporation yard located at 1000 Sherburne Hills
Road. For the public, in times of actual or threatened flooding, this program provides public
access sandbag centers where supplies are provided for citizens to fill bags. The Battalion Chief
will activate these centers on an as needed basis. If citizens request sandbags when these centers
are closed, they should be told that many of the home improvement type stores sell them for a
nominal fee. The District sandbag program is based on an emergency need basis.
This program utilizes some facilities and personnel from the Town of Danville and the City of
San Ramon. Because these are two autonomous agencies, there are slightly different procedures
for handling incidents in each jurisdiction.

INFORMATION

    A. Prefilled sandbags have been palletized for efficient loading by forklift. Therefore, when
       the Incident Commander orders sandbags, it should be done by the pallet (approximately
       50 per pallet). Whenever more that one pallet is ordered a heavy capacity truck such as
       the flatbed must be used.

    B. Procedure for suppression personnel in or around the Town of Danville

         1. Respond to the scene and evaluate needs.

         2. If there is a need for sandbags to prevent property damage, estimate the number of
            pallets needed then relay this information to dispatch. Dispatch will notify a crew at
            station 35 (if available) to respond with the sandbag trailer. As a secondary source,
            dispatch will assign a fire company to locate the appropriate vehicle (flatbed, pickup,
            etc.) and respond to the Danville Corporation Yard. Access to the corporation yard
            after business hours can be made by using a Medco key (to open the gate a switch


 AUTHOR:      Scott Bradley, Captain                                                           Page 1 of 9
 REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        12/2/97          REVISED DATE:   02/05, 11/05
                                                TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Sand Bags for Flood Protection
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      11/05              DOC NO:         TB197
                            CROSS REF:



             box is located on the right side of the gate). Also, for building and equipment keys
             there is a Medco box in front of the main building door.
             The Danville Corporation Yard will keep between 400 and 500 premade sandbags on
             pallets throughout the winter months. They keep 2,000 empty sandbags and bulk
             sand on property.

        3. The Town of Danville Maintenance Department has also agreed to supply staff to
           assist with sandbagging operations either at the scene or at the corporation yard (not
           in Alamo or county areas outside of Danville, Blackhawk, or Diablo).

             During normal business hours, dispatch can contact the Danville Maintenance
             Supervisor at 314-3412. For after hours contact, Sheriff’s Dispatch will have a
             24-hour emergency call back list for Danville personnel. This list will be updated
             weekly. When sandbags are used, Danville must be notified so they can arrange to
             replenish their supply.

             To load pallets of sandbags, Danville utilizes a backhoe with a forklift attachment.
             The backhoe should be operated by a Danville employee if at all possible. After
             hours, if no Danville personnel are present, fire district employees may run the
             backhoe if they are confident they have enough backhoe experience to do it safely. If
             not, wait for the Danville employee on call back to arrive. The Duty Battalion Chief
             must authorize the use of any other agency or organization resources.

        4. For incidents in or near Danville, the sandbag supply at their corporation yard should
           be used first. If more are necessary, the bags at the San Ramon Corp Yard should be
           used next. If all facilities are depleted then sandbags may be bought from Morgan’s
           Masonry in San Ramon. During business hours a transport vehicle can pick them up
           at 2233 San Ramon Valley Boulevard. After hours, Morgan’s owner can be paged at
           837-7444 and he will be at the yard to open it up within 15 minutes. Morgan’s
           Masonry also has employees available to load more sandbags and /or deliver them to
           the scene for us.

   C. Procedure for suppression personnel in or near The City of San Ramon

        1. Respond to the scene and evaluate the need.

        2. If sandbags are necessary, dispatch will have station 35 respond with the trailer. As
           an alternate source, dispatch will send a fire company to the San Ramon Corp Yard


AUTHOR:      Scott Bradley, Captain                                                           Page 2 of 9
REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        12/2/97          REVISED DATE:   02/05, 11/05
                                                TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Sand Bags for Flood Protection
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      11/05              DOC NO:         TB197
                            CROSS REF:



             with an appropriate vehicle (flatbed, pickup, etc.). After hours access can be made to
             the Corporate Yard via Medco key.

        3. After hours, Sheriff’s Dispatch will have a contact number to call San Ramon
           Corporate Yard employees in from off duty (see Program Contacts List).

        4. The San Ramon Maintenance Department will assist us at the scene with personnel
           under the following circumstances:
             a. The water causing the flooding condition originated from a public right of way or
                city property.
             b. The water is threatening city property.
             c. If the water originated from private property and is threatening residential
                property, help may be requested through the maintenance supervisor. During
                business hours it likely will be approved but after hours it’s unlikely.
             d. If in doubt, have dispatch call the maintenance supervisor who will respond and
                give you an answer.

        5. If we run out of bags, San Ramon Corp Yard employees will help make more.
           Sandbags are made at the San Ramon Corp Yard, 5000 Crow Canyon Road, San
           Ramon. Sand is stored at the Corp yard. There is a Medco box available for access
           after hours. If there is a further need for bags immediately, the ones located at the
           Danville Corporation Yard can be used as backups in San Ramon.

        6. If these resources are depleted, there is Morgan’s Masonry in San Ramon (2233 San
           Ramon Valley Boulevard). After hours the owner can be called by dispatch to
           respond to the business within 15 minutes (home number 837 -7444).

        7. Note: It is policy to keep the sandbag supplies at the San Ramon and Danville Corp
           Yards fully stocked. Therefore, the IC must insure that the supervisor at either
           location be notified when some are used.

   D. Seasonal rotation of sandbags

        Every November sandbags shall be made up for the winter. In June any unused sandbags
        shall be emptied.




AUTHOR:      Scott Bradley, Captain                                                           Page 3 of 9
REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        12/2/97          REVISED DATE:   02/05, 11/05
                                                TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Sand Bags for Flood Protection
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      11/05              DOC NO:         TB197
                            CROSS REF:



   E. Procedure to make sand bag supplies available to the public

        1. Shift Battalion Chiefs have the capability to access The National Weather Service’s
           home page on the Internet. From this home page they will be able to locate:
             a. A 12-hour storm forecast for the local area.
             b. The Goes West Satellite shows storms approaching the west coasts as far away as
                Hawaii.
             c. The National Weather Services flood prediction information for individual
                counties.
             d. Military satellite images of the bay area with weather overlays.

        2. This information should give approximately 12 hours notice of potential flooding
           conditions. If the Battalion Chief feels that serious flooding is likely, he can order the
           District’s public access sandbag centers set up. A premade press release will be
           issued to alert the public.

        3. The District will have two public access sandbag centers: one in Danville at Station
           35 and one in San Ramon at Station 38. In addition, the supplies to make up a third
           sandbag center are staged at station 32. Since there is no room at or around station
           32, these supplies are intended to be moved to any point in the District as needed.

        4. When the Battalion Chief activates the centers he will call stations 35 and 38.
             It will be the Captains responsibility at these stations to:
             a. Put out the supplied signs, which advertise the center is open. The plywood sign
                should be bolted to the traffic delineator.
             b. Place the garbage can, with an ample supply of empty sandbags, at the site.
             c. Put the shovels and buckets in a convenient location.
             d. When the sand is delivered, use the tarp to cover it. Use sandbags tied to the
                corners to keep the tarp in place.
             e. It will then be the Captains responsibility, at the respective stations, to
                periodically check on the centers and insure that they have adequate supplies. If
                the supply of sand is running low, dispatch should be notified and they will use
                the vendor’s list to order more. More empty sandbags are available at stations 33.




AUTHOR:      Scott Bradley, Captain                                                           Page 4 of 9
REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        12/2/97          REVISED DATE:   02/05, 11/05
                                                TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Sand Bags for Flood Protection
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      11/05              DOC NO:         TB197
                            CROSS REF:



        5. The Battalion Chief will also notify dispatch who will do the following:
             •    Use a vender list to contact a bulk sand supplier and have deliveries made to the
                  centers. This list should be updated by dispatch every November. Dispatch must
                  specify that we want only Olympic #2 sand.

        6. Once these centers are activated, the bulk sand will be left there until the Battalion
           Chief determines that spring has eliminated a significant chance of flooding for that
           year. At this time he will notify the following people who will pickup and dispose of
           the sand:
              •   For Danville - The Maintenance Supervisor at 314-3412
              •   For San Ramon - The Parks Department Supervisor at 973-2836.
              •   The station Captains will then insure that the supplies are stored for the summer.




AUTHOR:      Scott Bradley, Captain                                                           Page 5 of 9
REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        12/2/97          REVISED DATE:   02/05, 11/05
                                                TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Sand Bags for Flood Protection
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      11/05              DOC NO:         TB197
                            CROSS REF:




                      LOCAL VENDER LIST FOR BULK SAND SUPPLIERS


    Morgan's Masonry Supply
    2223 San Ramon Valley Boulevard
    San Ramon
    Business hours phone: 837 - 7296
    24-hour home number: 383 -7745

    Nav - Land Landscape Center
    800 Camino Ramon
    Danville
    Business hours phone: 820 - 8955
    NO SERVICE AFTER 5 PM


    NOTE this information must be checked every year prior to November to ensure it is
    current.

    ORDER 5 YARDS OF OLYMPIC #2 SAND.




AUTHOR:      Scott Bradley, Captain                                                           Page 6 of 9
REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        12/2/97          REVISED DATE:   02/05, 11/05
                                                TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:           Sand Bags for Flood Protection
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                      11/05              DOC NO:                  TB197
                            CROSS REF:



                                       SANDBAG PROGRAM CONTACTS

    24 hour Emergency Operation Center for flooding conditions.                               (800) 952-5530
    The path to Army Corp of Engineers, California Conservation
    Corp. etc. (this is a tremendous resource)


    ORGANIZATION                                         PERSON                      PHONE NUMBER

    Danville Corporate Yard                              Barbara Bierwith            314-3412 or 736-2377

    Emergency Call Back – Danville                       Sheriff’s Dispatch          646-2441

    Department of Water Resources                        Keith Luster                (800) 952-5530 (pager)
    (training materials)

    Emergency Technical Advice/Response                                              (800) 952-5530

    Napa Public Works                                    Frank Primm                 (707) 257-9524

    National Weather Service                             Todd Mondel                 (916) 979-3056 x327

    San Ramon Corporate Yard                             Patrick Gutierrez           973-2836

    San Ramon Parks (sand pickup)                                                    973-2800

    Emergency Call Back – San Ramon                      Sheriff’s Dispatch          646-2441

    Morgan Masonry – 24-hour Emergency Number                                        837-7444


                  INVENTORY FOR PUBLIC ACCESS SANDBAG CENTERS

    1. Empty sandbags – between 500 and 1,000 (large bundle = 1,000).
    2. Plywood sign and orange traffic delineator with bolts.
    3. 40 – 50 gallon garbage can with sandbag making instructions on lid.
    4. Large plastic tarp.
    5. Four shovels.
    6. Four empty buckets (to hold the bags while they are being loaded).
AUTHOR:      Scott Bradley, Captain                                                                    Page 7 of 9
REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                        12/2/97          REVISED DATE:   02/05, 11/05
                                                 TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Sand Bags for Flood Protection
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                      11/05              DOC NO:                TB197
                             CROSS REF:



                  VENDER LIST FOR SANDBAG SUPPLIES TO THE PUBLIC

                 Please advise the public to call these suppliers before going, some
                 have limited stock and may be sold out in a major storm emergency.

Alamo:                       Yardbirds Home Center                       837-5038
                             3211 Danville Blvd.                         100 in stock
                             $2.69 ea. full only
                             Hrs. Mon-Fri. 7a.m.-8p.m., Sat. 8a.m.-8p.m., Sun. 8a.m.-6p.m.

Brentwood:                   The Old Hardware Store                     634-3355
                             629 First Street                           50-75 in stock
                             $1.39 ea. empty only
                             Hrs. Mon.-Sat. 8a.m.-5:30p.m., Sun.9a.m.-3p.m.

Clayton:                     Rodie's Feed & Country Store               672-4600
                             8863 Marsh Creek Rd.                       500-1000 in stock
                             $0.99 ea. empty, $2.99 ea. full
                             Hrs. Mon.-Fri. 8:3Oa.m.-6p.m, Sat. 8:30a.m.-5p.m, Sun.9a.m.-4p.m

Concord:                     Concord Masonry Supply                       685-7731
                             249 Hookston Rd. Pleasant Hill               2000 in stock
                             $0.95 ea. empty, $3.95 ea. full
                             Hrs. Mon.-Fri,6:30a.m.,-5p.rn., Sat 8a.rn.-3p.m.

Lafayette:                   Diamond Supply                                           284-4477
                             3 671 Mt. Diablo Blvd.                                   2000 in stock
                             $0.95 ea. empty, $3.95 ea. Full
                             Hrs. Mon. -Sat.7:30a.m.-5p.m.

Martinez:                    Bay Area Barricade Service                               686-1089
                             1861 Arnold Industrial Blvd.                             4000 in stock
                             $0.75 ea. empty only
                             Hrs. Mon.-Fri. 8a.m.-5p.m.

Oakley:                      Cutino's Feed & Supply                      625-2200
                             3770 Main                                   200-500 in stock
                             $1.25 ea. empty only
                             Hrs. Mon.-Fri. 8:30a.m.-5:30p.m., Sat. 8:30a.m.-5p.m.

 AUTHOR:      Scott Bradley, Captain                                                                  Page 8 of 9
 REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        12/2/97          REVISED DATE:   02/05, 11/05
                                                 TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Sand Bags for Flood Protection
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                      11/05              DOC NO:               TB197
                             CROSS REF:



Pinole:                      OSH Orchard Supply Hardware                 223-0542
                             1440 Fitzgerald Dr.                         200-300 in stock
                             $0.55 ea. empty, $2.19 ea. full
                             Hrs. Mon.-Fri. 8a.m.-9p.m., Sat.-Sun 8a.m.-6p.m.

Pittsburg:                   Piedmont Lumber                            432-0111
                             2120 Piedmont Way                          600 in stock
                             $0.81 ea. empty only
                             Hrs. Mon.-Fri.7a.m-5p.m-, Sat. 8a.m.-5p.m.

Richmond:                    Weill Industrial Supply                    235-3181
                             540 S. 12th Richmond                       1000 in stock
                             Min. purchase of 50-wholesale-cash only.
                             "Call for Quote” Hrs. Mon.-Fri.7a.m.-5p.m.
                             (not best source for homeowner, good for contractor)

San Ramon:                   Home Depot                                               838-0194
                             2750 Crow Canyon Road                                    100 in stock
                                                                                      bags + sand



Bulk Suppliers for Empty Sandbags

Justus Bag Co. Inc.                                                                   800-456-7878

California Bag Company                                                                415-824-6427




 AUTHOR:      Scott Bradley, Captain                                                                 Page 9 of 9
 REVIEWED:          Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:          Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                        12/2/97          REVISED DATE:   02/05, 11/05
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:           Search Guidelines
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                     07/06       DOC NO:                TB216
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

When searching for victims in a fire, rescuers must always be concerned with safety. Personnel
should be properly trained and equipped with the necessary tools to accomplish the rescue in a
minimum amount of time. Unsafe, hurried rescue attempts could be fatal to rescuers and victims.


INFORMATION

   A. Following is a list of common-sense safety points of which rescuers should be aware before
      they attempt any type of search and rescue within a building:
       •   If fire conditions are so advanced or the condition of the building is so poor that the
           rescuers have a good chance of losing their lives, rescue should not be attempted. Under
           such conditions it is unlikely the victim would be alive
       •   When a backdraft is possible, attempt entry only after ventilation has begun. Entry
           before proper ventilation could result in a backdraft explosion, often causing serious
           injury.
       •   Always wear the full structure-firefighting PPE compliment, including SCBA with
           PASS device.
       •   Always work in pairs and keep in constant contact, remembering that each is responsible
           for the other. Radio contact alone is not adequate for maintaining contact between crew
           members. Radios, like all electronics, may fail at a crucial time. Contact must be
           possible by voice, visual or physical contact.
       •   Have a plan or objective. Do not wander aimlessly. Working systematically will reduce
           the possibility of disorientation.
       •   Make sure there is a secondary means of egress available for all firefighters involved in
           the search.
       •   When operating on the floor above the fire, having a charged hoseline ready can be
           useful as a lifeline in addition to supplying emergency fire fighting capability. Crews
           that are not trained to conduct “dry” searches above a fire should provide for the highest
           level of crew safety that a charged hoseline will provide.
       •   Mark entrance into rooms and make note of the direction turned while going into the
           room. To exit and return, turn in the opposite direction.
       •   Feel door for excessive heat before opening.
 AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 1 of 5
 REVIEWED:       Derek Krause, Division Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      03/91        REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:          Search Guidelines
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                    07/06       DOC NO:                 TB216
                        CROSS REF:



      •   Stay low and move cautiously.
      •   Stay alert.
      •   Watch for hot spots and weakened structures.
      •   Your SCBA will raise your center of gravity, especially while crawling down an incline.
          For this reason, crawl backward down stairs to be able to maintain your balance if you
          encounter loose, missing or burned through steps.
      •   Keep in contact with the wall (ropes and straps can extend coverage).
      •   As the rescuer moves around the room, windows may be opened to relieve heat and
          smoke, if such venting does not extend the fire.
      •   If fire is encountered, closing a door will often contain the fire temporarily, allowing the
          searchers to continue.
      •   Once the search is complete, searchers should report back promptly to the officer in
          charge.
      •   Open doors carefully. Feel the door first to judge the heat behind it. Don't stand in front
          of the door. Stay to one side, keep low, and open the door. If there is fire behind the
          door, this will allow the heat and combustion products to pass over your head.
      •   If a door is hard to open inward, do not kick the door open. A victim may have collapsed
          at the door while trying to escape. Slowly push the door open, feel behind it to check for
          the possible victim.
      •   Essential tools for the search crew to take with them are: radios, one for each crew
          member; forcible entry tools, to move from one locked compartment to another, or to
          force their way out if needed; a strong handlight; and door chocks. If one is available, a
          thermal imaging camera, (TIC), should be utilized for search and rescue operations. A
          TIC will increase the safety, efficiency and effectiveness of the search operation several
          times over. A tag line may be used, but crews should be trained in using one, otherwise
          it can be problematic.


  B. TRAPPED RESCUERS
      •   Trapped rescuers can obtain some protection by hiding behind a sturdy door.
      •   Interior walls can also be breached by trapped rescuers, providing access to uninvolved
          areas and buying time for Rapid Intervention Crews to find the trapped rescuers.

AUTHOR:                                                                                  Page 2 of 5
REVIEWED:       Derek Krause, Division Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      03/91        REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:           Search Guidelines
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     07/06       DOC NO:                   TB216
                       CROSS REF:



      •   A suitable “safe-haven” for trapped rescuers is any location that will protect crews from
          fire or other hazards long enough to be rescued or to prepare an escape. Trapped
          rescuers may need to continuously find or create several temporary “safe-havens” as
          previous ones become overrun.
      •   A trapped firefighter should try to locate an exterior wall. Exterior walls may have doors
          or windows that will provide portals to exit the structure. Exterior walls are more
          difficult to breach than interior walls and should only be attempted if the trapped
          firefighter has enough time, air and energy.
      •   If a firefighter is trapped in a structure above the first floor, they can drop objects from a
          window or other opening to signal for help from other firefighters on the fireground. AT
          NO TIME SHOULD A FIREFIGHTER REMOVE ANY PART OF THEIR PPE TO
          USE AS A DISTRESS SIGNAL, ESPECIALLY THEIR HELMET. PPE is designed to
          work together as a system and removing part of it may seriously jeopardize a
          firefighter’s safety.
      •   Stay calm if you lose your direction. Follow the wall, and it will bring you to the door
          through which you entered or a door to the other area. If you come across a hoseline,
          crawl along this line. It will take you to the nozzle team or lead you to the outside. If
          you become trapped, follow the wall to the nearest window and signal for assistance.
      •   If you feel you are losing consciousness, you can use your handlight to signal your
          location to others by setting the handlight on the floor with the light shining on the
          ceiling. Also, activate your PASS device, and tap on a pipe or other metal surface with a
          tool to attract attention. Conserve your air.
      •   If you are lost and running low on air, STAY CALM, and DO NOT GIVE UP!
      •   Radio for help immediately if you are lost; hesitation may mean the difference between
          rescuers finding you in time or not.
      •   After announcing a “mayday” or “emergency traffic,” give the following information
          over the radio: who you are; what your situation is, (i.e. lost, 1/8 of a tank of air left,
          separated from crew); where you are, or think you are, (including where you entered the
          structure, what floor you think you’re on, what you were doing when you became lost,
          any structural landmarks such as windows, doors, shafts, chimneys, etc, the quadrant of
          the structure you think you’re in, and any identifiable sounds around you, such as a
          ventilation crew chopping nearby); how you plan to escape, or the direction you are
          traveling.



AUTHOR:                                                                                    Page 3 of 5
REVIEWED:       Derek Krause, Division Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      03/91        REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:           Search Guidelines
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     07/06       DOC NO:                TB216
                       CROSS REF:



  C. THE BUILDING SEARCH
      •    Searching a building has two objectives; finding victims and obtaining information on
          the extent of the fire.
      •   Upon arrival at the fire scene, check with building occupants who have escaped the fire
          for information about those who might still be inside. If others are inside the building,
          ask those who have escaped where the others might be. Make sure the information is
          factual. Neighbors might know of the occupant’s possible location because neighbors
          can be familiar with habits and room location. Also, the victim might have been seen at
          the window just before your arrival.
      •   Crews that are entering a building to conduct rescue operations should always make sure
          the Incident Commander is aware the rescue crews are entering the structure and what
          their plan is. Under no circumstance should rescuers enter a building without first being
          sure that a properly trained, responsible person outside the structure knows what the
          rescuers are doing and where they will be working.

  D. BUILDING SIZE UP
      •    It takes only a few seconds to stop and look at the building before entering and to gather
          facts that will be useful to you when you go inside. Look at the entire building you are
          about to enter and its surroundings. Then, when you get to a window inside, you can
          figure out your location.

  E. ESTABLISHING A SEARCH PATTERN
      •   The "buddy" system of searching for victims should always be used. Two persons using
          an efficient system can search an average residence in a short time.
      •   The fire floor should be checked first, and the floor directly above the fire should be
          checked next (or at the same time, if enough personnel are available). Rescuers above
          the fire floor may take a charged hoseline with them to aid them in finding their way out,
          in low visibility conditions and for crew protection if they encounter fire, but it will
          require extra time and personnel to manage the hoseline through the structure. A very
          rapid search of the floor above the fire floor can be done without a charged hoseline if
          the rescuers have the proper training to conduct such an operation and if safety is not
          compromised.
      •   The initial size up should have indicated if there could be an attic apartment. If the roof
          is flat, there is no need in most residences to search for a staircase leading from the top
          floor.

AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 4 of 5
REVIEWED:       Derek Krause, Division Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      03/91        REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:           Search Guidelines
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     07/06       DOC NO:                TB216
                       CROSS REF:



      •   When multiple rooms or apartments lead off a center hallway, a rescuer’s search is a
          series of rooms or apartment searches. When entering the first room, the pair of rescuers
          will turn right or left, thereby establishing a search pattern that may be used to search
          any building, from a one story, single-family home, to a large high rise building. Enter
          and exit in the same direction if you are to continue the search. For example, enter right,
          exit right. If rescuers have to abort their search, or if a victim is located and is to be
          removed from a building, rescuers should leave by turning in the opposite direction of
          that used upon entering. It is important that rescuers exit a room or apartment where they
          entered to ensure a complete search.
      •   Rooms that have been searched should be marked to avoid duplication of effort. This
          must be clearly known and understood by all personnel who may participate in the
          search.
      •   This technique will help rescuers search a building systematically and give them a quick
          exit if they find a victim and want to return to their starting point.
      •   If for any reason the search is aborted, this information should be reported immediately
          to the officer in charge. During a search for victims, negative information is just as
          important as positive information to coordinate a complete search.
      •   If smoke has reduced your visibility, use your hands, legs, or pike pole to feel for
          victims under beds. You may find victims near windows, doorways, and other escape
          ways.




AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 5 of 5
REVIEWED:       Derek Krause, Division Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      03/91        REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                        TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:            Small Engine Fuel Maintenance
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                   05/06       DOC NO:                   TB061
                             CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District has many different small engine applications. To
reduce equipment failure and maintenance cost, fuel should be changed at regular intervals.
This includes all small engine fuel tanks as well as the fuel cans on the apparatus.


INFORMATION

•      All fuel contained in fuel cans will be changed during the unit’s monthly inspection.
•      Fuel contained in small equipment should be changed any time the fuel is bad or has been
       sitting, unused for a period of time longer than one month.


PROCEDURE

       1. The fuel will be changed by draining the fuel cans into the station unleaded fuel storage
          tanks. In order to avoid fuel spillage, a large funnel shall be used.

       2. Using a siphon pump and large funnel, drain the portable power equipment fuel tanks into
          the station unleaded fuel storage tank. Small equipment such as chain saws and rescue saws
          can be drained without the use of the siphon pump.

       3. Fuel cans are identified by a metal tag attached to each can that specifies (1) drip torch (2)
          gas and (3) mix.

       4. Refilling fuel cans and portable power equipment fuel tanks.

           a. For two-cycle fuel, add one bottle of two-cycle oil to one gallon of gas in the cans
              containing 2 cycle mix.

           b. Floto pumps have a one gallon fuel tank. This allows for mixing the two-cycle oil and
              fuel in the fuel tanks of the floto pumps.




    AUTHOR:      Michael Roeder, Engineer                                                      Page 1 of 1
    REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
    APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
    ORIGIN DATE:                       11/00       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:            Spotting of Ladder Trucks at Working Fires
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:               TB005
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION


Upon arrival at an incident, it is the arriving truck Captain’s discretion, unless specifically
directed by the Incident Commander, to determine the most advantageous location for the
apparatus. Spotting distances vary depending on individual circumstances surrounding each
incident. Care must be exercised to spot the vehicle as close to the structure as can safely be
accomplished, while considering collapse distances as well as aerial ladder operations.


INFORMATION

There are a number of general safety rules that assist the truck company in a spotting choice as
well as safe operations.
In addition to known obstructions (vehicles, overhead wires, etc.), the officer should be aware of
the type of building construction. It is a general rule of thumb that most walls which collapse
due to burnout fall "out" approximately one third of their height. The exception to this rule is the
concrete tilt-up wall. It should be expected to fall "out" its full height.
The operation of the elevated monitor on the ladder truck is considered a "Defensive Tactic." It is
used when a fire cannot be controlled with hand lines. Hand lines are withdrawn into an indirect
attack and the elevated monitor is put into operation.
The effective utilization of a ladder truck is dependent on its proximity to the involved building.
In most cases, "the closer the better;" however, the safety of personnel and equipment must be
considered in any decision making process. Spotting locations can most often best be determined
through preplanning and individual incident problem and potential analysis that Company
Officers can perform with their crews as they perform District familiarization.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:       Mike Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      04/90        REVISED DATE:   04/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:
                                            Starting the Diesel Engine – Type IV
                                            Engines
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:                 TB008
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The following procedure is to be used when starting the diesel engine in the type IV engines.
Please note that a diesel engine starts differently from a gasoline engine. Failure to follow the
starting procedure may result in damage to the engine.


INFORMATION

To Start:
Press the clutch pedal to the floor and shift the transmission to neutral. Hold the clutch pedal to the
floor while you are starting the engine. A starter safety device is designed to keep the starter from
operating if the clutch is not pushed all the way down.

Turn the ignition key to "RUN". DO NOT TURN IT TO "START" with the ignition on the
"RUN", the "GLOW PLUGS" light will come on. This tells you that small heating elements, called
"glow plugs" are warming the part of the engine for improved starting. When the engine is ready to
start, the "GLOW PLUGS" light will go out.

If the engine is warm, the "GLOW PLUG" light may not come on. This is normal. During
cranking, and/or after starting, the "GLOW PLUGS" light may cycle on and off a few times. This is
normal.

NOTICE: If you leave the ignition on "RUN" but do not start the engine, the glow plugs will
continue to operate and could drain the batteries.

With the "GLOW PLUGS" light out, press down the accelerator pedal halfway and hold; then crank
the ignition key to "Start". Release the key when the engine starts.

Pumping the accelerator pedal before or during cranking will not aid in starting, and could keep the
engine from starting.

If the engine does not start after cranking 10 to 15 seconds, release the ignition key. Wait 10 to 15
seconds and repeat the starting procedure.

NOTICE: Do NOT use starting "aids" in the air intake system. Such "aids" can cause immediate
engine damage.
 AUTHOR:                                                                                  Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       11/00       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:
                                           Starting the Diesel Engine – Type IV
                                           Engines
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:               TB008
                       CROSS REF:



When the engine is cold, let it run a few seconds before moving the vehicle. This will allow oil
pressure to build up. Increased operating noise and light smoke are normal when the engine is cold.

All of the above information was taken directly from the Operation Manual supplied with the
vehicles.




 AUTHOR:                                                                               Page 2 of 2
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      11/00       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:
                                          Structure Protection in Wildland Urban
                                          Interfaces Fires
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06       DOC NO:             TB217
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

There are large areas within the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District wildland interface areas
that pose threats to homes and lives. In order to help suppression forces plan to combat these
situations, the following information is provided. This information describes proven
tactics/strategies for a successful mission to be used in conjunction with a strong public education
and weed abatement program.

INFORMATION

   A. OPERATIONAL NOTES

       1. Upon arrival, assess what the fire has done and what is it likely to do. If the objective is
          structure protection, decide the following: what are the exposures, where are they, how
          many are there, are more resources needed and available.

       2. Remember the wildland priorities are:
           a. Life safety (including your own)
           b. Protect property
           c. Save wildland

   B. ASSESSMENT FOR STRUCTURE PROTECTION PRIOR TO DEPLOYMENT

       1. Is the interior burning? With multiple structures to protect, don't get involved in interior
          firefighting. Is the roof more than 1/4 involved? If yes, move on.

       2. Is the roof made of combustible material? Are the gutters full of leaves? Is the siding
          combustible?

       3. Do you see boxed gables/eves or porches (especially with the pillars enclosed in lattice)?
          These are all heat and ember traps.

       4. Windows - How many? How big? On which exposure? Do these windows have
          curtains? (Lacy, light weight curtains are a hazard, but heavy drapes are considered
          effective radiant heat blocks.)


 AUTHOR:                                                                                 Page 1 of 4
 REVIEWED:       Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      10/96           REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:
                                         Structure Protection in Wildland Urban
                                         Interfaces Fires
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06       DOC NO:              TB217
                       CROSS REF:



      5. How close to the house are the trees/brush? Is the vegetation green or dry and brown?
         Does any vegetation overhang the roof?

      6. Is the fire spotting around or past the structure? A spot fire that puts you between it and
         the main fire can rapidly accelerate both fires’ advances and become a deadly trap.

      7. How steep is the topography? The steeper the slope behind the structure, the greater the
         preheating. The rate of fire spread doubles for each 20% of slope.

      8. How good are the escape routes or safety zones? Beware of either if they have heavy
         overgrowth or canopies. Beware of power lines.

  C. PROTECTING LIFE

      1. Try to utilize the local law enforcement for evacuations. However, don't forget that
         rescue is still your top priority at a wildland fire.

      2. Notify residents of the impending danger. If escape routes are adequate and evacuation
         will not block incoming fire apparatus, encourage residents to leave. If the resident
         insists on staying, don't argue. It wastes time that can be used to save others. and the fire
         service has no right or obligation to force them to leave. Document the addresses
         contacted and the result: advised (will leave/will not leave), not home, etc.

      3. If the resident is determined to stay with their home, enlist their help to remove
         exposures (lace curtains, yard furniture, wood piles, etc.).

      4. For residents who stay, explain that in almost all instances, a person is safe in a well
         built structure when a fire sweeps past, even though it eventually may be destroyed. Try
         to explain to parents the importance of keeping the family together.

  D. STANDARD URBAN INTERFACE PROCEDURE

      1. Park the engine facing out with headlights on and windows rolled up. Look for as much
         safety zone around your engine as possible, but try to avoid blocking traffic. Remember
         to have the structure between your engine and the fire for radiant heat protection.
         However, should the structure be lost, don't park your engine too close.




AUTHOR:                                                                                  Page 2 of 4
REVIEWED:       Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      10/96           REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:
                                         Structure Protection in Wildland Urban
                                         Interfaces Fires
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06       DOC NO:               TB217
                       CROSS REF:



  E. ENGINE POSITIONING AND SETUP

      1. It is critical that you position your personnel, apparatus, and yourself to protect the
         structure. However, also be in a position so you can make a quick move, if necessary.
      2. Prepare the structure and lay out the protection lines as follows:




      3. Use two 1 1/2" perimeter lines at least 100 feet but not longer than 200 feet.
      4. Extend one line around each side of the structure so that the streams will overlap and
         cover the entire perimeter. If structures are close, think about protecting two with each
         line.
      5. Attach all lines to the same pump panel for quick disconnect. If you are within 100 feet
         of a hydrant and you are planning a stand-and-fight attack instead of a blitz-and-run,
AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 3 of 4
REVIEWED:       Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      10/96           REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:
                                         Structure Protection in Wildland Urban
                                         Interfaces Fires
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06       DOC NO:            TB217
                       CROSS REF:



          think about a 2 1/2" supply; never a 4" supply. Even consider sticking the homeowner’s
          garden hose in the engine’s tank; a little extra water could save the house or your life.
      6. Preplan for roof access: place the homeowner’s ladder against the best corner of the
         house (make sure the ladder is in good condition).
      7. Next, the company officer surveys the area around the structure to size up hazards and
         water supply. Remember, size up is an ongoing process.
      8. Clear a defensible space. Consider time but try for a space 1 1/2 times the height of the
         surrounding fuel, with a minimum 30 feet of cleared space. Do you have time and
         adequate resources to burn out around the structure?
      9. Improve the structures chances: close windows/drapes, remove yard furniture, cut down
         shrubbery/trees, put autos in the garage. Apply class A foam, if you have it. Are there
         air resources available to drop retardant or water?
      10. For crew safety, follow the LCES checklist:
          L -     Designate a lookout (the Engineer usually will be the best choice)
          C -     Have a communication plan
          E -    Have at least 2 escape routes
          S -    Decide now whether the structure or your engine will be the safety zone.

          Remember - It's not enough to just make these decisions. You must tell everyone on
          your crew. Also, always save 100 gallons of water for personnel safety.




AUTHOR:                                                                                Page 4 of 4
REVIEWED:       Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      10/96           REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              The Hill Mutual Pressure Zone
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:             TB023
                       CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

The Hill Mutual Pressure Zone, which is located just south of #174 Castle Crest Road, in
Alamo, is a water system similar to the Ridgewood Pressure Zone. In fact, these two are the
only two hydro-pneumatic systems of their kind in the entire EBMUD service area. This
Training Bulletin explains specific information regarding the system and the process of
operation.

INFORMATION

Hill Mutual Pressure Zone is in the jurisdiction of Contra Costa Fire District. However, due to
the close proximity of the system to the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District (SRVFPD)
and automatic aid, SRVFPD units are a vital part of any firefighting operation. During normal
water demands the Hill Mutual System is supplied from the Crest reservoir, 120,000-gallon
redwood tank located adjacent to the Hill Mutual pressure tank and pumping plant. All supply
lines in this system are 6” in diameter. The Hill Mutual pressure tank holds 3,000 gallons, which
supplies customer pressures and a limited fire flow. Hydrants on the Hill Mutual Pressure Zone
are fed from the pressure tank. Similar to Ridgewood Pressure Zone, there is a limited water
supply and unpredictable pressures for firefighting from the hydrants. During fire fighting
operations the Hill Mutual pressure tank is supplemented by a red/white hydrant system. The
hydrants are located on Castle Crest Drive. There is also a red/white system on Sydney Drive. It
is preferred that the system on Castle Crest is used, as the white hydrant on Sydney Drive is a
wharf hydrant.

Operation
Any working fire will require a pumper to be located at the red/white hydrants to maintain a
constant flow of water as well as a steady pressure. The pumper will take water from the RED
HYDRANT and pump into the WHITE HYDRANT. The discharge pressure should start at 85
PSI and be adjusted accordingly. When the Crest tank is full, it will start to overflow. There is
piping in place that directs overflow water away from surrounding landscaping and down to the
street. Overflowing water from the Crest tank is not an indicator of when to terminate
supply to the red/white system. Early termination may cause sporadic intake pressure and
insufficient GPM’s at the attack pumper. Therefore, it is essential for the attack and supply
engineers to maintain good communication regarding when it is appropriate to terminate
red/white supply operations.

      As with any EBMUD system, as soon as our units pump into the water supply, it may
become contaminated. EBMUD needs to be notified immediately upon using this system.

 AUTHOR:                                                                             Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:       Darren Olguin, Captain
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      03/03       REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:          Thermal Imaging Camera Use
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                     07/06       DOC NO:           TB186
                            CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

Due to the risk of injury and/or death during emergency operations, the District uses as many
tools as possible to make the scene as safe as possible for both citizens and firefighters.

An important tool is the thermal imaging camera (TIC). It is a navigational tool that provides a
visual image of the immediate surroundings in low visibility conditions. The District cameras are
carried on the District’s trucks and in the Duty Battalion Chief’s vehicle. The camera assigned to
station 34 may be moved from T34 to USAR 34 depending on which unit is responding.


INFORMATION

In addition to the obvious uses during smoky fire scenes, the thermal imaging camera can be
used in a variety of emergency scene situations including:

    •    Visualizing the release of certain hazardous materials from a safe distance.

    •    Locating victims of motor vehicle accidents that happen at night. The camera can assist
         in locating victims who may have been ejected from the vehicle(s).

    •    Identifying victims trapped in building collapses, mud slides, debris flows, and other
         entrapment situations.

    •    Locating victims in wildland fires.

    •    Locating hot spots in any type of fire and during overhaul.

    •    Other uses as deemed helpful by fire scene investigators.




 AUTHOR:      Don Armario, Captain                                                      Page 1 of 3
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       03/01           REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:          Thermal Imaging Camera Use
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     07/06       DOC NO:            TB186
                           CROSS REF:



PROCEDURE

   A. Upon arrival at a structure fire, the truck captain shall bring the thermal imaging camera
      to the designated entry point for use by personnel operating inside the structure.

   B. The officer operating inside the structure may use the camera at his/her discretion to
      perform such tasks as:
        1. Assisting with size up
        2. Searching for victims
        3. Locating the fire
        4. Checking for hidden fires
        5. Looking for collapse potential
        6. Locating obstacles
        7. Checking for holes in the floor
        8. Looking for the best ventilation point
        9. Finding additional or alternate means of egress.

   C. At incidents other than structure fires, the Incident Commander will determine how best
      to use the camera.


SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS

   A. Always test that the camera is functional before entering the operational area.

   B. Keep in mind the camera is a complex electrical system that could possibly fail.
      Therefore, the user must always know his or her exact location in a structure and not be
      solely dependent on the camera for a means of egress. The use of the TIC should never
      be substituted for good search techniques. Physical contact with a wall, hoseline, or
      search rope should be maintained, if possible.

   C. Exposure to high temperatures (approximately 800 degrees) for an extended period of
      time may result in picture degradation or loss of thermal image. If degradation is
      observed (white streaks in the viewfinder), remove the camera from the hot environment,
      turn off, and allow for a cool down period until the thermal image is restored.


AUTHOR:      Don Armario, Captain                                                       Page 2 of 3
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                       03/01           REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:          Thermal Imaging Camera Use
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     07/06       DOC NO:          TB186
                           CROSS REF:



   D. Being aware of the camera’s battery life is important to successful operation. Enter a
      hazardous environment with a fully charged battery. Operating endurance is up to 3
      hours.

   E. Two battery chargers with batteries are mounted in the trucks.

   F. The camera should not be placed on the ground after the search is completed. (Return
      camera to pelican box when not in use.)

   G. When entering a hot, humid, or smoky atmosphere, if firefighters find it is necessary to
      wipe off facemasks due to humidity, the front of the detector and the back viewing plate
      of the camera will also need to be wiped off.

   H. Although the camera is waterproof (short-term immersion to a depth of 3 feet), the
      camera will not provide thermal imaging under water.

   I. Do not use the camera in environments or atmospheres where static or a spark will cause
      an explosion. The camera may be an ignition source. (Not intrinsically safe.)

   J. Never point the camera directly at the sun. Damage to the detector may occur.

   K. Only authorized personnel may service the thermal imaging system. The camera operates
      under high voltage. Unauthorized personnel should never remove the cover or the casing
      of the camera.




AUTHOR:      Don Armario, Captain                                                     Page 3 of 3
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                       03/01           REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                         TOPIC:            Timberline Hose Clamp
                         EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06       DOC NO:           TB184
                         CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

The District uses the Timberline Hose Clamp. It is designed to allow for fast and easy clamping
of hose on progressive hose lays while protecting the hose from damage.


INFORMATION

Each unit in the District that responds to wildland fires uses this style hose clamp.

   A. OPERATIONS

       1. To install: Kneel beside the fire hose. With one hand, hold the clamp in the open
          position with the spanner wrench on top. With the other hand, roll the fire hose into
          the open jaws. Depress the top handle on the clamp to instantly shut of the water
          flow.
           The clamp is self-locking and will remain locked until manually released. For
           maximum efficiency and safety leave the hose on the ground during installation and
           removal. You may find installation more comfortable if you place the tip of your foot
           on the bottom handle and use your body weight to close the handles. This will also
           help stabilize the clamp while installing.
           Note: the clamp may leave a dark mark on the hose. This is a characteristic of
           aluminum alloy. It is not indicative of damage to the hose and will scrub off with
           routine cleaning.

       2. To remove: Firmly grip the top handle and release slowly to prevent excessive
          pressure surge in hose. When removing, lift on the handle releasing the lock
          mechanism as the cam breaks over center, the handles will want to spread rapidly due
          to the pressure in the hose. Firmly grip the handles and release slowly to prevent
          injury.

       3. Safety instructions:
           •    Hold clamp away from body at all times.
           •    Keep hose and clamp on the ground at all times during operation.
           •    Do not exceed 1-1/2” hose size.
           •    Inspect tool for signs of damage prior to use. If you experience any difficulties or
                excessive leakage while using clamp or note signs of damage, discontinue use
                immediately.


 AUTHOR:                                                                                Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       08/00           REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                   TRAINING BULLETIN
                      TOPIC:            Type III Engines (659, 660, 661, 662)
                      EFFECTIVE DATE:                        05/06              DOC NO:         TB115
                      CROSS REF:




INFORMATION


Features/Equipment:

      • 1991 4800 Series Navistar

      • MT653 Allison Automatic Transmission

      • Navistar DTA 466 Engine

      • 6 Cylinder 230 HP @ 2400 RPM

      • 154 Ft. Wheelbase

      • 500 GPM Hale 40FD8 Pump

      • 500 Gallon Fiberglass Tank

      • 3000 Series 2 Stage John Deere Hydraulic Pump

      • Volvo 2 Speed Hydraulic Motor

      • Pre-plumbed Class 'A' Foam With 8 Gallon Tank

      • Four SCBA's With Spare Bottles

      • 20,000 Lb. Hydraulic/Gear Driven Winch (Units 659 and 661 only)

      • Two 750,000 Candle Power Telescoping Lights




AUTHOR:                                                                                   Page 1 of 1
REVIEWED:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:      Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                     01/93           REVISED DATE:   11/00, 04/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:
                                           Type 3 Engine Training Bulletin
                                           Units 602, 603, 604, 605
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                      5/26/07      DOC NO:                   TB
                           CROSS REF:


INTRODUCTION


The information in this Training Bulletin contains specifications, operating procedures and
features of the 2005 International Type 3 Engines, maintenance #602, #603, #604 and #605.


INFORMATION

         CAB / CHASSIS

         YEAR / MANUFACTURER                            2005 International / Hi Tech
         CAB TYPE                                       7400 Crew Cab
         ENGINE                                         International DT570
                                                        Horsepower – 330hp Torque – 950 ft/lbs
         TRANSMISSION                                   Allison 3000EVS
         WHEELBASE                                      175”
         FUELTANK CAPACITY                              70 gallons
         OVERALL LENGTH                                 24’ 7”
         OVERALL HEIGHT                                 9’ 7”
         GROSS VEHICLE WEIGHT                           29,680
         FRONT AXLE WEIGHT                               9,840
         REAR AXLE WEIGHT                               19,840
         FRONT TIRE SIZE                                11R/22.5 Load Range H 16 Ply
         REAR TIRE SIZE                                 11R/22.5 Load Range H 16 Ply


         PUMP AND BUILD UP

         MAIN PUMP TYPE -                               Waterous 2 Stage Centrifugal Pump
         MAIN PUMP GPM/PSI -                            500 gpm @ 150 PSI
         TANK CAPACITY -                                500 Gallons
         PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE -                        Hale Pressure Master with 2 Pilot Valves
         PRIMING PUMP -                                 Hale ESP Oil-Less Primer

         FOAM CAPACITY / TYPE -                         20 Gallons Class A
         FOAM DISCHARGES -                              All Discharges

         GENERATOR OUTPUT -                             1600 Watt
         GENERATOR TYPE -                               Redi-Line 12 Volt DC
 AUTHOR:      John Viera, Battalion Chief                                                    Page 1 of 6
 REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
 APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      05/25/07           REVISED DATE:
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                          TOPIC:
                                          Type 3 Engine Training Bulletin
                                          Units 602, 603, 604, 605
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                      5/26/07   DOC NO:                 TB
                          CROSS REF:



        PUMP FEATURES AND OPERATION

        The engine is equipped with a Waterous 2 stage centrifugal pump. The pump is PTO
        driven so it can be used to Pump and Roll or be used in a Stationary Mode. The 2 stage
        pump provides the flexibility to pump in either the Pressure or Volume mode based upon
        the situation.

        THE ENGINE MUST BE AT IDLE BEFORE THE PUMP CAN BE SWITCHED
        FROM ONE PUMP STAGE TO THE OTHER.

        PUMP AND ROLL

        To perform a Pump and Roll operation, use the following steps:
               1. Bring the engine to a complete stop.
               2. Apply the parking brake.
               3. Shift the transmission to neutral.
               4. Engage the pump by pulling the “Mushroom Button” up, it will illuminate
                   red
               5. Place the pressure relief valve selector in the “Cab Control” position.
               6. Place the pump stage switch in the “Pump and Roll / Pressure” position.
                   The yellow light will illuminate
               7. Set the pressure relief valve to 100psi or adjust as needed.
               8. Engage the front axle and place the transfer case in low range.
               9. Engage the rear axle differential lock if needed (engage while vehicle is
                   stopped).
               10. Turn on Class A foam system if needed.

        After pump operation is complete use the following steps:
               1. Bring the engine to a complete stop.
               2. Apply the parking brake.
               3. Shift the transmission to neutral.
               4. Turn Class A foam system off.
               5. Flush out the lines and pump.
               6. Disengage the pump.
               7. Open Discharge Manifold drain to relieve pump case pressure.
               8. Disengage the front axle and place the transfer case in high range.
               9. Disengage the rear axle lock.
               10. Back the engine 30+ feet to disengage the front axle and transfer case.

AUTHOR:      John Viera, Battalion Chief                                               Page 2 of 6
REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      05/25/07           REVISED DATE:
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                          TOPIC:
                                          Type 3 Engine Training Bulletin
                                          Units 602, 603, 604, 605
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                      5/26/07   DOC NO:                   TB
                          CROSS REF:

        STATIONARY PUMP

        To perform a Stationary Pump operation, use the following steps:
               1. Bring the engine to a complete stop.
               2. Apply the parking brake.
               3. Shift the transmission to neutral.
               4. Engage the pump by pulling the “Mushroom Button” up, it will illuminate
                  red
               5. Place the pressure relief valve selector in the “Panel Control” position.
               6. Place the pump stage switch in the “Stationary / Volume” position. The
                  green light will illuminate.
               7. Use the hand throttle to set pump pressure.
               8. Adjust the pressure relief valve to the desired pressure.
               9. Turn on Class A foam system if needed.

        After pump operation is complete use the following steps:
               1. Turn Class A foam system off.
               2. Flush out the lines and the pump.
               3. Disengage the pump.
               4. Open the “Discharge Manifold Drain” to relieve pump case pressure.
               5. Return pressure relief valve selector to the “Cab” position.
               6. Return the pump stage switch to the “Pump and Roll / Pressure” Position.

        CLASS A FOAM SYSTEM

        Class A foam is supplied to all discharges on the pump. It is injected after a check valve
        after the Tank Filler discharge. This allows the tank to be refilled or discharge pressure to
        be circulated through the tank before it is injected with foam. The foam system can be
        turned on and off from two locations. The main Foam Pro Control is located on the pump
        panel and controls all foam system functions. The auxiliary Foam Pro Control located in
        the cab will turn the system on and off by pressing the “Red Button”. The foam will be
        injected at the percentage that is preset on the main Foam Pro Control located on the
        pump panel.

        RECIRCULATION LINE

        A ¼” recirculation line has been plumbed between the discharge side of the pump and the
        tank filler to always circulate a small volume of water to prevent overheating the pump.


AUTHOR:      John Viera, Battalion Chief                                                 Page 3 of 6
REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      05/25/07           REVISED DATE:
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                          TOPIC:
                                          Type 3 Engine Training Bulletin
                                          Units 602, 603, 604, 605
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                      5/26/07   DOC NO:                 TB
                          CROSS REF:



        DISCHARGE MANIFOLD DRAIN

        A “Discharge Manifold Drain” has been installed on the pump panel. This was
        necessary because Class A foam is supplied to all discharges. The check valve that was
        installed to prevent foam from flowing back into the pump and tank filler, traps discharge
        pressure on the discharge side of the check valve. This pressure can make discharge
        valves hard to operate. If a valve is hard to open, open the “Discharge Manifold Drain”.

        4 WHEEL DRIVE OPERATION

        These engines are equipped with a safety feature that prevents the transfer case from
        being shifted while the vehicle is in motion.

        To engage the 4 wheel drive, use the following steps:
              1. Bring the engine to a complete stop.
              2. Apply the parking brake.
              3. Shift the transmission to neutral.
              4. Switch the transfer case to low range.
              5. Engage the front axle.
              6. Engage the rear axle differential lock.

        To disengage the 4 wheel drive, use the following steps:
               1. Bring the engine to a complete stop.
               2. Apply the parking brake.
               3. Shift the transmission to neutral
               4. Switch the transfer case to high range.
               5. Disengage the front axle.
               6. Disengage the rear axle differential lock.
               7. Place the transmission in reverse.
               8. Release the parking brake.
               9. Back up 30+ feet to disengage the front axle and transfer case.


        KEY POINT: IF STEPS 1, 2 and 3 ARE NOT FOLLOWED TO ENGAGE OR
        DISENGAGE THE TRANSFER CASE, IT WILL NOT SHIFT AND AN
        AUDIBLE ALARM WILL SOUND.



AUTHOR:      John Viera, Battalion Chief                                               Page 4 of 6
REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      05/25/07           REVISED DATE:
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                          TOPIC:
                                          Type 3 Engine Training Bulletin
                                          Units 602, 603, 604, 605
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                      5/26/07   DOC NO:                    TB
                          CROSS REF:

        The engine is only to be driven in four wheel drive when it is off of a paved or hard
        surface. This will prevent damage to the drive train caused by excessive traction.

        BRAKES

        The chassis is equipped with front and rear drum brakes. Both the front and rear slack
        adjusters are automatic. It has a four wheel Anti-Lock brake system.


        AUXILIARY BRAKE

        The engine is equipped with an exhaust brake for auxiliary braking. It operates the same
        as a “Jake brake”. It has an on/off switch and a 3 position switch to adjust the amount of
        braking that is applied. The exhaust brake should be turned off during wet or slippery
        road conditions.


        CAB FEATURES

                 Water Tank Level Indicator
                 This allows the water tank level to be monitored in the cab.

                 Rear Axle Lock
                 This allows the rear axle to be locked for increased traction during four wheel
                 drive operation. It is only to be engaged when the vehicle is stopped. It is only to
                 be used for off road applications or damage to the drive train could be caused by
                 excessive traction.

                 Engine Fan Override
                 This allows the engine fan to be locked on for constant operation to provide extra
                 cooling in extreme conditions.

                 Power Windows
                 The cab was equipped with power windows. The power windows allow the
                 engineer to close all windows in the cab from the driver’s seat. The control on the
                 driver’s door has a selector for the front and rear windows.




AUTHOR:      John Viera, Battalion Chief                                                  Page 5 of 6
REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      05/25/07           REVISED DATE:
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                          TOPIC:
                                          Type 3 Engine Training Bulletin
                                          Units 602, 603, 604, 605
                          EFFECTIVE DATE:                      5/26/07   DOC NO:                      TB
                          CROSS REF:

                 Power Locks
                 The cab was equipped with power locks for security purposes. There is a toggle
                 switch located under the cab below the driver’s door. It allows the driver’s door to
                 be unlocked without the battery switch being in the on position.

                 Compass / Temperature Gauge
                 A compass and temperature gauge is located in the overhead console.

                 AM / FM / Weather Band Radio
                 The radio installed in the cab has a weather band for local weather reports.

                 Block Heater
                 The engine has a block heater. The electrical plug is located under the driver’s
                 side front fender. It is to be used if the engine is stored outside and subjected to
                 temperatures at or below 35 degrees.

        ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

        The engine’s electrical system is multiplexed. This allows the chassis electrical system to
        interface with the buildup and be controlled by the factory installed switches.


        GEAR STORAGE

        Storage for personal protective equipment and gear is located in front of the hose bed on
        both sides and in the saddle compartments under the Engineer’s and Captain’s doors.
        This should allow a minimum of additional equipment to be carried in the cab. During
        accidents, especially rollovers, many firefighter injuries come from secondary impacts in
        the cab from loose equipment.


        COMMITTEE MEMBERS

        For information needed beyond this training bulletin the Type 3 Engine Committee
        Members are:
               Mike Avery
               Mike French
               Mike Garske
               John Viera

AUTHOR:      John Viera, Battalion Chief                                                    Page 6 of 6
REVIEWED:         Richard Price, Assistant Chief Operations
APPROVED:         Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                      05/25/07           REVISED DATE:
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Use and Care of Reciprocating Saws
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                          06/06            DOC NO:         TB183
                             CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

All type 1 engines and all trucks are equipped with reciprocating saws to give another option to
use for rescues (auto extrication), fires (overhaul), or any other emergency deemed necessary for
their use.


INFORMATION

Removing and replacing the Quik-Lok Cord (Select Models) (Fig.1)




1. To remove the Quik-Lok" Cord, turn the cord nut 1/4 turn to the left and pull it out.

2. To replace the Quik-Lok" Cord, align the connector keyways and push the connector in as far
   as it will go. Turn the cord nut 1/4 turn to the right to lock.

Selecting a Blade

When selecting a blade, choose the right type and length.

Many types of blades are available for a variety of applications: cutting metal, wood, nail-
embedded wood, scroll cutting, roughing-in, and contours.

Many lengths are also available. Choose a length long enough to extend beyond the shoe and
your work throughout the stroke. Do not use blades less than 3-1/2" long since they won't extend
beyond the shoe throughout the stroke.




 AUTHOR:      Tom Andersen, Captain                                                              Page 1 of 9
 REVIEWED:        Adam Costa, Firefighter/Paramedic; Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       07/00          REVISED DATE:         05/06
                                            TRAINING BULLETIN
                                TOPIC:           Use and Care of Reciprocating Saws
                                EFFECTIVE DATE:                          06/06            DOC NO:         TB183
                                CROSS REF:




Quik-Lok Blade Clamp (Select Models) (Fig. 2)

Unplug the tool before changing blades. Be sure the spindle and blade clamp areas are clean.
Metal chips and sawdust may prevent the Quik-Lok Blade Clamp from clamping securely.




1. Depending on the job, the blade may be inserted with the teeth facing up or down. To install
   a blade, twist collar in the direction of the arrow while inserting the blade into the clamp
   until the tang butts against the collar.

2. Release collar and the spring loaded mechanism will clamp the blade firmly in place.

3. Twist collar in the opposite direction of the arrow to ensure that the blade is locked into the
   clamp.

4. Tug on blade to make sure it is securely locked in place.

5. To remove a blade, twist collar in the direction of the arrow while pulling on the blade. Be
   careful when handling hot blades.


Quik-Lok Blade Clamp Maintenance

•      Periodically clean dust and debris from the Quik-Lok Blade Clamp with dry compressed air.

•      If the collar resists twisting, twist the collar back and forth to shake debris loose.

•      Periodically lubricate Quik-Lok Blade Clamp with a dry lubricant such as graphite.

    AUTHOR:      Tom Andersen, Captain                                                              Page 2 of 9
    REVIEWED:        Adam Costa, Firefighter/Paramedic; Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
    APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
    ORIGIN DATE:                       07/00          REVISED DATE:         05/06
                                            TRAINING BULLETIN
                                TOPIC:           Use and Care of Reciprocating Saws
                                EFFECTIVE DATE:                          06/06            DOC NO:         TB183
                                CROSS REF:



Removing broken blades from the Quik-Lok Blade Clamp

Unplug the tool before removing blades. Broken blades can be removed by the following
methods.

•      Point the tool downward, twist the collar, and shake the tool up and down. (DO NOT turn
       the tool on while your fingers are holding the blade clamp open). The shank of the broken
       blade should drop out of the clamp.

•      If shaking the tool doesn't work...
       In most cases, a corner of the broken blade will extend beyond the blade clamp. Simply
       twist the collar and pull the broken blade out of the clamp by this corner.

•      If the broken stub doesn't extend far enough to be grabbed by its corner, use a thin blade
       with small teeth (such as a metal cutting blade) to hook the blade that is jammed in the
       clamp, while twisting the collar, and pull it out.


Adjustable Pivot Shoe (Fig. 3)

The shoe can be adjusted forward or backward, to six positions, to take advantage of the unused
portion of the blade or for special jobs requiring low blade clearance.

            Fig. 3




1. To adjust the shoe, pull the shoe release lever down 1/4 turn and slide the shoe forward or
   backward to the desired position.

2. To lock the shoe in position, push the shoe release lever up.

    AUTHOR:      Tom Andersen, Captain                                                              Page 3 of 9
    REVIEWED:        Adam Costa, Firefighter/Paramedic; Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
    APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
    ORIGIN DATE:                       07/00          REVISED DATE:         05/06
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Use and Care of Reciprocating Saws
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                          06/06            DOC NO:         TB183
                             CROSS REF:



3. After adjusting the shoe, slowly pull the trigger to be sure the blade always extends beyond
   the shoe and your work throughout the stroke.


DO NOT OPERATE SAWZALL WITHOUT SHOE. STRIKING THE SPINDLE
AGAINST WORK MAY DAMAGE THE RECIPROCATING MECHANISM.




Impact Protection System

Select models are equipped with a unique, patented gearing system that provides efficient power
transmission and extended life, in the most difficult cutting applications. This durable system
will absorb impacts, blade lock ups, and motor stalls. These models can be used for extreme
cutting applications, such as large diameter pipe, thick metal, pallets, and heavy demolition and
renovation work, as well as for general purpose cutting.


Starting, Stopping and Controlling Speed

1. To start the tool, grasp the handle firmly and pull the trigger.

2. To stop the tool, release the trigger. Allow the tool to come to a complete stop before
   removing the blade from a partial cut or laying the tool down.



 AUTHOR:      Tom Andersen, Captain                                                              Page 4 of 9
 REVIEWED:        Adam Costa, Firefighter/Paramedic; Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       07/00          REVISED DATE:         05/06
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Use and Care of Reciprocating Saws
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                          06/06            DOC NO:         TB183
                             CROSS REF:



Orbit Control Switch (Fig. 5)

The Orbital Super Sawzall is equipped with an orbit control switch. The tool may be operated in
straight reciprocating (non orbital) or orbital action. Straight reciprocating action should be used
when a smooth cut is needed. Orbital action is recommended for fast, aggressive cutting. The
optimum orbital action should be determined by the user for their specific cutting requirements.

1. For straight reciprocating action, move the orbit control switch to the straight cut symbol (1).

2. For orbital action, move the orbit control switch towards the orbital cut symbol (2).

The amount of orbital action may be adjusted by moving the orbital control switch to any
position between the two symbols. For larger orbital action, move the orbit control switch closer
to the orbital cut symbol (2). For smaller orbital action, move the orbit control switch closer to
the straight cut symbol (1).

Orbital action may be adjusted when the tool is running.

NOTE: Orbital action will not operate if the blade is installed with the teeth facing upward.




Selecting the Speed Range

The speed control dial controls the maximum strokes per minute. The speed will remain
variable to the chosen dial setting by use of the trigger switch. Refer to the chart for
recommended dial settings.

 AUTHOR:      Tom Andersen, Captain                                                              Page 5 of 9
 REVIEWED:        Adam Costa, Firefighter/Paramedic; Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       07/00          REVISED DATE:         05/06
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Use and Care of Reciprocating Saws
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                          06/06            DOC NO:         TB183
                             CROSS REF:




                      MATERIAL                                           SUGGESTED DIAL SETTINGS *

                        Mild Steel                                                         2-3

                           Wood                                                             5

                Nail-Embedded Wood                                                          5

                     Stainless Steel                                                       1-3

                         Drywall                                                           4-5

                        Fiberglass                                                         1-3

                          Plastics                                                         1-3

                         Cast Iron                                                         2-3

                 Non-Ferrous Metals                                                        2-3

* These are only suggested settings; the actual optimum setting may vary depending on line
voltage, blade selected and user preference.


Trigger Speed Control Switch

Super Sawzalls are equipped with a trigger speed control switch. It may be operated at any
speed from zero strokes per minute to full speed. Always start tool before blade contacts the
work piece. To vary the speed, simply increase or decrease the pressure on the trigger. The
further the trigger is pulled, the greater the speed. To stop the tool, release the trigger and allow
the tool to stop completely before removing from a partial cut or before laying the tool down.

General Cutting

For straight or contour cutting from an edge, line the blade up with your cutting line. Before the
blade contacts the workpiece, grasp the handle firmly and pull the trigger. Then guide the tool
along your cutting line. Always hold the shoe flat against the workpiece to avoid excessive
vibration.
 AUTHOR:      Tom Andersen, Captain                                                              Page 6 of 9
 REVIEWED:        Adam Costa, Firefighter/Paramedic; Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       07/00          REVISED DATE:         05/06
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Use and Care of Reciprocating Saws
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                          06/06            DOC NO:         TB183
                             CROSS REF:



Cutting Metals

Begin cutting at a slow speed, gradually increasing speed as you cut. When cutting into metals
or hard materials that cannot be cut from an edge, drill a starting hole larger than the widest part
of the blade.

Plunge Cutting (Fig. 6)

Your MILWAUKEE Sawzall is ideal for plunge cutting directly into surfaces that can not be cut
from an edge, such as walls or floors. Orbital action is recommended for plunge cutting. Plunge
cutting may be done two ways depending on how the blade is inserted. Column A shows how to
plunge cut with the teeth of the blade facing down. Column B shows how to plunge cut with the
teeth of the blade facing up.

NOTE: Orbital action will not operate if the blade is installed with the teeth facing upward.

Do not plunge cut into metal surfaces (see "Cutting Metals").




 AUTHOR:      Tom Andersen, Captain                                                              Page 7 of 9
 REVIEWED:        Adam Costa, Firefighter/Paramedic; Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       07/00          REVISED DATE:         05/06
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Use and Care of Reciprocating Saws
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                          06/06            DOC NO:         TB183
                             CROSS REF:



1. Insert the blade into the tool.
    If the blade is inserted with the teeth facing downward, hold the tool as shown in Column A,
    resting the edge of the shoe on the workpiece.

    If the blade is inserted with the teeth facing upward, hold the tool as shown in Column B,
    resting the edge of the shoe on the workpiece, as shown.

2. With the blade just above the workpiece, pull the trigger. Using the edge of the shoe as a
   pivot, lower the blade into the workpiece, as shown.

3. As the blade starts cutting, raise the handle of the tool slowly until the shoe rests firmly on
   the workpiece. Then guide the tool along the cutting line to acquire the desired cut.

NOTE: To make plunge cutting easier, use a heavy gauge blade and install the blade with the
teeth facing upward, as shown in Column B.

Maintaining Tools

Keep your tool in good repair by adopting a regular maintenance program. Before use, examine
the general condition of your tool. Inspect guards, switches, tool cord set and extension cord for
damage. Check for loose screws, misalignment, binding of moving parts, improper mounting,
broken parts and any other condition that may affect its safe operation. If abnormal noise or
vibration occurs, turn the tool off immediately and have the problem corrected before further
use. Do not use a damaged tool. Tag damaged tools "DO NOT USE" until repaired, and follow
District standard procedures for repair.

Under normal conditions, relubrication is not necessary until the motor brushes need to be
replaced. After six months to one year, depending on use, return your tool to the nearest
MILWAUKEE service facility for the following:
    •    Lubrication
    •    Brush inspection and replacement
    •    Mechanical inspection and cleaning (gears, spindles, bearings, housing, etc.)
    •    Electrical inspection (switch, cord, armature, etc.)
    •    Testing to assure proper mechanical and electrical operation




 AUTHOR:      Tom Andersen, Captain                                                              Page 8 of 9
 REVIEWED:        Adam Costa, Firefighter/Paramedic; Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       07/00          REVISED DATE:         05/06
                                         TRAINING BULLETIN
                             TOPIC:           Use and Care of Reciprocating Saws
                             EFFECTIVE DATE:                          06/06            DOC NO:         TB183
                             CROSS REF:



Cleaning

Clean dust and debris from vents. Keep the tool handles clean, dry and free of oil or grease. Use
only mild soap and a damp cloth to clean your tool since certain cleaning agents and solvents are
harmful to plastics and other insulated parts. Some of these include: gasoline, turpentine, lacquer
thinner, paint thinner, chlorinated cleaning solvents, ammonia and household detergents
containing ammonia. Never use flammable or combustible solvents around tools.

Blade Inventory

4     DW 4801 – Wood cutting 6” blade
4     DW 4849 – Wood cutting 12” blade
2     DW 4864 – Metal demolition 6” blade
2     DW 4865 – Metal demolition 8” blade




 AUTHOR:      Tom Andersen, Captain                                                              Page 9 of 9
 REVIEWED:        Adam Costa, Firefighter/Paramedic; Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                       07/00          REVISED DATE:         05/06
                                       TRAINING BULLETIN
                            TOPIC:
                                            Use of Master Streams During Firefighting
                                            Evolutions
                            EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:              TB226
                            CROSS REF:



INTRODUCTION

Master Stream appliances have several different uses on the fireground to assist on scene
personnel during firefighting evolutions. Some of these would include the following:

     (1)     Exposure Protection for adjacent structures.
     (2)     Suppressing hot embers in a convection column above a fire.
     (3)     Initial knockdown of a fire that is obviously too large for handlines to control.

As mentioned above, master streams can be used in several different situations ranging from a
straight stream applying large volumes of water to a light fog above a structure allowing the
Incident Commander to reposition existing resources to a more effective location.

When master streams are put into operation, tremendous volumes of water can be applied to the
structure in a short period of time which can put a great deal of additional load on the building.
In addition, if streams are directed into the structure from above, heat and smoke are then
directed back into the structure and onto the firefighters. This, in turn, makes visibility and the
ability to carry out tactics in the building difficult, if not impossible.

Because of the risks involved in using master streams and the possibility of firefighters being
injured unnecessarily, the following process should be followed.


INFORMATION

Once firefighters have entered a burning structure, every effort will be made to adhere to the
following guidelines prior to directing master streams into the structure.
    1. Before the Incident Commander orders master streams placed into operation, the first
       priority should be to account for all personnel on scene and their location.

    2. A radio command should be given to alert all personnel to prepare for master stream
       attack.

    3. Captains shall report to the Incident Commander by radio that their crews are clear of the
       building or are in a safe location relative to the operation.

    4. After the Incident Commander is confident all personnel have been accounted for, he or
       she may proceed with master stream use.

 AUTHOR:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                              Page 1 of 2
 REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                         09/99         REVISED DATE:   06/06
                                      TRAINING BULLETIN
                           TOPIC:
                                           Use of Master Streams During Firefighting
                                           Evolutions
                           EFFECTIVE DATE:                     06/06       DOC NO:         TB226
                           CROSS REF:



   5. As always, anytime large quantities of water have been applied in an attic area or the roof
      structure has been compromised due to exposure to fire, the Incident Commander should
      closely monitor the activities of interior crews while performing additional duties
      including salvage and overhaul.




AUTHOR:      Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief                                         Page 2 of 2
REVIEWED:        Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
APPROVED:        Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
ORIGIN DATE:                         09/99         REVISED DATE:   06/06
                                    TRAINING BULLETIN
                       TOPIC:              Utility Salvage Bag
                       EFFECTIVE DATE:                     05/06       DOC NO:                TB108
                       CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The Utility Salvage Bag is an efficient asset used during salvage operations. This small utility bag
is an organized collection of a few tools and supplies that are conveniently attached to your belt
during salvage operations.


INFORMATION

The Utility Salvage Bag contains the following items:

                        (1)       Claw Hammer
                        (1)       Utility Knife
                        (1)       Staple Gun
                        (1)       Box of 9/16" Staples
                        (1)       Box of 3" Scaffold Nails

This bag is currently located on all trucks and Salvage Unit 35. It can be used as necessary during
salvage operations for such procedures as covering roof openings, and securing windows and doors.
The bag is easily identifiable, with its blue codura fabric and attached carabiner for connection to
the belt.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                                  REVISED DATE:   05/06
                                     TRAINING BULLETIN
                        TOPIC:
                                          1 ½” WYE Bag for 1 ½” Flat Hose Load on
                                          Type III Engines
                        EFFECTIVE DATE:                        06/06              DOC NO:         TB130
                        CROSS REF:




INTRODUCTION

The District carries WYE Bags made up for the 1½" flat hose in the hose bed on the Type III
engines. These bags consist of (1) double-gated 1½ WYE and a separate Velcroed pouch inside the
bag, containing (1) 1½" plastic nozzle, (1) 1" plastic nozzle, and (1) 1½" to 1" reducer. These bags
attach to the end of the hose by a flap fastened by Velcro.


INFORMATION

The bags can be used if a unit cannot get any closer than 200 feet or more to an anchor point on a
wildland fire. In this case, a WYE bag with hose can be extended to the anchor point. Utilizing the
items within the bag, the progressive hose lay may begin at this point. The next crew can then start
a second progressive hose lay from the WYE, proceeding up the opposite flank, instead of pulling
an additional line parallel to a line already existing. This evolution can be done without any extra
equipment except Gnass packs and hose clamps, due to the nozzles in the WYE bag.




 AUTHOR:                                                                                    Page 1 of 1
 REVIEWED:       Michael Sylvia, Assistant Chief
 APPROVED:       Craig Bowen, Fire Chief
 ORIGIN DATE:                      12/93           REVISED DATE:   11/00, 05/06

				
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