POLICIES and PROCEDURES

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					                         POLICIES and PROCEDURES

                           BOY SCOUT TROOP 616

     Charter Organization: New Territory Residential Community Association

                              Tomahawk District

                          Sam Houston Area Council




Revised December 2003                                      Troop_616_policies.doc
                    B.S.A. TROOP 616 POLICIES and PROCEDURES
                             Summary and Signature Page

1. Expectations of Parents
   • Parents are encouraged and expected to take an active role in their son's scouting
      experience.
   • At least one parent or guardian is expected to register as an adult leader or Committee
      member in the Troop and become active.
   • There are many opportunities for involvement both directly with the boys and with work
      behind the scenes on the Troop committee.
   • All parents should read this document completely and sign below to indicate their
      agreement.
2. Expectations of Scouts
   • Scouts are expected to learn and adopt the Scout Oath, Law, Motto, Slogan and the
      Outdoor code as a means to a fun and successful Scouting experience.
   • Unscoutlike behavior will not be tolerated, and discipline will be handled in a fair but firm
      manner.
   • Scouts are in charge of their own advancement and scouting experience, but adult leaders
      share a responsibility in motivating and assisting Scouts to advance insofar as that
      enriches his experience without making Scouting a drudgery.
   • Scouts shall adhere to Scout uniform standards.
   • All Scouts should read this document and sign below to indicate their agreement.
3. Methods of the Troop
   • Troop 616 is heavily involved in outdoor activities as a means to helping the Scouts have
      fun and to grow as leaders and team members and to develop skills of self-reliance and
      helpfulness to others.
   • Therefore, frequent campouts and hikes are a central part of our activities. These occur
      nearly every month and are scheduled well in advance to allow families to handle
      scheduling conflicts.
4. Advancement
   • Scouts are in charge of their own advancement and are assisted by adult leaders who act
      as merit badge and rank advancement counselors.
   • Full descriptions of the merit badge and advancement processes are at the back of this
      document. Scouts and parents should refer to these important diagrams and follow these
      procedures.
5. Finances
   • New members shall pay fees and equipment costs, which shall be prorated to the month in
      which they join.
   • All troop members will take care of fees and costs and prepare up-to-date forms at the
      annual "recharter" time. Fees are established and published annually by the Troop
      Committee.
6. Code of Conduct
   • A Scout is expected to live by the Scout Oath and Law and to show respect to each other
      and to Troop leadership, both adult and Scout.
   • Troop 616 will use a 3-strike system and committee oversight to ensure a smooth-running
      Troop and fairness to all scouts.
   • Three accumulated strikes will result in a suspension from Troop activities.
   • A strike can be rescinded by 3-months good behavior, while a suspension cannot.
   • Three suspensions will result in immediate dismissal from Troop 616.
   • See additional policy details in this document.

I have read this document outlining the policies and procedures of B.S.A. Troop 616 in its
entirety and agree to support the Troop by abiding by the principles contained herein.

Scout:_________________________________             Parent:_______________________________

Date: ______________________                        Date:_________________________________
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                                                                      TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................................................................ 4

THE SCOUTING PROGRAM ....................................................................................................................................... 4
    GENERAL........................................................................................................................................................................ 4
    OBJECTIVE ..................................................................................................................................................................... 4
    METHODS ....................................................................................................................................................................... 5
    HOW TO HELP YOUR SON BECOME A SUCCESSFUL SCOUT ............................................................................................ 5
    HOW PARENTS CAN BE INVOLVED................................................................................................................................. 5
TROOP ORGANIZATION............................................................................................................................................. 5
    SCOUTS .......................................................................................................................................................................... 5
    ADULT LEADERS ............................................................................................................................................................ 6
TROOP ACTIVITIES ..................................................................................................................................................... 8
    PROGRAM PLANNING ..................................................................................................................................................... 8
    MEETINGS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 9
    SERVICE TIME ................................................................................................................................................................ 9
    FUND-RAISING ............................................................................................................................................................... 9
    WEB PAGE...................................................................................................................................................................... 9
TRANSPORTATION AND OUTINGS ....................................................................................................................... 10
    GENERAL...................................................................................................................................................................... 10
    EQUIPMENT .................................................................................................................................................................. 10
    TRANSPORTATION ........................................................................................................................................................ 10
    •    TRANSPORTATION PLANNING ............................................................................................................................. 10
    •    VEHICLES AND DISTRIBUTION OF SCOUTS .......................................................................................................... 11
    •    TRAVEL .............................................................................................................................................................. 11
    TOUR PERMITS ............................................................................................................................................................. 11
    EMERGENCY CONTACT ................................................................................................................................................ 11
    HIKING SAFETY ............................................................................................................................................................ 12
FINANCES ..................................................................................................................................................................... 12
    TROOP FINANCES ......................................................................................................................................................... 12
    CAMPOUT FEE .............................................................................................................................................................. 12
    PERSONAL FINANCIAL ACCOUNT GUIDELINES ....................................................... ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.
    EQUIPMENT FEE ........................................................................................................................................................... 13
PARTICIPATION ......................................................................................................................................................... 13
    REGISTRATION ............................................................................................................................................................. 13
    ACTIVE MEMBERSHIP................................................................................................................................................... 13
    UNIFORMS .................................................................................................................................................................... 14
    ADVANCEMENT ............................................................................................................................................................ 14
    BOARDS OF REVIEW ..................................................................................................................................................... 15
    PARENT RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................................................................................................................... 15
CODE OF CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINARY GUIDELINES ................................................................................. 16
    GENERAL DISCIPLINE POLICY ...................................................................................................................................... 16
    SPECIFIC BEHAVIORAL EXPECTATIONS ........................................................................................................................ 17
    THREE-THREE SYSTEM ................................................................................................................................................ 18
    STRIKE CONSEQUENCES ............................................................................................................................................... 18
    SUSPENSION PROGRESSION .......................................................................................................................................... 18
    SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................................................... 18
MEDICAL ...................................................................................................................................................................... 19
    MEDICAL FORMS .......................................................................................................................................................... 19
    MEDICINE ..................................................................................................................................................................... 19
    CONSENT TO TREAT ..................................................................................................................................................... 19
ATTACHMENT ONE: PURPOSE OF THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA ........................................................ 20

ATTACHMENT TWO: METHODS OF THE BOY SCOUT PROGRAM ............................................................ 21

                                                                                          2
   IDEALS ......................................................................................................................................................................... 21
   PATROLS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 21
   OUTDOORS ................................................................................................................................................................... 21
   UNIFORM ...................................................................................................................................................................... 21
   ADVANCEMENT ............................................................................................................................................................ 21
   ADULT ASSOCIATION ................................................................................................................................................... 21
   PERSONAL GROWTH ..................................................................................................................................................... 21
ATTACHMENT THREE: AIMS OF THE BOYS SCOUTS OF AMERICA......................................................... 22
   LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT ........................................................................................................................................ 22
ATTACHMENT FOUR: THINGS TO COMMIT TO MEMORY.......................................................................... 23
   THE SCOUT OATH ........................................................................................................................................................ 23
   THE SCOUT LAW .......................................................................................................................................................... 23
   THE SCOUT MOTTO ...................................................................................................................................................... 23
   THE SCOUT SLOGAN .................................................................................................................................................... 23
   THE OUTDOOR CODE ................................................................................................................................................... 23

ATTACHMENT FIVE: EAGLE SCOUT COURT OF HONOR

    Scout Responsibilities…………………………………………………………………………………………...……24
    Family Responsibilities……………………………………………………………………………………………….24
    Troop Responsibilities………………………………………………………………………………………………..25

ATTACHMENT SIX: ADULT OFFICES; ELECTION GUIDELINES

    Adult Offices…………………………………………………………………………………………………………26
    Election Guidelines…………………………………………………………………………………………………..26
EXHIBIT A MERIT BADGE PROCESS ................................................................................................................ 277

EXHIBIT B RANK ADVANCEMENT PROCESS .................................................................................................. 30

EXHIBIT C FEE SCHEDULE ................................................................................................................................. 333




                                                                                         3
                                         INTRODUCTION

This package provides Scouts and their parents with general information about the
Scouting program and about Troop 616 in particular. It will serve as a valuable reference
that all Scouts and their parents should refer to frequently. Of course, if you have a
question about something not covered in this package, please call one of the
Scoutmasters or Troop Committee members. This will contribute to the goal that we all
share, which is having the best Scouting program possible.


                                  THE SCOUTING PROGRAM

General
1. Troop Number: 6l6
2. Chartering Organization: New Territory Residential Community Association
3. District:  Tomahawk District
4. Council: Sam Houston Area Council
5. Primary Source for Program: Boy Scout Handbook (required at each and every meeting and
   campout)
6. Fees: Established and published annually by the Troop Committee. See Exhibit C.
7. Registration: Annually paid in January to the Boy Scouts of America (B.S.A.) for administration,
   insurance, etc.
8. Meetings: (See the Troop Calendar, issued each August for specific dates and locations)
   a) Troop meetings are held on Tuesday nights at The Club at New Territory from 6:30 to 7:45
       p.m. Exact time may vary depending on Club scheduling requirements.
   b) Patrol Leader Council (PLC) meetings are held once a month for the Patrol Leaders (PL)
       and Senior Patrol Leaders.
   c) Courts of Honor are usually held quarterly at a time to be announced.
   d) Parent Troop Committee meetings are held every other month at 6:30 PM at the Club.
       Dates to be established and published on the Troop calendar.

Troop 616, like all other BSA Troops, is a neighborhood organization. The boy leaders of
the Troop run the Troop with the help and guidance of the adult Scouters. The B.S.A.
supplies program aides, guidance, and regional planning; but the actual working of the
Troop is all ours. This is why parents are so important to the working of the Troop.
Without active parental participation and support, we cannot have a Troop. Without active
parents, we cannot have interesting and exciting activities. The more parents that help
out, the less individual time and effort it takes. Through this guide, we hope to inform and
communicate to all parents of Troop 616 the purpose and methods of Scouting, and the
inner workings of Troop 616.

Objective
The objective of the Scouting program is to provide for young men an effective program designed
to build desirable qualities of character, to train them in the responsibilities of active citizenship,
and to develop in them personal fitness and leadership. This involves developing:

     •   a sense of responsibility
     •   a keen respect for the rights of others
     •   the desire and skills to help others
     •   leadership skills
     •   a desire to be a good citizen of our community and nation

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    • physical, mental and emotional fitness

Methods
A number of methods are used to achieve this objective. Scouts strive to live according to the
principles of the Scout Oath, Law, Slogan, Motto, and Outdoor Code. By living according to these
principles, the Scout demonstrates Scout Spirit. The structure of the Troop and the nature of its
activities provide many opportunities for Scouts to develop leadership skills and to help others.
The advancement program provides opportunities to be recognized for gaining new knowledge
and skills. The objectives of Scouting are achieved in a program that is fun for the Scouts.

How to Help Your Son Become a Successful Scout
Here are some suggestions of things you can do to help make your son a successful Scout:
• Help him get to meetings and outings in the proper uniform, with his Scout Handbook, and on
   time. Without attending the activities, interest and momentum in the Troop are difficult to
   maintain.
• Attend Troop activities. Parents are always welcome at any Troop outing or meeting. Attend
   the periodic Courts of Honor, when your son receives formal recognition of his advancement
   and achievements.
• Do not let advancement taper off. When a boy starts, he needs to pass the early ranks
   (through First Class) as quickly as his ability allows him, or his friends of the same peer group
   will pass him by. If the boy gets too far behind, he may become dismayed and drop out.
• Periodically ask your son what he has passed, has enjoyed, what he is working on, etc. Share
   in your son's activities in Boy Scouts.
• Read the Scout Handbook for the rank your son is in.

How Parents Can Be Involved
What can the parents do? Here are some suggestions:

•   Serve as a Scoutmaster or Assistant Scoutmaster
•   Serve as a member of the Troop Committee
•   Be a Merit Badge Counselor
•   Provide transportation on outings
•   Help with Troop fund-raisers
•   Get trained. Note: It is a B.S.A. policy that all Registered Adult Leaders have attended
    Youth Protection Training, which requires about 2 hours. Many other courses are offered
    which will improve your abilities and confidence to be a better Adult Leader.
•   For insurance purposes, parents must be Registered Adult Leaders to attend
    Troop campouts.


                                   TROOP ORGANIZATION

Scouts
•   Patrols

    Patrols are what make up a Troop. Patrols are generally groupings of six to eight Scouts of
    varying ages and skill levels who work together as a team. Each Patrol elects its own leader
    and has its own internal structure, including Assistant Patrol Leader, Scribe and
    Quartermaster.. It teaches the scouts how to share leadership and places responsibility on
    their shoulders. The Patrols allow the Scouts to work in small groups where they can better
    relate to each other. The organization of the Troop into Patrols, and working under the
    direction of the Patrol Leaders, is called the Patrol Method.

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    The Patrol Method is very important in Scouting. Each Scout should form the habit of going to
    his Patrol Leader with questions and suggestions. The Patrol Leaders then relay information
    to the Senior Patrol Leader and the Patrol Leader Council.

    The adult Scoutmasters assign scouts to Patrols. Assignments are made to maintain a
    balance between advanced and newer Scouts, a variety of personality types, and in general, to
    build Patrols which function effectively.

•   Elected Officers (Patrol Leader Council)

    Troop activities are coordinated and directed by the Senior Patrol Leader, who is elected by
    Scouts registered in the Troop. Likewise, Patrol activities are coordinated and directed by the
    Patrol Leader, who is elected by members of the Patrol. A Scout may not hold the same
    office for more than two consecutive terms unless no other Scout is eligible for the
    office. A Scout must be at least Star rank to be a Senior Patrol Leader, and must be at least
    First Class rank to be a Patrol Leader.

    The elected officers and appointed Troop officers comprise the Patrol Leader Council. The
    Patrol Leader Council meets at least once a month to plan future Troop activities and to handle
    other Troop business.

•   Appointed Officers

    The Senior Patrol Leader appoints a number of officers after consulting with the Adult Leaders.
    These officers include an Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Troop Guide, Scribe, Quartermaster,
    Instructors, Librarian, Historian, and Chaplain's Aide. These appointments are based on
    interest, ability, participation in Troop activities and advancement needs.

    Likewise, each Patrol Leader appoints an Assistant Patrol Leader. The Assistant Patrol Leader
    position serves as good training for the younger Scouts. This position does not count as a
    leadership position for rank advancement.

•   Officer Responsibilities

    Regular attendance at Troop meetings and activities is required so that elected and appointed
    Troop and Patrol officers can fulfill the responsibilities of their offices. If an officer cannot be
    present at a function, he is to appoint another Scout to act in his place and to otherwise see
    that the duties of his office are not neglected. However, this does not relieve him of the
    planning, organizational, or any other responsibilities associated with his office. A written job
    description is available for each office. The Troop is run by the Patrol officers with adult
    assistance.

    Advancement to the higher ranks requires service in leadership positions for various periods of
    time. Meeting these requirements will be based on the actual leadership demonstrated in the
    position. That is, when a Scout holds an office for six months, he may receive credit for up to
    six months of leadership, depending on his performance in that office. Credit will not be given
    simply for occupying a position.

Adult Leaders
•   Charter Organization


                                                   6
    The Charter Organization (the New Territory Residential Community Association) ultimately
    owns the assets of Troop 616 and provides material assistance to the Troop currently in the
    form of a meeting place and supplies. The liaison between the Charter Organization and the
    Troop is the Charter Organization Representative. The "rep" is a member of the Troop
    committee and is responsible for seeing that basic leadership positions of the committee and
    troop are filled. The two key positions are the Committee Chairperson and Scoutmaster.

•   Troop Committee

    The Troop Committee consists of all adults who have registered with the Troop as Adult
    Leaders. All adults in the Troop ideally should register and participate as they are able. The
    committee is led by a Committee Chairperson, and acts as a "Board of Directors" for the Troop,
    controlling funds, formulating policies, selecting Scoutmasters, and ensuring that the Scouts
    and the Scoutmasters get the support they need to operate a first-rate Troop. The Committee
    meets at least every other month or at special meetings when required. All parents are
    encouraged to become active and may attend any Troop Committee meetings, even if they are
    not registered members.

•   Troop Subcommittees

    There are four subcommittees that serve specific functions and meet on an as-needed basis:

    1. Advancement -- Assist the Advancement Chairman with duties outlined in Exhibits A and
       B, assist with merit badge counseling, and assist with Boards of Review when necessary.

    2. Events and Activities Calendar -- Assist in constructing the annual calendar, help
       camping coordinator with details of scheduling and executing outings (permission slips,
       camping budgets, medical forms, phone contact coordination). From this subcommittee,
       the following key supporting roles for Troop outings and activities shall be identified:
           a. Emergency Contact -
                • In the event of a change of location of an outing, evacuation, or other
                   emergency, the Outing Leader will contact the Emergency Contact Person so
                   that, if needed, the parents can be notified.
                • If a parent needs to contact their son(s), they should contact the Emergency
                   Contact Person who will in turn contact the Outing Leader if needed and a true
                   emergency exists.
                • The Emergency Contact will be provided with an itinerary of the outing and
                   phone numbers where the Troop can be contacted in case of an emergency.
                • The Emergency Contact will be responsible for notifying the proper authorities if
                   the Troop members on the outing are overdue and will notify parents of the
                   situation.

           b. Telephone Coordinator -
               • Recruits assistants for the outing.
               • Stays near home at the time the Troop is expected to return.
               • With the help of assistants, calls parents to notify them of expected arrival time
                  of the Troop.
               • Makes Outing Leader aware of Scouts whose parents were not reached.
               • Stays available to call parents in the event of an emergency or change of plans.

           c. Camping Coordinator
              • Makes campsite reservations.
              • Obtains Wilderness and Fire Permits.
              • Files Tour Permits for Troop outings.
              • Contacts Ranger Station for trail, camp, water, and road conditions.

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               •   Provides road and trail maps for outing.
               •   Researches new camping locations.

           d. Transportation Coordinator
              • Ensures adequate transportation for all Troop campouts and outings.
              • Makes sure each scout has a seat belt.
              • Ensures that there is enough transportation to transport all Troop gear on the
                 outing.
              • Ensures that drivers are licensed and insured.

    3. Policies and Procedures -- Review and recommend changes to Troop procedures and
       guidelines when necessary

    4. Equipment -- Inventory equipment, recommend and carry out equipment requisitions when
       necessary

•   Scoutmasters/Assistant Scoutmasters

    Scoutmasters and Assistant Scoutmasters are Adult Leaders, approved by the Troop
    Committee, who work directly with the boys. The Scoutmasters train the boys in leadership
    skills, guide them to follow the ideals of Scouting, and help them conduct a safe and fun
    program. Scoutmasters assist in the planning of, attend, and monitor all activities.

•   Merit Badge Counselors

    All Scouts in the Troop can work at any time on merit badges, which are mini-courses in
    numerous subjects. However, because Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class are skill
    oriented, newer Scouts are encouraged to wait to begin earning merit badges until they attend
    their first summer camp. Merit badges are necessary for the Scouts to earn, but they cannot
    earn them without an adult skilled in the particular field who is willing to teach and coach the
    Scout. All adult Merit Badge Counselors are required to register with the B.S.A. for each
    badge they wish to counsel. To meet the B.S.A. Youth Protection Guidelines, merit badge
    classes must have a minimum of two Scouts, or a Scout and an adult in addition to the Merit
    Badge Counselor. Counselors should follow the guidelines and procedures presented in the
    B.S.A. pamphlet entitled "Merit Badge Counseling" (No.6517).

    A parent may serve as their own son's Merit Badge Counselor only if the following conditions
    are met:

    -   The parent is registered with the B.S.A. to counsel that merit badge.
    -   The merit badge is publicly offered to other Scouts in the Troop.
    -   All work sessions for the merit badge are available to the other Scouts working on it.


                                       TROOP ACTIVITIES

Troop activities consist of program planning, meetings, campouts, service projects, and fund-
raising. Scouts must participate actively in all these activities in order to derive the maximum
benefit from Scouting.

Program Planning
Each Scout participates in the Annual Program Planning process by submitting ideas for the next
year’s activities to the Patrol Leader Council through his elected representative, the Patrol Leader.
This is done once a year, usually in August at a special committee meeting called the Annual


                                                  8
Planning Session. The Senior Patrol Leader guides this with assistance from the Scoutmasters.
Also, there are monthly Patrol Leader Council Program Planning meetings.

Meetings
Troop meetings are held most every Tuesday at The Club at New Territory. During that time
Scouts will have an opportunity to meet with the Scoutmaster or participate in recreation. Please
refer to the Troop Calendar or the Troop's web page for exact dates and times. Patrol meetings
are held once per month with arrangements and location made by the Patrol Leader.

Service Time
Service time promotes a positive Scouting experience and develops an awareness of duty to
others. Scouts are encouraged to earn service time in multiple functions and so demonstrate
Scout Spirit. Most service time also fulfills requirements for various rank advancements. Scouts
should consult the Scoutmaster or an Assistant Scoutmaster for project approval prior to the event.

Service time cannot include time spent promoting the Troop, the Scouting program (e.g., working
at Scout Fair or selling Scout Fair tickets), or any troop fund-raising activities. Service hours
required by rank are as follows:
    • Second Class:           1 hour
    • First Class:            Not required
    • Star:                   6 hours
    • Life:                   6 hours
    • Eagle                   Pre-approved service project

Fund-Raising
The Troop occasionally conducts fund-raisers to purchase or repair Troop equipment, to provide a
budget to operate the Troop and to defray individual scout expenses. Fund-raising vehicles
include Scout Fair Ticket Sales and popcorn Sales.

•   Grocery Certificates -
    The Troop has made arrangements with Kroger and Randalls to acquire a rebate of 5% and
    3%, respectively, on family or troop grocery purchases. This is an easy way to participate in
    Troop fund-raisers. Proceeds go into the Troop Operating Account.

•   Other-
    Other fund-raisers will be conducted as general fund-raising or for the Scout’s Personal
    Financial Account as decided by the Troop Committee.

Web Page
The Troop maintains a web page as a means of communicating Troop schedules, organization
and activities. Both adult and junior Troop members are encouraged to contribute to the page.
The Troop recognizes that certain rules of logic and safety should be kept in mind:
    • No home addresses or phone numbers shall be published.
    • No last names shall be used unless they appear in a Council newsletter.
    • No pictures shall be used that allow the identification of individual Scouts.
    • No direct information will be used that directly identify schools attended by Troop Scouts.
    • The troop's website is currently located on the Sam Houston Area Council’s site,
        www.shac.org.




                                                9
                             TRANSPORTATION AND OUTINGS

General
The Troop strives to have one outing per month:
• At the Troop meeting two weeks prior to an outing, Scouts are given permission slips that are
   to be returned to the Troop meeting one week preceding the outing. Parents should indicate
   on the permission slip whether they plan to drive, if they plan to attend, and what medications
   their son will be taking.
• Patrol Leaders will contact Patrol members two weeks before the outing to confirm their
   attendance. This information is required in advance by the Transportation Committee, by the
   Patrol Leader Council and Scoutmasters making program arrangements, and by the Patrols for
   planning purposes.
• One week before the outing, permission slips are due, and duty rosters and menus should be
   planned by each patrol.

Each year, the Troop plans a long-term summer and occasional winter camp. In addition, several
hikes and other outdoor activities are planned. The summer and winter camps provide the Scouts
opportunity to earn merit badges that often are not available at the Troop level.

Equipment
Each Scout brings his own sleeping bag, eating utensils (knife/fork/spoon) and cook kit
(plate/bowl/cup), change(s) of clothes, and personal items (medicine, pocket knife, Boy Scout
Handbook, soap, towel, poncho, toothbrush/paste, etc.), Class A uniform and Class B (Troop or
Scout related shirt) uniform. Refer to the Medical section for further details regarding the handling
of medicines on troop outings.

Items that Scouts are not permitted to bring on campouts include:
    • tobacco (in any form)
    • sheath knives
    • folding knives having a blade length greater than 3 inches
    • firearms or fireworks
    • flammable liquids or aerosols of any kind
    • slingshots
    • electronic devices (games, radios, etc.)
    • cigarette lighters

Personal food brought on a campout MUST NOT be left in a tent overnight because it attracts wild
animals.

Transportation
All parents are needed to help in transportation. Upon joining the Troop, all parents are required to
turn in a Transportation Registration Form, providing vehicle and insurance information. In
addition to the rules and regulations set by the B.S.A. (copy available from the Transportation
Committee), Troop 616 has adopted the following policies regarding transportation to and from
Troop events.

   •   Transportation Planning
       Scouts and adults planning to attend a weekend activity must commit by the weekly Troop
       meeting preceding the activity (see TROOP ACTIVITIES - Outings). This is important to
       determine the number of drivers required and to obtain a Tour Permit from the Sam
       Houston Area Council main office. Patrol Leaders report the names/phone numbers of

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        those attending from their Patrol to the Transportation Committee at the weekly Troop
        meeting preceding the activity.

        If a parent has committed to be a driver for an activity and subsequently is unable to drive,
        it is his/her responsibility to find a qualified replacement from the list of Troop 616 parents
        and inform the Transportation Committee of this change. Please call if you need the
        names of eligible drivers.

    •   Vehicles and Distribution of Scouts
        Boy Scouts will be transported in parent vehicles, separate from equipment, when possible.
        Trucks, RV's, and campers will be used to transport equipment only. Passengers may ride
        in a truck's cab only; they may not ride in the truck’s bed. Effort will be made to minimize
        the number of vehicles used. Vehicles must not be overcrowded and all passengers and
        drivers must use individual seat belts. If only one passenger can ride in a vehicle, that
        passenger must be another adult or the son of the driver to fulfill the B.S.A. requirement for
        Youth Protection.

    •   Travel
        While en route, drivers will follow a common route to stay in proximity to each other.
        Vehicles must observe posted speed limits. Do not travel in convoy.

        Drivers will carry medical forms for each passenger. These are to be returned to the
        Scoutmaster or Transportation Coordinator upon arrival at the destination or drop-off point,
        so that they may be transferred to the next driver or returned to the Troop files.

        In the event of an accident, insurance carried by the owner of the vehicle is the primary
        applicable insurance.

        Any non-commercial air travel requires the BSA Flight Permit No. 23-672. Hang gliding,
        microlite and ultralight flying, experimental aircraft flying, parachuting, hot air ballooning
        and flight training are unauthorized activities.

Tour Permits
If the troop plans a trip within 500 miles of home, a local tour permit must be obtained. A national
tour permit is required for trips in excess of 500 miles from home or outside the continental U.S.

Emergency Contact
•   The Troop will designate an Emergency Contact Person for all outings.
•   In the event of a change of location of an outing, evacuation, or other emergency, the Outing
    Leader will contact the Emergency Contact Person so that, if needed, the parents can be
    notified.
•   If a parent needs to contact their son(s), they should contact the Emergency Contact Person
    who will in turn contact the Outing Leader if needed and a true emergency exists.
•   The Emergency Contact will be provided with an itinerary of the outing and phone numbers
    where the Troop can be contacted in case of an emergency.
•   The Emergency Contact will be responsible for notifying the proper authorities if the Troop
    members on the outing are overdue and will notify parents of the situation.




                                                  11
Hiking Safety
•   At least two adult leaders over the age of 21 must accompany the Troop on the trail. One of
    them must have at least Red Cross basic first aid training (Wilderness First Aid Courses in
    addition to Red Cross Training is preferred) and will be designated as the "Safety Officer."

•   One adult leader should be designated as the "Point" and will lead the hike. This position may
    on occasion be given to an experienced Junior Leader by the Outing Leader if the Junior
    Leader is very familiar with the hike. The "Point" must not let anyone get ahead of them on the
    trail. The "Point" should also have a compass and a trail map and is responsible for
    overseeing navigation on the hike.

•   The designated Outing Leader will hike in the back of Troop and will be known as the "Sweep."
    The "Sweep" may not let anyone from the group get behind them on the trail.

•   The "Point" and "Sweep" should maintain contact via cell phone or two-way radio on longer
    hikes or when the group becomes spread out over a long distance.

•   The Outing Leader will conduct a head count and trail briefing at the trail head prior to starting
    the hike.

•   The "Safety Officer" should hike with the "Sweep."

•   Other adult leaders should hike with the "Sweep" and in the middle of the group to monitor for
    any problems.

•   Junior Leaders should also watch younger scouts to help them out and ensure their safety.

•   All leaders need to watch others and themselves for signs of hypothermia, hyperthermia,
    altitude sickness, exhaustion, or any other medical problems that could arise.

•   Hike coordinators should check weather forecasts beforehand and postpone longer hikes if
    heat advisories warrant that action.


                                            FINANCES

Troop Finances
An annual Troop fee is paid at the time of recharter along with the B.S.A. registration. This fee is
due by January 15 of each year. This fee pays for Troop expenses such as advancements,
awards, merit badges, equipment purchases, BSA registration, insurance and Boys’ Life
subscriptions.

Campout Fee
•   Weekend

    A fee is charged for all weekend campouts. This covers food, supplies, and campground
    usage fees. In addition, this fee covers certain extras, such as the participation patches for
    District Camporees. Occasionally, fees will be higher where entrance fees are charged or
    where gas will be paid to those who drive on longer trips. In cases where fees are above those
    specified in Exhibit C a notification will be provided to the parents.

•   Long-term Camps
                                                 12
    The Troop participates in at least one long-term camp per year.        This fee includes camp
    registration and supplies

•   High-Adventure

    When the Troop participates in a high-adventure camp such as Philmont, the Troop Committee
    will establish the camp fee. The fee will vary by type of camp, location, length of stay, and
    travel distances.

Equipment Fee
In order to pay for camping equipment, the Troop will assess a one-time equipment fee for any
new Scout joining after October 1, 1995. See Exhibit C for Fee Schedule.


                                         PARTICIPATION

Registration
The Troop is required to recharter annually with the B.S.A. by the 28th of February. All members
of the Troop are required to register for the coming year at recharter time and to pay fees outlined
in Exhibit C at that time.

Active Membership
In order to maintain membership in Troop 616, Scouts must actively participate in the Patrol and
Troop. Active membership includes the following:

•   Participation in Patrol and Troop meetings, including holding office when elected or appointed
•   Paying Troop fees
•   Participation in Patrol and Troop activities such as campouts, service projects, fund-raisers,
    etc.
•   Completing advancement requirements
•   Practicing the principles of the Scout Law and Oath

When a Scout does not actively participate in these activities, he misses opportunities to work on
requirements toward advancement and negatively impacts the functioning of his Patrol and Troop.

A Scout will be considered inactive if he:

•   Misses four or more consecutive Patrol or Troop weekly meetings without notifying the
    Scoutmaster in advance of a valid reason, or

•   Does not pay annual fees at recharter time, or

•   Willfully and repeatedly fails to follow the Scout Law and Oath. (Refer to the section entitled,
    “Code of Conduct and Disciplinary Guidelines”.)

If a Scout meets the criteria of being inactive, as defined above, the Scoutmaster and/or a
Committee member will notify him and his parent(s). If a Scout does not become active within
three weeks of being notified, his name will be removed from membership in Troop 616.

Exceptions: A Scout may have personal or other reasons for being inactive for a period of time,
without wishing to resign. The Scout should discuss this with the Scoutmaster. The Scoutmaster,

                                                13
at his discretion, may grant the Scout temporary inactive status for a specific period of time, not
normally to be longer than three months. During this time, the Scout may be removed from his
Patrol roster and any Scout office he holds. Although the Scout is excused from participation, he
is still responsible for paying annual recharter registration fees, and must still follow the Scout Law,
Oath, and Promise. If the Scout does not become active after his term of temporary inactivity, he
will be withdrawn from membership in the Troop.

Uniforms
The Scout Class A uniform is to be worn by all Scouts, the Scoutmaster, the Assistant
Scoutmasters, and the Troop Committee members at the Troop meetings and when departing for
outings. In addition, the Class A uniform is required at Boards of Review, daily flag ceremonies at
all campouts, and certain other special functions, unless specific exceptions are announced by the
Scoutmaster. The Scout Class A uniform consists of the following:

•   Tan Boy Scout shirt with proper insignias
•   Blue jean or Scout shorts/blue jean or Scout long pants
•   Green Boy Scout web belt with brass buckle
•   Merit badge sash if the Scout has merit badges (optional at most functions but required at
    Courts of Honor)
•   Neat, clean shoes or athletic shoes and socks (no sandals or pool shoes)
•   Boy Scout Handbook
•   The Boy Scout mesh hat (ball cap) is optional

The less formal Scout Class B uniform may only be worn at functions as specified by the
Scoutmaster. The Scout Class B uniform consists of a Scout-related T-shirt (we have our own,
which are periodically available for purchase). The remainder of the uniform is the same as Class
A. The Sam Houston Area Council also sells a red polo-style shirt.

Wearing appropriate attire at Scouting functions is important to meeting the requirement of
showing Scout Spirit, which is necessary for advancement in each rank. Inappropriate attire will
be noted during the Troop meetings, and may cause a Scout to miss attending a Troop outing.

Advancement
The ranks of Scouting are Scout (a joining requirement), Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class,
Star, Life, and Eagle. The requirements for these ranks are in the Boy Scout Handbook. The
ranks up to First Class primarily involve learning various skills and working in service to others; the
ranks above First Class involve earning merit badges, working in Troop leadership positions, and
serving others. Each Scout's progress is recorded in his personal copy of the Handbook. The
initiative for advancement comes from the Scout.

Advancement is a four-step process: Learning, Testing, Review and Recognition. The Scout
first studies the requirements either on his own or in a skills session class held periodically by the
Troop or at summer camp (Learning). He then asks the appropriate rank advancement
Scoutmaster(s) or Merit Badge Counselor to work with him on passing the requirements (Testing).
Each Scout must show the Scoutmaster or Merit Badge Counselor that he has passed all the
requirements, and have his Handbook and/or merit badge cards signed. Even though many skills
classes are taught at summer camp, a Scoutmaster must still test the Scout. Upon completion of
all requirements for each rank, the Scout has a final conference with the appropriate rank
advancement Scoutmaster (Scoutmaster Conference). During this conference, the Scoutmaster
will review the Scout's activities, achievements, skills, and leadership. He also determines if he is
eligible for a Board of Review. Upon the successful completion of the Scoutmaster Conference,
the Scout is eligible to participate in the next scheduled Board of Review. For reviews of Scouts

                                                  14
seeking rank of First Class or below, a panel of at least two adult leaders will comprise the Board
of Review. Higher ranks will require at least three adult leaders. They will meet with the Scout to
briefly discuss his achievements, activities, and determine if he is ready to advance in rank. Upon
the successful completion of the Board of Review (Review), the Scout's Handbook is signed and
dated. The new rank will be awarded at the next Court of Honor (Recognition). Scouts are
recognized at a formal ceremony held approximately every quarter called the Troop Court of
Honor, where they receive rank and merit badge cards and rank pins for their mother. New Scouts
are inducted and officers are installed at the Courts of Honor. The Troop holds at least four Courts
of Honor each year and encourages families to attend.

Boards of Review
1. "After a Scout has completed all requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star,
   and Life ranks, or an Eagle palm, he appears before a board of review. This board of review is
   made up of at least three and not more than six members of the troop committee. One
   member serves as chairman, usually the committee member responsible for advancement.
   Unit leaders, assistant unit leaders, relatives, or guardians may not serve as members of a
   Scout's board of review. “(BSA #3087B) Senior scouts are welcome to participate in the
   Review of a scout seeking the rank of Tenderfoot through First Class.

2. "The review should be conducted at a convenient time and location, such as a meeting,
   summer camp or the home of a member of the troop committee." (BSA #3087B) The Scout
   should be in uniform.

3. The board of review is the last step in completing a rank and should not be considered until
   ALL other requirements for that rank have been completed and signed off in the Scout
   Handbook. It is each Scout's personal responsibility to request his Board of Review through
   his Patrol Leader.

4. No Scout should seek or attend a Board of Review without his Scout Handbook.

See Exhibits A and B for the merit badge process and rank advancement process, respectively.

All advancement documentation, consisting of the Scout Handbook, rank advancement
cards, and merit badge cards should be kept in a safe place. The Troop does not retain the
official rank and merit badge documentation, the Scout does. Progress for rank advancement is
recorded in each Scout's Handbook. The rank advancement and merit badge cards are easily
stored in baseball card plastic folders. These original advancement and merit badge cards are
necessary documentation for achieving the rank of Eagle Scout.

Parent Responsibilities
The consumption of alcohol and inappropriate use of drugs prior to or during a Scouting
function is prohibited. The use of tobacco products is strongly discouraged and not
allowed in the presence of Scouts.

Clearly, many active adults are required to ensure that a Troop has the kind of high quality
program we desire. All parents are expected to help with tasks that must be done by adults.
These include filling the Adult Leader positions, providing adult supervision on outings, driving to
and from outings, serving as Merit Badge Counselors, supervising fund-raising and service
projects, bringing something interesting for a meeting program, etc. No matter what his/her
interests and aptitudes, every parent can contribute something to make the Scouting experience
more beneficial for all our sons.


                                                15
Campouts provide many special opportunities for both Scouts and their parents. The B.S.A. policy
requires a minimum of two adults to accompany Scouts on any outing. On Troop campouts and
while attending summer camps, we recommend at least three adults, and at least one adult for
every five Scouts. The parents should appreciate these opportunities to spend some quality time
with their sons and his/their friends. Most parents have as much fun as the Scouts on these
outings do.

All parents should attend the parent meetings and generally get involved with the Troop. They
may contact the Committee Chairman or one of the Scoutmasters to find out about needs or to
express interest in a particular area. Parents should review the Troop calendar and Troop
newsletter sent home with the Scouts, especially for activities in which they can participate.

Families are encouraged to attend Courts of Honor as well as any other family activities held by
the Troop. As parents, you should understand how Boy Scouting works and help your son to
achieve his goals. If you have any questions, you should talk to any adult leader or, better yet,
come along to the next meeting or outing.


                 CODE OF CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINARY GUIDELINES

The Code of Conduct for a Boy Scout is very simple:

Live your life by the principles of the Scout Oath and Law.

The adult leadership expects this conduct from every Scout in Troop 616. In addition, every Scout
is to be aware of the principles of the Patrol Method. Besides being the basis by which we run our
Patrols and outings, it provides the Scouts with a procedure for settling disputes. This procedure
is outlined in Item 1 below.

General Discipline Policy
There are some other items listed below that each Scout must be aware of. These specific items
do not replace the Scout Code of Conduct. They are simply extensions of that Code. While a
member of Troop 616, these items will be enforced by all of the adult leaders.

1. Disputes between patrol members should be resolved by fellow patrol members.             If they
   cannot, the following procedure from the Patrol Method is to be followed:

   a) The Patrol members involved should report the dispute to the acting Patrol Leader and
      abide by his decision.

   b) If the Patrol Leader cannot resolve the problem, or if the problem is with the Patrol Leader,
      the Patrol members involved, along with the Patrol Leader, are to report the incident to the
      Senior Patrol Leader. The Senior Patrol Leader's decision is binding.

   c) If the Senior Patrol Leader feels he needs advice to resolve a problem, or that the
      problem's solution may have to concern the parents of the Patrol members involved, he
      may consult with the appropriate adult leader. Even if he does not seek advice, the Senior
      Patrol Leader is to report any such episodes to the appropriate adult leader.

2. Use of the meeting facilities is a privilege. Scouts shall treat the meeting place and its
   furnishings with respect and be considerate of others who will also use the facility.



                                               16
        Disciplinary Action: For the first violation at a Troop meeting, the Scout will be sent out of
        the room for several minutes. At the second infraction at the same Troop meeting, the
        Scout's parent will be called to the meeting. The parent can decide whether to sit with the
        Scout during the remainder of the meeting or take him home. If a Scout's parent cannot
        be reached, he is to sit out for the rest of the meeting.

3. Fighting and hazing are not to be tolerated. This includes any physically aggressive behavior,
   such as punching and kicking, regardless of provocation or reprisal.

        Disciplinary Action: Parents will be notified. Possible corrective action may include being
        sent home from the outing. If this occurs at a Troop meeting, the Scout's parent is to be
        called to come to the meeting. The incident will be explained to the parent, and the parent
        will be asked to take the Scout home. If a Scout's parent cannot be reached, he is to sit
        out for the rest of the meeting. Additional action may include the suspension from the next
        outing. This decision will be made by the Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmasters, in
        consultation with the Troop Committee Chairman.

4. Respect for the Scouting chain of command is critical to a smooth running program.
   Instructions of the Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmasters are to be respected and obeyed.

       Disciplinary Action: If a Scout refuses to do something that the Scoutmaster or an Assistant
       Scoutmaster directed him to do at any Troop function, the Scout's parents will be called
       and the Scout will be sent home. A consultation between the Scout, his parents, the
       Scoutmaster (including Assistant Scoutmaster, if involved in the incident), and the Troop
       Committee Chairman must be conducted. Satisfactory resolution of the episode must be
       accomplished before the Scout is allowed to participate in further Troop activities, including
       Troop and/or Patrol meetings.

Any incidents that require disciplinary action will be recorded. The date and the names of all
individuals involved, as well as the nature of the incident and the disciplinary action taken, are to
be recorded in a book kept by the Scoutmaster. The Scoutmaster, the Assistant Scoutmasters,
and the Troop Committee will use this book for advancement and other purposes.

Specific Behavioral Expectations
Troop 616 operates under rules and regulations that are specified in the Scout Oath and Scout
Law. Violation of these basic rules cannot and will not be tolerated. Members of Troop 616 that
are in violation of these rules will be issued a citation, called a "strike." Below are a few
representative examples of behavior that will result in a “strike” against the Scout:

•   Swearing and use of foul language
•   Stealing*
•   Fighting
•   Smoking
•   Drinking*
•   Taking illegal Drugs*
•   Verbal/physical harassment or hazing of other Scouts
•   Disrespect to the leadership of the unit, both Adult and Junior Leaders
•   Name calling and insults
•   Refusal to follow instructions
•   Walking away while being talked to
•   Disrespect to other Scouts (within Troop and other Troops)
•   Threatening of fellow Scouts
•   Intentional damage to Troop equipment*
•   Intentional damage to personal equipment/property (others or your own)*
                                                 17
•   Intentional damage or disrespect to meeting place property*
•   Behavior unbecoming a Scout as specified in the Scout Oath and Scout Law

* Immediate "Three Strikes" awarded for these violations

Three-Three System
The "Three-Three System" is the means by which Troop 616 will influence the conduct of the
Scouts in their charge. This is the fairest method by which we can distribute the appropriate level
of disciplinary action that will both afford the Scouts the optimum opportunity to keep out of trouble
and maintain an active status with the Troop.

Strikes are issued as a result of violating regulations outlined in the Discipline Policy. Strikes are a
means of gauging the conduct of each scout. A cumulative Strike Status Report will be available
at the weekly Troop Meeting so that Scouts can always be certain of their status relative to the
"Three-Three System". One strike will be awarded for each violation with the exception of those
violations that are highlighted in bold letters. For violations of items in bold letters, an immediate
"Three Strikes" will be awarded as they are considered to be severe violations by Troop 616.

Strikes will not be permanently held against any Scout. A strike's active life cycle is measured with
the first day of occurrence being the day the strike is awarded. Strikes can be rescinded by
demonstrating good behavior for 3 calendar months without an incident causing issuance of an
additional strike. Strikes can only be rescinded one at a time (two strikes would require 6 months
of good conduct to reverse).

Strike Consequences
First strike . . . . . . . Verbal warning from Scoutmaster
Second strike . . . . . . Verbal warning from Scoutmaster with notification to parents
Third Strike . . . . . . . . Suspension per "Suspension Progression Chart" and written notification to
                             parents.

Suspension Progression
Suspensions are issued as a result of earning three strikes. The following chart shows the
progression of consequences that will be distributed if more than one occurrence happens within
the calendar year.
• First Suspension (Results from a third strike received within a one-year period): Two Week
    Suspension and a meeting with the Scout and his parents on the week of his return. Scouts
    cannot return without this meeting.
• Second Suspension (Results from a second three-strike suspension within a year): Four
    Week Suspension and a meeting with the Scout and his parents on the week of his return.
    Scouts will not be allowed to return without this meeting
• Third Suspension (Results from a third three-strike suspension within a year): Immediate
    dismissal from Troop 616. An appeal for reconsideration will be considered with a written
    request from the Scout's parent. The appeal will be reviewed by the body of the Troop
    Committee and the Scoutmaster.

Summary
Unlike Strikes, Suspensions can not be rescinded. A Scout that receives three suspensions within
a calendar year will be dismissed form the Troop. Strikes at Troop 616 represent demerits and are
not favorable. Scouts are issued strikes for each infraction of the discipline policy. Strikes are
awarded one at a time for most infractions in an effort to allow scouts to modify their behavior
preventing further strikes. Upon accumulating three strikes a Scout receives a suspension.




                                                  18
                                            MEDICAL

Medical Forms
•   All Scouts and adults for all activities require a valid, current Class 1 medical form,
    signed by a parent or guardian.
•   All Scouts and leaders for summer camp require a valid, current Class 2 medical form,
    signed by a licensed physician.
•   All leaders over 40 years of age attending summer camp require a valid, current Class
    3 medical form, signed by a licensed physician.

Medicine
If medication is to be taken by a Scout during a Troop activity, parents are required to provide such
medication (properly labeled) to a designated adult leader. Medication will be administered as the
label instructs. After the outing, remaining medication will be returned to the parent.

Consent to Treat
In case of an emergency, every effort will be made to contact the parent or guardian. In the event
contact cannot be made, the adult leader in charge will provide the Consent to Treat authorization
(previously signed by the parent or guardian of the Scout) to the physician selected by the adult
leader in charge to secure proper treatment. This will be documented via the Class 1 Personal
Health and Medical History forms.




                                                 19
         ATTACHMENT ONE: PURPOSE OF THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
It is the purpose of the B.S.A. to provide for youth an effective program designed to build desirable
qualities of character, to train in the responsibilities of participating citizenship, and to develop in
them personal fitness, thus to help in the development of American citizens who:

•   Are physically, mentally, and emotionally fit.

•   Have a high degree of self-reliance as evidenced in such qualities as initiative, courage, and
    resourcefulness.
•   Have personal and stable values firmly based on religious concepts.
•   Have the desire and the skills to help others.

•   Understand the principles of the American social, economic, and governmental system.

•   Are knowledgeable about, and take pride in, their American heritage and understand America's
    role in the world.

•   Have a keen respect for the basic rights of all people.

•   Are prepared to fulfill the varied responsibilities of participating in, and giving leadership to,
    American society and in the forums of the world.

The B.S.A. accomplishes this purpose by making its program available in cooperation with existing
groups having compatible goals. These include religious, educational, civic, fraternal, business,
labor and governmental bodies.




                                                     20
           ATTACHMENT TWO: METHODS OF THE BOY SCOUT PROGRAM

Ideals
The ideals of Scouting are spelled out in the Scout Oath, Law, Motto, and Slogan. The Scout
measures himself against these ideals and continually tries to improve. The goals are high, and as
he reaches for them he has some control over what he becomes.

Patrols
The Patrol Method gives Scouts an experience in group living and cooperative citizenship. It
places a certain amount of responsibility on young shoulders and teaches boys how to accept it.
The Patrol Method allows Scouts to act in small groups where they can easily relate to each other.
These small groups determine Troop activities through their elected representatives.

Outdoors
Boy Scouting is designed to take place outdoors. It is in the outdoors that Scouts share
responsibilities and learn to live with each other. It is here that the skills and activities practiced at
Troop meetings come alive with purpose.

Being close to nature helps Scouts gain an appreciation for God's handiwork and mankind's place
in it. The outdoors is the laboratory for Scouts to learn ecology and practice conservation of
nature's resources.

Uniform
The uniform makes the Scout Troop visible as a force for good and creates a positive youth image
in the community. Boy Scouting is an action program, and wearing the uniform is an action that
shows each Scout's commitments to the aims and purposes of Scouting. The uniform gives the
Scout identity in a world brotherhood of youth that believe in the same ideals.

The uniform is practical attire for Scout activities, and provides a way for Scouts to wear the
badges that show what they have accomplished.

Advancement
Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps to overcome them through the
advancement method. The Scout plans his advancement and progresses at his own pace as he
overcomes each challenge. The Scout is rewarded for each achievement, which helps him gain
self-confidence. The steps in the advancement system help a boy grow in self-reliance and the
ability to help others.

Adult Association
Boys learn from the example set by their Adult Leaders. Troop leadership may be male or female,
and association with adults of high character is encouraged at this stage of a young man's
development.

Personal Growth
As Scouts plan their activity and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth.
The Good Turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Scouting. Boys grow as
they participate in community service projects and do Good Turns for others. There probably is no
device so successful in developing a basis for personal growth as the daily Good Turn.


                                                   21
         ATTACHMENT THREE: AIMS OF THE BOYS SCOUTS OF AMERICA

Boy Scouting works toward three aims. One is growth in moral strength and character. We may
define this as what the boy is himself: his personal qualities, his values, and his outlook.

A second aim is active citizenship. Used broadly, citizenship means the boy's relationship to
others. He comes to learn of his obligations to other people, to the society he lives in, to the
government that presides over that society.

A third aim of Boy Scouting is development of physical, mental, and emotional fitness. Fitness
includes the body (well tuned and healthy), the mind (able to think and solve problems), and the
emotions (self-control, courage, and self-respect).

The methods are designed to accomplish these aims. Thus it is important that you know and use
the methods of Boy Scouting. Other methods are good, but they may bring different results--
results quite different than we are seeking.

The religious emblems program is also a large part of the personal growth method. Frequent
conferences with his Scoutmaster help each Scout to determine his growth toward Scouting's
aims.

Leadership Development
Boy Scouting encourages boys to learn and practice leadership skills. Every Scout has
the opportunity to participate in both shared and total leadership situations.
Understanding the concepts' of leadership helps a boy accept the leadership roles of
others and guides him toward the citizenship aim of Scouting.

We predict that for every 100 boys who join a Boy Scout Troop:
• Twelve will have their first contact with a church or synagogue
• Five will earn their religious emblem
• One will enter the clergy
• Eighteen will develop hobbies that will last through their adult lives
• Eight will enter a career that was learned through the merit badge system
• One will use his Boy Scout skills to save a life
• One will use his Boy Scout skills to save his own life
• Seventeen will become Scouting volunteers
• Two will become Eagle Scouts




                                              22
                ATTACHMENT FOUR: THINGS TO COMMIT TO MEMORY

The Scout Oath
On my honor
I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country and
To obey the Scout Law;
To help other people at all times;
To keep myself physically strong,
Mentally awake, and morally straight.

The Scout Law
A Scout is:

Trustworthy
Loyal
Helpful
Friendly
Courteous
Kind
Obedient
Cheerful
Thrifty
Brave
Clean
Reverent

The Scout Motto
Be Prepared

The Scout Slogan
Do A Good Turn Daily

The Outdoor Code
As an American, I will do my best to -
Be clean in my outdoor manners,
Be careful with fire,
Be considerate in the outdoors,
and
Be conservation minded.




                                          23
Attachment Five: Eagle Scout Court of Honor
The primary purposes of the Eagle Scout Court of Honor are to honor the new Eagle
Scout for his achievement in obtaining scoutings highest rank; to set an example for the
other Scouts in the Troop; and to inform and inspire the Eagle Scout’s family members,
friends, other Scout parents, chartered organization members, and the community at large
through the news media and those in attendance at the ceremony.

The Eagle Scout award should be presented at a special Court of Honor held to honor a
single new Eagle Scout rather than at a regular Troop Court of Honor. The Eagle Scout
Court of Honor is a Troop function, which means the Troop Committee will work with the
family to organize the Eagle Scout Court of Honor.

Scout Responsibilities

The Scout must first pass his Eagle Board of Review, and applications must be reviewed
and approved by the local (Sam Houston Council) and national offices of Boy Scouts of
America. The Scout must notify the Troop Committee at least 8 weeks prior to the
planned date of the Eagle Scout Court of Honor.

Family Responsibilities

The family will be responsible for:

1. Reserving the facility. A list of suggested facilities is included in the Eagle Scout Court
   of Honor Troop Binder.

2. Recruiting presenters and promoting the Court of Honor (i.e., through the media and
   written invitations) in coordination with and subject to the approval of the Troop
   leadership.

3. Deciding the particulars of the ceremony and contacting the participants in the
   ceremony. Examples of various ceremonies are included in the Eagle Binder.

4. Ordering or obtaining the following: invitations, programs, paper products, utensils,
   refreshments, etc. Ordering information is contained in the Eagle Binder.

1. Inviting Troop members and their families to the ceremony.




                                             24
Troop Responsibilities

The Troop will be responsible for:

   1. Reimbursing the family in the amount of up to fifty dollars ($50 receipts required) to
      assist in defraying some of the costs incurred by the family for the Eagle Scout
      Court of Honor. The Troop will purchase the pewter Eagle Medal Kit.

   2. With the family’s input, sending out requests for the commendation letters to the
      President of the United States of America, Members of Congress and state and
      local dignitaries.

   3. Maintaining the Eagle Scout Court of Honor Box that will include the following
      items: NESA banner, BSA fringed panel drape, Eagle statue, seven framed rank
      badges, candle holders for the candle ceremony, and the Eagle Binder. The family
      of the Eagle Scout may borrow the Troop’s Eagle Scout Court of Honor Box under
      the following conditions: (1) the family must return the Box as soon as possible
      following the ceremony, and (2) the family is responsible for any lost or damaged
      items upon returning the Box. The family is encouraged to add another item that will
      commemorate their son’s achievement and assist the families of future Eagle
      Scouts in their Eagle Scout Courts of Honor.




                                            25
ATTACHMENT SIX: ADULT OFFICES; ELECTION GUIDELINES

ADULT OFFICES

The Adult Offices of the Troop are as follows:

Scoutmaster
Parent Committee Chair
Secretary
Treasurer
Adult Chaplain
Meeting Mentor
Advancement Chair
Events and Activities Chair
Emergency Contact Chair
Telephone/Communications Chair
Recruiting Chair
Risk/Safety Chair
Venture Group Coordinator
Camping Coordinator
Transportation Coordinator

ELECTION GUIDELINES

Elections shall be conducted at least annually during the month of October at a regularly
scheduled meeting of the Parent Committee. Each family that is in good standing in the
Troop shall be entitled to one vote for each office to be elected or each action to be taken
as such meeting.

The Scoutmaster shall be elected for a term of two years and may be re-elected for one
additional two year term. The Parent Committee Chair shall be elected for a term of two
years and may be re-elected for one additional two year term. All Adult Offices shall be
elected for a one year term and may be re-elected for three additional one year terms. An
interim election for any Adult Office may be called at any time upon the affirmative vote of
35% of the families in the Troop.




                                             26
EXHIBIT A   MERIT BADGE PROCESS




               27
Merit Badge Process (page 1)


                               Scout requests a Merit
                                 Badge card from
                                   Scoutmaster




                                   Is Scout eligible     No          Scout works on
                                  for Merit Badge?               eligibility requirements



                                              Yes

                                                                 Scoutmaster recruits a
                                    Is there a           No           counselor for
                                 Counselor for this              requested badge and
                                  Merit Badge?                   informs Advancement
                                                                       Chairman

                                              Yes

                                Scoutmaster issues
                                Scout a merit badge
                                       card




                               Merit Badge counselor
                               informs Advancement
                                 Chairman of issued
                                        card




                               Scout (and at least one
                                buddy) contact merit
                                 badge counselor to
                               schedule work on merit
                                       badge




                               Merit Badge counselor
                                works with scouts to
                               complete merit badge
                                    requirements




                                    Did the scout
                               successfully complete
                                  the merit badge
                                   requirements?


                                             Continued on next page. . .

                                        28
Merit Badge Process (page 2)

                                    Did the scout
Continued from previous page   successfully complete
                                  the merit badge
                                   requirements?




                               Merit badge counselor
                                   signs card as
                                     completed




                                Scout turns in merit
                                  badge card to
                                  Advancement
                                    Chairman




                                Scout is reviewed at
                                 Board of Review




                                  Advancement
                               Chairman completes
                                BSA Advancement
                               Report and turns it in
                                  to Scout Shop




                                   Advancement
                                Chairman purchases
                                   merit badges




                                   Advancement
                                 Chairman updates
                                  Troop records




                               Scout is awarded merit
                               badge at next Court of
                                        Honor




                                         29
EXHIBIT B   RANK ADVANCEMENT PROCESS




                  30
Rank Advancement Process (page 1)

                               Scout learns Boy
                                 Scout skills




                              Scout requests to be
                                tested on skills




                             Leader tests the scout
                             or assigns this task to
                                 an older scout




                                 Has the scout           No
                                  met the skill
                                 requirement?




                                Initial and date
                                 (MM/DD/YY)
                             completed requirement
                                in scout's BSA




                                                         No
                            Are all requirements for a
                               rank advancement
                                     complete?




                                Scout and leader
                             arrange and conduct a
                                  Scoutmaster
                                  Conference



                             Leader reviews scout's
                                 knowledge or
                                 requirements




                                  Did the scout          No
                             demonstrate knowledge
                                of requirements?


                                           Yes -- Go to next page

                                        31
Rank Advancement Process (page 2)


                                 Did the scout
                            demonstrate knowledge        (Continued from previous page)
                               of requirements?



                                              Yes

                                 Leader notified
                            Advancement Chairman
                             that scout is ready for
                                Board of Review




                            Advancement Chairman
                           records requirements from
                              Scout Handbook into
                                 Troop records




                            Advancement Chairman
                              arranges Board of
                            Review (people, place &
                                   location)




                              Scout is reviewed at
                               Board of Review




                            Advancement Chairman
                            completes Advancement
                             Report and turns it in to
                                 Scout Shop




                             Badge, card, Mother's
                             pin are purchased at
                                   this time




                             Scout is recognized at
                              next Court of Honor




                                         32
EXHIBIT C   FEE SCHEDULE




            33
                                           EXHIBIT C

                                          Fee Schedule


I.      Annual Registration

     At Recharter: $70.00



•    B.S.A. Registration                             $ 10.00
•    Boys Life                                       $ 10.80
•    Insurance                                       $ 1.00
•    Troop Operating Account                         $ 48.20
                                                     $ 70.00

     Second Boy – same family

     Deduct the current Boys Life fee for the second and subsequent boys within the same family.


II. Campouts

     • Weekend                                       $ 30.00 (average)
     • Summer Camp                                   $150.00 (average)
     • High-Adventure                                Established by Troop Committee
                                                     on case-by-case basis


III. Equipment Fee                                    $ 60.00
     (One time, at Joining)




                                                34

				
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