Appendix_C_Existing_Conditions by xiagong0815

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									Appendix C

EXISTING CONDITIONS
report


Memphis Urban Area 2040 Long-
Range Transportation Plan

Transit Element - Existing Conditions and
Transit Needs




prepared for

Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. and Memphis MPO



prepared by

Cambridge Systematics, Inc.
1566 Village Square Boulevard, Suite 2
Tallahassee, FL 32309



date

October 3, 2011




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Table of Contents
                  1.0    Introduction ..................................................................................................... 1-1

                  2.0    Planning Context ............................................................................................ 2-1
                         2.1     MATA Regional Transit Plan (1997)...................................................... 2-1
                         2.2     Regional Rail Program, Phase I - Corridor Selection (2000) ............... 2-2
                         2.3     Downtown-Airport Corridor Alternative Analysis (2002) and
                                 Environmental Screening Report (2005)................................................ 2-3
                         2.4     Memphis 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan (2008) ...................... 2-6
                         2.5     MDOT I-69 Corridor Alternatives Analysis (2011)............................... 2-9

                  3.0    Existing Transit Service ................................................................................. 3-1
                         3.1     Existing MATA Service .......................................................................... 3-1
                         3.2     Other Transit Services............................................................................. 3-8

                  4.0    Transit Needs Assessment ........................................................................... 4-10
                         4.1     Current Transit Needs .......................................................................... 4-10
                                 Population and Employment Density ................................................. 4-10
                                 Transit Propensity ................................................................................. 4-14
                                 Travel Patterns ...................................................................................... 4-15
                         4.2     Future Transit Needs ............................................................................ 4-17
                                 Congested Corridors............................................................................. 4-17
                                 Population and Employment Density ................................................. 4-20
                                 Travel Patterns ...................................................................................... 4-23
                         4.3     Key Findings ......................................................................................... 4-26
                                 Short-Term Transit Needs .................................................................... 4-26
                                 Long-Term Transit Needs .................................................................... 4-27

                  5.0    Potential High Capacity Transit Corridors .................................................. 5-1
                         5.1     Radial Corridors...................................................................................... 5-2
                                 South Corridor ........................................................................................ 5-3
                                     South Corridor Western Alignment.................................................. 5-3
                                     South Corridor Eastern Alignment ................................................... 5-4
                                 Southeast Corridors ................................................................................ 5-6
                                     Poplar Corridor................................................................................... 5-6
                                     Lamar (Dowtown-Airport) Corridor ................................................ 5-7


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                                Northeast Corridor ................................................................................. 5-9
                                North Corridor ...................................................................................... 5-11
                          5.2   Suburban Non-Radial Corridors.......................................................... 5-12
                                I-240 Circumferential Corridor ............................................................ 5-14
                                I-40 Circumferential Corridor .............................................................. 5-15
                                DeSoto – Goodman Corridor ............................................................... 5-16
                          5.3   Summary of Potential High Capacity Transit Corridors and
                                Preliminary Transit Concepts .............................................................. 5-17
                                Radial Corridors.................................................................................... 5-17
                                    Southeast Corridors.......................................................................... 5-17
                                    South Corridor .................................................................................. 5-18
                                    North Corridor.................................................................................. 5-18
                                    Northeast Corridor ........................................................................... 5-19
                                Non-Radial Corridors ........................................................................... 5-19
                                    Circumferential I-240 Corridor ........................................................ 5-19
                                    Circumferential I-40 ......................................................................... 5-19
                                    DeSoto - Goodman Corridor ........................................................... 5-20
                                Conclusion ............................................................................................. 5-20




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List of Tables
                  Table 2.1   2030 LRTP – Transit Element, Short and Long-Term Strategies ....... 2-7
                  Table 3.1   MATA Key and Most Heavily Used Routes ...................................... 3-6
                  Table 3.2   MATA Rider Profile ............................................................................. 3-7
                  Table 4.1   Highest Density Planning Districts ................................................... 4-13
                  Table 4.2   Largest Total Home Based Work Trip Density between
                              Planning Districts ............................................................................... 4-17




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List of Figures
                  Figure 2.1 High Capacity Transit Corridors (1997) ............................................. 2-2
                  Figure 2.2 Downtown-Airport Corridor within the Southeast Corridor
                             (2002) ..................................................................................................... 2-3
                  Figure 2.3 Refined Alignment Alternatives Downtown-Airport
                             Alternative Analysis Study (2002)....................................................... 2-4
                  Figure 2.4 Light Rail Build Alternative Downtown-Airport Corridor
                             (2005) ..................................................................................................... 2-6
                  Figure 2.5 2030 LRTP – Regional Transit Vision .................................................. 2-9
                  Figure 2.6 Locally Preferred Alternative – I-69 Bus Rapid Transit ................... 2-10
                  Figure 3.1 MATA Fixed-Route Bus ....................................................................... 3-2
                  Figure 3.2 MATA System Map (2009)................................................................... 3-3
                  Figure 3.3 Riverfront Trolley ................................................................................. 3-4
                  Figure 3.4 MATA Annual Passenger Trips .......................................................... 3-5
                  Figure 3.5 MATA Operating Revenue Sources .................................................... 3-8
                  Figure 4.1 2009 Dwelling Density (Household/Acre)....................................... 4-12
                  Figure 4.2 2010 Employment Density (Jobs/Acre) ............................................ 4-13
                  Figure 4.3 Transit Propensity Index.................................................................... 4-15
                  Figure 4.4 Existing Regional Home Based Work Trips ..................................... 4-16
                  Figure 4.5 2040 Network Volume/Capacity Ratios (PM Peak Period) ............ 4-19
                  Figure 4.6 2040 Dwelling Unit Density (Household/Acre) .............................. 4-21
                  Figure 4.7 2040 Employment Density (Jobs/Acre) ............................................ 4-22
                  Figure 4.8 2040 Total Home-Based Work Trips (AM Peak) .............................. 4-24
                  Figure 4.9 2040 Transit Home-Based Work Trips (AM Peak) ........................... 4-25
                  Figure 5.1 Potential Radial High Capacity Transit Corridors............................. 5-3
                  Figure 5.2 Potential Suburban Non-Radial Transit Corridors .......................... 5-14




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    1.0 Introduction
                  The Transit Element of the 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan for the
                  Memphis Urban Area addresses the selection of high capacity transit corridors,
                  the development of high capacity transit concepts and the identification of
                  complementary transit strategies. The focus is on the identification of corridors
                  with potential for higher capacity transit service in the long term based on
                  forecasted demand, major trip producers and attractors, and anticipated growth
                  patterns. This work was conducted taking into account prior work as reflected in
                  the 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan, previous studies developed to
                  evaluate high capacity transit alternatives, and ongoing work in the Short Range
                  Transit Plan for the Memphis Area Transit Authority (MATA). The 2040 LRTP
                  Transit Element work is being conducted in collaboration with MATA.
                  This draft report summarizes the work conducted to complete Task 4 – Assess
                  Existing Conditions and Task 5 – Transportation Needs Assessment of the
                  Transit Element of the Memphis Urban Area 2040 Long Range Transportation
                  Plan. It also identifies and documents potential high capacity transit corridors to
                  be further defined in a subsequent technical memorandum (Task 7) where transit
                  concepts for the high capacity transit corridors and other transit improvements
                  will be described. The draft report is organized in the following sections:
                       Section 2.0 Planning Context – Presents a background of the previous
                       planning documents developed by MATA as part of their Regional Rail
                       Program, as well as the most recent Mississippi Department of
                       Transportation (MDOT) I-69 Alternatives Analysis.
                       Section 3.0 Existing Transit Service– Provides an overview of the existing
                       transit service in the Memphis Urban Area.
                       Section 4.0 Transit Needs Assessment – Assess the transit needs from the
                       existing transit market analysis and transit rider preferences identified in the
                       ongoing work of the MATA Short Range Transit Plan and from the 2040
                       socio-economic and travel conditions estimated by the regional travel
                       demand model.
                       Section 5.0 Potential High Capacity Transit Corridors– Identifies potential
                       high capacity transit corridors and concepts based on previous work
                       completed and the existing and future transit environment. A technical
                       memorandum will follow this draft report consisting of the evaluation of
                       candidate long-term high capacity transit corridors with basic transit
                       concepts for each corridor (Task 7), as well as identification of other long-
                       term transit improvements and strategies.




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    2.0 Planning Context
                  Considerable work has been conducted over nearly two decades to identify the
                  potential role of high capacity transit in the Memphis Metropolitan Planning
                  Organization (MPO) region. This background is described below and presents
                  the planning context for the 2040 Memphis Urban Area LRTP Transit Element
                  and the identification of potential high capacity transit corridors by the year
                  2040.


        2.1 MATA REGIONAL TRANSIT PLAN (1997)
                  MATA developed a twenty-year Regional Transit Plan (RTP) in 1997 to map the
                  future of high capacity, fixed guideway rail service in Memphis. The plan
                  recommended the development of high capacity, fixed guideway systems in
                  three general corridors extending outward from the downtown area by the year
                  2020, as well as bus facilities and bus service components. The Memphis Area
                  MPO adopted the RTP as the Transit Element of the Long Range Transportation
                  Plan (LRTP) in 1998; the RTP recommendations were included in the 2026 LRTP
                  adopted in 2004.
                  The three corridors selected for more detailed analysis were:
                       North Corridor, approximately 17.4 miles in length between Downtown and
                       Millington serving North Memphis and Frayser;
                       Southeast Corridor, formerly known as the East Corridor, approximately
                       25.2 miles extending between Downtown and Collierville serving Midtown,
                       East Memphis, and Germantown; and
                       South Corridor, approximately 11.6 miles extending between Downtown
                       and Horn Lake, Mississippi with service to South Memphis, Whitehaven, and
                       Southaven, including a spur to the Memphis International Airport.




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                 Figure 2.1       High Capacity Transit Corridors (1997)




                 Source: Regional Rail Program – Phase 1, Corridor Selection Final Report, Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade &
                          Douglas, Inc., 2001


       2.2 REGIONAL RAIL PROGRAM, PHASE I - CORRIDOR
           SELECTION (2000)
                 MATA, with the assistance of a Regional Rail Steering Committee (RRSC),
                 initiated a Regional Rail Program to implement a planning process in three
                 phases for the development of a new fixed guideway facility by the year 2020 in
                 one of the three adopted corridors identified in the 1997 RTP. The first phase of
                 the Regional Rail Program, known as the Corridor Selection Study, resulted in
                 the selection of the Southeast Corridor as the priority corridor. Implementation
                 of the Southeast Corridor would include the link between downtown and the
                 airport as the first segment of the regional system which serves the largest
                 generator of jobs in the region. The Downtown-Airport corridor extends from
                 downtown Memphis, through the heavily residential Midtown area, to the
                 Memphis International Airport connecting the region’s largest employment and
                 activity centers: Downtown Memphis, the Medical District and the Airport area,
                 which includes a major FedEx package sorting facility. The Southeast Corridor
                 contains more than one-third of the jobs in the Memphis region as well as many
                 of the major tourist destinations in the region. The Corridor also contains
                 residential neighborhoods of a wide range of prices and housing conditions,
                 public housing, and housing for college students and senior citizens. Throughout


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                  the Corridor are vacant or underutilized properties with declining business and
                  residential or institutional uses that are targets for economic redevelopment. The
                  Corridor contains substantial areas with low income and unemployed residents
                  who would benefit from enhanced access to job centers.

                  Figure 2.2       Downtown-Airport Corridor within the Southeast Corridor (2002)




                  Source: Downtown-Airport Transit Corridor Alternative Analysis and Environmental Screening Report,
                           Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, Inc., 2005


        2.3 DOWNTOWN-AIRPORT CORRIDOR ALTERNATIVE
            ANALYSIS (2002) AND ENVIRONMENTAL
            SCREENING REPORT (2005)
                  In 2001, MATA embarked on an Alternatives Analysis of the selected
                  Downtown-Airport Corridor. This included a work phase known as Phase II
                  which evaluated alternative transit technologies and developed and evaluated
                  alignment alternatives within the selected corridor. The result was a filtering
                  down of a long list of options to a set of “feasible alternatives” for continued
                  study. Four modes were considered early in this phase including conventional
                  bus, bus rapid transit, monorail and light rail. However, MATA determined
                  early on in this phase that the conventional bus mode “could not be expanded to
                  provide an effective level of high-capacity service desired for the Memphis


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                 region,” and thus only the three remaining modes remained in consideration
                 through the phase. At the end of this phase of the process, the MATA Board
                 made the decision to move forward only with further analysis of the light rail
                 technology. Their decision resulted from the recommendation of the Regional
                 Rail Steering Committee which was based on two factors – the likely impacts of
                 the transit technologies on the existing neighborhoods and the potential for the
                 type of service to encourage neighborhood and community redevelopment.
                 Seven preliminary alignments were reduced to four alternatives during this
                 phase, two of which were recommended for further consideration (Alternative 1
                 and 2A). This decision was confirmed by the MATA Board in early 2002.

                 Figure 2.3       Refined Alignment Alternatives Downtown-Airport Alternative
                                  Analysis Study (2002)




                 Source: Memphis Regional Rail Program, Downtown-Airport Corridor Alternatives Analysis, Executive
                          Summary, Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, Inc., 2002




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                  The subsequent stage of the Alternatives Analysis process, known as Phase III,
                  evaluated the short list of feasible alternatives in more detail and included
                  environmental screening. The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) was
                  consulted during this phase of the process. However, since they did not review
                  the Phase III documents prepared in 2006, these documents are still in a draft
                  stage. The Alternatives Analysis and Environmental Screening Report evaluated
                  two primary light rail alignment Build Alternatives, as well as No Build and
                  Transportation System Management (TSM) Alternatives. In 2006, the MATA
                  Board voted to eliminate one of the alternatives and the remaining Build
                  alternative at the end of the draft process was Build Alternative 2. It would
                  construct a light rail line along or adjacent to Pauline Street, Lamar Avenue,
                  Airways Boulevard, and Plough Boulevard between Madison Avenue (an
                  existing streetcar line) and the Airport. Since then and about to open in fall 2011,
                  the Airways Transit Center has been constructed at the proposed end of the rail
                  line. The Airways Transit Center will serve as an intermodal Transit Center with
                  MARTA bus service, Greyhound intercity bus service, a taxi stand, parking and
                  police substation, and a future use would be as a station on the Downtown-
                  Airport light rail line.




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                 Figure 2.4       Light Rail Build Alternative Downtown-Airport Corridor (2005)




                 Source: Downtown-Airport Corridor Alternatives Analysis and Environmental Screening Report, Parsons
                          Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, Inc., 2005.


       2.4 MEMPHIS 2030 LONG RANGE TRANSPORTATION
           PLAN (2008)
                 The Transit Element of the most recent long range transportation plan, the
                 Memphis Urban Area 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan prepared in 2008,
                 identifies local issues related to transit and identifies strategies aimed to enhance
                 access and mobility for all residents of the region. The long and short term
                 transit strategies identified in the Transit Element of the 2030 LRTP are
                 summarized in the table below.




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                  Table 2.1         2030 LRTP – Transit Element, Short and Long-Term Strategies
                   Short-Term Strategies
                      MATA and the Memphis MPO should coordinate with other human service providers to complete the
                      recommendations identified in the MACHSTP (Memphis Area Coordinated Human Service
                      Transportation Plan) report.
                      Transit should be promoted for all types of riders.
                      Passenger amenities should be improved and expanded.
                      Consider development of a transit master plan to extend the planning of operation and capital needs
                      beyond a year-to-year basis.
                   Long-Term Strategies
                      Complete an inventory of existing park-and-ride facilities.
                      Identify future routes to be responsive to future land use patterns.
                      Consider establishing a regional transit agency with its own dedicated funding source for transit.
                      A fixed guideway study should be completed to analyze potential transit service on the High
                      Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-40 and I-55.
                      Coordination with the Memphis MPO and other transportation providers should continue to implement
                      the Action Plan within the MACHSTP report.
                      Improved transit information technology should be explored.
                      The long-term recommendations of the transit master plan (recommended as a short-term strategy)
                      should be implemented.
                      Consider creation of a transit delivery system that offers service oriented to activity centers and
                      corridors.
                      Pursue acquisition of existing or presentation of abandoned freight railroad rights-of-way for future use
                      for fixed guideway transit, bikeways and green belts.

                  Source: Memphis Long-Range Transportation Plan, Destination 2030, Transit Element, Kimley-Horn and
                          Associates, Inc., 2008.
                  The 2030 LRTP Transit Element, as part of its Planning Context, identifies the
                  development of light rail service in the Memphis area as part of the long term
                  transportation strategy for the area, particularly the planning efforts for the
                  Downtown to Airport line. It also states that fixed guideways are still under
                  consideration for the remainder of the Southeast Corridor, the South Corridor
                  and the North Corridors, previously identified in the Regional Transit Plan
                  (1997). The design and construction of fixed guideway projects in the Southeast
                  and South Corridors are included as the Regional Rail System in the then current
                  2008-2011 Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) which provided a
                  financially constrained list of the most immediate priority transportation
                  improvements for the Memphis Urban area (TIP # 5309-2002-03; LRTP #
                  40000016).
                  The Transit Element of the 2030 LRTP also presents the regional transit vision for
                  the area as a network of activity centers and corridors. It identifies activity



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                 centers or major economic and employment generators in the region and
                 envisions a web of transit corridors connecting the center city and the activity
                 centers, as well as within the activity centers themselves. In this vision, transit
                 service is augmented or increased to serve the rapidly increasing employment
                 centers in suburban areas, usually from other suburban areas, bypassing the
                 downtown core altogether. The Regional Transit Vision identified possible
                 community activity centers in the Memphis region for the creation of cross-town
                 routes and feeder connections to link these activity centers. Some possible routes
                 identified in the 2030 Regional Transit Vision are between:
                     Downtown and Millington;
                     Bartlett, Lakeland and Arlington, and;
                     Southaven and Hernando, MS with connections between Horn Lake, Olive
                     Branch, and existing service in Germantown.
                 MATA service is envisioned to include reverse commute and express service, as
                 well as Bus Rapid Transit and light rail along strategic corridors connecting large
                 activity centers.




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                  Figure 2.5      2030 LRTP – Regional Transit Vision




                  Source: Memphis Long-Range Transportation Plan, Destination 2030, Transit Element, Kimley-Horn and
                           Associates, Inc., 2008


        2.5 MDOT I-69 CORRIDOR ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS
            (2011)
                  The MDOT sponsored the I-69 Alternatives Analysis study at the request of the
                  local jurisdictions along the I-69 corridor in De Soto County in Mississippi and
                  Memphis, Tennessee after a $70 million earmark was included in SAFETEA-LU,
                  the 2005 federal surface transportation bill, to study the possibility of high speed,
                  high capacity transit in the corridor. The Alternatives Analysis Study initiated in
                  2008 evaluated transportation needs in the corridor and identified solutions that
                  might include new transit services in the study area which extended south to the
                  unincorporated community of Tunica Resorts in Tunica County, Mississippi and
                  north to the City of Memphis Central Business District in Tennessee. This study
                  area goes further south than the “South Corridor” identified as a priority



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                 corridor for high capacity transit service in the previous regional rail planning
                 studies described earlier.
                 Three technologies (commuter rail, light rail and bus rapid transit) and four
                 alignments were considered with Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) along I-69 selected as
                 the proposed Locally Preferred Alternative (LPA) in 2010. The BRT service
                 envisioned on I-69 would operate along the 43-mile route serving 14 stations
                 between Tunica Resorts and downtown Memphis including new or enhanced
                 local bus service in Tunica, De Soto and Shelby counties. The next step in this
                 study is to finalize the Alternative Analysis report and submit an application to
                 the Federal Transit Administration’s Small Start Program as well as add the
                 project to the MPO Long Range Transportation Plan.

                 Figure 2.6      Locally Preferred Alternative – I-69 Bus Rapid Transit




                 Source: MDOT I-69 Corridor Alternatives Analysis, Gresham Smith and Partners, June 2011.




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    3.0 Existing Transit Service
                  For many residents in the Memphis region that use transit, taking transit is not a
                  choice but a necessity. Residents without access to private automobiles depend
                  on transit to access jobs, medical care, professional services, and many other
                  aspects of daily life. Some residents choose to ride transit. These residents board
                  buses, trolleys, vans and shuttles to take advantage of the convenience and cost
                  savings afforded to transit users. As the region grows and development patterns
                  shift, convenient and reliable transit service becomes more important. However,
                  limitations may occur due to the operational costs associated with providing
                  additional services to new, currently underserved areas.
                  Within the context of the transportation system, transit provides a viable
                  transportation alternative that decreases dependence on automobiles and in turn,
                  lessens the demand on the existing transportation system. One way to encourage
                  transit use on existing routes and services is to develop around each stop a safe
                  and comfortable customer delivery system complete with attractive and
                  convenient amenities. Since most regular transit users walk or bike to and from
                  transit stops, a network of sidewalks, safe street crossings, bike facilities, multi-
                  use paths, and pedestrian level lighting should complement the amenities
                  provided at the stop. The efficiency of transit also depends on an interconnected
                  system of roads and highways that provide access to major destinations and
                  transit stops.


        3.1 EXISTING MATA SERVICE
                  The bulk of public transportation services in the Memphis region are provided
                  by the Memphis Area Transit Authority (MATA). Services provided by MATA
                  include fixed route bus service, rail trolley, MATAplus paratransit, and event
                  shuttles. These services are supplemented by several private initiatives including
                  taxicab companies, Greyhound, Amtrak, a private circulator system near the
                  downtown medical campuses, and human services transportation providers.




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                 Figure 3.1       MATA Fixed-Route Bus




                 Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.
                 MATA provides service in four cities in Shelby County as well as West Memphis,
                 Arkansas. Each weekday, MATA transports over 40,000 riders throughout the
                 Memphis region using buses, paratransit (demand-responsive) vans, and vintage
                 rail trolleys. There are currently 33 numbered fixed-route bus routes and three
                 trolley routes, encompassing approximately 800 route miles. The size of MATA’s
                 fleet is approximately 240 transit vehicles. The vehicles within the fleet are
                 designated by service type so that the vehicle specifications best meet the needs
                 of each service. MATA’s fixed-route service consists of 162 vehicles.
                 Approximately 135 of these vehicles are in active service. All buses are accessible
                 and are equipped with bike racks. MATA operates two bus transfer and park-
                 and-ride facilities in Downtown Memphis, located along Main Street. MATA’s
                 current fixed bus routes are shown in MATA’s system map (Figure 3.2). The
                 fares for MATA services vary depending on the type of service. MATA offers
                 several discounts including $0.25 fares on Ozone alert days.




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Figure 3.2      MATA System Map (2009)




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                 Based on information from the 2000 U.S. Census, the Memphis Urbanized Area
                 (UZA) covers 400 square miles, extending into Mississippi and Arkansas. With a
                 population of 972,091 in 2000, the Memphis UZA ranked 40 out of 465 UZAs in
                 the United States. As reported to the 2009 National Transit Database, with the
                 Memphis UZA, MATA’s service area covers 288 square miles, or 72% of the
                 UZA, and provides access to a population of 888,627, or 91% of the UZA.
                 The existing trolley service in Memphis was introduced in three phases. The first
                 phase along Main Street was completed in May 1993. Phase 2 along the riverfront
                 began service in October 1997. The most recent phase along Madison Avenue
                 was completed in March 2004. Today, a peak fleet of 12 vehicles services the 24
                 stops and 6 miles of trolley routes. The trolley service comprises three routes:
                 Main Street, Madison Avenue and the Riverfront. MATA owns 20 trolley cars, of
                 which 19 are in the active fleet. All trolley stations and stops are American with
                 Disabilities Act (ADA) accessible.

                 Figure 3.3       Riverfront Trolley




                 Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.
                 The six miles of trolley service include 0.8 miles on exclusive right-of-way (the
                 Pedestrian Mall), 2.0 miles on railroad right-of-way, and 4.2 miles on street in
                 shared travel lanes. Headways vary between 5 and 10 minutes with service
                 provided from 6:00 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. on Monday through Thursday, 6:00 a.m. to
                 1:00 a.m. on Friday and Saturday, and 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Sunday. There
                 are a total of 20 trolley vehicles in the fleet, of which 19 are active. All of the
                 trolleys in MATA’s fleet are electric-powered vintage-styled vehicles.
                 MATAplus, provides special service to persons in the Memphis urbanized areas
                 with disabilities that prevent them from riding the fixed route buses. MATAplus,
                 operates during the same days and hours as the fixed-route bus system. The
                 service area extends 0.75 miles beyond the fixed-routes. Points of origin and
                 destinations not within a 0.75 mile corridor are eligible for ADA service with the
                 understanding that MATAplus is only required to provide transportation within


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                  the service area. MATAplus will schedule service for areas outside of the service
                  area only if MATAplus has the capacity to provide the service. A trip may require
                  more than one hour from origin to destination due to the size of the MATAplus
                  service area and group trips. MATAplus has 58 transit vehicles in its fleet, of
                  which 44 are in active service. MATAplus is made up of a variety of vehicles, but
                  all are fully accessible.

                  Ridership on MATA’s services has declined by 8 percent from 2004 to 2009.
                  According to the National Transit Database (NTD), during this time period the
                  bus service experienced a 10 percent decrease in ridership and the trolley service
                  experienced a 13 percent increase in ridership. MATAplus experienced a
                  fluctuation in ridership from year to year, but did not change overall from 2004
                  to 2009. Negative growth within the City of Memphis and service cuts within this
                  time period played a part in the decrease in ridership on MATA’s services.
                  Figure 3.4 provides the annual breakdown of MATA’s ridership data.

                  Figure 3.4       MATA Annual Passenger Trips




                  Source: National Transit Database
                  In order to classify MATA routes, the Short Range Transit Plan still in progress,
                  has proposed a list of key routes for consideration by the MATA Board. Most of
                  these routes carry over 1,000 daily riders, however, three routes carry fewer
                  riders. The ten key routes have been identified and are listed in the table below
                  with some other high volume routes (900 or more) that were not designated key
                  routes included to highlight MATA’s most heavily used routes.




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                 Table 3.1           MATA Key and Most Heavily Used Routes
                                                                                              Effective
                                            Key    Type of Route      Peak     Daily           Speed
                  Route Name               Route   (Service Area)    Headway   Riders          (mph)
                  50      Poplar             X     Radial (E/SE)       15      2,391            15*
                  43      Elvis Presley      X     Radial (S)          15      2,106            14*
                  31      Crosstown          X     Crosstown           15      1,710             14
                                                   (via CBD – N/S)
                  52      Jackson            X     Radial (NE)         15      1,537            12*
                  39      S. Third                 Radial (SW)         30      1,489            N/A*
                  57      Park                     Radial (E)          20      1,464            N/A*
                  36      Hacks Cross              Radial (E/SE)       15      1,404            N/A
                  56      Union Kimball      X     Radial (S/SE)      30-40    1,325            18*
                  53      Summer                   Radial (E/NE)       30      1,210             18
                  4       Walker                   Radial (SE)         20      1,184            13*
                  11      Thomas             X     Radial (N)          25      1,178            17*
                  10      Watkins            X     Radial (N)          30      1,157            13*
                  20      Bellevue/                Radial (S)          30       962              16
                          Winchester
                  19      Vollintine         X     Radial (N/NE)       20       809             N/A
                  8       Chelsea            X     Radial (N)          20       762             14*
                  13      Lauderdale –       X     Radial (S)          30       477             N/A
                          Wellington

                 Source: MATA Short Range Transit Plan and MATA Schedules
                 * Speed on trunk segment only.


                 An on-board survey was conducted by MATA in 2005. The data from this survey
                 suggests that riders use MATA services primarily to travel to and from work and
                 that MATA’s riders are primarily dependent on mass transit. Table 3.2 shows the
                 results from this survey.




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                  Table 3.2       MATA Rider Profile
                                                                  Employment    Household         Household Auto
                   Age             Race           Gender          Status        Income            Ownership
                   18 & Under      African        Female          Full Time     Less than $18k    Zero
                                   American
                   9%                             50%             43%           66%               60%
                                   89%
                   19-35                          Male            Part Time     $18k-$30k         One
                                   Caucasian
                   38%                            50%             18%           18%               25%
                                   8%
                   35-49                                          Student       $30k-$42k         Two or More
                                   Other
                   35%                                            15%           11%               15%
                                   3%
                   50-64                                          Other         Over $42k
                   16%                                            24%           5%
                   65+
                   2%

                  Source: Memphis On-Board Survey – Final Report, 2005.

                  MATA’s operating costs are covered by a combination of federal, state and local
                  funding as well as passenger fares. The City of Memphis, MATA’s only source of
                  local government funds, contributed nearly $22 million, or about 40 percent of
                  MATA’s operating revenue in FY 2009. The Federal Transit Administration
                  (FTA) contributed approximately $11 million, while the State of Tennessee
                  contributed another $8 million. Fare revenues, advertisements and other
                  revenues generated by the system provided about $10 million, covering
                  approximately 20 percent of MATA’s costs. Figure 3.5 shows the breakdown of
                  the sources of MATA’s operating revenue from 2003 to 2009.




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                 Figure 3.5       MATA Operating Revenue Sources

                     Federal Funds     State Funds   Local Funds      Other Funds    Fare Revenues

                   $60,000,000

                   $50,000,000


                   $40,000,000

                   $30,000,000


                   $20,000,000

                   $10,000,000


                            $0
                                     2003    2004    2005      2006      2007       2008   2009
                 Source: National Transit Database


       3.2 OTHER TRANSIT SERVICES
                 General discussions of public transportation traditionally center on the services
                 similar to those provided by MATA – namely, fixed route and paratransit. These
                 transit services are important components of the larger public transportation
                 network that also includes taxis, intercity bus travel, intercity rail service, private
                 shuttles and human service transportation providers.
                 Several taxicab companies operate within the Memphis area providing bus, limo
                 shuttle, minivan, and sedan services. These companies provide service based on
                 drop-off, per-mile and waiting time rates. The number of taxicabs in the
                 Memphis MPO area has no direct correlation to the level of anticipated ridership
                 for transit. However, the presence of the companies does indicate a need within
                 the region’s population for a means of travel other than privately owned
                 automobiles. This is true for both captive riders as well as potential choice riders
                 to and within Memphis.
                 Additional services include Greyhound, which provides bus service to and from
                 thousands of locations throughout North America, including other cities in
                 Tennessee and Mississippi and Amtrak, the national rail system, provides service
                 to and from Memphis on the “City of New Orleans” line. The Amtrak station is
                 located at 545 South Main Street in Memphis.
                 Human service transportation services, particularly for transit-dependent
                 populations, are described in the Memphis Area Coordinated Human Services
                 Transportation Plan (MACHSTP). Within this plan, services were placed into four




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                  groups, which are listed below with examples of organizations providing this
                  service:
                       Fixed route and fixed schedule services (MATA, Delta Area Rural Transit,
                       and Laidlaw Transportation for school bus services);
                       Semi-fixed services which travel on fixed route but with flexible schedules
                       (Memphis Inter-Faith Association, EastArk Enterprises);
                       Semi-demand responsive services which travel on flexible routes but with
                       fixed schedule (Arrow Transportation, EastArk Enterprises); and
                       Total demand responsive services which travel on flexible routes and flexible
                       schedules in response to customers’ requests (MATAplus, MATA through
                       City Wide Cab, Memphis Rideshare Program, Associated Catholic Charities).
                  A private hospital shuttle provides service between St. Jude Hospital, the Ronald
                  McDonald House, Target House, and the Memphis Grizzlies House. This free
                  shuttle runs on a continuous loop Sunday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 11:30
                  p.m. and on Saturdays from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.




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       4.0 Transit Needs Assessment
                 In preparing the transit needs assessment for the Transit Element of the 2040
                 Memphis Urban LRTP, the 2011 Short Range Transit Plan Market Analysis
                 Report was evaluated to identify the current and short-term transit needs of the
                 Memphis urbanized region. Long-term transit needs were identified through the
                 review of 2040 projections of population and employment densities, as well as
                 travel demand from the existing plus committed (E+C) Memphis MPO Travel
                 Demand Model. The E+C model includes transportation improvements already
                 on the ground (i.e. existing) or that have been programmed for funding in the
                 Transportation Improvement Program (i.e. committed).


       4.1 CURRENT TRANSIT NEEDS
                 MATA initiated a Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) in 2011 to make sure MATA
                 services meet and support community needs, make the bus an attractive option
                 for more people in the community where study recommendations will focus on
                 finding ways to increase bus ridership, and ensure MATA services are operated
                 in the most cost effective and efficient way possible. This SRTP has conducted an
                 extensive evaluation of existing conditions including existing services and
                 markets in its Draft Market Analysis Report (September 2011). This analysis
                 used a combination of the U.S. Census Bureau 2005-2009 American Community
                 Survey, the 2010 projected conditions from the Memphis MPO Travel Demand
                 Model, and data derived from earlier sources. For the analysis, the Memphis
                 urban area was divided into 20 planning districts (aggregations of Traffic
                 Analysis Zones) to group neighborhoods which share similar characteristics.
                 MATA currently operates fixed-route service in 15 of Memphis’ 20 planning
                 districts, with limited service in Shelby Farms/Germantown, Northwest and
                 Northeast Shelby County and McKellar Lake neighborhoods; and no service in
                 Millington, East Shelby County, Collierville, and East and West DeSoto County
                 (MS).

                 Population and Employment Density
                 The SRTP market analysis first looked at existing population and employment
                 density to understand the types and quantity of transit service that may be
                 supported by each of the different planning areas within the Memphis Urban
                 Area. The outlying areas of Shelby Farms/Germantown, Northeast Shelby
                 County, Collierville and East Shelby County grew considerably from 2000 to




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                  20091. However, the planning districts with the largest amount of total
                  population are still located in the traditional neighborhoods that ring Memphis’
                  urban core: Southwest Memphis, Raleigh Bartlett, and East Memphis plus the
                  outlying areas of Hickory Hill and Shelby Farms/Germantown. Employment
                  growth has been consistent with population growth between 2004-2010, with the
                  outlying areas to the north and east, as well as to the south to DeSoto County in
                  Mississippi being the ones exhibiting the biggest gains in employment2. Hickory
                  Hill on the contrary, lost population during 2000-2009, but increased its
                  employment numbers from 2004-2010.              Dwelling (households/acre) and
                  employment (jobs/acre) densities are shown in Figure 4.1 and Figure 4.2,
                  respectively. These illustrate that employment densities in the Central Business
                  District (CBD) and Midtown areas, together with some of the corridors radiating
                  out of downtown Memphis, such as Poplar Avenue, Lamar Avenue, and Elvis
                  Presley Boulevard are likely sufficient to support high capacity transit with
                  frequent service. The maps also illustrate there are pockets of high density
                  employment near the airport and in Hickory Hill; as well as around I-240 in East
                  Memphis and Shelby Farms/Germantown; and along I-40, north of I-240 (see
                  Table 4.1).




                  1   U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 and 2009 Population Estimates Program.
                  2   Memphis MPO Travel Demand Model.




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                 Figure 4.1      2009 Dwelling Density (Household/Acre)




                 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2005-2009 American Community Survey.




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                  Figure 4.2       2010 Employment Density (Jobs/Acre)




                  Source: Memphis MPO 2010 Travel Demand Model

                  Table 4.1        Highest Density Planning Districts
                                                    Average Dwelling Density           Average Employment Density
                   Planning District                   (Households/Acre)                       (Jobs/Acre)
                   CBD                                            3.04                             43.30
                   Midtown and Depot                              3.28                              4.80
                   University                                     3.11                              2.95
                   North Memphis                                  2.63                              2.04
                   East Memphis                                   2.59                              N/A
                   Shelby Farms/Germantown                        N/A                               2.90
                   Hickory Hill                                   2.97                              2.56
                   Airport                                        2.55                              6.50
                   Southwest Memphis                              2.00                              N/A

                  Source: Table 2 and 3 combined, MATA Short Range Transit Plan Market Analysis, July 2011

                  Similar to other metropolitan areas in the United States, Memphis’ urban core is
                  losing population and employment to the suburban areas. However, while the
                  urbanized area still has the most population and employment, the trend is



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                 towards continued shifting of population and employment to the suburban parts
                 of Shelby County and into the surrounding counties. In the short-term,
                 urbanized Memphis continues to be MATA’s strongest market with more
                 population and employment; greater densities of population and employment;
                 and more people who rely on public transportation services. At the same time,
                 connecting the urban core with the employment markets in the outlying areas is
                 likely to become increasingly important.

                 Transit Propensity
                 In addition to population and employment density, the SRTP also examined
                 various indicators of transit propensity among the population including vehicle
                 ownership, household income, age, ethnicity, and disability combining them into
                 an overall assessment of transit propensity. In areas where the Transit
                 Propensity Index is high, the relative demand for transit is more likely to be
                 higher. Conversely, in areas where the index is low, the relative transit demand
                 would be lower. MATA’s service coverage is concentrated where transit
                 propensities are highest, such as the CBD, southwest Memphis, North Memphis,
                 and Frayzer, while lower concentrations of service are where transit propensities
                 are lower, such as Shelby Farms/Germantown, Raleigh Bartlett and Millington.
                 However, a notable exception is the Hickory Hill area were service demand
                 (transit propensity) is high but the concentration of MATA service is lower. This
                 may indicate a potential new market for MATA.




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                  Figure 4.3       Transit Propensity Index




                  Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.

                  Travel Patterns
                  The SRTP market analysis also examined the employment density and specific
                  activity centers and land uses. The 2010 trip patterns for travel by all modes
                  combined were examined at the planning district level, as shown in Figure 4.4.
                  The travel pattern analysis was conducted using total volumes and trip density
                  (the latter to address differences in the size of districts) and for all trip purposes
                  and work trips. The results of the work trip analysis by trip density are shown in
                  Table 4.2. The travel pattern analysis identified very substantial travel markets to
                  suburban activity centers (using both of the above measures) but also noted that
                  the characteristics in those suburban districts indicated low transit propensity
                  and the development patterns were not transit friendly.




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                 Figure 4.4      Existing Regional Home Based Work Trips




                 Source: Memphis MPO 2010 Travel Demand Model




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                  Table 4.2           Largest Total Home Based Work Trip Density between Planning
                                      Districts
                                                                                     Total Home Based     Total Trips per
                                         Planning Districts                           Work Daily Trips     Square Mile
                   CBD                           Midtown and Depot                         13,439              541.4
                   Hickory Hill                  Shelby Farms Germantown                   32,272              263.3
                   Hickory Hill                  Airport                                   14,145              220.3
                   Raleigh Bartlett              Shelby Farms Germantown                   28,000              211.5
                   East Memphis                  Shelby Farms Germantown                   21,557              204.2
                   East Memphis                  Hickory Hill                              15,620              196.2
                   CBD                           Southwest Memphis                         10,204              180.9
                   Southwest Memphis             Airport                                   10,817              161.8
                   East Memphis                  Raleigh Bartlett                          11,703              130.8
                   Collierville                  Shelby Farms Germantown                   13,450              110.7
                   Southwest Memphis             Hickory Hill                              10,393              104.8

                  Source: Table 10, MATA Short Range Transit Plan Market Analysis, July 2011.


                  The MPO travel demand model identifies Shelby Farms/Germantown as a key
                  travel market, especially for home-based work trips. The data also suggests that
                  there is significant demand between Shelby Farms/Germantown and the
                  Raleigh/Bartlett area, Hickory Hill and East Memphis. It also identifies Hickory
                  Hill as both an important origin and destination for trips including all trips and
                  home-based work trips. Other important travel markets are between Hickory
                  Hill and East Memphis and the Airport. MATA has limited transit service
                  connecting these areas with only five cross-town routes in service today.


        4.2 FUTURE TRANSIT NEEDS
                  Anticipated congested corridors, projected population and employment growth
                  patterns, and forecasted travel demand with major trip producers and attractors
                  were analyzed to identify the long-term transit opportunities for the Memphis
                  Urban Area by 2040. These are summarized below.

                  Congested Corridors
                  The 2040 Existing plus Committed Scenario network model run (which includes
                  all committed transportation projects in the TIP as well as the existing
                  transportation network) for this LTRP identified the expected congested
                  corridors in 2040. These are corridors expected to reach high traffic volumes and
                  low travel speeds which can become potential corridors for high capacity transit



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                 service in order to alleviate the future congestion. Figure 4.5 shows the volume-
                 over-capacity ratios during the PM peak period for the year 2040 as estimated by
                 the Memphis MPO travel demand model.
                 Future year 2040 conditions indicate congested conditions will be experienced
                 outside of the Memphis urban core, particularly along the Austin Parkway
                 Highway to the north, north I-40 to the northeast, and portions of south US 78
                 and arterial roads in Hickory Hill and Shelby Farms/Germantown. This
                 indicates that travel conditions by 2040(if no other improvements are
                 implemented) in those corridors and areas will worsen given the projected
                 population and employment growth experienced in the suburban areas of Shelby
                 County and north DeSoto County. The opportunity for high capacity transit
                 service in these corridors could be explored with potential express buses on HOV
                 lanes or expressway shoulders, as they could provide a competitive alternative
                 travel option to single-occupant vehicles.




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Figure 4.5      2040 Network Volume/Capacity Ratios (PM Peak Period)




                  Source: Memphis MPO 2040 E+C Travel Demand Model


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                 Population and Employment Density
                 Population and employment density as projected in 2040 by the regional network
                 travel demand model prepared for the current LRTP, indicates population and
                 employment density patterns are similar to the 2010 conditions. Population will
                 continue to expand further to the outer areas of Shelby County, particularly to
                 southern Tipton County (Millington), north DeSoto County (West DeSoto and
                 East DeSoto County) and pockets in Marshall and Fayette Counties, as shown in
                 Figure 4.6. The trend towards continued shifting of population to the suburban
                 parts of Shelby County and into the surrounding counties, particularly to DeSoto
                 County, appears to continue by 2040.
                 Employment densities in 2040 continue the same trend as 2010 projections.
                 Figure 4.7 illustrates employment in 2040 will continue to be concentrated close
                 to downtown Memphis, given the renaissance in residential and commercial
                 development in the Memphis urban core, with Poplar Avenue corridor
                 continuing to exhibit significant concentration of employment densities along its
                 corridor. The area surrounding the Memphis International Airport continues to
                 exhibit significant job density given the many warehousing and distribution
                 operations serving the world’s busiest freight airport in the nation. The
                 suburban markets of Hickory Hill, Shelby Farms/Germantown, and Raleigh
                 Bartlett along I-240 and along I-40 also stand out with increased job density in
                 2040. The Midtown, Depot, Southwest Memphis, and West Memphis districts
                 are projected to increase in employment density in 2040 compared to 2010
                 conditions.




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Figure 4.6      2040 Dwelling Unit Density (Household/Acre)




                  Source: Memphis MPO 2040 E+C Travel Demand Model



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Figure 4.7     2040 Employment Density (Jobs/Acre)




                 Source: Memphis MPO 2040 E+C Travel Demand Model



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                  Travel Patterns
                  Total trip volumes and transit trip volumes (home-based work trips in the
                  morning peak) from the travel demand model 2040 E+C Scenario were analyzed
                  to see where the model estimates travel demand in 2040. Figure 4.8 summarizes
                  the total trip volumes in 2040 and illustrates suburban travel (suburb to suburb)
                  will be where the most travel demand will be in 2040, with travel between
                  Raleigh Bartlett, Shelby Farms/Germantown, Hickory Hill and East Memphis
                  showing a significant number of home-based work trips during the morning
                  peak. The 2040 E+C model data also illustrates how travel between Southwest
                  Memphis and West DeSoto County and between Hickory Hill and East DeSoto
                  County intensifies, where population densities were found to increase by 2040.
                  Providing transit in these outlying areas where population densities are
                  increasing, but where employment densities are not intensifying and transit
                  propensity is low, may be challenging.
                  Estimated 2040 transit travel patterns indicate transit demand continues to be
                  concentrated in the radial corridors emanating from the Memphis CBD to East
                  Memphis, Midtown/Depot, Hickory Hill and Southwest Memphis (see Figure
                  4.9). The Memphis urban core continues to show relatively high transit demand
                  by 2040. The 2040 scenario also projects significant cross-town transit demand
                  among North Memphis, Midtown/Depot and the Airport. The 2040 model does
                  not estimate considerable transit demand in the suburbs given the existing
                  transit network which currently provides limited or no service in those areas. In
                  the long term improved transit service may be needed outside the Memphis
                  urban core. This service would connect the existing transit service areas with the
                  projected residential and employment/activity centers located in the eastern
                  parts and outer areas of Shelby County where there is limited or no MATA
                  service (i.e. Millington, Arlington, Germantown, Collierville, Hickory Hill and
                  Hernando, MS). Reverse commute and circumferential commuter routes are
                  likely to be needed in these areas.




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Figure 4.8     2040 Total Home-Based Work Trips (AM Peak)




                 Source: Memphis MPO 2040 E+C Travel Demand Model



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Figure 4.9      2040 Transit Home-Based Work Trips (AM Peak)




                  Source: Memphis MPO 2040 E+C Travel Demand Model


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       4.3 KEY FINDINGS
                 Short-Term Transit Needs
                 Key findings were summarized as follows in the Short Range Transit Plan
                 Market Analysis report which identifies the existing transit needs in the
                 Memphis Urban Area:
                     Within the MATA service area, the Shelby Farms/Germantown planning
                     district is the fastest growing and most populated planning district as well as
                     one of the wealthiest. It is also the fastest growing planning district in terms
                     of employment and has the most jobs. However, much of the population and
                     employment in this area is low density, making traditional transit services
                     less effective. So, while the growing market is important, traditional services
                     are not likely to be as effective as they are in the denser parts of the market.
                     Hickory Hill is an increasingly important market in MATA’s service area,
                     both for population and employment. There is also strong travel demand to
                     and from this area. Challenges associated with serving this growing and
                     important market are associated with the low density development and the
                     demand from Hickory Hill to other low density areas, such as Shelby
                     Farms/Germantown.
                     None of the planning districts in the study area have average population
                     densities that meet industry standards for the highest frequency transit
                     service. Of the planning districts used for this study, only Midtown,
                     University and the CBD demonstrated densities greater than 3 households
                     per acre, which are considered appropriate for higher frequency transit
                     service, such as enhanced bus or BRT.
                     It is important to note that the Planning Districts used in this analysis are
                     fairly large and consequently mask smaller areas with higher densities.
                     Indeed, several neighborhoods within these planning districts have
                     significantly higher densities than shown in the planning district level as a
                     whole.
                     In terms of average employment density at the district level, only the
                     Memphis CBD district has sufficient employment density to support high
                     capacity transit, such as higher frequency bus service or bus rapid transit
                     service.
                     The Poplar Avenue corridor is a critical transportation facility and home to
                     much of the region’s activity and employment centers. Overall, however, the
                     corridor does not contain large transit dependent populations. As a result, it
                     will be important to connect neighborhoods to the corridor as well as support
                     travel along the corridor.




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                  The MATA Short Range Plan is still in progress and is currently developing a
                  series of improvements that can be implemented to address the short range
                  needs. It is anticipated that these strategies will include local and express bus
                  services as well as flexible or demand responsive services in selected areas that
                  are not suitable for fixed route transit. The plan will likely incorporate routing
                  adjustments, span and frequency adjustments, information and bus stop
                  amenities and other low capital cost improvements.
                  In summary, the MATA service area is growing and changing. While much of
                  MATA’s service operates in areas with the most population and employment
                  and the largest concentrations of key population groups that tend to use transit,
                  the network may be less oriented around the shortest path between the origins
                  and destinations of these markets. For example, the existing service is
                  concentrated around the western part of the urban area of the County; this is a
                  critical market for service but also reflects MATA’s local funding source -- the
                  City of Memphis. At the same time, there is a growing market for services to and
                  within the eastern part of the service area. The current network tends to serve
                  radial trips well within the city but lacks regional connections to growing areas
                  in eastern Shelby County and in Mississippi. There may be an increasing need
                  for connections between existing service areas and new employment markets,
                  including reverse commute and circumferential commuting.

                  Long-Term Transit Needs
                  The long range transit needs include increasing the coverage and intensity of
                  transit service to the growing areas in eastern Shelby County and in Desoto
                  County, Mississippi as well as introducing new high capacity transit service in
                  selected corridors. The focus of the long range transportation plan is in
                  identifying long lead time capital improvements such as high capacity transit
                  services. The next section discusses the transit corridors which may be most
                  appropriate for such transit improvements. Nevertheless, the long range
                  transportation plan needs to anticipate the resources necessary to continue to
                  expand conventional fixed route bus service (local and express), as well as
                  flexible and demand responsive services reflecting further expansion of the short
                  term transit strategies. A subsequent technical memorandum (Task 7) will
                  discuss these services or transit concepts in more detail that will complement the
                  high capacity transit corridors.




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    5.0 Potential High Capacity
        Transit Corridors
                  The Transit Element of the 2040 Memphis Urban Area Long Range
                  Transportation Plan focuses on the identification of corridors with potential for
                  higher capacity transit service in the long term based on the following
                  characteristics:
                       Previously identified as a candidate corridor by the MPO or MATA;
                       Large volume of existing transit riders;
                       Demographic characteristics associated with transit dependency;
                       High population and employment densities;
                       High roadway volumes and congestion;
                       Potential for dedicated transit right-of-way; and
                       Opportunities for transit-oriented development.
                  Previous planning studies summarized in Section 2.0 identified several corridors
                  for potential high capacity transit service. These are:
                       North Corridor – This corridor was identified in the 1997 Regional Transit
                       Plan but not considered a priority at that time. Almost ten years later, a
                       North Corridor for transit between Downtown and Millington to serve
                       northern Shelby County was identified in the 2030 Memphis Urban Area
                       LRTP.
                       Northeast Corridor – Both the 2030 LRTP and the 2011 SRTP identify a
                       potential transit corridor to the northeast of the Memphis CBD serving
                       Bartlett, Lakeland and Arlington, as well as Wolfchase Mall and St. Francis
                       Hospital, based on major travel generators in this corridor in terms of trip
                       volumes and fairly robust trip densities.
                       Southeast Corridor – Selected in 1997 as the priority corridor to explore high
                       capacity transit service, this corridor was subsequently slightly modified and
                       a portion of the corridor was further studied as the Downtown - Airport
                       corridor with light rail service identified as the most preferred mode of
                       travel. The 2011 SRTP also identifies two corridors in the Southeast area
                       likely sufficient to support higher capacity transit with frequent service,
                       given its mix of population and employment densities along the corridor;
                       these are Poplar Avenue and Lamar Avenue, both in terms of number of
                       daily trips along existing bus routes in the two corridors and the trip density
                       of many activity centers in the corridors.



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                     South Corridor – Identified in the 1997 Regional Transit Plan as one of three
                     potential high capacity transit corridors, this corridor was most recently
                     (2010) included in the MDOT I-69 Alternative Analysis study which resulted
                     in BRT being the locally preferred alternative to connect the city of Memphis
                     with DeSoto County in Mississippi to the south. Elvis Presley Boulevard, a
                     corridor radiating out of downtown Memphis to the south, is also identified
                     in the 2011 SRTP as a corridor likely sufficient to support higher capacity
                     transit, with frequent service given its mix of population and employment
                     densities along the corridor.
                 The goal of this Transit Element was not to duplicate prior planning work
                 already completed but to examine updated projections and to confirm or modify
                 the corridors identified in earlier and ongoing studies.


       5.1 RADIAL CORRIDORS
                 The following section summarizes the candidate high capacity transit corridors
                 with long term potential to be recommended in the 2040 Memphis Urban Area
                 LRTP. These can be classified as radial corridors emerging from the Memphis
                 CBD which are described below and illustrated in Figure 5.1.




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                  Figure 5.1      Potential Radial High Capacity Transit Corridors




                  Source: Cambridge Systematics, Inc.

                  South Corridor
                  The South Corridor, as defined in prior studies, really contains two parallel
                  corridors, one on a more western alignment and one on a more eastern alignment.
                  Each is discussed separately below with the basis for selection as a potential high
                  capacity corridor described.

                  South Corridor Western Alignment
                  The more western of these is centered on the South Third Street corridor.
                       Existing Transit Routes and Riders - South Third Street hosts MATA Route
                       39 from Shelby Drive to Downtown Memphis and operates every 15 minutes
                       in the peak period and carries 1,489 daily riders, the fifth highest ridership in
                       the MATA system. Route 39 has been designated as a key route by MATA’s
                       Short Range Transit Plan (as previously shown in Table 3.1). A nearby
                       parallel route is Route 12 which operates on Florida Street between
                       downtown and I-55 and carries 700 riders. Route 31 (also designated a key
                       route) also operates in this area but serves the Medical District instead of the
                       core of downtown and continues north of downtown. It carries a total of
                       1,710 riders, although admittedly some are not in the South Corridor. Other



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                     routes enter the corridor serving cross-town (east-west) trips (Route 30 and
                     69) or branch off to serve adjacent neighborhoods (Routes 13 and 15). Thus
                     overall, there are several thousand riders today in this corridor.
                     Transit Propensity - The neighborhoods served by these routes in Southwest
                     Memphis tend to have high transit propensity based on demographic factors
                     including lower incomes and lower automobile ownership levels. This area
                     also contains a largely minority population.
                     Population and Employment Density - The area has few major activity
                     centers and very little employment. As a result, the transit service provides
                     critical access to jobs in the downtown core as well as in the Airport area and
                     other areas to the east.
                     Travel Patterns - 2010 trip patterns showed the largest flow of home-based
                     work trips was to the core and the airport area and other flows were headed
                     east and northeast to other districts. The 2040 trip patterns showed the largest
                     trip volumes were to West DeSoto County with other large flows to the
                     airport, Hickory Hill, the CBD, East DeSoto County and Midtown/Depot.
                     Projected transit trips in 2040 indicate a large transit demand from Southwest
                     Memphis to the Memphis CBD, which this potential high capacity transit
                     corridor would serve.
                     Potential Concepts - This corridor could be a target corridor for improved
                     transit service in a north-south direction along arterials or using the Illinois
                     Central (IC) Railroad right-of-way (ROW), particularly in the part of the area
                     north of I-55 where the rail line traverses the areas served by existing bus
                     routes. Light rail service either on arterials or along the rail ROW might be
                     one option. Bus-based improvements could include longer stop spacing,
                     signal priority and other priority treatments, higher frequency of service,
                     improved bus stop/station amenities, customer information improvements,
                     branding, etc. There might not be sufficient ridership to justify an overlay
                     service, suggesting that the improvement would need to replace current local
                     bus service along the corridor. The high transit propensity in the corridor
                     may limit the potential to draw many new riders since mode share may
                     already be quite high. Enhanced transit stations could serve as anchors to
                     east-west bus service.

                 South Corridor Eastern Alignment
                 The more eastern of the two parallel corridors is along Elvis Presley Boulevard
                 and Bellevue Boulevard in the northernmost segment. The corridor enters
                 downtown Memphis in the vicinity of the Medical District west of the historic
                 center.
                     Existing Transit Routes and Riders - This corridor hosts MATA Route 43
                     Elvis Presley, which operates every 15 minutes in the peak period and carries
                     2,106 daily riders, the second highest in the MATA system. This corridor is
                     roughly paralleled by Interstate Highways with I-240 in the northern part of


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                        the corridor and I-55 in the southern part of the corridor. Other routes
                        traverse substantial parts of the corridor including Route 20, which branches
                        off at Winchester Road to serve the Airport and locations west of the Airport
                        and carries 960 daily riders. Other routes serve shorter segments or intersect
                        the corridor.
                        Transit Propensity - The population characteristics of this area, including
                        lower income and automobile ownership and high concentrations of
                        minority populations, also indicate high transit propensity (though to a lesser
                        degree in the southern part of the corridor and as compared to the more
                        western parallel corridor).
                        Population and Employment Density - Unlike the parallel western corridor,
                        this corridor does have significant employment concentrations and activity
                        centers, including Graceland, Methodist Hospital South, Southland Mall, and
                        Southbrook Mall.
                        Travel Patterns – See South Corridor western alignment discussion above.
                        Potential Concepts - Improvements could include arterial bus rapid transit,
                        light rail, or express bus from the southern part of the corridor via I-55. Bus
                        or BRT improvements could include longer stop spacing, signal priority and
                        other priority treatments, higher frequency of service, improved bus
                        stop/station amenities, customer information improvements, branding, etc.3
                        The southernmost portion of the corridor is adjacent to the IC railroad ROW
                        (if the western corridor improvement were to use the IC Railroad ROW it
                        could serve the southernmost part of this corridor most likely with feeder
                        service). If the Southeastern Corridor improvements are implemented in the
                        Downtown-Airport Corridor there may be some overlap in markets. The
                        Elvis Presley Corridor is positioned best to extend southward into DeSoto
                        County, MS.
                        It should be noted that the recent MDOT I-69 Alternatives Analysis selected a
                        preferred alternative for this corridor linking DeSoto County with downtown
                        Memphis. Three technologies were evaluated – Commuter rail, light rail and
                        Bus Rapid Transit. Four alignment alternatives were evaluated. The selected
                        technology was Bus Rapid Transit and the alignment uses the median of the
                        I-55 and I-240 interstate highways from Mississippi to downtown Memphis.
                        This alignment is parallel to Elvis Presley Boulevard and essentially is the
                        eastern alignment of the South Corridor.




                  3   The portion of Elvis Presley Boulevard from Shelby Drive to Brooks Road is the site of a
                      committed roadway improvement project (2011-2014) with improved bus stops but no
                      bus lane.




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                 Southeast Corridors
                 An East Corridor was originally defined in the 1997 Regional Transit Plan along
                 Poplar Avenue. Subsequently, this was renamed the Southeast Corridor and
                 broadened to include the Lamar Avenue corridor to the Airport. Poplar Avenue
                 and Lamar Avenue are really two separate arterial corridors and will be
                 discussed separately, even though it is the area between these two transportation
                 corridors (US 72 and US 78) that is the most densely populated radial “corridor.”

                 Poplar Corridor
                 The Poplar Avenue corridor extends from the CBD District, to the Midtown and
                 Depot District, to the University District, to the East Memphis District, to the
                 Shelby Farms/Germantown District and ends in the Collierville District.
                     Existing Transit Routes and Riders - Poplar Avenue (US 72) hosts MATA’s
                     Route 50 which is the most heavily used bus route in the MATA system and
                     is designated as a key route in the draft Short Range Transit Plan. The route
                     operates every 15 minutes on its trunk portion and carries 2391 daily riders.
                     Other routes serve small portions of the corridor or intersect it. Fairly parallel
                     to the corridor are Routes 2 and 34; neither is a key route. Route 2 carries 742
                     daily riders and Route 34 carries 270 daily riders. Route 57 operates on Park
                     Avenue (and Quince Road) which parallel Poplar Avenue at the outskirts of
                     Memphis just west of Germantown. Route 57 carries 1,464 daily riders,
                     however many of those riders use the route farther west where Park Avenue
                     is farther from Poplar Avenue.
                     Population and Employment Density – Poplar Avenue is one of the most
                     heavily developed corridors in the Memphis region. It exhibits considerable
                     dwelling density and employment density and hosts many activity centers.
                     Among the activity centers along the corridor beyond the CBD and Medical
                     District are: University of Memphis, Clark Tower employment center, East
                     Memphis Poplar office complex, Chickasaw Oaks Plaza, Central Library,
                     Poplar Plaza/Highland Retail District, Oak Court Mall, Eastgate Shopping
                     Center, Laurelwood Shopping Center, Village Shops at Forest Hill, Park Place
                     Mall, Carrefour at Kirby Woods, St. Francis Hospital, LeBonheur East
                     Hospital, Methodist LeBonheur Germantown Hospital, Germantown
                     Performing Arts Center, the Germantown Village Square/Shops at Seattle
                     Creek suburban activity center and the Collierville suburban activity center.
                     Transit Propensity - The Poplar Avenue corridor does not exhibit the
                     demographic characteristics traditionally associated with high transit use.
                     The Short Range Plan market analysis of 2010 conditions identified a lower
                     transit propensity beyond the University District (and the Medical District
                     and CBD).
                     Travel Patterns - The travel pattern analysis of 2010 data conducted as part of
                     the Short Range Plan market analysis did identify large district-to-district
                     volumes of trips along the Poplar Avenue corridor including home-based


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                       work trips. The 2040 travel pattern analysis also illustrates very large total
                       trip flows between East Memphis and Shelby Farms/Germantown districts.
                       Transit trip volumes in 2040 from East Memphis and University to the CBD,
                       most likely in the Poplar corridor, are significant; this demonstrates this
                       corridor’s potential for high capacity transit service in the future.
                       Potential Concepts - A high capacity transit service with more attractive
                       service characteristics might be able to attract a share of travelers who have
                       automobile alternatives to transit and combined with an already high transit
                       ridership might generate sufficient trip making to support the service.
                       Candidate improvements could include a Bus Rapid Transit service either
                       along the arterial or along the right of way of the Norfolk Southern Railroad
                       that roughly parallels Poplar Avenue (it runs along Poplar Avenue from
                       South Perkins Road to White Station Road and then along Park Avenue and
                       Poplar Pike to Germantown and on to Collierville (via Commander Smith
                       Road, Poplar Pike and Poplar Avenue). The original Southeast Corridor was
                       designed to follow the Norfolk Southern Railroad ROW to Collierville. If
                       demand was sufficient and if exclusive right-of-way permitted, light rail
                       might also be an option possibly branching off the Madison Streetcar
                       alignment.

                  Lamar (Dowtown-Airport) Corridor
                  The Airport Downtown Corridor that emerged from Phase 2 of the Regional Rail
                  Study was envisioned as the first phase of a Southeast Corridor transit service
                  and an extension of the current Madison Avenue Streetcar Line. The selected
                  alignment used Pauline Street, Lamar Avenue and Airways Boulevard to extend
                  from Madison Avenue to an Airport North Station near Winchester (the site of
                  the new Airways Transit Center). It was envisioned that the line would
                  ultimately be extended to the east along Winchester Avenue. The line could
                  conceivably be extended south from Airways Transit Center to DeSoto County.
                       Existing Transit Routes and Riders - Currently this corridor is served by
                       several MATA bus routes including the 2, 4, 7, 17, 32, and 36. Some of these
                       routes extend beyond the basic corridor to serve other areas. Each route is
                       described below.
                       –      Route 2 operates between downtown Memphis and the airport via
                              Adams Avenue, Madison Avenue, Cooper Street, and Airways
                              Boulevard. The route has a second branch that operates from Madison
                              Avenue to the east along Central Avenue serving the University and Oak
                              Court Mall in the Poplar Corridor. Route 2 carries 742 riders, however
                              less than half these riders appear to use the buses serving the airport
                              branch.
                       –      Route 4 serves the airport and Memphis Business Park just northwest of
                              the airport, but connects to the CBD via other streets and neighborhoods
                              south and west of the Lamar corridor. Route 4 carries 1,184 daily riders.



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                     –    Route 7 operates along Lamar Avenue from the CBD to the Airport
                          Industrial Area east of the airport and to Shelby Drive. It carries 271
                          riders.
                     –    Route 17 operates a short segment on Airways Boulevard and operates on
                          other streets roughly parallel to Lamar Avenue to access the CBD. It
                          operates to the American Way Transit Center northeast of the airport.
                          The route carries 477 riders.
                     –    Route 32 is a cross-town route that serves the airport and Airways
                          Boulevard but does not enter the CBD. Instead it heads north on
                          Hollywood Street. The route carries 759 riders.
                     Other routes also operate along Lamar Avenue including Route 57 to Park
                     Avenue east of the corridor, Route 56 to American Way Transit Center
                     northeast of the Airport, and Route 36 which operates on Lamar Avenue to
                     American Way Transit Center northeast of the Airport and continues east on
                     Winchester Avenue. Route 30 is a cross-town route that operates from
                     Nonconnah Corporate Center just west of Airways Boulevard to the Fedex
                     Hub and American Way Transit Center before heading north.
                     Population and Employment Density – The heavy concentration of
                     employment at and near the Airport as well as the dwelling density and
                     transit propensity in the Airport – Downtown Corridor was the reason this
                     corridor was identified in prior long range plans as the priority corridor.
                     Travel Patterns – Largest total home to work flows in 2040 are between the
                     CBD and Midtown/Depot and from Midtown Depot and Hickory Hill. The
                     Airport district has its largest flows with Hickory Hill as well as with other
                     adjacent areas. The 2040 transit trip volumes support the selection of the
                     Downtown-Airport Corridor alignment as a priority corridor since
                     considerable transit trips are projected between the CBD, Midtown/Depot
                     and Airport districts.
                     Potential Concepts - The recent Downtown-Airport Alternatives Analysis
                     had identified the preferred alignment and mode to be light rail. If a light rail
                     system were to be implemented in the corridor, an important component of
                     the overall plan is a feeder bus network that will connect the origins and
                     destinations of riders to the rail stations. These locations would include a
                     wide range of employment centers and residential areas.
                     The corridor would have potential for expansion both to the south in the I-55
                     corridor to DeSoto County, Mississippi as well as to the east. An eastern
                     extension could be developed along Winchester Road from the end of the
                     first segment or as a branch of the Airport line from farther north along the
                     alignment assuming the service were expanded to have branches extending
                     both south and east. A western extension into Southwest Memphis would
                     also be an option that would connect that area to jobs near the airport; this
                     would likely however offer a more circuitous and slower route to downtown



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                       than existing bus routes offer. Alternatively, cross-town (east-west) bus
                       service could connect Southwest Memphis with the Southeast Corridor.
                       It should be noted that the recent MDOT I-69 Alternatives Analysis selected a
                       preferred alternative for a corridor linking DeSoto County with downtown
                       Memphis. Three technologies were evaluated – Commuter rail, light rail, and
                       Bus Rapid Transit. Four alignment alternatives were evaluated and one of
                       them was an extension of the Airport Corridor on Airways Boulevard. The
                       selected technology is Bus Rapid Transit. The proposed LPA concept does
                       not connect with the Airport corridor and uses the median of the I-55 (I-69)
                       and I-240 interstate highways directly from Mississippi to downtown
                       Memphis (essentially the South Corridor eastern alignment).
                       Given the arterial alignment that has been proposed in the Downtown-
                       Airport Alternatives Analysis, bus rapid transit modes could be
                       reconsidered. One advantage of bus rapid transit could include the potential
                       for some service currently operating along Lamar Avenue to the American
                       Ways Transit Center and points east of the Airport to be integrated into the
                       corridor so as to offer a one-seat ride.
                       The Southeast Corridor has been broadly defined as including areas east of
                       the Airport. The preferred alignment in the Regional Rail Alternatives
                       Analysis serves the areas west of the airport fairly close to the eastern
                       alignment (Elvis Presley) of the South Corridor. If the South Corridor were
                       viewed as a separate project of high priority and the eastern alignment were
                       preferred, the Lamar/Airport Corridor alignment could be reconfigured to
                       serve the Fedex Hub and American Way Transit Center northeast of the
                       Airport rather than the Airways Transit Center. Presumably, the western
                       alignment of the South Corridor and the Lamar Airport Corridor would be
                       too proximate to both proceed as high priority projects.

                  Northeast Corridor
                  This corridor emanates from the Memphis CBD roughly along Jackson Avenue
                  (CR 14), North Parkway (US 64), Summer Avenue (US 70 & US79), Sam Cooper
                  Boulevard and I-40 to Bartlett, Lakeland and Arlington.
                       Existing Transit Routes and Riders - Currently, transit service along the
                       southern edge of this corridor includes MATA Route 53 along North
                       Parkway/Summer Avenue which operates every 20 minutes in the peak
                       period and carries 1,210 daily riders. This bus route serves a number of
                       activity centers including the Memphis Zoo, Rhodes College, Summer
                       Shopping Center, Perimeter Mall, Sycamore Center Mall, New Moon Plaza,
                       Shelby Crossing Shopping Center, Southwest Tennessee Community College,
                       Shelby County Hospital, and Shelby County Correctors Center.
                       The northern edge of this corridor is served by MATA Route 52 along
                       Jackson Avenue. This route, which is designated as a key route in the Draft
                       Short Range Plan, operates every 15 minutes in the peak period and carries


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                     1,537 daily riders. This bus route serves several activity centers including
                     Memphis Works (employment agency) inside the I-40 perimeter highway
                     and Methodist Hospital North, Raleigh Springs Mall and Luther Terrace
                     Apartments outside the I-40 perimeter highway.
                     MATA Route 19 operates in a northeasterly direction serving the area just
                     north of Jackson Avenue and branches north and east. The east branch serves
                     the corridor ending at Summer Avenue while the north branch could be
                     considered a north corridor route. Route 19 is designated as a key route in the
                     draft Short Range Plan; it operates every 20 minutes on the trunk in the peak
                     period and carries only 809 riders on both branches combined.
                     Wolfchase is a large regional retail center located at the intersection of US 64,
                     I-40 and Germantown Parkway and has several individual activity centers
                     including Wolfchase Galleria, The Commons at Wolfchase and St. Francis
                     Hospital. This location is served by MATA Route 82 from Germantown and
                     MATA Route 40 and 40L on Stage Road, which connect to the CBD. The 40
                     and 40L operate east-west to North Hollywood Street. Route 40 serves the
                     inner part of Jackson Avenue. Route 40L is a limited stop express route which
                     enters the interstate highway at North Hollywood Street and enters the
                     central area from the north.
                     Other routes intersect the corridor such as Route 30, 32, and 35.
                     Population and Employment Density – This corridor exhibits moderate
                     dwelling density as far east as Bartlett in 2040. The corridor also exhibits
                     moderate employment density with a particular concentration at Wolfchase
                     in Bartlett.
                     Transit Propensity - The residential area between Jackson and Summer does
                     not show very high propensity for transit. The area contains more moderate
                     levels of people that exhibit the characteristics of transit dependents. The
                     highest transit propensity is found north of Jackson Avenue but these areas
                     have lower dwelling density but more employment density.
                     Travel Patterns – Total home-to-work travel desire lines in 2040 show a fairly
                     strong trip flow between the Raleigh-Bartlett District and the East Memphis
                     District, as well as with the Shelby Farms/Germantown District. Transit
                     travel desire lines in 2040 indicate moderate transit demand between Raleigh-
                     Bartlett and the CBD with light transit demand to East Memphis and Shelby
                     Farms. This indicates that although total volume of trips is significant to
                     these northeastern districts, the existing transit network does not capture a
                     substantial share of that demand; this is likely due in part to the fact that
                     existing MATA service is limited in those eastern parts of Shelby County and
                     in part due to low transit propensity. There may be opportunities to expand
                     transit service in the northeast corridor to attract new transit riders.
                     Potential Concepts - There may be opportunities to improve bus service
                     along this corridor, either on the current arterials or introducing a higher



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                       speed bus service to and from Wolfchase and the Shelby Crossing Area. Such
                       an express bus could use I-40 and Sam Cooper Boulevard but would need to
                       be afforded some priority at the I-40/I-240 interchange.
                       This corridor is also traversed by the railroad ROW located along Chelsea
                       Avenue and its Extension generally along the north edge of the corridor. The
                       location of the railroad ROW does not seem ideal for creating a transit
                       service.

                  North Corridor
                  The North Corridor, as defined in earlier studies, was largely focused around the
                  IC Railroad ROW which extends in a north-northeast direction from downtown
                  Memphis parallel to US 51 and extending to Millington in northern Shelby
                  County. The corridor boundaries were drawn to encompass several existing bus
                  services and roadways.
                       Existing Transit Routes and Riders - Currently two routes, Routes 10 and 11,
                       serve this area (both designated as key routes in MATA’s draft Short Range
                       Transit Plan).
                       –      Route 11 travels north on Route 51 (Thomas Street) until it branches east
                              and west, with the east branch extending along Frayzer Boulevard and
                              then Frayser Raleigh Road to the Raleigh Springs Mall (within the city
                              limits) and the west branch extending northwest (outside the city limits).
                              Route 11 operates every 25 minutes in the peak on its trunk portion and
                              carries 1,178 daily riders.
                       –      Route 10 operates primarily on Watkins Street/North Watkins Road, an
                              arterial that is parallel to Thomas Street/US 51 but located east of I-40 in
                              the southern portion of the corridor. The route then branches. Route 10
                              operates every 30 minutes on the trunk portion and carries 1,157 daily
                              riders. Route 10 has the advantage of serving the Medical District en
                              route to the CBD. Other routes, such as Routes 8, 19, and 31, traverse the
                              southernmost portions of this corridor. A branch of Route 19 also serves
                              the northeast portion of this corridor to some extent.
                       Combined, these routes carry at least 2,500 daily riders. However, given the
                       distance between the two routes, it is unclear that a single high capacity
                       transit service could serve the combined market. Each route alone may not
                       support a high capacity service.
                       It might be possible to link the areas served by Route 10 in Frayser to a high
                       capacity transit service via US 51 and rely on other routes to serve Watkins
                       Street south of I-40. However, this would eliminate direct service to the
                       Medical District. Alternatively, it may be possible to link the areas in the
                       north served by Route 11 to a high capacity service along Watkins. The IC
                       Railroad ROW tends to parallel US 51/Thomas Street and heads to the CBD
                       more parallel to the current Route 11.



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                     There is no current service to Millington which was viewed as the northern
                     end of the North Corridor.
                     Population and Employment Density - The North Corridor includes the
                     North Memphis and Frayser planning districts. North of Frayser the
                     population characteristics are less favorable to transit. Millington has some
                     pockets that are moderately favorable to transit including modest dwelling
                     and employment density and other demographic characteristics. There are
                     few major activity centers in the corridor. Among those present are several
                     shopping centers in the Frayser planning district - Northgate Shopping
                     Center and Frayser Plaza, Georgian Hills and Frayser Village.
                     Transit Propensity - Transit propensity is high in North Memphis and some
                     pockets in Frayser. The population has a high share of minority residents in
                     North Memphis and Frayser. There are pockets of low income and no vehicle
                     households in both North Memphis and Frayser.
                     Travel Patterns – 2010 data on total home-to-work travel patterns showed
                     significant volumes of trips (over 5,000 daily trips) from North Memphis to
                     the CBD. Frayser had less than 5,000 daily trips. The volumes of total trips to
                     and from Frayser seem modest. There are substantial flows between Raleigh
                     Bartlett and a number of adjacent districts including East Memphis and
                     Millington. Total travel flows to the CBD are more modest. On the other
                     hand, transit travel patterns in 2040 indicate substantial transit demand
                     between Frayser, North Memphis and the CBD. Taking into consideration
                     existing transit demand and the expected growth of population densities
                     farther north (e.g., in the Millington area and Tipton County), a potential
                     high capacity transit corridor to the North is considered.
                     Potential Concepts - Improvements to service in this corridor could include
                     enhanced bus corridors along the alignments of the existing trunk bus
                     corridors, a BRT or potentially a light rail (LRT) along the IC Railroad ROW,
                     or express bus service along I-40. Note that there is currently an express
                     version of Route 40 (40L) that operates express on I-40 from Austin Parkway
                     Highway (a location well to the east of the North Corridor). The current
                     ridership in the corridor would not support a high capacity service and there
                     would need to be significant attraction of new riders to create demand for
                     LRT or even BRT.


       5.2 SUBURBAN NON-RADIAL CORRIDORS
                 The 2040 home-based work trip desire lines indicate clearly that work trip flows
                 to suburban areas are very large. This was noted in the similar analysis of 2010
                 data performed in the Short Range Plan market analysis. As noted in that
                 document, the overall size of the market does not necessarily translate into
                 potential for transit for three reasons:




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                  1. The suburban districts are larger so that the larger number of trips is spread
                     over a larger area. This can be accounted for by looking at trip density rather
                     than trip volumes;
                  2. The demographics of the population in the suburban areas tend to favor
                     automobile transportation over transit so that very low transit mode shares
                     are attainable; and
                  3. The nature of the land use patterns are such that both employment and
                     residences are not highly concentrated and access to and from transit can be
                     very difficult.
                  Nevertheless, the growth of employment, shopping, and other activity centers as
                  well as residential development in suburban areas cannot be ignored by transit.
                  A component of the long range plan must address the suburban development to
                  provide reverse commute options for city residents and to offer alternatives to
                  suburban users with more travel choices.
                  Candidate travel patterns to address the potential corridor alignments are
                  identified below (see Figure 5.2) and each is discussed in more detail in the
                  following section:
                       Circumferential travel along the I-240 corridor in the south and east portions
                       of Shelby County;
                       Circumferential travel along the I-40 corridor in the central portion of Shelby
                       County; and
                       Intra-DeSoto County travel along the Goodman Road Corridor.




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                 Figure 5.2      Potential Suburban Non-Radial Transit Corridors




                 Source: Cambridge Systematics, Inc.

                 I-240 Circumferential Corridor
                 This corridor includes circumferential travel focused on Shelby
                 Farms/Germantown, Hickory Hill, East Memphis and Raleigh Bartlett and the
                 airport area along I-240. The corridor is made up of two component parts: 1) east-
                 west extending from South Memphis to the airport and Hickory Hill and 2)
                 north-south from Hickory Hill to East Memphis, Shelby Farms/Germantown
                 and Raleigh Bartlett.
                     Existing Transit Routes and Riders - There are MATA bus routes that
                     currently serve some of the circumferential travel. Route 30 operates from
                     Southwest Memphis to the airport area (serving both transit centers) and
                     then turns north on Perkins Road in East Memphis and continues north to
                     the Raleigh Springs Mall. This route which was not designated as a key route
                     in the Draft Short Range Plan operates every half hour in the peak period and
                     carries only 576 daily riders. Route 69 also begins in Southwest Memphis and
                     makes a circuitous route through the airport area (serving both transit
                     centers) and serves Hickory Hill and the Mount Moriah and Park Avenue
                     areas of East Memphis. It operates every 45 minutes in the peak period and
                     carries 880 daily riders. Route 50 has branches from East Memphis to Hickory
                     Hill and Germantown but does not link the latter two directly. Route 82 links


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                       Germantown and Wolfchase operating along Germantown Parkway. It
                       operates infrequently and carries very few riders.
                       Population and Employment Density - Dwelling density is substantial in the
                       Southeast Corridor between US 78 and US 72, both inside and outside of I-
                       240. Employment density is high along I-240 from I-55 on the west to the US
                       70/I-40 area. The relatively considerable employment density extends
                       outside of I-240 along major corridors such as US 72, US 78, I-40 and US 70 in
                       the east as well as along I-55 and US 51 in the south. In addition, high density
                       exists within the I-240 beltway in East Memphis, largely along the Poplar
                       Avenue (US 72) corridor.
                       Transit Propensity - Based on the Short Range Plan Market Analysis,
                       propensity to transit is highest in the South Corridor (in Southwest Memphis
                       and in the Airport and Midtown and Depot Districts). The eastern part of the
                       corridor (north-south leg) shows lower transit propensity.
                       Travel Patterns - The 2040 total home-to-work trip desire lines show high
                       travel volumes between Raleigh Bartlett and Shelby Farms/Germantown,
                       between Shelby Farms/Germantown and Hickory Hill, between East
                       Memphis and Shelby Farms/Germantown, and between Hickory Hill and
                       East Memphis. There are also fairly high total and transit travel volumes
                       between the Airport and Hickory Hill.
                       Potential Concepts - Given the current low transit ridership, this corridor
                       may have limited potential as a high capacity transit corridor but may have
                       opportunities for some service improvements. Options may include:
                       –      An express I-240 Connector from South Memphis to Airways to
                              American Way to Park Place St. Francis to either Perimeter/Shelby
                              Crossing or Germantown;
                       –      A Brooks-Winchester limited stop route from South Memphis to Airways
                              to American Way AND another American Way to Park Place/St. Francis
                              to either Perimeter/Shelby Crossing or Germantown; or
                       –      A continuous Winchester Road local bus route.

                  I-40 Circumferential Corridor
                  This corridor includes circumferential travel focused on connecting North
                  Memphis, Frayser, East Memphis, Raleigh Bartlett and Shelby Farms along I-40.
                       Existing Transit Routes and Riders - There are currently bus routes
                       operating in Frayser and Raleigh Bartlett. The only route on Stage Road (US
                       64) in Raleigh is the 40 (40L). Route 40 operates infrequently (less than every
                       hour) in the peak period and carries 654 passengers.
                       The highly populated areas in Frayser are served by MATA Routes 10 and 11
                       which connect to downtown Memphis. One branch of Route 11 operates east-
                       west along Frayser Boulevard and makes connections with several other


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                     routes at the Raleigh Springs Mall, including Route 30 to East Memphis and
                     the Airport area and serving employment along Covington Road.
                     Population and Employment Density - This corridor is based on the
                     dwelling and employment density along the corridor rather than identified
                     high inter-district travel patterns. Dwelling density is notable in the North
                     Memphis/Frayser districts and the Raleigh Bartlett district north of I-40.
                     Employment density is high along US 64 (Stage Road) and north of I-40 in the
                     Raleigh Bartlett district.
                     Travel Patterns - The inter-district travel patterns in the model in 2040 do not
                     indicate a high total travel volume between Frayser and Raleigh Bartlett.
                     Transit travel patterns in 2040 indicate some transit demand between
                     Raleigh-Bartlett and the Memphis CBD.
                     Transit Propensity - Some pockets of moderate to high transit propensity are
                     evident in the western part of the corridor.
                     Potential Concepts - This corridor may have potential for improved bus
                     service but does not have sufficient indication of travel demand to be
                     considered a potential high capacity corridor.

                 DeSoto – Goodman Corridor
                 This corridor focuses on the intra-county travel in DeSoto County along the
                 Goodman Road Corridor.
                     Population and Employment Density - This corridor is based on the high
                     2040 travel volume desire lines between the West and East DeSoto districts
                     and the density of employment and dwellings along Goodman Road.
                     Goodman Road appears to be a major concentration of activity along an east-
                     west axis in northern DeSoto County near the state line. It is bisected by the I-
                     55/I-69 corridor (identified as part of the radial South Corridor). The highest
                     density of both dwellings and employment appears to be concentrated at the
                     intersection of the east-west Goodman Road corridor and the north-south I-
                     55/I-69 corridor. Since DeSoto County and the State of Mississippi do not
                     financially support MATA, MATA does not operate bus service currently in
                     this area.
                     Potential Concepts - An east-west transit service could serve both local
                     travel, as well as serve as a feeder and distributor to a north-south corridor
                     radial transit line. The distributor function of an east-west transit service
                     would be particularly important to providing reverse commuter services
                     from Memphis. Either fixed route local bus or flexible bus might be
                     applicable. While a north-south corridor in this area may be a candidate for
                     high capacity transit (as part of the radial South Corridor to Memphis and the
                     Airport), the east-west corridor is unlikely to generate the transit demand
                     needed to be a candidate for high capacity transit.




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                       The MDOT I-69 Corridor Alternative Analysis Study examined transit
                       alternatives in DeSoto County. An east-west feeder bus transit service along
                       Goodman Road was suggested as part of that start-up phase for a bus rapid
                       transit service in the north-south corridor.


        5.3 SUMMARY OF POTENTIAL HIGH CAPACITY
            TRANSIT CORRIDORS AND PRELIMINARY TRANSIT
            CONCEPTS
                  A review of prior planning, the current short range planning analysis and data
                  analysis conducted as part of this long range plan has been conducted to identify
                  candidate corridors for high capacity transit for 2040, which are summarized
                  below. The analysis confirmed that the best candidate corridors for high capacity
                  transit are radial corridors that have been the subject of prior long range
                  planning. It is important to note that each of these radial corridors will require an
                  effective feeder or distributor bus service particularly for reverse commuters to
                  access locations beyond the potential immediate station areas. There will be a
                  need for park-and-ride lots at major hubs along the corridors as well to serve
                  inbound travelers.
                  Below is a summary of the high capacity transit corridors recommended for
                  inclusion in the Memphis Urban Area 2040 LRTP and some preliminary transit
                  concepts developed for each. These transit concepts will be described in greater
                  detail in a subsequent technical memorandum (Task 7) to be included for
                  evaluation as part of the alternatives analysis process within the 2040 LRTP.

                  Radial Corridors

                  Southeast Corridors
                  The Southeast corridors exhibit strong indicators of need and opportunity for
                  high capacity transit. These indicators include population density, employment
                  density, activity centers, large travel flows, high transit ridership, and subareas
                  with moderate to high transit propensity. The Southeast corridor really consists
                  of two corridors – Lamar (Airport) and Poplar. As these corridors diverge as they
                  leave the CBD, they are really distinct. Both corridors have strong indicators.
                  Some preliminary transit concepts developed are summarized below:
                       Lamar (Downtown-Airport) Corridor - Prior planning has identified the
                       Lamar (Airport) corridor as the highest priority corridor based on the large
                       employment centers surrounding the airport. The Airport Corridor was
                       identified as the first phase of a longer Southeast Corridor, as an extension to
                       the Madison Streetcar. Although both light rail and BRT have been studied,
                       prior planning established light rail as the preferred technology for this
                       corridor. The preferred alignment is along an arterial.



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                     Poplar Corridor - The Poplar Corridor may also have light rail or BRT
                     potential. There is a freight railroad parallel to Poplar Avenue. Similar to the
                     Lamar corridor, it could also be an extension to the Madison Streetcar. The
                     Poplar Corridor can serve East Memphis and Germantown, which are areas
                     with many activity centers, even if exhibiting less propensity for transit in the
                     population demographics.

                 South Corridor
                 The South Corridor serves lower income areas in Southwest Memphis that
                 exhibit high transit propensity. The corridor does not have high employment
                 concentrations within Shelby County except along some section of I-55. Some
                 preliminary transit concepts developed are summarized below:
                     There are potential alignments on the eastern (Third Street) and western
                     (Elvis Presley Boulevard or I-55) side of this corridor. Both have high transit
                     ridership.
                     There is likely some market overlap between the western alignment of the
                     South Corridor and the Southeast Lamar/Airport Corridor.
                     Either corridor could extend into DeSoto County which is a growing
                     suburban area with both employment and residential concentrations.
                     The MDOT I-69 Corridor Alternatives Analysis identified a locally preferred
                     alternative linking DeSoto County with downtown Memphis – BRT via an
                     alignment along the median of I-55 (I-69) and I-240; this is essentially the
                     western alignment.
                     There is also a freight railroad in the corridor (the MDOT study considered
                     for commuter rail as well as light rail alternatives), which could be
                     considered as a potential alignment.

                 North Corridor
                 The North Corridor has somewhat weaker indicators of transit demand. There
                 are few concentrations of employment or activity centers although there is
                 residential density and some areas with high propensity to use transit. Some
                 preliminary transit concepts developed are summarized below:
                     Improvements in the North Corridor could conceivably range from express
                     bus to BRT to light rail although the relatively weaker demand is less likely
                     to support rail modes.
                     There are freight railroads along the corridor, which could be considered as
                     potential alignments, but they tend to be at the outskirts of the denser urban
                     concentrations.




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                  Northeast Corridor
                  The Northeast Corridor has not been a focus of the earlier long range plan. The
                  focus narrowed to North, South and Southeast corridors as far back as 1997.
                  Travel volumes in this area do not indicate very strong travel flows to downtown
                  Memphis but there are bus routes carrying a substantial number of riders. There
                  are employment concentrations and activity centers at the outer end of the
                  corridor (east of I-240). Some preliminary transit concepts developed are
                  summarized below:
                       There may be potential bus-based improvement opportunities ranging from
                       express bus to BRT.
                       There is a freight railroad along the corridor, which could be considered as a
                       potential alignment, but it is not ideally located in relation to existing
                       residential concentrations.

                  Non-Radial Corridors
                  Beyond the radial corridors, there are other key travel patterns creating
                  opportunities for transit. These include three primary non-radial corridors,
                  described below. These non-radial corridors would also require an effective bus
                  feeder system to link stations or transit centers to off-route origins and
                  destinations, particularly for the circumferential corridors proposed.

                  Circumferential I-240 Corridor
                  This corridor includes circumferential travel focused on Shelby
                  Farms/Germantown, Hickory Hill, East Memphis and Raleigh Bartlett and the
                  Airport area. It is made up of two component parts: 1) east-west extending from
                  South Memphis to the Airport and Hickory Hill and 2) north-south from Hickory
                  Hill to East Memphis, Shelby Farms/Germantown and Raleigh Bartlett. While
                  this corridor shows large travel flows and concentrations of population and
                  employment, the transit propensity of the population is relatively low and
                  current bus routes are not highly utilized. Suburban development patterns also
                  are not very transit-friendly. These factors likely limit the potential for high
                  capacity transit. Some preliminary transit concepts developed are summarized
                  below:
                       Opportunities in this corridor are likely to include express and limited stop
                       bus routes or more local bus routes.
                       Routes could utilize interstate roads or parallel arterials.

                  Circumferential I-40
                  While there were not high inter-district travel flows in this corridor, the dwelling
                  and employment density along the corridor was fairly high. Some pockets of
                  moderate to high transit propensity are evident in the western part of the
                  corridor. There is some limited bus service in the corridor with moderate


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                 ridership. This corridor may have potential for improved bus service but does
                 not have sufficient indication of travel demand to be considered a potentially
                 high capacity corridor.

                 DeSoto - Goodman Corridor
                 This corridor is based on the high 2040 travel volume desire lines between the
                 West and East DeSoto districts and the density of employment and dwellings
                 along Goodman Road, which appears to be a major concentration of activity
                 along an east west axis in northern DeSoto County near the state line. Some
                 preliminary transit concepts being considered are summarized below:
                     The MDOT I-69 Corridor Alternative Analysis Study examined transit
                     alternatives in DeSoto County. An east-west feeder bus transit service along
                     Goodman Road was suggested as part of that start-up phase for a bus rapid
                     transit service in the north-south corridor. An east-west transit service could
                     serve both local travel, as well as serve as a feeder and distributor to a north-
                     south corridor radial transit line. The distributor function of an east-west
                     transit service would be particularly important to providing reverse
                     commuter services from Memphis. Either fixed route local bus or flexible bus
                     might be applicable.
                     While a north-south corridor in this area may be a candidate for high
                     capacity transit (as part of the radial South Corridor to Memphis and the
                     Airport), the east-west corridor is unlikely to generate the transit demand
                     needed to be a candidate for high capacity transit.

                 Conclusion
                 It is important to bear in mind that whether these potential corridors can actually
                 support high capacity transit is dependent on an evaluation of ridership using
                 the MPO regional travel demand model and also considering estimates of costs.
                 Some candidate corridors may prove to lack sufficient demand to support high
                 capacity transit modes in 2040. However, land use policies to encourage
                 increased population and employment density along the corridors (and focused
                 on station areas) would enhance the ability of these corridors to support high
                 capacity transit and would likely be an important component of a high capacity
                 transit plan.
                 A subsequent technical memorandum (developed as a product of Task 7) will
                 fully describe the basic transit concepts for each of the corridors analyzed above
                 including:
                     Corridor endpoints;
                     Likely range of modes;
                     Supporting facilities;
                     Frequency of service;



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                       Likely order of magnitude capital and operating costs;
                       Potential markets and ridership; and
                       Compatibility with other LRTP improvements or goals.




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report


Memphis Long Range
Transportation Plan

Freight Section




prepared for

Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc and Memphis MPO



prepared by

Cambridge Systematics, Inc.
730 Peachtree Street, NE, Suite 1050
Atlanta, GA 30308



date

October 2011




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Table of Contents
                  1.0    Introduction ..................................................................................................... 1-1

                  2.0    Regional Freight Demand.............................................................................. 2-3
                         2.1     Freight Flows By Mode And Direction ................................................. 2-3
                         2.2     Memphis Freight Trading Partners ....................................................... 2-3
                         2.3     Major Commodities in Memphis Region .............................................. 2-5

                  3.0    Freight Facilities and Flows ........................................................................... 3-9
                         3.1     Highways................................................................................................. 3-9
                                 Truck Commodity Flows........................................................................ 3-9
                                 Highway Facilities ................................................................................ 3-10
                         3.2     Highway Safety ..................................................................................... 3-16
                         3.1     Planned Improvements ........................................................................ 3-20
                         3.2     Rail ......................................................................................................... 3-21
                                 Rail Commodity Flows ......................................................................... 3-22
                                 Rail Facilities.......................................................................................... 3-24
                                     Intermodal Facilities ......................................................................... 3-24
                                 Improvements to Freight Rail Infrastructure...................................... 3-25
                         3.3     Ports ....................................................................................................... 3-27
                                 Port of Memphis/Water Freight Flows ............................................... 3-27
                                 Port/Water Facilities ............................................................................ 3-27
                                 Improvements to Port Infrastructure .................................................. 3-30
                         3.4     Airports.................................................................................................. 3-31
                                 Air Cargo Facilities ............................................................................... 3-31
                                 Memphis Airport/Air Commodity Flows .......................................... 3-33
                                 Improvements to Air Cargo Infrastructure......................................... 3-35

                  4.0    Forecast Flows ................................................................................................. 4-1
                                 Direction .................................................................................................. 4-1
                                 Mode ........................................................................................................ 4-2
                                 Trading Partners ..................................................................................... 4-3
                                 Commodities ........................................................................................... 4-3

                  5.0    Outreach to Private Sector ............................................................................. 5-2

                  6.0    Priority Freight Projects ................................................................................. 6-1




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List of Tables
                  Table 2.1    Inbound and Outbound Freight Tonnage by Mode 2007.................. 2-3
                  Table 2.2    Aggregation of Census Divisions for Regional Trading Partners .... 2-4
                  Table 2.3    Commodities by Mode in Memphis (Inbound and Outbound
                               Flows Combined) 2007 Tons ................................................................ 2-6
                  Table 3.1    Top Commodities for Truck Traffic in 2007 Tons............................. 3-10
                  Table 3.2    Top 15 Interstate Highway Truck Bottlenecks 2010......................... 3-15
                  Table 3.3    Top 15 Non-Interstate Highway Truck Bottlenecks 2010 and
                               2040 ...................................................................................................... 3-15
                  Table 3.4    Top 15 Highest Truck Crash Locations............................................. 3-16
                  Table 3.5    Top 15 Highest Crash Rate Locations, Sorted by Crashes per
                               Mile ...................................................................................................... 3-17
                  Table 3.6    Top 10 States for Bulk Rail Shipments Inbound and Outbound ........ 3-23
                  Table 3.7    Top 10 States for Intermodal Rail Shipments Inbound and
                               Outbound.............................................................................................. 3-23
                  Table 3.8    Inbound and Outbound Rail Commodities 2007 and 2035.............. 3-24
                  Table 3.9    Memphis Area Rail Yards .................................................................. 3-25
                  Table 3.10 Access Needs of Rail Intermodal Yards in Tennessee ..................... 3-26
                  Table 3.11 Pidgeon Industrial Park Access Improvements ............................... 3-31
                  Table 3.12 Air Commodities and Growth 2007 and 2035................................... 3-34
                  Table 4.1    Increase in Inbound and Outbound Freight Tonnage by Mode
                               2007 and 2035......................................................................................... 4-2
                  Table 4.2    Inbound and Outbound Rail Commodities 2007 and 2035................ 4-5
                  Table 4.3    Inbound and Outbound Water Commodities 2007 and 2035 ............ 4-6
                  Table 4.4    Inbound and Outbound Air Commodities 2007 and 2035 ................. 4-6
                  Table 4.5    Top 15 Interstate Highway Truck Bottlenecks 2010 and 2040 ........... 4-7
                  Table 4.6    Top 15 Non-Interstate Highway Truck Bottlenecks 2010 and
                               2040 ........................................................................................................ 4-8
                  Table 6.1    Freight Projects Highlighted by Tennessee Statewide Freight
                               Plan ........................................................................................................ 6-1




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                    Table 6.2   Other Freight Beneficial Projects by Mode for the Memphis
                                Region.................................................................................................... 6-2
                    Table 6.3   Freight Projects Highlighted by Tennessee Statewide Freight
                                Plan and Memphis Infrastructure Plan............................................... 6-3




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List of Figures
                  Figure 1.1 Regional Freight Transportation System ............................................ 1-2
                  Figure 2.1 Trading Partners by Mode 2007 .......................................................... 2-4
                  Figure 3.1 Major Truck Corridors, Tennessee Statewide Model Truck
                             Counts 2008 ......................................................................................... 3-12
                  Figure 3.2 Top 15 Major Truck Bottlenecks in the Memphis Region 2010 ....... 3-13
                  Figure 3.3 Top 15 Major Truck (Non-Interstate Highway) Bottlenecks in
                             the Memphis Region .......................................................................... 3-14
                  Figure 3.4 Truck Crash Locations in the Memphis Region ............................... 3-18
                  Figure 3.5 Facilities with the Highest Incidence of Truck Crashes (i.e.,
                             Annual Crashes per Road Mile) ........................................................ 3-19
                  Figure 3.6 Rail Facilities in the Memphis Region............................................... 3-22
                  Figure 3.7 Commodity Distribution at the Port of Memphis, 2008 .................. 3-27
                  Figure 3.8 Major Water Transportation Facilities .............................................. 3-28
                  Figure 3.9 President’s Island Area ...................................................................... 3-29
                  Figure 3.10 Pidgeon Industrial Park Area ............................................................ 3-30
                  Figure 3.11 Airport Facilities in the Memphis Area ............................................ 3-33
                  Figure 4.1 Memphis Inbound and Outbound Freight Tonnage 2007 and
                             2035 ........................................................................................................ 4-1
                  Figure 4.2 Total Tonnage by Mode 2035............................................................... 4-2
                  Figure 4.3 Top 10 Trading Partners (State and Region) 2007 and 2035............... 4-3
                  Figure 4.4 Top 15 Major Truck Bottlenecks in the Memphis Region 2040 ......... 4-9
                  Figure 4.5 Top 15 Major Truck (Non-Interstate Highway) Bottlenecks in
                             the Memphis Region 2040 .................................................................. 4-10




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    1.0 Introduction
                  Memphis is a crossroads for freight transportation. It is a major air, rail, water
                  and truck hub and a significant warehousing and distribution sector. Figure 1.1
                  shows the primary features of the Memphis freight infrastructure system.
                  This report has been developed to support the Memphis metropolitan planning
                  organization (MPO) 2040 long range transportation plan (LRTP). This report
                  describes the movement of goods across the Memphis region, the facilities that
                  accommodate this goods movement, the operating condition of the Memphis
                  freight infrastructure, and potential projects to consider supporting the
                  movement of goods in the future.
                  Several recent and ongoing planning efforts have helped inform this report.
                  These studies include:
                       Memphis Chamber of Commerce Memphis Regional Freight Infrastructure
                       Plan;
                       Tennessee DOT Lamar Avenue Corridor Study;
                       Tennessee DOT Freight Infrastructure Intermodal Analysis Task; and
                       The Southern Gateway Environmental Impact Study.




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                 Figure 1.1           Regional Freight Transportation System




                 Source: National Transportation Atlas Database, 2011, Railroad web sites




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    2.0 Regional Freight Demand
                  This section describes the movement of freight across the Memphis region in
                  terms of modes, commodities, origin-destination patterns, and volume. The
                  primary source for this information is a 2007 Transearch freight flow database.
                  The database describes freight movement at the county level for the entire state
                  of Tennessee. It also includes a forecast of freight flows in 2035. The Transearch
                  analysis described in this chapter focuses exclusively on Shelby County. This
                  county is the generator of the majority of the freight traffic in the Memphis
                  region.


        2.1 FREIGHT FLOWS BY MODE AND DIRECTION
                  This analysis highlights the different freight transportation modes and
                  directionality of freight flows for each mode. Table 2.1 displays the inbound and
                  outbound tonnage by mode for Shelby County. The table demonstrates that over
                  80 percent of the freight flows in the region are either by truck or carload rail.

                  Table 2.1        Inbound and Outbound Freight Tonnage by Mode
                                   2007
                                                                                       Percent of
                   Mode               Inbound        Outbound            Total           Total
                   Truck               44,652,944      28,210,898        72,863,841            46%
                   Carload Rail        30,016,423      25,575,845        55,592,268            35%
                   Water               14,485,559       4,404,196        18,889,755            12%
                   IMX Rail             4,748,440       5,311,600        10,060,040             6%
                   Air                  1,070,009            872,411      1,942,420             1%
                   Total               94,973,376      64,374,949       159,348,325           100%

                  Source:     TRANSEARCH, 2007.


        2.2 MEMPHIS FREIGHT TRADING PARTNERS
                  Figure 2.1 shows the top trading partners for Shelby County. Georgia is the top
                  trading partner primarily due to shipments of coal that transload in the Memphis
                  region and are destined for coal-fired power plants throughout Georgia. The
                  “Rest of Tennessee”, which includes the entire state outside of Shelby County, is
                  a close second in terms of tonnage. The vast majority of the goods between
                  Shelby County and the Rest of Tennessee are shipped by truck. The vast




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                 majority of these flows utilize I-40 which makes that interstate a critical freight
                 corridor for the region.
                 Trade with the Mountain States is dominated by carload rail tonnage, mostly
                 coal from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. Trade with the Pacific states is
                 driven by intermodal rail tonnage from those states from the Ports of Los
                 Angeles and Long Beach, one of Memphis’ major gateways.1
                 Water tonnage to and from Kentucky and Illinois is composed largely of coal by
                 barge traveling inbound to the Memphis area. Freight flows to and from the
                 West S. Central region includes a large volume of inbound water tonnage, mostly
                 consisting of chemicals and petroleum products shipped by barge from the Port
                 of New Orleans.
                 Table 2.2 lists the specific states within the regions described in Figure 2.3. All
                 other states are in the “All Remaining” category.

                 Figure 2.1         Trading Partners by Mode
                                    2007
                     Millions of Tons
                     35
                     30
                     25
                     20
                     15
                     10
                      5
                      0




                                                  Truck      Air   Water   Carload    IMX


                 Source:      TRANSEARCH, 2007.

                 Table 2.2          Aggregation of Census Divisions for Regional Trading Partners
                     Region                                                Comprising States
                     West North Central                         Iowa                            Nebraska
                                                               Kansas                          North Dakota
                                                              Minnesota                        South Dakota



                 1   Memphis Regional Freight Infrastructure Plan.




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                                                                    Missouri
                   West South Central                              Arkansas                              Oklahoma
                                                                   Louisiana                              Texas
                   Mountain                                         Arizona                               Montana
                                                                   Colorado                                Utah
                                                                     Idaho                                Nevada
                                                                  New Mexico                              Wyoming
                   Pacific                                          Alaska                                Oregon
                                                                   California                            Washington
                                                                    Hawaii

                  Note:       State totals for all the states in Census Region 6 (E. South Central) plus Arkansas, Georgia,
                              Illinois, Indiana, North Carolina, Missouri, Ohio, and Virginia were aggregated from County
                              information in the TRANSEARCH database.


        2.3 MAJOR COMMODITIES IN MEMPHIS REGION
                  Table 2.3 shows the top commodities shipped in and out of the Memphis region
                  by freight mode. 27 percent of the total tonnage in and out of the Memphis
                  region is coal. As mentioned previously, much of this is traveling by rail
                  between the Powder River Basin and Georgia. 13 percent of the total tonnage is
                  called secondary traffic, all of which moves by truck. This category of goods
                  includes goods that move from warehouses and distribution centers along with
                  goods drayed to and from intermodal rail yards and ports. Food, chemical, and
                  farm products are the three other commodities with more than five percent of the
                  total tonnage in and out of the Memphis region. The truck mode moves most of
                  these goods.
                  Air freight handles generally specialty/expensive products or time-sensitive
                  products. Key commodities for air include mail and express traffic (such as those
                  shipped by FedEx), machinery, and chemicals. Water freight is dominated by
                  heavy bulk commodities such as coal, petroleum products, and waste.




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Table 2.3        Commodities by Mode in Memphis (Inbound and Outbound Flows Combined)
                 2007 Tons
                                                                                                                                       Percent of
Commodity Type                                  Truck       Air         Water          Carload (Rail)   IMX (Rail)         Total
                                                                                                                                         Total
Coal                                             138,713           0    6,220,600       35,885,858                   0   42,245,171            27%
Secondary Traffic                              21,136,900          0               0             0                   0   21,136,900            13%
Food or Kindred Products                        6,108,928    15,863      277,805         5,156,016         415,160       11,973,772             8%
Chemicals                                       5,736,925   187,154      756,515         3,845,464         250,440       10,776,497             7%
Farm Products                                   7,071,132    37,650      940,210         2,296,919          90,080       10,435,991             7%
Petroleum or Coal Products                      2,316,563         799   5,767,963          548,148          20,920        8,654,393             5%
Miscellaneous Mixed Shipments                           0   143,220                0         3,080       7,635,880        7,782,180             5%
Nonmetallic Minerals, except Fuels              5,966,637         119    522,371           958,759           4,880        7,452,766             5%
Clay, Concrete, Glass, or Stone Products        4,439,543     3,294      400,222         1,013,188          24,760        5,881,007             4%
Lumber or Wood Products                         3,524,676         288        894         1,809,720         206,320        5,541,898             3%
Transportation Equipment                        1,734,744   136,814       13,341         2,341,480          32,560        4,258,939             3%
Fabricated Metal Products                       2,912,783    34,006       76,411             6,000          53,360        3,082,560             2%
Waste or Scrap Materials                           5,067          12    2,570,369          395,012          33,240        3,003,699             2%
Pulp, Paper, or Allied Products                 2,131,953    34,433       96,289           542,732         174,360        2,979,768             2%
Primary Metal Products                          1,934,530     4,152      211,110           671,440          10,280        2,831,513             2%
Metallic Ores                                   1,393,837          0     899,629                 0             280        2,293,746             1%
Machinery – Other than Electrical               1,360,835   236,572       80,672            28,880          50,160        1,757,119             1%
Rubber or Miscellaneous Plastics Products       1,304,974    23,462        2,160             3,960         107,480        1,442,036             1%
Electrical Machinery, Equipment, or Supplies    1,215,212   127,088                2        14,160          44,560        1,401,021             1%
Mail and Express Traffic                                0   782,421                0             0          12,000         794,421           <0.5%
Printed Matter                                   630,259     66,337                0             0          26,120         722,716           <0.5%
Empty containers                                        0          0               0        51,960         569,200         621,160           <0.5%
Miscellaneous Manufacturing Products             541,556      9,319                0             0          17,440         568,316           <0.5%
Furniture or Fixtures                            489,765      1,417          321                 0          56,840         548,343           <0.5%




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                                                                                                                                           Percent of
Commodity Type                                 Truck          Air          Water         Carload (Rail)   IMX (Rail)          Total
                                                                                                                                             Total
Apparel                                         311,415        41,619         1,104                0         114,120          468,258           <0.5%
Textile Mill Products                           192,629         3,042          144                 0          21,240          217,055           <0.5%
Instruments – Photographic or Optical Goods     146,893        43,600                0             0          11,920          202,413           <0.5%
Leather or Leather Products                      85,133         2,312          100                 0             200           87,745           <0.5%
Miscellaneous Freight Shipments                   1,963             0       21,200            13,412          18,120           54,695           <0.5%
Freight Forwarder Traffic                               0           0                0             0          43,760           43,760           <0.5%
Fresh Fish or Other Marine Products                    128      7,386       29,530                 0           3,560           40,604           <0.5%
Ordnance                                         20,612             1                0             0                   0       20,613           <0.5%
Small Packages LTL                                      0           0                0             0           9,840             9,840          <0.5%
Tobacco Products                                  8,079             0          793                 0                   0         8,872          <0.5%
Crude Oil and Gasoline                            1,315             0                0         3,200                   0         4,515          <0.5%
Waste Hazardous Materials                               0           0                0         2,880             720             3,600          <0.5%
Shipper Association or Similar Traffic                  0           0                0             0             240              240           <0.5%
Hazardous Materials                                    74           39               0             0                   0          114           <0.5%
Forest Products                                        67           1                0             0                   0              68        <0.5%
Total                                         72,863,841     1,942,420   18,889,755       55,592,268      10,060,040       159,348,325           100%

Source: TRANSEARCH, 2007.




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    3.0 Freight Facilities and Flows
                  Five different types of freight transportation facilities in the Memphis area were
                  studied for this project:
                        1. Highways;
                        2. freight rail facilities;
                        3. Air freight facilities;
                        4. Ports, and
                        5. Intermodal facilities.
                  Based on an evaluation conducted for the Memphis Regional Freight
                  Infrastructure Plan by the Center for Intermodal Freight Studies at the University
                  of Memphis, the Memphis area currently has 840 miles of interstate and U.S.
                  designated highways, nine regional airports capable of supporting air cargo,
                  service by five Class I railroads, 99 distinct port terminals, 19 intermodal
                  terminals, 490 truck terminals, 956 warehouses, and 136 industrial parks.2 A large
                  proportion of the truck and rail intermodal terminals, warehouses, and air cargo
                  facilities are within a very short distance (i.e., within 5 miles) of an interstate
                  highway. The scope and scale of freight infrastructure in the region, with its
                  strong representation by so many different modes has few parallels throughout
                  the United States. This chapter highlights characteristics of each transportation
                  mode including a discussion of major facilities, more detail about specific
                  commodity trends on those facilities, and needed improvements to maximize the
                  efficiency of the freight transportation system in the region.


        3.1 HIGHWAYS
                  Truck Commodity Flows
                  According to the TRANSEARCH database, commodities shipped inbound and
                  outbound by truck to and from the Memphis region in 2007 included about 72
                  million tons of freight. This does not include internal freight or other local
                  deliveries. These are trucks traveling to and from the region from other Counties
                  in the South or other states in the United States. Commodities shipped by trucks
                  to and from the Memphis area in 2007 include a products ranging from farm or
                  food products, to consumer products and other miscellaneous shipments
                  classified in “secondary traffic,” which generally constitutes intermodal cargo


                  2   Memphis Infrastructure Plan, IHS Global Insight, 2010.




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                 that has been transloaded or passed through a warehouse or distribution facility.
                 Secondary traffic accounts for the single largest proportion of truck traffic
                 (almost 30 percent). Table 3.1 shows the existing and future expected growth

                 Table 3.1        Top Commodities for Truck Traffic in 2007
                                  Tons
                  Truck Commodity                                 2007 Tons    Percent of Total
                  Secondary Traffic                               21,136,900        29%
                  Farm Products                                    7,071,132        10%
                  Food or Kindred Products                         6,108,928          8%
                  Nonmetallic Minerals, except Fuels               5,966,637          8%
                  Chemicals                                        5,736,925          8%
                  Clay, Concrete, Glass, or Stone Products         4,439,543          6%
                  Lumber or Wood Products                          3,524,676          5%
                  Fabricated Metal Products                        2,912,783          4%
                  Petroleum or Coal Products                       2,316,563          3%
                  Pulp, Paper, or Allied Products                  2,131,953          3%
                  All Remaining                                   11,517,801        16%
                  Total                                           72,863,841       100%

                 Source:   TRANSEARCH, 2007.

                 Highway Facilities
                 Trucks are used on nearly all major highways in the Memphis area. Trucks play a
                 role not only in the distribution of local freight and deliveries but also as a cog in
                 the intermodal logistics of the Memphis region and the Southeast as a whole.
                 Trucking logistics centers (where intermodal transfers occur) are centered
                 around all the major freight “generators” in the Memphis area including the
                 Memphis International Airport, Port of Memphis, manufacturing, warehousing,
                 and distribution facilities, and rail yards.
                 Figure 3.1 highlights the highest truck volume corridors in the Memphis region.
                 These highest corridor segments are:
                           Interstate 40 just outside of I-240;
                           Interstate 55 close to the Mississippi; and
                           Interstate 240 on the south side of Memphis.
                 Each of these interstate segments have over 14,000 trucks per day. On the non-
                 interstate highway system, the highest volume corridors are:
                           Lamar Avenue (U.S. 78);



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                              Poplar Avenue (U.S. 72);
                              Holmes Road;
                              Plough Boulevard;
                              U.S. 51 near Millington in the northern part of Shelby County; and
                              SR 177 connecting I-40, Poplar Avenue, and E. Shelby Drive near the
                              airport
                  Each of these locations has over 7,000 trucks per day. There are also several
                  corridors with over 900 trucks per day as shown in Figure 3.1.
                  Figure 3.2 shows the volume to capacity (V/C) ratios for all the highways in the
                  region, developed for the Memphis Regional Transportation model.3 The base
                  year of the model is 2010 and is based on traffic counts collected throughout the
                  region. Also included are the Top 15 locations with the highest volumes of truck
                  traffic in the region.4 These constitute the Top 15 freight traffic bottlenecks in the
                  region. The daily traffic on these facilities shows segments on I-40, I-240, and I-55
                  that are currently experiencing deficient levels of service.5 Table 3.2 displays the
                  location of each of the bottlenecks and the corresponding V/C ratio and truck
                  volume.
                  In order to identify the non-interstate highway facilities that currently are
                  causing freight bottlenecks, Figure 3.3 shows the Top 15 highest truck volume
                  locations (for U.S. and state highways) and corresponding V/C ratios from the
                  traffic model. This shows that the non-interstate facilities with the highest truck
                  volumes in the region are on U.S. highways U.S. 78, U.S. 72, and U.S. 51.
                  Table 3.3 shows that these facilities also have very high V/C ratios and are
                  inhibiting the flow of truck traffic in the region. Although few of the routes have
                  a V/C exceeding 1.00, most are approaching the value, indicating high levels of
                  congestion.
                  In the forecast section (Section 4.0), the V/C ratios of the highway network and
                  corresponding maps are displayed for 2040.




                  3   Volume to capacity ratios are calculated by dividing the volume of a roadway by the
                      “capacity” of the roadway, which is the maximum number of vehicles that the roadway
                      is designed to accommodate. Roadways with a V/C ratio exceeding 1.00 typically
                      experience very congested conditions, including serious delays, stop and go traffic, and
                      average much lower than posted speeds.
                  4   Truck volumes are taken from the State of Tennessee’s 2008 Daily Truck Counts.
                  5   High volume to capacity ratios (>1.00) denote a facility where volume exceeds available
                      capacity.




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Figure 3.1      Major Truck Corridors, Tennessee Statewide Model Truck Counts
                2008




Source: Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008.



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Figure 3.2      Top 15 Major Truck Bottlenecks in the Memphis Region
                2010




Source: Memphis Regional Transportation Model, 2010, Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008.


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Figure 3.3      Top 15 Major Truck (Non-Interstate Highway) Bottlenecks in the Memphis Region




Source: Memphis Regional Transportation Model, 2010, Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008.



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                  Table 3.2           Top 15 Interstate Highway Truck Bottlenecks
                                      2010
                                                                            Truck AADT                      2010 V/C
                   Map ID                     Route                     (based on TN Counts)            (based on AADT)
                   1                        Interstate 40                      16,566                         0.72
                   2                       Interstate 240                      16,392                         0.83
                   3                        Interstate 40                      15,612                         0.78
                   4                        Interstate 40                      15,065                         0.88
                   5                        Interstate 40                      17,199                         0.75
                   6                        Interstate 40                      16,401                         0.86
                   7                        Interstate 40                      16,129                         1.03
                   8                        Interstate 40                      15,776                         0.95
                   9                        Interstate 40                      15,370                         0.65
                   10                       Interstate 40                      16,400                         0.47
                   11                       Interstate 40                      16,874                         0.40
                   12                       Interstate 55                      14,259                         0.85
                   13                       Interstate 55                      14,114                         0.62
                   14                       Interstate 55                      14,263                         0.75
                   15                       Interstate 55                      14,003                         0.74

                  Source:     Memphis Regional Transportation Model, 2010, Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008.

                  Table 3.3           Top 15 Non-Interstate Highway Truck Bottlenecks
                                      2010 and 2040
                                                                            Truck AADT                      2010 V/C
                   Map ID                     Route                     (based on TN Counts)            (based on AADT)
                   1                 U.S. 78 (Lamar Avenue)                    10,814                         0.92
                   2                 U.S. 78 (Lamar Avenue)                    10,709                         1.12
                   3                SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)                9,336                         0.86
                   4                SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)                9,270                         0.91
                   5                SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)                9,099                         0.91
                   6                SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)                9,064                         0.73
                   7                SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)                9,008                         0.64
                   8                SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)                8,963                         0.69
                   9                SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)                8,905                         0.74
                   10               SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)                8,897                         0.47
                   11               SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)                8,784                         0.72
                   12                U.S. 78 (Lamar Avenue)                     6,700                         0.86
                   13                U.S. 78 (Lamar Avenue)                     6,654                         0.82
                   14                U.S. 78 (Lamar Avenue)                     6,531                         0.75
                   15                SR 175 (Shelby Avenue)                     5,246                         0.82

                  Source: Memphis Regional Transportation Model, 2010, Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008.




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       3.2 HIGHWAY SAFETY
                 Tables 3.4 and 3.5 display locations in the Memphis area that have the highest
                 number of truck crashes and truck crashes per highway mile, respectively.
                 Figure 3.4 identifies the locations of all truck crashes categorized by number of
                 fatalities, injuries, or property damage only. The most serious crashes (i.e.,
                 fatalities or injuries) are concentrated on many of the smaller, but heavily truck-
                 trafficked corridors such as highways SR 4 (Crump Boulevard, Lamar Avenue6),
                 SR 177 (N. Germantown Parkway) and SR 204 (Covington Pike). Table 3.4 lists
                 the Top 15 locations in the Memphis area with the highest number of truck
                 influenced crashes.
                 Figure 3.5 displays truck crashes per highway mile. The locations with the
                 highest number of crashes per highway mile include: SR 177 (N. Germantown
                 Parkway), U.S. 64 (Union Avenue), U.S. 72/State Route 23 (Poplar Avenue), and
                 SR 175 (E Shelby Drive). The freeways generally have fewer crashes per mile
                 than the U.S. highways, and State Routes, however there are a higher number of
                 incidents per mile around freeway interchanges such as the I-240/U.S. 72 exit
                 near Germantown. Table 3.5 shows the Top 15 highway segments sorted by the
                 crashes per highway mile.

                 Table 3.4       Top 15 Highest Truck Crash Locations
                                                    Vehicle   Truck    Truck Percent on        Number
                     Route    From Mile   To Mile    AADT     AADT         Highway        of Truck Crashes
                     SR 177      5.8        7.3      60,870   2,435           4%                29
                     SR 177      7.3      10.1       46,410   2,321           5%                28
                     SR 57       4.7        7.0      36,200   1,448           4%                18
                     SR 15       1.6        5.1      31,660     317           1%                17
                     SR 4        5.3        7.4      33,270   6,654          20%                16
                     SR 177      3.0        5.8      57,010   2,280           4%                16
                     SR 23       0.0        1.2      30,790     924           3%                15
                     SR 204      0.0        1.8      40,590   1,624           4%                15
                     SR 57       1.9        4.7      27,830   1,392           5%                15
                     I-240      13.3      15.6      159,800   9,588           6%                14
                     SR 175      4.8        6.1      27,470   1,099           4%                13
                     I-240       0.0        1.4      64,720   6,472          10%                12
                     I-240       1.4        2.9      89,210   6,245           7%                12
                     SR 175      6.8        9.8      43,720   5,246          12%                12



                 6    Note Lamar Avenue is co-signed SR 4 and U.S. 78 from southeast of downtown
                      Memphis to the Mississippi State Line.




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                   SR 23             1.2           2.1         27,840           835                3%              11

                  Source: Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008, Statewide Truck Crashes, 2008.



                  Table 3.5            Top 15 Highest Crash Rate Locations, Sorted by Crashes per Mile
                               From         To       Vehicle     Truck   Truck Percent Number of Road Segment           Crashes
                    Route       Mile        Mile      AADT       AADT     on Highway Truck Crashes Length (Mile)        Per Mile
                    SR 177     5.8          7.3      60,870      2,435       4%              29           1.5            19.0
                    SR 3       1.6          1.7      10,430        626       6%               1           0.1            14.9
                    SR 23      0.0          1.2      30,790        924       3%              15           1.2            12.8
                    SR 23      1.2          2.1      27,840        835       3%              11           0.9            12.0
                    SR 3       9.9         10.1      32,460        974       3%               2           0.2            12.0
                    SR 57      0.5          1.2      34,760      1,390       4%               8           0.7            11.1
                    SR 57      8.1          8.8      60,480        605       1%               8           0.7            10.7
                    SR 175     4.8          6.1      27,470      1,099       4%              13           1.3            10.1
                    SR 177     7.3         10.1      46,410      2,321       5%              28           2.8            10.0
                    I-240     12.4         13.3     149,020     16,392      11%               8           0.9             9.0
                    SR 177    10.1         10.8      38,520        770       2%               6           0.7             8.8
                    I-240      0.0          1.4      64,720      6,472      10%              12           1.4             8.5
                    SR 204     0.0          1.8      40,590      1,624       4%              15           1.8             8.4
                    SR 1       2.6          3.5      20,990        630       3%               7           0.9             8.1
                    I-240      5.5          6.6     126,160     16,401      13%               9           1.1             8.1

                  Source: Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008, Statewide Truck Crashes, 2008.




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Figure 3.4      Truck Crash Locations in the Memphis Region




Source: Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008, Statewide Truck Crashes, 2008.




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Figure 3.5      Facilities with the Highest Incidence of Truck Crashes (i.e., Annual Crashes per Road Mile)




Source: Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008, Statewide Truck Crashes, 2008.




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       3.1 PLANNED IMPROVEMENTS
                 Recent studies, including the previous LRTP, the Memphis Chamber Regional
                 Freight Infrastructure Plan, the TDOT Lamar Avenue Study, have identified
                 projects that are anticipated to have the greatest impact on improving freight
                 flows on highways in the region. These projects have been included in the LRTP
                 in various forms for many years and continue to remain a major priority for
                 improving freight flows. The Memphis Regional Freight Infrastructure Plan
                 highlights five major projects that stand to make the largest impact on the
                 regional highway freight flows. Many of these projects were highlighted by the
                 bottleneck and safety analysis from this evaluation.
                 Other high priority corridors which should be considered for improvements
                 based on safety concerns and bottleneck issues for trucks are described in
                 Section 5.0 Priority Projects.
                 1. Lamar Avenue Corridor Improvements
                      The Lamar Avenue study recommended substantial capital improvements to
                     the corridor to manage future freight flows, ranging from operational
                     improvements (i.e., synchronized signals), costing only a few million dollars,
                     to developing an extension of I-22 from the Mississippi state line to I-240, to
                     creating grade-separated interchanges at key intersections to provide limited
                     access, costing nearly 700 million dollars.
                 2. Holmes Road (East-West connection that provides access to the freight
                    facilities at the Port and Airport) Corridor Improvements
                     Improving Holmes Road, one of the major roadways for truck traffic as well
                     as bottlenecks and safety concerns should remain a top priority for the MPO.
                     Improvements to Holmes Road would also help take traffic off of Shelby
                     Drive, potentially improving safety on this parallel facility. Holmes Road
                     improvements are included in the current TIP.
                 3. Interstate 40/Interstate 55 Interchange Modifications
                     Connections between I-40 and I-55 in the Memphis area are difficult for
                     trucks due to congestion and poor design of the interchanges. Improvements
                     to the geometry and capacity of these interchanges would eliminate
                     bottlenecks and improve safety for the region and allow for more efficient
                     truck movement both inbound and outbound from Memphis.
                 4. Third Mississippi River Bridge Crossing
                     This project has also been explored for many years and is currently
                     undergoing an environmental analysis to identify preferred alternative
                     options for the third bridge. This project will allow for greater access to the
                     burgeoning freight developments to the West of Memphis in Arkansas and
                     provide an additional outlet for intermodal freight trucks traveling east to



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                        west. The project is currently identified by the Memphis and West Memphis
                        MPO in their Long Range Transportation Plans.
                  5. Construction/Completion of I-69/I-2697
                        A key priority for improving freight flows as well as overall traffic flows in
                        the region is the construction/completion of I-69 in the Memphis area. The
                        Memphis area segment, will provide a connection from Millington, TN (State
                        Route 385/Proposed I-269 (Paul Barrett Parkway) in Shelby County) to
                        Hernando, MS (I-55/MS-304 Interchange) south of the study area. The
                        segment in the Memphis area will largely follow existing interstates and
                        provide additional connections to the east side of Memphis. The FEIS for this
                        segment has been accepted. Completion of this project would allow for the
                        diversion of through truck traffic away from Memphis and provide the
                        means for expanding freight oriented development in the region.


        3.2 RAIL
                  The Memphis area is one of only three railroads that is served by all five Class I
                  railroads. Chicago and St. Louis are the other two cities. Memphis area
                  intermodal yards serve as distribution hubs for the mid-south region and as
                  transfer locations between western and eastern Class I railroads. Bulk carload
                  yards are used to transfer goods between western and eastern railroads.
                  Additionally, they are used to transfer goods from the rail line to the region’s
                  extensive inland port system. Figure 3.6 displays the rail network in the
                  Memphis area and the existing rail yards.




                  7   I-69 currently runs from the Michigan/Canada border to Indianapolis, IN. It is
                      proposed to be extended from Indianapolis, IN to the Texas/Mexico border in the
                      Lower Rio Grande Valley. This corridor for I-69 has been designated by Congress as a
                      High Priority Corridor of National Significance due to its potential to encourage trade
                      between the United States, Canada, and Mexico.




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                 Figure 3.6       Rail Facilities in the Memphis Region




                 Source: National Transportation Atlas Database, 2011, Railroad web sites.

                 Rail Commodity Flows
                 The railroads in the Memphis area process a large volume of through freight, as
                 with other major modes of transportation. Rail currently accounts for about 65
                 million tons of freight inbound and outbound to and from the Memphis region,
                 with about 85 percent of the tonnage accounted for with carload freight and the
                 remainder with intermodal. Carload freight generally consists of bulk
                 commodities, which are often much heavier but of lower value than intermodal
                 cargo (i.e., commodities that can be shipped using containers).
                 Carload rail, similarly to water freight typically handles very heavy bulk
                 commodities such as coal and food products (such as grain). Coal shipments
                 account for nearly two thirds of the inbound and outbound carload shipments in
                 Shelby County. Coal shipments are arriving inbound primarily from the
                 Mountain States (i.e., Powder River Basin) and are traveling outbound largely to
                 Monroe County in the center of the State of Georgia (nearly 70 percent). Smaller
                 inbound flows are arriving in the Memphis area from West South Central States
                 of Oklahoma and Texas and the State of Arkansas. Oklahoma and Texas are also
                 important for outbound carload rail flows as well as other destinations in the


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                  State of Tennessee. Table 3.6 displays the Top 10 States for inbound and
                  outbound bulk rail shipments.

                  Table 3.6          Top 10 States for Bulk Rail Shipments
                                     Inbound and Outbound
                                         Inbound       Percent of    Outbound        Percent of       Total        Percent
                    State/Region       Carload (Rail) Total Inbound Carload (Rail) Total Outbound Carload (Rail)   of Total
                    Mountain            18,912,101        63%          514,520           2%         19,426,621       35%
                    Georgia              237,200          1%          17,008,414        67%         17,245,614       31%
                    West S Central      2,130,476         7%          1,861,136          7%          3,991,612       7%
                    Tennessee            466,484          2%          2,277,995          9%          2,744,479       5%
                    Arkansas            1,632,351         5%           261,952           1%          1,894,303       3%
                    West N Central      1,548,463         5%           169,404           1%          1,717,867       3%
                    Illinois            1,424,536         5%           108,440           0%          1,532,976       3%
                    Pacific              422,480          1%           602,664           2%          1,025,144       2%
                    Mississippi          706,792          2%           175,404           1%          882,196         2%
                    Canada               751,536          3%           111,200           0%          862,736         2%
                    All Others          1,784,004         6%          2,484,716         10%          4,268,720       8%
                    Total               30,016,423       100%         25,575,845        100%        55,592,268      100%

                  Source:      TRANSEARCH, 2007.

                  Intermodal rail tonnage to the Memphis region is dominated by miscellaneous
                  mixed freight shipments (i.e., containers) accounting for over 75 percent of
                  intermodal rail tonnage inbound and outbound from Memphis. Much of the
                  intermodal tonnage (nearly 40 percent of the total) is inbound intermodal
                  tonnage traveling to Memphis on the rail bridge from the States on the Pacific
                  coast (i.e., likely from the major intermodal West Coast ports of Los Angeles and
                  Long Beach). Nearly 90 percent of this tonnage is composed of miscellaneous
                  mixed shipments. Another major trading partner for intermodal rail is the State
                  of Georgia with about 14 percent of the total inbound and outbound tonnage.
                  Miscellaneous mixed shipments bound for the Atlanta and Savannah areas
                  compose a large proportion of this tonnage. Table 3.7 displays the Top 10 States
                  for inbound and outbound intermodal rail shipments and Table 3.8, the Top bulk
                  and intermodal rail commodities.

                  Table 3.7          Top 10 States for Intermodal Rail Shipments
                                     Inbound and Outbound
                                         Inbound      Percent of     Outbound        Percent of       Total        Percent
                   State/Region         IMX (Rail)   Total Inbound   IMX (Rail)    Total Outbound   IMX (Rail)     of Total
                   Pacific              3,312,200        70%         2,201,640          41%          5,513,840      55%
                   Georgia               403,320          8%           981,920          18%          1,385,240      14%
                   South Carolina        147,920          3%           385,760           7%            533,680       5%



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                  North Carolina          148,840             3%             320,760     6%              469,600           5%
                  West S Central          117,480             2%             286,400     5%              403,880           4%
                  Florida                 125,080             3%             251,400     5%              376,480           4%
                  Illinois                150,360             3%             160,760     3%              311,120           3%
                  Alabama                 122,800             3%             139,600     3%              262,400           3%
                  Pennsylvania             73,520             2%             157,200     3%              230,720           2%
                  South Atlantic           24,520             1%             198,720     4%              223,240           2%
                  All Others              122,400             3%             227,440     4%              349,840           3%
                  Total                 4,748,440            100%           5,311,600   100%           10,060,040         100%

                 Source:     TRANSEARCH, 2007.

                 Table 3.8          Inbound and Outbound Rail Commodities
                                    2007 and 2035
                  Commodity                                         Carload 2007         IMX 2007             Total Rail 2007
                  Coal                                                   35,885,858               0             35,885,858
                  Miscellaneous Mixed Shipments                              3,080       7,635,880                  7,638,960
                  Food or Kindred Products                                5,156,016       415,160                   5,571,176
                  Chemicals                                               3,845,464       250,440                   4,095,904
                  Farm Products                                           2,296,919        90,080                   2,386,999
                  Transportation Equipment                                2,341,480        32,560                   2,374,040
                  Lumber or Wood Products                                 1,809,720       206,320                   2,016,040
                  Clay, Concrete, Glass, or Stone Products                1,013,188        24,760                   1,037,948
                  Nonmetallic Minerals, except Fuels                       958,759             4,880                 963,639
                  Pulp, Paper, or Allied Products                          542,732        174,360                    717,092
                  All Others                                              1,739,052      1,225,600                  2,964,652
                  Total                                                  55,592,268     10,060,040              65,652,308

                 Source:     TRANSEARCH, 2007.

                 Rail Facilities

                 Intermodal Facilities
                 Class I railroads in the region are working to leverage their existing resources
                 and expand their intermodal freight rail presence with the recent expansion of
                 several existing rail yards and the development of new facilities in the Memphis
                 area. The Eastern railroads of CSX and NS have recently been improving their
                 access to the Memphis area, both recently completing upgrades to intermodal
                 rail yards in the Memphis area. In May of 2011, NS broke ground on a new
                 intermodal yard in Rossville, TN to allow for expected growth related to the
                 Crescent corridor project. In April of 2010, BNSF completed the expansion of



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                  their Memphis intermodal yard. The BNSF yard will eventually have the
                  capacity to handle 1 million lifts per year at full build out.
                  All five class one railroads have intermodal and bulk rail yards in the Memphis
                  area, with several of the railroads with multiple access points. There are nine
                  intermodal rail yards in the Memphis region, with one (Marion Yard-UP) on the
                  Arkansas side of the Mississippi River. The following table shows the major
                  intermodal rail yards in the Memphis area and the owners of the railroads. Three
                  facilities, accounting for potentially 1.5 million annual container lifts, have
                  recently been either expanded or are under construction. These yards all facilitate
                  rail-to-truck or rail-to-rail intermodal connections transferring or consolidating
                  containerized cargo to freight transportation facilities for distribution throughout
                  the United States.

                  Table 3.9             Memphis Area Rail Yards
                                                                                           Design Lift
                                                                                            Capacity              Planned or recently
                      Intermodal Railyard                                Railroad          (TEUs/Yr)            completed Improvements
                      Forest Yard                                            NS             123,000a
                      BNSF Memphis Intermodal Facility                    BNSF              700,000        8,300 foot long track added, triple
                                                                                                           capacity, 8 wide span gantry cranes
                                                                                                           complete
                      Yale Yard                                           BNSF           Auto Facilities
                      Harrison (Johnston) Yard                           CN/CSX              70,000        $100 million for yard expansion
                      Leewood Yard – CSX                                     CSX             20,000
                      Intermodal Gateway Memphis – CN & CSX              CN/CSX             200,000        $25 million investment by railroads
                      Marion Yard (Intermodal Railport)                 UP (West            375,000        Recent $70 investment
                                                                        Memphis)
                      Sargent Yard                                           UP             Unknown
                      NS Intermodal Facility                                 NS             370,000*       New $105 million dollar facility
                                                                                                           (completed 2012)

                  Source:      Memphis Regional Freight Infrastructure Plan, TN DOT Freight Infrastructure Intermodal Analysis.
                  a   NS will end intermodal activity at Forrest Yard with construction of its new intermodal yard in Fayette County.

                  Improvements to Freight Rail Infrastructure
                  Access to the existing and recently developed or expanded rail yards, especially
                  with improved intermodal connections, is a key concern for the City of Memphis,
                  Shelby County and the Memphis region. The Panama Canal widening in
                  addition to increasing trade with China and the BRIC countries have raised the
                  profile of the U.S. logistics system, encouraging shippers to identify the most cost
                  and time effective route to the consumer in the U.S. interior. The railroads are
                  preparing to compete with more efficient Panama Canal service to East Coast
                  ports, which may shift as much as one-quarter of the current trade from West to




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                 East Coast Ports8 by improving land-bridge connections with termini such as
                 Memphis.
                 Major highway facilities that serve the rail yards include all major interstates,
                 and other freight trucking corridors such as U.S. 78 (Lamar Avenue). Other major
                 access facilities include Airways Boulevard (NS—Forrest Yard), Kansas Street
                 (Harrison Yard—CN), Jackson Avenue (CSX), and Paul R. Lowry Road
                 (Intermodal Gateway Memphis—CN/CSX). The table below, included in the
                 2010 TDOT Freight Intermodal Infrastructure Analysis describes the distances
                 between the interstates and the rail intermodal yards. Nearly all major yards are
                 within 10 miles of major truck corridors or via connecting roads to the interstates.
                 However, many of the access roads are two lanes only, indicating a need for
                 future expansion, as well as improvements to best accommodate trucks (i.e.,
                 truck turning apron, wider lanes). Improving these connecting roads would
                 provide a significant benefit to the Memphis regional rail infrastructure.

                 Table 3.10           Access Needs of Rail Intermodal Yards in Tennessee
                                                                                                                 Distance         No.
                     Intermodal Railyard   Railroad       City        Route Type    Access Road Name           to Interstate     Lanes
                     Marion Yard             UP       Marion (AR)      State Road          SR 77              2 miles to I-55      2
                     Marion Yard             UP       Marion (AR)      Func. Road       Military Road         2 miles to I-55      2
                     Forrest Yard            NS        Memphis         State Road       S. Pkwy East          3 miles to I-69      4
                     Forrest Yard            NS        Memphis         State Road     Southern Avenue         4 miles to I-240     4
                     Forrest Yard            NS        Memphis         State Road       Airways Blvd          4 miles to I-240     5
                     Forrest Yard            NS        Memphis         State Road      Lamar Avenue           4 miles to I-240     5
                     Memphis Intermodal      NS         Rossville      State Road   SR 57, Poplar Avenue,    15 miles to I-240    2-4
                     Terminal                         (Fayette Co.)                  Bill Morris Parkway
                     (completed 2012)                                                      (SR 385)
                     BNSF Memphis Yard      BNSF       Memphis         State Road      Lamar Avenue           6 miles to I-240    5-9
                     Harrison (Johnston)   CN/CSX      Memphis         Func. Road       Kansas Street          1 mile to I-55      2
                     Yard
                     Harrison (Johnston)   CN/CSX      Memphis         Func. Road       Kansas Street          1 mile to I-55      5
                     Yard
                     Leewood Yard            CSX       Memphis         State Road          SR 14              5 miles to I-240     5
                                                                                      (Jackson Avenue)
                     Intermodal Gateway    CN/CSX      Memphis         Func. Road    Paul R Lowry Road        8 miles to I-55     2-5
                     Memphis

                 Source: TDOT Freight Infrastructure Intermodal Analysis, 2010.

                 Other improvements include proposals by the local governments and the Class I
                 railroads to develop a rail bypass of the City of Memphis.9 This was explored in


                 8    Memphis Chamber Regional Freight Infrastructure Plan




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                  the Tennessee State Rail Plan and found to have a relatively uncompetitive cost-
                  benefit analysis, however may yield public benefits relating to safety and rail
                  operations. Other rail improvements that are currently under analysis are the
                  development of a third rail bridge over the Mississippi River to add capacity to
                  the river crossing. The rail mode is being evaluated as part of the Environmental
                  Impact Statement process currently underway for the Southern Gateway.


        3.3 PORTS
                  Port of Memphis/Water Freight Flows
                  For the most current year data available, the International Port of Memphis in
                  2008 sent and received shipments of over 16 million tons. This constituted 2.4%
                  of the total moved on the Mississippi River.10 The following chart displays the
                  commodity breakdown, with bulk commodities, farm products, coal, petroleum,
                  and crude materials accounted for nearly 90 percent of the cargo. Intermodal
                  products, shipped primarily by container accounted for about 6 percent of the
                  total commodities at the Port.

                  Figure 3.7      Commodity Distribution at the Port of Memphis, 2008

                              Manufactured
                                Goods
                                  6%                     Other
                                                          7%

                                                                               Petroleum
                                                Crude Material                   37%
                                                    13%



                                                      Coal
                                                      18%
                                                                   Food and Farm
                                                                      Products
                                                                        19%

                  Source: Port of Memphis web site.

                  Port/Water Facilities
                  The International Port of Memphis currently includes 150 to 200 distinct industry
                  operations including warehousing and distribution, bulk loading, and


                  9    Memphis Chamber Regional Freight Infrastructure Plan.
                  10   Port of Memphis Commodity Comparison.




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                 intermodal transloading facilities including port to water, port to truck, and port
                 to rail cargo handling. The Port is the 4th largest inland port in the United States
                 and covers area on both the Tennessee and Arkansas side of the Mississippi
                 River in and around the City of Memphis. Port facilities consist of five public
                 terminals totaling 11 berths and several private terminals. There are also a
                 variety of barge and trucking carriers serving the Port. The Port is served directly
                 by three of Memphis’s five Class I railroads (with nearby access to the other two)
                 and the Port’s location on the Mississippi river provides direct access to I-40 and
                 I-55.11 The following map displays the major facilities at the Port and access to
                 the highway network.

                 Figure 3.8       Major Water Transportation Facilities




                 Source: National Transportation Atlas Database, 2011, Port web site.
                 As described above, there are several truck-water intermodal facilities at the Port
                 of Memphis, including the Kinder Morgan Bulk terminals on Presidents Island,
                 Wolf River Harbor near downtown Memphis, and Fullen Dock and Warehouse,


                 11   http://www.portofmemphis.com/about.asp.




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                  north of President’s Island. President’s Island currently houses 95 percent of the
                  industries at the Port. Figure 3.9 shows the different areas at President’s Island.
                  Although there are a few site locations available on President’s Island, over 95
                  percent of the terminal space is currently occupied.12

                  Figure 3.9       President’s Island Area




                  Source: Port web site.
                  Pidgeon Industrial Park, located south of the President’s Island Terminals is a
                  newer development opportunity within the Port of Memphis area. The Park
                  includes five major industrial development areas with over 2,200 acres of
                  development potential. There is a large amount of available space at the Park
                  and access is generally provided by I-55. One recent development project to
                  improve industrial access at Pidgeon was the expansion of the CSX/CN
                  Intermodal Facility, which provided direct rail access to perspective developers
                  at the site. The facility, run jointly by CN and CSX is available to be used by all
                  five Class I railroads in the Memphis area. The map below shows the Pidgeon
                  Industrial Park area. Development and expansion of the Pidgeon Industrial park
                  has continued to put pressure on the local access roadway system. With the
                  development of the CN/CSX Memphis Intermodal Terminal, there will be an
                  increasing demand for truck access to those facilities.




                  12   http://www.portofmemphis.com/pres_island.asp.




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                 Figure 3.10 Pidgeon Industrial Park Area




                 Source: Port web site.

                 Improvements to Port Infrastructure
                 Access to the Port Terminals at President’s Island is provided by I-40 and I-55,
                 via the Jack Carley Causeway. The Pidgeon Industrial area facility access is
                 provided by Paul R Lowry and Riverport Road via I-55. As Pidgeon Island
                 Industrial park expands, additional infrastructure improvements will be
                 required, which are currently being explored by the County, City, and private
                 developers. Table 3.10 identifies the proposed access improvements to the
                 Pidgeon Industrial Park. These improvements will likely be funded by a




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                  combination of private and public support, including future tenants of the
                  facilities.

                  Table 3.11             Pidgeon Industrial Park Access Improvements
                       Pidgeon Island
                       Industrial Area           Existing Access                    Proposed Access                    Direct Rail Access
                       Area 1            Gravel Levee road along east        2 lane along Paul R. Lowry Road    CN
                                         boundary                            1/2 mile to east
                       Area 2            2 lane (wide) on east boundary      4 lanes east to west roads on        CN
                                                                             north, north central, south central,
                                                                             and south.
                                                                             Expansion to 5 lanes on east
                                                                             boundary
                       Area 3            5 lane and 2 lane running east to   2 north to south 4 lane and one    CN
                                         west in Ensley “A” Subdivision      east to west 4 lane in the south
                       Area 4            2 lane along west boundary line     Expansion of 2 to 5 lanes on west CN
                                                                             boundary line. Others to be
                                                                             determined
                                                                             later
                       Area 5            2 lane ending at north east corner 5 lane on east boundary and two     CN and Intermodal Gateway
                                                                            east to west 4 lane streets         Memphis facility (CSX)

                  Source: Port of Memphis web site.

                  According to the Port, the five existing public terminals have sufficient capacity
                  to handle expected water freight into the future.13 Roadway improvements
                  would improve freight movement and alleviate bottlenecks in the Port area.
                  Recent transportation access improvements, such as the ongoing project
                  reconfiguring the Mallory Avenue/Interstate 55 interchange are intended to
                  improve highway access to and from the Port. The Port has also identified the
                  Fullen Dock and Warehouse for its growth potential and maintaining access to
                  that facility will be important into the future. One of the Tier I improvements
                  from the previous LRTP, developing a new interchange for I-55 at Crump, is still
                  a top priority for improving access at the Port, especially President’s Island.
                  Other high priority corridors which should be considered for improvements
                  based on improving access to Port facilities for trucks are described in Section 5.0
                  Priority Projects.


        3.4 AIRPORTS
                  Air Cargo Facilities
                  The Memphis region plays a major role in the National Air freight system with
                  Memphis International Airport, one of the largest in the world by freight volume,

                  13   Memphis Regional Freight Infrastructure Plan, IHS Global Insight, 2010.




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                 mostly due to Memphis’ role as the domestic hub for FedEx. Memphis
                 International handled approximately 4.2 million tons of air freight in 2007,
                 number one in the world.14 The Memphis area has an interest in maintaining and
                 expanding its position in intermodal trade and its truck-air, and air-air
                 intermodal connections. Apart from the Memphis Airport, there are several other
                 airports in the Memphis region.
                 Figure 3.11 displays the location of these airports. Charles W. Baker Airport in
                 Millington, TN and General Dewitt Spain Airport in Downtown Memphis are
                 reliever airports for Memphis International. The other airports in the region have
                 a minor role in regional air cargo. One airport that the region has identified for
                 its air cargo potential is the Millington Regional Jetport. FedEx already utilizes
                 the airport as an alternate landing facility and helps financially support the air
                 traffic control tower operating budget.15 Other regional airports are used for
                 private operations and small aircraft and are not used for air cargo.




                 14   Memphis Airport and Memphis Regional Freight Infrastructure Plan.
                 15   Memphis Regional Freight Infrastructure Plan, IHS Global Insight, 2010.




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                  Figure 3.11 Airport Facilities in the Memphis Area




                  Source: National Transportation Atlas Database, 2011.

                  Memphis Airport/Air Commodity Flows
                  The air freight system at the Memphis airport includes a substantial volume of
                  cargo being shipped into and out of the facility. Data from the airport in the most
                  recent month available (August 2011) indicate that there were over 10,000 cargo
                  flight movements16 with over 95 percent of those accounted for through FedEx
                  planes.17 Since a flight movement is either a take-off or landing, it can be inferred
                  that there were about 5,000 cargo flights in the month and an average of between
                  150 and 175 flights/day.18 There is additional cargo transported in the belly of
                  passenger planes as well, however the volume is relatively insignificant
                  compared to the cargo airlines. In the most recent month where data is available

                  16   Movement indicates either a takeoff or landing of aircraft. One typical flight equals two
                       movements.
                  17   Memphis Airport Activity Report, August 2011.
                  18   5,000 flights/month/30 days in a month equals 166 flights/day.




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                 there was nearly 800,000 lbs of cargo handled by the passenger airlines and over
                 700 million pounds of cargo handled by the cargo airlines, with over 99 percent
                 handled by FedEx. It is likely that each of these flights would include a package
                 transfer from plane to truck for sorting, warehousing, or distribution. These
                 trucks will need to be accommodated on the region’s highways. The trucks used
                 by FedEx not only include the delivery trucks, but since the Memphis airport acts
                 as FedEx’s major distribution facility, cargo from all over the world is sorted and
                 redistributed through transfer to other planes and to long haul trucks.
                 Major air freight commodities include the standard express packages, the
                 commodity for which FedEx is well known. This constitutes over 40 percent of
                 all air freight inbound and outbound from the Memphis region.19 Other major
                 commodities include machinery, chemicals, and electronics. These commodities,
                 also playing a major role in the just-in-time supply chain are high value
                 commodities that can cover the high costs of air freight. Access to and from the
                 air facilities to manufacturers, assembly, and distribution facilities will need to be
                 improved and intermodal connections expanded to maximize the utility of
                 intermodal air freight in the Memphis area.

                 Table 3.12         Air Commodities and Growth
                                    2007 and 2035
                  Commodity                                               2007
                  Mail and Express Traffic                              782,421
                  Machinery – Other than Electrical                     236,572
                  Chemicals                                             187,154
                  Miscellaneous Mixed Shipments                         143,220
                  Transportation Equipment                              136,814
                  Electrical Machinery, Equipment, or Supplies          127,088
                  Printed Matter                                         66,337
                  Instruments – Photographic or Optical Goods            43,600
                  Apparel                                                41,619
                  Farm Products                                          37,650
                  All Others                                            139,946
                  Total                                                1,942,420

                 Source:    TRANSEARCH, 2007.




                 19   TRANSEARCH database, 2007.




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                  Improvements to Air Cargo Infrastructure
                  According to the Memphis Airport’s Airport Master Plan (completed in 2010),
                  three major roadway projects have previously been recommended by the MPO
                  as most crucial for access to the airport. These projects have been highlighted in
                  the most previous version of the LRTP as Tier I projects and continue to be a
                  major priority for improving access to air cargo facilities in the Memphis region:
                       The interchange of I-240 and Plough Boulevard: Improvement plans
                       currently being developed by TNDOT. (This project is still included on the
                       project list as # 131).
                       The interchange of Plough Boulevard and Winchester Road: Improvement
                       plans currently being developed by City of Memphis. This project is still
                       included on the project list as # 199
                       Winchester Road, between Plough Boulevard and Swinnea Road: MPO has
                       identified improvements to this roadway as “Network Priority 1” (high-
                       priority) and improvements are planned to be completed by 2016. This
                       specific project is no longer included on the project list.
                  The recent evaluation for the Memphis Regional Freight Infrastructure Plan,
                  noted that although users of the system identified minimal improvements to
                  accommodate existing and future demand to the actual air freight system,
                  roadways adjacent to the airport are very congested. Improving airport access
                  roads will improve freight transportation operations, especially connections
                  between truck and air. Key Memphis Airport access roads include: Lamar
                  Avenue, Interstate 240, Airways Boulevard, Shelby Drive, Winchester Road, and
                  Holmes Road. Many of these roadways were highlighted in the highways section
                  as having capacity or safety deficiencies that necessitate improvements.
                  Another improvement promoted by the airport that would not directly influence
                  freight traffic but may yield indirect freight benefits by providing an alternative
                  for passengers to access the airport is the project extending the light rail system
                  to the airport. MATA is currently evaluating alignment corridors to extend the
                  light-rail system to the Passenger Terminal complex or to a station located
                  immediately west of the Airport, at the intersection of Winchester Road and
                  Airways Boulevard.
                  High priority corridors that should be considered for improvements based on
                  improving access to Air freight facilities are described in Section 5.0 Priority
                  Projects.




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    4.0 Forecast Flows
                  The following section describes the growth in commodity flows into and out of
                  Shelby County in 2007 and 2035. The total inbound and outbound freight flows
                  are expected to increase by over 60 million tons (40 percent) by 2035 to over 220
                  million tons. Figure 2.1 displays the growth anticipated in overall freight tonnage
                  inbound and outbound between 2007 (base year of the TRANSEARCH data) and
                  2035. Since highways play such a major role in connecting the various modes of
                  transportation (i.e., rail to truck connections, port to truck to rail connections, air
                  to truck connections), it is critical to direct attention to the roadway and rail
                  improvements that connect the key freight facilities and trading partners.
                  Table 4.1 shows the increase in freight tonnage by mode between 2007 and 2035.

                  Figure 4.1      Memphis Inbound and Outbound Freight Tonnage
                                  2007 and 2035

                   Millions of Tons
                   250


                   200


                   150


                   100


                    50


                     0
                                  2007                2035


                  Source: TRANSEARCH, 2007.

                  Direction
                  By 2035, the balance of trade is expected to shift slightly, with over 57 percent of
                  the trade inbound to the region. This is largely due to substantial increases in
                  outbound intermodal and carload rail tonnage. This increase will serve the
                  growing truck-rail, water-truck-rail, and air-truck intermodal clusters in the
                  Memphis region. Although both inbound and outbound trade is expected to
                  increase overall between 2007 and 2035, outbound trade is expected to grow by



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                 47 percent, compared to only 33 percent for inbound. The following chart
                 highlights the increases in inbound and outbound tonnage between 2007 and
                 2035.

                 Table 4.1           Increase in Inbound and Outbound Freight Tonnage by Mode
                                     2007 and 2035
                                        Inbound                            Outbound                            Total
                  Mode        2007         2035      Growth      2007         2035       Growth      2007        2035       Growth
                  Truck    44,652,944   64,983,124    46%     28,210,898 40,931,812       45%     72,863,841 105,914,936     45%
                  Air      1,070,009     2,402,693 125%         872,411     1,771,234    103%      1,942,420    4,173,928 115%
                  Water    14,485,559   17,739,005    22%      4,404,196    4,388,480      0%     18,889,755   22,127,485    17%
                  Carload 30,016,423    31,708,336     6%     25,575,845 33,792,952       32%     55,592,268   65,501,288    18%
                  Rail
                  IMX      4,748,440     9,880,468 108%        5,311,600 13,791,733      160%     10,060,040   23,672,201 135%
                  Rail
                  Total    94,973,376 126,713,626     33%     64,374,949 94,676,211       47%     159,348,325 221,389,836    39%

                 Source:   TRANSEARCH, 2007.

                 Mode
                 Figure 4.2 shows the modal breakdown for inbound and outbound flows in
                 Shelby County in 2035. By 2035, the tonnage shipped by truck is expected to
                 increase as a relative proportion to 51 percent of total County flows, with
                 substantial growth in truck tonnage and relatively slower grow in rail carload
                 tonnage accounting for the change. Air cargo is expected to more than double to
                 over 2 million tons of air freight by 2035.

                 Figure 4.2          Total Tonnage by Mode
                                     2035


                                                               Rail
                                                               33%
                                                                                 Truck
                                                                                 51%

                                                                 Water
                                                         Air     14%
                                                         2%

                 Source: TRANSEARCH, 2007.
                 The following shows the growth in Inbound and Outbound tonnage by mode in
                 the Memphis area. Overall flows are expected to increase by nearly 40 percent by
                 2035, with air cargo and intermodal rail driving growth. Carload rail for inbound


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                  cargo and outbound water cargo will remain constant with existing volumes by
                  2035. Truck volume is anticipated to account for about half (30 million tons) of
                  the overall growth, both inbound and outbound tonnage experiencing growth of
                  near 50 percent.

                  Trading Partners
                  The top trading partners for the Memphis area include the States of Georgia and
                  the rest of Counties in Tennessee (besides Shelby County) as highlighted in the
                  Figure 2.6. The top two trading partners are expected to experience an increase of
                  about 50 percent in tonnage traded with Shelby County by 2035. Also of note is
                  the growth anticipated between the Memphis area and the Pacific states
                  (California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and Hawaii). This increase is driven by
                  an increase of nearly 140 percent in intermodal tonnage from those states, likely
                  to increased intermodal rail from the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, one
                  of Memphis’ major gateways.20

                  Figure 4.3       Top 10 Trading Partners (State and Region)
                                   2007 and 2035

                   Millions of Tons
                   60

                    50

                    40

                    30

                    20

                    10

                       0




                                                               2007   2035


                  Source: TRANSEARCH, 2007.

                  Commodities
                  By 2035, there is expected to be substantial growth in truck tonnage, increasing
                  by almost 50 percent. Secondary traffic is driving this growth, increasing by over


                  20   Memphis Regional Freight Infrastructure Plan.




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                 20 million tons. For inbound and outbound rail commodities, both carload and
                 intermodal tonnage is expected to grow between now and 2035, with intermodal
                 tonnage increasing at a far faster rate. Coal tonnage and other very heavy bulk
                 commodities continue to play a major role in freight rail tonnage in the Memphis
                 area but those types of commodities are only anticipated to experience modest
                 growth by 2035 (27 percent for coal and declines for food and kindred products,
                 farm products, lumber, and non-metallic minerals). Intermodal miscellaneous
                 mixed shipments (i.e., containers) are expected to increase by over 12 million
                 tons for inbound and outbound cargo, testifying to the increasing importance of
                 intermodal freight in the Memphis area. Overall, intermodal rail tonnage will
                 more than double by 2035, with growth in the commodity types: transportation
                 equipment, clay, concrete, glass, and stone and non-metallic minerals. The table
                 below shows the other major commodities shipped by rail inbound and
                 outbound from the Memphis area in 2007 and 2035.




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Table 4.2        Inbound and Outbound Rail Commodities
                 2007 and 2035
                                             Carload      Carload                                                        Total        Total         Total
 Commodity                                    2007         2035       Growth       IMX 2007      IMX 2035     Growth    Rail 2007    Rail 2035     Growth
 Coal                                       35,885,858   45,435,163    27%                  0            0      0%     35,885,858   45,435,163       27%
 Miscellaneous Mixed Shipments                  3,080        6,495    111%         7,635,880     19,470,082   155%      7,638,960   19,476,577      155%
 Food or Kindred Products                   5,156,016    4,872,759     -5%             415,160     388,236      -6%     5,571,176    5,260,995       -6%
 Chemicals                                  3,845,464    4,653,013     21%             250,440     262,639      5%      4,095,904    4,915,652       20%
 Farm Products                              2,296,919    2,074,413    -10%              90,080      67,707     -25%     2,386,999    2,142,120      -10%
 Transportation Equipment                   2,341,480    2,924,465     25%              32,560      69,326    113%      2,374,040    2,993,791       26%
 Lumber or Wood Products                    1,809,720    1,327,457    -27%             206,320     181,099     -12%     2,016,040    1,508,557      -25%
 Clay, Concrete, Glass, or Stone Products   1,013,188      917,668     -9%              24,760      31,068     25%      1,037,948     948,737        -9%
 Nonmetallic Minerals, except Fuels           958,759      296,719    -69%               4,880       6,891     41%       963,639      303,610       -68%
 Pulp, Paper, or Allied Products              542,732      706,130     30%             174,360     182,696      5%       717,092      888,827        24%
 All Others                                 1,739,052    2,287,005     32%         1,225,600     3,012,456    146%      2,964,652    5,299,461       79%
 Total                                      55,592,268   65,501,288    18%        10,060,040     23,672,201   135%     65,652,308   89,173,488       36%

Source: TRANSEARCH, 2007.




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                 For water commodities by 2035, certain commodities are expected to grow
                 substantially, and others decline. Waste or scrap materials are expected to more
                 than double to over 6 million tons. In spite of anticipated declines in some
                 commodity categories (i.e., coal, farm products) there is expected to be an overall
                 increase in water tonnage of about 4 million tons between 2007 and 2035, an
                 increase of nearly 20 percent. Roadway access to the Port areas, especially the
                 intermodal terminals will be especially crucial to accommodate this growth.

                 Table 4.3          Inbound and Outbound Water Commodities
                                    2007 and 2035
                  Commodity                                               2007         2035              Growth
                  Coal                                                  6,220,600    4,419,352            -29%
                  Petroleum or Coal Products                            5,767,963    6,894,860            20%
                  Waste or Scrap Materials                              2,570,369    6,106,417           138%
                  Farm Products                                          940,210      435,001             -54%
                  Metallic Ores                                          899,629      540,071             -40%
                  Chemicals                                              756,515      824,212              9%
                  Nonmetallic Minerals, except Fuels                     522,371     1,197,944           129%
                  Clay, Concrete, Glass, or Stone Products               400,222      541,682             35%
                  Food or Kindred Products                               277,805      207,783             -25%
                  Primary Metal Products                                 211,110      401,945             90%
                  All Others                                             322,961      558,218             73%
                  Total                                                18,889,755   22,127,485            17%

                 Source:   TRANSEARCH, 2007.

                 Major growth commodities for air cargo between 2007 and 2035 include
                 machinery, chemicals, electronics, and precision instruments. Access to
                 intermodal freight transportation facilities will be very important to
                 accommodating this growth.

                 Table 4.4          Inbound and Outbound Air Commodities
                                    2007 and 2035
                  Commodity                                               2007         2035              Growth
                  Mail and Express Traffic                               782,421      738,782              -6%
                  Machinery – Other than Electrical                      236,572      972,576            311%
                  Chemicals                                              187,154      566,052            202%
                  Miscellaneous Mixed Shipments                          143,220      409,843            186%
                  Transportation Equipment                               136,814      330,044            141%
                  Electrical Machinery, Equipment, or Supplies           127,088      502,648            296%
                  Printed Matter                                          66,337      100,546             52%




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                   Commodity                                               2007              2035            Growth
                   Instruments – Photographic or Optical Goods             43,600           190,592           337%
                   Apparel                                                 41,619            17,390           -58%
                   Farm Products                                           37,650            21,791           -42%
                   All Others                                             139,946           323,665           131%
                   Total                                                1,942,420         4,173,928           115%

                  Source:     TRANSEARCH, 2007.

                  Based on the future evaluation of the Memphis Region’s traffic system by 2040
                  (the forecast year of the regional model), highway operating conditions are
                  expected to deteriorate substantially. While only a few highways are operating at
                  a V/C ratio approaching 1.00 in 2010 (based on traffic counts) there are some that
                  have a much higher ratio. I-40 and I-55 are expected to deteriorate significantly
                  by 2040 and become some of the worst congested freeways in the region. These
                  facilities also happen to be major truck routes and in order to accommodate
                  freight flows in the region into the future will have to be improved to manage
                  future demand. Tables 4.5 and 4.6 show the V/C ratios of corridors with the
                  highest volume of truck traffic in 2010 and 2040. Most of these are interstate
                  highways I-40, I-55, and I-240; however there are some U.S. highways (U.S. 78 SR
                  385) that have extremely high V/C ratios and a large volume of truck traffic.
                  Figures 4.4 and 4.5 display the bottleneck locations of the highest 15 truck count
                  locations for interstate and non-interstate highways. Generally the interstate
                  highways, which nearly a V/C ratio of 1.00 on many segments are operating at a
                  more acceptable level than the non-interstate major truck routes, many of which
                  have segments exceeding a V/C of 1.00 by 2040.

                  Table 4.5           Top 15 Interstate Highway Truck Bottlenecks
                                      2010 and 2040
                                                                                                            V/C Increase
                                                     Truck AADT             2010 V/C          2040 V/C      between 2010
                   Map ID          Route         (based on TN Counts)   (based on AADT)   (based on AADT)     and 2040
                   1            Interstate 40          16,566                0.72               0.84             0.12
                   2            Interstate 240         16,392                0.83               0.86             0.03
                   3            Interstate 40          15,612                0.78               0.80             0.02
                   4            Interstate 40          15,065                0.88               0.91             0.03
                   5            Interstate 40          17,199                0.75               0.78             0.03
                   6            Interstate 40          16,401                0.86               0.88             0.02
                   7            Interstate 40          16,129                1.03               1.06             0.03
                   8            Interstate 40          15,776                0.95               1.05             0.10
                   9            Interstate 40          15,370                0.65               0.84             0.19
                   10           Interstate 40          16,400                0.47               0.70             0.23
                   11           Interstate 40          16,874                0.40               0.60             0.20




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                                                                                                                 V/C Increase
                                                     Truck AADT               2010 V/C           2040 V/C        between 2010
                  Map ID         Route           (based on TN Counts)     (based on AADT)    (based on AADT)       and 2040
                  12          Interstate 55            14,259                  0.85                0.98              0.13
                  13          Interstate 55            14,114                  0.62                0.73              0.11
                  14          Interstate 55            14,263                  0.75                0.81              0.06
                  15          Interstate 55            14,003                  0.74                0.86              0.12

                       V/C Ratio Exceeds 1.00.
                       V/C Ratio Exceeds 1.25.
                 Source: Memphis Regional Transportation Model, 2010, Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008.

                 Table 4.6         Top 15 Non-Interstate Highway Truck Bottlenecks
                                   2010 and 2040


                                                                                                                V/C Increase
                                                               Truck AADT           2010 V/C        2040 V/C   between 2010
                  Map ID              Route                (based on TN Counts) (based on AADT) (based on AADT) and 2040
                  1           U.S. 78 (Lamar Avenue)             10,814               0.92                1.09         0.17
                  2           U.S. 78 (Lamar Avenue)             10,709               1.12                1.46         0.34
                  3         SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)          9,336               0.86                1.09         0.23
                  4         SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)          9,270               0.91                1.04         0.13
                  5         SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)          9,099               0.91                0.96         0.05
                  6         SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)          9,064               0.73                1.06         0.33
                  7         SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)          9,008               0.64                0.92         0.28
                  8         SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)          8,963               0.69                0.92         0.23
                  9         SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)          8,905               0.74                1.28         0.54
                  10        SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)          8,897               0.47                1.06         0.59
                  11        SR 385 (Bill Morris Parkway)          8,784               0.72                1.25         0.53
                  12          U.S. 78 (Lamar Avenue)              6,700               0.86                0.94         0.08
                  13          U.S. 78 (Lamar Avenue)              6,654               0.82                0.82         0.00
                  14          U.S. 78 (Lamar Avenue)              6,531               0.75                0.85         0.10
                  15          SR 175 (Shelby Avenue)              5,246               0.82                0.95         0.13

                       V/C Ratio Exceeds 1.00.
                       V/C Ratio Exceeds 1.25.
                 Source: Memphis Regional Transportation Model, 2010, Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008.




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Figure 4.4      Top 15 Major Truck Bottlenecks in the Memphis Region
                2040




Source: Memphis Regional Transportation Model, 2010, Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008.



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Figure 4.5      Top 15 Major Truck (Non-Interstate Highway) Bottlenecks in the Memphis Region
                2040




Source: Memphis Regional Transportation Model, 2010, Tennessee Statewide Truck Counts, 2008.



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                  There have been many efforts in recent years to identify improvements to key
                  freight routes in the region. One effort highlighted the Lamar Avenue corridor,
                  which serves several rail yards in the area, as well as a large number of
                  warehousing and distribution clusters. The study concluded that future traffic
                  volumes on Lamar Avenue will make it very difficult to manage without capital
                  improvements of some sort. Operational improvements, while they will help
                  provide marginal benefits to the corridor, will fail to effectively manage both
                  existing and future traffic congestion issues. Lamar Avenue (U.S. 78)
                  improvements will be described further in this study.




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      5.0 Outreach to Private Sector
                 Recent projects in the Memphis area have solicited feedback from the freight
                 stakeholder community. The Southern Gateway project, an environmental
                 impact review of a third crossing over the Mississippi River in the Memphis area
                 provided some insight into major infrastructure concerns to help guide this
                 LRTP process and substantiated the priority projects for freight.
                 Additionally, a brief stakeholder survey was prepared for the private sector
                 freight stakeholder community to provide further validation of the findings from
                 previous efforts. The survey was distributed online and via phone to a list of
                 major      shippers,    carriers,   and      other    logistics  providers    (i.e.
                 warehouse/distribution center) that was prepared as part of other freight
                 planning efforts in the region by the project team. The survey consisted of a
                 series of identification questions for the freight-oriented businesses and well as
                 three specific transportation improvements that would improve mobility in the
                 Memphis region.
                 Although response from the survey was limited, the responses that were
                 received did substantiate the findings from previous efforts, including the
                 Memphis Regional Freight Infrastructure Plan and recent freight planning efforts
                 for the Tennessee Department of Transportation. Top priority projects (for
                 infrastructure) recommended by survey respondents were consistent with the
                 priorities identified in other recent freight planning efforts.




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    6.0 Priority Freight Projects
                     This chapter identifies projects that have the potential to improve freight
                     movement in the Memphis region. In 2010, the Tennessee Department of
                     Transportation conducted a statewide freight study which identified freight
                     projects throughout the state. Projects were identified based on existing freight
                     bottlenecks and a review of previous freight-related studies. In the Memphis
                     region, this study reviewed the Memphis Chamber Regional Freight
                     Infrastructure Plan, the Lamar Avenue Study, and several freight planning tasks
                     conducted earlier by TDOT. Table 6.1 lists the projects that were identified in the
                     TDOT statewide freight study. These projects are also ranked from highest to
                     lowest priority based on a qualitative benefit-cost assessment.
                     Table 6.2 lists freight improvement projects that have been identified from other
                     portions of the 2040 Memphis MPO LRTP. Table 6.3 lists projects that were
                     found to be important based on previous analysis in this report. The full list of
                     freight improvement projects to be considered as part of the LRTP process can be
                     found by combining the projects listed in Tables 6.1 – 6.3.

Table 6.1          Freight Projects Highlighted by Tennessee Statewide Freight Plan

Project                                                     Original Source of Project          Highway     Air     Rail   Water
The Crescent Corridor                                              Freight Scan
Lamar Avenue (U.S. 78) Corridor Improvements             Memphis Chamber, Memphis MPO,             X         X       X
                                                              Congestion Analysis
I-69/I-269 Completion (West TN)                           Freight Scan, Memphis Chamber,           X         X       X
                                                        Department of Economic Development


Holmes Road Corridor Improvements                               Memphis Chamber                    X         X       X
Interstate 40/Interstate 55 Interchange Modifications           Memphis Chamber                    X         X       X       X

I-240 and Poplar Interchange Improvements                       Memphis Chamber                    X                 X
I-240 midtown widening and interchange                          Memphis Chamber                    X                 X
improvement
Tenn-Tom Intermodal Corridor, AL and MS                  Appalachian Regional Commission

I-240 from Poplar Avenue to Walnut Grove Road                     Memphis MPO
(Memphis) – Widen 6 to 8 lanes
Upgrade Mississippi Central Railroad to support                 Memphis Chamber                                      X
286,000-pound load limits
Upgrade at I-55 and McLemore interchange and                    Memphis Chamber                    X                 X       X
access road to President’s Island




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Project                                                      Original Source of Project                Highway          Air         Rail      Water
I-40 at I-240 Interchange East of Memphis (construct     Memphis MPO, Tennessee Trucking                   X             X           X
new flyover ramp)                                                  Association


I-55 at Crump Boulevard (Memphis) Interchange                        Memphis MPO                           X             X           X              X
Modification
Tunica Mega Site Rail Access                                     Memphis Chamber                           X                         X
Widen I-40 to 6 lanes from Germantown (Exit 18) to          TDOT I-40/I-81 Corridor Study
SR 59 (Exit 35)
Widen Hacks Cross Road to four lanes                             Memphis Chamber                           X                         X

Construction of rail marshalling yard and rail access            Memphis Chamber                                                     X              X
to Port of Helena
Plough Boulevard and Winchester Road interchange                 Memphis Chamber                           X             X
design completion
Expansion of Milington Regional Jetport terminal                 Memphis Chamber                                         X
building and construction of new t-hangers and
storage hangers.




Table 6.2            Other Freight Beneficial Projects by Mode for the Memphis Region
       Route                 Termini            Type of Improvement                                 Benefit                                 Mode
SR 204 (Covington      Macon Road to          Widen from 4-6 lanes             Safety issues: relatively high proportion of truck        Rail/Highway
Pike)                  Austin Peay                                             traffic, large number of fatal truck crashes


SR 177 (North          Wolf River to I-40     Operational improvement or Safety issues throughout the corridor: large                    Rail/Highway
Germantown             and Highway 70 to      capacity enhancement       number of fatal truck crashes, access to NS
Parkway)               Austin Peay                                       Intermodal Yard in Fayette County


Getwell Road           State Line to Shelby Widen from 4-7 lanes               Improve access to Airport, reduce congestion                  Air
                       Drive
U.S. 51                State Line to          Operational improvement or Capacity issue: very high proportion of truck                       Rail
(Union Avenue)         Collierville           capacity enhancement       traffic


I-55                   State Line to Shelby Widen from 8-10 lanes              Improve access to Airport, reduce congestion                  Air
                       Drive
I-55                   Shelby Drive to        Widen from 8-10 lanes            Improve access to Airport, reduce congestion                  Air
                       Winchester Road
Malone Road            Holmes Road to         Widen from 2-5 lanes             Improve access to Airport, reduce congestion                  Air
                       Shelby Drive
Pleasant Hill Road     Holmes Road to         Widen from 5-7 lanes             Improve access to Airport, reduce congestion                  Air
                       Shelby Drive
U.S. 72 (Poplar        Widening from I-240 Operational improvement or Safety issues: relatively high proportion of truck                     Rail
Avenue)                South               capacity enhancement       traffic, high truck crash rate, improve access to
                                                                      NS Memphis Intermodal Terminal




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          Route               Termini           Type of Improvement                                Benefit                            Mode
SR 385 (Bill Morris    I-240 to Poplar        Operational improvement or Safety issues: relatively high proportion of truck        Rail/Highway
Parkway)               Avenue                 capacity enhancement       traffic, high truck crash rate


Raines Road            Getwell Road           Construct new interchange       Improve access to Airport, reduce congestion             Air
Shelby Drive           Paul Lowry Road to     New 4 lane divided roadway Improve access to Pidgeon Island                           Water/Rail
Extension              Sewanee Road
Shelby Drive           Sewanee Road to        Widen from 2 to 5 lanes     Improve access to Pidgeon Island                          Water/Rail
                       Weaver Road            with grade separation at RR
                                              track
Shelby Drive           Lamar Avenue to        Widen from 5-6 lane             Improve access to Airport, reduce congestion,          Air/Rail
                       Mendenhall Road        (divided)                       improve safety, high proportion of truck traffic,
                                                                              high truck crash rate
Tchulahoma Road        Shelby Drive to        Widen from 2 to 5 lanes         Improve access to Airport, reduce congestion             Air
                       Christine Road
Winchester Road        Getwell Road           Reconstruct Interchange         Improve access to Airport, reduce congestion             Air

Paul R Lowry Road Func. Road                  Widen from 2 to 5 lanes         improved access to Frank Pidgeon Industrial           Water/Rail
                                                                              Park (Intermodal Gateway Memphis-CN/CSX)


S. Parkway East        State Road             Widen from 4 lanes              Improve access to Forrest Yard-NS                        Rail

Southern Avenue        State Road             Widen from 4 lanes              Improve access to Forrest Yard-NS                        Rail
Kansas Street          Func. Road             Operational improvement or Improve access to Harrison Yard-CN                            Rail
                                              capacity enhancement
SR 14                  State Road             Widen from 5 lanes              Improve access to Leewood Yard-CSX                       Rail
(Jackson Avenue)


Source:     LRTP Bottleneck and safety evaluation, Port of Memphis, Memphis Airport Master Plan, Tennessee Freight Infrastructure Analysis,
            2010



Table 6.3           Freight Projects Highlighted by Tennessee Statewide Freight Plan and
                    Memphis Infrastructure Plan

                                                                                         Freight Mode Improved by Project

Project                                                       Source               Highway*        Air*      Rail *       Water*
Third Mississippi River Bridge Crossing                  Memphis Chamber                X                      X             X
Port of Cates Landing Inland Port Highway                Memphis Chamber                                                     X
Accessibility
Reconstruct I-240 and Airways Blvd Interchange           Memphis Chamber                            X

Complete E. Shelby Drive Intersection                    Memphis Chamber                X
Improvements




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                                                                      Freight Mode Improved by Project

Project                                             Source        Highway*    Air*    Rail *        Water*
Widen Poplar Avenue between Shelby Dr. and SR   Memphis Chamber      X
196 from 2 to 4 lanes
Widen Poplar Avenue between Shelby Dr. and SR   Memphis Chamber      X
196 from 2 to 4 lanes
Port of Cates Landing to CN                     Memphis Chamber                                       X
Upgrade Tennken Railroad to support 286,000     Memphis Chamber                         X
pound limits
Brownsville, TN megasite rail access            Memphis Chamber                         X
I-40/I-240 East Interchange Phase II            Memphis Chamber      X




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