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					City of West Sacramento
Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy



                          DRAFT
Recommendations
                            October 18, 2004
                         West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


The City of West Sacramento
Recommendations Report
October 18, 2004


AngelouEconomics is pleased to present the Recommendations Report as part of the City of
West Sacramento Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS). This strategy is a
roadmap for stakeholders in the community to improve the economy of the city. An enormous
number of people have contributed their input to the development of this strategy, including over
1350 survey respondents, 100 focus group participants, and 20 interviewees. Public meetings
have included three CEDS Committee workshops, two City of West Sacramento Economic
Development Advisory Committee meetings, and three City of West Sacramento City Council
meetings.

The Community Assessment Report highlights major issues that the City needs to address and
opportunities that the City can seize. The Target Industry Report identifies and describes
specific industries that should be targeted for business expansion and recruitment. The target
industries are: fuel cells, biotechnology, food processing, logistics, and retail. It is important for
stakeholders to fully understand and become experts in each of these industries since many of
the recommendations found in this strategy are focused on these industries. This
Recommendations Report provides specific recommendations that will address issues and
opportunities that have been identified.

The City can achieve the success that many in the community envision. West Sacramento will
become the most exciting community in the Sacramento region with a powerful
economic engine by:

   •   leveraging area economic development assets;
   •   growing more technologically advanced companies;
   •   creating opportunities for citizens through entrepreneurship; and
   •   continuously improving education and quality of life.

By working together and aggressively implementing recommendations found in this strategy, in
addition to existing City plans, the community will realize its vision.

Both the Community Assessment Report and the Target Industry Report have led to this last
document, the Recommendations Report. The recommendations are organized by the
following Goals:

               ∗   Workforce Development and Education
               ∗   Entrepreneurship
               ∗   Quality of Life
               ∗   Land Use, Sites, and Infrastructure
               ∗   Economic Development Efforts
               ∗   Marketing




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                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


For each of the six goals listed, the report provides specific objectives and implementation
actions.

The Appendix contains a Marketing Guide (MG) that contains information to assist the
community while implementing marketing objectives; suggestions for measuring progress of this
plan; a summary of input received from the online survey; and descriptions of past and current
City plans that have been incorporated into the analysis and development of economic
development strategies.

Finally, this report conforms to the Economic Development Administration’s (EDA) CEDS
guidelines. This report will be submitted to the EDA for their confirmation that the document
meets the CEDS guidelines criteria. A completion of a CEDS plan permits a community to
pursue federal government funding (from the EDA) for economic development projects,
depending on the economic status of the community.

All reports will be available online at www.ShapeWSac.com as they are completed. We
encourage you to review them thoroughly, and provide us with your comments and insight.
Thank you for your input.




Angelos Angelou, Principal
Amy Holloway, Vice President for Economic Development
Chris Engle, Vice President and Senior Analyst
Jeff Marcell, Project Manager
Sean Garretson, Project Manager
Nicole Urbis, Marketing Strategist
Travis Warziniack, Research Manager




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                      West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Table of Contents
    Introduction                                              5

    Key Findings                                              5

    Target Industries                                         6

    Vision and Goals                                          7

    Implementation                                            8
          Implementation Matrix

    City Priorities                                           17

    Recommendations                                           23

           Workforce and Education                            23

           Entrepreneurship                                   30

           Quality of Life                                    38

           Land Use/Sites and Infrastructure                  44

           Economic Development Efforts                       49

           Marketing                                          55



    Appendix

           Performance Metrics

           Economic Development Survey Report

           Marketing Guide

           Relevant City Plans Incorporated into Economic Development Plan

           Potential Funding Sources




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                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Introduction
Since its inception in 1987, West Sacramento has been progressive in its planning and
aggressive in its implementation of those plans. That hard work and determination has been
paying off and the city has seen remarkable change since its formation. Historically, the city has
been in an awkward position because it does not reflect the rural environment that exists in the
majority of Yolo County. Likewise, because of the separation from Sacramento by the river and
its political boundaries, it has not been considered a part of the City of Sacramento. West
Sacramento has traditionally been perceived as an industrial, blue-collar part of the region.

In the past decade, the industrial businesses in the city have generated a great number of jobs
and a large amount of investment and they will continue to do so. However, the community has
expressed a desire to diversify the city and build other assets. This is shown through the
creation of several plans that are remaking parts of the city into mixed-use areas with an
exciting, urban flair. Due to progressive leadership, West Sacramento is in the early stages of a
renaissance that will attract new residents, retail outlets, entertainment venues, and businesses.

The AE team has reviewed the plans that the city has previously adopted and has considered
them while developing the recommendations within this report. A common theme that underlies
each of these plans is the desire for new managed growth that captures the excitement
and prosperity that the city envisions for its future. This economic development strategy
reflects this desire, and challenges the community to implement these recommendations and
create the future it envisions.

Key Findings
The Community Assessment Report provides an in-depth analysis of key strengths,
opportunities, and areas for improvement in West Sacramento. The following are the most
important issues that this strategic document addresses:

   •   Absence of a higher education institution within the city
   •   Perception of the city largely as an industrial location
   •   Lack of entrepreneurial support and focus
   •   Poorly skilled workforce
   •   Poor perception of K-12 schools
   •   Large number of people working but not living in the city
   •   Lack of engagement of the business community in the city’s future
   •   Lack of quality retail, entertainment and nightlife
   •   Division between long time and newer residents
   •   Economic development services provided completely by city government
   •   City departments do not appreciate their role in economic development




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                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Target Industries
The Target Industry Report provided recommendations on which specific industries the City
should focus economic development efforts. Recommendations within this plan focus on the
following target industries (more information on these industries can be found in the Target
Industry Report):

Biotechnology
A 2002 Sacramento Business Journal article stated that, “West Sacramento, long seen as a
regional backwater of cheap motels and grimy warehouses, is aggressively -- and successfully -
- courting biotech companies for a high-tech makeover.” Biotech has been a target industry for
the City since 1996, and since then West Sacramento has succeeded by being the low cost
alternative for buildings and land. This has served to build a critical mass of research
companies in the city, many of which were founded in West Sacramento. Biotech activities in
the city range from medical devices to bioinformatics to veterinary diagnostics. Regionally,
many of the biotech companies are tied to the local agricultural presence with research involving
modified foods, food and drug safety, and pest resistance of crops.

Retail
Retail is not typically a target for economic developers. It is generally seen as a locally serving
industry with no real economic impact. However, by focusing on retail development, the City will
be improving its quality of life, increasing tax revenue, and improving its image.

Logistics
The regional distribution industry has been hit hard by the weakened economy. Employment
has fallen for the last three years. The Port of Sacramento is the most visible distribution
employer in the city and has about 150 full-time equivalent workers. It handles bulk cargo such
as rice, wheat, lumber, and fertilizer. The Port, however, lost $3 million over the last three and a
half years, creating an air of uncertainty about its future. Major distribution companies have
stated that West Sacramento is the perfect fit for their models; however, the City has had their
fill of traditional distribution centers. The logistics industry, therefore, is a good match for
West Sacramento. It matches its strengths in distribution while adding a high tech component
to its industry targets.

Food Processing
Food processing is already a target industry for the City of West Sacramento and continues to
be a good fit. Many of the City’s inquiries from companies considering locating to West
Sacramento are food processors. The industry benefits from many of the same assets that the
distribution industry uses, and is actually a large user of transportation services. West
Sacramento offers access to large markets like San Francisco without incurring the high
operating and real estate costs of those markets.

Fuel Cells
The fuel cell target industry represents a great long term opportunity for the City of West
Sacramento. The city already has one of the few hydrogen stations in the world, fuel cell
research programs for all eight of the major auto manufacturers, and strong backing by state
and federal government agencies. The fuel cell work happening in the city has given West
Sacramento global visibility among industry leaders.




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                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Vision Statement
Every plan must start with a vision. The Goals, Objectives, and Actions in this report support
the following vision. This proposed vision statement for the City has been distilled from
comments, opinions, and information from West Sacramento stakeholders:

West Sacramento will be the most exciting community in the Sacramento region
with a powerful economic engine by leveraging area assets; growing more
technologically advanced companies; creating opportunities for citizens through
entrepreneurship; and continuously improving education and quality of life.




Goals
This Recommendations Report contains objectives that will increase West Sacramento’s
opportunities for growing its target industries and other high impact businesses. AE has
identified six goals for the city’s economic development efforts. Each goal relates to a section of
the CEDS plan. The goals are:

   •   Goal One: Workforce development and education programs are focused on
       preparing the workforce for West Sacramento’s target industries.

   •   Goal Two: Entrepreneurship and small business growth are significant drivers of the
       economy.

   •   Goal Three: West Sacramento is an appealing place to live for young professionals and
       individuals employed by target industry companies.

   •   Goal Four: West Sacramento’s sites and infrastructure meet the needs of target
       industries and a growing population.

   •   Goal Five: Existing talents, leaders and resources are coordinated so that there is a
       seamless system for economic development services in West Sacramento.

   •   Goal Six: The city has a strong internal campaign that informs and gains support from
       the community for the city’s economic development strategy; and a strong external effort
       that promotes West Sacramento, increases mindshare among targeted audiences, and
       attracts business investment from targeted industry companies.




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                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Implementation
The City of West Sacramento’s Redevelopment Agency has been largely alone in its effort to
bring economic development to the city. The regional economic development organization,
SACTO, and the state economic development agency have assisted the city by bringing site
selectors and companies considering expansion or relocation to the region, and sometimes to
the city. But these efforts have been rarely successful. Most of the city’s economic successes
have come exclusively from the efforts of city staff and elected officials, working with local
brokers and developers. The Chamber of Commerce is fledgling but with additional resources,
strategic direction and effective leadership, the Chamber can play a more significant role in
economic development efforts in the City.

This strategy proposes to expand the economic development efforts that the redevelopment
agency is pursuing and assigns responsibility for other aspects of economic development to
other organizations within the city. It is impossible for the city to take on all of the roles that
must be filled to create an effective economic development effort - the staff is too small and the
assignments too voluminous to be carried out effectively. The most successful communities
have a broad base of economic development support. It is not the place of the city to take on all
aspects of economic development; it is up to the citizens of the city to get involved and take
some of this responsibility.

To facilitate the implementation of the plan, a matrix has been developed (found on the following
pages) that lists each Goal, Objective, and Action Step; a suggested timeline for when steps
should be taken; and which recommendations are priorities (labeled as “must do” or “good to
do”). AngelouEconomics makes the following key recommendations to aid in this plan’s
implementation:

•   The private sector in West Sacramento must be further involved in economic
    development efforts for the city. The goal of economic development is the creation of
    jobs and capital investment in the community. This is achieved primarily through private
    sector decisions. It is has proven to be most successful when the private sector is the
    driving force for any initiative to encourage development in the community.

•   The City of West Sacramento should act as the coordinator of the implementation of
    this economic development strategy as part of its overall mission. The city should bring
    together as many organizations and leaders in the city as possible, being as inclusive as
    possible, in an effort to coordinate economic development activities. It is imperative that long
    time residents and new residents be involved in the implementation of this plan.

•   Other organizations should also take on leadership or support roles for the plan
    implementation. The table on page 10 provides direction on which organization should lead
    the implementation of each goal and which organization(s) should be supportive of each
    goal. In many instances throughout this plan these organizations are identified in
    parentheses after each action.

    As lead coordinator, the city should convene a stakeholder meeting to focus on
    implementation where the result of the meeting should be to gain a consensus on the
    organizational strategy for implementation and the creation of an Implementation




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                             West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


      Committee. Task forces should be created for each goal that will report accomplishments to
      this committee on a quarterly basis. Quarterly meetings should be open to the public, and
      press releases highlighting accomplishments and participants should follow every meeting.
      Only through widespread city involvement and media attention will this plan maintain the
      dynamic energy that is required to meet the desires and goals of the city.

•     Regularly update and modify the plan. As with all plans, this one should be fluid – utilized
      frequently, reviewed and updated annually. The City should adjust this plan accordingly
      with input from all stakeholders mentioned. The City should use the performance metrics
      that are listed in the Appendix to assess the economic performance of the city on key
      variables. The city should benchmark itself against regional and national competitors by
      these variables.

      This plan is expected to be revised following the completion of the Port’s Maritime Demand
      Analysis and Master Land use Plan. The Port studies seek to determine the Port’s
      commodity targets, the land and investment needed to pursue a viable maritime economic
      model and a master land use plan for land owned by the Port but not needed for maritime
      use. Following completion of the Port master planning efforts, this strategy will consider
      opportunities for the Port and the city to cooperate and collaborate on mutually acceptable
      economic goals and activities.

•     Complete the city’s priority projects. While this report recommends over 70 separate
      actions to implement the economic development strategy, resource limitations will require
      that they be implemented in a methodical manner. AE has listed the projects most critical to
      the city’s success in the section entitled “City Priorities”.

•     Celebrate the successes of this plan. The often-forgotten part of implementation is
      appreciating the success that the city has achieved. The City should meet annually to
      provide an update to both those that have and those that have not been involved in the
      development and implementation of this plan. The City should consider recognizing key
      accomplishments as well as key individuals and organizations that have provided a
      significant contribution or impact in the implementation.

The table below provides an explanation of key headings that are found in the implementation
matrix and terms that are used throughout this plan.
             TERM                                                 DEFINITION

    Goal                      Outcome statements that broadly define what the City is trying to accomplish

    Objective                 Measurable actions that support the completion of individual elements of each goal

    Action                    Specific steps to take that support each objective

                              The organization that has primary responsibility for convening taskforces and leading
    Primary Implementer
                               implementation of a specific goal, objective or action

    Supporting Implementer The organization (s) that should s upport the primary implementer

    Time Frame                Period which it takes to begin and accomplish an objective

                              Performance measurements to monitor, adjust, and rate the success of actions taken to
    Metric
                              accomplish an objective



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                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


The table provided below illustrates the key stakeholders that should be involved in the
implementation of this plan. Please note that for every major section of this plan, one
organization is listed as the primary implementer. That is not to say that the organization is
responsible for implementation, but rather based upon their current involvement in their
respective programs, they should spearhead the implementation in cooperation with the other
stakeholders listed as supporting organizations. The primary implementer should help in the
formation of taskforces to support each major function area. Other organizations not listed as
supporting organizations are welcome to participate in the implementation of this plan.
                                      PRIMARY
       FUNCTION AREA                                          SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS
                                    IMPLEMENTER
                                                       Washington Unified School District
                                                       Yolo County
                                                       West Sacramento Chamber
      Workforce and                                    Community Colleges
                                         Cty           Universities
       Education                                       Employment Development Agencies
                                                       Local Non-profits
                                                       Local Churches
                                                       Local Banks
                                                       Sacramento Area Regional Technology Alliance
                                                       UC Davis CONNECT
                                                       Golden State Venture Capital Network
                                                       Sacramento Entrepreneurship Academy (SEA)
                                                       California Capital
                                                       Greater SBDC
                                                       Chamber of Commerce
    Entrepreneurship                     City          Universities
                                                       Washington Unified School District
                                                       Local Non-profits
                                                       Local Banks
                                                       Redevelopment Agency
                                                       Sacramento Entrepreneurship Academy
                                                       Other local venture capitalists
                                                       Community Colleges
                                                       Redevelopment Agency
                                                       Local Retail Developers
                                                       California Highway Patrol
                                                       West Sacramento Real Estate Brokers
                                                       Chamber of Commerce
      Quality of Life                    City          Sacramento Convention and Visitors Bureau
                                                       Service Clubs
                                                       Non-profits
                                                       Churches
                                                       Local Businesses
                                                       Sacramento River Cats
                                                       Yolo County Transportation District
                                                       Chamber of Commerce
                                                       Museums
  Land Use, Sites and                                  Port
                                         City
     Infrastructure                                    Developers
                                                       City Artists
                                                       Telecommunications Companies
                                                       Redevelopment Agency
                                                       Chamber of Commerce
      Economic
                                         City          Yolo County
  Development Efforts                                  SACTO
                                                       Chamber of Commerce
         Marketing                       City          Redevelopment Agency
                                                       Local media




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                                    West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Summary of Workforce Development and Education Recommendations
GOAL: Workforce development and education programs are focused on preparing the workforce for West Sacramento’s
target industries.

                                                                                                                               Page #
                                             RECOMMENDATIONS                                                          Timing
                                                                                                                               in Rpt.


Workforce and Education Objective One: Create a permanent, dedicated educational
facility committed to the pursuit of higher learning within the city of West Sacramento.                               2004      24
*  Currently the extent of the city’s commitment to higher education is an outreach center of the Los Rios
Community College system.
Action 1: Identify partners and determine resources and level of participation.
Action 2: Create a development plan for the proposed learning facility
Action 3: Model the facility after similar successful centers .
Workforce and Education Objective Two: Ensure K-12 education is as strong as
                                                                                                                       2004      25
possible.
*    Those regions across the U.S. who have invested in basic education are the most successful in growing high
tech, high wage employers.
Action 1: Develop collaborations with education, business community, civic groups, and the Chamber to leverage
community resources to inform students, teachers, and parents of post-graduation options other than college.
These programs will help keep graduates in the city, fill workforce needs, and keep students from dropping out of
high school .
Action 2: Invest in technological infrastructure within schools .


Workforce and Education Objective Three: Adopt programs that improve adult
                                                                                                                       2005      26
education for workers in transition who have not received a high school degree or
who need to update their skills to prepare for new job opportunities.
*    Workforce training programs need to be holistic, encompassing not just formal education and skill
development but also issues related to healthcare, affordable housing, transportation, daycare, and a monthly
stipend.

Action 1: Inventory existing workforce development preparedness programs offered by Yolo County Department
of Employment and Social Services (Yolo DESS), Yolo County Department of Education, Sacramento
Employment and Training Agency (SETA), Los Rios Economic Development Center of Excellence.
Action 2: Begin a dialogue with the Yolo County including the Workforce Investment Board about these initiatives
and opportunities for collaboration, policy augmentation, and funding sources.

Action 3: Seek greater collaboration with Yolo DESS on workforce training and development programs/activities.

Action 4: Increase promotion and awareness of Yolo DESS programs and services within the business
community and prospective businesses through joint marketing efforts of the City and the Chamber.

Action 5: Examine initiatives of other communities for ideas on innovative new programs for West Sacramento.
Action 6: Seek funding for program development .
Action 7: Inform the community that these programs are available .
Workforce and Education Objective Four: Create and enhance programs that help
                                                                                                                       2005      28
workers transition into target industry occupations.
*   West Sacramento must begin training its current and future workforce for the industries that it will target for
growth.

Action 1: Economic development groups and Los Rios Community College should become familiar with target
industry skill requirements in further developing programs to meet current and future needs.
Workforce and Education Objective Five: Develop workforce-training programs geared
                                                                                                                       2005      29
towards the Hispanic population.
*   West Sacramento has seen an increase in its Hispanic population during the past decade, and the Hispanic
population in the city will continue to rise.
Action 1: Continue English as a Second Language (ESL) programs and widely promote the availability and value
of these programs.
Action 2: Develop cultural awareness programs and events for all residents and businesses.
Priority Code -                     = Must Do                        = Good to Do




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                                 West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Summary of Entrepreneurship Recommendations
GOAL: Entrepreneurship and small business growth are significant drivers of the economy.
                                                                                                                         Page #
                                           RECOMMENDATIONS                                                      Timing
                                                                                                                         in Rpt.
Entrepreneurship Objective One: Energize the business environment of the city
by creating a facility that nurtures and develops entrepreneurs.                                                 2004      32
*    An environment of excitement about new growth and development of investment and jobs should
surround facilities dedicated to assisting entrepreneurs, educating people, and building a culture that
embraces opportunity for the future.

Action 1: Prepare a development plan for an entrepreneurial resource assistance center/incubator .
Action 2: Consider viable short-term alternatives such as creating smaller scale facilities that can be
developed within existing facilities or institutions such as the California Fuel Cell Partnership, California
Trucking Association, Chamber of Commerce, Los Rios/Sacramento City College, existing business
facilities.
Action 3: Provide in the incubator multiple services to assist entrepreneurs.
Action 4: Visit several incubators to identify best practices and pitfalls before the process begins .
Entrepreneurship Objective Two: Provide citizens in West Sacramento with
innovative educational resources to help them learn about entrepreneurship and                                   2005      34
starting a new business.
*     In the future, entrepreneurship will be responsible for more than 70 percent of economic development
in the U.S.
*     As manufacturing jobs continue to be lost to overseas competition, the U.S. economy will be driven by
small businesses.
Action 1: Think entrepreneurially in all K-12 school programming and investment .
Action 2: Develop a Youth in Philanthropy project throughout the City .
Entrepreneurship Objective Three: Nurture and build the local entrepreneurial
                                                                                                                 2005      36
environment and network.

*   Funding for business start-up is one of the biggest impediments to furthering entrepreneurship.

*   Entrepreneurial networks are a central component of an entrepreneurial climate – a cultural, social, and
economic milieu that encourages and nurtures the creation of new business ventures.
Action 1: Assist in the development and expansion of business incubators .
Action 2: Sponsor or host periodic Entrepreneurs’ Association events.
Action 3: Host an annual one-day entrepreneurial education workshop .
             Priority Code -                      = Must Do                          = Good to Do




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                                    West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Summary of Quality of Life Recommendations
GOAL: West Sacramento is an appealing place to live for young professionals and individuals employed by target industry

                                                                                                                                     Page #
                                                 RECOMMENDATIONS                                                            Timing
                                                                                                                                     in Rpt.


Quality of Life Objective One: Attract diverse, complimentary retail services to the city.                                   2005      40
* One of the chief issues regarding quality of life in the city is the lack of high-end retail.
* The city’s growing population, large daytime population and close proximity to the Sacramento central business
district create excellent opportunities for retailers.
Action 1: Work with developers to begin planning for additional retail locations in West Sacramento.
Action 2: Actively recruit desired retailers in concert with retail property owners .
Action 3: Develop a marketing program and materials to promote the unique ethnic restaurants in the central business
district to expand this retail segment. Consider development of an international marketplace with farmers’ market and
international restaurants along the West Capitol Corridor.
Action 4: Evaluate and identify appropriate sites for redevelopment of underutilized or obsolete uses into neighborhood
commercial or retail uses along commercial corridors.

Quality of Life Objective Two: Create a safe and secure environment for residents of the                                     2004      41
community.
* There has been a dramatic decrease in the level of violent crime in the city of West Sacramento over the last several
years.
* Crime level lower than that of Sacramento from most recent FBI data.

* Despite this drop in crime, the city is still perceived as one of the more dangerous locations in the region.
Action 1: Recognize the hard work of the city’s police department through a “Safe Streets Celebration”
Action 2: Create a collaborative relationship with the California Highway Patrol training academy in West Sacramento.
Although the California Highway Patrol does not have jurisdiction in the city, opportunities exist to increase the
presence of the Academy in the community.

Quality of Life Objective Three: Encourage city employees, school district employees, and
                                                                                                                                       42
large private sector company employees to live in West Sacramento.
* Very few employees at the city, school district and large companies live in West Sacramento.

Action 1: Hold periodic brown bag lunch meetings designed to inform those that work in West Sacramento about the
opportunities to live in the city. Area residential real estate brokers, new business owners, and new residents can speak
about the opportunities for purchasing or leasing homes in West Sacramento .
Action 2: Support the city's efforts to create a homebuyers assistance program for employees working in the city to
purchase homes in the city.
Quality of Life Objective Four: Create opportunities for young professionals to
                                                                                                                             2005      42
communicate and collaborate.
* There has been a large increase in the number of young people moving into the city., but AE has continued to hear
that there are very few opportunities to meet with other young professionals.
Action 1: Encourage the participation of young professionals in existing leadership, business, and service
organizations.

                                                                                                                             2004      43
Quality of Life Objective Five: Improve the visual image of the City of West Sacramento.
* Although the city has made great strides in improving the physical appearance of the City, the image of the city still
needs to be improved.
Action 1: Develop litter control and beautification program for targeted areas of the city .
Quality of Life Objective Six: Increase the entertainment and recreation opportunities in
the city, emphasizing family-oriented recreation and entertainment, sports, music and                                        2004      43
cultural events.

* Survey respondents overwhelming suggest that they want more entertainment and recreation opportunities.

Action 1: Support efforts to build state museums in West Sacramento, including the California Highway Patrol Museum.
Action 2: Encourage the development of more live music venues, restaurants, cafés and other entertainment related
businesses in appropriate locations in the city .
Action 3: Hold more public events such as cultural festivals, concerts, and community celebrations .
             Priority Code -                      = Must Do                         = Good to Do




                                                                                                                                      13
                                          West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Summary of Land Use, Sites and Infrastructure Recommendations
GOAL: West Sacramento’s sites and infrastructure meet the needs of target industries and a growing population.
                                                                                                                                                              Page #
                                                             RECOMMENDATIONS                                                                         Timing
                                                                                                                                                              in Rpt.
Sites and Infrastructure Objective One: Continue to focus on aggressive code enforcement throughout the
city.                                                                                                                                                 2004      45
Η Open storage is a serious issue throughout many parts of the city.
Action 1: Require landowners/motel owners to take a property management course if they are cited for various issues.
Action 2: Continue the efforts of the ACE team along West Capitol Avenue and in other areas that are a focus for redevelopment.
Sites and Infrastructure Objective Two: Continually assess the city’s competitiveness as a place to do
                                                                                                                                                      2005      45
business and develop.
Η The busijness climate is competitive right now but it is important to constantly assess how the city compares to others in the region.
Action 1: Annually benchmark West Sacramento’s development review process against other competitor cities to ensure the city’s
competitiveness.
Action 2: Annually survey the development community to assess their perspective on various development issues within the city.
Action 3: Review for adequacy city regulations regarding open storage. Encourage compliance through targeted code enforcement.
Sites and Infrastructure Objective Three: Expand transportation linkages with UC-Davis faculty, staff and
                                                                                                                                                      2005      46
students, and Davis residents.
Η Access to and efficiency of the public transportation system has been cited in several meetings as an impediment to growth.
Action 1: Survey existing commuters from Davis to West Sacramento and from West Sacramento to Davis. Identify their multi-modal
preferences and assess how the City and other stakeholders can take advantage of commuter interests to better serve the City of West
Sacramento .
Action 2: Begin planning for expanded bus service between Davis and West Sacramento. Include a marketing campaign to encourage
ridership .
Action 3: Identify ways to improve transit service within the city and between the cities of West Sacramento, Sacramento and Davis.
Sites and Infrastructure Objective Four: Continue to make improvements in telecommunications
                                                                                                                                                      2005      46
infrastructure
Η Maintaining cutting edge telecommunications infrastructure in a city will become a greater factor to the younger demographic including key
entrepreneurs.
Η It is important for West Sacramento to have several Wi-Fi systems throughout the city.
Action Item 1: Develop a partnership with a class from the UC-Davis telecommunications program to assess the city’s existing infrastructure
and to benchmark that with other competitor communities.
Action Item 2: Develop a scope of work for the UC Davis students, including strategies to improve existing infrastructure.
Action Item 3: Work with telecommunications providers to implement strategies identified by class, and annually benchmark the city’s
competitiveness in this area.
Sites and Infrastructure Objective Five: Redevelop vacant or underutilized distribution facilities into unique
                                                                                                                                                      2006      47
live/work arrangements.
Η Several underutilized or vacant distribution facilities exist in the city.
* These can be converted into unique live/work arrangements for artists or another similar group.

Action 1: Do survey to determine if there are candidate industrial buildings in existing mixed-use plan areas (I.e., Washington, Triangle).
Action 2: Review city building and zoning regulations to determine whether conversion to live/work use is possible and what regulatory
changes would be required.
Action 3: Interview developers to gauge market interest in converting industrial sites to mixed use / live and work projects.
Action 4: Identify three vacant or underutilized warehousing/distribution sites for mixed use potential (live/work facilities).

Action 5: If development interest is enthusiastic, proceed on parallel tracks with required regulatory changes and pilot development project.
Action 6: Determine appropriate maximum level of conversion capacity to ensure that adequate warehouse space remains for distribution
users.
Sites and Infrastructure Objective Six: Encourage an arts and entertainment district in the city.                                                     2005      47
Η Several plans, including the Waterfront Plan, Jefferson Plan and the Washington-specific plan have identified areas to promote retail and
entertainment.
Action Item 1: Earmark 1% of all city capital improvement project budgets for public art.

Action Item 2: Consider imposition of a development fee of 1% on building projects to fund the placement of public art in West Sacramento.

Action Item 3: Work with local artists and regional art museums to develop and secure art that falls within the guidelines of the public art plan.
Sites and Infrastructure Objective Seven: Consider recommendations from the Port of Sacramento
                                                                                                                                                      2004      48
Maritime Demand Analysis and Master Land Use Plan.
Η The Port of West Sacramento is undertaking a maritime demand analysis to determine the market conditions for the port and to identify the
best future uses of port land.
Action Item 1: Identify and integrate those strategies within the Port master plan that harmonize with the overall vision for economic
development for the city.
Action Item 2: Identify opportunities for joint recruitment and marketing to target industries desired by the city and the Port.
Action Item 3: Amend this plan as appropriate opportunities for collaboration are identified.
Priority Code -                      = Must Do                         = Good to Do




                                                                                                                                                              14
                                      West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Summary of Economic Development Efforts Recommendations
GOAL: To coordinate existing talents, leaders, and resources so that there is a seamless system for economic development services in
                                                                                                                                                   Page #
                                                      RECOMMENDATIONS                                                                     Timing
                                                                                                                                                   in Rpt.
Economic Development Objective One: Distribute, improve, and coordinate economic development
initiatives.                                                                                 2004                                                    50
Η The Redevelopment Agency of the City of West Sacramento carries the entire responsibility of economic development for the
city.
Η Economic development efforts are more effective and efficient, as well as being more credible in the eyes of site selectors and
company analysts when the private sector plays a major role.

Action 1: The Chamber should continue to respond to general business inquiries and requests for business assistance.
Action 2: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce should consider assisting Agency staff in business retention, with the goal
of increasing the Chamber's role over time.
Action 3: The annual contract between the City and Chamber of Commerce should be expanded to include specific economic
development deliverables.
Action 4: The City of West Sacramento's Redevelopment Agency should redefine its role and responsibility for economic
development activities to more effectively pursue and recruit targeted industries.
Action 5: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and its ambassadors and membership should play a more active role in
the city's business assistance and recruitment effort.
Economic Development Objective Two: Create a tool kit of resources to make economic
                                                                                                                                           2004      53
development more efficient.
Η With more tools, the city's economic development functions can be much more effective.
Action 1: The city needs a customized software program that has the capability to track leads and prospects the agency is working
with.
Action 2: The city needs to customize its incentive policy to attract targeted business growth.
Action 3: Explore possibilities for other target industry incentives that are within the control of other economic development partners
such as Yolo County (development impact fees) and utility providers, etc.
Action 4: The city should schedule meetings to educate each department about the city's economic development programs and
what their department's role is in recruiting and retaining business in the city.
Action 5: Further promote the use of the Enterprise Zone and other zones.
Priority Code -                    = Must Do                         = Good to Do




                                                                                                                                                   15
                                         West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Summary of Marketing Recommendations
Goal #1: Launch a strong internal campaign that informs and gains economic development support from the West Sacramento
community at large.
Goal #2: Launch a strong external effort that promotes West Sacramento, increases mindshare among targeted audiences, and
gains business investment from target industry companies.
                                                                                                                                                         Page # in
                                                         RECOMMENDATIONS                                                                        Timing
                                                                                                                                                           Rpt.
Marketing Objective One: Establish a coordinated economic development message and commit to
                                                                                                                                                 2004       58
implementing a marketing plan.
* With more tools, the city's economic development functions can be much more effective.

Action 1: City staff and chamber members should discuss and agree on coordinated economic development marketing efforts .
Action 2: Gradually expand the Chamber’s role in economic development target industry marketing activities.
Action 3: Increase coordination between the Chamber, the Agency, the Chamber Marketing Committee and the City Public Relations
Committee and Public Information Officer for city-wide marketing activities.
Action 4: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and the City should approve a joint and coordinated marketing plan to achieve
Chamber and City economic objectives.
Marketing Objective Two: Expand the Chamber Marketing Committee                                                                                  2004       59
* With more tools, the city's economic development functions can be much more effective.

Action 1: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce should consider expanding the current Marketing Committee to include individuals
who can aid in implementing economic development-related marketing including city economic development staff.
Action 2: The committee director should continue to hold periodic meetings, invite appropriate individuals to serve on this committee, convey
new committee goals, and provide updates to the Chamber leadership.
Marketing Objective Three: Create a logo with a unique theme to promote economic development in West
                                                                                                                                                 2005       60
Sacramento.
* With more tools, the city's economic development functions can be much more effective.
Action 1: The City of West Sacramento Redevelopment Agency, the West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce, and other economic
development organizations should discuss and approve an economic development theme.
Action 2: All local economic development organizations should agree to use a single, consistent message to promote West Sacramento to
local businesses, citizens, and new businesses .

Action 3: West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce should consider development of a professional logo (Chamber of Commerce).
Action 4: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce should distribute the new logo and style guide in electronic files to all organizations
promoting the city for economic development .
Action 5: All economic development organizations should revamp marketing collateral to convey this primary message .

Marketing Objective Four: Develop professional marketing tools.                                                                                  2005       51
* With more tools, the city's economic development functions can be much more effective.
Action 1: West Sacramento should add or update certain components on its web sites.
Marketing Objective Five: Agree on target audiences and better understand their needs.                                                           2004       52
* With more tools, the city's economic development functions can be much more effective.
Action 1: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce, the City Redevelopment Agency, and all other local economic development leaders
should become familiar with the characteristics and needs of each target audience.
Action 2: Revamp marketing communication with targeted message.
Action 3: Identify target industry champions.
Action 4: Become industry experts.
Marketing Objective Six: Increase local media coverage and gain community marketing allies.                                                      2004       64
* With more tools, the city's economic development functions can be much more effective.
Action 1: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and the City Redevelopment Agency should identify local media champions that can
assist with persuading the local media to communicate economic development stories to the public.

Action 2: Local media champions should assist the city with writing and distributing press announcements to local news companies.
Marketing Objective Seven: Expand local and attract new target industry companies.                                                               2005       65
* With more tools, the city's economic development functions can be much more effective.
Action 1: Ensure that target industry companies outside of West Sacramento can easily find the primary economic development web site, and
constantly update information this audience desires.
Action 2: West Sacramento should have a single source for economic development news.

                                                                                                                                                 2005       66
Marketing Objective Eight: Launch an aggressive campaign focusing on target industry companies.
* With more tools, the city's economic development functions can be much more effective.
Action 1: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and the City Redevelopment Agency should approve marketing campaigns and ask
volunteers to assist with implementation.
Action 2: Individuals from the community with a passion for economic development and marketing should volunteer and become a part of the
marketing committee.
Action 3: West Sacramento should continue its participation with regional and state marketing and business recruitment activities including
Team California, SAMG and Yolo County BioZone.

Action 4: West Sacramento should request that Yolo County participate and support SAMG's regional marketing and trade missions.
Priority Code -                   = Must Do                       = Good to Do




                                                                                                                                                          16
                         West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


City Priorities
The city should undertake the following highest priority projects in the order listed below. This
will permit the city to direct resources to the most critical needs, and to areas that will have the
biggest impact in the city. All of these priority projects are described elsewhere in this plan, but
more information is presented here to give a better understanding of each project’s importance.

The five priority projects are:
P   Create a permanent, dedicated educational facility committed to the pursuit of higher
    learning within the city of West Sacramento.

P   Create and support facilities that nurture and develop entrepreneurs and accelerate
    small business formation.

P   Create and enhance programs at Los Rios Community College that help workers
    transition into target industry occupations.

P   Prepare High School Guidance Counselors to inform students, teachers, and parents
    of post-graduation options other than college. These programs will help keep
    graduates in the city, fill workforce needs, and keep students from dropping out of
    high school.
P   The Washington Unified School District should make investments in technological
    infrastructure within schools.




               More information on each of these projects is described below.




                                                                                               17
                    West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy



1. Create a permanent, dedicated educational facility committed to the pursuit of
   higher learning within the city of West Sacramento. Estimated Cost - $2.5 million

   AE recommends the creation of an entrepreneurial and learning complex. This complex
   will house an incubator/innovation center and a multi-purpose learning center. By
   housing these two facilities together, the community will create a focal point that fosters
   an entrepreneurial culture and commitment to higher education. This will create an
   excitement and interest within the city that will lead to development of new jobs, new
   investment, and an expanded identity for the community.

   Currently the city’s sole higher education facility is an outreach center of the Los Rios
   Community College system. This does not reflect the high regard that the community
   has towards education, nor does it represent a commitment to education. In order to
   revolutionize the city’s focus on education, the community will have to make a
   substantial commitment and be creative. The recommendation that we propose will
   showcase the community as the premiere center for innovative education in the
   Sacramento region and for all of Northern California.

   AE recommends the creation of a multi purpose-learning center that uses the latest
   technology to provide students, citizens and businesses access to the learning
   institutions that exist in Northern California. This campus will house satellite locations of
   several educational institutions serving many different types of students. Community
   college courses and university courses will be taught here using teleconferencing
   technology and web based learning.

   This recommendation will achieve the goal of preparing the West Sacramento workforce
   and educational programs for the targeted industries by providing a dedicated higher
   educational facility in the city that can meet the needs of these industries. The facility
   will be able to work directly with West Sacramento companies and organizations
   involved in the target industries, and will provide the training to residents of the city that
   the companies will need.

   One institution that would likely use the facility would be the Los Rios Community
   College. The community college has been considering building a permanent campus in
   West Sacramento, and the City has encouraged this project by agreeing to work
   collaboratively with Los Rios to meet the college’s parking needs within the central
   business district. The proposed learning facility would support this expansion, and at the
   same time allow access to institutions from anywhere in the world.

   An excellent example of this type of facility is The University Center in the Woodlands,
   Texas, developed by the North Harris Montgomery Community College District. The
   center is a public/private partnership with six universities and the community college
   district offering bachelors, masters, and doctorate degrees along with certification,
   professional development and customized training. The center has two-way voice video
   interactive classrooms, 21 “smart” classrooms and eight seminar rooms, a lecture hall,
   four computer classrooms, a computer lab, a computer library connecting all partner
   libraries via Internet, and a 6,000 square foot technology training area.




                                                                                           18
                    West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


   Incorporate into this learning facility an Advanced Research and Technology
   Center for Youth. The Center for Advanced Research and Technology (CART) in
   Fresno, California is one of the most comprehensive, state-of-the-art education reform
   efforts at the secondary level in the United States. The CART collaborates with
   businesses and community agencies to educate students in a cross-curricular, project-
   based environment that is academically rigorous, and facilitated through a business
   based instructional model. AE recommends that West Sacramento consider the
   development of a similar program at the proposed learning center. The CART combines
   rigorous academics with technical, design, process, entrepreneurial, and critical thinking
   skills. High school students who participate in this program provide technical assistance
   to area businesses, and receive hands-on technical training in a unique environment.


2. Create and support facilities that nurture and develop entrepreneurs and
   accelerate small business formation. Estimated Cost - $1million

   West Sacramento has the opportunity to become the entrepreneurial center of the
   Sacramento region. The city has all of the needed assets close at hand to achieve this
   vision, but it requires a focal point where these assets can be concentrated to aid
   entrepreneurs, educate students of all types, energize the city, and change perception.
   This is the perfect time to capitalize on the city’s cool, hip image, and expand it to being
   “the place” where entrepreneurs and emerging technology businesses want to be. A
   facility dedicated to assisting entrepreneurs, educating people, and building a culture
   that embraces opportunity for the future will generate excitement and new growth,
   investment and jobs.

   Create an alternative incubator/innovation center focused on encouraging and
   assisting citizens of West Sacramento to start their own businesses. The center
   will educate young people about this employment alternative, and build entrepreneurial
   spirit into the community. This facility should embrace the multitude of opportunities that
   exist in the region and state, capitalizing on the entrepreneurial activity within the region.

   The center will achieve the goal of driving the economy by growing small business and
   entrepreneurship and by creating a nurturing environment where this activity is
   encouraged and taught. Providing this resource to West Sacramento citizens will build
   the economy from within, one business at a time.

   The center will need guidance, input and support from interested regional higher
   education institutions such as U.C. Davis and California State University at Sacramento.
   These two institutions have expertise in entrepreneurial issues and their involvement will
   be critical to the success of a future entrepreneurial resource center.

   The center should be the resource for small business development in the city,
   specifically for the citizens of West Sacramento. The center should work with California
   State University at Sacramento’s business school and Los Rios Community College to
   assist, educate, and mentor area entrepreneurs. While the number of jobs created
   through this alternative business incubation facility might be relatively small initially,
   fostering an entrepreneurial spirit within the community will help retain young and
   creative talent, and will be a strong business recruitment tool. Given time, the center will




                                                                                           19
                   West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


   graduate many entrepreneurs who will invest in West Sacramento - creating jobs and
   building the tax base.

   The entrepreneurial facility should house a Small Business Development Center branch
   office. This would allow the SBDC to hold workshops and courses assisting
   entrepreneurs. Additionally, the facility could house a Business Information Center
   providing services and resources for start-up and existing small businesses. Some
   examples of those services are Business Information Libraries, Workshops and
   Seminars, Government Contract Information, One-on-One Consultations with Qualified
   Professionals, Tax Incentive Information, Recruitment/Pre-Screening of Applicants, Free
   Posting of Job Vacancies, and Free Use of Interview Facilities.

   Opportunities for co-location or joint use of the facility with the West Sacramento
   Chamber of Commerce may create efficiencies and synergies related to Chamber
   events, business mentoring, seminars, and partnerships with the local business
   community.

   West Sacramento is fortunate to have the Technology Development Center, a for-
   profit business incubator managed by the Soderquist Group. This organization builds
   successful companies through technology venturing. Additionally, DFJ Frontier, an
   affiliate of Draper Fisher Jurvetson, an early stage venture capital firm headquartered in
   Silicon Valley, has moved their Sacramento office to the Technology Development
   Center. These organizations provide a unique entrepreneurship base that the city
   should leverage and help grow. Supporting incubators will achieve the goal of growing
   small business and entrepreneurship in the community. It will bring new, cutting edge
   start-up companies into the city and help drive the economy.


3. Create and enhance programs that help workers transition into target industry
   occupations. Estimated Cost - $20,000 per year

   Economic development organizations, workforce development agencies and Los Rios
   Community College should become familiar with target industry skill requirements in
   further developing programs to meet current and future needs.

   Economic Development staff should hold quarterly workshops with community college
   leaders and economic development players to educate them on why specific industries
   are targeted by the city, and what training is needed to prepare workers for those
   industries.

   This recommendation will achieve the goal of preparing the West Sacramento workforce
   and educational programs for the targeted industries by providing technical training that
   is needed immediately.

   Educational institutions, economic development organizations, and companies should
   develop programs that train people and position West Sacramento for the biotech
   industry. West Sacramento has a number of small biotech companies. These
   companies are in immediate need of workers with technical skills, like medical-
   technicians. These positions require certifications or two-year degrees, and could be




                                                                                         20
                   West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


   filled by city residents. These opportunities are exceptional for young people or people
   changing careers. On-the-job training at area biotech companies should also be
   explored. UC Davis should be a partner in bringing together the companies, the
   community college, and the high school to achieve this goal.


4. Prepare High School Guidance Counselors to inform students, teachers, and
   parents of post-graduation options other than college. These programs will help
   keep graduates in the city, fill workforce needs, and keep students from dropping
   out of high school. Estimated Cost - $50,000 per year

   Early on in high school, counselors should identify students who may be interested in a
   track other than college. A good example is the Mountain Empire Community College’s
   Talent Search Program in Virginia. This program helps 12-18 year old students from
   low-income families define career and educational goals. It is designed to keep students
   on track throughout their education. Students work with educators to monitor their
   progress and stay focused on long-term goals. Counselors should guide these students
   into apprenticeship programs for occupations that are growing but currently not being
   pursued by students.

   High school administrators should become familiar with the workforce needs of the
   targeted industries and establish General Prep and Vocational Prep courses of study
   that match those needs. The resources of the Los Rios Community College should be
   promoted in the high school.

   This will achieve the goal of preparing the West Sacramento workforce and educational
   programs for the targeted industries by providing an alternative career choice for
   students. These students will understand how they can quickly enter employment in the
   target industries after high school graduation.

   The Washington Unified School District should create a web site and printed information
   package containing resources for non-university bound youths. The web site and
   package should contain information about non-college options, links with training
   organizations, apprenticeship programs, and the community college. The web site could
   also contain job postings.


5. The Washington Unified School District should make investments in technological
   infrastructure within schools. Estimated Cost - $75,000 per year

   West Sacramento recently achieved a major success when 68.5% of the voters in West
   Sacramento voted “Yes” on Measure Q, a $52 million school bond measure to build a
   new high school. The city will have one opportunity to create a high school that can
   meet the educational demands that will be placed on the next generation.

   Providing a foundation of science and technology to the students of West Sacramento
   will better prepare them for careers in the target industries likely to be growing and
   hiring.




                                                                                       21
                West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


AE recommends that the Washington Unified School District continue to investigate
cutting edge programs and concepts throughout the country, programs such as the
Center for Advanced Research and Technology in the Fresno and Clovis Unified School
Districts in California as previously described.

The district should incorporate activities and programs oriented to the targeted industries
in vocational programs and classes in K-12 education. For example, science classes for
elementary school children could include a segment on biotechnology. As children
progress through school, educators could provide field trips and internships with local
biotech firms. Currently, students from other districts are interning at West Sacramento
biotech companies. West Sacramento students should have the same opportunity.

The district should work with local universities to create a permanent display that
constantly reinforces the option of college to students - why it’s important, what students
need to do to achieve that option, and the relationship between education and the
targeted industries in the city.

The district should work with area universities to provide dual credit courses to students
in courses and that are focused on the targeted industries.




                                                                                      22
                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Recommendations
WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES
GOAL: Workforce development and education programs are focused on
      preparing the workforce for West Sacramento’s target industries.

Education and skills are important determinants of the employability and income-potential of
workers. The productivity of labor is a function of the technical skills the employee has acquired.
As the value of strong minds and knowledge increases, employers will seek skilled and
educated workers. The demand for education and workforce training thus increases.

The educational attainment level in West Sacramento is perhaps the city’s greatest challenge.
The percentage of people with Bachelor’s degrees is less than half that of the state average; the
percentage of graduate degrees is less than a third of the state level. K-12 in the city has
historically under-performed. The city must address these issues if it is to find real success in
building a strong and forward-looking economy.

For much of the 20th Century, attitudes about workforce development and education across the
country reflected a limited “manufacturing” vision of business development – relying on low-skill,
low-wage, and low-value-added industries. Many of these traditional manufacturing industries
are no longer providing jobs in West Sacramento or the United States, underscoring the
importance of changing West Sacramento’s perspective on education and workforce. The
attitudinal change needs to come from within, and community leaders must demonstrate their
commitment to change. As leaders and stakeholders in West Sacramento have already
recognized, education and workforce training must be a top priority for the city and its
education and workforce development partners.

The following are West Sacramento’s workforce and education objectives:

       •   Create a permanent, dedicated educational facility committed to the pursuit of
           higher learning within the city of West Sacramento.

       •   Ensure K-12 education is as strong as possible.

       •   Adopt programs that improve adult education for workers in transition who
           have not received a high school degree or who need to update their skills to
           prepare for new job opportunities, including customer service, literacy,
           computer, and technical skills. Emphasis may be given to target income
           groups and the under-employed and unemployed adults.

       •   Create and enhance programs at Los Rios Community College that help
           workers transition into target industry occupations.

            Detailed activities to support these objectives are provided below.




                                                                                             23
                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Workforce Objective One: Create a permanent, dedicated educational
facility committed to the pursuit of higher learning within the city of West
Sacramento.

   Currently the city’s sole higher education facility is an outreach center of the Los Rios
   Community College system. This does not reflect the high regard that the community has
   towards education, nor does it represent a commitment to education. In order to
   revolutionize the city’s focus on education, the community will have to be creative and bold.
   The recommendation that we propose will showcase the community as the premiere center
   for innovative education in the Sacramento region and for all of Northern California.

      •   AE recommends the creation of a multi purpose-learning center providing students,
          citizens, and businesses of West Sacramento access to the highly regarded learning
          institutions that exist in Northern California through the use of technology. This
          campus will house satellite locations of several educational institutions serving many
          different types students. Community college to university courses will be taught here
          using teleconference technology and web based learning.

      •   A principal participant in the facility could be the Los Rios Community College, an
          institution that has shown an early commitment to meeting the city’s higher
          educational needs. The proposed learning facility will allow the community to
          expand on the community college campus concept and allow area students access
          to institutions from anywhere in the world.

   Action 1: Identify partners and determine resources and level of participation.
      • Begin dialogue with implementing agencies and higher education institutions, create
          a task force, including West Sacramento Chamber Education Committee, Los Rios
          Community College District, Washington Unified School District, Yolo County
          Department of Employment and Social Services, Yolo County Department of
          Education.

   Action 2: Create a development plan for the proposed learning facility (City,
   Community Colleges, Universities).
   City staff should initiate discussions with educational institutions regarding a development
   plan.
           • The development plan will determine the appropriate size of the facility, location,
               founding educational institution members and their course plans, budget, and
               time line.

          •   Potential locations: Central Business District, West Capitol Avenue, the Triangle
              or the Washington Specific Plan areas. These are ideal locations due to the
              proximity to transit and to downtown Sacramento, and the large development
              capacity of these areas.

   Action 3: Model the facility after similar successful centers (City, Community
   Colleges, Universities).




                                                                                           24
                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


           •   Speak with representatives of the University Center and the Center for Advanced
               Research and Technology. Visit their facilities and learn how they created their
               facilities.

Workforce Objective Two: Ensure K-12 education is as strong as possible.

Basic education is the foundation of successful economic development. Those regions across
the U.S. that have invested in basic education are the most successful in growing high tech,
high wage employers.

Many of the employees working for companies operating within the city live in outlying areas.
Moreover, many residents of the city cannot offer the skills desired by companies located in the
city. Before an aggressive external economic development campaign is launched, it is essential
that West Sacramento invest in the core of the community: K-12 education. This investment will
help the city retain its current employers and high skilled workers, and will bolster community
pride and spirit.

Businesses in the target industries that have been recommended by AE demand the best
possible K-12 education system and workforce training programs to prepare the workforce to
succeed in fast growing and changing industries. These businesses need to recruit and retain
young professionals who demand that their children receive excellent education. A commitment
to basic education conveys that West Sacramento is willing to invest in its future and support
them in the future.


   Action 1: Develop collaborations with education, business community, civic groups,
   and the Chamber to leverage community resources to inform students, teachers, and
   parents of post-graduation options other than college. These programs will help keep
   graduates in the city, fill workforce needs, and keep students from dropping out of
   high school (Washington Unified School District).

   Action 2: Invest in technological infrastructure within schools (Washington Unified
   School District).




                                                                                          25
                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Workforce Objective Three: Adopt programs that improve adult education for
workers in transition who have not received a high school degree or who need to
update their skills to prepare for new job opportunities, including customer
service, literacy, computer, and technical skills. Emphasis may be given to target
income groups and the underemployed and unemployed adults.

Workforce training programs need to be holistic, encompassing not just formal education and
skill development but also issues related to healthcare, affordable housing, transportation,
daycare, and a monthly stipend. To effectively transition displaced workers into target industries,
coordinating workforce development programs with these other types of services will yield the
most positive results.

   Action 1: Inventory existing workforce development preparedness programs offered
   by Yolo County Department of Employment and Social Services (Yolo DESS), Yolo
   County Department of Education, Sacramento Employment and Training Agency
   (SETA), Los Rios Economic Development Center of Excellence. Yolo DESS offers
   childcare, transportation, literacy, skill development, and other support services to its
   clients. Los Rios offers a variety of workforce training and skill improvement courses
   and customized training services for employers.

   Action 2: Begin a dialogue with Yolo County and the Workforce Investment Board
   about these initiatives and opportunities for collaboration, policy augmentation, and
   funding sources.

   Action 3: Seek greater collaboration with Yolo DESS on workforce training and
   development programs/activities.

   Action 4: Increase promotion and awareness of Yolo DESS programs and services
   within the business community and prospective businesses through joint marketing
   efforts of the City and the Chamber.

   Action 5: Examine initiatives of other communities for ideas on innovative new
   programs for West Sacramento (Employment Development Agencies, Community
   Colleges).

           •   Good examples include: Project QUEST in San Antonio and STRIVE in
               Baltimore.

           •   The Los Rios Community College’s outreach center provides classes that lead to
               second and four-year degrees, as well as English as a Second Language
               courses. The community college should consider some of the best practices at
               the Danville Community College Neighborhood Educational Outreach
               Centers. After a careful assessment of who utilized the college and who did not,
               Danville Community College (VA) established four Neighborhood Educational
               Opportunity centers that provide GED, computer literacy, and continuing
               education courses for underserved populations. Through the centers, residents
               have access to education, job training and placement, neighborhood
               revitalization work, economic development assistance, and leadership
               development activities for youth and adults.



                                                                                             26
                    West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy



       •   Southeastern Community College (SCC) in Whiteville, North Carolina. SCC
           in collaboration with the Columbus County Partnership for Children, Columbus
           County Schools, and Four County Community Services offers a Family Literacy
           Program. In this program, parents and children go to school together. Parents
           can improve upon their own basic education skills and then actively participate in
           teaching their children.

Action 6: Seek funding for program development (Local Non-Profits).
       • Although there are some federal and state funds to support innovative programs,
          philanthropic funds would be more flexible. The most successful programs are
          community-based approaches with private investment.

Action 7: Inform the community that these programs are available (Employment
Development Agencies, Community Colleges).
      • Ensure that all leadership and economic development professionals fully
          understand the new workforce program delivery at all levels so that they can talk
          intelligently about these programs in their business development and expansion
          efforts. Encourage people in need to participate.

       •   Develop a community-wide informational program to funnel often hesitant, older
           workers into new vocational programs. These workers may be uncomfortable in
           a traditional educational environment but can be enticed into the work force with
           a more tailored program.

       •   Prepare a media program to distribute information throughout the community
           (E.g. libraries, churches, chambers, employers, local print and broadcast media,
           civic groups).




                                                                                       27
                    West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Workforce Objective Four: Create and enhance programs that help workers
transition into target industry occupations.

  Action 1: Economic development groups and Los Rios Community College should
  become familiar with target industry skill requirements in further developing
  programs to meet current and future needs (Los Rios Community College, Economic
  Development Agencies, and City).

        •   Hold a series of workshops with community college leaders and economic
            development agencies to develop strategic plans to train workers for the target
            industries. Achieve a group understanding on why these industries are targeted
            by the city.

        •   Build programs that train people and position West Sacramento for the biotech
            industry. West Sacramento has a number of small biotech companies. These
            companies are in immediate need of workers with technical skills, like medical-
            technicians. These positions require certifications or two-year degrees, and are
            exceptional opportunities for young people or people changing careers. Arrange
            on-the-job training opportunities at area biotech companies. UC Davis should be
            a partner in bringing together the companies, the community college, and the
            high school to achieve this goal.

        •   Dialogue with Yolo County WIB about enhancements to existing DESS
            programs/services.




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                         West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Workforce Objective Five: Develop workforce-training programs geared towards
the Hispanic population.

West Sacramento has seen an increase in its Hispanic population during the past decade. The
Hispanic population in the city will continue to rise. It is important that the city have programs to
assist Hispanics to learn English, obtain job training, job placement, and to save money in local
banks. It is important that non-Hispanic residents learn about the Hispanic culture so that
incoming residents feel welcome and engaged in the community.

   Action 1: Continue English as a Second Language (ESL) programs and widely
   promote the availability and value of these programs (Los Rios Community College,
   Washington Unified School District, Local Churches, and Local Banks).
          • ESL is currently being taught at the Los Rios Community College outreach in
             West Sacramento. Other entities that could offer classes include local public
             schools and churches.

           •   Launch a citywide public/private program to educate Hispanic residents about the
               options available to them, including ESL, other educational opportunities, and
               banking services. The program will involve a mix of public service
               announcements (PSAs), billboards, and flyers distributed at churches,
               restaurants, and other gathering places. Promotional materials should be in
               Spanish.

   Action 2: Develop cultural awareness programs and events for all residents and
   businesses (City, Local Churches, and Local Banks).
          • Continue to make learning about the Hispanic culture and other city cultures fun.
             Sponsor city events that promote cultural awareness. Invite leaders from various
             ethnic communities within West Sacramento to work on economic development
             activities and to become engaged in the future of the city.

           •   Local banks should become more flexible to the needs of Hispanic workers.
               Provide information on banking in Spanish. Be flexible on the type of
               identification required to open a savings account.




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                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


ENTREPRENEURSHIP STRATEGIES
GOAL: Entrepreneurship and small business growth are significant drivers
      of the economy.

A critical aspect of building sustainable economic competitiveness is a supportive social
structure. The Sacramento region is very diverse in terms of educational attainment, workforce
skills, and economic performance. West Sacramento has a history of being more economically
challenged and must strive to reduce disparities between itself and its neighbors. The
stimulation of entrepreneurship through the formation and development of new commercial
businesses and social enterprises will play a key role in employing underutilized resources in
the distressed areas of West Sacramento.

Entrepreneurs are primary contributors. They develop new businesses that are a provider of
employment for others, and a stabilizing factor in the society. The major benefits of
entrepreneurship include:

       •   Providing a productive outlet for enterprising and energetic people
       •   Creating jobs at relatively low capital cost, especially in the fast growing service
           sector
       •   Developing a pool of skilled and semi skilled workers who are the base for business
           expansion
       •   Accelerating innovation in products, services and techniques
       •   Serving a social function by creating career opportunities and upward social mobility,
           and by preserving, in many instances, values celebrating success and achievement.
Several entities within the region provide services for entrepreneurship with programs including
training, technical assistance, funding, and networking. Although there are numerous groups
providing various aspects of entrepreneurial development, the most overarching organizations
in the region are the Sacramento Area Regional Technology Alliance, UC Davis CONNECT,
and Golden State Venture Capital Network. Below is a summary of these organizations and
their missions.

   •   Sacramento Area Regional Technology Alliance (SARTA), a private-public
       partnership to foster local development and growth of the technology industry.

   •   UC Davis CONNECT is the University’s Technology and Entrepreneurship program
       linking entrepreneurs with the resources of the university and regional business
       professionals to promote growth of technology business ventures.

   •   Golden State Venture Capital Network is a non-profit organization that provides
       networking, training, and consulting to entrepreneurs, service providers, investors, and
       communities in 13 western states.

   •   Sacramento Entrepreneurship Academy (SEA) is a non-profit organization that
       recruits, encourages, and supports Sacramento region college students to become
       entrepreneurs.



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                         West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


   •    California Capital is a non-profit organization that specializes in "start-ups" of all kinds,
        including the EntreFund which is a loan fund of $250-$25K for new businesses.

   •    The Greater Sacramento Small Business Development Center is a federally-funded
        non-profit organization that assists small business owners in resolving problems,
        increasing productivity and improving profitability. The SBDC also provides assistance to
        individuals considering starting their own small business.

Entrepreneurship should be viewed as an alternative career path that all residents of West
Sacramento can pursue. Like any discipline, with proper education and resources, individuals
can learn to be successful entrepreneurs.

The education process should begin by instructing the workforce that starting a business can
happen in any field. Often, entrepreneurship is thought of an activity only engaged by people in
the high tech industry. This is not the case. Starting a small business can occur in any field. All
of West Sacramento’s target industries – from biotechnology to food processing offer
opportunities for local residents to be a part of an entrepreneurial endeavor. Provided with the
proper tools, West Sacramento’s residents can begin adding to its employment base one
company at a time.

The following are the entrepreneurship objectives that we recommend for West Sacramento.

        •   Energize the entrepreneurial environment of the city by creating and
            supporting facilities that nurture and develop entrepreneurs.
        •   Provide citizens in West Sacramento with innovative educational resources to
            help them learn about entrepreneurship and starting a business.
        •   Nurture and build the local entrepreneurial environment and network.


       Specific activities to support each of the above objectives are provided below.




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                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Entrepreneurship Objective One: Energize the business environment of the city
by creating a facility that nurtures and develops entrepreneurs.

   Action 1: Prepare a development plan for an entrepreneurial resource assistance
   center/incubator (City).
   A thorough development plan is important for the successful creation of any new business
   incubator. The plan will:
       • assist in making real-estate location decisions
       • determine building requirements of the facility
       • specify services to be provided
       • determine candidate entrance criteria and guidelines
       • increase community awareness of the project
       • determine who the facility’s administrators will be and help them to understand their
          role
       • serve as a requisite for grant funding applications.

   Action 2: Consider viable short-term alternatives such as creating smaller scale
   facilities that can be developed within existing facilities or institutions such as the
   California Fuel Cell Partnership, California Trucking Association, Chamber of
   commerce, Los Rios/Sacramento City College, existing business facilities.

   Action 3: Provide in the incubator multiple services to assist entrepreneurs:

      •   A professional, affordable workspace and facility
      •   Onsite business workshops and seminars (e.g., government contracting)
      •   Experienced business advisors offering legal, management, venture capital and tax
          advice
      •   Employment services including recruitment and pre-screening of job applicants
      •   Business library and resource room
      •   Networking opportunities
      •   Receptionist and facility-based services
      •   Equipment available - photocopier, fax, audio-visual equipment and more
      •   Mail and parcel delivery
      •   Flexible office and manufacturing space
      •   Short term leases
      •   High speed T1 connections
      •   Conference and lunchroom facilities
      •   Ample free parking

   Action 4: Visit several incubators to identify best practices and pitfalls before the
   process begins (City).

      McClellan Technology Incubator (MTI), a non-profit organization located on the former
      McClellan air force base can serve as an example and provide insight into their
      experience creating their facility. University of California, Davis has recently signed a
      memorandum of understanding to support the refurbishment of aging wet laboratory
      facilities at McClellan.




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               West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy



Other examples of successful incubators include:

   •   The Santa Fe Business Incubator
              http://sfbi.net/

   •   The Toronto Business Development Center
             http://www.tbdc.com/

   •   The Mobile Business Innovation Center
             http://www.ceebic.org/about%20us.htm

   •   The Denver Enterprise Center
             http://www.thedec.org/index2.ivnu

   •   Advancing California’s Emerging Technologies: ACET is a non-profit business
       development incubator located on the Alameda Naval Station in Alameda,
       developed in partnership with Alameda County, CSUS Hayward and two
       Department of Energy laboratories in Alameda County. ACET boasts that they
       are the only incubator with wet lab facilities in Northern California
       (www.greenstart.org/acet).




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                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Entrepreneurship Objective Two: Provide citizens in West Sacramento
with innovative educational resources to help them learn about
entrepreneurship and starting a new business.

In the future, entrepreneurship will likely be responsible for more than 70 percent of economic
development in the U.S. As manufacturing jobs continue to be lost to overseas competition,
U.S. job growth will be increasingly driven by small businesses. It is critical to prepare today’s
workforce for a future where they may create their own jobs, rather than expect a job with a
large employer to be waiting for them when they graduate or transition into a new career.
Providing the residents of West Sacramento with the educational tools they need to become a
community of entrepreneurs will allow them to adapt to the changing economy and will provide
the city with a diverse and resilient economy.

   Action 1: Think entrepreneurially in all K-12 school programming and investment
   (Washington Unified School District, West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce,
   Community Colleges, U.C. Davis).
   Seven out of ten high school students want to start their own businesses, according to the
   first national Gallup poll on entrepreneurship education commissioned and co-developed by
   the Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership (CEL) of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation
   [1994]. Today’s high school students are observing in dismay as corporations downsize their
   workforce and abandon the unwritten contract between the long-term employee and the
   corporate employer. Young people are skeptical that corporate America will take care of
   them, and are open to alternative employment opportunities.

           •   Emphasize Junior Achievement programs in middle and high school in
               West Sacramento. This program invites local business owners to talk with
               students about why they started their own business, what they enjoy about it, and
               how they did it.

           •   Develop a youth leadership-training program in 10th/11th grade for the high
               school in West Sacramento. Look to the John Ben Sheppard Institute, or the
               Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA, utility company in Austin, Texas) as
               model programs for youth leadership. Partner with local civic groups.

           •   Support an annual business plan competition for high school students in
               West Sacramento (Similar to UC Davis Graduate School of Management
               “Big Bang” Business Plan Competition). Invite local business leaders to
               conduct business plan instruction each fall semester. In the spring, launch a
               competition in which students conceive of a business idea and submit an
               executive summary of a business plan. Winners should receive college
               scholarships or seed capital. Invite previous year’s winners to become mentors
               and judges in the competition.

           •   Start a summer entrepreneurship-training program for teachers. Ask
               leaders at the Technology Development Center, Universities, Community
               Colleges, civic groups and private businesses to lead a one-day seminar for
               teachers to provide them with tools they can use in their own classrooms to train
               students on entrepreneurship.




                                                                                              34
                    West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy



Action 2: Develop a Youth in Philanthropy project throughout the City (West
Sacramento Chamber of Commerce, Local Non-Profits, Civic Groups, West
Sacramento Youth Commission).
Youth want to be involved in improving a community, but the opportunities to do so are
limited. A model for this type of project exists in Fort Bend County, Texas. This project is
sponsored by the George Foundation, the Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce, and local
business leaders. Highlights of this effort include:

       •   Students are involved in philanthropy by researching, planning, and
           implementing community service projects.

       •   Winners receive cash awards to be donated to charity of their choice.

       •   Select scholarship awards are provided for exceptional work for community.

       •   Total of $25,000 in scholarships awarded by community minded and committed
           leaders and businesses.




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                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Entrepreneurship Objective Three: Nurture and build the local
entrepreneurial environment and network.

Funding for business start-up is one of the biggest impediments to furthering entrepreneurship.
According to a recent article by Erik Pages and Shari Garmise in the Economic Development
Journal, “networks are a central component of an entrepreneurial climate – a cultural, social,
and economic milieu that encourages and nurtures the creation of new business ventures.” The
objective of an entrepreneurial network is to provide a forum in which business executives and
people who seek to become executives of their own companies can share ideas, do business
together, and build relationships. The city currently houses a private incubator and this facility is
a critical member of the entrepreneurial network of the community. Other individuals have
expressed interest in developing incubators.

   Action 1: Assist in the Development and Expansion of Business Incubators (City,
   Redevelopment Agency). AE recommends that the agency do as much as possible to
   support the expansion and development of incubator facilities. We also recommend that
   any assistance be contingent on several factors, and these factors should be incorporated in
   any agreement made:

   There should be a concerted effort on the part of the incubator to focus on the target
   industries and recommendations that have been identified in this CEDS plan.


           §   Biotechnology-West Sacramento has had enormous success recruiting biotech
               companies. This coupled with the research that is being conducted at UC Davis
               and its close proximity to West Sacramento creates a unique environment that
               can be ideal for biotech startups. There is a shortage of wet lab space in the
               region creating a perfect opportunity for an incubator that can meet that demand.

           §   Fuel Cell Technology-The incubator should work with the California Fuel Cell
               Partnership to identify opportunities where the incubator can take advantage of
               area research and the Partnership’s activities to further develop this long-term
               target.

           §   Logistics-The incubator should have a focus on the field of logistics, working
               with UC Davis researchers at the Institute of Transportation Studies and the
               wealth of logistics and distribution assets and industries that exist in West
               Sacramento.

           §   Food processing-The incubator should have an additional focus on the food
               processing industries, working with UC Davis researchers in agriculture and
               natural sciences to commercialize potential products.

           §   Community education and outreach- The Center should be a part of educating
               the young people of the city about what entrepreneurs do and how to become
               one.




                                                                                               36
                  West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Action 2: Sponsor or host a periodic Entrepreneurs’ Association event (Local Venture
Capitalists, Law Firms, SARTA, UC Davis CONNECT, Golden Capital Network,
Sacramento Entrepreneurship Academy, Technology Development Center).

      •   The event should include 20-30-minutes of networking time, and a 20-30-minute
          educational presentation.

      •   Speakers for the event could include: successful entrepreneurs from West
          Sacramento, the Technology Development Center, venture and angel capitalists,
          representatives from the SBDC and business incubator, instructors from
          Community Colleges’ recommended entrepreneurship class.

Action 3: Host an annual one-day entrepreneurial education workshop (Chamber of
Commerce, SBDC, and Community College.

      •   Present topics such as how to write a business plan, small business finance, and
          marketing.




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                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


QUALITY OF LIFE STRATEGIES
GOAL: West Sacramento is an appealing place to live for young
      professionals and individuals employed by target industry
      companies.

From the urban culture of Sacramento to the scenic beauty of the ocean and mountainous
terrain of Northern California, West Sacramento has access to many qualities that will be
appealing to young professionals. Yet, the city has suffered from a poor reputation regionally
and lacks key quality of life factors.

AE received 1,323 responses from a survey that was sent out to evaluate public opinion in West
Sacramento. Some survey results regarding quality of life should be of great concern. Of those
responses, 93% were from residents of the city. Over 70% of respondents said that
entertainment and recreation were below average for the city, and over 46% felt that the image
of the city was below average. An overwhelming number of respondents want to see
restaurants and music venues in the city. These opinions indicate that residents are not
satisfied with the quality of life in the community.

Retaining young professionals is as important as recruiting them. In this section, we
recommend improvements to existing quality of life features and the creation of new amenities
that will show young singles and families that West Sacramento is progressive and paying
attention to their needs. The projects we recommend are designed to generate a new energy in
the city that appeals to a younger population.

The most successful economic development regions in the U.S. feature strong quality of life
amenities. In addition to quality education, a quality environment plays a large part in the
location choices of young, skilled professionals. It also plays a significant role in retaining good
citizens.

The recommendations offered within this section are aimed at improving the quality of life for
current residents of the city, young high skilled workers and employees of target industry
companies. As addressed in the Workforce Development recommendations, young skilled
workers and target industry companies look for cities with high-performing primary and
secondary schools. Both groups are also attracted to locations with good healthcare, quality
housing, safety, ample parks recreation and green space, artistic and cultural amenities, a
vibrant downtown, and environmental cleanliness.




                                                                                               38
                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


The following are the quality of life objectives that we recommend for West Sacramento:

   •   Attract diverse, complimentary retail services to the city.

   •   Create a safe and secure environment for residents of the community.

   •   Encourage city employees, school district employees, and large private sector
       company employees to live in West Sacramento.

   •   Create opportunities for young professionals to communicate and collaborate.

   •   Improve the visual image of the City of West Sacramento.

   •   Increase the entertainment and recreation opportunities in the city, emphasizing
       family-oriented recreation and entertainment, sports, music and cultural events.


            Specific activities to support these objectives are provided below.




                                                                                          39
                         West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Quality of Life Objective One: Attract diverse, complimentary retail
services to the city.

One of the chief issues regarding quality of life in the city is the lack of retail shopping choices.
The city’s growing population, large daytime population, and close proximity to the Sacramento
central business district create excellent opportunities for retailers. The opening of the Nugget
Center in Southport and the recruitment of IKEA and the likely build-out of the balance of the
700,000 SF Riverpoint Center will satisfy much of the community’s hunger for retail
opportunities. The Riverpoint Center could well be filled within 18 months however, so the city
should begin planning for its next large and small scale retail locations.

   Action 1: Work with developers to begin planning for additional retail locations in
   West Sacramento (City, Retail Developers).
          • Inventory existing and potential retail sites in the community.

           •   Prepare marketing materials describing sites and demographics for distribution to
               retailers and developers

           •   Work with developers to begin planning for large scale successor site to
               Riverpoint.

   Action 2: Actively recruit desired retailers in concert with retail property owners. (City
   Retail Developers)

   Action 3: Develop a marketing program and materials to promote the unique ethnic
   restaurants in the central business district to expand this retail segment. Consider
   development of an international marketplace with farmers’ market and international
   restaurants along the West Capitol Corridor. (City)

   Action 4: Evaluate and identify appropriate sites for redevelopment of underutilized or
   obsolete uses into neighborhood commercial or retail uses along commercial
   corridors. (City)




                                                                                                40
                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Quality of Life Objective Two: Create a safe and secure environment for
residents of the community.

There has been a dramatic decrease in the level of violent crime in the city of West Sacramento
over the last several years. In fact, it is lower than that of Sacramento from most recent FBI
data. Despite this drop in crime, the city is still perceived as one of the more dangerous
locations in the region.

   Action 1: Recognize the hard work of the city’s police department through a “Safe
   Streets Celebration” (City).
          • Take this opportunity to celebrate something that is important to all citizens.

           •   Highlight the successes of the department’s activities at the event and present
               city awards.

           •   Create a press packet and program to attract regional media coverage.

   Action 2: Create a collaborative relationship with the California Highway Patrol
   training academy in West Sacramento. Although the California Highway Patrol does
   not have jurisdiction in the city, opportunities exist to increase the presence of the
   Academy in the community (City, California Highway Patrol).
          • Work with the Academy to create public outreach programs with the residents of
              the city.




                                                                                           41
                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Quality of Life Objective Three: Encourage city employees, school district
employees, and large private sector company employees to live in West
Sacramento. (Why not: Encourage West Sacramento workers to become
West Sacramento residents? Ie. Why are we singling out these 3 groups?)


   Action 1: Hold quarterly brown bag lunch meetings designed to inform those that
   work in West Sacramento about the opportunities to live in the city. Area residential
   real estate brokers, new business owners, and new residents can speak about the
   opportunities for purchasing or leasing homes in West Sacramento (West Sacramento Real
   Estate Brokers, West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce).


   Action 2: Support the city’s efforts to create a homebuyers assistance program for
   employees working in the city to purchase homes in the city.




Quality of Life Objective Four: Create opportunities for young
professionals to communicate and collaborate.

Although the percentage of young residents in West Sacramento is increasing, there are very
few opportunities to meet with other young professionals.

   Action 1: Encourage the participation of young professionals in existing leadership,
   business, and service organizations. (West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce,
   Service Clubs, City) Business and service organizations should market themselves to
   young people at the college level as a means to engage and network with other young
   professionals. If there is sufficient interest, established organizations should help to set up
   more focused networking opportunities for young people perhaps as sub-units of the
   established organization. The city can encourage participation of young professionals in the
   city’s advisory and decision-making bodies by recruiting young individuals for these
   positions.




                                                                                            42
                      West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Quality of Life Objective Five: Improve the visual image of the City of West
Sacramento.

  Action 1: Develop litter control and beautification program for targeted areas of the
  city (City, Local Businesses, Residents).
          • Establish an “Adopt a Road” litter control program modeled after successful state
              highway programs.

         •   Hold a “Beautify West Sacramento” contest encouraging residents and local
             businesses to spruce up their property. The city’s recently implemented “Best on
             the Block” program does exactly this.




Quality of Life Objective Six: Increase the entertainment and recreation
opportunities in the city, emphasizing family-oriented recreation and
entertainment, sports, music and cultural events.

  Action 1: Support efforts to build state museums in West Sacramento, including the
  California Highway Patrol Museum (City, Residents, Businesses).

         •   Go to http://www.chpmuseum.org/ for more information.

  Action 2: Encourage the development of more live music venues, restaurants, cafés
  and other entertainment related businesses in the city in appropriate locations (City,
  Developers, and Businesses).
        • Target the Washington and Triangle areas for business recruitment of these
            uses.

         •   Review development regulations to insure that they do not discourage
             entertainment uses where desirable.

         •   Encourage adequate secure parking in designated entertainment districts.

  Action 3: Hold more public events such as cultural festivals, concerts, and
  community celebrations (Sacramento River Cats, City, Sacramento Convention and
  Visitors Bureau).

         •   Work with concert and festival promoters to coordinate joint private/community
             events, such as cultural festivals, live music concerts, wine and food tasting, foot
             and bicycle races.

         •   Consider implementation of dedicated funding source and organization to provide
             year round professional programming of events in the riverfront area.




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                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy



LAND USE, SITES AND INFRASTRUCTURE STRATEGIES

GOAL: West Sacramento’s sites and infrastructure meet the needs of target
      industries and a growing population.

West Sacramento has a good supply of business park facilities to support office and light
commercial businesses. Due to West Sacramento’s transportation network and location, the city
will continue to be attractive for higher end distribution uses.

As West Sacramento redefines itself and shifts its economic focus from industrial to retail and
professional services, it is clear that that the city needs to continue to focus on redevelopment
efforts. This includes improvements in the appearance of the community, as well as the
promotion of mixed-use developments and entertainment.

We suggest the following objectives for improving West Sacramento’s sites and infrastructure:

   •   Continue to focus on aggressive code enforcement throughout the city.
   •   Continually assess the city’s competitiveness as a place to do business and
       develop. Expand transportation linkages with UC-Davis faculty, staff and students,
       and Davis residents.
   •   Continue to make improvements in telecommunications infrastructure.
   •   Redevelop vacant or underutilized distribution facilities into unique live/work
       arrangements.
   •   Encourage an arts and entertainment district in the city.
   •   Consider and implement recommendations from the Port of Sacramento Maritime
       Demand Analysis and Master Land Use Plan for business development targets
       that are desirable to both the city and the Port.



            Detailed activities to support these objectives are provided below.




                                                                                           44
                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Sites and Infrastructure Objective One: Continue to focus on aggressive
code enforcement throughout the city.

West Sacramento has a creative team approach to dealing with some of the landowner and
code enforcement issues along West Capitol Avenue. The efforts of the Action for Community
Enhancement (ACE) team are some of the most innovative and collaborative efforts to eliminate
blight and crime in redeveloping communities.

   Action 1: Require landowners/motel owners to take a prope rty management course if
   they are cited for various issues (City).

   Action 2: Continue the efforts of the ACE team along West Capitol Avenue and in
   other areas that are a focus for redevelopment (City).
          • The Action for Community Enhancement (ACE) Task Force is a collaborative
             group comprised of key staff from different city departments including
             Redevelopment, Parks and Community Services, Grants and Community
             Investment, Community Development, and Police. ACE meets regularly to
             coordinate actions to address specific problems the City has identified. Most
             efforts of the ACE task force have focused on West Capitol Avenue, the city’s
             main east/west corridor.




Sites and Infrastructure Objective Two: Continually assess the city’s
competitiveness as a place to do business.

   Action 1: Annually benchmark West Sacramento’s development review process
   against other competitor cities to ensure the city’s competitiveness (City).

   Action 2: Annually survey the development community to assess their perspective on
   various development issues within the city (City, Chamber of Commerce).

   Action 3: Review for adequacy city regulations regarding open storage. Encourage
   compliance through targeted code enforcement (City).




                                                                                        45
                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Sites and Infrastructure Objective Three: Expand transportation linkages
with UC-Davis faculty, staff and students, and Davis residents.

Access to and efficiency of the public transportation system supports high quality economic
development. The city should form a partnership with transportation providers in improving the
public transportation system within West Sacramento, and from Sacramento to Davis.

   Action 1: Survey existing commuters from Davis to West Sacramento and from West
   Sacramento to Davis. Identify their multi-modal preferences and assess how the City and
   other stakeholders can take advantage of commuter interests to better serve the City of
   West Sacramento (Yolo County Transportation District, City).

   Action 2: Begin planning for expanded bus service between Davis and West
   Sacramento. Include a marketing campaign to encourage ridership (Yolo County
   Transportation District, City).

   Action 3: Identify ways to improve transit service within the city and between the
   cities of West Sacramento, Sacramento and Davis.




Sites and Infrastructure Objective Four: Continue to make improvements
in telecommunications infrastructure

Maintaining cutting edge telecommunications infrastructure in a city benefits all businesses but
is especially important to the younger demographic including key entrepreneurs. It will be
important for West Sacramento to work with the entrepreneurs that have already established
Wi-Fi service at Raley Field and along West Capitol Avenue to expand Wi-Fi systems
throughout the city.

   Action 1: Develop a partnership with a class from the UC-Davis telecommunications
   program to assess the city’s existing infrastructure and to benchmark that with other
   competitor communities (City).

   Action 2: Develop a scope of work for the UC Davis students, including strategies to
   improve e xisting infrastructure (City).

   Action 3: Work with telecommunications providers to implement strategies identified
   by class, and annually benchmark the city’s competitiveness in this area (City,
   Telecommunication Companies).




                                                                                            46
                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Sites and Infrastructure Objective Five: Redevelop vacant or underutilized
distribution facilities into unique live/work arrangements.

A large amount of vacant warehouse space currently exists in the city. Some strategically
located space could be considered for conversion into unique live/work arrangements for artists
or another similar group.

   Action 1: Do survey to determine if there are candidate industrial buildings in existing
   mixed-use plan areas (i.e., Washington, Triangle).

   Action 2: Review city building and zoning regulations to determine whether
   conversion to live/work use is possible and what regulatory changes would be
   required. (City, Agency)

   Action 3: Interview developers to gauge market interest in converting industrial sites
   to mixed use / live and work projects (Agency).

   Action 4: Identify three vacant or underutilized warehousing/distribution sites for
   mixed use potential (live/work facilities) (Agency).

   Action 5: If development interest is enthusiastic, proceed on parallel tracks with
   required regulatory changes and pilot development project (City, Agency,
   Developers).

   Action 6: Determine appropriate maximum level of conversion capacity to ensure that
   adequate warehouse space remains for distribution users.



Sites and Infrastructure Objective Six: Encourage an arts and
entertainment district in the city.

Several plans, including the Riverfront Master Plan, and Triangle and Washington specific plans
have identified areas to promote retail and entertainment. The City should encourage public art
with specific themes, as part of all redevelopment projects and throughout the city.

   Action 1: Earmark 1% of all city capital improvement project budgets for public art
   (City).

   Action 2: Consider imposition of a development fee of 1% on building projects to fund
   the placement of public art in West Sacramento (City).

   Action 3: Work with local artists and regional art museums to develop and secure art
   that falls within the guidelines of the public art plan (City Artists and Museums).




                                                                                          47
                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Sites and Infrastructure Objective Seven: Consider recommendations from
the Port of Sacramento Maritime Demand Analysis and Master Land Use
Plan.

The Port of West Sacramento is undertaking a maritime demand analysis and master land use
planning effort to determine the market conditions and opportunities for the Port. Based on that
analysis and public discussion of its implications, the study will in its second phase develop
alternatives for use of all Port lands for maritime and possibly non-maritime uses.

   Action 1: Identify and integrate those strategies within the Port master plan that
   harmonize with the overall vision for economic development for the city (City, Port).

   Action 2: Identify opportunities for joint recruitment and marketing to target
   industries desired by the city and the Port.

   Action 3: Amend this plan as appropriate opportunities for collaboration are
   identified.




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                         West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

GOAL: Coordinate existing talents, leaders, and resources so that there is
a seamless system for economic development services in West
Sacramento.

An economic development effort founded on accurate research and understanding of West
Sacramento’s strengths will help recruit companies, workforce talent, and entrepreneurs to the
community. This will lead to the creation of better paying, higher quality jobs and will build
momentum to spark the growth of startup companies.

The city has a strong foundation for economic development in the Redevelopment Agency. The
agency has two full-time staff members dedicated to retaining and recruiting industry. They
have attracted many large and small companies and have formed strong ties within the city and
with regional organizations that have a role in economic development. The agency has
accomplished this on a very limited budget.

Currently the economic developers within the agency have a broad workload, providing general
business assistance, marketing, community relations, a business loan program, business
recruitment and retention programs and various administrative duties.         This has lead to a
reactive approach to inquiries or problems, with limited ability to be proactive in their efforts.
Opportunities exist for the agency to increase its ability to recruit and market the community
more effectively by better allocating existing resources. This type of improvement requires
shifting responsibility and additional funds, which will require the commitment of the leadership
in the community. By distributing responsibility throughout the city, the economic development
efforts of the community will become more efficient and effective, yielding better results.

There are enormous development opportunities that lie ahead for West Sacramento. Growth
will inevitably occur because of land availability and location. It is not guaranteed, however, that
this growth will fit within the community’s vision. It is essential that the city commit to a proactive
economic development initiative, one that directs growth rather than reacting to it. This plan
outlines changes and new initiatives that will deliver the economic development program that
can accomplish this.

The following are the strategies recommended to improve economic development efforts with
detailed activities to support these strategies:

   •   Distribute, improve, and coordinate economic development initiatives.

   •   Create a toolkit of resources to make economic development more efficient.

             Detailed activities to support these objectives are provided below.




                                                                                                49
                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Economic Development Objective One: Distribute, improve, and
coordinate economic development initiatives.

The Redevelopment Agency of the City of West Sacramento carries almost the entire
responsibility of economic development for the city. With limited resources the agency is
producing less than the city is capable of. Economic development efforts are more effective and
efficient, as well as being more credible in the eye of site selectors and company analysts when
the private sector plays a major role. Economic development is about business decisions and
the most effective economic development requires input from the business community.

   Action 1: The Chamber should continue to respond to general business inquiries and
   requests for business assistance.

           •   Agency staff should familiarize Chamber staff with available business assistance
               resources so that either organization can respond to routine business inquiries
               and requests for business assistance.

           •   The agency responds to a high volume of routine business inquiries which
               reduces time spent proactively recruiting and retaining target industry companies.
               Having another resource in the Chamber staff to provide this assistance would
               enhance business assistance and increase time for Agency staff to pursue target
               industry companies.

   Action 2: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce should consider assisting
   Agency staff in business retention, with the goal of increasing the Chamber’s role
   over time. (Chamber of Commerce, Agency)

           •   It is the job of the Chamber of Commerce to communicate with and understand
               the issues that affect the local business community, and to advocate on their
               behalf. This should continue. The city’s retention program overlaps with those
               efforts. The Chamber should coordinate with the city for business retention visits.

           •   The Chamber has had difficulty demonstrating value to large corporations in the
               city, resulting in a lack of active participation by those corporations. Membership
               in the Chamber is low and increasing membership needs to be a priority. By
               allowing the Chamber a role in business retention, it will demonstrate value to its
               members and aid in attracting more members.

           •   A stronger Chamber translates into a stronger business community. This creates
               jobs and builds wealth in the community.

           •   The Agency and Chamber should develop an agreement regarding chamber
               participation in business retention efforts.


   Action 3: The annual contract between the City and Chamber of Commerce should be
   expanded to include specific economic development deliverables (City).




                                                                                             50
                   West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Every activity the Chamber is involved in has an impact on economic development. The
working relationship and communication between these two organizations should be
seamless.
       • The terms of the annual contract between the City and the Chamber of
           Commerce should be expanded to include additional economic development
           activities described in this strategy.

       •   The contract should require activity and accomplishment reports to be delivered
           semi-annually.

       •   The contract should continue to incorporate activity reports and performance
           standards to ensure that the terms of the contract are being met.

       •   The Redevelopment Agency should have a seat on the Chamber Board.


Action 4: The City of West Sacramento’s Redevelopment Agency should redefine its
role and responsibility for economic development activities to more effectively
pursue and recruit targeted industries (Agency).

       •   The Agency should reallocate existing resources to handle routine business
           assistance inquiries in order to maximize priority business recruitment and
           retention activity.

       •   By having the Chamber of Commerce participate in economic development by
           responding to routine business inquiries and participating in the City’s business
           retention efforts, the agency will have additional staff time with which to
           proactively market the community.

       •   The agency should remain as the lead organization for business recruitment and
           research. The agency has the full time staff, resources and expertise to interact
           with site selectors, regional economic development organizations working with
           prospects, and companies who are analyzing the city as a place for relocation or
           expansion. Agency staff should continue to compile and maintain research on
           site selection data standards, and should continue to respond to inquiries and
           coordinate site visits. The agency should utilize marketing tools that are
           generated from the contract work of the chamber of commerce (described in
           greater detail in the marketing section of this report) to proactively recruit
           companies in the target industries that have been identified in the previous
           report.

       •   The agency should continue to manage the city’s incentive programs -
           determining the appropriate participation in a given project and conducting the
           due diligence of the project and applicant. The agency should continue to
           provide guidance and expertise for other incentives at the state and federal
           level.




                                                                                       51
                   West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


       •   The agency recently took over responsibility for the enterprise zone. This will
           create additional work for agency staff, however AE feels the agency is the best
           location for managing the enterprise zone program.

       •   The redevelopment agency should act as the lead coordinator for the
           implementation of this comprehensive economic development strategy.

       •   The redevelopment agency should act as lead coordinator and main catalyst for
           the incubator/learning center project that has been described previously. The
           agency will coordinate funding sources, be responsible for writing grant
           applications, work with area institutions and stakeholders to achieve buy in and
           support for the project. The agency should provide leadership in all aspects of
           the project’s development.

       •   Agency should continue to collaborate with Yolo County to pursue mutual
           economic development goals and industries.


Action 5: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and its ambassadors and
membership should play a more active role in the city’s business assistance and
recruitment effort (Chamber of Commerce).
       • By design, a Chamber of Commerce is the business ambassador of the
           community. As such, they play a vital role in business attraction.

       •   The Chamber’s Economic Development Committee is a potent resource. They
           have the ability to provide authoritative counsel on business practices and
           experiences in the city.

       •   The chamber should build a response team designed to assist the city’s staff in
           responding and interacting with prospective companies or consultants.
           Confidentiality is frequently of prime importance to prospects. The Chamber’s
           response team will need to adhere to confidentiality requests.

       •   Having a chamber representative welcome a business prospect and offer
           assistance should be routine.

       •   Creating and projecting a public/private team image to prospective companies
           will help sell the community and build a stronger relationship with the city and
           business community at the same time.

       •   Confidentiality agreements should be included in the Chamber contract to
           respect prospect companies’ privacy.




                                                                                       52
                      West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Economic Development Objective Two: Create a tool kit of resources to
make economic development more efficient.

  Action 1: The city needs a customized software program that has the capability to
  track leads and prospects the agency is working with (Agency).
          • The Agency recently purchased new software designed to track all aspects of
            economic development with the ability to produce timely activity reports. Agency
            and IT staff are customizing the program to maximize its utility.


  Action 2: The city needs to customize its incentive policy to attract targeted business
  growth (Agency).
         • Though Senate Bill 975 and subsequent amendments require payment of
            prevailing wages to projects receiving public assistance, and may affect the
            feasibility of a project, the city’s Development Assistance Policy should be
            retained. The policy should specifically mention the five-targeted industries and
            the incentives available to projects that further the development of those
            industries within the city.

         •   These incentives should be selective and only offered to anchor projects that
             create a predetermined number of jobs or predetermined wage level and
             preference should be given to targeted industries.


  Action 3: Explore possibilities for other target industry incentives that are within the
  control of other economic development partners such as Yolo County (development
  impact fees) and utility providers, etc.

  Action 4: The city should schedule meetings to educate each city department about
  the city’s economic development programs and what their department’s role is in
  recruiting and retaining business in the city (City).
              • Economic Development staff should lead these meetings, and specific
                guidance to each department should be provided on how they can assist in
                the city’s economic development efforts.

             •   The city should consider adopting a policy regarding the responsibility of city
                 staff to assist in and encourage all efforts pertaining to economic
                 development.

  Action 5: Further promote the use of the Enterprise Zone (Agency) and other Zones.
  (City, Chamber of Commerce)

             •   As the department responsible for management of the enterprise zone the
                 Redevelopment Agency should continue to communicate the enterprise zone
                 benefits to site selectors, companies considering expansion, and to county
                 and regional economic development organizations.




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         West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


•   The Chamber of Commerce should include enterprise zone, HUB Zone and
    TACPA information in marketing material that is produced, and share that
    information with local businesses.

•   Provide information to small business owners and residents in the region
    about the HUB Zone (Highly Underutilized Business) and TACPA (Target
    Contract Preference Area) zones through city newsletters, chamber
    meetings, etc. Publicize that this program applies also to employees of a
    business who live in the zone.




                                                                            54
                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


MARKETING STRATEGIES
GOALS:         Launch a strong internal campaign that informs and gains
               economic development support from the West Sacramento
               community at large.

               Launch a strong external effort that promotes West
               Sacramento, increases mindshare among targeted audiences,
               and gains business investment from target industry companies.

Marketing entails every activity that promotes West Sacramento - research, word-of-mouth,
local and national news stories, web sites, personal selling, campaigns, and printed material
distribution.

For West Sacramento to be most effective in marketing, the city should first market internally.
Internal marketing informs citizens and business leaders of the economic development vision,
and trains individuals to promote West Sacramento with a unified message rather than
numerous confusing messages. Internal marketing also builds local awareness and buy-in so
that when West Sacramento markets outside of its region, it has a larger team to get the
message out and is more customer-friendly when prospects visit. The use of local media and
personal meetings are good avenues for building local awareness. With strong internal support,
the chances of successful external marketing increase considerably.

Once West Sacramento has a large number of citizens acting as marketing allies, the city
should incorporate external marketing activities aimed at recruiting targeted businesses from
outside of the region. West Sacramento will most likely be prepared to launch effective external
marketing one year after internal efforts have begun. External marketing will make substantial
impacts on the city by attracting high quality development, diversifying the tax base, providing
more jobs, and creating more quality of life amenities for all citizens. After establishing external
marketing, the trick will be to create a balance between internal and external activities to get the
most return – awareness and business investment.

The following are West Sacramento’s marketing objectives. The objectives and specific actions
required to achieve these objectives were formulated following a review of existing marketing
efforts in the City. There are eight recommended strategies:

   1. Establish a coordinated economic development message and commit to
      implementing a marketing plan
   2. Expand the Chamber marketing committee
   3. Create a logo with a unique theme to promote economic development in West
      Sacramento
   4. Develop professional marketing tools
   5. Agree on target audiences and better understand their needs
   6. Increase local media coverage and gain community marketing allies
   7. Expand local and attract new target industry companies
   8. Launch an aggressive campaign focusing on target industry companies




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                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


West Sacramento is receiving a Marketing Guide (MG) that contains information to assist West
Sacramento while implementing marketing. It is meant to be used in conjunction with this
strategic plan by those leaders who will execute the marketing campaign.


Review of Existing Marketing Efforts

West Sacramento has two main organizations marketing the city: the City of West
Sacramento’s Redevelopment Agency and the West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce. The
city is also fortunate to have partnerships with regional organizations, with similar missions
that jointly promote the area for economic development.

The City of West Sacramento Redevelopment Agency’s primary marketing tools are its Web
site, http://www.ci.west-sacramento.ca.us/cityhall/departments/redev/ed/default.cfm, electronic
newsletter (E-Dollars and Sense), brochures, publications, print ads in local and national
publications and city newsletter, City Lights, produced by community relations staff in the City
Manager’s office. The Redevelopment Agency has two positions (an economic development
analyst whose primary function is business retention and expansion and an economic
development coordinator devoted to target industry recruitment) charged with marketing and
selling the city.

The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce’s primary marketing tools are its Web site,
http://www.westsacramentochamber.com , brochures and publications. The President of the
Chamber manages day-to-day marketing and selling, and has a board and Ambassador team
that supports this function.

A review of a collection of marketing tools from organizations marketing West Sacramento,
yields the following observations:

   •   There are conflicting economic development tag lines, which present a mixed message.

   •   Several marketing tools, such as the Web site, are outstanding, while some need
       improvement to get the attention of target industry executives.

   •   West Sacramento has received awards, such as the “Most development friendly city” by
       the Sacramento Business Journal, which could be better used to promote the city.

   •   Local newspapers and publications are eager to publish stories related to economic
       development; but the city could do more to capitalize on this interest.




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                    West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Tag lines
We have identified more than 10 different tag lines used by economic development
organizations in West Sacramento. As a result, the city’s main message is muddled:

       •    City of West Sacramento
                o Just look at us now
                o City that works
                o We make things happen
                o Perfect environment to grow your business, the perfect place to raise your
                    family
                o Work hard, play hard and enjoy life
                o On the go
       •    West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce
                o We mean business
                o Land of opportunity
                o A great place to live, work, and play
                o On the go
                o Go west
       •    City of West Sacramento City Council,
                o Vibrant City Where You Can Live, Work and Play

Web sites
The City of West Sacramento is the first site that appears after conducting a web search
under the city name. This is good; however, once on the city’s site, links to economic
development information are difficult to find. For instance, a mention and link to the
economic development page is lacking on the home page.

The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce indicates that they plan to re-design their site
after the city’s economic development strategy is approved.

Awards
 In 2001, the Agency received a California Association of Local Economic Development
(CALED) award of excellence for a marketing program called Yolo County BioZone, a
collaboration between Yolo County, UC Davis and the cities of West Sacramento, Davis and
Woodland to market Yolo County and its cities to expanding life science companies.

News
An April 28, 2004 news release on SARTA’s web site discussed the City of West
Sacramento’s partnership with SARTA; however, this story was not on the City of West
Sacramento or the Chamber of Commerce’s web sites. News such as this should be posted
on every appropriate communication source.

Local newspapers, such as the Sacramento Bee and the Sacramento Business Journal, see
economic development stories as newsworthy. The City of West Sacramento has a Public
Information Officer that writes and publishes a quarterly newsletter, City Lights. This
newsletter is a good tool for communicating information about economic development plans
and progress to the citizens of West Sacramento. The Redevelopment Agency staff should
continue to regularly provide content.




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                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Marketing Plan

MARKETING GOAL ONE: Launch a strong internal campaign that informs
                     and gains economic development support from
                     the community at-large.


Marketing Objective One: Establish a coordinated economic development
message and commit to implementing a marketing plan.

It is important for the city to have a unified economic development message. A unified message
promotes clarity, brand identity, and impact through repetition.

Currently, both the Chamber and the City participate in marketing. Each organization’s efforts
are often created independently. Coordination of these efforts would yield greater results.

The Chamber and City should jointly plan and develop a marketing plan to achieve the two
organizations’ economic development goals. Implementation of this can begin with each
organization’s existing marketing budgets and be augmented in the future if agreed upon
performance measures are reached.

   Action 1: City staff and chamber members should discuss and agree on coordinated
   economic development marketing efforts (Chamber of Commerce, City).

   Action 2: Gradually expand the Chamber’s role in economic development target
   industry marketing activities.

   Action 3: Increase coordination between the Chamber, the Agency, the Chamber
   marketing committee and the city Public Relations Committee and Public Information
   Officer for city-wide marketing activities.

   Action 4: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and the City should approve
   a joint and coordinated marketing plan to achieve Chamber and City economic
   objectives.




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                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Marketing Objective Two: Expand the Chamber marketing committee.

Currently, the West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce has a marketing committee in place.
Ideally, the Chamber and City should work together and have one team implementing marketing
for the city. One team will eliminate redundant efforts and make certain that marketing is
focused on the economic development vision. AE recommends the Chamber expand its
marketing committee and eventually take on new responsibilities to support economic
development.

The members of the Chamber’s marketing committee should include individuals who are
passionate about economic and community development. City should participate on this
committee. The Chamber could expand this group to include influential and innovative thinkers
who support the city’s vision and will help get the message out to other citizens and business
leaders.

The committee should meet routinely and assist with implementation, by both volunteering time
and financial support.

   The goals of this committee can be to:
      • Manage day-to-day implementation of this plan
      • Coordinate with all local and regional economic development organizations
      • Serve as ambassadors
      • Inform and update the community at-large on economic development progress
      • Interact with business prospects when appropriate
      • Write press releases and distribute to local media
      • Identify and obtain funding for marketing initiatives
      • Coordinate with advertising and marketing firms on branding, collateral, web site,
         and publications
      • Design and send campaign materials to targeted audiences

   Action 1: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce should consider expanding
   the current Marketing Committee to include individuals who can aid in implementing
   economic development-related marketing including city economic development staff.

   Action 2: The committee director should continue to hold periodic meetings, invite
   appropriate individuals to serve on this committee, convey new committee goals, and
   provide updates to the Chamber leadership.




                                                                                        59
                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Marketing Objective Three: Create a logo with a unique theme to promote
economic development in West Sacramento.

Communities that adopt a marketing theme that differentiates the city have a greater chance of
attracting economic growth. A marketing theme, tag line, and logo should share a consistent
message with the goal of increasing awareness and positive perception.

AE’s online survey asked individuals if they believe West Sacramento has a bad perception in
the Sacramento region and 80.7% of respondents said yes. When we asked individuals why
they thought West Sacramento has a bad perception, responses included high crime, industrial
image, the image of Capitol Avenue, and poor schools. It is interesting to note that FBI crime
statistics indicate that West Sacramento is actually safer than Sacramento, the schools are
consistently improving, and the city is dedicated to diversifying its economy. Recommendations
to improve the appearance of the city are listed in the quality of life section of this report.
Highlighting the positive change occurring in the city will gradually change the negative
perception to one that is more favorable.

A marketing theme is used to build a brand. A brand theme conveys “who” and “where” the city
is, as well as “what” the city offers to its target audiences. Local leaders feel that the most
marketable attributes of West Sacramento are “its proximity, great quality of life, small town
‘feel’, UC Davis biotechnology expertise, relatively affordable land, and business-friendly
environment.” These attributes can form the basis for development of a strong logo and brand
identity.

Throughout this project and during a marketing workshop, we asked individuals to give a one-
word descriptor that conveys how they would describe West Sacramento today and what they
want others to think about West Sacramento in the future. Some of the most popular
descriptors include:

              Potential             Advancing      Convenient
              Vibrant               Bridge         Untapped
              Research              Technical      Beautiful
              Growth                Diverse
              Smart                 Proactive
              Fertile               Affordable
              Science               Fuel Cells
              River                 Fun
              Eccentric             River Cats
              Cool                  Land
              Evolving              Friendly

The table below contains visual representations of how West Sacramento’s benchmark
communities market for economic development. On the right side of the page, you’ll see West
Sacramento’s two lead organizations’ logos. See the Marketing Guide for an additional review
and critique of West Sacramento’s benchmark marketing.




                                                                                         60
                    West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


City of Davis
Logo                   Tagline
                              No Tagline




City of Dixon
Logo                   Tagline
                              No Tagline




City of Folsom
Logo                   Tagline
                               Integrity,
                          Professionalism,
                       Teamwork, Workplace of
                       Choice, Innovation, Trust
                            and Respect.




City of Elk Grove
Logo                   Tagline
                              No Tagline




City of Woodland
Logo                   Tagline
                          The City of Trees




City of Vacaville
Logo                   Tagline
                              No Tagline




Sacramento PMSA
Logo                   Tagline
                       Building on Our History -
                        Creating a Place to Be




                                                                    61
                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


We have provided some branding themes as recommendations for economic development
leaders that take into consideration West Sacramento’s unique descriptors and target
audiences, benchmark communities’ themes, and the approach of successful economic
development branding. These suggested themes are meant to aid economic developers in
developing the most appropriate theme to use in marketing. Economic development leaders
should choose one theme to use in all efforts to promote economic development for West
Sacramento.

Recommended Branding Themes                                               Brand Identity:
                                                                          West Sacramento, CALIFORNIA
   •   Powering Business
   •   Fueling Growth of Emerging Business
   •   California’s Cool New City                                         Brand Theme:
   •   Home of Clean Energy Technologies                                  Advancing the way we live
   •   Advancing the Way We Live

AE believes that both “Powering Business” and “Advancing the way we live,” reflect a unique
aspect of West Sacramento. It is home to fuel cell and biotechnology innovation; its business-
friendly attitude leads to expansion and growth; it has an abundant, creative workforce; it
provides access to an acknowledged international leader, UC Davis, and several other
outstanding universities and colleges; it’s affordable compared to other California cities; and it’s
near some of the world’s most beautiful recreational amenities. West Sacramento is a city with
cool, smart people fueling growth of emerging technologies.

With Fuel Cells and Biotechnology being recommended key target industries, West Sacramento
can differentiate the city by tailoring its message to get the attention of these industry
executives. Growth conveys a positive message that will resonate with this business audience.
This primary message will also convey to other target audiences that West Sacramento is
advanced and cutting edge for such a young city. Businesses, entrepreneurs, and a young
workforce desire this type of environment.

An economic development mission statement says who West Sacramento is today and
indicates the city’s goals. AE recommends that West Sacramento’s economic development
mission should be, “To advance creation and expansion of emerging technology jobs.” West
Sacramento should communicate a primary message centered on the unique characteristics of
the community, such as “West Sacramento is powering business growth.”


                                    Advanced                       What does West Sacramento represent?


                              Superb proximity, access to
                             UC Davis expertise, knowledge-
                                based workforce, business-
                                  friendly, affordable land
                                                                         What are West Sacramento benefits?
                                 and office space, superior
                           quality-of-life, and welcoming people
                               in a small town atmosphere.



                          Northern California City,
                                                                              What is West Sacramento’s product?
                               formed in 1987,
                       Home to CA Fuel Cell Partnership.




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                  West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Action 1:   The City of West Sacramento Redevelopment Agency, the West
Sacramento Chamber of Commerce, and other economic development organizations
should discuss and approve an economic development theme (City , Chamber of
Commerce).

Action 2: All local economic development organizations should agree to use a single,
consistent message to promote West Sacramento to local businesses, citizens, and
new businesses (City, Chamber of Commerce).

Action 3: West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce should consider development of
a professional logo (Chamber of Commerce).

Action 4: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce should distribute the new
logo and style guide in electronic files to all organizations promoting the city for
economic development (Chamber of Commerce).

Action 5: All economic development organizations should revamp marketing
collateral material to convey the city’s primary message (City , Chamber of
Commerce).




                                                                               63
                      West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Marketing Objective Four: Develop professional marketing tools.

Before West Sacramento launches a new and more effective internal campaign, it should review
existing tools and consider producing new collateral material. Marketing tools aid economic
development leaders and help them promote the city. Some of West Sacramento’s most
effective current marketing tools are the Chamber’s electronic newsletter, the Chamber Chat
and Agency’s Dollars and Sense electronic newsletter.

All tools should be consistent and professional. The most optimal marketing tools that West
Sacramento should design or continue using include:
        • The City Web site
        • Chamber’s Electronic Newsletter
        • Agency’s E-Dollars and Sense electronic newsletter
        • City’s Lights Newsletter
        • Datasheets on Land and Industrial / Office Parks
        • Selective advertisements in targeted publications
        • Press releases to targeted media
        • Brochures / Flyers (Annual Report, How to Start a Business, and Welcome Packets)
        • Direct mail / e-mail campaign messages

The City’s Web site should be the primary information source that is mentioned in every
marketing activity. Invest in this activity first.

       Action 1: West Sacramento should add or update the following components on its
       web sites:
       • Economic and industry information
       • How to start a business in West Sacramento
       • Local company database
       • Sites and business parks specifications
       • Current economic development projects
       • Job postings
       • Economic development news wire
       • Local company testimonials
       • Recognition of achievements – high school and college students, entrepreneurs,
          leaders
       • Quality of life – safety
       • Entertainment and events
       • Incentives and permitting
       • PDF’s of collateral material
       • Links to economic development organizations and all other partners




                                                                                      64
                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Marketing Objective Five: Identify target audiences and better understand
their needs.

Understanding how West Sacramento satisfies the needs of each target audience will help
economic development leaders effectively communicate with internal audiences and target
industry businesses.

First, understand the needs of internal audiences and inform them of West Sacramento’s
economic development vision. Local employers, the current workforce, influencers, politicians,
academics, and entrepreneurs are an important aspect to economic development. Recognizing
these segments as a target audience and understanding their needs is sometimes overlooked.

The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and the City’s Redevelopment Agency should
continue to improve relationships with local businesses. The use of local media and personal
meetings are good avenues for building awareness and demand for economic development
services. Some additional activities to incorporate into the marketing mix include:

       •   Continue to utilize the “Mayor’s Breakfast” to promote economic development.
           Invite business leaders and discuss topics pertaining to economic development.
       •   Conduct an annual on-line business survey. Initiate an annual survey to local
           businesses that asks leaders to rate West Sacramento on topics similar to the AE
           on-line survey. Use the same survey each year to measure progress.
       •   Speak at business association meetings. The Chamber and Redevelopment
           Agency should have a stable of representatives available to speak at business
           association meetings specifically about economic development issues upon request.
       •   Meet with regional economic development organizations. Invite regional
           organizations to an annual West Sacramento Economic Development event. Make
           this an event to share information among economic development leaders throughout
           the region and to promote the city.
       •   Continue the bi-annual “West Sacramento On the Go” real estate tour event.
       •   Host a “Business Awards Event.” Similar to the city-hosted breakfast held in 2002
           personally honoring local businesses that were included in the Business Journal’s
           “Fastest Growing Businesses” publication. This is a great event for the Chamber,
           the Business Journal, and the City to jointly sponsor.
       •   Host an annual “Economic Development Forum.” During the event, regional
           leaders can provide an overview of the year’s successful economic development
           activities and an update of economic data for West Sacramento.
       •   Continue to send routine newsletters with updates and information.

Once West Sacramento succeeds in better understanding and addressing internal audiences’
needs, it should become familiar with targeted industry businesses. The city should identify
target industry champions. These champions must understand industry players, trends,
challenges, and opportunities. These individuals should have powerful connections within an
industry, and should be willing to meet with site selectors, voluntarily speak at events promoting
the city, and share industry knowledge with economic development leaders. The city should
have at least three industry champions for each target industry.




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                          West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


 West Sacramento's Target Audience Requirements and Points to Promote

 Audience             Top Requirements (Needs)                      Top Assets to Promote
 Local companies      •    Skilled workforce                        •   Quick and inexpensive permitting
                      •    Low operating costs                      •   Available land and sites
                      •    Sites to expand                          •   Dedicated workforce
 Skilled workers      •    Quality jobs (advancement opportunity)   •   Proactive leaders
                      •    Entertainment / Shopping / Recreation    •   Economic development vision and
                           options                                      plan
                      •    Affordable housing                       •   Quality of life amenities
 Entrepreneurs        •    Access to capital                        •   Financing options
                      •    Incubator facility                       •   MTI and other incubators
                      •    How to start a business tools            •   UC Davis talent
                      •    Creative workers                         •   Access to Sacramento / San
                      •    Fun city                                     Francisco entertainment
 Business             •    Competitively priced land                •   Available land and sites
 Influencers and      •    Incentives                               •   Targeted incentives
 Developers           •    Low costs and quick permitting           •   Permitting process
 Public sector        •    Raise tax base                           •   Economic development vision and
 officials            •    Improve quality of life                      plan
                      •    Provide more jobs                        •   Integrated team working to improve
                                                                        and market
 Community at large   •    Quality jobs                             •   Economic development vision and
                      •    Balanced growth                              plan
                      •    Better infrastructure (roads)            •   More jobs
                      •    Downtown activities / shopping           •   Superb quality of life
 Fuel Cells           •    Available financing                      •   Home of the CA Fuel Cell
                      •    Technical workforce                          Partnership
                      •    Strong research presence                 •   Plentiful affordable industrial space
                      •    Affordable industrial space              •   Access to State Capital
 Biotechnology        •    Scientific-based workforce               •   UC Davis – best bio program in the
                      •    Affordable lab space                         nation
                      •    Presence of major bio-focused            •   Research skilled workforce
                           University                               •   Affordable lab space
 Logistics            •    Access to major highways                 •   Traditionally a distribution economy
                      •    Affordable land                          •   Proximity to suppliers and
                      •    Proximity to large metros                    customers
                                                                    •   Regional Wi-Fi network
 Food Processing      •    Proximity to markets with large          •   Established agricultural industry
                           populations                              •   Access to large population
                      •    Access to highways                       •   Strong distribution system
                      •    Low operation costs / labor
                      •    Access to packaging suppliers
 Retail               •    Proximity to markets with large          •   Growing residential population
                           populations                              •   Large daytime population nearby
                      •    Inexpensive labor



The Marketing Guide lists industry associations that can be a resource for target industry trends
and the identification of prospects. The target audiences include: fuel cells, biotechnology, food
processing, logistics, and retail. West Sacramento can use the targeted messaging and the
main “points to promote” in this section when crafting




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                  West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Action 1: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce, the City Redevelopment
Agency, and all other local economic development leaders should become familiar
with the characteristics and needs of each target audience (Chamber of Commerce,
City and Agency).

Action 2: Revamp marketing communication with targeted message (Chamber of
Commerce, Ag ency).

Action 3: Identify target industry champions (Agency).

Action 4: Become industry experts (Agency).




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                      West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Marketing Objective Six:             Increase local media coverage and gain
community-marketing allies.

West Sacramento needs media support to broadcast its economic development message.
Local newspapers, radio stations, television stations, newsletters, events, and web sites are
good tools for communicating information about economic development to the targeted internal
audiences.

 Accomplishing the marketing goal requires media coverage that educates and creates
excitement. Private and public leaders should regularly meet with the media and provide
updates on economic development successes. The local media should be viewed as a primary
avenue for “building the local buzz.”

    Consider the following types of press releases:
      • “West Sacramento’s New Marketing Theme – Advancing the way we live””
      • “Growing Entrepreneurs”
      • “Value of Education”
      • “West Sacramento Recognizes Special Teachers”
      • “Be Proud of West Sacramento’s Students”
      • “Local Start-up / Business Successes”
      • “Recruiting New Companies”
      • “Improving West Capitol Avenue”
      • “Promote West Sacramento”
      • “Call for Industry Champions”
      • “Economic Development Marketing Achievements”
      • “Living in West Sacramento”
      • “Community Ambassadors Celebrate West Sacramento”

A large number of individuals from the community acting as a team of promoters, rather than
individuals will yield a stronger campaign. These media champions should be trained to
promote West Sacramento with a single message, rather than numerous confusing messages.
Internal marketing builds local awareness and buy-in so that when a community markets outside
of its region, it has a strong team to get out the message.

   Action 1: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and the City Redevelopment
   Agency should identify local media champions that can assist with persuading the
   local media to communicate economic development stories to the public (Chamber of
   Commerce, Agency).

   Action 2: Local media champions should assist the city with writing and distributing
   press announcements to local news companies (Individuals).




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                       West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


MARKETING GOAL TWO: Launch a strong external effort that promotes
                    West Sacramento, increases mindshare among
                    targeted audiences, and gains business
                    investment from target industry companies.


Marketing Objective Seven:              Expand and attract new target industry
companies.

External marketing promotes West Sacramento to targeted industry businesses outside of the
city. Marketing to industry businesses outside of West Sacramento should occur after the
community is behind the economic development vision. External marketing campaigns could
begin in mid-2005. Web sites should be the primary communication tool.

   Action 1: Ensure that target industry companies outside of West Sacramento can
   easily find the primary economic development web site, and constantly update
   information this audience desires (Agency, Yolo County).

   Information that should be available to target industry business executives includes:

       •   Demographic and economic profile
       •   Land and industrial / office specifications
       •   List of similar companies / suppliers and customers
       •   Incentives and financing
       •   Professional development organizations
       •   University commercialization
       •   Primary contact person

Some of the most effective current national economic development web sites include:
      • Metro Orlando Economic Development Corporation,
          http://www.business-orlando.org/
      • San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation,
          http://www.sandiegobusiness.org/
      • State of New York,
          http://www.iloveny.state.ny.us/portal/flashed.html

All economic development-related web sites should contain easy-to-find links to one another.

   Action 2: West Sacramento should have a single source for economic development
   news (Agency, Chamber of Commerce).

   For example, the Chamber and City could have a page dedicated to news, where all press
   releases, awards, and news and publication stories are listed and archived. The page could
   reside on either organization’s server, with a link to the other’s web page. The city should
   develop a page specifically for target industry information where more custom PDF collateral
   pieces for download are posted.




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                        West Sacramento Economic Development Strategy


Marketing Objective Eight: Launch an aggressive campaign directed
toward target industry companies (City, Yolo County, SACTO, SAMG).

Publicity and personal selling are the most cost effective ways for communities to get their
message out and recruit new target industry companies. West Sacramento should include
these activities in outreach efforts, be consistent in the message conveyed, and focus on
campaigns that will directly reach prospects.

West Sacramento could significantly increase the amount of publicity it receives by establishing
a PR Committee to develop and distribute releases.

West Sacramento economic development leaders should consider engaging in marketing
missions to recruit target industry companies from other regions. Each year the city could
schedule marketing missions to regions with a high concentration of target industries (for
instance, San Francisco, San Diego and Boston). Volunteer representatives from business,
government, and academia should attend marketing missions. The missions should involve a
series of meetings with local companies to sell West Sacramento as a great location for
business.

City economic development staff currently sponsor and attend 2-3 industry conferences per
year to obtain face time with prospects, and jointly sponsor target industry conferences with
regional organizations to reduce costs and increase visibility and association with more well-
known entities such as Sacramento Area Marketing Group (SAMG), Sacramento Area
Commerce and Trade Organization (SACTO) and Team California.


   Action 1: The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and the City Redevelopment
   Agency should approve marketing campaigns and ask volunteers to assist with
   implementation (Agency, Chamber of Commerce).

   Action 2: Individuals from the community with a passion for economic development
   and marketing should volunteer and become a part of the marketing committee
   (Individuals).

   Action 3: West Sacramento should continue its participation with regional and state
   marketing and business recruitment activities including the SAMG and Team
   California, Yolo County BioZone.

   Action 4: The City should request that Yolo County participate and support the
   regional SAMG marketing activities and trade missions.




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