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ECSC DRAFT List of 10 Ideas - 11 19 2007

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ECSC DRAFT List of 10 Ideas - 11 19 2007 Powered By Docstoc
					                         DRAFT MASTER LIST - ECSC “10 Ideas” (1.07.2008)
This list is not complete, and has NOT been adopted or approved by the ECSC; it has been compiled from
ECSC member & public “10 Idea” submissions (compiled by Penny Wheat.)


INTRODUCTION

Energy conservation and efficiency methods have been publicized for years with much less than 100%
market penetration. However, the pressures on our atmosphere and energy delivery systems have
increased dramatically: effective action is needed -- immediately. Additional publication of endless lists
of things to “Save the Planet” will not succeed without public acceptance of our common, overarching
goals. Endless lists carry no common buy-in, because there is the ability for every interest group to pick
apart every suggestion in turn.

When President John F. Kennedy wanted to unite the American people on a mission to space, he did not
ask us to support a low-Earth, lunar–rendezvous space mission. He asked us to go to the Moon and back
safely before the decade was out.

When FDR wanted to spur the industrial might of America to win the war against the Axis, he didn’t say:
“Let’s build 1932 heavy 4-engine bombers, 562 patrol planes, 6752 fighters, and 9000 carrier planes.”
He said: “We will build 50,000 planes each year and let no man say it can’t be done.”

To create a more resilient and energy-sustainable community, the ECSC recommends to the Alachua
County Commission aggressive policy goals and specific programs.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES (should include at least one guiding principle from each subcommittee)

       Recognize that energy issues will affect in perpetuity Alachua County’s livelihood and
        livability. Add energy sustainability to BOCC-adopted vision.
       Life-cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) should form the basis of any decision on use or
        generation of fuel sources. Equal consideration should be given to minimizing toxic pollutants
        and strict enforcement of US EPA guidelines.
       Life-cycle analysis of GHG emissions should form the basis of waste management policy. Such
        an analysis precludes direct burning of solid waste for power generation. Further develop the
        Alachua County Transfer Station for use of waste-based industries, and issue Request for
        Proposals (RFP) for industry to use Alachua County waste & discards in manufacturing or
        related activity. Match waste to industry.
       Maximize carbon sequestration throughout all County operations. Additionally, Alachua
        County government should develop the organizational capacity to participate in carbon
        markets as a source of revenue, while minimizing the carbon credits that must be purchased
        for government operations and power production.
       All County purchasing decisions should be based on, or include, a life-cycle energy component.
       Create a Berkley-style property tax based “bank” to encourage, promote and effect the
        optimum use of insulation, weatherization, upgrades, and other energy saving measures to all
        existing structures (building envelopes and machinery.) Energy codes in construction were
        first required in XX year. As 90% of structures in Alachua County were built prior to 1999, it is
        expected that significant efficiencies can be achieved.
       The guiding principles for energy production (efficiency of energy use/alternative energy)
        should be development of distributed power generation and development of a county-wide
        smart grid. Evaluate and institute fair and equitable net metering and feed-in tariffs, which
        have as their primary goal the creation of distributed power production.
       After achieving efficiencies in building envelopes and machinery, effect optimum use of local
        renewable energy resources.

ENERGY CONSERVATION


ENERGY EFFICIENCIES - BUILDINGS

POLICY. Aggressively attack our community’s electricity consumption, with a long term goal to
become as efficient (on a per capita basis) as California, Denmark, Japan, Germany, etc.

POLICY. Practice (1), conservation; (2), efficiencies (building envelope and mechanical systems); and (3),
renewable energy generation. Efficiency goals should include the following:

Goal: All phantom, or vampire loads, should be modified by home and business owners to limit or
eliminate this waste of power. Nationally, this represents 6% of our nation’s electricity consumption, an
amount equal to all of the electricity produced from hydroelectric resources.
Goal: All incandescent lights should be replaced with compact fluorescents or newer, more efficient
technologies (LEDs) as they become available.
Goal: Create a Berkley-style property tax-based plan, along with appropriate rebates (and sticks). This is
much like a road “special assessment”, where a number of families on a dirt road ask the County to front
the capital costs to pave the road. The County collects the paving cost (+ interest) from each property
owner over a period of time. Property owners could access this “bank” for efficiency upgrades after an
energy audit of their building by a government agency. This would allow a large portion of the
community to:
                              i. Add insulation where needed.
                             ii. Replace all single-pane windows with double-pane windows.
                            iii. Replace all old refrigerators with new Energy Star appliances.
                            iv. Replace inefficient water heaters.
                             v. Upgrade HVAC systems with smaller, more efficient units.
                            vi. Upgrade duct system. A significant amount of energy is lost through HVAC
                                 system duct leakage. The following organizations give estimates for the
                                 energy loss and conditioned air loss for homes in Florida and around the
                                 country. (see Sean 12/17 email from EBrown w/ more info.)
                           vii. Add solar water heaters to approximately 20,000 homes and businesses.
                          viii. Weatherize 7000 low-income homes.
                            ix. Add 2.0 kW PV systems to approximately 20,000 homes and businesses.
Goal: Require all swimming pool owners to operate circulation pumps during non-peak hours.
Goal: Develop a multi-faceted publicity campaign to persuade ALL residential pool owners to use
multiple pin-sets on their pool timers to run pool pumps multiple, shorter times per day, thus avoiding
utility peaks. This is also more effective at collecting fallen debris. A quick analysis shows this one action
might be worth 5-8 MW of load shifting.
Goal: Require home owners with excessive water consumption (over a specific amount/household) to
setup cisterns to collect rain water used to water the garden.
Goal: Require minimum of R-19 insulation in attic of all applicable rental units
      Addressed through Minimum Housing Code (City following the same path)
     Can be triggered by Landlord license/permits if they are enacted
Goal: Require full disclosure of Relative Energy Intensity of all rental units; and/or all real estate
transactions.
     Adopt a HERS (Home Energy Rating System).
     Addressed through Landlord license/permits if they are enacted
Goal: Require a maximum energy intensity threshold for all rental units
     Addressed though Landlord license/permits if they are enacted

NON-RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS
POLICY. Set aggressive reduction goals for both energy and demand, and create a measurable plan
with benchmarks to achieve them.
Goal: Eliminate the use of T12 fluorescent lamps: Retrofit all fluorescent T-12 systems still in use to T-8
or better electronic ballast systems
Goal: Convert all high-bay lighting from HID sources to linear, high-output T5 fluorescent lamps
controlled by occupancy sensors.
Goal: Install individual cubicle lighting systems controlled by a motion sensor and capable of user-
selected lighting levels.
Goal: Retrofit all remaining incandescent or CFL exit signs to LED exit signs (GRU rebate.)
Goal: Install light sensors in hallways, stairwells, and infrequently used areas in all government and
commercial buildings.
Goal: Periodically check all photo sensor-controlled lighting fixtures to assure they do not operate in
daylight hours.
Goal: Evaluate all office/administrative spaces for compliance with IES-NA standard lighting levels.
Exceeding these levels may be necessary for use by visually impaired people.
Goal: Evaluate veiling glare on computer monitors and remove lamps/fixtures as needed to improve
productivity.
Goal: Reduce heat and AC in government and commercial buildings. Specify acceptable temperature
ranges (medical buildings & portions of buildings with heat-sensitive inventory would be exempt.)
Goal: For commercial and government buildings, mandate off-hours temperature ranges. For example,
during off hours in an office building during hot months the minimum temperature might be 78 degrees
(except for medical buildings or buildings that require climate control to protect inventory.) The
maximum temperature during off-hours in winter might be 60 degrees. Require the posting of signs in
conspicuous places that inform employees how to anonymously report violations and to receive rewards
if a violation is found. Perhaps the whistle-blower would be given a number that could be brought to a
government office after the investigation and receive the reward. Fines will be set in terms of the
square footage.
Goal: Require all non-residential buildings to install solar energy for that energy consumed between
8pm and 8am.
Goal: Reduce available shopping hours, and eliminate 24/7 operating hours unless the power consumed
between midnight and 6am (for example) is generated/offset during the day (e.g., via solar energy.)
Goal: Install ‘Vending Misers’ on all refrigerated drink vending machines (free - GRU Program.)
Goal: Xeriscape/retrofit all buildings with native groundcovers; require xeriscaping on all new
construction.
Goal: Wherever possible, retrofit non-residential buildings with solar Photo Voltaic (PV) and solar
thermal.
Goal: Encourage geothermal heat pumps, especially for schools and public buildings.
Goal: Require minimum of LEED Silver on all future construction projects
Goal: Design new buildings to incorporate day lighting.
Goal: Design new buildings with the appropriate orientation to take advantage of passive solar design.
Goal: Provide tax incentives for certain energy efficiency upgrades.
Goal: Require that all new buildings be built to LEED standards (which level is open to debate, probably
related to time: lower level first, higher level later on).
Goal: Work with business leaders, GRU, national vendors and regulatory agencies to begin re-lamping all
applicable commercial businesses within the county. (This action has good economics, multiple benefits
and maximum effect per effort. Re-lamping one K-Mart might be worth upgrading 100-150 houses to
Energy Star status. Having T12 fluorescents with magnetic ballasts and incandescent lamps galore in one
of the most energy-literate counties in Florida is embarrassing.)


Goal: For government buildings only, mandate that the temperature be within specific ranges during
normal business hours. For example, a minimum temperature of 76 degrees when the air conditioner is
on and a maximum temperature of 68 degrees when the heater is on. Require the posting of signs in
conspicuous places that tell employees how to anonymously report violations and to receive rewards if
a violation is found. Perhaps the whistle-blower would be given a number that could be answered by a
government office after the investigation and receive the reward. Fines could be set in terms of the
square footage.


ALACHUA COUNTY GOVERNMENT: BUILDINGS & OPERATIONS

POLICY: Establish a timeline for reduction of fossil fuel use, consistent with the goal of a 50% GHG
reduction by 2030, and an 80% GHG reduction by 2050.

POLICY: Maximize carbon sequestration throughout all County operations.
Goal: Develop the professional capacity within Alachua County to evaluate GHG emissions reductions
and scoping of County lands for offset potential.
Goal: Develop the capacity for Alachua County to act as a carbon credit aggregator/broker for local
agriculture and forestry operations, and conservation/preservation lands. Carbon markets will become a
reality sometime during the next two years. Alachua County should develop the organizational capacity
to participate in carbon markets as a source of revenue, while minimizing the carbon credits that must
be purchased for government operations and power production.
Goal: Develop the professional capacity within Alachua County EPD for certifying sustainability of forest
lands used in production of woody biomass for power generation. EPD certification shall be a
requirement for all woody biomass sold for power generation.
Goal: Identify resources needed for creation and maintenance of carbon mitigation projects on County
lands.
Goal: Identify potential partners for creation of carbon offset programs on private lands.
Goal: Consider use of Interlocal Agreements to accomplish county-wide energy self-sufficiency goals,
carbon credit trading, countywide purchasing, and other opportunities.

POLICY: Review alternative funding streams through differential taxes and tariffs associated with
conventional and innovative energy use, building design, and community design. Development of the
capacity to sell carbon credits should be part of this portfolio. Linkage of public funding to power
generation should be extensively reviewed and modified so as to provide incentives for alternative
power generation, distributed power generation, and development of demand management and smart
grids.
Goal: Require minimum efficiency levels for all new construction projects that receive government
funding or incentives.

POLICY: Adopt policies that require all purchasing decisions to be based on, or include, a life-cycle
energy component.
Goal: Consolidate all fuels for local government (at least Gainesville, Alachua County and School Board)
into one purchasing and distribution system. Have one purchasing entity and use ID cards to apportion
cost based on consumption by agency.
Goal: Use county buying power to help provide for materials to be used by groups for “Weatherization”
activities in low-income areas. Note: Current combined efforts reach approximately 100 houses per
year. To totally cover all substandard housing in the county, nearly 1500 houses need to be upgraded
each year for the next ten years. Combine this effort with an education program to prevent reworking
same houses every five years.
Goal: Buy recycled paper products only, e.g., (at least) toilet paper, paper towels and napkins. Goal:
Establish a Central Purchasing Entity and/or co-op for Green Building Materials to significantly drive
down the cost of green materials (compact fluorescent lights, rain barrels, cisterns, recycled building
materials, solar or PV products, etc.) for public buildings, but also to relay these savings to Alachua
County residents.

Goal: Create County staff team to address legal issues associated with moving toward a sustainable
future. ECSC (or similar perpetual committee) would interact with this County team. Background: The
energy and environmental challenges we face require us to follow a new path toward a sustainable
future. Many creative, important and powerful solutions to the challenges we face could be stymied by
laws, regulations and policies put in place during the era of cheap and abundant energy. These existing
regulations may create roadblocks along this path to sustainability and make the journey more difficult,
slow and frustrating. Our laws, regulations and policies must change to reflect the new reality on global
warming and rapid energy resource decline:

        (1), identify any legal roadblocks in the path to sustainability, and develop strategies that
        empower local governments and entrepreneurs to make policy decisions that support a
        sustainable Alachua County;
        (2) develop new and creative strategies to implement energy conservation plans adopted by
        BOCC;
        (3), direct County Attorney & Manager to develop ongoing collaborative relationships (with staff
        from other local government agencies within the North Florida region and across the state) and
        leverage the ideas and policies other organizations have developed to address legal roadblocks
        associated with changing policies and laws that address global warming and energy resource
        decline;
        (4), direct the County Attorney and County Manager to contact local, county, and state level
        government attorneys in Oregon and California to learn their methods for overcoming
        roadblocks to a sustainable future in those communities. Contact: Portland, Oregon City
        Commissioner Dan Saltzman, and Portland’s legal staff to learn about their new green building
        policy. Background: The state building code was a significant roadblock and in order to enact
        the new green building policy, Portland developed a plan that circumvented the state building
        code.

Goal: Develop energy efficiency standards for all properties leased by the County; only rent properties if
they meet these standards.
Goal: Require that all new buildings be built to LEED standards (which level is open to debate, probably
related to time: lower level first, higher level later on).
Goal: By a specific date, require that all lighted outdoor signs (including billboards) use only renewable
energy systems (solar) and LEDs.
Goal: Require that any County use of billboards, lighted at night, must be by solar LEDs.
Goal: Stay on daylight saving time year round. If this can’t be achieved for practical reasons, have all
county offices (and others, after it’s proven to work) shift start times in the morning to 7 AM during
standard time and 8 AM during normal daylight saving time. (The problems with this are caused largely
by small children and school start times, but the most recent unscientific Sun poll showed 67% prefer
extra daylight in the afternoon rather than morning – which coincidentally saves energy in this latitude –
why we are the “Sunshine State”.)
Goal: Outside of core city areas and intersections, require that ½ of all street lights turn off at midnight;
the other ½ at 2AM. (Most western states and Canada have no lighted street lights at night outside of
core city area.)
Goal: Convert all signaling and traffic control devices to LED lamps.

FLEET MANAGEMENT
POLICY: Develop an internal CAFÉ standard and timeline for implementation of higher fleet MPG.
Goal: Develop a timeline for implementing conversion of government fleets to PHEVs (plug-in hybrid
electric vehicles), biodiesel and biogas.
Goal: Avoid the use of ethanol until such time as this fuel source provides at least a 50% reduction in life
cycle GHG emissions relative to petroleum.
Goal: Change incandescent lights in light bars of emergency service vehicles to LEDs. Require LEDs in
light bars of all new EMS vehicle purchases.
Goal: Introduce and enforce “no-idle” policies for all fleet vehicles. Require that they be shut down
when stationary longer than 2 minutes. Include emergency vehicles in the policy, unless they are parked
in traffic at an emergency and must have power for emergency lighting; however, experiment with
compact generators or battery packs for those vehicles. Measure the results. (The significant difference
in fuel costs per mile between emergency vehicles or buses and standard fleet vehicles is largely from
idling.) This policy can be enacted for ALL vehicles, as it has by the California Air Monitoring Board: they
issue citations and fines for pollution from vehicles left idling (e.g., trucks unloading at downtown
businesses.)

LAND USE
POLICY : Comprehensive Plan - The County Commission shall adopt the guiding principle of using
incentives to foster redevelopment and infill before allowing expansion of urban boundaries.
POLICY: The Commission shall work with municipalities to establish firm urban boundaries for all cities
of the county.
Goal: The County should review incentives to keep agricultural and forested lands from being developed
as subdivisions, and adopt tax and zoning structures that favor maintenance of agriculture and forestry.
Goal: New neighborhoods should be designed to be walkable with neighborhood commercial centers
and road design so as to minimize needless travel by automobiles.
Goal: Require new housing developments within the urban cluster around Gainesville to be within a 10-
minute walk of a funded mass transit route.
Goal: Require new development to be mixed use with inclusionary housing and several “mini-market”
level stores.
Goal: Require new developments within the Gainesville urban cluster to have a gross density of not less
than 4 DU/acre.
Goal: Incorporate an Energy Element within the Comprehensive Plan. At a minimum, this element
should be consistent with the future land use, the housing, and the transportation elements. The goal
of the element is to minimize the energy consumption of energy for all sorts of activities (transportation,
residential, commercial, etc.)
Goal: Produce an Energy Suitability Map as a part of the planning effort to delineate where it is most
appropriate to produce energy. This map should incorporate the suitability for various types of
centralized and decentralized energy production (biomass, solar, wind, etc.) and should be designed so
that the tradeoffs in choice for development are well understood. The energy suitability map could also
form the basis for differential impact, linkage and/or mitigation fees or development incentives that
reflect the opportunity costs associated with the development of specific parcels.
Goal: If new development is proposed on land that is used for biomass or other energy production, the
developer would be required to contribute to continue to produce the same amount of energy through
other methods (on-site or off-site) or contribute to an energy mitigation bank.
Goal: The county should develop comprehensive plan policies and land development regulations that
guarantee a "right-to-solar" access for all new development in suitable locations and should prevent
new development from blocking sunlight to any existing solar panels.




ENERGY/DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS & CODES ENFORCEMENT
Goal: Fast track building permits for green buildings, with a tiered system of cost savings and permitting
depending on the degree of energy-efficient design of the proposed construction. Mandate maximum
fees and expand fees for buildings using conventional design.
Goal: Design new buildings to incorporate day lighting: require use of building orientation and solar
tubes to bring more natural light into dark areas of buildings (homes, schools or businesses)
Goal: Promote retrofit use of solar tubes.
Goal: Design new buildings with the appropriate orientation to take advantage of passive solar design.
Goal: Require training and licenses in energy-efficient construction for building contractors and
subcontractors; require at least 1-day of training in energy-efficiency installation for all workers involved
in HVAC and insulation installation.
Goal: Require non-hardening caulking around light switches and other air-leakage pathways in new
construction.
Goal: Prohibit recessed fixtures into unconditioned spaces that are not sealed against air leakage.
Goal: Require that new developments pass blower-door or equivalent test for air leakage.
Goal: Require double-pane windows in new construction with thermal breaks if aluminum frames are
used.
Goal: Require geothermal heat pumps where feasible; or require systems with comparable energy
ratings.
Goal: Require at least two zones with programmable thermostats for HVAC in residential housing (??)
Goal: Require east-west street orientation (with N-S collector streets). Limit east- or west-facing
windows that do not have external shading devices to not more than two 12 sq. ft.
Goal: Require retrofitting of existing housing that has more than 24 sq. ft. of east or west-facing
windows with external shading devices (that could include deciduous trees).
Goal: Synchronize rooftop policies so that there are rational policies to emphasize rooftop solar panels
versus shade trees, green roofs, or reflective roofs.
Goal: All new construction (government buildings, schools, homes, businesses, etc.) should allow only
Xeriscape and native groundcovers. This will save millions of gallons of water and reduce aquifer
contamination. Irrigation & fertilization needs are minimal.
Goal: Require that newly installed grass (“manicured” lawn) be limited to ¼ or 1/8th acre; or require that
newly-installed grass can only be X portion of new construction.
Goal: Adopt strict lawn fertilizer regulations.
Goal: Enact and enforce regulation to require soil moisture-meter-override of automatic lawn watering
systems.
Goal: Ensure that LDRs allow drying clothes “online,” outside.
Goal: Change landscape lawn to Xeriscape.
Goal: Put green roofs on all county buildings to reduce the heat load of buildings.
 Goal: Require landlords to maintain minimum efficiency standards
 Goal: Vigorous inspection for code violations


POLICY: Adopt a Green Building Ordinance for green building and development that includes sustainable
incentives and sustainable directives for all new public buildings. Outline a sustainable incentive strategy
based on successful models such as the City of Austin’s Smart Housing Index.
Goal: Propose a Green Building Program that executes the Green Building Ordinance goals and
objectives. Immediately modify code to allow for innovative green technologies that save resources
(e.g., reclaimed water or graywater collected from rain, showers and/or washing machines, to be used
for flushing toilets and irrigating yards) and incentivize residents who implement these technologies
Goal: Develop a community strategy to implement the approved Annual Green Marketing Week the first
week of May, approved May 3, 2006 by BOCC in perpetuity, and integrate components of ESCS &
education; i.e., banners, TV and radio PSA’s, Enviro-Fair.
Goal: Develop and Propose Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to community partners (for
example, landlords who volunteer energy disclosures on their rentals) who join with Alachua County to
meet these goals.


WASTE MANAGEMENT
POLICY: Alachua County and Gainesville should uphold the waste reduction and recycling provisions of
local government comprehensive plans.
POLICY: Life cycle analysis of GHG emissions should form the basis of waste management policy. Such
an analysis precludes direct burning of solid waste for power generation.
POLICY: Further develop the Alachua County Transfer station for use of waste-based industries, and
issue RFP for industry to use waste & discards in manufacturing or related activity. Match waste to
industry.
Goal: Conduct a waste mix study on all solid waste being transferred to Three Rivers Landfill. Back
calculate how to remove the most recyclables and compostables from the waste stream and the
economic benefits and costs. Determine whether it is necessary to raise solid waste fees to cover the
added cost, but look for ways to reverse it to a revenue stream.
Goal: Expand the materials recovery facility (MRF) at Alachua County Environmental Park as needed to
process recovered recyclable materials that are to be delivered there from throughout the county and
elsewhere.
Goal: Promote the location of waste-based industries near the MRF to make useful products from
recycled materials.
Goal: Expand sorting and recovery of products from transfer stations to provision the development of
such an industry. (Add wet/organic component; buy-back center.)
Goal: Require source-separation of all municipal solid waste, both residential and commercial, into “dry
stream” recyclable materials, “wet stream” biodegradable materials, and other materials.
Goal: Significantly expand recycling capacity, especially with respect to wood products that could be
used to offset fossil fuels in power production.
Goal: As existing contracts come to a close, develop plans for landfill methane power generation as part
of distributed energy plan. Investigate collaboration with other counties in this activity.
Goal: Place recycling containers in public places.
Goal: Enact a county-wide ordinance prohibiting disposal of recyclable materials.
Goal: Establish a CFL recycling program.
Goal: Reduce use of throw-away plates, containers, etc. in restaurants.
Goal: End land-spreading of sewage sludge within three years, to be replaced by anaerobic digestion for
methane production.
Goal: Develop one or more anaerobic digestion facilities for producing methane from various
components of biodegradable waste including wet-stream MSW, sludge, yard, and food wastes from
grocery stores and restaurants.
Goal: Develop a joint Gainesville-Alachua County program to make beneficial use of byproducts of
anaerobic digestion: to grow plants for landscaping, use in landscaping public places, growing trees such
as in Balu Forest or elsewhere, make available for use by the public either as give-away or for sale
through a third party.
Goal: Charge for yard-waste pickup sufficient to meet the costs or pickup and disposition of the waste.
Encourage on site composting of yard waste.
Goal: Promote increased use of products with recycled content.
Goal: Evaluate potential for on-site power generation (e.g., anaerobic digestion, pyrolysis, etc.) in
agricultural areas & farming operations.

POLICY: Promote purchases of durable goods rather than one-use, throw-away ones.
Goal: Discourage the use of plastic bags for shopping.
Goal: Require businesses to recycle plastic bags if they offer them to customers
Goal: Adopt a policy that requires all business establishments to charge customers (the cost of making
and recycling the plastic bags) if they use plastic bags. Background: The amount of petroleum used to
manufacture 14 plastic bags is equivalent to the petroleum needed to move an automobile one mile.
The average person uses 500 bags a year (35 miles!), and it costs 17 cents to recycle each bag. These
plastic bags end up in the landfill (a minority are recycled) after being used only once. The unnecessary
cost to purchase and recycle these bags is added to the cost of all the products we buy. A customer
requesting a plastic bag should have to pay for the bag and the recycling, just like the merchandise they
purchase. If a customer uses a recycled bag or brings a reusable bag to the store, that customer should
not be charged for plastic bag or the recycling fee. Business establishments should be encouraged to
develop business policies that provide free cloth bags to customers who purchase products with little or
no packaging. Consumers who try to minimize their ecological footprint should be rewarded, not
required to subsidize others who consume more (similar to Alachua County’s “pay as you throw”
philosophy). For more, see:
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/california/la-me-lopez12sep12,0,7379480.column?coll=la-
headlines-pe-california

WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT
Gainesville Regional Utilities, GRU, is the regional utility provider. The Gainesville City Commission is the
Board of Directors of this public utility.
POLICY: Gainesville City Commission should adopt a goal of using sewage as an energy source first,
and secondarily as a fertilizer or product to be sold or spread on agricultural lands.
Goal: Anaerobic digestion should be the preferred treatment of ???, and facilities in US and Europe (i.e.,
Bern, Switzerland) should be reviewed for appropriate technology. Methane produced from anaerobic
digestion should be used for WWTP power generation, and as a fuel for buses.
Goal: Gainesville City Commission should set a time goal for GRU to develop this alternative.
Goal: A pilot anaerobic digester should be installed immediately and evaluated for expansion.
Goal: Existing facilities for aerobic digestion should be phased out as anaerobic digestion is phased in.

TRANSPORTATION & TRANSPORTATION FUELS

By simple percentages the transportation goal will result in a national level decrease from 9.2 million
barrels per day of gasoline to a new level of less than 300,000 barrels of fossil fuel based gasoline per
day.

                Double gas mileage (mpg): 9.2 million barrels per day to 4.6 million barrels per day.
                Decrease miles driven by half: 4.6 million barrels per day to 2.3 million barrels per day
                Move 25% of drivers to mass transit: 2.3 million barrels per day to 1.73 million barrels
                 per day.
                Change SOV ridership from 1.5 people per trip to 2.0 people per trip: 1.73 million
                 barrels per day to 1.29 million barrels per day.
                Produce 1.0 million barrels per day of cellulosic ethanol: 1.29 million barrels per day to
                 290,000 barrels per day

POLICY. As a community, locally support & adopt the following national trends:
Goal: Double the fuel consumption efficiency (mpg) of our commercial and private fleets over the next
ten years.
Goal: Every licensed driver in the country drives approximately 13,500 miles each year; cut this figure in
half over the next ten years.
Goal: Expand our mass transit system to allow 25% of current drivers or trips to be moved from private
automobiles to mass transit vehicles.
Goal: Increase Single-occupancy vehicle (SOV) ridership from 1.5 people per trip to 2.0 riders per trip.
Goal: Support production, in a sustainable manner, of 1.0 million barrels per day of cellulosic ethanol.

POLICY: Sustainable mobility: Develop rights-of-way for dedicated multimodal transportation
throughout the county in a manner consistent with the eventual development of light rail.
Goal: Many areas of the county are inadequately serviced by existing bus routes. Expand and optimize
bus service to facilitate its use as an alternative to the automobile. Optimize scheduling and express
service. Seek professional advice for enhancing the bus service.
Goal: Add bus rapid transit and HOV lanes along major transportation corridors.
Goal: Provide free bus passes to all county residents (a reduction in number of SOV drivers is a benefit to
those who do not ride the bus.)
Goal: Use fuel taxes to fund mass transit programs; devote three cents of the recently-adopted gas tax
to improving mass transit (including free passes for everyone).
Goal: Bus routes 1, 5, and 8 should run every 10 minutes in the morning (7am to 10 am) and in the
afternoon (4pm to 7pm.)
Goal: Identify a source of biodiesel and convert buses to biodiesel where possible.
Goal: As biogas generation capacity is developed and the County grows in population, convert buses to
biogas as a fuel source.
Goal: Create a bicycle rental program like the one in Paris (students ride free). Bikes should be available
in a first round at Oaks Mall, down Newberry Rd to the movie theater and Publix at 34th Street, down to
Archer Road and Butler Plaza, east on Archer Road to downtown and back all along University Avenue to
34th Street, as well as up 13th Street to Verde Plaza and South to Williston Rd.
Goal: Synchronize traffic lights.
Goal: Enforce speed limits.
Goal: Establish a vehicle commuting survey so that companies have a baseline and a goal for reducing
passenger miles and single-occupancy trips.
Goal: Institute incentives and penalties for large companies to increase e-commuting.
Goal: Promote vanpools as an incentive for employers to reduce commuter trips. This proposal would
probably need to be part of a larger program. The system in Seattle has been growing (chapter 4 of
http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/172087A9-85D1-416B-86C4-
33281C7BDE68/0/CTR_Report_05.pdf).
Goal: Identify communities in Alachua County that offer the greatest potential for trip reduction
and promote vanpools, carpools or other transportation by directly contacting people in those
communities. For an example of social marketing in communities, see
http://www.metrokc.gov/kcdot/transit/inmotion/doityourself/images/ResearchPaper.pdf
Goal: Incentivize government agencies and businesses to devise ways to reduce employee commuting.
Once the plans are initiated, employees typically continue to use the new commuting behavior. The
Washington State Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) focuses on sites that have 100 or more employees
(page 3 http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/172087A9-85D1-416B-86C4
33281C7BDE68/0/CTR_Report_05.pdf) , which might not be effective in Alachua County. The CTR
program was effective statewide and in Seattle (page 4). A local program might need to focus on a
broader entity, such as districts or groups of work sites. For example, there might be many small stores
in the Oaks mall, but a trip reduction program might focus on the mall as a single unit.
Goal: Provide incentives to get employees to reduce their environmental impact of commuting: Read
the "Top Two Projects" section and the "Lessons Learned" section from the CTR program.
http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/FF9220C9-EC49-46B7-A84D-
B5103C63F0CA/0/20032005_CTR_ProgramReport.pdf
Goal: Washington trip reduction executive order:
http://www.governor.wa.gov/execorders/eoarchive/eo_01-03.htm
Goal: An educational flyer sent to businesses to ask them for ways to improve
commuting: http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/5B32A11A-9D42-4CDA-8423-
1BBCF82363C2/0/2007_TRPP_Brochure.pdf
Goal: As part of the approval process, require that each new County-approved development have a plan
and timetable to be connected to a funded RTS route.
Goal: Encourage entrepreneurs to provide (and the public to use) Zip car, Flex-car and carpooling
programs.
Goal: Establish regional transit service to address various niche markets. Currently RTS serves people
attending sports events on the UF campus and students going to downtown venues in the evening.
Other potential niches may include express bus commuter service to outlying communities and park and
ride lots, bus service to the airport (in Gainesville, and to Jacksonville, Tampa and Orlando.)
Goal: Increase the frequency of transit service to major activity centers in the City and County
Goal: Reinforce the demand for transit to activity centers by creating true nodes of activity including mix
of uses (including residential), higher densities and interconnected grid networks
POWER GENERATION
Also by percentages, our community can reduce the amount of electrical generation capacity from
600MW to 300 MW. If we also add 150MW of renewable energy, we could ideally shut down all of our
coal-fired power plants and rely on 150 MW of natural gas-fired electricity production for the
remainder.

POLICY. Life-cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) should form the basis of any decision on use or
generation of fuel sources. Equal consideration should be given to minimizing toxic pollutants and
strict enforcement of US EPA guidelines.
Goal: Establish a timeline for reduction of fossil fuel use, consistent with the goal of a 50% GHG
reduction by 2030, and an 80% GHG reduction by 2050.
Goal: Establish policy that precludes the generation of public capital as the primary reason for adopting
a means of power production.
Goal: Decrease our community’s needed generation capacity from 600 MW to 300MW over the next ten
years.
Goal: Develop new generation capacity from renewable sources. Over the same ten year period,
develop 100 MW of biomass electricity generation, 30 MW equivalent of solar thermal generation, and
20 MW equivalent of Photo-voltaic (PV) generation. Woody biomass should be the preferred means of
meeting base load. Peak load should be offset through distributed power generation provided by
residential and commercial solar PV.
Goal: Develop a Berkeley-style program that moves a significant number of residences to solar PV. This
is much like a road “special assessment”, where a number of families on a dirt road ask the county to
pave the road. The cost for paving is then collected from each home owner over a period of time. In
2006, a total of 85 solar PV systems were installed in Florida. The total number of systems to be installed
in Alachua County would certainly be less than 50 in the next year or two. If the amount financed is
$15,000 on average, then $1 million allocated for the program should be an appropriate beginning.

GAINESVILLE REGIONAL UTILITIES
Gainesville Regional Utilities, GRU, is the regional utility provider. The Gainesville City Commission is the
Board of Directors of this public utility.

POLICY. The guiding principles for energy production (efficiency of energy use / alternative energy)
should be development of distributed power generation and development of a county-wide smart
grid. Evaluate and institute fair and equitable net metering and feed-in tariffs, which have as their
primary goal the creation of distributed power production.
Goal: Gainesville City Commission should foster the capacity of the public utility to serve as a power
manager, rather than primarily a power producer; and further develop GRU’s institutional capacity to
advise homeowners and business owners on their energy and financing options. This should include
expanded targeting of energy intensive customers for promotional visits.
Goal: Gainesville City Commission direct GRU to establish a non-peak hour electric rate (for pool pumps,
dishwashers, clothes washers, dryers, water heaters, etc.) during low peak hours, because there is a
lower rate for those KWh.
Goal: Gainesville City Commission should aggressively implement and expand demand management
policies and rate structures.
Goal: Gainesville City Commission should direct GRU to develop a smart grid for optimizing power
distribution; and expand GRU’s rebate programs for homeowners and for large commercial users.
Goal: Linkage of public funding to power generation should be extensively reviewed and modified so as
to provide incentives for alternative power generation, distributed power generation, and development
of demand management and smart grids.
Goal: If spike in electric or water use, energy provider alert customers re: their bill.


POWER GENERATION - RENEWABLES
Goal: Place solar panels in “alternative” locations to purchasing a chunk of land: put them along
sidewalks; at bus shelter; on all surface parking lots, etc.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA & SHANDS
Goal: Begin long-term planning now for the time when UF’s utility contract expires with Progress Energy.
If we want to have more local control and effect, then we need to bring the biggest customer back to
local government, not investor-owned utilities controlled by distant shareholders.
Goal: Obtain unused Shands solar thermal panels.

SCHOOLS
Goal: Create & offer an alternate energy design and construction magnet program (e.g., at Eastside High
School and SFCC.)
Goal: Educate children in Energy & Water Conservation; include “Responsible Use of Energy and Water”
education at elementary, middle and high schools. Students can be encouraged to take this information
home, thus educating their parents about energy conservation.
Goal: Hold a competition between the schools in energy conservation. Each elementary, middle, and
high school would compete with schools in the same category. Assess the per capita and per sq. ft.
consumption. Each school would get 10 percent of the saving compared to year 1 as a budget for school
activities and events. Winner is the school with the best improvement compared to last year as well as
the school with the best overall reduction in consumption since Day 1.
Goal: Adopt same schedule for elementary and middle school.
Goal: Retrofit schools with solar thermal hot water systems and Solar PV systems.
Goal: School districts and Energy Education, Inc. (EE, Inc.) helped a school district in Ohio save 31% on its
energy bill using a people-oriented program – they achieved these savings by changing behaviors and
training people to utilize the systems they had with maximum efficiency. These energy savings were
NOT associated with spending money on new technology or machines.

The savings achieved by implementing these programs is 15%-30%, with the majority of the savings for
each district in the 20%-30% range. The savings come from all the energy expenditures in the district,
including water, wastewater, etc.

The cost to the school district is nothing – fees are paid by the energy savings from the conservation
programs and the company guarantees that the district will not pay for the conservation services. EE,
Inc. has worked with many school districts in Florida. Polk County has saved $52M over the past 15
years working with the Energy Education, Inc program.

Orange and Sumpter counties also have EE, Inc programs in progress. Contact Jan Noel-Smith at EE, Inc.
940-767-1500 ext 137.

EDUCATION & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT: OPPORTUNITIES
Goal: Create an energy information center with the respective marketing and monthly events. Tie the
issue of energy with nutrition (the right nutrition gives you more energy for mind and body).
Goal: Organize events such as "bike ins" where people come with bus, bike or other means of
transportation than cars. Close 2nd Avenue between campus and downtown for Friday night roller blade
event.
Goal: Channel 12 - Develop a one-hour program to be shown at a set time each day that discusses
energy issues. Initially, have 10 programs in a rotation.
Objective: Increase AC Library District & AC School information sources on energy issues.
Goal: Put copies of “Crude Awakening” and “An Inconvenient Truth” in public schools and libraries.
Offer a scholarship for best paper on climate change.
Goal: Develop an education program to explain how to save energy and water when building a new
home or renovating an existing home. The program should focus on opportunities to save energy and
water in Florida and specifically Alachua County. A text explaining the ways we can all save energy is
needed. A text that is easy to read and understand for an average Floridian is critical to increasing the
energy efficiency of our homes through energy conservation and energy efficiency efforts. A text is
available to meet the needs expressed above. The book is called Building, Buying, or Remodeling Your
Florida Home: A guide to Energy and Water Savings.The book is the result of the collaboration of many
organizations and individuals, including Wendell Porter. IFAS Extension was responsible for creating this
book that was revised and retitled in March of 2003. Propose that the Alachua County purchase 2,000
($12,000) of these books and distribute them to churches, high schools, libraries, government offices,
real estate agents, landscapers, light stores, HVAC contractors, plumbers, electrical contractors, interior
designers, other building professionals, and any other organization that can help educate the public
about how to reduce energy and water consumption. A letter from the Alachua County BoCC should
accompany the books.


 Goal: KF is teaching a continuing education course at SFCC (green building) and is not accepting any fee,
 and would urge all those with expertise to take personal responsibility and do the same.
 Goal: Ed Brown stated that the books and DVDs in the Alachua County Library District (ACLD) on ECSC-
 relevant topics are out of date and few in number. Everyone will come to the next ECSC meeting with a
 list of suggested books and DVDs, and the Chair will write a letter to the ACLD suggesting these
 purchases.
 Goal: Potential to have an “energy sustainability” (or another name) month throughout the ACLD, same
 as Black History Month, etc. ECSC members would develop and staff different booths (and invite
 organizations like UF-IFAS, which teaches Master Gardener program, etc.)
 Goal: what are all the ways ECSC can begin to engage our community about these issues and facilitate
 community discussion?




ACTION LIST: LEGISLATIVE ITEMS
Goal: Eliminate Tax for Energy Star appliances. (i.e., front load washers, seer 16 and up AC)
Goal: Ban regular incandescent light bulbs.
Goal: Seek change in state law to allow local governments to regulate packaging.
Goal: Lobby the state to alter building codes (or amend codes in AC & cities of Alachua County to modify
parts of their building codes) in appropriate sections to require motion sensors to control lighting. Using
Section 13-415.1 of the New Construction guide as an example, require existing buildings to use energy-
saving mechanisms to control lighting in commercial buildings (i.e., timers or sensors).


ACTION LIST: ALACHUA COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN - EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL
RECOMMENDATIONS

ACTION LIST: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ALACHUA COUNTY LIBRARY DISTRICT
Objective: Dedicate a week each spring to advocating energy conservation.
Goal: Hold a competition between the schools in energy conservation. Each elementary, middle, and
high school would compete with schools in the same category. Assess the per capita and per sq. ft.
consumption. Each school would get 10 percent of the saving compared to year 1 as a budget for school
activities and events. Winner is the school with the best improvement compared to last year as well as
the school with the best overall reduction in consumption since Day 1.
Goal: Purchase more books and videos about energy and energy sustainability; place in all libraries
throughout Alachua County.


OTHER IDEAS
Goal: To develop regional economy & more regional purchasing, create a “store” that sells only locally-
grown products (perhaps starting with a 4-county region). Provide government support (sales staff,
warehousing, bookkeeping, delivery service, no sales tax) for specific time period.
Goal: Tell businesses with which you trade to adjust their thermostats (78 in summer, 70 in winter)
Goal: Develop a program for people who have reduced their energy use through behavior changes (not
energy efficiency upgrades) to be financially rewarded and publicly acknowledged for making these
changes. (see Sean email of 12.12 w/ EBrown email explanation)
Goal: To reduce the fuel used to ship food long distances, reallocate existing land to increase the
availability of community gardens (pea patches) for the purpose of growing food. These would allow
residents to pay a small fee to work an area of land if they agree to farm fruits and vegetables.
Goal: Use bath towels for a longer period. Replace all when needed with a “lighter weight” towels.
Goal: Save small plastic cartons and put in refrigerator or freezer if either is not filled to capacity to help
appliances to run more efficiently. Also could bag supply of ice cubes for that purpose.
Goal: Reject buying food products in plastic. Look for glass containers.
Goal: Extend rebates to smaller appliances and waterless or water efficient toilets.
Goal: Governments plant native ground cover in medians and right of ways.
Goal: Governments add tax to all plastic bottles that are not recyclable.
Goal: Ask all grocery stores to try to find recyclable or compostable food containers for their produce
and meat. Also for bagged groceries.
Goal Submit the 2002 GRU GHG report as a top 10 list: http://tinyurl.com/yu7mz7
 Promote use of vanpools through vans purchased by the County and/or commercial
 businesses, and allocated to commuters in outlying areas. Each commuter pays a fee, and
 the driver rides free. See the Seattle example: http://transit.metrokc.gov/tops/van-
 car/vanpool.html
 Goal: Water conservation = carbon reduction. Abusing our water now will increase the need
 to use energy intensive water purification processes in the future. Start pricing water now
 to reflect the future carbon credits and additional energy requirements. The money would
go into a fund or to projects for water purification.
Goal: Use very steep utility rates for: a) “energy hogs,” b) “water hogs,” and c) “waste
hogs.”
Goal: Reduce use of power lawn tools (responsible for 5% of air pollution).
Goal: Grow food not lawn.
Goal: Reduce meat production (EBrown email message in Sean 12/2 email)

QUESTIONS/ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
-Landlord licensing fees – can the County create one?
-Can County (and Gville) require disclosure of HERS? If can’t require, can landlord volunteer
and obtain a slightly discounted LL licensing fee?
-Issue about electric service panels and difference between older and newer panels, and
that the utility is required to generate sufficient capacity to meet those new load
requirements. Possible impact or other fee?
-Do State regulations prevent local government from establishing higher standards? If so,
can other methods be used to encourage use of higher standards?
-What influence can the County have on Net Metering issue?
-Can impact fees be reduced if new construction meets a certain energy-efficiency standard?
(public purpose) Can the City and/or County reduce these fees on all new solar installations,
or at least for low-income installations?




-


-




Engage young people - energy conservation clubs within the school district? Perhaps find a
sponsor for some type of awards program for students targeting energy conservation.
The public is facing several storms: debt and inability to fund future programs;peak oil; andclimate
change(PW would add 4, aging US population.)




Advocate adoption of Energy Management Programs.
Goal: Create HERS energy rating requirement for buildings, especially for sale and for rent.
Goal: With proper authorization, produce interim reports to the Commission and in the form of ‘Speaking
Out’ columns in local newspapers to publicize actions to take in different topical areas that benefit us all
now, and our children in the future.

Goal: Publicize local energy use success stories (residential, commercial, industrial.) Focus first on what
can be done with energy efficiency alone, then focus on renewable energy activities.


Goal: Educate buyers about payback times for energy-efficiencies.
Goal Publicize (especially to homeowners’ associations) that State law prohibits enforcing any
covenants, conditions and restrictions (CCR) that limit a homeowner’s right to install solar energy
systems of any type on their homes.
Goal Work with County building inspectors and local contractors to spread the knowledge that virtually
every new house constructed using flex-duct in the HVAC system represents violations of numerous
Florida Building Codes and Standards, as well as subsequent energy losses/gains. These losses, in
aggregate over time, will total more than will be produced by any near-term renewable energy production
program.

Goal: KF is teaching a continuing education course at SFCC (green building) and is not accepting any fee,
and would urge all those with expertise to take personal responsibility and do the same.
Goal: Ed Brown stated that the books and DVDs in the Alachua County Library District (ACLD) on ECSC-
relevant topics are out of date and few in number. Everyone will come to the next ECSC meeting with a
list of suggested books and DVDs, and the Chair will write a letter to the ACLD suggesting these
purchases.
Goal: Potential to have an “energy sustainability” (or another name) month throughout the ACLD, same
as Black History Month, etc. ECSC members would develop and staff different booths (and invite
organizations like UF-IFAS, which teaches Master Gardener program, etc.)

Goal: City of Gainesville has the “Let’s Go Downtown” music and video series; CF offered that the ECSC
should suggest energy-relevant movies (this would be a letter to GCC w/ copy to Cultural Affairs?


- Tour de Nash (Nashville)

				
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