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					Patrick Heart – Project Manager           LauraLee Young – Marketing Consultant
Brandon Matt McKee – Software Engineer    Dr. Fink – Technical Adviser
Ronak Patel – Hardware Engineer           Professor Wright – Sponsor’s Delegate
Greg Moore – Communication Engineer       Painless Performance – Sponsor




                                      Editor




       Printed Name                            Signature                   Date
Contents
Introduction .............................................................................................................. - 4 -
      Background ............................................................................................................. - 4 -
      Objective ................................................................................................................. - 4 -
      Justification ........................................................................................................................ - 4 -
Project Design........................................................................................................... - 4 -
      Problem Statement .................................................................................................. - 4 -
      Functional Requirements......................................................................................... - 5 -
      Conceptual Design .................................................................................................. - 6 -
      Car Base Module Block Diagram ........................................................................... - 6 -
      Key-fob Block Diagram .......................................................................................... - 8 -
      PDA Block Diagram ............................................................................................... - 9 -
Work Plan ................................................................................................................ - 10 -
      Research ................................................................................................................ - 10 -
      Procurement .......................................................................................................... - 10 -
      Design and Development ...................................................................................... - 10 -
      Testing ................................................................................................................... - 11 -
      Document .............................................................................................................. - 11 -
      Closing .................................................................................................................. - 11 -
Milestones................................................................................................................. - 11 -
Deliverables ............................................................................................................. - 12 -
Resources.................................................................................................................. - 13 -
Team Qualifications ............................................................................................. - 13 -
Market Analysis ..................................................................................................... - 13 -

List of Figures
Figure 1: Conceptual Block Diagram ........................................................................... - 6 -
Figure 2: Pushbutton functionality ................................................................................ - 7 -
Figure 3: Car Base Modual ........................................................................................... - 8 -
Figure 4: Key-Fob ......................................................................................................... - 9 -
Figure 5: PDA ............................................................................................................... - 9 -
Figure 6: Work Plan .................................................................................................... - 10 -


October 9, 2007                                                     -3-                                         CARKI Project
Introduction
Imagine the capability of being able to know that your car is ninety-plus degrees, and having the
ability to start your car remotely from either a wireless PDA or key-fob device. Or, imagine your
car having the ability to know if you are inside it, and from that information allow the vehicle to
start (only if you are there) by the simple push of a button. DOCAAT Technology and Painless
Performance have teamed up to develop such a product. CARKI, or Car Advanced RF Keyless
Ignition, will provide these capabilities and more.

Background
Painless Performance is an aftermarket automobile accessory production company located in
Fort Worth, Texas. Painless Performance strives to make their products to simple in installation,
while maintaining top level quality. Their target customers are those who renovate older model
vehicles or those who create custom hotrods. The idea of CARKI came about as Painless
Performance began to widen their corporate vision into adding more high tech, fancy aspects
that Original Equipment Manufactures (OEM) are starting to develop, such as the push button
ignition.

Objective
The objective at DOCAAT Technology is to develop an aftermarket technology that will provide
automobile owners the capability of starting their vehicle without actually inserting a physical
key. The product will also incorporate an automatic identification security device that will not
allow the car to be started until the correct wireless PDA or key-fob has been identified. The
PDA and key-fob will also have the capabilities of controlling some features of the car such as
remote start. These features will be discussed later in this document.

Justification
The reason for the need of this product is that there is a huge gap between newer model
vehicles and older model vehicles. Newer Model vehicles provide value through high tech
applications such as a security enabled pushbutton ignition, while older model vehicles are high
in value due to their antiquity. This gap has not been closed because the OEM technology has
not been fully integrated with the high tech aftermarket technology.

Project Design
Problem Statement
Painless Performance has expressed their desire for a pushbutton ignition switch that will utilize
an RF technology. CARKI will also provide automobiles and customers with security via a
wireless technology by developing a 2-in-1 aftermarket remote system that will incorporate
features such as automatic identification, in-car temperature, remote start, door lock and
unlock, and a panic alarm.




October 9, 2007                               -4-                           CARKI Project
Functional Requirements
Before a more detailed design of CARKI can be developed, several functional requirements for
each component of the system must be established. These requirements have been specified
by DOCAAT Technology to meet the needs of Painless Performance.
Two component System – Two components will be designed and developed to create the CARKI
system. The stationary module will be necessary to install in the vehicle, and a wireless key-fob
will be needed for remote functionality. A Java program will be developed for a PDA to act as an
optional second component.
Intercommunication – The components of the system will be able to communicate via class 1
Bluetooth up to a distance of 100m under optimal conditions.
Battery Operated – The car’s base module will be powered by the 12V car battery while the key-
fob will need to be powered by inexpensive, compact, and long-lasting batteries.
Secure Identification – A security algorithm must be implemented to enable secure automatic
identification between the car and the remote device.
Augments Ignition Switch – the keyed ignition switch normally found in vehicles will be replaced
by a pushbutton.
Ergonomic Interface – In addition to the pushbutton, a user friendly interface will be developed
for both the key-fob and the PDA application.
Pocket Sized Remote – the key-fob will be designed to be compact by fitting all the necessary
features and components into a durable plastic enclosure.
Lock/Un-lock – the wireless device (key-fob/PDA) will be able to lock and un-lock the driver and
passenger doors.
Start/Stop – the wireless device (key-fob/PDA) will be able to start and stop the vehicle’s
engine.
Panic Alarm – the wireless device (key-fob/PDA) will enable the driver to sound the panic alarm.
Relay Temperature – the base module will relay the vehicle’s inside temperature to the user by
displaying it on the PDA or the key-fob’s LCD.
Easy to Install – the CARKI system should be installed with minimal technical expertise in order
follow the Painless Performance methodology.




October 9, 2007                               -5-                          CARKI Project
Conceptual Design
In order to understand how the CARKI system functions a high level conceptual diagram has
been provided in Figure 1. The main part of the CARKI system is the base module found inside
the vehicle. This module will have wireless capability and intelligence to control the vehicle’s
ignition system. The multifunction pushbutton will replace the keyed ignition switch normally
found in automobiles and provide the in-car user interface. This module will communicate to a
wireless key-fob or PDA through which the user will interact. The car’s inside temperature will
be relayed to the wireless device which can then be used to lock/unlock the car doors,
start/stop the engine, or sound the panic alarm. In order to use a PDA as the wireless device, an
application created in J2ME(Java 2 Mobile Edition) will be provided.




                              Figure 1: Conceptual Block Diagram

Car Base Module Block Diagram
With the primary requirements for CARKI defined, an in depth look at the system can be
performed by creating a more detailed functional block diagram of the car’s base module –
presented in Figure 3. This diagram shows the major components that are necessary to
implement the features of the CARKI system.
 The blocks shaded in red indicate the power for the base model, which will be provided by the
vehicle’s 12V battery. An in line fuse will be needed to ensure protection to the unit under
excessive current draw. Inside the module, circuitry will be designed to provide voltage
regulation and noise filtering to the digital components. The block shaded blue-gray represents
the microprocessor that will provide the module with digital intelligence. Currently, a
PIC18F4685 microprocessor, manufactured by Microchip, has been selected. This component is
paired with the Bluetooth transceiver (dark blue) which provides the class 1 communications to
the wireless key-fob or PDA. The Bluetooth transceiver will be controlled by a set of commands


October 9, 2007                              -6-                           CARKI Project
issued by the microprocessor. The driver, once securely identified, will be able to start and stop
the car by using the pushbutton ignition switch. The pushbutton will have a built in bi-color LED
that will illuminate red when the driver is identified and green once the vehicle has been
successfully started. The functions of the button are given below in Figure 2.




                                Figure 2: Pushbutton functionality

Many vehicles have slightly different methods or starting their engine; however, they are all
fairly similar. Older cars tend to have direct connections from the battery to the accessories
fuse block, the starter solenoid, the ignition coils, and the ignition system fuse block. Because of
this, the CARKI system may need to handle high amounts of current to start the engine;
therefore, automotive relays manufactured by NEC will be used to control the power to the
accessories, starter, and ignition system. These relays can handle up to 25 amps of current and
are switched on by a 12V signal. Since the microprocessor will not be able to provide a 12V
signal, several line drivers will be added to increase the digital signal from the processor to the
12V needed to switch the relays. Once switched, they will output 12V power to the accessories,
the starter, and the ignition system. Since these are system outputs they are shaded green.
Other outputs from the base module include signals to lock and unlock both the driver and
passenger doors as well as turn on the horn when the panic alarm is enabled. In addition to the
outputs of the system, several inputs (shaded yellow) are also necessary. By including a
temperature sensor, the base module can determine the inside temperature of the vehicle and
relay that information to the wireless device.               Also, the system will receive the
tachometer/spark signal to know when the engine has successfully started. Last, an input from
the brake switch will be included as a safety/security measure. The brake must be applied to
start the engine when pressing the pushbutton ignition switch. The system’s input signals must
be properly condition to prevent damage to the microprocessor. This conditioning is
represented by the voltage conditioning circuitry.




October 9, 2007                                -7-                           CARKI Project
                                   Figure 3: Car Base Module

Key-fob Block Diagram
In addition to the car’s base module, a completely custom key-fob will be designed and
developed. The functional block diagram of the key-fob is provided in Figure 4. The blocks in
this diagram are shaded to match those of the base module. The power supply for the wireless
key-fob will be provided by two 3.3V lithium disc batteries. These are easy to replace,
inexpensive, and found at many stores. The processor selected is a PIC18F2685 manufactured
by Microchip. It is similar to that found in the base module except that it has fewer
input/output pins, making it smaller. Again, a class 1 Bluetooth transceiver will be paired with
the processor to provide the wireless communications link to the base module. An LCD driver
will control the three digit LCD screen which is used to display the temperature inside the
vehicle. This information is obtained from the base module and relayed to the key-fob via
Bluetooth. The user interface of the key-fob will consist of four buttons. These buttons will
allow the user to remotely lock and unlock the doors, start and stop the engine, and enable the
panic alarm.




October 9, 2007                              -8-                          CARKI Project
                                        Figure 4: Key-Fob

PDA Block Diagram
An application for PDAs will be developed as an optional wireless device that can take place of
the included key-fob. The block diagram of the PDA application is given in Figure 5. The
program will be written using the Java 2 Mobile Edition (J2ME) development environment and
will utilize the Bluetooth stack. It will incorporate all of the same features as the key-fob. This
application will only be intended for PDAs that have built in Bluetooth functionality.


                     PDA
                                                                      Car
                               Bluetooth Stack



                                    J2ME



                                 Features
                                  Auto I.D.
                                 Start/Stop
                                Lock/Unlock
                                Temperature



                                           Figure 5: PDA



October 9, 2007                                  -9-                        CARKI Project
           Work Plan
           DOCAAT Technology has put together the following work plan shown below in FIGURE XX.XX.
           This plan defines the tasks that are to be completed during the duration of the CARKI project.
           The work plan has six phases, they are: research, procurement, design and development,
           testing, document, and closing. Each phase has a set of activities which also have tasks that
           must be completed before each phase is fully completed.




                                                   CARKI


                                             3.0
   1.0                2.0                                          4.0                 5.0                     6.0
                                         Design and
Research          Procurement                                    Testing            Document                 Closing
                                        Development
                                                Figure 6: Work Plan

           Research
           The first phase is research which includes many subsequent activities and tasks. First, we will
           look into several different types of processors. CARKI will require two processors: one for the
           key fob and one for the car module. 8-bit and 16-bit processors will be researched by
           comparing their individual capabilities. Processors will also be compared by manufacture
           including those made by Freescale, Atmel, and Microchip. Software will then be researched to
           determine what the optimal programming language will be for the microcontrollers and the
           PDA. Languages such as C, J2ME, and Visual Basic will be considered. Additionally, several
           different types of hardware such as buttons for the key fob, LCDs, components, and enclosures
           will be examined. Communication standards such as Bluetooth, RFID, and Zigbee as well as
           inter-peripheral standards such as SCI/SPI/I^2C will all be compared.

           Procurement
           Items that will be procured are documents such as wiring diagrams for the vehicle that will be
           used for testing. Bluetooth modules, processors, and all additional hardware components will
           be major items that will need to be sampled and ordered on time to meet the project deadlines.

           Design and Development
           During this phase, the base module and key fob will to be designed and developed. The
           software that will be loaded to these components, including the PDA, will also need to be
           thoroughly developed and implemented. Throughout all of the phases many preliminary
           configurations, including schematics and software will be adjusted and adapted to reflect any
           changes that occur.


           October 9, 2007                             - 10 -                       CARKI Project
Testing
This phase will be highly important. All of the components including the base module, the key-
fob, and the PDA will be tested to ensure that their inputs and outputs are functioning properly.
We will also make sure that the PCB is correctly designed and efficient in layout. In testing the
software, all user interfaces will be tested to ensure easy usability. The communications
capabilities will also be tested, especially when dealing with the security automatic
identification. Last, the enclosure will be examined to make sure that the casing does not
terribly affect the communication range and that the overall system works when installed.

Document
The document phase is vital to the successful closure of the project. All documentation that
accumulates will be properly updated to reflect the most recent and final changes that occur.
Documenting the software as the project progresses will make it easier any third party to
further develop or debug any issues or additions that might be encountered in the future. A test
plan documenting the testing phase, user’s manual, and an installation manual will also be
produced.

Closing
In closing the CARKI project, all documentation will be finalized and a presentation to the
customer, Painless Performance, will be carried out. CARKI will be installed in the test vehicle to
demonstrate that is has met all of the requirements specified by Painless Performance.

Milestones
Throughout the development of CARKI many milestones will be reached. These milestones are
essential for the project to be completed in a successful manner. The milestones that will be
met include the following:
    •   Project Approval – This is the first milestone required before the start of the project.
        The approval of this project will be completed after the white paper is completed and
        presented.
    •   Completion of research – When the CARKI project is finally approved, the next landmark
        the team will be looking towards is the completion of research. This milestone will take
        a few months to complete but will lay the foundation for the rest of the project.
    •   Receive products and components – Once the research is finished, products and
        components will be ordered. Since the entire project will be a race against time, this is
        an opportunity for the project to be delayed. Every time a product or component is
        received another milepost will be reached.
    •   Integrate devices – This event will be the first major event of its kind. When the
        products and components are received, a great deal of effort will be contributed to
        integrating them. The success of this milestone will bring a great sense of
        accomplishment to the team.
    •   Working bench top prototype – Even though the integration of the devices will be the
        first physical appearance of CARKI, much more work will have to be done to supply a


October 9, 2007                               - 11 -                        CARKI Project
       working bench top prototype. Having a working prototype will give the team a turning
       point that allows for a sense of accomplishment and knowing that the product is
       capable of being developed.
   •   Testing complete – No prototype is effectively complete without the completion of
       testing. Many problems can arise while testing a project. The success of testing the
       prototype presents another major breakthrough.
   •   Final demonstration – The last major milepost for the design and implementation of
       CARKI will be the final demonstration. This demonstration allows the project to move
       onto the next phase.

Deliverables
Similar to milestones, there will be many deliverables. The creation of deliverables throughout
the CARKI project will allow for documentation to have a major significance. Every deliverable
will be given to Painless Performance throughout the creation of the project. Deliverable that
will be created are as follows:
   •   Functional Block Diagram – The functional block diagram will be the first main
       deliverable of the project. This diagram shows a more detailed working of the product
       through a series of interconnected blocks. Each block describes a function of the system
       and the entire diagram provides a technical understanding of the CARKI design.
   •   Hierarchy Chart – This type of chart will be used for the development of our hardware
       and software. It will give a broad overview of the components and programming code
       found in each. The chart lists items in hierarchical order to represent their importance
       and level of functionality provided to the system.
   •   Flow Chart – This type of chart is similar to the hierarchy chart in that it is used for the
       development of our hardware and software. The flow chart is used to represent how
       the system works through a series of inputs and outputs from one component to the
       next. Another chart will also be used to show the flow of software code.
   •   Parts List – A parts list will be generated as the design of the project gets narrowed
       down. It will contain a list of the parts and components used in the system. Each part
       will have a designated number, unit price per quantity, manufacture and vender
       associated with it.
   •   Gerber Files – These file are created by the CAD program for the manufacturing of the
       PCB layout processes.
   •   PCB Schematic – This is a detailed layout, in schematic form, of the PCB board. It will be
       used as a reference for to component circuitry for testing and further design.
   •   Test Results – This document will contain the results of the product testing that was
       carried out during the CARKI project.
   •   Prototype – The prototype is a functional device that will be the basis for the
       manufactured product. This prototype will operate as the final production product will.
   •   Final Report – The final report will be put together at the completion and testing of the
       project. This report will include all the deliverables presented, an installation guide and
       user’s manual.


October 9, 2007                              - 12 -                         CARKI Project
Resources
   •   Labor (4 Engineers x $30 per Hr x 40 Hrs per Week x 15 weeks)          $72,000
   •   Dev Board PICDEM 2Plus                                                     $99
   •   Programmer/Debugger                                                       $159
   •   PIC 18F2685                                                                 $7
   •   PIC 18F4685                                                                 $6
   •   Bluetooth Module $35 x 2                                                   $70
   •   PCB                                                                       $200
   •   Custom Enclosure                                                           $75
   •   Wiring/Connectors                                                          $40
   •   Lab Fees (16 Weeks)                                                     $4,800
   •   LCD                                                                         $3
   •   Circuit Components                                                         $75
   •   PDA                                                                       $300
   •   Miscellaneous                                                             $500
       TOTAL                                                                 $78,334


Team Qualifications
DOCAAT Technology has a long list of qualifications. The qualities each team member processes
gives DOCAAT the ability to achieve success when designing and producing CARKI. The project
manager, Patrick Hart, has worked at Painless Performance as a design engineer. He has
worked on numerous projects for the company, helping to design many of their products which
are now being sold and installed across the country. In addition, he is a certified project
manager through the Project Management Institute which gives him the expertise to guide this
team to success.
The team also includes Matt McKee. He has valuable experience working at National
Instruments as a systems engineer. There he developed interface codes to control testing
equipment and reliability labs. He also worked at Harrington Media Center where he helped
design and develop presentation consoles like the ones used in Texas A&M lecture halls.
Ronak Patel is also a valuable asset to the team. He has worked as a lead systems specialist at
Johnson Controls. He programmed control systems for building automation. He was also an
R&D test engineer at General Electric where he tested the functionality of new products with
LabVIEW data acquisition.
Lastly, Greg Moore has worked at Hyperlink Internet as a Network /Communications Specialist.
While there he was involved in the design, installation and maintenance of major Ethernet
networks. He also has worked for Managed Systems Incorporated where he specialized as a
computer systems engineer managing many employees on the technical support staff.




October 9, 2007                             - 13 -                       CARKI Project
Aftermarket Automobile Accessory
Industry Analysis
Environment Analysis
The aftermarket automobile accessories industry is a highly focused market that is growing
quickly. In fact, it has increased at a rate of 2% a year since 2003, and brings in around $1.2
billion in revenues annually. i,ii The consumers in this market have an average of 2.9 vehicles in
their household, and the average American has two. iii,iv Of these 2.9 vehicles the majority are
passenger cars, with light trucks trailing closely.v Overall, the average age of vehicles on the
road for Americans is seven or more years, meaning that most cars on the road will not have the
new technologies being offered by CARKI, and will be easier to interface with since they are not
as technologically complex.vi Further, the average finance time for new vehicles is four years or
more, which will be important as research reveals how likely consumers are to purchase
accessories for a car for which the financing is incomplete.vii
Most importantly, IMS Research found that the “Total World market for [Original Equipment
Manufacturers (OEM)] automotive electronic systems…is forecast to increase from $129 billion
in 2006 to $161 billion in 2015.”viii Further, they found that “North America is forecast to
continue as the largest automotive electronic systems market over the period to 2015.” While
these number include original in-car equipment, they are significant in that CARKI is bring OEM
products to aftermarket vehicles and merging the gap between the two. Thus, upward trends in
the OEM market can and will be positive for the CARKI product. Further, other positive trends
noted by SBDCNet Market Research include the projections that, “…from 2004 through 2010 the
number of 16-34 year olds will increase by 4.2 million, while the number of minority household
will increase by 3.2 million. The combination of these two events will have a positive effect on
the market, rapidly expanding… sales of automotive parts and accessories.”ix
The consumers in the aftermarket automobile accessories industry, specifically for which many
of the above stats are directed, are predominantly rural and urban dwelling, young males, who
typically are more affluent than the average American.x The most important age group for this
market is the 35 to 44 year old group, which is more likely to have money and to be married
with kids. A secondary group is also predominant, that is, the 18 to 34 year old age group, who
are more likely to want decorative enhancements on their vehicles and to purchase accessories
for appearance purposes.xi Most analysis shows “that sales have historically been driven by a
demanding and limited number of males,” however, many automotive accessories providers
include females age 18 to 50 broadly as part of the target market.xii,xiii
For this consumer group, the number one reason to make modifications to their cars was to
protect the investment made in the car; followed by, improving performance, safety, and
security.xiv It was also found that in general, “vehicle owner’s today feel more secure with the
help of cellular phones and security systems…” both of which are integrated for greater security
in-the-CARKI-system.xv
Other important trends to note for the industry are telematics or in car technology which will
“lie in on-board software, wireless communications and convenience features,” and which are
appearing on new vehicles and provide services such as traffic information and engine
diagnostics.xvi Ford has created a new Sync device providing a Bluetooth communications


October 9, 2007                              - 14 -                        CARKI Project
network and a USB port to allow portable devices to be operated with voice commands. These
features could possibly be provided to those who do not want to buy a new car with expansions
of CARKI’s Bluetooth system. The main benefit of this expansion would be to provide users with
traffic information, diagnostics, and entertainment features without the requirements of in-car
screens or software, instead using phone or PDA.
At this juncture, it is necessary to perform further market research to more fully identify CARKI’s
target consumers, and potential market share. Surveys would be a key to finding more
information and identifying buyers. These surveys could be taken at current sellers of
aftermarket products to enable CARKI to segment the aftermarket accessory consumers into
targets or not, to understand what extra features are important to include, and to better
determine initial price and demand possibilities.

Competitor Analysis
Overall the aftermarket automobile industry is highly fragmented with thousands of products.
There are a growing number of online competitors, a recent and important one to note being
Amazon, who entered the general aftermarket auto parts sector in 2007. Mostly, the
differences in CARKI versus competing products, where features or utilities are the same for
both, are extras on competing models that are not featured on CARKI.
Many of these features are expansions on a basic model. At its base, CARKI is unique, providing
something distinctive from the competition including easy installation and synchronization with
a PDA or cell phone. However, many of the competitor features, which might make CARKI look
less desirable to a consumer in the short term, can be adopted after the base technology and
framework is developed. A further look into competition will be considered in the
“Weaknesses” and “Threats” sections of the S.W.O.T. analysis, however, listed below are central
features that could (in the future) be included in the CARKI model, and that would add
marketability and competitiveness to the product.
    •   Some form of visual confirmation that the remote start is engaged—flashing headlights
        or parking lights.
    •   A temperature sensor or an oil-pressure circuit to sense whether the engine is
        overheating.
    •   A pin switch on the hood of the vehicle to prevent remote start from engaging if
        someone is working on the car.
    •   Anti-scan technology to prevent code grabbing, or stealing the information uniquely
        identifying the car owner with their car.
    •   System for standard transmission vehicle use. Major competitors such as Viper, Python,
        and Clifford all have this newer feature and would open up a market sector originally
        unavailable.
    •   Longer range for remote-start ability.

S.W.O.T Analysis
S.W.O.T Analysis looks broadly at the internal and external factors affecting a business or
product. In general, internal factors are classified as either “Strengths” or “Weaknesses,” while
external factors are “Opportunities” or “Threats.” These factors are used to develop
competitive advantage and determine placement within the market.


October 9, 2007                               - 15 -                        CARKI Project
Strengths:
    •   Uniqueness (in market versus current offerings of competitors)
        -Integration with PDA/cell phone technology
        - Blue tooth
        -aftermarket pushbutton ignition
    •   Increased protection of car, a huge priority of aftermarket parts purchasers
    •   Appeals to “appearance” purchases—allows them to have the newest features in older
        vehicles.
    •   Aligned with market trends and consumer trends relating to technology and cell phone
        usage.
    •   Most cars on the road are 7 or more years old.
    •   Appeals to the custom car market
    •   Easy installation
Weaknesses:
    •   Extra accessory features on other models that are not currently on this model.
    •   ENVIRONMENT: More than 3 in 10 vehicles are leased.
    •   People leasing are unlikely to spend money on accessories.
    •   Sales in the aftermarket industry have typically been driven by a “demanding and
        limited number of males”
    •   Target consumers are yet unspecified totally
    •   More market research is necessary.
    •   Market is limited by consumers who are “turned off” by the complexity
        of product installation.
Opportunities:
    •   Extra accessory features can be added when base technology is developed.
    •   Developments in new cars with dashboard computers could be implemented
    •   Extensions of new products requiring screens can instead work with the cell phones.
    •   Large untapped consumer categories that may not be represented in aftermarket
        number
    •   Alliances with oil and lube places allowing installation of product while oil is changed.
    •   Reach consumers who feel isolated due to the technical nature of installation.
Threats:
    •   Ideas or similar features are not hard to copy once implemented.
    •   Market is highly fragmented with thousands of products.
    •   Distrust of cell phone integration with car system.
    •   The increase of new cars purchased deters potential buyers.
Overall, the market environment for the aftermarket automobile accessory industry is good and
appears to be growing. CARKI by its number of strengths can be a strong competitor in this
market, especially if it successfully compensates for, adjusts for, or uses its weaknesses to better
its market position. One crucial finding at this stage of the process is that CARKI requires further
market research into who the target consumer is, and how much they would pay to buy the
product. Such research could be in the form of surveys and would allow a clearer view at the
market and CARKI’s place in it.


October 9, 2007                               - 16 -                         CARKI Project
i
  Business Plan, Auto Accessories Unlimited
ii
     Reagan, Tilke. SBDCNET. “Aftermarket Automotive Accessories.”11/23/2004. Based on the work of the U.S. Small Business
Administration.
iii
    See endnote 2
iv
    See endnote 1
v
    See endnote 2
vi
    See endnote 1
vii
     See endnote 1
viii
     IMS Research. “The Worldwide Market for OEM Automotive Electronic Systems & Semiconductors in Automotive Systems- 2007
Edition.” 07/2007
ix
     See endnote 2
x
   Mintel International Group: Consumer, Media, & Market Research. “Automotive Aftermarket: Accessories & Speciality Products”-
US- August 2004
xi
    See endnote 8
xii
     See endnote 2
xiii
     See endnote 1
xiv
     See endnote 2
xv
     See endnote 1
xvi
     Plunkett Research, “Industry Stats: Automotive Accessories”
http://www.plunkettresearchonline.com.ezproxy.tamu.edu:2048/ResearchCenter/Trends/display.aspx?Industry=1&index=18




October 9, 2007                                             - 17 -                                 CARKI Project

				
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