Annual Performance Report

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   Annual Performance Report
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          Published by the City of Austin Budget office
                                                                                                            

                                             CITY OF AUSTIN 
                                      FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 




                                          TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Executive Summary....................................................................................... E-1
Citywide Dashboard.......................................................................................... 1
    Departments
       Public Safety
         Emergency Medical Services ............................................................... 23
         Fire....................................................................................................... 31
         Municipal Court.................................................................................... 37
         Police ................................................................................................... 45
       Community Services
         Health and Human Services ................................................................ 57
         Library ................................................................................................. 71
         Neighborhood Housing and Community Development........................ 79
         Parks and Recreation........................................................................... 81
       Infrastructure
         Austin Transportation .......................................................................... 87
         Planning and Development Review ..................................................... 93
         Public Works ...................................................................................... 101
         Watershed Protection ........................................................................ 109
       Utilities/Major Business Enterprises Departments
         Austin Convention Center .................................................................. 115
         Austin Energy .................................................................................... 121
         Austin Water Utility ............................................................................ 129
         Aviation.............................................................................................. 141
         Code Compliance............................................................................... 147
         Economic Growth and Redevelopment Services ............................... 151
         Solid Waste Services.......................................................................... 157
Appendix ...................................................................................................... 163
                                             This
Certificate of Excellence
                                      is presented to


                               Austin, TX
for exceeding the standards established by the ICMA Center for Performance Measurement™
    in the identification and public reporting of key outcome measures, surveying of both
     residents and employees, and the pervasiveness of performance measurement in the
                                     organization’s culture.

                       Presented at the 96th ICMA Annual Conference
                                     San José, California
                                       17 October 2010




        Rob e rt J. O’Ne i ll Jr.                                      Dar n e ll Ear ley
    I C MA Ex e c utive Di r e ctor                                    I C M A Pr e s i de n t




                                        Mic hae l Lawson
                                            Di r e ctor
                       I C MA Ce nte r f or Pe r f or manc e Meas u r e m e nt
                                      CITY OF AUSTIN 
                               FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT  
                                                  
                                                  

                                 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
Performance reporting is a major component of high-functioning organizations. It is a best-
practice identified by the International City/County Management Association, the Governmental
Accounting Standards Board, the Association of Governmental Accountants, the Government
Finance Officers Association, and numerous other professional agencies. In order to make good
business decisions, citizens and City government need the highest quality performance
information available. The use of performance measures makes it possible to:
       •   Identify results departments intend to achieve,
       •   Monitor performance and provide feedback,
       •   Make good business decisions based on reliable, understandable and consistent
           data,
       •   Shift the organizational focus from “what we do” to “what customers get”,
       •   Produce better results for customers, and
       •   Know when success has been achieved.

This City of Austin Annual Performance Report includes 113 measures that were identified by
City departments as “key” or “most important” in determining the success or improvement of
direct city services. Depending upon data availability, these measures are reviewed on either a
monthly, quarterly or annual basis by department staff. This report shows final year-end
performance for Fiscal Year 2009-10 as well as up to five years of historical information, if
available. The goals or targets that are set for these measures are also included in the report.
Having the additional time-trend information and targets can provide valuable insight in
determining progress or achievement with these key indicators.

This report is divided into four major service areas: Public Safety, Community Services,
Infrastructure, and Utility/Major Business Enterprises. Within each section, the departments are
arranged alphabetically. For instance, under the Public Safety tab, the departments included
are Emergency Medical Services, Fire, Municipal Court, and Police. Each department includes a
measure summary table, a message from the department director, and a full-page of data and
discussion for each key indicator. A staff contact has been provided for each measure in the
event that additional information or clarification be required. The 21 measures comprising the
newly created City of Austin Dashboard have been consolidated under a separate tab at the
front of the report and a summary table of all 113 measures and 5 years of data is included as
an appendix.

BEST MANAGED CITY 
The City of Austin’s vision of being the most livable city in the country means that Austin is a
place where all residents participate in its opportunities, its vibrancy and its richness of culture
and diversity. Austin residents share a sense of community pride and a determination that the
City’s vision is not just a slogan, but a reality for everyone who lives here. Local government
plays a critical role in determining a city’s quality of life. When Austin is viewed by others, it
receives high marks. Austin’s rankings reflect a City government that keeps its vision in the
forefront while planning for the future. In addition, each service provided by each City
department is aligned with the City’s vision.

To achieve the vision of making Austin the most livable city in the country, Austin’s city
government must be the best managed city in the country. The City Manager and his executive
team are committed to creating an environment that fosters creative thinking and innovation
by the workforce to tackle both today’s and future challenges. Being the best managed is about
everybody in the organization providing the best services possible to the community.

This report directly supports the ideal of Best Managed City by first qualifying what success
looks like and then quantifying how well we as a City are performing.

                                                E-1
                                      CITY OF AUSTIN 
                               FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT  
                                                  
                                                  
AUSTIN’S PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 
The City of Austin has been using data to track its performance for decades. The first budget
document to include performance measures was published in 1970. Since 1999, the City of
Austin has been using a business planning and performance monitoring model called Managing
for Results, which links people, dollars, and resources to the results that customers and citizens
expect from City services. This system integrates strategic planning with budgeting,
performance measurement and decision making. The goal of Managing for Results is to have
an effective performance management system that is accountable to citizens for achieving
results.

Managing for Results is built on the long-standing performance management principles of
“Plan, Do, Check, and Act.” The Managing for Results program in Austin is based on an annual
cycle that coincides with the City’s fiscal year. The complete framework represents a
continuous cycle of planning, budgeting, reporting and making decisions. City departments
assess the past, present and future to develop plans for the upcoming fiscal year. Program
budgets are developed based on the goals and results departments expect to achieve in the
upcoming year. Performance information is collected throughout the year to monitor progress
towards department goals and objectives. The performance information is also used to improve
the effectiveness of services provided to citizens. Having accurate data to measure
performance improves the organization’s ability to make results-oriented business decisions
and, ultimately, improve the services we provide to our customers.

As a result of our efforts in Managing for Results, the City of Austin has been recognized by the
Government Finance Officers Association for excellence in budget preparation since 1988 and
by the International City/County Management Association for excellence in performance
measurement since 2002.

CITY OF AUSTIN DASHBOARD
Of the 113 key indicators included in this annual report, 21 of the measures are newly
identified as citywide key indicators or citywide dashboard measures. These 21 measures are
collectively referred to herein as the City of Austin Dashboard.

Organization dashboards are a relatively new concept for city governments, with only a few
high-functioning jurisdictions having developed them to date. The idea behind an
organizational dashboard is to provide a summarized snapshot of performance for the most
important services that a city provides, so that these measures can easily and frequently be
reviewed by city staff, Council and citizens. In the City of Austin, the dashboard measures will
further improve performance reporting, increase transparency and accountability, and help to
achieve the City Manager’s challenge of being the Best Managed City in the nation. These 21
indicators will give City management, City Council, and the residents of Austin a tool for quickly
assessing how well the City of Austin is performing.

Building upon the efforts already made by departments during the annual business planning
process, the project began by focusing on the 113 key indicators included in this annual report.
From there, City staff narrowed the list down to 51 indicators using criteria that the measures
provide valuable information regarding citizen quality of life and measure a direct service to
the community.

To collect citizen input, 18 graduates from the last two CityWorks Academies were recruited to
participate in two evening workshops. The group also participated in an online forum to help
with the dashboard selection process. These citizens were uniquely qualified to participate in
this project because they have already shown considerable interest in City services by
volunteering their time to learn more about the City through the CityWorks Academy. As a
result, in addition to having a citizen perspective, they possess a detailed understanding of City
services.


                                               E-2
                                            CITY OF AUSTIN 
                                     FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT  
                                                        
                                                        
This citizen group developed a selection process to narrow the list from 51 to 16 measures. The
selection criteria included the following:

    •   Greatest population impact or impact on marginalized populations
    •   Impact on quality of life
    •   Safety and health
    •   How the measure language resonates and how clear the language is
    •   Frequency of reporting the measure (prefer more frequent reporting)
    •   How meaningful the reporting is and whether the measure is expressed in counts or
        percentages
    •   Whether the measure reflects efficiency of operations / gauges optimization
    •   Future impact on the City of Austin's sustainability goals, and
    •   Impact on affordability.

The recommendations of the CityWorks Academy graduates were then reviewed by City
management. Fifteen of the 16 recommended measures were approved for the final
Dashboard. Two measures related to energy reliability were combined and 6 measures were
added in order to reflect a broader range of City Services. The result is the 21 City of Austin
Dashboard measures shown below. Prior year data and the 2009-10 measure targets are
shown for each measure. These measures have been arranged into the four major service
areas outlined in this performance report: Public Safety, Community Services, Infrastructure,
and Utilities/Major Business Enterprises. One additional category, Economic and Financial
Health, includes two dashboard measures related to job growth and the City’s credit ratings
that are best categorized separately from the other major service areas.

Public Safety
Six public safety performance measures are included on the dashboard. These include the
city’s property and violent crime rates, response time to emergencies from the Police, Fire and
Emergency Medical Services departments and the Fire department’s key measure of the
percent of structure fires contained to room of origin. In FY 2009-10, five of the six targets set
for these measures were met or exceeded. In addition, these five measures showed
improvement from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10, with EMS’ response time measure improving
each year throughout the five-year timeframe from FY 2005-06 through FY 2009-10. Other
measures showing overall improvement throughout the five-year period include the violent
crime rate and Police and Fire response times. The City has made a concerted effort in the
current fiscal year, FY 2010-11, to further improve performance in these critical areas with the
addition of 100 sworn public safety personnel.

Citywide Dashboard: Public Safety 
                                                                                            2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                     2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09 2009‐10 
                                                                                             Target  Met?   # 
Violent crime rate per 1,000 population            5.15    5.40    5.22    5.23    5.00      5.29             46 
Property crime rate per 1,000 population               58.57  63.41  59.45  62.45  60.02    63.35             47 
Total police response time for emergency and 
urgent calls 
                                                        7:51   8:09   8:04   7:53   6:53     7:35             50 
Percent of potentially life threatening calls 
responded to by Emergency Medical Services on‐         80.2%  82.9%  85.7%  88.8%  90.1%     90%              24 
scene in <10 minutes (city only) 
Percent of emergency incidents where the amount 
of time between call receipt and the arrival of the     81%    82%    84%    86%    84%      85%              32 
Austin Fire Department unit is 8 minutes or less 
Percent of structure fires confined to room of origin  80%     81%    84%    81%    82%      80%              33 




                                                     E-3
                                             CITY OF AUSTIN 
                                      FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT  
                                                          
                                                          
Community Services
Six community services measures are included on the dashboard. These measures represent
services provided by the Neighborhood Housing and Community Development Department,
Health and Human Services, the Austin Public Library, and the Austin Parks and Recreation
Department. Two of the measures are newly reported in FY 2010-11, so targets were not
established in prior years even though some prior year data is available for them. Although
only one of the four measures that had targets met the target for FY 2009-10, all four of the
measures have shown improvement over the five-year timeframe.

Citywide Dashboard: Community Services 
                                                                                                 2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                        2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09 2009‐10 
                                                                                                  Target  Met?   # 
Total number of households/persons assisted 
through all services provided by Neighborhood       4,857    7,080    8,722    6,058    8,573    8,815             80 
Housing and Community Development 
Percent of animal shelter live outcomes              49%     48%      56%      68%      72%       75%              58 
Number of homeless persons receiving case 
management who move into safe and stable             496     519      562      691      670       515              60 
housing 
Number of immunizations given at the Shots for 
                                                    41,464 48,563 62,949 37,133 42,905  48,000                     61 
Tots clinics 
                                                                                                  No 
Library usage per capita                             0.16    0.15     0.17     0.16     0.16             N/A       72 
                                                                                                 Target 
Citizen satisfaction with the appearance of park      Not     Not     Not                         No 
                                                                               72%      70%              N/A       82 
grounds                                             tracked tracked tracked                      Target 

Infrastructure Services
Three infrastructure services measures are included on the citywide dashboard. These services
are provided by the Planning and Development Review department, Public Works and the
Austin Transportation Department. One of the 3 measures met FY 2009-10 targets, and this
measure also shows overall improvement over the five-year timeframe. Although performance
of on-time inspections has declined over the last few years, this measure has maintained at
least 90 percent throughout the five-year timeframe. In addition, 10 new inspectors have been
hired to replace retired staff in an effort to meet the target in FY 2010-11. The Austin
Transportation Department is actively looking at new traffic systems in an effort to keep on top
of monitoring for congested intersections and failed devices to allow for quick response and
reduce traffic delays. By maintaining the optimal travel time for city streets, the Department
hopes to improve citizen satisfaction with traffic flow.

Citywide Dashboard: Infrastructure Services 
                                                                                                 2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                        2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09 2009‐10 
                                                                                                  Target  Met?   # 
Percent of inspections by the Planning and 
Development Review department performed within  90%             93%     96%    94%    90%   95%                    94 
24 hours of request 
Percent of lane miles in fair to excellent condition   73.0%  73.8%  73.9%  74.8%  76.1%  76.1%                    102 
Percent of residents “satisfied” or “very satisfied”    Not     Not     Not 
with traffic flow on major city streets               tracked tracked tracked
                                                                              27.2%  27.4%  39%                    88 


Utilities/Major Business Enterprises
Four measures on the dashboard relate to the City’s major business enterprise operations.
These services are provided by Austin Energy, Austin Water Utility and Solid Waste Services
(SWS). Three of the measures met FY 2009-10 targets, and all four have shown improvement
over the five-year period reported. The percent of waste stream diverted from the landfill by
SWS’ efforts has shown a marked improvement since the implementation of the Single-Stream
Recycling program.
                                                       E-4
                                             CITY OF AUSTIN 
                                      FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT  
                                                             
                                                             
Citywide Dashboard: Utilities/Major Business Enterprises 
                                                                                                       2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                           2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09 2009‐10 
                                                                                                        Target  Met?   # 
Electricity System average interruption frequency    1.00    1.02   0.63   0.89   0.69   0.80                              122 
Percentage of renewable energy in Austin Energy’s 
energy supply 
                                                     6.0%  5.8%  6.6%  10.6%  9.6%  12.2%                                  123 

Drinking water quality: turbidity                    0.10    0.10   0.10   0.08   0.09   0.10                              131 
Percent of waste stream diverted by Solid Waste 
                                                     Not     Not 
Services curbside and Household Hazardous Waste 
                                                   tracked tracked
                                                                   30.4%  36.1%  37.3%  37.1%                              158 
operations 

Economic and Financial Health
Two measures on the dashboard monitor the economic and financial health of the city. These
measures are tracked by the Economic Growth and Redevelopment Services Office and the
Financial and Administrative Services Department. All of the measures met or exceeded targets
and have improved since they have been tracked.

Citywide Dashboard: Economic and Financial Health 
                                                                                                       2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                           2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09 2009‐10 
                                                                                                        Target  Met?   # 
Number of new jobs created through economic              Not     Not 
development efforts                                    tracked tracked
                                                                       1,368         810     1,550        500              152 
                  GO Bonds:                              Aa1,    Aa1,  Aa1,         Aa1,      Aaa,        Aa1, 
                  Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, Fitch      AA+,  AA+,  AAA,           AAA,      AAA,        AAA,              21 
City of Austin’s  Investors                              AA+     AA+    AA+         AA+       AAA         AA+ 
Bond Ratings  Combined Utility Revenue Bonds:            A1,     A1,    A1,          A1,       A1,         A1, 
                  Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, Fitch      AA‐,    AA‐,   AA‐,        AA,       AA,         AA‐,              21 
                  Investors                              AA‐     AA‐    AA‐         AA‐       AA‐         AA‐ 

SUMMARY OF PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE CITY’S SERVICE CATEGORIES 
Ninety-nine of the 113 measures reported had targets for FY 2009-10. Of these, 60 measures,
or 61 percent, achieved or met their goals. In addition, 69 measures, also 61 percent, maintained
or improved performance from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10. Eighty of the measures, or 71
percent, maintained performance or have shown overall improvement over the five-year
timeframe shown or from when the measure was first tracked. The City of Austin emphasizes
that departments set realistic, yet challenging, targets for their measures. A full summary of
the key indicators included in this report are in the appendix at the end of this report.

                                                                                       Improved or           Improved or 
                                                                 Met or Exceeded 
                                                                                     Maintained from          Maintained 
Service Category                 Number of Key Measures          2009‐10 Targets 
                                                                                    2008‐09 to 2009‐10        Over Time 
                                                                Number Percent Number Percent  Number Percent
                                          113 
Overall*                                                          60       61%        69        61%          80        71% 
                                   2009‐10 targets: 99 
                                          30 
Public Safety                                                     20       71%        21        70%          24        80% 
                                   2009‐10 targets: 28 
                                          24 
Community Services                                                 6       37%        13        54%          14        58% 
                                   2009‐10 targets: 16 
                                          22 
Infrastructure                                                    12       57%        14        64%          15        68% 
                                   2009‐10 targets: 21 
Utilities/Major                           36 
                                                                  21       62%        20        56%          26        72% 
Business Enterprises               2009‐10 targets: 34 
*The Overall category includes the measure “City of Austin’s Bond Ratings,” which is a City Dashboard measure only.




                                                           E-5
                                     CITY OF AUSTIN 
                              FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT  
                                                 
                                                 
Of the 30 public safety measures included in this report, 20 achieved the FY 2009-10 targets.
Because two measures did not have targets in FY 2009-10, 71 percent of the measures met
their targets. Twenty-one of the 30 measures, or 70 percent, maintained or showed
improvement from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10, and 24 measures, or 80 percent, maintained or
improved performance over the five-year timeframe or from when the measure was first
tracked.

Of the 24 community services measures included in the report, six met FY 2009-10 targets.
Because eight measures did not have targets in FY 2009-10, 37 percent of the measures met
the targets. Thirteen of the 24 measures, or 54 percent, maintained or showed improvement
from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10. Fourteen measures, or 58 percent, maintained or showed
improvement overall during the five-year timeframe or from the when the measure was first
tracked.

Of the 22 infrastructure measures, twelve, or 57 percent, met FY 2009-10 targets with one
measure not having a target in FY 2009-10. Fourteen measures, or 64 percent, maintained or
improved performance from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10. Fifteen, or 68 percent, of the measures
maintained or improved performance overall during the entire five-year timeframe or from
when the measure was first tracked.

Of the 36 utilities/major business enterprises measures, 21, or 62 percent, met FY 2009-10
targets, with two measures not having targets set for the fiscal year. Twenty of the 36
measures, or 56 percent, improved or maintained performance from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10.
26 measures, or 72 percent, improved or maintained performance overall during the entire
five-year timeframe or from when the measure was first tracked.

A summary of individual departmental performance can be found on each department divider
page throughout the document. In addition, departmental summaries by service categories can
be found at the end of this report in the appendix. Page numbers are included on the appendix
tables so that the reader can easily refer to the one-page narratives for each measure.

DATA RELIABILITY 
City management, Council and citizens depend on reliable and accurate data in order to make
the best decisions possible from the performance information. City staff take several steps to
ensure the accuracy of the data being reported. Each measure included in this report has a
data collection plan that establishes methods to accurately capture the data. These measures
go through several layers of review at both the department and Budget Office levels. The City
has established a formal “measure self-assessment” process that departments can use to
determine the accuracy of their data reporting. Many of the measures included in this report
have gone through the self-assessment process, with the remaining measures still planned for
future assessments. Although not all have received formal assessments, all of the data for the
measures in this report have been reviewed for accuracy.

WHERE TO GET MORE INFORMATION 
In addition to the 115 measures published in this report, performance data on approximately
2,500    city   measures     can    be    found    on   the   City’s   ePerformance     website:
http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/budget/eperf/. This website shows current performance data, prior
year performance and data descriptions for each measure. Also, at the bottom of each measure
page in this report, there is a staff contact and phone number so that citizens can call for
additional information if needed. The City also conducts an annual Citizen Survey, the results of
which can be found at http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/budget/citizensurvey.htm.




                                               E-6
                            CITYWIDE DASHBOARD MEASURES 
                                                                                                            2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                                  2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                             Target  Met?
Citywide Dashboard: Public Safety 
Violent crime rate per 1,000 population                        5.15      5.40    5.22     5.23      5.00     5.29           
Property crime rate per 1,000 population                      58.57     63.41    59.45    62.45    60.02    63.35           
Total police response time for emergency and urgent 
calls 
                                                               7:51      8:09    8:04     7:53      6:53     7:35           
Percent of potentially life threatening calls responded to 
by Emergency Medical Services on‐scene in <10 minutes         80.2%  82.9%  85.7%  88.8%  90.1%              90%            
(city only) 
Percent of emergency incidents where the amount of 
time between call receipt and the arrival of the Austin        81%       82%     84%      86%       84%      85%        
Fire Department unit is 8 minutes or less 
Percent of structure fires confined to room of origin          80%       81%     84%      81%       82%      80%            
Citywide Dashboard: Community Services 
Total number of households/persons assisted through 
all services provided by Neighborhood Housing and             4,857     7,080    8,722    6,058    8,573    8,815       
Community Development 
Percent of animal shelter live outcomes                        49%       48%     56%      68%       72%      75%        
Number of homeless persons receiving case 
management who move into safe and stable housing 
                                                               496       519     562       691      670      515            
Number of immunizations given in the Shots for Tots 
                                                              41,464 48,563 62,949 37,133  42,905  48,000               
clinics 
                                                                                                              No 
Library usage per capita                                       0.16      0.15    0.17     0.16      0.16             N/A 
                                                                                                            Target
                                                                Not     Not     Not                          No 
Citizen satisfaction with the appearance of park grounds                                  72%       70%              N/A 
                                                              tracked tracked tracked                       Target
Citywide Dashboard: Infrastructure Services 
Percent of inspections by the Planning and 
Development Review department performed within 24              90%       93%     96%      94%       90%      95%        
hours of request 
Percent of lane miles in fair to excellent condition          73.0%      73.8%  73.9%  74.8%  76.1%  76.1%                  
                                                               Not        Not     Not 
Citizen satisfaction with traffic flow on major city streets
                                                             tracked    tracked tracked
                                                                                        27.2%  27.4%  39.0%             
Citywide Dashboard: Utilities/Major Business Enterprises 
Electricity System average interruption frequency              1.00      1.02    0.63     0.89      0.69     0.80           
Percentage of renewable energy in Austin Energy’s 
energy supply 
                                                               6.0%      5.8%    6.6%     10.6%     9.6%    12.2%       
Drinking water quality: turbidity                              0.10      0.10    0.10     0.08      0.09     0.10           
Percent of waste stream diverted by Solid Waste 
                                                               Not        Not 
Services curbside and Household Hazardous Waste 
                                                             tracked    tracked
                                                                                30.4%  36.1%  37.3%  37.1%                  
operations 
Citywide Dashboard: Economic and Financial Health 
Number of new jobs created through economic                    Not        Not 
development efforts                                          tracked    tracked
                                                                                1,368  810         1,550     500            
                                                               Aa1,       Aa1,  Aa1,    Aa1,        Aaa,    Aa1, 
                 GO Bonds: Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, 
City of          Fitch Investors 
                                                               AA+,       AA+,  AAA,  AAA,          AAA,    AAA,            
                                                               AA+        AA+    AA+    AA+         AAA     AA+ 
Austin’s Bond 
                 Combined Utility Revenue Bonds:                A1,       A1,    A1,                         A1, 
Ratings                                                                                A1, AA,     A1, AA, 
                 Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, Fitch             AA‐,       AA‐,   AA‐, 
                                                                                        AA‐         AA‐ 
                                                                                                            AA‐,            
                 Investors                                      AA‐       AA‐    AA‐                        AA‐ 
                                                                                              Citywide Dashboard

                               VIOLENT CRIME RATE PER  1,000 POPULATION 

Measure Description: The FBI identifies seven “Part I Index Crimes” based on their seriousness and frequency
of occurrence. Four of these represent violent crimes: murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. The
Austin Police Department reports crime counts to the FBI, whose UCR (Uniform Crime Reporting) program
provides for consistent crime reporting across the country. Once UCR statistics are released, these become our
official statistics.
Calculation Method: Violent crimes are counted by either number of victims (murder, rape, aggravated
assault) or number of offenses (robbery). Violent crime rate is calculated by dividing violent crime count by a
population factor (Austin population divided by 1,000). For prior years (FY 2008-09 and earlier), we report FBI
UCR violent crime rate, which is based on a calendar year and our US census population, and is considered
official. For the current year (FY 2009-10), violent crime rate is based on a fiscal year and Austin’s full-purpose
population. This result is considered unofficial until the FBI releases its final results in September.
FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 5.29 crimes per 1,000 residents. The actual
result was 5.00 crimes per 1,000 residents, which was 5% below the goal.

                                       Violent Crime Rate per 1,000 Population


  7.00
  6.00                                                                            5.40
                                     5.40                   5.22                                   5.29
                5.15
  5.00
                5.00                 4.90                   4.99                  5.23             5.00
  4.00
  3.00
  2.00
  1.00
  0.00
              2005-06              2006-07              2007-08                  2008-09          2009-10

                                                   Result          Goal


Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 4% lower than FY 2008-09 and
5% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09). Austin’s violent crime rate
in 2009 (the most recent official results) was 5.23, which was considerably below the rate of 8.85 for all large
US cities.*
Another way to look at violent crime rate data is to examine the four violent crime types. During FY 2009-10,
Austin experienced 30 homicides, which represents a rate of 0.04 per 1,000 residents, or an increase of 36%
as compared with the previous year. Austin’s 2009 homicide rate of 0.03 per 1,000 residents was much lower
than the rate of 0.12 for large US cities. Austin’s number of rapes fell 10% to 246 in FY 2009-10; our 2009 rate
of 0.3 rapes per 1,000 was about the same as other large US cities.
Austin also saw a 10% decrease in robberies from last year, to 1.6 per 1,000 residents; our 2009 robbery rate
of 1.8 per 1,000 residents was about half the rate of 3.4 for large US cities. Austin’s number of aggravated
assaults was up 1% compared to last year, but our rate of 3.0 per 1,000 population in 2009 was well below the
rate of 5.0 per 1,000 for other large US cities.
Next Steps: Operation Total Saturation, a bureau-wide initiative, aimed to reduce violent crime in the
downtown entertainment district. It involved metro response, patrol, and highway enforcement officers, as well
as district representatives. The operation targeted suspects involved in drug traffic and alcohol-related
violations, and also worked with bar owners to discourage selling to underage and over-served patrons. During
the initiative (January through March), violent crime was reduced 36% vs. the same period last year. The
initiative continued through April and May, resulting in an 8% reduction in violent crime during the initiative for
that period; that reduction was comprised of a 40% decrease in robberies and a 33% increase in aggravated
assaults.
In addition, throughout the year, the Central Bureau operated a crime initiative concentrated in bureau hot
spots. The operation was a coordinated effort involving patrol officers, district representatives, walking beat
officers, and metro response officers. Using observation of high-potential crime areas and patrol saturation,
violent crime was reduced 5%.
*Note: Comparison crime rates for large US cities are based on the most recent FBI data for calendar year
2009. Included are cities with population between 500,000 and 999,999 (as comparison, Austin’s population
was 774,636 in 2010).
For more information contact Commander Julie O’Brien, Violent Crime Division, at (512) 974-8292.
                                                      1
Citywide Dashboard

                               PROPERTY CRIME RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION

Measure Description: The FBI identifies seven “Part I Index Crimes” based on their seriousness and frequency
of occurrence. Three of these represent property crimes: burglary, theft, and auto theft. The Austin Police
Department reports crime counts to the FBI, the UCR (Uniform Crime Reporting) program provides consistent
crime reporting across the country. Once UCR statistics are released, these become our official statistics.
Calculation Method: Property crimes are counted by number of premises entered (burglary), number of
offenses (theft), or number of vehicles (auto theft). Property crime rate is calculated by dividing property crime
count by a population factor (Austin population divided by 1,000). For prior years (FY 2008-09 and earlier), we
report FBI UCR property crime rate, which is based on a calendar year and our US census population. For the
current year (FY 2009-10), property crime rate is based on a fiscal year and Austin’s full-purpose population.
This result is considered unofficial until the FBI releases its final results in September.
FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 63.35 crimes per 1,000 residents. The actual
result was 60.02 crimes per 1,000 residents, which was 5% below the goal.


                                      Property Crime Rate per 1,000 Population

  100.00
   90.00
   80.00
                                      63.41                                      62.45              63.35
   70.00          58.57                                      59.45
   60.00
   50.00                                                                          63.00             60.02
                  55.60               54.70                  57.50
   40.00
   30.00
   20.00
   10.00
    0.00
                 2005-06             2006-07              2007-08                2008-09           2009-10

                                                    Result           Goal

Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 4% lower than FY 2008-09 and
2% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09). Austin’s property crime
rate in 2009 (the most recent official results) was 62.45, which was significantly higher than the rate of 49.00
for all large US cities.*
Another way to look at property crime rate data is to examine the three property crime types. Austin’s FY
2009-10 rate of 11.2 burglaries per 1,000 residents was up slightly (1%) from last year and our 2009 rate of
11.4 was similar to the rate for other large US cities (11.7 per 1,000 residents). Austin saw a small (3%)
decrease in the theft rate from last year, but our 2009 rate of 48 thefts per 1,000 residents was much higher
than the rate of 32 for large US cities. Austin’s FY 2009-10 rate of 3.0 auto thefts per 1,000 residents is also
down slightly (3%) from last year, but our 2009 rate of 3.0 was far below the rate of 5.8 for large US cities.
Next Steps: During the December holidays, patrol officers citywide conducted operations designed to keep
shoppers safe in and near area retail centers. Activities included high-profile patrols, plain-clothes surveillance,
decoy vehicles, and distribution of safety information to raise awareness and educate residents about how to
prevent crimes such as burglary of vehicles.
The Central West area command, including the west campus area, was the target of a March initiative to
reduce the volume of burglaries, including both burglary of vehicles (BOVs) and burglary of residences (BORs).
Increased high-visibility presence and traffic enforcement were used, resulting in a 24% reduction in BOVs and
a 29% reduction in BORs. During the third quarter, the Central Bureau continued a crime initiative
concentrated on bureau hot spots. Using observation of high-potential crime areas and patrol saturation,
property crime was reduced by 9%.
In April, the department launched an operation aimed at reducing the number of thefts of large pickup trucks
which are often used in human smuggling activities. The joint effort involved the Auto Theft and patrol units,
as well as Round Rock Police Department and surrounding jurisdictions. The operation ran through the 3rd
quarter and resulted in a 9% decrease in large truck thefts as compared with the 2nd quarter.
*Note: Comparison crime rates for large US cities are based on the most recent FBI data for calendar year
2009. Included are cities with population between 500,000 and 999,999 (as comparison, Austin’s population
was 774,636 in 2010).
For more information contact Commander Wayne Demoss, Centralized Property Crime Division, (512) 974-8275.
                                                 2
                                                                                               Citywide Dashboard

                  TOTAL POLICE RESPONSE TIME FOR EMERGENCY AND URGENT CALLS 

Measure Description: Calls for service are received from citizens and prioritized for dispatch to patrol officers.
The highest priority calls are emergency (imminent threat to life or public safety) and urgent (not emergency,
but still require an urgent response). Using call priorities helps to ensure a rapid response to these critical call
types.

Calculation Method: Total response time is calculated from the time the call for service is answered by a call
taker to the time the first police officer arrives on scene. In addition, although response time for emergency
and urgent calls is reported as a single result, a weighted average is calculated. This allows differences in
volumes for the two call types to be taken into consideration.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure, total response time for emergency and urgent calls, was 7:35.
The actual result was 6:53, which was 11% below the goal.


                                  Total Response Time for Emergency and Urgent Calls


  10.00
                                       8.09                   8.04
                 7.51                                                            7.53                 7.35
    8.00

                  7.00                                        7.30               7.30
    6.00                               7.00                                                           6.53

    4.00


    2.00


    0.00
                2005-06              2006-07              2007-08              2008-09              2009-10

                                                     Result          Goal


Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 13% lower than FY 2008-09
and 16% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09). Another way to look
at response time is to examine the two call priorities. For FY 2009-10, the goal for emergency call response
time was 5:51 and the actual result was 5:36 (4% faster than the goal). The urgent call response time goal was
8:06 and the result was 7:50 (3% faster than the goal).

The decrease in total response time from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10 is likely the result of a change made in the
2nd quarter. After an annual review of call priorities, one call type was reclassified: traffic hazard on high-speed
roadway. This call type was originally considered urgent, but because it is not a violent crime, it was more
accurately classified as a Priority 2 call. These calls continued to be assigned to officers as soon as possible.
Because of the reclassification, traffic hazard calls were excluded from urgent response time calculations,
thereby lowering total response times.

Next Steps: In September, Austin 311 began using improved criteria to help filter incoming calls and, thereby,
reduce the number of non-police calls received by the Communications section. Ultimately, this allowed more
efficient handling of the non-police calls (by avoiding repeated transfers) and improved capacity to handle
calls appropriately directed to 911 and Teleserve (which handles non-emergency police calls). By December,
the monthly call volume was reduced by nearly 30% as compared with September.

In August, communications initiated a cross-training rotation requiring dispatchers to work each sector of the
city. The goal was to ensure that dispatchers maintain their proficiency with communications tools, ensuring
they can effectively cover any sector. Although this was done in anticipation of a January 2011 redistricting
(that will create new sector boundaries), this focus on performance has already resulted in modest, 1-2%
decreases in response time for all call types.

For more information contact Marcia Brooks, Emergency Communications Division Manager, at (512) 974-0943.




                                                         3
Citywide Dashboard

                PERCENT OF POTENTIALLY LIFE THREATENING CALLS RESPONDED TO BY  
                         EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES ON‐SCENE IN  < 10 MINUTES 

Measure Description: This measure tracks the percent of time that EMS responds to potentially life threatening
Priority One calls within 9:59 minutes in urban areas of the community. The EMS department utilizes a
demand for EMS service model to define urban and suburban areas. By this industry standard, each EMS
incident is plotted on a map for a month with average incident volume. If two or more incidents occur in the
same square kilometer and an adjacent square kilometer also have two or more incidents in a month both
areas are considered to be urban, for the purpose of EMS deployment. All areas of the City of Austin and some
areas of Travis County outside of Austin are considered to be urban utilizing the model.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by examining the total time, from the moment Emergency
Medical Services (EMS) 911 Communications receives a call for service to the moment an ambulance arrives at
the incident, for each Priority One call.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10 EMS’ performance was 90.1%. This was an improvement over the FY 2008-
09 percentage of 88.8%.


                      Percent of Potentially Life Threatening Calls Responded to by EMS On-Scene
                                                      in < 10 Minutes

  100%
   90%
   80%                                                                      88.8%                  90.1%
                                                       85.7%
            80.2%                82.9%
   70%
   60%
   50%                                                                                                     54.1%
   40%                                                         48.9%                49.1%
                    40.9%                42.6%
   30%
   20%
   10%
    0%
               2005-06              2006-07              2007-08               2008-09               2009-10

                                                     Urban     Suburban




Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the overall improvement in Priority One Response Time
percentage since the beginning of FY 2005-06. FY 2009-10 represented EMS’ first time at achieving 90% in the
urban areas. The improvement in FY 2009-10 was attributable to the combination of the continued
implementation and use of the dynamic Move Up Module (MUM), which positions units in real-time for
optimizing coverage; a daily Operations review of prior day calls in order to analyze root causes of late calls
and exceptions; and continued maximization of resources to ensure coverage at peak demand times.

Next Steps: EMS will continue to strive to find ways to improve response time. In FY 2009-10 EMS introduced a
three-year operational deployment plan designed to improve response time reliability for all incident priorities
throughout the community. The plan analyzes the time, location, and severity of EMS incidents and uses this
information to determine trends and identify locations for future ambulance placement. The addition of a new
unit at Avery Ranch and two new Peak Load Units in the suburban county areas of Bee Caves and Pflugerville
will provide additional resources to help meet a continued growing demand for services.

For more information contact James Shamard, Assistant Director – Operations, at (512) 972-7200




                                                          4
                                                                                                              Citywide Dashboard

PERCENT OF EMERGENCY INCIDENTS WHERE THE AMOUNT OF TIME BETWEEN CALL RECEIPT AND THE 
                   ARRIVAL OF AUSTIN FIRE DEPARTMENT UNIT IS 8 MINUTES OR LESS 

Measure Description: This measure provides an overall picture of response to fire and medical emergencies,
from phone pickup at Austin Fire Department (AFD) or Emergency Medical Services (EMS) dispatch centers to
arrival of the first AFD unit.

Calculation Method: For each incident, total response is calculated as first unit arrival minus time of initial
phone pickup at the EMS or AFD dispatch centers. The measure result is obtained by dividing the number of
incidents with response times of 8 minutes or less by the total number of incidents with valid data. The
selection criteria exclude non-emergencies, requests for assistance by law enforcement agencies, and
responses outside the AFD service area.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 85% of emergency responses within 8
minutes of call receipt. The FY 2009-10 result was 84%.


                         P e r ce nt o f E m e r ge ncy Incide nts with Fir s t Unit A r r iv a l Within 8 Minute s
  100%
                                                                     84%                    86%                        85%
                81%                       82%
   80%
               80%                                                                                                     84%
                                         81%                       80%                      80%
   60%


   40%


   20%


    0%
               2005-06                  2006-07                   2007-08                  2008-09                    2009-10

                                                           R e s ult          Goal



Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates an increasing trend the past several years followed by a
slight decline in the most recent fiscal year. The increases in FY 2007-08 and FY 2008-09 likely reflect a
change in measurement method rather than actual improvement in response time. The increase coincides
with the use of Automated Vehicle Locator data, starting in late FY 2007-08, to automate the time-stamping of
arrival times (rather than relying on individuals to push a button). After changing the reporting method, station
alert times were cut in half, from 12 to 6 seconds, and structure fire call processing decreased by an average
of 31 seconds.

Next Steps: The department will continue to analyze call-processing times to ensure that the necessary
adjustments and modifications to processes are implemented. The ongoing relationship with the Austin
Transportation Department will continue to be vital in order for AFD to address intersections in the city that
have long traffic queues so that we can seek ways to reduce travel times of emergency response apparatus. In
Operations, data will continue to be evaluated to ensure that “Turnout Time” is uniformly kept to a minimum
across the battalions and the three shifts. Companies that deviate from the norm for their unit type will be
identified and corrective actions will be implemented.

For more information contact Matt Orta, Assistant Chief, (512) 974-0135 or George Blackmore, Assistant Chief,
(512) 974-0136.




                                                                 5
Citywide Dashboard

                       PERCENT OF STRUCTURE FIRES CONFINED TO ROOM OF ORIGIN 

Measure Description: This measure is an indicator of Austin Fire Department’s success in controlling the
amount of damage caused by fires occurring in residential, commercial, and industrial structures citywide.
Factors that affect performance include having a high quality fleet, a well trained workforce, effective standard
operating guidelines (everyone knows what their job is on the scene), and a strong incident command
structure. This measure is further affected by the number of firefighters that can get to the scene quickly, the
age and construction type of the structure, regular fire prevention inspections, and public safety education
efforts.

Calculation Method: This measure is the sum of the number of fires confined to object of origin and room of
origin, divided by the total number of structure fires occurring in the specified property uses. The measure
excludes structure fires occurring on outdoor structures such as bridges and bus stops.

FY 2009-10 Results: 82% of structure fires were confined to room of origin, compared to a goal of 80%.


                                       P e r ce nt o f Fir e s C o nf ine d to R o o m o f O r igin
  100%

                                      81%                          84%                       81%      82%
                80%
   80%
                 80%                  80%                                                    77%       80%
   60%
                                                                   75%


   40%


   20%


    0%
               2005-06               2006-07                    2007-08                     2008-09   2009-10

                                                            R e s ult            Goal



Assessment of Results: This measure covers a wide range of property uses and fire causes. About 40% of
incidents occur in single family or duplex residences, which are not inspectable, while the remaining 60%
occur in properties legally subject to fire code inspections. Multi-family residences (apartments) have the
highest priority for inspections, due to their greater aggregate risk of fire deaths and property loss. Inspection
rates for other property uses are primarily affected by the amount of new development occurring in the city.
During periods of development growth, proportionately more inspector resources are allocated to making sure
new buildings comply with fire codes, thereby reducing the amount of resources available to conduct
inspections of existing properties. Analysis of room of origin results indicate the increase in FY 2007-08 was
concentrated in commercial properties, which may reflect the impact of reallocations of inspection resources
to existing properties during the recent recession. One factor in the uptick observed in FY 2009-10 may be the
half-minute decrease in call processing times for structure fires, allowing field units to be dispatched more
quickly. Because of this, the goal was increased for FY 2010-11 to 82%.

Next Steps: Operations companies will continue to receive Continuing Education instruction that will include
proper strategy selection for fire incidents as well as tactical refresher classes. The Department is also reviving
its Battalion Medical Instructor program. This effort de-centralizes a large portion of our medical training and
allows units to remain in their assigned territories rather than travelling across the City to receive this training.
Dispatch call processing times and unit “Turnout” times will continue to be evaluated to ensure that times are
uniformly kept to a minimum. AFD has initiated a new program in which the neighborhood of any major fire
incident is canvassed to provide information about the incident, provide fire safety instruction and inquire
about the status of working smoke alarms. These efforts should reduce the likelihood of fire or reduce the
amount of time required for the citizen to call 9-1-1. In-service fire safety inspections will continue to identify
and correct fire hazards. Hydrant maintenance and testing will continue to ensure readiness and facilitate
needed repairs.

For more information contact Ken Crooks, Assistant Chief, (512) 974-4189.




                                                               6
                                                                                             Citywide Dashboard
     TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS/PERSONS ASSISTED THROUGH ALL SERVICES PROVIDED BY 
                      NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Measure Description: The total number of households/persons assisted through all services Key Indicator
includes households served in all Neighborhood Housing and Community Development (NHCD) programs,
including Homeless/Special Needs, Renter Assistance, Homebuyer Assistance, Homeowner Assistance, Housing
Developer Assistance, Commercial Revitalization, and Small Business Assistance. This measure provides a
snapshot of the total impact of all NHCD programs on the community.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by summing the households served in all NHCD programs
annually.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was 8,815 households served. In FY 2009-10, NHCD served
8,573 households, which was under the goal by 242 households.



                      Total Number of Households/Persons Assisted Through All Services

     12,000
                                                           9,790
     10,000                                                                 8,993             8,815
                                      8,036
      8,000

      6,000        4,857
      4,000

      2,000        3,191              7,080             8,722               6, 058            8, 573
          0
                   2005-06           2006-07           2007-08              2008-09          2009-10



                                              Result                 Goal



Assessment of Results: As the graph above indicates, the overall number of households/persons assisted
through all services during FY 2009-10 was less than anticipated. Over the entire five-year period of
assessment, NHCD achieved 91% of the goal. NHCD attributes the number of households assisted to several
factors, which have driven both the demand for services as well as the supply of available funding to meet
community needs. The current economic recession and continued population growth in Austin have
contributed to gaps in affordable rental and ownership housing for Austin residents, leading to increased
demand for NHCD services. Over this five year period, NHCD has seen steady increases in number of
households served. In addition, NHCD has been able to expand services offered due to increased revenue
through the passage of the 2006 General Obligation Bonds for affordable housing, as well as strong support for
affordable housing initiatives by the Austin City Council as seen through support of the Housing Trust Fund,
Permanent Supportive Housing, and other initiatives. All of these factors have contributed to an increase in the
overall number of households assisted through NHCD programs.

Next Steps: The City’s strategy for housing and community development operates at a satisfactory pace given
economic constraints and the availability of resources. Affordable housing continues to be the highest priority
for the City as it relates to the use of the federal grants. The City continues to support job creation and
neighborhood revitalization as important economic development activities. The City recognizes that the need
for job creation opportunities will also increase, as the national and local economies continue to be volatile.
Availability to short- and long-term financial assistance programming will help develop and strengthen Austin’s
small and minority business community and stimulate the growth of better-paying jobs for minority- and low-
income residents.

For more information contact Rebecca Giello, Acting Assistant Director, at (512) 974-3045.




                                                       7
Citywide Dashboard

                              PERCENT OF ANIMAL SHELTER LIVE OUTCOMES  

Measure Description: This measure assesses the outcomes for all animals inhabiting the animal shelter in a
given fiscal year. Live outcomes include those animals returned to their owners, adopted, or transferred to
rescue groups and other community partners. In addition, this category also includes the small number of
animals that escape, are stolen, or are lost. In other words, the live outcomes category includes all sheltered
animals not euthanized.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing all sheltered animals in the fiscal year by those not
euthanized. Those animals that succumb to disease or injury are not included in this calculation.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was 75% and the result 72%. This live outcome percentage is
the highest in the history of the Town Lake Animal Shelter. Of the 24,026 animals sheltered, only 6,771 were
euthanized. The low euthanasia rate corresponds to a high number of successful outcomes. In FY 2009-10, a
total of 6,231 animals were adopted, 5,617 were rescued, and 3,329 were returned to their owner.


                                     Percent of Animal Shelter Live Outcomes

                                                                                            75%
        80%
                                                                         68%
        70%
                                                       56%                                 72%
        60%                          48%
                     49%
        50%
        40%                                                               45%
                     42%              43%               44%
        30%
        20%
        10%
         0%
               2005-06 Actual       2006-07           2007-08           2008-09          2009-10


                                                    Result       Goal



Assessment of Results: This chart illustrates the department’s achievements in reducing the shelter euthanasia
rate from FY 2005-06 to FY 2009-10. The 72% was achieved through increasing returns, adoptions, and
rescues for sheltered animals and slowing the anticipated rate of growth in shelter intake. Staff attributes the
increase in the live outcome percentage rate to several policy improvements: the feral cat sterilization
program and free pet spay/neuter clinics that decreased the growth in shelter intake; increases in the number
of pets adopted or transferred to rescue partners because of shelter promotions, publicity, and the growth in
number and capacity of rescue groups; a foster care program that saved many young animals who could not
thrive in a shelter setting; and moratorium requirements that prohibited euthanizing any animals if a kennel or
cage was available.

Next Steps: The animal shelter’s goal is to increase live outcomes to 90% by FY 2011-12. The current year’s
budget contains funding for several programs that will build on our successes to date and help to further
improve the live outcomes rate. For example, initiatives in FY 2010-11 will include an expanded foster care
program, the spay street program that provides outreach to more neighborhoods, an emergency care fund, a
public awareness campaign, and increased veterinary staff to continue to make animals more immediately
ready for adoptions.

For more information contact Abigail Smith, Chief Animal Services Officer, at (512) 972-6088.




                                                       8
                                                                                            Citywide Dashboard

                    NUMBER OF HOMELESS PERSONS RECEIVING CASE MANAGEMENT 
                               WHO MOVE INTO SAFE AND STABLE HOUSING 


Measure Description: This measure identifies the number of homeless individuals who were able to move into
safe and stable housing as a result of case management funded through City of Austin social services
contracts. It includes facilities such as emergency shelters, transitional housing, and permanent supportive
housing. Individuals include homeless youth, families, women with children, and single adults.

Calculation Method: This measure reflects people who received case management and subsequently moved
into safe and stable housing from the following City of Austin funded agencies: Blackland, Caritas, Casa
Marianella, Foundation for the Homeless, Front Steps (Austin Resource Center for the Homeless), Green Doors,
VinCare, LifeWorks, and Salvation Army (Downtown Shelter and Women and Children’s Shelter). The agencies
report on the status of client’s homelessness at the time of exit from their agency/program.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10, 670 individuals moved from homelessness into safe and stable housing.
Agencies report that clients stayed longer in their facilities, reducing the overall number of people served, but
that a higher percentage of their clients exited to safe and stable housing than in prior years.


              Number of Homeless Persons Receiving Case Management Who Move into Safe and Stable
                                                    Housing

        800
        700
                                                                          691               670
        600                                             562
                                      519
        500         496
                                                                                            515
        400                                                               470
                                                        450
        300
                    355               355
        200
        100
          0
                  2005-06           2006-07           2007-08           2008-09           2009-10


                                                    Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: There was an increase in funding beginning in FY 2008-09 from state and federal
stimulus grant awards to move people into safe and stable housing from homelessness. While clients may
have had to stay longer in shelter (or other homeless facilities), the opportunities for moving into housing grew
through additional financial assistance and additional case management. Federal stimulus funding was the
largest single monetary source for financial assistance and case management. Those dollars will end in FY
2010-11.

Next Steps: HHSD will continue work on the City’s goal of establishing 350 new units of permanent supportive
housing (PSH) so that more clients can move out of shelter or transitional housing and into permanent
housing. A joint Request for Proposal (RFP) between Neighborhood Housing and Community Development and
Health and Human Services for PSH capital and services funding is planned for 2011. Homeless services will be
funded under Goal One of the Social Services Self-Sufficiency RFP that is taking place in 2011, with contracts
starting in FY 2011-12. The City is also monitoring activities at the State Legislature related to Homeless
Housing and Services Program as this new state funding will potentially be eliminated or cut during the 2011
Legislative session. If those funds are lost, the City would lose approximately $2.0 million in homeless services
funding over the biennium.

For more information contact Vince Cobalis, Assistant Director, Human Services Division, at (512) 972-5011.




                                                       9
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                 NUMBER OF IMMUNIZATIONS GIVEN AT THE SHOTS FOR TOTS CLINICS  
                                                           
Measure Description: The number of shots given to children (17 years of age and under) in the Shots for Tots
clinics is one indicator of productivity in the immunization clinics and, to some extent, indicates capacity to
prevent disease. However, vaccine formularies change and a vaccine that prevented two diseases in 2010
may prevent four in 2011. For this reason the data have to be carefully considered and interpreted in context
with other performance measures (i.e., number of clients served).

Calculation Method: All clients (both child and adult) immunizations are entered into a data base called TWICES
(Texas-Wide Integrated Client Encounter System) directly after a clinic visit. The TWICES application allows
users to run reports on the number of shots given over any period of time.

FY 2009-10 Results: FY 2009-10 realized a small increase in the number of shots given, increasing from 37,133
to 42,905. This increase can be attributed to the fact that the program became fully staffed with four full time
Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVN) providing shots at two clinic locations.


                             Number of Immunizations Given at the Shots for Tots Clinics




  80,000
                                                         62,949
  60,000                                                                      48,000           48,000
                                    48,563
                41,464
  40,000
                                                         45,000                                42,905
                39,550              41,000
  20,000                                                                      37,133

        0
                2005-06             2006-07              2007-08              2008-09         2009-10


                                                     Result        Goal




Assessment of Results: Clinic staffing levels and the program’s response to public health emergencies directly
impacted the number of children that could be served from late 2008 through the spring of 2010. For many
months nursing staff was at 50% of normal capacity. In addition, the H1N1 response pulled resources away
from the Shots for Tots operations for about six months from, October 2009 to March 2010, reducing the
capacity to provide childhood immunizations.

Next Steps: The Immunization Program recently moved clinical services from the Rosewood Zaragosa clinic
(located in east Austin) to the already existing Far South location (doubling capacity at that clinic). We expect
this reallocation of resources to increase accessibility to the public. The Rosewood location had been open for
three years and did not perform at acceptable capacity. In fact, appointment data show that the program was
experiencing an opportunity loss (Far South’s appointments were full and Rosewood Zaragosa’s were not).
The Far South clinic capacity was increased in the November of 2010. The program should experience an
increase in the number of clients served as a result of this change.

The Immunization Program is also responsible for:
    •   Outreach to mothers and children exposed or at risk for exposure to Hepatitis B.
    •   Auditing daycare and schools to ensure facilities are maintaining records properly and children in
        facilities are up-to-date on immunizations.
    •   Monitoring vaccine inventory levels, ensuring proper storage protocol and providing technical
        assistance to 100 area Vaccines for Children Providers in Travis County.

The program is currently evaluating performance measure criteria for all of these areas to develop a more
comprehensive overview based on new performance measures.

For more information contact Kurt Becker, Immunization Program Manager, at (512) 972-5523.

                                                        10
                                                                                              Citywide Dashboard

                                         LIBRARY USAGE PER CAPITA  
                                                            
Measure Description: Library usage per capita is a standard indicator in the library industry. This measure was
chosen as a new key indicator in FY 2010-11 in conjunction with a new ranking system for public libraries, the
Index of Public Library Service, proposed by Library Journal in 2009. It uses only statistics that describe library
service outputs, such as visits, circulation, public Internet computer usage, and program attendance. By
dividing the total attendance by the population, the Library has a simple indicator of how much “repeat”
business it receives.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the total attendance at all library programs by the
corresponding full-purpose population figure.

FY 2009-10 Results: As this was a newly instituted key indicator for FY 2010-11, there was no FY 2009-10 goal
established for this measure. The FY 2009-10 actual result was 0.16. A goal of 0.17 has been established for
this measure in FY 2010-11.


                                                Library Usage Per Capita


        0.18
                                                           0.17
        0.17
                     0.16                                                    0.16           0.16
        0.16
                                      0.15
        0.15


        0.14


        0.13
                   2005-06           2006-07              2007-08           2008-09        2009-10


                                             Result      A goal was not established




Assessment of Results: Similar to customer visits, library usage can also be affected by the closure of library
locations. Budget funding was included in FY 2005-06 to reopen our branch libraries one day per week from
closures implemented in FY 2003-04. This operating schedule continued through FY 2007-08, and overall
library usage increased by 13% during this two-year period. Library usage counts come from two separate
categories: youth program attendees and adult/family program attendees. While youth library usage remained
relatively consistent between FY 2005-06 and FY 2007-08, increasing only 1%, adult/family library usage
increased 100% during the same period. Historically, the vast majority of adult/family programs had been
provided at the Faulk Central Library and Austin History Center. In early FY 2007-08, however, the Library
began a focused effort to provide more adult/family programs in branch libraries. The outcome of this effort
was a 7% increase in adult/family programs offered and an increase of 20% in adult/family library usage over
FY 2006-07. In FY 2008-09, however, this effort declined due to staffing and resource issues and adult/family
library usage has not seen any real growth in FY 2008-09 and FY 2009-10. Youth library usage decreased
approximately 4% between FY 2007-08 and FY 2009-10, primarily due to the reduction of 3.0 FTEs in the Youth
Services division as part of the FY 2009-10 Approved Budget. In FY 2008-09, total library usage decreased by
2% while the population increased by almost 4%, dropping library usage per capita by 6%. In FY 2009-10,
total library usage only decreased by 1%, while the population increased 1%, leaving library usage per capita
stable at 0.16.

The department is projecting a 7% increase in library usage in FY 2010-11 while full-purpose population is
projected to increase 1%, which would lead to a goal of library usage per capita at 0.17.

Next Steps: Since this measure was added as a new key indicator in FY 2010-11, the department plans to
continue using this key indicator in future years in order to build historical data for comparison and evaluation.

For more information contact Dana McBee, Library Support Services, at (512) 974-7433.

                                                          11
Citywide Dashboard

                     CITIZEN SATISFACTION WITH THE APPEARANCE OF PARK GROUNDS 

Measure Description: This measure tracks citizen satisfaction with the appearance of park grounds in Austin
and is gathered from the Annual City of Austin Citizen Survey. The information provides an assessment of
citizen’s feelings about the appearance and upkeep of parks grounds by the Parks and Recreation Department
(PARD). The appearance of the parks grounds in Austin is a direct reflection of the community and the values
of the Citizens of Austin that hold their parks in high esteem. Having clean and attractive parks reduces crime
and vandalism, as well as promotes the usage of the parks and increases physical activity. In addition, having
clean and attractive parks reduces safety concerns in the park's infrastructure and increases the value of the
homes in those neighborhoods. To support our motto of "A City within a Park," the Citizens of Austin use and
depend on our park system and have high expectations of our staff and appearance of the parks grounds.

Calculation Method: This measure is the sum of “very satisfied” and “satisfied” responses divided by the total
number of respondents who reported an opinion. The measure excludes those who left the question blank or
reported “don’t know.”

FY 2009-2010 Results: In the 2010 City of Austin Citizen Survey, 70% of respondents were satisfied or very
satisfied with the appearance of park grounds in Austin. The Parks and Recreation Department did not have an
established goal for this measure in FY 2009-10. The goal for the 2011 survey is to have a steady improvement
of citizen satisfaction with the appearance, attractiveness, cleanliness and safety of our parks. Therefore, our
goal for 2011 is to have a satisfaction rate of 72%.


                        Citizen Satis faction Rating of the Appearance of Park Grounds in Aus tin


  100%

   90%

   80%
                            71%                                                 70%
   70%
   60%
                                                                                                        Result
   50%
                                                                                                        No Goal
   40%

   30%
   20%

   10%

    0%
                           2008-09                                            2009-10



Assessment of Result: In the last two survey years, the result for the appearance of park grounds in Austin is
above the national average of 62% satisfaction. The survey instrument is able to assess the subset of
responses from citizens who stated that they had visited an Austin park in the last year. The satisfaction
ratings among park users for 2009 and 2010 were similar to the ratings of all respondents, 70% and 71%
respectively in each survey year.

Even with a rating well above the national average, the Department and the City Council have taken steps to
further improve resources for park maintenance. For FY 2010-11, the Council repurposed funding for the Trail
of Lights Festival toward parks grounds maintenance. The Department is using those funds to add eight
additional full-time equivalent positions to the grounds maintenance program.

Next Steps: PARD will continue to provide maintenance to enhance the quality park grounds. The amount of
staff and equipment that is available to PARD has a direct correlation to the quality and level of service. In
addition, the Department will develop "best practices", improve technology and employ more efficiency in our
operations in order to make the most of the resources available.

For more information contact Troy Houtman, Grounds Maintenance Division Manager, (512) 974-9481.




                                                          12
                                                                                            Citywide Dashboard

PERCENT OF INSPECTIONS BY THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW DEPARTMENT PERFORMED 
                                       WITHIN  24 HOURS OF REQUEST 

Measure Description: The Building Inspection Division measures the percentage of inspections conducted
within 24 hours of scheduling in order to track construction delays that results in additional construction costs
to the customer. These inspections are for residential building, electrical, plumbing, mechanical, energy and
commercial building construction.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the number of building inspections conducted within
24 hours of request by the number of inspections requested.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was to achieve a 95% on time rate. The actual result was 90%,
which was 5% below the goal.


                               Annual Building Inspections Completed within 24 Hours

  100%                                                      95%
                                    95%                                        95%                95%
               90%
                                                            96%                94%
                 90%                 93%                                                          90%
    75%




    50%




    25%
               2005-06             2006-07                2007-08            2008-09            2009-10

                                                 Result             Goal



Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the combined total of residential and commercial
inspections performed within 24 hours as a percentage of the total inspections requested per fiscal year.

For FY 2009-10, Building Inspections performed 150,228 inspections with a 90% on time rate. Each inspector
performed an average of 16 inspections per day. This is a decrease from FY 2008-09, in which 177,854
inspections were performed with a 94% on time rate. Each inspector performed an average of 18.5
inspections per day.

In FY 2008-09, the division implemented a special inspections program which provides timed inspections for
home owners. Inspections are scheduled in specific time slots where each inspector is assigned 7 inspections
per day. The effect on the average inspections per day overall was a reduction of 2.5, which ultimately led to
fewer inspections being performed within 24 hours of request. The metric also suffered in FY 2008-09 and FY
2009-10 because attrition and turnover averaged 22%. Most of these were senior inspectors who retired. The
division is rebuilding and has hired 10 new inspectors.

Next Steps: The Building Inspection Division is in the process of adding a proposed special inspection program
for electrical type work in FY 2011-12. This would be modeled after the existing special inspections program
for plumbing and mechanical type work implemented in FY 2008-09. Unless additional staff are hired, the
percent of on-time reviews will continue to drop.

For more information contact Dan McNabb, Building Inspections Manager, at (512) 974-2752.




                                                       13
Citywide Dashboard
                      PERCENT OF LANE MILES IN FAIR TO EXCELLENT CONDITION  
                                                         
Measure Description: The condition of the roadways in a community impacts mobility, commerce, and quality
of life for its residents and businesses. The appearance of the roadways also makes a statement about the
value of a community’s infrastructure and the commitment of the public to care for its transportation
investment.

Calculation Method: Data is collected from an annual street condition survey and is used to classify the
pavement condition. Streets rated as fair to excellent are considered satisfactory. To calculate the
percentage, the total number of lane miles of streets rated as satisfactory is divided by the lane miles in the
inventory. The City’s ultimate goal is to improve and maintain the percentage of the inventory rated as
satisfactory to at least 80% by the end of FY 2017-18.

FY 2009-10 Results: The Public Works Department (PWD) has made steady progress toward the 80% goal
since it was established in FY 2008-09.


                            Percent of Lane Miles in Fair to Excellent Condition


     90.0%
                  73.3%             73. 8%             73. 9%               75.8%           76.1%
     75.0%
                                      73.4%                 73.6%          74. 8%             76.1%
                  73. 0%
     60.0%

     45.0%

     30.0%

     15.0%

      0.0%
                 2005-06           2006-07             2007-08             2008-09         2009-10

                                              Result                Goal


Assessment of Results: An estimated 23.4 additional lane miles of overlay were completed in early FY 2009-10,
as a result of $1.4 million in federal stimulus grant funding and part of the FY 2008-09 contract not counted in
FY 2008-09, helped assist PWD to equal the FY 2009-10 condition rating goal. Street conditions have been
steadily improving over the years with the continued investment in aggressive street preventative
maintenance programs. Although the short term network trend for FY 2011-12 appears fairly flat, the current
strategy will result in a large improvement over the next few years with attainment of 80% by FY 2017-18.

Next Steps: Fugro Consultants Inc., a provider of geotechnical engineering services, is in the process of
collecting detailed condition data and new smoothness scores for the street network. Data collection is
expected to be complete in late February 2011. Funding from the 2010 transportation bond passed by the
voters will continue to fund reconstruction of the City’s “very poor” and “poor” rated streets leading to an
overall improvement in the street network condition.

For more information contact Ed Poppitt, Infrastructure Management Group, at (512) 974-8768.




                                                       14
 
                                                                                              Citywide Dashboard
                                                           
    PERCENT OF RESIDENTS “ SATISFIED”  OR “ VERY SATISFIED” WITH TRAFFIC FLOW ON MAJOR CITY 
                                                    STREETS 

Measure Description: The City of Austin Citizen Survey has been conducted since the late 1990’s. The main
objective of this survey is for City Officials to have a useable tool to assist in decision making for the City. It
offers information on residents’ perceptions, opinions, and usage of specific City divisions and services.
Satisfaction with traffic flow is an indirect indicator on how successful the city engineers have been in
identifying congested arterials or intersections and making necessary adjustments. Travel time is the best
indicator of how well traffic flows along any given arterial.

Calculation Method: This measure is the sum of “very satisfied” and “satisfied” responses divided by the total
number of respondents who reported an opinion. The measure excludes those who left the question blank or
reported “don’t know”.

FY 2009-10 Results: The satisfaction with the traffic flow remained at 27% in FY 2010.


              Per cent of Residents "Satisifed" or "Very Satisfied" with the Traffic Flow on
                                              Major Streets
     100%


      80%


      60%
                                 39%                                              39%
      40%


      20%                        27%                                               27%

       0%
                               2008-09                                          2009-10

                                                 Result             Goal


Assessment of Results: Citizen satisfaction with traffic flow in Austin is low. Although the national average of
major cities for traffic flow satisfaction is also low at 39%, Austin’s satisfaction is lower than this benchmark.
One of the possible reasons for citizens’ dissatisfaction with traffic flow might be due to the current system
not having the capability to notify staff about unusual congestion levels caused by accidents, stalled vehicles,
unusual traffic pattern, etc. In addition, the Austin Transportation Department follows the nationally
recommended practice of retiming traffic signals and arterials at least once every three years because the
quality of traffic flow and travel time degrade over time. However, once an arterial reaches its optimal travel
time, percentage of travel time improvements will be very flat. At this point, the goal is to maintain the optimal
travel time.

Next Steps: The City is looking at proposals for a new Advanced Traffic Management System, which will
provide crucial capabilities in monitoring and managing traffic in real-time. With the new system, unusual
congestions, unusual speeds, failed devices, will be detected and reported automatically. The system will also
would provide real-time information about traffic condition thru smart phones. This allows for a quick response
to various situations, and helps reduce traffic delays.

For more information contact Ali Mozdbar, Arterial Management Program, at (512) 974-4070.




                                                        15
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                       ELECTRICITY SYSTEM AVERAGE INTERRUPTION FREQUENCY  

Measure Description: This measure tracks the average number of times or frequency that a customer's electric
service is interrupted during the fiscal year and is an important indicator of the reliability of the system. This
measure is affected by conditions like as weather and equipment failure.

Calculation Method: The average is determined by dividing the total number of customers interrupted during
the fiscal year by the average number of customers served.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 0.8 interruptions. The FY 2009-10 actual was
0.69 interruptions, well under the goal.


                              Electricity System Average Interruption Frequency

         1.20

         1.00                                                                0.89
                      1.00              1.02
         0.80
                      0.80              0.80                0.80             0.80              0.80
         0.60                                                                                  0.69
                                                            0.63
         0.40

         0.20

         0.00
                    2005-06           2006-07             2007-08         2008-09            2009-10

                                                 Result            Goal



Assessment of Results: Austin Energy’s distribution reliability performance continues to beat industry averages
by almost 50%. Austin Energy experienced a particularly quiet weather year, which contributed to these
results. The annual system tree trimming maintenance cycle and targeted maintenance on AE’s electric
system components also contributed to these results. Austin Energy has outperformed the industry average
two out of the last three years.

FY 2005-06 and FY 2006-07 had numbers above the goal due to a higher number of weather related events
than Austin normally sees. Thunder storms combined with heavy winds and an ice event in each of the fiscal
years caused equipment failures and downed power lines which directly affected the performance in these
fiscal years.

The measure System Average Interruption Duration is an important component to this measure. It measures
the average number of minutes customers are without service during each outage. The goal for the average
interruption duration was established at 60 minutes with the industry standard at 90 minutes. The FY 2009-10
actual is 51.57 minutes, well under the goal.


Next Steps: Austin Energy will continue to pursue best operating and maintenance practices for its electric
delivery system to ensure reliability, supports its Excellent Customer Service Strategy. A reliable electric
delivery system is important to customer economics and customer satisfaction.

Austin Energy will continue with its tree trimming and maintenance programs in order to maintain reliability at
this level. The FY 2010-11 approved budget includes $64.3 million in operations and maintenance for the
Distribution and Transmission systems, as well as $81.5 million in capital improvements to ensure reliability
performance standards of the system continue to be met.

For more information contact David Wood, Vice President Electric Service Delivery, at (512) 322-6940.




                                                       16
                                                                                           Citywide Dashboard

              PERCENTAGE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY IN AUSTIN ENERGY’S ENERGY SUPPLY

Measure Description: This measures the percentage of renewable energy such as wind, solar, biomass, in
Austin Energy's total energy supply. Austin Energy’s generation resource plan has a goal of 35% renewable
energy in the portfolio by 2020.

Calculation Method: Total megawatts hours (MWh) of renewable energy either purchased in Purchase Power
Agreements (PPA's) or generated by Austin Energy divided by the total number of megawatt hours provided by
the energy supply.

FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 goal for this measure was established at 12.2 percent renewable energy.
The FY 2009-10 actual is 9.6%.


                      Percent of Renewable Energy in Austin Energy's Energy Supply
   14.0%

                                                                                               12.2%
   12.0%
                                                                        10.6%
   10.0%
                                               8.0%                                        9.6%
    8.0%                                                                 10.0%
                             7.0%
             6.0%
    6.0%                                                6.6%
                 6.0%               5.8%
    4.0%

    2.0%

    0.0%
                2005-06           2006-07             2007-08          2008-09            2009-10
                                               Result           Goal



Assessment of Results: As the chart above illustrates, the percentage of renewable energy for Austin Energy
decreased in FY 2009-10 from the prior year. Reasons for the decrease include a four and one half month
outage at one of the landfill sites and a slightly lower wind output from current purchased power wind
contracts. In addition, there was lower renewable energy than expected due to a delay in construction of a 30
megawatt (MW) solar farm on Austin Energy’s Webberville property from which renewable power will be
purchased. This solar plant should be on-line producing renewable energy by the end of calendar 2011.

Next Steps: Austin Energy has an Energy Resource Plan that addresses this goal. The original renewable
energy goal was adopted in 2007. In April 2010, City Council approved an Energy Resource Plan but delayed
implementation until affordability measures could be developed and approved by Council. February 17, 2011,
Council approved the implementation of the Austin Energy Resource, Generation, and Climate Protection Plan
to 2020, including an affordability goal. This Energy Resource Plan increases the percentage of renewable
energy in Austin Energy’s portfolio by 2020 to 35% from 30%.

Looking forward, Austin Energy has two purchase power agreements for renewable energy from a 30MW solar
farm on Austin Energy’s Webberville property expected on-line by the end of calendar 2011 and a 100MW
biomass energy plant being constructed in East Texas with a completion date in FY 2011-12. In FY 2010-11,
Austin Energy expects to increase the percentage of renewable energy by adding 123MW of additional wind
power capacity through a new purchase power agreement.

For more information contact Jackie Sargent, Senior Vice President Power Supply and Market Operations, at (512)
322-6491.

                                                         
                                                         
                                                         
                                                         


                                                      17
Citywide Dashboard

                                  DRINKING WATER QUALITY: TURBIDITY 

Measure Description: One way of assessing drinking water quality is to examine its turbidity, Nephelometric
Turbidity Units (NTU), which indicate the measure of relative clarity of a liquid or measure the clearness of the
water. The greater the turbidity, the murkier the water, and it indicates that more suspended solids, like clay,
silt, plankton, industrial wastes, sewage, and bacteria, are possibly present. Austin Water Utility attempts to
achieve the lowest NTU possible, rather than barely meeting permit levels, to ensure the public safety of
potable drinking water. It is also an excellent measure of plant optimization to ensure maximum public health
protection. NTU’s of 1.0 or less generally are not detected by the naked eye.

Calculation Method: Finished water turbidity is measured at each Water Treatment Plant every 4 hours (2am,
6am, 10am, 2pm, 6pm, and 10pm). These readings are reported to Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality (TCEQ) for every four-hour period that the Water Treatment Plant is treating water. Maximum possible
readings of 186 are collected for each Water Treatment Plant that appears on the Monthly Operating Report
(MOR).

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 0.10. The Utility’s .09 NTU result was under
the Permit Level by .21 and the goal by .01. The lower the NTU means that the quality of water produced is
safer and it has remained below the permit level due to improvements in plant chemical monitoring, filtering
and treatment processes to ensure the internal goal is met.


                                         Drinking Water Quality: Turbidity


         0.40


         0.30


         0.20

                      0.10               0.10                 0.10              0.10              0.10
         0.10
                      0.10               0.10                 0.10             0.08               0.09

         0.00
                     2005-06           2006-07               2007-08          2008-09           2009-10


                                                    Result             Goal




Assessment of Results: TCEQ monitors the permit level for NTU at 0.3. Austin’s drinking water NTU of 0.09 is
well below the permit level. The Utility’s on-going continuous improvement efforts in plant maintenance,
operations, and treatment processes continue to provide consistent high quality drinking water to customers.

Next Steps: The City draws water from Colorado River into two water treatment plants: Davis and Ullrich.
Davis Water Treatment Plant constructed in 1954 and Ullrich Water Treatment Plant constructed in 1969. The
combined maximum capacities of the plants are 285 million gallons per day (MGD). The Austin Water Utility is
committed to producing high quality drinking water that surpasses regulatory standards and the low NTU
results help demonstrate our success in this critical area.

For more information contact Steven Carrico, Division Manager Treatment, at (512) 972-1818.




                                                       18
                                                                                                         Citywide Dashboard

   PERCENT OF WASTE STREAM DIVERTED BY SOLID WASTE SERVICES CURBSIDE AND HOUSEHOLD 
                                        HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS 

Measure Description: This measure shows the percent of materials collected at the curb by Solid Waste
Services (SWS) and received at the Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) facility that are recycled instead of
sent to the landfill. This measure will track the Department’s progress toward its long-term zero waste goal of
diverting at least 90% from landfills by 2040.

Calculation Method: Total tons of materials that are recycled or composted, divided by the sum of the total
tons of materials that are recycled, composted and landfilled. Materials recycled or composted include
traditional materials such as plastics, paper, cardboard, and aluminum collected from Single-Stream Recycling
program; brush and yard trimming materials; and materials such as paints, batteries, and anti-freeze collected
from the HHW drop-off facility.

FY 2009-10 Results: The actual diversion rate for SWS curbside and HHW operations for FY 2009-10 is 37.32%,
which is 0.62% over the goal of 37.09%.


                 P e r ce nt o f W a s te Str e a m Div e r te d by SW S C ur bs ide a nd HHW O pe r a tio ns


         50.0

                                                            36. 1                            37. 3
         40.0
                           30. 4
         30.0                                                                                37.1
                                                            32.7
                          29.5
         20.0


         10.0


          0.0
                         2007-08                          2008-09                          2009-10



                                                             R e s ult      Goal



Assessment of Results: The diversion rate increased slightly during FY 2008-09 as residential recycling set outs
increased. The residential participation rate has steadily increased since the introduction of Single-Stream
recycling service. Single-Steam Recycling provides customers with the ability to place a wider array of
recyclables into one 96-gallon cart. Through this program, customers are able to recycle plastics grades 1-7,
cardboard, paperboard, paper, aluminum, tin, and steel. The 37.32% diversion rate was a 3.41% increase over
the previous fiscal year and the FY 2009-10 goal of 37.09% was slightly exceeded. The low level of consumer
economic activity has affected the amount of packaging available to recycle. This two-year decline in the
economy is expected to improve in FY 2010-11 with a projected increase in consumer spending, which will
increase recyclables available for diversion collection.

Next Steps: Increased public education through several planned marketing campaigns will increase the amount
recycled per household as well as the percentage of households participating in recycling services. The
recently signed recycling processing contract allows for new materials such as milk cartons and other aseptic
containers to be added to the recycling program. In addition, public awareness will increase as the Zero Waste
Master Plan is presented to and approved by the Austin City Council. The recently adopted Universal Recycling
Ordinance (URO) will generate renewed interest in the multi-family and commercial business sectors,
increasing recycling and yard waste collections. The URO requires all commercial and multi-family properties
to provide recycling of paper, plastic, cardboard, aluminum and glass to their customers and tenants.
Properties will be phased in over a four year period. During FY 2010-11, businesses in the food service
industry, such as restaurants, bars, and grocery stores, will also be evaluating food scrap composting.

For more information contact Robert Gedert, SWS Director, at (512) 974-1926.




                                                             19
Citywide Dashboard

            NUMBER OF NEW JOBS CREATED THROUGH ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS 

Measure Description: The purpose of the Economic Development Program is to encourage location and
expansion of businesses within the Desired Development Zone and increase the number of jobs created
through these economic development efforts. This is accomplished through implementing Chapter 380
agreements (economic development agreements), administering the Business Retention & Enhancement Loan
Program, local resolutions that support the Enterprise Zone designations for local projects that create and
retain jobs, as well as partnering with the State of Texas to utilize State level programs such as the Texas
Enterprise Fund and the Emerging Technology Fund.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated from the cumulative total of jobs created by businesses
locating or expanding within the Desired Development Zone during a fiscal year.

FY 2009-10 Results: The actual number of jobs created exceeded the FY 2009-10 goal of 500 reaching a total
of 1,550.



                           Number of Jobs Created Through Economic Development Efforts

  2,000

                                                                                          1,550
                       1,368
  1,500
                                                        1,170

  1,000                                                    810
                         668
                                                                                           500

    500


      0
                      2007-08                           2008-09                          2009-10

                                                     Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: Austin continued to lead the nation in terms of job growth for 2010. The Austin MSA
was ranked as the best performing job market in the U.S. among the 50 largest metros. Total non-farm payroll
jobs for the Austin MSA increased by 2.4%, a full percentage point higher than the 2nd best national job market.
Additionally, Austin continued to have one of the lowest unemployment rates in the nation. The most recent
figures show Austin’s unemployment rate at 6.4%, while that of the State of Texas shows an unemployment
rate of 8.1% and the U.S. at 9.6%.

Next Steps: As the global recession lingers, it is critical that the City continues it’s recruitment of new
businesses to Austin, while simultaneously working with existing businesses to help them expand locally. In
order to accomplish this, we will continue to work closely with the State leadership, the various local Chambers
of Commerce, and our existing businesses to market Austin as a suitable location for business expansion and
location.

Recent public private partnerships in these efforts include four new incentive agreements which will bring
1,350 new jobs to Austin by 2014. Taxes generated from these firms will produce a net $2.6 million
improvement in tax revenues plus substantial indirect consumer spending over 10 years from expansion of the
gross regional domestic product output.

For more information contact Brian Gildea, Economic Development Manager, at (512) 974-6381.




                                                      20
                                                                                               Citywide Dashboard


                                      CITY OF AUSTIN’S BOND RATINGS 

Measure Description: A bond rating is a “grade” assigned by private independent rating services (Moody’s,
Standard & Poor’s, and Fitch) that indicates credit quality. The ratings are the result of evaluations done by the
rating agencies that measure an entity’s ability to repay principal and interest on debt issued. The
performance of the local economy, strength of financial and administrative management, and various debt
ratios are all considered when assigning a rating to an entity. The rating indicating the highest credit-quality
investment grade bonds is “AAA,” and the lowest grade is “C,” also known as “junk.” Investors utilize these
ratings when deciding whether to purchase bonds issued by the City of Austin. The higher the rating, the lower
the risk to the investor, which results in a lower return to the investor and a lower cost of borrowing for the
City of Austin.

Calculation Method: The ratings are assigned directly by Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, and/or Fitch.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goals for these measures were met or exceeded.

                                                                                    FY 2009-10      FY 2009-10
GO Bonds                   FY 2005-06     FY 2006-07    FY 2007-08    FY 2008-09
                                                                                      Actual           Goal
Moody’s                        Aa1            Aa1           Aa1           Aa1           Aaa             Aa1
Standard
& Poor’s                       AA+           AA+            AAA           AAA           AAA             AAA
Fitch
Investors                      AA+           AA+            AA+           AA+           AAA            AA+

Combined Utility                                                                    FY 2009-10      FY 2009-10
                           FY 2005-06     FY 2006-07    FY 2007-08    FY 2008-09
Revenue Bonds                                                                         Actual           Goal
Moody’s                         A1            A1             A1            A1           A1              A1
Standard
& Poor’s                        AA-           AA-           AA-            AA            AA             AA-
Fitch
Investors                       AA-           AA-           AA-           AA-            AA-            AA-

Assessment of Results: In April 2010, Fitch Ratings and Moody’s Investors Service recalibrated the policies and
practices, General Obligation (GO) bonds rating from AA+ to AAA, and Aa1 to Aaa, respectively. All three rating
agencies now rate the City of Austin’s GO debt with the highest possible rating. An “A” assigned to revenue
bonds indicates good credit risk. The City of Austin’s revenue bonds exceed the A rating.

Next Steps: City management is committed to the continuation of its strong financial management, including
the maintenance of designated reserve funds and policies limiting their use, will result in long-term budgetary
stability and corresponding quality debt ratings. The current quality ratings help ensure that the City of Austin
will achieve favorable financing rates when issuing debt.

For more information contact Art Alfaro, Treasury Office, at (512) 974-7882. 
Citywide Dashboard




                     22
                                                                 
                                                                 
                                                                 
                                                                 
                                                                 
                                                                 
                                                                 
 
                  EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                            2009‐10  Goal 
    Measure Name                                                2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                             Target  Met?
    Percent of potentially life threatening calls responded to 
    by Emergency Medical Services on‐scene in < 10              80.2%  82.9%  85.7%  88.8%  90.1%  90.0% 
    minutes (city only) 
    Percent of EMS calls answered by EMS communications 
                                                                94.0%  94.0%  95.0%  95.0%  95.0%  95.0% 
    in less than 10 seconds 
    Total number of EMS responses (units dispatched)            107,162 116,850 116,897 113,410  115,637  110,000
    Percent of patients with cardiac arrest from cardiac 
    causes delivered to an appropriate medical facility with    28.2%  32.9%  31.4%  28.8%  31.9%  29.0% 
    a pulse 
    Percent of patients with cardiac arrest from cardiac 
                                                                13.7%  12.1%  10.0%  10.9%  13.9%  10.5% 
    causes discharged from the hospital alive 
                    Average minutes from call to delivery         Not       Not     Not 
                                                                                          41.39    40.20    40.00 
                    cardiac (STEMI alert) patients at ER        tracked   tracked tracked
    Critical Alert  Average minutes from call to delivery         Not       Not 
                                                                                   36.20  34.04    34.15    33.50 
    Patients        trauma alert patients at ER                 tracked   tracked
                    Average minutes from call to delivery         Not       Not     Not 
                                                                                          37.51    37.47    37.00 
                    stroke alert patients at ER                 tracked   tracked tracked
    Twelve‐Month Collection Rate Percentage on Patient            Not 
                                                                          51.9%  51.6%  51.7%  48.1%  43.0% 
    Bills                                                       tracked



 
                                                                                            


                       EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT  
                             FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 



Director’s Message

The mission of Austin-Travis County EMS (ATCEMS) is to change the lives of the people we serve. We preserve
life, improve health, and promote safety, and we are engaged in and accountable to the community. Our vision
includes a commitment to responding to the changing needs of an expanding service area and being a
recognized leader in innovative, cost effective, clinically sophisticated delivery of comprehensive emergency
medical services.

Fiscal Year 2009-2010 was a successful year for ATCEMS in a number of ways. Some of the notable
accomplishments included:


    •   Partnering with AMLI Residential to open an urban mini-station at the AMLI on 2nd Street apartment
        community. This facility supports EMS and Police units for the downtown area and provides a great
        example of a public-private partnership for a better community.
    •   Implementing an electronic patient care reporting system (ePCR) that allows patient medical and
        billing data to be captured electronically, thus creating a significant tool for improving clinical care.
    •   Introducing two new types of ambulance vehicle types, both of which are more fuel efficient, cost
        effective, and provide better flexibility to meet service demands.
    •   Implementation of the new paramedic Developmental Academy that drew recruits without training or
        experience into a unique ATCEMS program that will eventually train them into paramedics or
        communication medics.
    •   Development of a three-year Operations Deployment Plan that is designed to improve response time
        reliability for all incident priorities throughout the city and county.
    •   Exceeding the major goal of Priority One response time rate of 9:59 or less 90% in the urban service
        areas and achieving clear improvement in response times in the suburban service areas of the county.
    •   Implementation of a Community Health Program in which ATCEMS partnered with hospitals and local
        health care providers to work with patients who frequently use 911 to access health care.
    •   Achieved a very high patient satisfaction rate as determined by an independent third party research
        company that surveyed actual ATCEMS patients.

ATCEMS is proud of its accomplishments in 2009-2010 but recognizes that there are still issues to be
addressed in the future. Demand for service continues to grow, and this is demonstrated by the fact that all
primary volume indicators – 911 calls received, incidents, and billing accounts created – all grew in 2009-2010
over 2008-2009. ATCEMS is dedicated to finding ways to meet those demands while providing outstanding
care to patients, and the 2011-2012 Business Plan provides a framework for responding to that demand. We
truly are dedicated to changing people’s lives and remain steadfast in pursuit of our mission in the community.

Ernie Rodriguez
Executive Director




                                                       23                   EMS ‐ Saving Lives Changing Lives 
Emergency Medical Services

                PERCENT OF POTENTIALLY LIFE THREATENING CALLS RESPONDED TO BY  
                         EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES ON‐SCENE IN  < 10 MINUTES 

Measure Description: This measure tracks the percent of time that EMS responds to potentially life threatening
Priority One calls within 9:59 minutes in urban areas of the community. The EMS department utilizes a
demand for EMS service model to define urban and suburban areas. By this industry standard, each EMS
incident is plotted on a map for a month with average incident volume. If two or more incidents occur in the
same square kilometer and an adjacent square kilometer also have two or more incidents in a month both
areas are considered to be urban, for the purpose of EMS deployment. All areas of the City of Austin and some
areas of Travis County outside of Austin are considered to be urban utilizing the model.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by examining the total time, from the moment Emergency
Medical Services (EMS) 911 Communications receives a call for service to the moment an ambulance arrives at
the incident, for each Priority One call.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10 EMS’ performance was 90.1%. This was an improvement over the FY 2008-
09 percentage of 88.8%.


                      Percent of Potentially Life Threatening Calls Responded to by EMS On-Scene
                                                      in < 10 Minutes

  100%
   90%
   80%                                                                      88.8%                  90.1%
                                                       85.7%
            80.2%                82.9%
   70%
   60%
   50%                                                                                                     54.1%
   40%                                                         48.9%                49.1%
                    40.9%                42.6%
   30%
   20%
   10%
    0%
               2005-06              2006-07              2007-08               2008-09               2009-10

                                                     Urban     Suburban




Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the overall improvement in Priority One Response Time
percentage since the beginning of FY 2005-06. FY 2009-10 represented EMS’ first time at achieving 90% in the
urban areas. The improvement in FY 2009-10 was attributable to the combination of the continued
implementation and use of the dynamic Move Up Module (MUM), which positions units in real-time for
optimizing coverage; a daily Operations review of prior day calls in order to analyze root causes of late calls
and exceptions; and continued maximization of resources to ensure coverage at peak demand times.

Next Steps: EMS will continue to strive to find ways to improve response time. In FY 2009-10 EMS introduced a
three-year operational deployment plan designed to improve response time reliability for all incident priorities
throughout the community. The plan analyzes the time, location, and severity of EMS incidents and uses this
information to determine trends and identify locations for future ambulance placement. The addition of a new
unit at Avery Ranch and two new Peak Load Units in the suburban county areas of Bee Caves and Pflugerville
will provide additional resources to help meet a continued growing demand for services.

For more information contact James Shamard, Assistant Director – Operations, at (512) 972-7200




                                                         24
                                                                                      Emergency Medical Services

                    PERCENT OF EMS CALLS ANSWERED BY EMS COMMUNICATIONS 
                                         IN LESS THAN  10 SECONDS

Measure Description: The percent of calls answered by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) 911
Communications in less than 10 seconds is a key statistic used to determine responsiveness, workload and
process performance.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by an analysis of data from the 911 public safety phone system
for all phone calls to 911 that are transferred to EMS Communications, from the Primary Public Safety
Answering Point (Austin Police Department 911 or Travis County Sheriffs Department 911). The calculation is
the amount of time between transferring the 911 phone call to EMS Communications and the phone being
answered by EMS Communications Medics.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure in FY 2009-10 was 95% and EMS performed at 95.5% for fiscal
year 2009-10.


                     EMS Calls Received and Percent of Calls Answered in Less Than 10 Seconds


                                                                                                       96.0%
    120,000                                                  108,478                       110,703
                                                                            106,477
                               100,796        101,787                                                  95.5%
                 97,254
    100,000
                                                                                                       95.0%
     80,000
                                                                              95%           95%
                 95%                                          95%
                                                                                                       94.5%
     60,000

     40,000                                                                                            94.0%
                                94%            94%
     20,000                                                                                            93.5%

          0                                                                                            93.0%
                2004-05        2005-06        2006-07        2007-08        2008-09        2009-10

                   EMS 911 Calls Received       Percentage of Calls Answered in Less Than 10 Seconds


Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the historical performance of EMS Communications in
answering 911 EMS phone calls in 10 seconds or less in comparison of overall call volume. Despite the growth
in calls EMS Communications has been able to maintain its performance in answering the majority of calls in
less than 10 seconds. A key step in maintaining the performance was the addition of six additional
Communications Medics in FY 2007-08, along with one additional Communications supervisor and one
Communications Quality Improvement position. Collectively those positions helped address workload and
allowed EMS to get its percentage of calls answered in less than 10 seconds back up to 95%. Another key
change for Communications was a recent conversion to a new work schedule for Communications staffing that
improved coverage and helped manage call volume.

Next Steps: EMS has strived to maintain its performance in the face of growth in calls to 911. In FY 2009-10
EMS identified vacant positions that were reallocated to Communications in order to keep staffing at a level
commensurate with the anticipated growth in calls. In addition, EMS Communications will be working in FY
2010-11 and FY 2011-12 to maintain its National Academies of Emergency Dispatch (NAED) “Center of
Excellence” accreditation. This nationally recognized accreditation emphasizes training curriculums,
management and quality improvement processes, dispatch protocols, and certification standards in order to
promote high levels of performance for 911 communications. It is an honor to have achieved the NAED Center
of Excellence level and EMS considers it a key component for driving performance improvement.

For more information contact James Shamard, Assistant Director, at (512) 972-7200.




                                                        25
Emergency Medical Services
                                                                
                       TOTAL NUMBER OF EMS RESPONSES (UNITS DISPATCHED) 

Measure Description: The total number of responses Emergency Medical Services (EMS) performs in a fiscal
year.

Calculation Method: This measure is a compilation of the total number of responses made by EMS for a
complete fiscal year. This data is derived from the 911 Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) System.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10 EMS had a total of 115,637 responses. This was a 2.0% increase over the
prior fiscal year.


                                  Total Number of EMS Responses (Units Dispatched)


        140,000
                                          116,850             116,897              113,410             115,637
        120,000      107,162
                                                    111,000                                  123,000             110,000
        100,000                                                          116,000
                                102,000
         80,000

         60,000

         40,000

         20,000

              0
                      2005-06             2006-07              2007-08             2008-09             2009-10


                                                     Result        Projected Demand




Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the total number of responses for EMS for each fiscal year
from FY 2004-05 through FY 2009-10. After a small decline in FY 2008-09 EMS experienced a 2.0% increase in
FY 2009-10. This increase was consistent with all other demand indicators; calls to 911, incidents, and
transports all increased over the prior year.

Next Steps: Continued investment in resources to meet the anticipated continued growth in demand will be a
priority for EMS. In FY 2010-11 EMS adds a new unit in the Avery Ranch area and two new peak load units in
southwest and northeast Travis County areas respectively will help maintain improved response times in the
face of growth in demand. EMS will also continue to utilize deployment resources such as the Move Up Module
(MUM) to help position units in the optimal locations for response time, and this will also assist EMS in
maintaining effective response time while managing growth in calls for service.

For more information contact James Shamard, Assistant Director, at (512) 972-7200.




                                                              26
                                                                                        Emergency Medical Services
                                                            
                 PERCENT OF PATIENTS WITH CARDIAC ARREST FROM CARDIAC CAUSES 
                   DELIVERED TO AN APPROPRIATE MEDICAL FACILITY WITH A PULSE 

Measure Description: This measure is the percentage of patients with full cardiac arrest (excluding trauma)
who achieve are delivered to an appropriate facility with a return of pulse.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by analyzing the medical records of cardiac arrest patients, due
to medical causes, to determine the correct patient population, and then determining from that group how
many patients achieved a return of pulse while being provided care by Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

FY 2009-10 Results: The percentage of patients with a return of pulse was 31.9%, and this was a slight
improvement over the prior year percentage.


            Percent of Patients with Cardiac Arrest from Cardiac Causes Delivered to an Appropriate Medical
                                                   Facility with a Pulse

        40.0%
        35.0%                           32.9%             31.4%                                 31.9%
                                                                             29.5%
        30.0%        28.2%
        25.0%                                              29.0%             28.8%              29.0%
        20.0%        24.0%              24.5%

        15.0%
        10.0%
         5.0%
         0.0%
                    2005-06            2006-07            2007-08           2008-09            2009-10


                                                        Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: The above chart details the percentage since FY 2004-05. EMS’ performance in the area
of cardiac arrest return of pulse rates improved in FY 2009-10 as compared to the prior year and was
consistent with a similar increase in the discharged alive rate for cardiac arrest patients. Although there are
many medical factors that can impact a patient’s survival, EMS’ continued improvement in response time may
be one factor contributing to this performance, as improved response time results in paramedics reaching
patients sooner. In addition, EMS has continually invested in training its paramedics through annual mandatory
continuing education and providing them with the right tools and equipment that allows them to provide
outstanding clinical care to cardiac arrest patients.

Next Steps: EMS will continue to invest in continuing education for paramedics in order to ensure they have the
most up to date information in the ever changing medical field, and new units approved in FY 2010-11 will
improve response time performance. In addition, in January 2011 new Clinical Operating Guidelines will
provide a framework that ultimately results in improved patient care. The new guidelines, among other things,
are formatted in a manner that reduces the need for extensive reading, recall of treatment steps, and
recollection of drug doses. By making those changes the result is a paramedic who reduces the risk of error
and has potentially more time to address patient care. In addition to the specific changes within ATCEMS,
there are broader trends in the entire EMS industry related to cardiac arrest treatment, and those trends,
which are rooted in scientific research, could ultimately contribute to improved survival rates. The general
trends in CPR point to less emphasis on advanced procedures in the field and more emphasis on good chest
compressions, rapid defibrillation, and rapid transport. EMS is also striving to increase CPR training throughout
the community through its Take 10 CPR Program. This program provides short but intensive training to citizens
on the fundamentals of CPR, and having more people trained in CPR will improve the chain of survival and lead
to better patient outcomes.

For more information contact Teresa Gardner, Assistant Director, at (512) 978-0120.




                                                         27
Emergency Medical Services
                                                           
                PERCENT OF PATIENTS WITH CARDIAC ARREST FROM CARDIAC CAUSES 
                                 DISCHARGED FROM THE HOSPITAL ALIVE 

Measure Description: This measure is the percentage of patients with full cardiac arrest (excluding trauma)
discharged from the hospital alive.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by analyzing the medical records of cardiac arrest patients, due
to medical causes, to determine the correct patient population, and then determining from that group how
many patients are ultimately discharged from a hospital.


                             Percent of Patients with Cardiac Arrest from Cardiac Causes
                                         Discharged from the Hospital Alive


  16.0%
                     13.7%
  14.0%                                                                                             13.9%
                                          12.1%                                 10.9%
  12.0%                                                         10.0%
                                                                                        10.7%
  10.0%
    8.0%                                                                                            8.0%
                                                                7.2%
    6.0%
    4.0%
    2.0%
    0.0%
                2005-06             2006-07               2007-08              2008-09          2009-10

                                                  National Benchmark      Result



FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure in FY 2009-10 was 10.5% and the actual result was 13.9%.

Assessment of Results: The above chart provides a glimpse of how Emergency Medical Services’ (EMS)
performance compares to a national database for tracking the survival rate of cardiac arrest patients. This
specific data comes from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) Study. The Office of the
Medical Director is the lead for capturing this data and reporting it to the CARES Study. The CARES Study is
collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the American Heart Association, Emory
University, and multiple communities that provide cardiac arrest data.

EMS’ performance in the area of cardiac arrest survival rates improved in FY 2009-10 as compared to the prior
year and was also clearly better than the benchmark average reported by CARES. Although there are many
medical factors that can impact a patient’s survival, EMS’ continued improvement in response time may be
one factor contributing to this performance. In addition, EMS has continually invested in training its
paramedics through annual mandatory continuing education and providing them with the right tools and
equipment that allows them to provide outstanding clinical care to cardiac arrest patients.

Next Steps: EMS will continue to invest in continuing education for paramedics in order to ensure they have
the most up to date information in the ever changing medical field, and new units approved in FY 2010-11 will
improve response time performance. In addition, in January 2011 new Clinical Operating Guidelines will
provide a framework that ultimately results in improved patient care. The new guidelines, among other things,
are formatted in a manner that reduces the need for extensive reading, recall of treatment steps, and
recollection of drug doses. By making those changes the result is a paramedic who reduces the risk of error
and has potentially more time to address patient care. In addition to the specific changes within EMS, there are
broader trends in the entire EMS industry related to cardiac arrest treatment, and those trends, which are
rooted in scientific research, could ultimately contribute to improved survival rates. The general trends in CPR
point to less emphasis on advanced procedures in the field and more emphasis on good chest compressions,
rapid defibrillation, and rapid transport.

For more information contact Teresa Gardner, Assistant Director, at (512) 978-0120.




                                                         28
                                                                                          Emergency Medical Services

                    AVERAGE MINUTES FROM CALL TO DELIVERY OF CRITICAL ALERT 
                                       PATIENTS AT EMERGENCY ROOM 

Measure Description: The average time in minutes for patients with ST segment-elevation myocardial
infarctions (STEMI), stroke, or trauma alert from receipt of call by EMS 911 Communications to delivery at
hospital emergency room.

Calculation Method: Data is calculated for each specific incident involving each STEMI, stroke, and trauma alert
patient. Time is measured from information taken from Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) system.

FY 2009-10 Results: The average times in FY 2009-10 were 40.20 minutes for STEMI patients; 37.47 minutes
for stroke patients, and 34.15 minutes for trauma patients.


                         Average Minutes from Call to Delivery of Critical Alert Patients at ER


         50
         45                      41.39                                                40.20
         40                                  37.51                                                37.47
                       34.04                                              34.15
         35
         30
         25
         20
         15
         10
          5
          0
                                2008-09                                              2009-10

                                  Trauma Alert    STEMI Alert   Stroke Alert


Assessment of Results: STEMI, stroke, and trauma alerts are special situations for certain medical conditions in
which rapid transport to an emergency room is vital to patient outcomes. The alert status declaration is made
by paramedics treating a patient and allows the paramedics and 911 Communications to work in sync to
determine the most expeditious transport method to an appropriate hospital and also allows advance
notification to the receiving hospital. The alert process creates a flow of information and transportation
designed to get a critical patient to a hospital and ultimately improve the patient’s health and safety.

There are differences in these medical situations that may impact the amount of time involved from call to 911
to delivery at a hospital. Heart attacks, strokes, and trauma represent unique medical conditions for patients
and require different approaches for the paramedics. And different hospitals have different capabilities in
terms of handling these situations, and that can contribute in the decision on transport destination. For
example, stroke and trauma centers are classified regionally according to a state-wide designation system.

EMS had noticeable improvement in FY 2009-10 in the area of STEMI patient alerts, and a key part of that
improvement has been a concentrated effort to building relationships with all the hospitals that are receiving
centers for STEMI alert patients. An EMS Designated Medical Officer (DMO) is assigned a specific hospital and
is expected to attend all meetings involving EMS issues. The DMO’s also meet monthly with the catheterization
lab managers as well as the hospital emergency department managers. In addition each receiving facility has
at least a quarterly STEMI quality improvement meeting and EMS presents data and ideas to the team to
improve the times. This level of cooperation and teamwork among EMS and hospitals has helped foster
analysis and communication in an effort to ultimately improvement STEMI patient outcomes, and hospital
feedback to EMS has helped paramedics with finding ways to provide care for STEMI patients in a pre-hospital
emergency situation.

Next Steps: EMS will continue to actively participate and collaborate with hospitals on how to improve the care
of critical alert patients, and the implementation of the electronic patient care reporting system in FY 2009-10
will allow EMS to gather and analyze medical data in levels never seen before and share the data with
hospitals in an effort to continue the improvement in performance. Additional ambulance units funded in FY
2010-11 may also help improve delivery times as the overall EMS system has more resources available to
address all patient needs, including the most critical patients.

For more information contact Teresa Gardner, Assistant Director, at (512) 978-0120.

                                                         29
Emergency Medical Services

                  TWELVE‐MONTH COLLECTION RATE PERCENTAGE ON PATIENT BILLS 

Measure Description: The Twelve-Month Collection Rate Percentage on Patient Bills is a measure of the
effectiveness of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) billing in collecting billable charges over a one year period
from the date of service of each trip.

Calculation Method: This measure is a calculation of the total credits within 365 from the date of service as a
percentage of total charges for each account. Mandated disallowable charges are subtracted from the total
charges in order to determine the total charges truly available to collect from.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure in FY 2009-10 was 43%, and EMS actually collected 48.1% for
the fiscal year. EMS had assumed a conservative estimate for the year due to the implementation of rate
increases in July 2009 that would contribute to a lower collection percentage. Another factor in setting the
initial estimate was the anticipated impact of implementing the EMS electronic patient care reporting system,
which provides the data necessary for billing. Collection performance, however, did not decrease as far as
anticipated, but the lower collection percentages may be seen in FY 2010-11 due to the overall lag in the
billing process that was seen in the second half of FY 2009-10.


                               Twelve-Month Collection Rate Percentage on Patient Bills


        70%
        60%                                   53%                     53%
                      51.9%
                                                                                          48.1%
        50%
                      50%                    51.6%                   51.7%
        40%
                                                                                           43%
        30%
        20%
        10%
         0%
                     2006-07                2007-08                 2008-09               2009-10


                                                      Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the anticipated decrease in collection percentage that is
expected as a result of the rate increases implemented in July 2009. Those increases raised base rates from a
range of $415.00 to $615.00 to a range of $815.00 to $950.00. With such large increases, it is anticipated that
some trips will simply be harder to collect and that will result in a decrease in overall collection percentages.
The decline in the rate was not as steep as projected, but that is more a function of the lags experienced in FY
2009-10 due to the implementation of the new electronic patient care reporting system.

Next Steps: EMS has taken steps in FY 2010-11 to examine all aspects of its billing process in order to improve
efficiency and effectiveness of that process and try to offset the potential decreases in overall collections.
Consultant resources were added in the first quarter of FY 2010-11 that brought in significant expertise in
ambulance billing processes, and these resources are reviewing all aspects of the EMS billing operation and
implementing improvements. It is anticipated a complete overhaul of the EMS billing process will take place
during FY 2010-2011 and this will allow EMS to identify improvements for FY 2011-12.

For more information contact John Ralston, Assistant Director, at (512) 972-7211.




                                                         30
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                             FIRE KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                           2009‐10  Goal 
    Measure Name                                               2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                            Target  Met?
    Percent of emergency incidents where the amount of 
    time between call receipt and the arrival of the Austin     81%     82%      84%     86%     84%        85% 
    Fire Department units is 8 minutes or less 
    Percent of structure fires confined to room of origin       80%     81%      84%     81%     82%        80% 
    Number of fire deaths in the past 12 months                  8        8       1        6       4          6 
    Percent of cardiac arrests with return of spontaneous 
                                                                33%     44%      42%     37%     41%        40% 
    circulation after application of CPR or AED 
    Percent of customers satisfied with the quality of AFD       Not     Not     Not 
                                                                                          90      90         90 
    services                                                   tracked tracked tracked
 
                                                                                              

                                  AUSTIN FIRE DEPARTMENT 
                                 FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 


 
Director’s Message
 
The Austin Fire Department is proud to serve the community of Austin and remains committed to keeping our
customers uppermost in our mind. Our goal is to ensure we assist our fellow citizens as efficiently, effectively,
and compassionately as possible.

Firefighting is but one component in a myriad of services we provide. As first responders, approximately 70
percent of our calls are for medical emergencies. Our other roles include rescues, hazardous material
response, arson investigations, emergency prevention, recruiting, communications, public education, and
wellness. We currently have 45 fire stations strategically placed around the city.

Fiscal Year 2009-10 was a successful year for the Austin Fire Department, as demonstrated below:

Performance
 82% of structure fires were confined fires to the room of origin, exceeding our goal of 80%.
 4 unintentional fire deaths – two fewer than the established goal.
 45% of cardiac arrest patients experienced a return of spontaneous circulation after Cardiopulmonary
  Resuscitation (CPR) and/or the application of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

Employee Safety
 Received the Billy Goldfeder Fire Service Organizational Safety Award from the International Association of
  Fire Chiefs (IAFC).
 Installed diesel exhaust extraction systems in several stations throughout the city to help mitigate diesel
  exhaust fumes in the truck bays.
 Administered flu shots to every employee of the City of Austin who wanted one at no charge.

Innovation
 Received “Finalist” award for a "Best Practices in Business Intelligence and Analytics" from Computer World
  magazine.
 Conducted Chevy Volt training in conjunction with Chevrolet and the National Fire Protection Association for
  departments throughout central Texas to better understand how to deal with electric cars in emergency
  situations.

Community
 AFD was recognized by the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (EGSR) with a Department of
  Defense award for our “best practices” approach in working with AFD personnel who are also members of
  the military.
 AFD personnel donated more than 100 pints of blood to the Central Texas Blood and Tissue Center during
  the annual “Boots vs. Badges” blood drive.
 Firefighters established a wildlife habitat at Stations 5 and 20, as well as AFD Headquarters.

Rhoda Mae Kerr
Fire Chief




                                                                         AFD ‐ Do Your Part – Zero Fire Deaths! 
                                                         31
Fire

PERCENT OF EMERGENCY INCIDENTS WHERE THE AMOUNT OF TIME BETWEEN CALL RECEIPT AND THE 
                   ARRIVAL OF AUSTIN FIRE DEPARTMENT UNIT IS 8 MINUTES OR LESS 

Measure Description: This measure provides an overall picture of response to fire and medical emergencies,
from phone pickup at Austin Fire Department (AFD) or Emergency Medical Services (EMS) dispatch centers to
arrival of the first AFD unit.

Calculation Method: For each incident, total response is calculated as first unit arrival minus time of initial
phone pickup at the EMS or AFD dispatch centers. The measure result is obtained by dividing the number of
incidents with response times of 8 minutes or less by the total number of incidents with valid data. The
selection criteria exclude non-emergencies, requests for assistance by law enforcement agencies, and
responses outside the AFD service area.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 85% of emergency responses within 8
minutes of call receipt. The FY 2009-10 result was 84%.


                         P e r ce nt o f E m e r ge ncy Incide nts with Fir s t Unit A r r iv a l Within 8 Minute s
  100%
                                                                   84%                      86%                        85%
                81%                       82%
   80%
               80%                                                                                                     84%
                                         81%                       80%                      80%
   60%


   40%


   20%


       0%
               2005-06                  2006-07                   2007-08                  2008-09                    2009-10

                                                           R e s ult          Goal



Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates an increasing trend the past several years followed by a
slight decline in the most recent fiscal year. The increases in FY 2007-08 and FY 2008-09 likely reflect a
change in measurement method rather than actual improvement in response time. The increase coincides
with the use of Automated Vehicle Locator data, starting in late FY 2007-08, to automate the time-stamping of
arrival times (rather than relying on individuals to push a button). After changing the reporting method, station
alert times were cut in half, from 12 to 6 seconds, and structure fire call processing decreased by an average
of 31 seconds.

Next Steps: The department will continue to analyze call-processing times to ensure that the necessary
adjustments and modifications to processes are implemented. The ongoing relationship with the Austin
Transportation Department will continue to be vital in order for AFD to address intersections in the city that
have long traffic queues so that we can seek ways to reduce travel times of emergency response apparatus. In
Operations, data will continue to be evaluated to ensure that “Turnout Time” is uniformly kept to a minimum
across the battalions and the three shifts. Companies that deviate from the norm for their unit type will be
identified and corrective actions will be implemented.

For more information contact Matt Orta, Assistant Chief, (512) 974-0135 or George Blackmore, Assistant Chief,
(512) 974-0136.




                                                                32
                                                                                                                 Fire

                       PERCENT OF STRUCTURE FIRES CONFINED TO ROOM OF ORIGIN 

Measure Description: This measure is an indicator of Austin Fire Department’s success in controlling the
amount of damage caused by fires occurring in residential, commercial, and industrial structures citywide.
Factors that affect performance include having a high quality fleet, a well trained workforce, effective standard
operating guidelines (everyone knows what their job is on the scene), and a strong incident command
structure. This measure is further affected by the number of firefighters that can get to the scene quickly, the
age and construction type of the structure, regular fire prevention inspections, and public safety education
efforts.

Calculation Method: This measure is the sum of the number of fires confined to object of origin and room of
origin, divided by the total number of structure fires occurring in the specified property uses. The measure
excludes structure fires occurring on outdoor structures such as bridges and bus stops.

FY 2009-10 Results: 82% of structure fires were confined to room of origin, compared to a goal of 80%.


                                       P e r ce nt o f Fir e s C o nf ine d to R o o m o f O r igin
  100%

                                      81%                        84%                         81%      82%
                80%
   80%
                 80%                  80%                                                    77%       80%
   60%
                                                                 75%


   40%


   20%


    0%
               2005-06               2006-07                    2007-08                     2008-09   2009-10

                                                            R e s ult            Goal



Assessment of Results: This measure covers a wide range of property uses and fire causes. About 40% of
incidents occur in single family or duplex residences, which are not inspectable, while the remaining 60%
occur in properties legally subject to fire code inspections. Multi-family residences (apartments) have the
highest priority for inspections, due to their greater aggregate risk of fire deaths and property loss. Inspection
rates for other property uses are primarily affected by the amount of new development occurring in the city.
During periods of development growth, proportionately more inspector resources are allocated to making sure
new buildings comply with fire codes, thereby reducing the amount of resources available to conduct
inspections of existing properties. Analysis of room of origin results indicate the increase in FY 2007-08 was
concentrated in commercial properties, which may reflect the impact of reallocations of inspection resources
to existing properties during the recent recession. One factor in the uptick observed in FY 2009-10 may be the
half-minute decrease in call processing times for structure fires, allowing field units to be dispatched more
quickly. Because of this, the goal was increased for FY 2010-11 to 82%.

Next Steps: Operations companies will continue to receive Continuing Education instruction that will include
proper strategy selection for fire incidents as well as tactical refresher classes. The Department is also reviving
its Battalion Medical Instructor program. This effort de-centralizes a large portion of our medical training and
allows units to remain in their assigned territories rather than travelling across the City to receive this training.
Dispatch call processing times and unit “Turnout” times will continue to be evaluated to ensure that times are
uniformly kept to a minimum. AFD has initiated a new program in which the neighborhood of any major fire
incident is canvassed to provide information about the incident, provide fire safety instruction and inquire
about the status of working smoke alarms. These efforts should reduce the likelihood of fire or reduce the
amount of time required for the citizen to call 9-1-1. In-service fire safety inspections will continue to identify
and correct fire hazards. Hydrant maintenance and testing will continue to ensure readiness and facilitate
needed repairs.

For more information contact Ken Crooks, Assistant Chief, (512) 974-4189.




                                                              33
Fire

                            NUMBER OF FIRE FEATHS IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS 

Measure Description: This performance measure is defined as the number of unintentional deaths caused by
fire. Common causes of unintentional fire deaths include improper disposal of smoking materials,
combustibles placed too close to heaters, electrical malfunctions, and other causes that are preventable in
nature.

Calculation Method: Medical Examiner reports of autopsy results are the primary determinant of whether fire
caused the death, either through burns or smoke inhalation. Fire deaths also include deaths from trauma
resulting from fire (e.g., jumping out of a window).

FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 result was four unintentional deaths, two fewer than the established goal
for that fiscal year.


                                        Number of Fire Deaths in the Past 12 Months

   10
                8                   8
       8
                                                                                 6               6
       6
                6                   6                         6                  6               4
       4

       2                                                      1

       0
             2005-06             2006-07                2007-08               2008-09         2009-10

                                                   Result           Goal




Assessment of Results: Previous goals were based on an historic average of 5-6 fire deaths annually. While
that number is low for a city our size, even one death is too many. Twice in this decade Austin has experienced
a pattern where very deadly years were soon followed by a year or two with an extremely low number of
deaths, and then fire deaths started to increase again. This suggests a pattern where a large number of fire
deaths occurring close together trigger a sense of urgency in AFD, in local media, and among community
members, leading to an upsurge in smoke alarm installations, battery checks, and other fire safety efforts. But
then attention wanes, batteries wear out and don’t get replaced, and the risk of deadly fire rises once again.

Next Steps: For FY 2010-11, the Austin Fire Department (AFD) set a goal of zero unintentional fire deaths and
will work toward this goal through education and action. AFD plans to use a cooking fire demonstration trailer
to show the perils of putting water on grease fires and to demonstrate appropriate methods of fighting minor
cooking fires. This educational simulator is a normal kitchen range that will demonstrate what happens when
water is inappropriately applied.

The Fire Prevention & Safety Grant allows the fire department to explore new ways to increase its productivity
and effectiveness in fire inspections. The utilization of hand held hardware devices (tablets computers),
customized software and mobile printers will improve our capability in collecting data. These enhancements
will further assist fire inspectors in minimizing risk and improving safety.

The Juvenile Fire Intervention Program is part of a nation-wide program for children and juveniles, ages three
to sixteen. The juvenile program assists in reducing the severity and frequency of fires set by juveniles. The
fire department will continue to conduct child and family assessments that aid in the determination of a child
or juvenile's level of involvement in fire activity.

AFD has initiated a new program in which the neighborhood of any major fire incident is canvassed to provide
information about the incident, provide fire safety instruction and inquire about the status of working smoke
alarms. In addition, the Community Outreach Section will be investigating additional methods of disseminating
our Zero Fire Deaths program to the community and the steps that citizens can take to help ensure their
safety.

For more information contact Richard Davis, Assistant Chief, (512) 974-0133.

                                                         34
                                                                                                                                      Fire

                     PERCENT OF CARDIAC ARRESTS WITH RETURN OF SPONTANEOUS   
                                CIRCULATION AFTER APPLICATION OF CPR OR AED 

Measure Description: This measure captures the initial success of efforts made by Austin Fire Department
(AFD) personnel to save the lives of patients undergoing cardiac arrest. This new measure for FY 2010-11
covers a broader range of cardiac arrest cases than before, including cases where AFD performed
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) as well as those where AFD applied an Automated External Defibrillator
(AED).

Calculation Method: The number of cardiac arrest patients experiencing a return of spontaneous circulation
divided by the number of confirmed cardiac arrest patients who received CPR and/or the application of an
Automated External Defibrillator by fire personnel.

FY 2009-10 Results: This measure started in the current fiscal year, FY 2010-11, with a goal of 40%. The actual
result for FY 2009-10 was 45%, exceeding the goal.

                            Percent of Cardiac Arrest Patients with Return of Spontaneous Circulation


               -------------------------------------- Old measure --------------------------------------             -New measure--
  100%
                                              (Applied AED)                                                            (CPR / AED)

    80%


    60%
                                      44%                     42%                                                         45%
                                                                                      37%                   41%
    40%        33%

                                                                                     40%                   40%
    20%        31%                    35%                    37%


     0%
             2005-06                2006-07                 2007-08                2008-09                 2009-10      2009-10

                                                                Result                 Goal



Assessment of Results: A prior version of this measure focused solely on cardiac cases where AFD applied an
AED. Actual AED use by AFD has declined substantially in recent years because of a change in clinical practice
to applying CPR for two minutes prior to AED usage. This had the effect of increasing the number of cases
where EMS arrived with manual defibrillators before an AED could be deployed. In FY 2009-10, for example,
AFD applied AEDs to only one-third of its cardiac arrest cases.

The FY 2009-10 result for the AED-only measure was 41%, while the result over the same time period for the
combined CPR/AED measure was 45%. The new measure provides a more complete picture of the role of AFD
in resuscitating cardiac arrest patients and points once again to the importance of CPR to patient survival.
Recent efforts to improve CPR performance include implementation of a pit crew model emphasizing
continuous chest compressions with minimum interruption. Also, 12 AFD units participated in a field study of
the LUCAS™ Chest Compression System, a machine that provides automated chest compressions.

Next Steps: More than 70% of Cardiac Arrests are identified as Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA). The
continued utilization of the pit crew model and the advantage of uniformity it teaches will be the single most
important intervention dependant skill for OHCA events. Field Medical Officers (FMO) will continue to play an
integral role in ensuring the pit crew model is accomplished with quality and efficiency throughout the
department. The Austin Fire Department will continue with department-wide EMT-Basic certification and
renewal training as mandated by the Texas Department of State Health Services. In 2009, AFD took part in a
study of 12 LUCAS™ Devices to determine fit, ease, and effectiveness of these mechanical chest compression
devices. The data indicated that the device did fit most patients and that the device was easy to use; however,
additional study is recommended on the effect the LUCAS™ device has on resuscitation outcomes including
Return of Spontaneous Circulation. New Clinical Operating Guidelines will take effect in January 2011. These
new guidelines will allow for a higher level of EMT-Basic intervention on emergencies involving an unconscious
patient. Additionally, AFD will be evaluating the value of continuing and/or expanding the LUCAS™ device
program.

For more information contact Matt Orta, Assistant Chief, (512) 974-0135.

                                                                      35
Fire

                    CUSTOMER SATISFACTION WITH THE QUALITY OF AFD SERVICES 

Measure Description: This is a measure of satisfaction with the quality of Austin Fire Department (AFD) services
by persons who had contact with AFD in the past year. The data come from the City’s annual survey of a
representative sample of Austin residents.

Calculation Method: This measure is the sum of “very satisfied” and “satisfied” responses divided by the total
number of respondents who reported an opinion. The measure includes only those respondents who reported
in a separate question that they had contact with AFD in the past year. The measure excludes those who left
the question blank or reported “don’t know.”

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal was 90% satisfaction and the result was 90%.


                                Customer Satisfaction with Quality of AFD Services

                               90%                                                   90%
   100%

       80%
                              90%                                                    90%
       60%

       40%

       20%

       0%
                             2008-09                                            2009-10

                                                    Result       Goal



Assessment of Results: Customer satisfaction is a fundamental measure of AFD’s performance, and AFD is
grateful for the confidence and goodwill expressed by its customers. While the performance measure is
specific to respondents who reported contact with AFD, a high level of satisfaction (88%) was also found
among all respondents, irrespective of contact. As the survey report notes, the local result exceeds the
national average of 82% for large U.S. cities with populations over 250,000. One program that contributes to
customer satisfaction is the Community Services Group (CSG) which helps fire victims in their hour of need. In
addition to ensuring all residents are accounted for, the CSG also answers questions and arranges the retrieval
of needed items, such as medications and clothing, from the fire scene.

Next Steps: The Department will continue to utilize the Community Services Group to assist fire victims. AFD
will also use business analysis tools, post-incident reviews, personnel training and other methods to continually
improve our services to the community.

For more information contact Harry Evans, Assistant Chief, (512) 974-0132.




                                                       36
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                           MUNICIPAL COURT KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                       2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                               2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                        Target  Met?
Compliance Rate                                            79.69% 96.71% 84.79% 87.83%  99.44%  94.80%
                                                             Not     Not 
Percent of cases set on a docket within 60 days                            92.61% 96.12%  94.65%  75% 
                                                           tracked tracked
Number of cases set on scheduled dockets and 
                                                           120,826 121,704 139,831 159,038  158,597  137,000
appearing at walk‐in dockets 
Total number of cases filed                                414,018 346,223 425,175 446,777  369,053  444,733
Average age of terminated cases (days)                         214    292     261      252    268       260 
Percent of offenders who complete rehabilitative 
                                                           84.00% 90.29% 65.78% 72.89%  75.03%  85.00%
recommendations 
Level of customer satisfaction as indicated by Voice of                        Not 
                                                               83%    82%              87%    87%       80% 
the Customer survey                                                          tracked




                                                            
                               MUNICIPAL COURT DEPARTMENT 
                                FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 
                                              
             
                                                                                             

Director’s Message                                              
 
 
The City of Austin Municipal Court is committed to administering justice in a fair, efficient, and timely manner.
Court services are increasingly available online, by telephone, and through the mail which contributes to
compliance in a customer service and eco-friendly way. Downtown Austin Community Court (DACC) provides
additional opportunities to resolve public nuisance violation cases for a defined geographical area which
includes downtown Austin.

Fiscal Year 2009-2010 was successful for the courts as demonstrated by:
    •   369,053 cases were filed and processed by the court.
    •   Court’s compliance rate increased by 11.6% due to enhanced efforts to contact and work with
        defendants on alternatives to full payment. The court passed an audit of its collection improvement
        plan by the State Comptroller.
    •   Court docketed 94.7% of the cases on which defendants plead not guilty within 60 days.
    •   Court accommodated an increase in the number of defendants seeking alternative compliance
        options, such as driver safety requests, deferred dispositions, extensions to pay and community
        service.
    •   Court implemented online enhancements relating to compliance dismissals, deferred dispositions,
        citizen initiated complaints, motions, court setting inquiries and various youth services.
    •   Established a bicycle deferred disposition program in cooperation with the cycling community.
    •   Customer satisfaction as indicated by Voice of the Customer survey is at 87%.
    •   Employee job satisfaction as indicated by Listening to the Workforce survey increased to 86%.
    •   DACC completed the first phase of realigning its mission and resources toward concentrating on
        repeat offenders in the downtown area.

Austin Municipal Court and DACC will continue pursuing innovative ideas to encourage defendants to handle
their cases in a timely and efficient manner.
    •   The courts will continue to emphasize exceptional customer service to include further online
        enhancements, e-citations, and other technological advances.
    •   We will prepare for future relocation to a new building allowing for adequate customer service areas,
        courtrooms, staffing, and parking.
    •   DACC will continue realigning and enhancing resources to more effectively address frequent offender
        rehabilitation.
    •   Municipal Court will assess staffing needs to accurately handle our workload and reduce our
        outstanding caseload.

Austin Municipal Court remains committed to improving business decisions and focusing on the goals,
objectives, and culture of Austin being the “Best Managed City.”


 
Rebecca Stark
Court Director




                                                          37                                            
Municipal Court

                                            COMPLIANCE  RATE 
                                                        
Measure Description: This measure generally reveals if the Municipal Court is keeping up with its caseload by
comparing the number of cases terminated to filed. Compliance includes payments or credits applied to fines
as well as dismissals and acquittals. Cases are administratively terminated when all court compliance efforts
have been exhausted.

Calculation Method: The measure compares the total number of cases terminated to the total number of cases
filed in Municipal Court.

FY 2009-10 Results: The measure was expected to be 94.8%. Court exceeded this expectation by 4.6%.


                                               Compliance Rate
    100.0%
                                                   98.0%                  92.1%                  99.4%
               87.0%                96.7%
                                                                                           94.8%
                                       87.4%                                      87.8%
                                                           84.8%
                    79.7%


      50.0%




       0.0%
                  2005-06            2006-07           2007-08                2008-09      2009-10

                                                  Result           Goal



Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the percentage of cases that are complying with orders and
disposed of completely. During the year, the court enhanced its collection efforts to encourage defendants to
handle their cases resulting in an 11.6% increase in compliance.

Next Steps: Court will continue pursuing innovative ideas to encourage defendants to handle their cases
quickly at court in addition to complying with the state mandated collections program. This measure may be
affected by the Police Department’s electronic citation project to be implemented in FY 2011-12.


For more information contact Rebecca Stark, Court Director, at (512) 974-4692.




                                                      38
                                                                                                 Municipal Court

                          PERCENT OF CASES SET ON A DOCKET WITHIN 60 DAYS  
                                                         

Measure Description: This measure shows the Court's ability to place criminal cases on appearance or trial
dockets in a timely manner. The goal is to docket cases no less than 3 weeks from date of “not guilty” pleas to
give defendants time to prepare and no more than 60 days.

Calculation Method: Number of cases set on a docket within 60 days as a percentage of total number of cases
to set on a docket.

FY 2009-10 Results: The court expects that 75% of cases are set on a docket within 60 days. In FY 2009-10
Court exceeded this goal by 19.7%.



                                Percent of Cases Set on a Docket Within 60 Days


    100.0%
                                                            96.1%                          94.7%
                          92.6%
     75.0%
                           75.0%                            75.0%                          75.0%

     50.0%


     25.0%


      0.0%
                          2007-08                           2008-09                       2009-10

                                                     Result           Goal




Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the Court’s ability to hear docket cases in a timely manner.
The percent of cases set on a docket within 60 days decreased 1.8% in FY 2009-10 due to an increase in the
number of cases on which defendants plead “not guilty”. For FY 2010-11, Court expects to set 95% of the
cases on a docket within 60 days. Historical trends were not available in previous years when the goal of 75%
was set.

Next Steps: Court will continue pursuing innovative ideas for scheduling cases on dockets to minimize the
length of time from initial filing to the case being set on a docket. Additionally, Court will prepare for future
relocation to a new building allowing for adequate courtrooms and staffing.


For more information contact Rebecca Stark, Court Director, at (512) 974-4692.    
                                                         




                                                       39
Municipal Court

       NUMBER OF CASES SET ON SCHEDULED DOCKETS AND APPEARING AT WALK‐IN DOCKETS  
                                                         

Measure Description: This measure reflects the Municipal Court’s criminal caseload that requires physical
appearance before judges. It affects the amount of judicial resources needed by the court as well as other
court resources such as clerical support, jurors, translators, court reporters and courtroom availability. It also
indicates the number of prosecutorial resources required of the city’s Law Department.

Calculation Method: The sum of all cases that were set on dockets.

FY 2009-10 Results: The expected number of cases docketed was 137,000. The expectation was exceeded by
21,597 or 15.7%.



                  Number of Cases Set on Scheduled Dockets and Appearing at Walk-in Dockets



     200,000
                                                                             159,038          158,597
     150,000                                                139,831
                     120,826          121,704

                                                                             127,000          137,000
     100,000                         125,000             120,000
                    120,000


      50,000


            0
                    2005-06           2006-07            2007-08             2008-09          2009-10
                                                      Result          Goal



Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the court’s challenge to hear cases in a timely manner with
relatively limited courtrooms. The total number of cases docketed has increased 37,771 or 31.3% from FY
2005-06 to FY 2009-10. The caseload increase can largely be attributed to “driving while license invalid” cases
(previously a county charge) being filed with the Municipal Court beginning in FY 2008-09. Additionally, more
defendants are seeking alternative payment options as a result of the economic condition.

Next Steps: The court will continue to provide additional services by clerical staff whenever possible to help to
reduce the number of cases going before a judge.

For more information contact Rebecca Stark, Court Director, at (512) 974-4692.




                                                       40
                                                                                                         Municipal Court

                                         TOTAL NUMBER OF CASES FILED 
                                                            

Measure Description: The number of cases filed is a direct result of the number of citations issued by the Austin
Police Department (APD) and other departments/agencies that issue citations filed in the Municipal Court. For
this reason, the budgeted (expected) and estimated “number of cases filed” are not meant to imply any
citation issuance requirements by law enforcement agencies including APD, rather it is meant to reflect a
workload for Municipal Court staff and help track resource allocation. The types of cases filed include traffic,
city ordinance, state class ‘c’ misdemeanors, parking and red light camera.

Calculation Method: The sum of all of cases filed.

FY 2009-10 Results: The number of cases expected in FY 2009-10 was 444,733. The actual number of cases
filed was 369,053 compared to 431,958 for FY 2008-09, a decrease of 62,905 or 14.6%.

                                             Total Number of Cases Filed
 500,000                                                                               Total
                   Total                                        Total
                                                           425,175                 446,777
                 414,018
 400,000                                                                                                   Total
                                          Total                                                          369,053
                                         346,223
                                                                                 265,943
 300,000         235,760                                       243,444
                                         181,456
                                                                                                         225,914
 200,000

                 147,054                                       145,115           135,313
                                     133,840
 100,000                                                                                                 106,957


                   31,204                                      35,680              30,702                 23,409
                                         30,927
         0
                  2005-06                2006-07               2007-08           2008-09                 2009-10
                                Red Light Program *            Misdemeanor     Parking         Traffic

  *Red Light Program: FY 2007-08 = 936    FY 2008-09 = 14,819    FY 2009-10 = 12,773

Assessment of Results: The above chart reflects a decrease in number of cases filed for FY 2009-10 as
compared to the previous year. The City completed the installation of a new parking pay system in FY 2008-
09 that provided expanded payment options for customers resulting in decreased parking violations cited. In
addition, the implementation of the state wide database for insurance verification resulted in fewer “failure to
maintain financial responsibility” case filings that historically resulted in dismissal.

Next Steps: Court will continue to concentrate on disposition of older cases and reallocate resources to handle
increased workloads in other areas and concentrate on backlogs. This measure may be affected by the
implementation of the expanded parking program in the latter part of FY 2010-11, by the FY 2011-12
implementation of the Police Department’s electronic citation project and legislation enacted in FY 2010-11.



For more information contact Rebecca Stark, Court Director, at (512) 974-4692.




                                                         41
Municipal Court

                               AVERAGE AGE OF TERMINATED CASES (DAYS ) 
                                                         

Measure Description: This measure generally reveals the efficiency of Municipal Court processes and
procedures by calculating the average length of time it takes to process cases from initial filing to termination.
The cases processed include traffic, parking, misdemeanor, and red light camera violations.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by taking the average age of all cases processed from filing to
actual termination.

FY 2009-10 Results: This measure was expected to be 260 days. Actual time exceeded expectation by 8 days
or 3.1%.

                                     Average Age of Terminated Cases (days)


                                       292                                 275
       300                                                                                     268
                                                            261

                   250                250                250                 252              260
       200          214



       100



          0
                  2005-06           2006-07            2007-08            2008-09            2009-10

                                                     Result        Goal



Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the average number of days to process cases from initial
filing to termination as compared to projected for the last 5 years. The average time to terminate cases
increased from 252 days in FY 2008-09 to 268 days in FY 2009-10, an increase of 16 days or 6%. During the
year, court was able to place greater emphasis on older cases due to a decrease in the number of new cases
filed. This increased the average days to terminate cases. In addition, there was an increase in the number of
defendants seeking alternative payment options, such as driver safety course requests and deferred
disposition, which extends the time to case closure.

Next Steps: The Court will continue to monitor and update case processing and procedures to ensure fast and
effective customer service and administration of justice. This measure may be affected in FY 2011-12 as the
Police Department implements its electronic citation project.


For more information contact Rebecca Stark, Court Director, at (512) 974-4692.




                                                       42
                                                                                                Municipal Court

           PERCENT OF OFFENDERS WHO COMPLETE REHABILITATIVE RECOMMENDATIONS
                                                       

Measure Description: This measure shows the percent of offenders who completed their rehabilitative
sentence. Rehabilitative sentences include but are not limited to treatment, education, assessment referral,
and other social service recommendations.

Calculation Method:    Number of completed rehabilitation sentences divided by number of rehabilitation
sentences.

FY 2009-10 Results: The measure was expected to be 85% for FY 2009-10. Community Court achieved 75.0%
which was 10.0% less than its goal.




                      Percent of Offenders Who Complete Rehabilitative Recommendations


  100.0
                                     90.3                                                  85.0
                  84.0                                                   83.3
                                                      90.0
    75.0
                  77.2              77.2                                  72.9              75.0
                                                       65.8
    50.0


    25.0


     0.0
                2005-06           2006-07            2007-08             2008-09          2009-10

                                                   Result         Goal



Assessment of Results: The percent of offenders who completed rehabilitative recommendations increased
from 65.8% to 75.0% or 9.3% over the past 2 years. In FY 2007-08, the number of offenders receiving
rehabilitative sentences was 1,122 and in FY 2009-10 1,514 which is an increase of 392 sentences. During the
same period offenders who completed their rehabilitative recommendations increased to 1,136 in FY 2009-10
from 738 in FY 2007-08 for a total increase of 398 completed recommendations.

Next Steps: After hiring two new case managers in FY 2010-11 with the sole focus on frequent offenders,
including outreach activities, we expect to complete the realignment of internal resources such as our
Rehabilitation budget toward this group. We anticipate requesting additional funds for Rehabilitation in line
with the recommendations of our Advisory Committee and stakeholders, including working with agencies in
the City and County to increase the availability of permanent supportive housing. We may also be studying
ways to adjudicate Class C misdemeanors within the Court’s jurisdictional boundary with a consideration on
shifting cases out of the Court deemed not suitable for a problem-solving, therapeutic jurisprudence venue.


For more information contact Peter Valdez, Court Administrator, Community Court, at 974-4873.




                                                     43
Municipal Court

     LEVEL OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION AS INDICATED BY THE CITY OF AUSTIN CITIZEN SURVEY 
                                                          

Measure Description: The level of customer satisfaction as indicated by the City of Austin is a measure that
reflects the level of satisfaction of Municipal Court’s accessibility and quality of service as measured by the
City of Austin Citizen Survey. The survey is administered annually by the City.

Calculation Method: The percent of customers that respond very satisfied, satisfied or neutral with Municipal
Court customer services. The measure includes only those respondents who reported in a separate question
that they had contact with Municipal Court. This data excludes those who left the question blank.

FY 2009-10 Results: The results for FY 2009-10 are consistent with the FY 2008-09 at 87% surpassing the goal
of 80%.

                                     Level of Customer Satisfaction as Indicated by the
                                                City of Austin Citizen Survey

    100%
                                                                                 87%            87%
                   83%                82%
     80%                                                                                                Goal
                                                                                32%            32%

     60%                             49%
                   54%

     40%
                                                                                39%            39%

     20%                             24%
                   24%
                                                      Not tracked
                                                                                16%            16%
                    5%                9%
      0%
                  2005-06           2006-07              2007-08              2008-09         2009-10

                                 Very Satisfied          Satisfied          Neutral


Assessment of Results: The total satisfaction remained constant from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10 at 87%.
Comparing respondents from FY 2005-06 on the level of satisfaction in the quality of services, the total
satisfaction increased from 83% to 87% or 4%, very satisfied respondents increased from 5% to 16% or 11%,
satisfied respondents increased from 24% to 39% or 15% and respondents in the neutral category decreased
from 54% to 32% or 22%. The survey was not tracked in FY 2007-08. The City of Austin Municipal Court
satisfaction results surpassed other large United States cities participating in the survey by 2%.

Next Steps: Court continues to emphasize delivery of exceptional service to its customers to include further
online enhancements, more quality assurance, and a new building with adequate parking.


For more information contact Rebecca Stark, Court Director, at (512) 974-4692.




                                                       44
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                      POLICE KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                        2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                               2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                         Target  Met?
Violent crime rate per 1,000 population                     5.15    5.40     5.22     5.23     5.00      5.29 
Property crime rate per 1,000 population                   58.57    63.41    59.45    62.45   63.35 
                                                                                               60.02 
                                                                                               No 
Part II crime rate per 1,000 population                     162    159    156    143    128          N/A 
                                                                                              Target
Percent of Part I crimes cleared                           13.4%  13.7%  13.9%  13.2%  12.2%  13.2% 
Total police response time for emergency and urgent 
                                                            7:51    8:09     8:04     7:53     6:53      7:35 
calls 
Percent of residents who are satisfied with the overall      Not     Not     Not 
                                                                                      70%      74%       75% 
quality of police services                                 tracked tracked tracked
                                                                                                          No 
Rate of citizen complaints per 100,000 population           16.8    21.0     28.0     14.9     12.9              N/A 
                                                                                                        Target
Rate of traffic fatalities per 100,000 population           9.04    8.42     7.71     7.83     6.84      7.30 
Rate of serious‐injury‐producing collisions per 100,000 
                                                           17.94    14.50    12.71    12.01    10.97     9.24 
population 
Rate of DWI‐related fatalities per 100,000 population       3.53    2.90     2.43     2.61     2.97      3.10 
Average training hours per police employee                   43      52       50       53       45        37 
                                                                                            

                                 AUSTIN POLICE DEPARTMENT 
                                 FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 


 
Director’s Message

Austin Police Department works to keep the community safe and to ensure that residents and visitors feel
safe. To that end, we focus on reducing crime (both violent and property), increasing traffic safety, and
improving residents' satisfaction with service delivery and perceptions of safety.

We rely heavily on key indicators for violent and property crime rates to gauge our results in reducing crime.
 Austin's violent crime rate for FY10 (5.00 incidents per 100,000 residents) declined 4% vs. last year. We
   experienced decreases in the rates of all four violent crime types (homicide, rape, robbery, and
   aggravated assault). During the year, the department conducted operations targeting violent crime in the
   downtown entertainment district, and citywide hot spots.

 Our property crime rate for FY10 (60.02 incidents per 100,000 residents) dropped 4% from last year. During
   the year we saw decreases in auto theft and other theft rates, and only a small increase (1%) in the
   burglary rate. Auto theft, burglary of vehicle, and burglary of residence initiatives worked to prevent these
   incidents in West campus and citywide hot spots.

Keeping Austin drivers safe on the road is another important departmental focus.
 Austin's traffic fatality rate (6.84 fatalities per 100,000 residents) was reduced by 13% from last year; the
   rate of serious-injury collisions (10.97 collisions per 100,000 residents) was reduced by 9%. Highway
   enforcement operations work to target and prevent dangerous driving behavior.

 Austin's DWI fatality rate (2.97 per 100,000 residents) represents a 14% increase from FY09. The
   department continues its No Refusal program during holiday periods. This initiative is aimed at improving
   prosecution, thereby making roads safer.

A critical component of the department's performance is the quality of our service to Austin residents.
 Response time to high-priority calls for service was reduced by 13% during FY10. This improvement in
    responding to emergency and urgent calls was accomplished, in part, by better filtering and handling of
    non-emergency calls, thereby freeing up 911 call takers to more quickly respond to calls of the highest
    priority.

Resident perceptions of safety and their ongoing satisfaction with police services directly support our mission.
 Citizen complaints for FY10 were down 13% as compared with FY09, and were 11% lower than our goal. A
    revised departmental process for investigating complaints against staff allows supervisors to take a more
    active role in coaching their direct reports, which should lead to improved performance department-wide.

 The percent of residents reporting satisfaction with police service quality was 74%, which was 6% higher
   than last year, and was significantly higher than the average for other US cities of our size. Department-
   wide leadership training, for both sworn and civilian staff, seeks to continue to promote a culture of
   leadership and quality.

Austin Police Department's mission of keeping the community safe is paired with our vision to be respected
and trusted by all segments of Austin’s diverse community. Together, these aims drive our efforts, our
resources, our energy, and our scorecard.

H. A. Acevedo
Chief of Police




                                                                                                       APD 
                                                         45
Police

                               VIOLENT CRIME RATE PER  1,000 POPULATION 

Measure Description: The FBI identifies seven “Part I Index Crimes” based on their seriousness and frequency
of occurrence. Four of these represent violent crimes: murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. The
Austin Police Department reports crime counts to the FBI, whose UCR (Uniform Crime Reporting) program
provides for consistent crime reporting across the country. Once UCR statistics are released, these become our
official statistics.
Calculation Method: Violent crimes are counted by either number of victims (murder, rape, aggravated
assault) or number of offenses (robbery). Violent crime rate is calculated by dividing violent crime count by a
population factor (Austin population divided by 1,000). For prior years (FY 2008-09 and earlier), we report FBI
UCR violent crime rate, which is based on a calendar year and our US census population, and is considered
official. For the current year (FY 2009-10), violent crime rate is based on a fiscal year and Austin’s full-purpose
population. This result is considered unofficial until the FBI releases its final results in September.
FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 5.29 crimes per 1,000 residents. The actual
result was 5.00 crimes per 1,000 residents, which was 5% below the goal.

                                       Violent Crime Rate per 1,000 Population


  7.00
  6.00                                                                            5.40
                                     5.40                   5.22                                   5.29
                5.15
  5.00
                5.00                 4.90                   4.99                  5.23             5.00
  4.00
  3.00
  2.00
  1.00
  0.00
              2005-06              2006-07              2007-08                  2008-09          2009-10

                                                   Result          Goal


Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 4% lower than FY 2008-09 and
5% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09). Austin’s violent crime rate
in 2009 (the most recent official results) was 5.23, which was considerably below the rate of 8.85 for all large
US cities.*
Another way to look at violent crime rate data is to examine the four violent crime types. During FY 2009-10,
Austin experienced 30 homicides, which represents a rate of 0.04 per 1,000 residents, or an increase of 36%
as compared with the previous year. Austin’s 2009 homicide rate of 0.03 per 1,000 residents was much lower
than the rate of 0.12 for large US cities. Austin’s number of rapes fell 10% to 246 in FY 2009-10; our 2009 rate
of 0.3 rapes per 1,000 was about the same as other large US cities.
Austin also saw a 10% decrease in robberies from last year, to 1.6 per 1,000 residents; our 2009 robbery rate
of 1.8 per 1,000 residents was about half the rate of 3.4 for large US cities. Austin’s number of aggravated
assaults was up 1% compared to last year, but our rate of 3.0 per 1,000 population in 2009 was well below the
rate of 5.0 per 1,000 for other large US cities.
Next Steps: Operation Total Saturation, a bureau-wide initiative, aimed to reduce violent crime in the
downtown entertainment district. It involved metro response, patrol, and highway enforcement officers, as well
as district representatives. The operation targeted suspects involved in drug traffic and alcohol-related
violations, and also worked with bar owners to discourage selling to underage and over-served patrons. During
the initiative (January through March), violent crime was reduced 36% vs. the same period last year. The
initiative continued through April and May, resulting in an 8% reduction in violent crime during the initiative for
that period; that reduction was comprised of a 40% decrease in robberies and a 33% increase in aggravated
assaults.
In addition, throughout the year, the Central Bureau operated a crime initiative concentrated in bureau hot
spots. The operation was a coordinated effort involving patrol officers, district representatives, walking beat
officers, and metro response officers. Using observation of high-potential crime areas and patrol saturation,
violent crime was reduced 5%.
*Note: Comparison crime rates for large US cities are based on the most recent FBI data for calendar year
2009. Included are cities with population between 500,000 and 999,999 (as comparison, Austin’s population
was 774,636 in 2010).
For more information contact Commander Julie O’Brien, Violent Crime Division, at (512) 974-8292.
                                                        46
                                                                                                             Police

                               PROPERTY CRIME RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION

Measure Description: The FBI identifies seven “Part I Index Crimes” based on their seriousness and frequency
of occurrence. Three of these represent property crimes: burglary, theft, and auto theft. The Austin Police
Department reports crime counts to the FBI, the UCR (Uniform Crime Reporting) program provides consistent
crime reporting across the country. Once UCR statistics are released, these become our official statistics.
Calculation Method: Property crimes are counted by number of premises entered (burglary), number of
offenses (theft), or number of vehicles (auto theft). Property crime rate is calculated by dividing property crime
count by a population factor (Austin population divided by 1,000). For prior years (FY 2008-09 and earlier), we
report FBI UCR property crime rate, which is based on a calendar year and our US census population. For the
current year (FY 2009-10), property crime rate is based on a fiscal year and Austin’s full-purpose population.
This result is considered unofficial until the FBI releases its final results in September.
FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 63.35 crimes per 1,000 residents. The actual
result was 60.02 crimes per 1,000 residents, which was 5% below the goal.


                                      Property Crime Rate per 1,000 Population

  100.00
   90.00
   80.00
                                      63.41                                      62.45              63.35
   70.00          58.57                                      59.45
   60.00
   50.00                                                                          63.00             60.02
                  55.60               54.70                  57.50
   40.00
   30.00
   20.00
   10.00
    0.00
                 2005-06             2006-07              2007-08                2008-09           2009-10

                                                    Result           Goal

Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 4% lower than FY 2008-09 and
2% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09). Austin’s property crime
rate in 2009 (the most recent official results) was 62.45, which was significantly higher than the rate of 49.00
for all large US cities.*
Another way to look at property crime rate data is to examine the three property crime types. Austin’s FY
2009-10 rate of 11.2 burglaries per 1,000 residents was up slightly (1%) from last year and our 2009 rate of
11.4 was similar to the rate for other large US cities (11.7 per 1,000 residents). Austin saw a small (3%)
decrease in the theft rate from last year, but our 2009 rate of 48 thefts per 1,000 residents was much higher
than the rate of 32 for large US cities. Austin’s FY 2009-10 rate of 3.0 auto thefts per 1,000 residents is also
down slightly (3%) from last year, but our 2009 rate of 3.0 was far below the rate of 5.8 for large US cities.
Next Steps: During the December holidays, patrol officers citywide conducted operations designed to keep
shoppers safe in and near area retail centers. Activities included high-profile patrols, plain-clothes surveillance,
decoy vehicles, and distribution of safety information to raise awareness and educate residents about how to
prevent crimes such as burglary of vehicles.
The Central West area command, including the west campus area, was the target of a March initiative to
reduce the volume of burglaries, including both burglary of vehicles (BOVs) and burglary of residences (BORs).
Increased high-visibility presence and traffic enforcement were used, resulting in a 24% reduction in BOVs and
a 29% reduction in BORs. During the third quarter, the Central Bureau continued a crime initiative
concentrated on bureau hot spots. Using observation of high-potential crime areas and patrol saturation,
property crime was reduced by 9%.
In April, the department launched an operation aimed at reducing the number of thefts of large pickup trucks
which are often used in human smuggling activities. The joint effort involved the Auto Theft and patrol units,
as well as Round Rock Police Department and surrounding jurisdictions. The operation ran through the 3rd
quarter and resulted in a 9% decrease in large truck thefts as compared with the 2nd quarter.
*Note: Comparison crime rates for large US cities are based on the most recent FBI data for calendar year
2009. Included are cities with population between 500,000 and 999,999 (as comparison, Austin’s population
was 774,636 in 2010).
For more information contact Commander Wayne Demoss, Centralized Property Crime Division, (512) 974-8275.
                                                        47
Police

                                PART II CRIME RATE PER  1,000 POPULATION 

Measure Description: The FBI organizes crime into two types: Part I and Part II. Part I crimes include offenses
such as homicide, robbery, and theft. Part II crimes are either less serious or are less frequently reported, and
include crimes such as simple assault, drug offenses, forgery, fraud, gambling, public drunkenness,
prostitution, vagrancy, vandalism, and weapons offenses. Although law enforcement reporting typically
concentrates on Part I offenses, it is worthwhile to consider Part II offenses as well, to gain a more complete
picture of crime.

Calculation Method: Part II crime rate is calculated by dividing Part II crime count by a population factor (Austin
full-purpose population divided by 1,000). For prior years (FY 2008-09 and earlier), we report official rates,
which are reported by the FBI, and are based on calendar year. For the current year (FY 2009-10), results are
based on fiscal year and are considered unofficial. Part II crime counts typically rise once they’ve been audited
and become official.

FY 2009-10 Results: This is a new measure for FY 2010-11 and has an established goal of 142. The FY 2009-10
result of 128 is 10% lower than the FY 2008-09 actual.


                                        Part II Crime Rate per 1,000 Population


  200


  175
                162
                                     159                     156
  150                                                                              143

                                                                                                     128
  125


  100
              2005-06              2006-07               2007-08                  2008-09          2009-10

                                       Result        A goal was not established




Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 10% lower than FY 2008-09
and 17% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09). Comparing FY 2009-
10 data to previous years, however, has limited use. FY 2009-10 results are unofficial and – as mentioned
above – are likely to be understated until they become official.

Next Steps: Operation Candlelight, a joint operation with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) that ran
throughout the 1st quarter, targeted local marijuana smugglers and resulted in the conviction of three top-level
smugglers. In November, Operation Tourniquet, a joint investigation with the FBI, resulted in the arrest of 30
narcotics defendants and the seizure of 30 kilos of cocaine. In July, a one-year joint investigation (with the
DEA) resulted in the seizure of 30 kilos of cocaine and the indictment of three suspects in Federal court.

An ongoing program led by the Narcotics Conspiracy unit seeks increased sentences for repeat offenders by
elevating the cases to Federal courts. Since the program's inception in 2007, more than 70 defendants have
been sentenced in the Federal system and are still incarcerated.

Operation Southern Cross, an investigation into a multinational Mexican drug trafficking organization, began in
April 2008 and concluded in April 2010 with the arrest of 12 suspects as well as the seizure of firearms, drugs,
and currency. The operation was conducted by a multi-jurisdictional taskforce including APD’s Organized Crime
division, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the FBI, and the Texas Department of Public Safety.

For more information contact Dr. Ronnelle Paulsen, Planning and Crime Analysis Unit Manager, (512) 974-5315.




                                                        48
                                                                                                            Police

                                    PERCENT OF PART I CRIMES CLEARED

Measure Description: The FBI identifies seven “Part I Index Crimes” based on their seriousness and frequency
of occurrence. These are murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, theft, and auto theft. Crimes
can be cleared in two ways: by arrest and by exception. A crime is cleared exceptionally when a circumstance
prevents an arrest. Examples include when the offender dies, the victim refuses to cooperate with the
prosecution, or the offender is being prosecuted in another jurisdiction and cannot be extradited. Each year,
the Austin Police Department reports crimes and clearances to the FBI, whose UCR (Uniform Crime Reporting)
program provides for consistent crime reporting across the country. Once UCR statistics are released, these
become our official statistics.

Calculation Method: Percent of Part I crimes cleared is calculated by dividing total clearances by total offenses.
For prior years (FY 2008-09 and earlier), we report FBI UCR clearance rate, which is based on a calendar year
and is considered official. For the current year (FY 2009-10), the clearance rate is based on fiscal year and is
considered unofficial until the FBI releases its final results in September.

FY 2009-10 Results: This is a new key indicator and has an established goal of 13.2% for FY 2009-10. The FY
2009-10 result of 12.2% is 8% lower than the goal and the FY 2008-09 actual.


                                         Percent of Part I Crimes Cleared


  20%



  15%          13.4%               13.7%                  13.9%                                  13.2%
                                                                              13.2%


  10%                                                                                            12.2%


    5%



    0%
              2005-06              2006-07             2007-08                2008-09           2009-10

                                                 Result                Goal



Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 8% lower than FY 2008-09 and
10% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09). FY 2009-10 results are
unofficial and are likely to be understated because the offense count is likely to decline and the cases cleared
count is likely to increase. FY 2008-09 results, however, are official, and can be used to compare Austin to
other large US cities. For 2009, Austin’s clearance rate for Part I crimes was 13.2%, which was lower than the
18.3% clearance rate of other large US cities.

Looking at the crime types, Austin cleared 43% of Part I violent crime in 2009, which was higher than the 41%
clearance rate for large US cities. For each violent crime type (murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault),
Austin outperformed other cities on clearing all types of violent crime.

Solving property crime is generally more difficult, though, because many property crimes are discovered after
the crime has occurred, with no known suspects or witnesses. During 2009 Austin solved 11% of property
crimes, which was lower than the rate of 14% for other cities of similar size. Looking at the type of property
crime, Austin underperformed other cities on burglary and theft clearances, but outperformed other cities on
clearing auto theft cases.

Next Steps: During the 2nd quarter, APD’s Sex Crimes unit worked with Austin/Travis County Sexual Assault
Response Resource Team (SARRT) to modify procedures to allow a longer timeframe for evidence-gathering in
cases involving sexual assault. This change expands the timeframe from four to five days, which benefits
victims as well as investigators.

For more information contact Commander Julie O’Brien, Violent Crime Division, at (512) 974-8292 or Commander
Wayne Demoss, Centralized Property Crime Division, at (512) 974-8275.


                                                       49
Police

                  TOTAL POLICE RESPONSE TIME FOR EMERGENCY AND URGENT CALLS 

Measure Description: Calls for service are received from citizens and prioritized for dispatch to patrol officers.
The highest priority calls are emergency (imminent threat to life or public safety) and urgent (not emergency,
but still require an urgent response). Using call priorities helps to ensure a rapid response to these critical call
types.

Calculation Method: Total response time is calculated from the time the call for service is answered by a call
taker to the time the first police officer arrives on scene. In addition, although response time for emergency
and urgent calls is reported as a single result, a weighted average is calculated. This allows differences in
volumes for the two call types to be taken into consideration.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure, total response time for emergency and urgent calls, was 7:35.
The actual result was 6:53, which was 11% below the goal.


                                  Total Response Time for Emergency and Urgent Calls


  10.00
                                       8.09                   8.04
                 7.51                                                            7.53                 7.35
    8.00

                  7.00                                        7.30               7.30
    6.00                               7.00                                                           6.53

    4.00


    2.00


    0.00
                2005-06              2006-07              2007-08              2008-09              2009-10

                                                     Result          Goal


Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 13% lower than FY 2008-09
and 16% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09). Another way to look
at response time is to examine the two call priorities. For FY 2009-10, the goal for emergency call response
time was 5:51 and the actual result was 5:36 (4% faster than the goal). The urgent call response time goal was
8:06 and the result was 7:50 (3% faster than the goal).

The decrease in total response time from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10 is likely the result of a change made in the
2nd quarter. After an annual review of call priorities, one call type was reclassified: traffic hazard on high-speed
roadway. This call type was originally considered urgent, but because it is not a violent crime, it was more
accurately classified as a Priority 2 call. These calls continued to be assigned to officers as soon as possible.
Because of the reclassification, traffic hazard calls were excluded from urgent response time calculations,
thereby lowering total response times.

Next Steps: In September, Austin 311 began using improved criteria to help filter incoming calls and, thereby,
reduce the number of non-police calls received by the Communications section. Ultimately, this allowed more
efficient handling of the non-police calls (by avoiding repeated transfers) and improved capacity to handle
calls appropriately directed to 911 and Teleserve (which handles non-emergency police calls). By December,
the monthly call volume was reduced by nearly 30% as compared with September.

In August, communications initiated a cross-training rotation requiring dispatchers to work each sector of the
city. The goal was to ensure that dispatchers maintain their proficiency with communications tools, ensuring
they can effectively cover any sector. Although this was done in anticipation of a January 2011 redistricting
(that will create new sector boundaries), this focus on performance has already resulted in modest, 1-2%
decreases in response time for all call types.

For more information contact Marcia Brooks, Emergency Communications Division Manager, at (512) 974-0943.




                                                        50
                                                                                                            Police

                                PERCENT OF RESIDENTS WHO ARE SATISFIED 
                             WITH THE OVERALL QUALITY OF POLICE SERVICES

Measure Description: The city commissions an annual survey of resident satisfaction with city services. Results
are used to identify trends, set budget priorities, and compare Austin to other cities of our size. In 2010 the
survey was distributed to 3,000 households and produced a 44% response rate. Beginning in 2009, a survey
question was included that asks respondents to rate their satisfaction with overall quality of police services;
choices include: very satisfied, satisfied, neutral, dissatisfied, very dissatisfied, and don’t know.

Calculation Method: Resident satisfaction with the overall quality of police services is calculated by adding
together the percent of residents who respond with either “very satisfied” or “satisfied.” The measure
excludes those who left the question blank or reported “don’t know.”

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 75% of residents reporting satisfaction with
the overall quality of police services. The actual result was 74%, which was 1% below the goal.


                         Percent of Residents Satisfied with Overall Quality of Police Services



            100%

                                                                                   75%
                                      71%
             75%
                                                                                    74%
                                      70%
             50%


             25%


              0%
                                    2008-09                                      2009-10

                                                     Result         Goal


Assessment of Results: Compared to last year – when the measure was first established – the FY 2009-10
result was 6% higher. Austin’s FY 2009-10 result (74% resident satisfaction) was higher than the 68% resident
satisfaction average reported nationally (US cities with population greater than 250,000).

Next Steps: During this fiscal year, the department launched the Leadership Command College, a training
series aimed at developing management skills in department leadership. The attendees (commanders and
selected civilian division managers) will, in turn, develop these skills in their direct reports. The goal is to
promote a department culture of professional development, leadership, and quality. During FY 2010-11, the
series will be offered to a broader audience, including lieutenants and civilian managers.

Also during this fiscal year, the department increased the number of offerings of its basic Leadership
Development Program, a leadership curriculum targeted to first-line supervisors.

For more information contact Dr. Ronnelle Paulsen, Planning and Crime Analysis Unit Manager, at (512) 974-
5315.




                                                          51
Police

                         RATE OF CITIZEN COMPLAINTS PER 100,000 POPULATION

Measure Description: Citizens can make complaints against the department or its officers by filing either a
supervisory inquiry or formal complaint. Supervisory inquiries generally involve less serious allegations or are
made to clarify department policy, and are handled by the officer’s supervisory chain of command. Formal
complaints involve a formal interview and statement, which are then investigated by the department’s Internal
Affairs division. This performance measure (citizen complaints) tracks formal complaints.

Calculation Method: Citizen complaint rate is calculated by dividing the number of formal complaints by a
population factor (Austin full-purpose population divided by 100,000).

FY 2009-10 Results: This is a new measure for FY 2010-11 and has an established goal of 21.7. The rate of
citizen complaints fell to 12.9 per 100,000 in FY 2009-10.


                                Rate of Citizen Complaints per 100,000 Population


  50


  40


  30                                                    28.0

                                   21.0
  20          16.8
                                                                              14.9
                                                                                                 12.9
  10


    0
             2005-06             2006-07              2007-08                2008-09            2009-10

                                           Result       A goal was not established




Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 13% lower than FY 2008-09
and 36% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09). Another way to look
at citizen complaints is to examine formal complaints as a percentage of total complaints. From FY 2005-06 to
FY 2009-10 there has been a moderately steady decline in the proportion of formal complaints, from 20% in FY
2005-06 to 17% in FY 2007-08 to 8% in FY 2009-10.

Next Steps: Late in FY 2008-09, the department revised its policy for handling formal citizen complaints.
Previously, the Internal Affairs unit investigated all incoming complaints against department employees.
Beginning in June 2009, complaints found to be lesser by the Internal Affairs unit were referred to the subject’s
chain-of-command for investigation.

This procedure change was intended to give supervisors a more active role in managing the performance of
their direct reports, including coaching of performance problems. This change does not directly alter the
number of incoming formal citizen complaints, but supervisors – through immediate feedback and coaching –
should prevent the recurrence of performance problems, as well as demonstrate to citizens that complaints
are being heard and addressed. If done effectively, both actions should ultimately result in fewer formal
complaints.

For more information contact Commander Donald Baker, Professional Standards Division, at (512) 974-5294.




                                                       52
                                                                                                              Police

                          RATE OF TRAFFIC FATALITIES PER  100,000 POPULATION

Measure Description: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) uses a set of measures to
track performance and assess progress in traffic safety at the local, state, and national level. Results are also
used to set national and state goals and allocate resources. Traffic fatalities is one of the measures NHTSA
tracks.

Calculation Method: Traffic fatality rate is calculated by dividing number of traffic fatalities by a population
factor (Austin’s full-purpose population divided by 100,000).

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 7.30 traffic fatalities per 100,000 population
(or about 57 fatalities). The actual result was 6.84 fatalities per 100,000 population (or 53 fatalities), which
was 6% below the goal.


                                   Rate of Traffic Fatalities per 100,000 Population


   12.00


                  9.86
   10.00

                                                              8.40
                                      8.42
                  9.04
                                                                                  7.83
     8.00                                                                                          7.30
                                      8.10
                                                              7.71
                                                                                  7.30
                                                                                                   6.84
     6.00
                2005-06              2006-07              2007-08               2008-09           2009-10

                                                     Result          Goal



Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 13% lower than FY 2008-09 (60
fatalities) and 17% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09; 61
fatalities).

During calendar year 2009, most traffic fatalities involved motor vehicle occupants (48%), followed by
pedestrians (26%) and motorcyclists (24%). In addition, 40% of motor vehicle victims were not using restraints
and 47% of motorcycle victims were not wearing helmets. Looking at other factors, 35% of fatal crashes
involved speed and 43% of fatal crashes occurred on freeways (e.g., IH-35, Mo-Pac, US Hwy 183, and State
Hwy 71/290 West).

Next Steps: Citywide, Highway Enforcement and bureau patrol officers were visible on area highways to target
and prevent dangerous driving behavior that traditionally occurs from Thanksgiving through New Year's Day.

For more information contact Commander Jason Dusterhoft, Highway Enforcement Division, at (512) 974-5981.




                                                          53
Police

             RATE OF SERIOUS‐INJURY‐PRODUCING COLLISIONS PER  100,000 POPULATION

Measure Description: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) uses a set of measures to
track performance and assess progress in traffic safety at the local, state, and national level. Results are also
used to set national and state goals and allocate resources. Traffic crashes involving serious injuries is one of
the measures NHTSA tracks.

Calculation Method: Serious-injury-producing collision rate is calculated by dividing the number of collisions
involving serious injuries by a population factor (Austin’s full-purpose population divided by 100,000).

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 9.24 serious-injury collisions per 100,000
population (or about 72) collisions. The actual result was 10.97 collisions per 100,000 population (or 85
collisions), which was 19% above the goal.


                                Rate of Serious-Injury Collisions per 100,000 Population


  25.00


  20.00                              17.64                    17.64

                 17.94
  15.00                                                                           12.90
                                      14.50
                                                                                                    10.97
                 13.82                                        12.71
  10.00                                                                           12.01

                                                                                                    9.24

    5.00
                2005-06             2006-07                2007-08               2008-09           2009-10

                                                     Result           Goal




Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 9% lower than FY 2008-09 (92
collisions) and 23% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09; 105
collisions).

Next Steps: A dedicated radio channel for traffic-related incidents was reactivated in January 2010. The
channel allows for faster dispatching of Highway Enforcement officers to traffic-related incidents on high-speed
roadways, thereby clearing roadways more quickly and preventing secondary collisions. This program was
initially piloted from mid-2008 to mid-2009; new grant funding will allow the program to run through December
2011.

For more information contact Commander Jason Dusterhoft, Highway Enforcement Division, at (512) 974-5981.




                                                         54
                                                                                                                Police

                       RATE OF DWI‐RELATED FATALITIES PER 100,000 POPULATION  

Measure Description: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) uses a set of measures to
track performance and assess progress in traffic safety at the local, state, and national level. Results are also
used to set national and state goals and allocate resources. Traffic fatalities involving impaired drivers is one
of the measures NHTSA tracks.

Calculation Method: DWI-related fatality rate is calculated by dividing the number of traffic fatalities by a
population factor (Austin full-purpose population divided by 100,000). DWI fatalities include traffic deaths
(drivers or passengers) where an alcohol-impaired driver was involved.

FY 2009-10 Results: This is a new measure for FY 2010-11 and has an established goal of 2.53. The rate of
DWI-related increased to 2.97 per 100,000 in FY 2009-10.


                            Rate of DWI-Related Fatalities per 100,000 Population


  8



  6



  4          3.53
                                   2.90                                                            2.97
                                                        2.43                     2.61

  2



  0
            2005-06              2006-07              2007-08                  2008-09           2009-10

                                           Result            A goal was not established




Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 14% higher than FY 2008-09
and 3% higher than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09). During calendar year
2009, 43% of fatal crashes involved an impaired driver, as compared with 39% in 2008. Of all pedestrian
fatalities, 44% involved an impaired pedestrian, as compared with 47% in 2008.

Next Steps: Citywide, the department conducted No Refusal initiatives on holidays (Halloween, New Year's Eve,
Super Bowl Sunday, and Mardi Gras). This initiative allows officers to obtain blood samples from DWI suspects
who refuse breath or blood tests, which is aimed at improving prosecution, and thereby making roads safer.

During the summer, the Park division increased staffing in conjunction with the Highway Enforcement
Command’s DWI Unit to reduce boating-related injuries and fatalities by improving enforcement of BWI
(boating while intoxicated) laws.

For more information contact Commander Jason Dusterhoft, Highway Enforcement Division, at (512) 974-5981.




                                                        55
Police

                             AVERAGE TRAINING HOURS PER POLICE EMPLOYEE

Measure Description: Average training hours per employee is one gauge of the department’s investment in
staff development. This measure tracks the number of hours of training taken, on average, by employees.
Both sworn and civilian staff are included; cadet (new officer) training is excluded.

Calculation Method: Average training hours is calculated by adding the total hours of training taken by all
employees, both sworn and civilian. This total is divided by the number of budgeted, full-time equivalent staff.

FY 2009-10 Results: This is a key indicator measure for FY 2010-11. A goal for this measure was not
established until FY 2009-10.


                                       Average Training Hours per Employee


   60
                                     52                                        53
                                                            50
   50                                                                                               45
                43
   40

   30                                                                                               37

   20

   10

    0
             2005-06              2006-07              2007-08               2008-09             2009-10

                                                   Result            Goal



Assessment of Results: Looking at results over time, the FY 2009-10 result was 15% lower than FY 2008-09
and 9% lower than the average of the last four years (FY 2005-06 through FY 2008-09). But comparing FY
2009-10 data to previous years adds some distortion. Due to the lag time between conducting training and
reporting training hours, FY 2009-10 is somewhat underreported. For that same reason, prior years (FY 2008-
09 and earlier) are likely to appear higher. Going forward, comparisons between FY 2009-10 and future years
will be more meaningful.

Next Steps: During FY 2009-10, the training academy focused its efforts on advanced officer training, including
defense tactics and shooting. Civilian training included citywide ethics training, as well as an offsite briefing in
early 2009 (attended by both civilian and sworn staff), which was led by the chief, who reflected on the
previous year’s accomplishments and provided direction for the priorities and expectations for the new year.

For more information contact Commander Brian Manley, Training Division, at (512) 974-5216.




                                                        56
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
               HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                           2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                                 2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                            Target  Met?
Percent of animal shelter live outcomes                       49%     48%     56%     68%     72%    75%               
Animals sheltered and euthanized per 100,000                 2,578;  2,809;  2,531;  2,164;  2,247;   No 
                                                                                                                    N/A 
population                                                   1,307  1,453  1,120  684         633  Target
Number of homeless persons receiving case 
                                                              496       519     562      691      670       515 
management who move into safe and stable housing 
Number of immunizations given at the Shots for Tots 
                                                             41,464 48,563 62,949 37,133  42,905  48,000
clinics 
Total Mortality Rate (all causes) in Travis County per         Not 
                                                                       750.6    750.6    759.0    761.3    733.9 
100,000                                                      tracked
Total Infant Mortality Rate in Travis Co. / 1,000 live         Not 
                                                                        6.1      5.5      6.0      4.9       5.5 
births                                                       tracked
Heart disease mortality rate in Austin/Travis County           Not       Not     Not 
                                                                                       166.5      164.4    166.5 
area                                                         tracked   tracked tracked
Average years of potential life lost in the Austin/Travis      Not       Not     Not 
                                                                                       19.67      19.46    19.67 
Co area                                                      tracked   tracked tracked
                                                               Not       Not     Not 
Obesity rate in the Austin/Travis County area                                          18.50      22.00    18.50       
                                                             tracked   tracked tracked
The incidence rate of HIV per 100,000 population               23.0      17.4    19.3   12.0         11.4 
                                                                                                  14.4                 
Unemployment rate for the Austin MSA                           3.8%      3.7%  4.5%  7.2%            6.0% 
                                                                                                  7.2%                 
                                                                                          Not yet     No 
Poverty rate in the Austin/Travis County area                15.2%  14.7%  14.8%  16.2%  available                  N/A 
                                                                                                    Target
                                                                                          


                      HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT 
                            FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 



Director’s Message

The Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department (HHSD) offers a variety of services to the
community through direct service provision and in partnership with community organizations to achieve the
department’s mission of promoting health, safety and well being. It is the role of public health and human
services to promote community-wide wellness and self-sufficiency, prevent disease and poverty, and protect
the community from infectious diseases, epidemics, and environmental/social hazards. HHSD has several
programs that work towards the department’s mission. These programs are categorized in three large areas,
Animal Services, Human Services and Public Health. The scope of services provided by the department include
child care and development programs, homeless assistance, graffiti abatement, environmental health services,
disease surveillance and prevention, community health initiatives, birth and death records, Women, Infants
and Children (WIC) program, animal control and animal sheltering.

HHSD engaged Council, the community and staff through out the fiscal year. This engagement resulted in
several programmatic changes that directly affect services delivered to the community. Through this
engagement the Sustainable Food Policy Board was created and the Social Services Request for Proposal,
Permanent Supportive Housing plans, and the Animal Services Implementation Plan were developed.
Stakeholder engagement also resulted in a change in the mobile food vendor ordinance and the approval of
the Betty Dunkerley Campus conceptual plan, which includes the construction of the new Animal Service
Center.

HHSD has made several service enhancements in the community through effective use of stimulus funding
and increased grant funding. Through Tobacco ARRA, a $7.5 million grant, HHSD has promoted tobacco
cessation throughout the community. Agreements have been developed with several agencies to eliminate
tobacco use at their respective locations. The Community Services Block Grant ARRA has provided funding to
alleviate poverty and foster self-sufficiency and the Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing ARRA grant
has increased services to the homeless community. In addition to stimulus funding, HHSD has received
additional State grant funding and has expanded the WIC program to Elgin and Bastrop.

In an effort to be a best managed department, HHSD has engaged best practices in several areas of the
department. HHSD’s response to the H1N1 outbreak has become the example for other cities to deploy during
emergency preparedness and outreach efforts. The department was also one of 30 departments selected
nationwide for the National Association of County and City Health Officials beta test for accreditation.

Below are the key community indicators the department uses to gain insight on the status of the community at
large and allow HHSD to determine the areas that require increase programming.
     •  Total mortality and infant mortality rates in Travis County focuses on the department’s goal to reduce
        racial and ethnic disparities in these mortality rates.
     •  Obesity and heart disease mortality rates, and average number of years of potential life lost focuses
        on the overall health of the community
     •  The Incidence rates of HIV allow the department to track progress in fighting HIV and AIDS.
     •  Unemployment and poverty rates are larger economic indicators for the community
     •  Animals sheltered and euthanized per 100,000 population focuses on these statistics relative to
        growth in Austin and Travis County
     •  Percent of sheltered live outcomes illustrates the department’s progress in the goal for 90% live
        outcomes.

HHSD is committed to continuous improvements throughout its programs and service areas and will continue
to work with and for the community to promote health, safety and well-being.

Shannon Jones
Acting Director 




                                                                                                    HHSD 
                                                        57
Health and Human Services

                              PERCENT OF ANIMAL SHELTER LIVE OUTCOMES  

Measure Description: This measure assesses the outcomes for all animals inhabiting the animal shelter in a
given fiscal year. Live outcomes include those animals returned to their owners, adopted, or transferred to
rescue groups and other community partners. In addition, this category also includes the small number of
animals that escape, are stolen, or are lost. In other words, the live outcomes category includes all sheltered
animals not euthanized.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing all sheltered animals in the fiscal year by those not
euthanized. Those animals that succumb to disease or injury are not included in this calculation.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was 75% and the result 72%. This live outcome percentage is
the highest in the history of the Town Lake Animal Shelter. Of the 24,026 animals sheltered, only 6,771 were
euthanized. The low euthanasia rate corresponds to a high number of successful outcomes. In FY 2009-10, a
total of 6,231 animals were adopted, 5,617 were rescued, and 3,329 were returned to their owner.


                                     Percent of Animal Shelter Live Outcomes

                                                                                            75%
        80%
                                                                         68%
        70%
                                                       56%                                 72%
        60%                          48%
                    49%
        50%
        40%                                                               45%
                    42%               43%               44%
        30%
        20%
        10%
         0%
               2005-06 Actual       2006-07           2007-08           2008-09          2009-10


                                                    Result       Goal



Assessment of Results: This chart illustrates the department’s achievements in reducing the shelter euthanasia
rate from FY 2005-06 to FY 2009-10. The 72% was achieved through increasing returns, adoptions, and
rescues for sheltered animals and slowing the anticipated rate of growth in shelter intake. Staff attributes the
increase in the live outcome percentage rate to several policy improvements: the feral cat sterilization
program and free pet spay/neuter clinics that decreased the growth in shelter intake; increases in the number
of pets adopted or transferred to rescue partners because of shelter promotions, publicity, and the growth in
number and capacity of rescue groups; a foster care program that saved many young animals who could not
thrive in a shelter setting; and moratorium requirements that prohibited euthanizing any animals if a kennel or
cage was available.

Next Steps: The animal shelter’s goal is to increase live outcomes to 90% by FY 2011-12. The current year’s
budget contains funding for several programs that will build on our successes to date and help to further
improve the live outcomes rate. For example, initiatives in FY 2010-11 will include an expanded foster care
program, the spay street program that provides outreach to more neighborhoods, an emergency care fund, a
public awareness campaign, and increased veterinary staff to continue to make animals more immediately
ready for adoptions.

For more information contact Abigail Smith, Chief Animal Services Officer, at (512) 972-6088.




                                                       58
                                                                                                                Health and Human Services

                                            ANIMALS SHELTERED AND ANIMALS EUTHANIZED PER 100,000  POPULATION  

Measure Descriptions: These measures examine the number of sheltered animals and the number of sheltered
animals euthanized relative to Austin/Travis County’s increasing population. With a larger population and an
increased coverage area due to annexations, there is an automatic increase in the number of pets and the
number of feral animals that the shelter must assist.

Calculation Method: In order to calculate this measure, we first divide the City Demographer’s population
estimate for Austin/Travis County by 100,000. Next, we take the number of animals sheltered and the
numbers of animals euthanized for the fiscal year and divide each by the first number.

FY 2009-10 Results: We do not have a FY 2009-10 goal for these measures because they are new for FY 2010-
11. The graph shows how both the number of animals sheltered and the number of animals euthanized has
decreased in recent years relative to the Austin area’s growth in population. The intake rate has decreased
from 2,578 in FY 2005-06 to 2,247 in FY 2009-10 and the euthanized rate has decreased from 1,307 to 633 in
the same time period.


                                                     Animals Sheltered and Animals Euthanized per 100,000 Population


                                     1,100,000                                                                                 3,000
                                                     2,578                   2,809
   Austin/Travis County Population




                                                                                                                                       Animals Sheltered and Animals
                                                                                          2,531
                                     1,000,000                                                         2,164                   2,500
                                                       Sheltered
                                                                                                                       2,247




                                                                                                                                             Euthanized Rate
                                      900,000                                                                                  2,000

                                                     1,307             1,453
                                      800,000                                                                                  1,500
                                                                                          1,120
                                      700,000          Euthanized                                                              1,000
                                                                                                       684
                                                                                                                       633
                                      600,000                                                                                  500


                                      500,000                                                                                  0
                                                 2005-06           2006-07           2007-08      2008-09          2009-10




Assessment of Results: The achievements in reducing animals sheltered relative to population growth are a
result of expanding the feral cat sterilization program and providing more free spay/neuter clinics. The
declining euthanasia rate results from increases in adoptions and transfers to partners, a foster program that
assists young animals, and the requirement that no animal be euthanized if there is a kennel or cage to house
it.

Next Steps: The FY 2010-11 budget includes funding for many programs that aim at continuing the current
trends including an offsite adoption program, a continued expansion of the foster care program, a spay street
program that provides outreach to more neighborhoods, an emergency care fund, and a public awareness
campaign, and increased staffing to provide medical services to continue to make animals more immediately
ready for placements. Our goal for FY 2011-12 is to reduce the euthanasia rate per 100,000 population to 138
and reduce the shelter intake rate to 1,384. These rates correlate to our goal of a 90% live outcome
percentage, a 10% euthanasia rate, and shelter intake at 21,000 in FY 2011-12.

For more information contact Abigail Smith, Chief Animal Services Officer, at (512) 972-6088.




                                                                                     59
Health and Human Services

                    NUMBER OF HOMELESS PERSONS RECEIVING CASE MANAGEMENT 
                               WHO MOVE INTO SAFE AND STABLE HOUSING 


Measure Description: This measure identifies the number of homeless individuals who were able to move into
safe and stable housing as a result of case management funded through City of Austin social services
contracts. It includes facilities such as emergency shelters, transitional housing, and permanent supportive
housing. Individuals include homeless youth, families, women with children, and single adults.

Calculation Method: This measure reflects people who received case management and subsequently moved
into safe and stable housing from the following City of Austin funded agencies: Blackland, Caritas, Casa
Marianella, Foundation for the Homeless, Front Steps (Austin Resource Center for the Homeless), Green Doors,
VinCare, LifeWorks, and Salvation Army (Downtown Shelter and Women and Children’s Shelter). The agencies
report on the status of client’s homelessness at the time of exit from their agency/program.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10, 670 individuals moved from homelessness into safe and stable housing.
Agencies report that clients stayed longer in their facilities, reducing the overall number of people served, but
that a higher percentage of their clients exited to safe and stable housing than in prior years.


              Number of Homeless Persons Receiving Case Management Who Move into Safe and Stable
                                                    Housing

        800
        700
                                                                          691               670
        600                                             562
                                      519
        500         496
                                                                                            515
        400                                                               470
                                                        450
        300
                    355               355
        200
        100
          0
                  2005-06           2006-07           2007-08           2008-09           2009-10


                                                    Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: There was an increase in funding beginning in FY 2008-09 from state and federal
stimulus grant awards to move people into safe and stable housing from homelessness. While clients may
have had to stay longer in shelter (or other homeless facilities), the opportunities for moving into housing grew
through additional financial assistance and additional case management. Federal stimulus funding was the
largest single monetary source for financial assistance and case management. Those dollars will end in FY
2010-11.

Next Steps: HHSD will continue work on the City’s goal of establishing 350 new units of permanent supportive
housing (PSH) so that more clients can move out of shelter or transitional housing and into permanent
housing. A joint Request for Proposal (RFP) between Neighborhood Housing and Community Development and
Health and Human Services for PSH capital and services funding is planned for 2011. Homeless services will be
funded under Goal One of the Social Services Self-Sufficiency RFP that is taking place in 2011, with contracts
starting in FY 2011-12. The City is also monitoring activities at the State Legislature related to Homeless
Housing and Services Program as this new state funding will potentially be eliminated or cut during the 2011
Legislative session. If those funds are lost, the City would lose approximately $2.0 million in homeless services
funding over the biennium.

For more information contact Vince Cobalis, Assistant Director, Human Services Division, at (512) 972-5011.




                                                       60
                                                                                           Health and Human Services

                 NUMBER OF IMMUNIZATIONS GIVEN AT THE SHOTS FOR TOTS CLINICS  
                                                           
Measure Description: The number of shots given to children (17 years of age and under) in the Shots for Tots
clinics is one indicator of productivity in the immunization clinics and, to some extent, indicates capacity to
prevent disease. However, vaccine formularies change and a vaccine that prevented two diseases in 2010
may prevent four in 2011. For this reason the data have to be carefully considered and interpreted in context
with other performance measures (i.e., number of clients served).

Calculation Method: All clients (both child and adult) immunizations are entered into a data base called TWICES
(Texas-Wide Integrated Client Encounter System) directly after a clinic visit. The TWICES application allows
users to run reports on the number of shots given over any period of time.

FY 2009-10 Results: FY 2009-10 realized a small increase in the number of shots given, increasing from 37,133
to 42,905. This increase can be attributed to the fact that the program became fully staffed with four full time
Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVN) providing shots at two clinic locations.


                             Number of Immunizations Given at the Shots for Tots Clinics




  80,000
                                                         62,949
  60,000                                                                      48,000                48,000
                                    48,563
                41,464
  40,000
                                                         45,000                                     42,905
                39,550              41,000
  20,000                                                                      37,133

        0
                2005-06             2006-07              2007-08              2008-09              2009-10


                                                     Result        Goal




Assessment of Results: Clinic staffing levels and the program’s response to public health emergencies directly
impacted the number of children that could be served from late 2008 through the spring of 2010. For many
months nursing staff was at 50% of normal capacity. In addition, the H1N1 response pulled resources away
from the Shots for Tots operations for about six months from, October 2009 to March 2010, reducing the
capacity to provide childhood immunizations.

Next Steps: The Immunization Program recently moved clinical services from the Rosewood Zaragosa clinic
(located in east Austin) to the already existing Far South location (doubling capacity at that clinic). We expect
this reallocation of resources to increase accessibility to the public. The Rosewood location had been open for
three years and did not perform at acceptable capacity. In fact, appointment data show that the program was
experiencing an opportunity loss (Far South’s appointments were full and Rosewood Zaragosa’s were not).
The Far South clinic capacity was increased in the November of 2010. The program should experience an
increase in the number of clients served as a result of this change.

The Immunization Program is also responsible for:
    •   Outreach to mothers and children exposed or at risk for exposure to Hepatitis B.
    •   Auditing daycare and schools to ensure facilities are maintaining records properly and children in
        facilities are up-to-date on immunizations.
    •   Monitoring vaccine inventory levels, ensuring proper storage protocol and providing technical
        assistance to 100 area Vaccines for Children Providers in Travis County.

The program is currently evaluating performance measure criteria for all of these areas to develop a more
comprehensive overview based on new performance measures.

For more information contact Kurt Becker, Immunization Program Manager, at (512) 972-5523.


                                                        61
Health and Human Services

                 TOTAL MORTALITY RATE (ALL CAUSES) IN TRAVIS COUNTY PER  100,000 

Measure Description: This measure tracks the age-adjusted mortality rate for Travis County, this includes all
deaths regardless of cause for Travis County.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by determining the number of deaths in Travis county and
dividing by the total population in Travis county times 100,000. For the overall mortality rates, FY 2007-08 is
based on 2004 data, while the FY 2009-10 goal is based on 2005 data. The FY 2008-09 actual is based on 2006
data. FY 2009-10 end-of-year is based on 2007 data.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10, the age adjusted mortality rate for all causes for Travis County was 761.3
deaths per 100,000, compared to 759.0 deaths per 100,000 in FY 2008-09.

                              Total Mortality Rate in Travis County (All Causes) per 100,000


          790
                    779.8
          780

          770                                                                                   761.3
                                                                           759.0
          760                                  750.6
   Rate




          750
                                                                                                733.9
          740        750.6                                                  750.6
                                                 750.6
          730

          720

          710
                    2006-07                    2007-08                    2008-09              2009-10

                                                         Result           Goal


Assessment of Results: This chart emphasizes the department’s goal of promoting a healthy community by
preventing disease and promoting improvements in social, economic, and environmental factors that will
result in an improved overall health status for all groups and a reduction of health disparities among groups.

Mortality rates have increased overall and rates for blacks and Hispanics have as well. For other races,
however, the rate decreased. Our epidemiologists note that the rates for our community remain stable in the
FY 2007-08 through FY 2009-10 time period. While the numbers may appear to vary, the small changes are
due to random variation and are not statistically different. The difference among races, however, remains
statistically significant. Total mortality rates are important indicators of health in the community. While slight
variations in rates between years may show subtle changes, its trends over time (5 to 10 years) that can
demonstrate more apparent changes in the community and can indicate the effectiveness of intervention
strategies.

Next Steps: The department’s goal is to decrease racial and ethnic total mortality rates by 5% by FY 2011-12.
Mortality rates are calculated for racial and ethnic groups to see if any group has a higher or lower mortality
rate than the other groups. Differences in mortality rates among racial and ethnic groups may occur due to a
combination of many factors including, but not limited, to socioeconomic status, geography, gender, age, and
disability status. The current year’s budget contains funding for several programs that will help to further
improve these rates through community collaboration, education, health screening services, and policy
changes. Initiatives in FY 2010-11 will include:
     •    the African American Quality of Life and Community Health Initiative which aim to improve overall
          community health through increasing access to health care for underserved populations;
     •    the Family Health/Injury Prevention Program which focuses on reducing the frequency and severity of
          accidental injuries by providing direct intervention and assisting community partners with
          incorporating injury prevention strategies into their regular on-going efforts;
     •    the Obesity Prevention and Diabetes Programs which aim to improve overall community health
          through strategic planning and to educate the population on prevention of obesity and its related
          adverse effects on health;
     •    the Tobacco Prevention initiatives funded by DSHS and CDC which aim to reduce chronic disease
          related to tobacco by producing broad, high-impact, sustainable, health outcomes through policy,
          systems, and environmental change.

For more information contact Janet Pichette, Unit Manager, at (512) 972-5486.

                                                          62
                                                                                           Health and Human Services

              TOTAL INFANT MORTALITY RATE IN TRAVIS COUNTY PER 100,000 LIVE BIRTHS 

Measure Description: This measure assesses the rate of deaths among persons less than 1 year of age per
1,000 live births in Travis County. Total infant mortality rates are important indicators of health in the
community because they often reflect maternal health status, adequacy of prenatal care, infant nutrition
and/or access to adequate health care.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by determining the number of infant (less than 1 years of age)
deaths in Travis county and dividing by number of Travis county live births times 1,000. For the infant
mortality rates, FY 2006-07 and FY 2007-08 are based on 2004 data, while the FY 2009-10 goal is based on
2005 data. The FY 2008-09 actual is based on 2006 data. FY 2009-10 actual is based on 2007 data.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10, the total infant mortality rate for Travis County was 4.86 deaths per 1,000
live births, compared to 5.8 deaths per 1,000 live births in FY 2008-09.


                            Total Infant Mortality Rate in Travis County per 1,000 Live Births


          8
                   6.6
          7                                     6.1                          6.0
          6                                                                                          5.5

          5         6.1
                                                5.5                          5.8
   Rate




          4                                                                                          4.86
          3
          2
          1
          0
                  2006-07                     2007-08                     2008-09                  2009-10



                                                         Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: This chart emphasizes the department’s goal of promoting a healthy community by
preventing disease and promoting improvements in social, economic, and environmental factors that will
result in an improved overall health status for all groups and a reduction of health disparities among groups.

Infant mortality rates have declined overall and for Black and Hispanics as well. Our epidemiologists note that
the rates for our community remain stable in the FY 2007-08 through FY 2009-10 time period. While the
numbers may appear to vary, the small changes are due to random variation and are not statistically different.
The difference among races, however, remains statistically significant. While slight variations in rates between
years may show subtle changes, its trends over time (5 to 10 years) that can demonstrate more apparent
changes in the community and can indicate the effectiveness of intervention strategies.

Next Steps: The department’s goal is to reduce racial and ethnic total mortality rates by 10% by FY 2011-12.
The current year’s budget contains funding for several programs that will help to further improve these rates.
Programs such as Women, Infant and Children (WIC), Family Health/Injury Prevention, African American Quality
of Life (AAQL) and Community Health initiative (CHI) conduct activities related to parents and their children.

WIC is a supplemental nutrition program where pregnant women, new mothers, and young children learn
about nutrition and how to stay healthy. WIC foods provided to pregnant women help to reduce the number of
premature and low birth-weight babies, which can put infants at risk for other serious health complications.
AAQL and CHI are comprised of the Mobile Health Van Screening Program, Basic Needs/Field Office Program
and “Health Talk,” a community radio show. These programs are developed to encourage community
participation in the effort to prevent disease and promote health in the community. The education and access
to key services provided by these programs aim to improve overall community health and decrease
differences among population groups.

For more information contact Janet Pichette, Unit Manager, at (512) 972-5486.




                                                          63
Health and Human Services

                 HEART DISEASE MORTALITY RATE IN THE AUSTIN/TRAVIS COUNTY AREA 

Measure Description: The age-adjusted heart disease mortality rate in Travis County is an important measure
because it provides an estimate of the number of deaths in residents attributable to coronary heart disease. In
some cases, heart disease is preventable through making healthier choices. This measure became an indicator
in FY 2010-11 in conjunction with the Health and Human Services Department (HHSD) receiving new funding
from the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) for Community-Based Obesity Prevention
activities in Austin/Travis County and from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Communities
Putting Prevention to Work initiative which works to prevent chronic disease related to obesity and tobacco by
producing sustainable, positive and improved health outcomes through the implementation of programmatic
efforts through policy, systems, and environmental level change.

Calculation Method: To calculate the rate, the number of deaths in the Austin/Travis County area attributable
to coronary heart disease is divided by the population and multiplied by 100,000. The number of deaths is
taken from the death certificates data maintained by the department.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10, the age adjusted mortality rate for Diseases of the Heart in the
Austin/Travis County area was 164.4 deaths per 100,000 population. In FY 2008-09, the same rate was 166.5
deaths per 100,000 population.

                            Heart Disease Mortality rate in the Austin/Travis County Area

                                173.9
           175

           170                                                                       166.5
    Rate




           165

           160
                   166.5
                                                                       164.4
           155
                                2008-09                                              2009-10
                                                        Result       Goal



Assessment of Results: This chart emphasizes the department’s goal of promoting a healthy community by
preventing disease and promoting improvements in social, economic, and environmental factors that will
result in an improved overall health status. FY 2008-09 and FY 2009-10 goals are based on 2005 data; while
the FY 2009-10 actual is based on 2007 data. Our epidemiologists note that the rates for our community
remain stable in the FY 2008-09 through FY 2009-10 time period. The small change between the two years is
due to random variation and is not statistically different. While slight variations in rates between years may
show subtle changes, it is trends over time (5 to 10 years) that can demonstrate more apparent changes in the
community, and can indicate the effectiveness of intervention strategies. The 2007 age-adjusted mortality rate
for heart diseases for Travis County is similar to the rate for Bexar and El Paso Counties as the 95% confidence
intervals overlap. Dallas, Harris and Tarrant Counties have a higher 2007 age-adjusted mortality rate for heart
diseases than Travis County; these differences are statistically significant as the 95% confidence intervals do
not overlap.

Next Steps: The current year’s budget contains funding for several programs that will help to further improve
these rates. Certain health conditions and health behaviors can put people at higher risk for developing heart
disease. Chronic conditions like high blood cholesterol levels and high blood pressure can narrow or put
excess stress on the arteries, which affect how well the heart and cardiovascular system function. Health
behaviors like alcohol use, tobacco use, diets high in saturated fats, cholesterol, or sodium, and not getting
enough exercise, can also increase blood cholesterol levels and blood pressure. Initiatives in FY 2010-11 will
include:
     •   the African American Quality of Life and Community Health Initiative which aim to improve overall
         community health as well as to decrease differences among population groups through increasing
         access to health care for underserved populations;
     •   the Obesity Prevention and Diabetes Programs which aim to improve overall community health
         through strategic planning and to educate the population on prevention of obesity and its related
         adverse effects on health;
     •   the Tobacco Prevention initiatives funded by DSHS and CDC which aim to reduce chronic disease
         related to tobacco by producing broad, high-impact, sustainable, health outcomes through policy,
         systems, and environmental change.

For more information contact Janet Pichette, Unit Manager, at (512) 972-5486.

                                                        64
                                                                                         Health and Human Services

                                 AVERAGE YEARS OF POTENTIAL LIFE LOST 
                                   IN THE AUSTIN/TRAVIS COUNTY AREA 

Measure Description: This measure quantifies the average estimated loss of years due to preventable disease
and unhealthy behavior. The average number of years of potential life lost (YPLL) is an important indicator
because it provides an estimate of premature mortality within a population. In other words, the average YPLL
for a given population estimates how many years of life, on average, were lost due to premature death. The
overarching goal of many of HHSD’s grant-funded programs is to reduce the burden of excess morbidity and
mortality due to preventable chronic disease. YPLL is used to measure the impact of these programs because
it captures premature mortality due to all causes, a major proportion of which is due to chronic disease.

Calculation Method: The estimated loss of years based on life expectancy of persons with healthy vs. unhealthy
lifestyles. A healthy lifestyle includes regular physical activity, avoidance of tobacco products, regular
consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables, and maintaining a healthy weight through limitation of high-
calorie, high-fat, and sugary foods. Data used to calculate YPLL is taken from death certificate data maintained
by Department of State Health Services (DSHS). The FY 2008-09 actual is based on 2006 data, while the FY
2009-10 actual is based on 2007 data.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10, the average years of potential life lost in the Austin Travis County Area was
19.46. In FY 2008-09, the same number was 19.67.

                        Average years of Potential Life Lost in the Austin/Travis County Area

          19.7
                                                                                            19.67
                                 19.67
   Rate




          19.5
                                                                                        19.46

          19.3
                                 2008-09                                               2009-10




                                                        Result        Goal




Assessment of Results: While the numbers may appear to vary, the small changes may be due to random
variation and may not be statistically different. The slight variations in rates between years may show subtle
changes; however, it is trends over time (5 to 10 years) that can demonstrate more apparent changes in the
community and can indicate the effectiveness of intervention strategies. Austin/Travis County’s average YPLL
is comparable to the other major metropolitan areas in Texas, including San Antonio, Houston, Dallas, El Paso,
and Fort Worth.

Next Steps: The current year’s budget contains funding for several programs that will help to further improve
these rates. In particular, our Obesity and Tobacco Prevention Programs will work to reduce unhealthy
behaviors that contribute to a high prevalence of chronic disease in the community. Tobacco use, in particular
cigarette smoking, has been linked to many chronic conditions, including high blood pressure, some cancers,
and heart disease. Obesity has been linked to similar chronic conditions, in particular diabetes, high blood
pressure, some cancers, and heart disease. Excess weight strains cardiovascular function, which increases the
risk of a heart attack or stroke. Excess fat also compromises the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar levels,
leading to an increased risk of developing diabetes. Obese individuals who are also diabetic have more
difficulty controlling their diabetes. Initiatives in FY 2010-11 will include:
      •   the African American Quality of Life and Community Health Initiative which aim to improve overall
          community health as well as to decrease differences among population groups through increasing
          access to health care for underserved populations;
      •   the Obesity Prevention and Diabetes Programs which aim to improve overall community health
          through strategic planning and to educate the population on prevention of obesity and its related
          adverse effects on health;
      •   the Tobacco Prevention initiatives funded by DSHS and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
          (CDC) which aim to reduce chronic disease related to tobacco by producing broad, high-impact,
          sustainable, health outcomes through policy, systems, and environmental change.

For more information contact Janet Pichette, Unit Manager, at (512) 972-5486.

                                                         65
Health and Human Services

                          OBESITY RATE IN THE AUSTIN/TRAVIS COUNTY AREA 

Measure Description: The obesity rate in Travis County is an important measure because it provides an
estimate of the percent of the community that live with a body mass index (BMI) of more than 20% which puts
them at risk for chronic diseases including, but not limited to, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and
hypertension. This measure became an indicator in FY 2010-11 in conjunction with HHSD receiving funding
from the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) for Community-Based Obesity Prevention
activities in Austin/Travis County.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the number of adult residents with 20% higher than
BMI range by the adult population. For the obesity rates, FY 2008-09 goal is based on 2006 data from the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Selected
Metropolitan Area Risk Trends (SMART). BRFSS is a state-based system of health surveys that collects
information via telephone on health risk behaviors, preventive health practices and health care access
primarily related to chronic disease and injury. The FY 2009-10 goal is based on 2007 CDC BRFSS SMART data,
while the FY 2009-10 actual is based on 2008 CDC BRFSS SMART data.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10, the estimated prevalence of obesity among adults in the Austin/Travis
County area was 22.0%. In FY 2008-09, the estimated prevalence of obesity among adults in the Austin/Travis
County area was 18.5%.


                                   Obesity rate in the Austin/Travis County Area




          30
                               24.3
          25                                                                         22
          20
   Rate




          15                    18.5                                                18.5
          10
           5
           0
                               2008-09                                             2009-10


                                                      Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: This chart emphasizes the department’s goal of promoting a healthy community by
preventing disease and promoting physical activity, nutrition, and improvements in social, economic, and
environmental factors that will result in an improved overall health status.

Our epidemiologists note that the rates for our community remain stable in the FY 2008-09 through FY 2009-
10 time period. While the numbers may appear to vary, the small changes are due to random variation and
are not statistically different. The 2008 CDC BRFSS SMART obesity prevalence estimate for Travis County is
similar to the same estimate for Bexar, Dallas, El Paso, Harris, and Tarrant Counties as the 95% confidence
intervals overlap.

Next Steps: The current year’s budget contains funding for several programs that will help to further improve
these rates. For example, initiatives in FY 2010-11 will include the Obesity Prevention Program and Diabetes
Program which aim to improve overall community health through strategic planning and to educate the
population on prevention of obesity and its related adverse effects on health.

For more information contact Janet Pichette, Unit Manager, at (512) 972-5486.




                                                       66
                                                                                        Health and Human Services

                          TOTAL INCIDENCE RATE OF HIV PER 100,000 POPULATION  

Measure Description: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a member of the retrovirus family that can cause
acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to
fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections. An HIV case has had a positive or detectable HIV non-
antibody test reported to Health and Human Services (HHS). Since the introduction of highly active
antiretroviral therapy in 1996, patients with access to treatment have experienced improvement in both
prognosis and quality of life. As a result, HIV has become increasingly thought of as a chronic disease, which
when treated effectively significantly prolongs the onset of AIDS and extends a patients longevity many years.
This measure is important because it provides an estimate of the number of new HIV cases reported to HHSD
so that the department may link patients with needed health and social services to prolong the onset of AIDS
and prevent further transmission.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing newly reported HIV cases by 100,000 population.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10, the rate of newly reported HIV cases in Travis County was 14.4 per 100,000
population. In FY 2008-09, the rate was 12.0 cases per 100,000.


                                 The Incidence Rate of HIV per 100,000 Population


          30                           26
          25         23                                     24
                                                                                20
          20
                   23.0                                                                            14.4
   Rate




          15                                                19.3
                                      17.4
          10
                                                                               12.0                 11.4
           5
           0
               2005-06 Actual       2006-07              2007-08              2008-09             2009-10


                                                       Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: This key indicator measures our progress in fighting HIV and AIDS. The FY 2009-10
data is based on disease reports from October 2009 through September 2010. The differences from FY 2007-
08 to FY 2009-10 data are due to random variation, as well as changes in both state reporting law and local
and state data collection methodology. Since the goal is a reflection of the previous year’s actual, the
decrease from FY 2005-06 through FY 2009-10, these changes are also due to random variation, and changes
in both state reporting law and local and state data collection methodology.

Next Steps: The department’s goal is to reduce racial and ethnic HIV rates by 5% by FY 2011-12. The current
year’s budget contains funding for several programs that will help to improve these rates. Differences among
population groups exist and are statistically significant, indicating disparities among races in newly reported
HIV cases. In Austin/Travis County, minority populations shoulder a considerably higher proportion of the HIV
disease burden. African Americans experience a higher rate of newly reported cases of HIV than other racial
and ethnic groups, while the mode of exposure to HIV most frequently reported by HIV cases are men who
have sex with men (MSM). Department education, outreach, and treatment programs are culturally sensitive
and available to all community population groups and work to decrease these disparities. For example,
initiatives in FY 2010-11 will include the Prevention Counseling and Partner Elicitation, Black Faith Based
Health Initiative, African American Quality of Life, and Community Health Initiative which aim to improve
overall community health as well as to decrease differences among population groups through increasing
access to health care for underserved populations.

For more information contact Janet Pichette at (512) 972-5486 or Claudella Wright at (512) 972-5567.




                                                       67
Health and Human Services

                                UNEMPLOYMENT RATE FOR THE AUSTIN MSA 

Measure Description: This measure tracks the percentage of the total workforce who are unemployed and are
looking for a paid job in the Austin Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). The unemployment rate is one of the
most closely watched statistics because a rising rate is seen as a sign of a weakening economy. A falling rate,
similarly, indicates a growing economy. The Austin MSA contains the cities of Austin, Cedar Park, Pflugerville,
Leander, Round Rock, Georgetown, San Marcos, Lockhart, Bastrop, Taylor and Lakeway among others.

Calculation Method: The unemployment rate for the Austin MSA is reported by the Texas Workforce
Commission (TWC). Most economists agree that a rate around 4.5% constitutes full employment.

FY 2009-10 Results: This is a community indicator rather than a goal that the Health and Human Services
Department actively manages or impacts. The Austin MSA’s unemployment rate is lower than that of most
Texas cities and significantly lower than that in many MSAs across the county.


                                      Unemployment Rate for the Austin MSA


         9.0%
         8.0%
         7.0%
                     5.3%                                                                   7.2%
         6.0%                                                             7.2%
                                       4.3%
         5.0%                                            4.5%                               6.0%
         4.0%
         3.0%        3.8%              3.7%              3.9%             3.9%
         2.0%
         1.0%
         0.0%
                    2005-06          2006-07           2007-08           2008-09          2009-10


                                                      Result      Goal



Assessment of Results: This chart illustrates unemployment rates in FY 2008-09 and FY 2009-10 have remained
level at 7.2%. This indicates that the economy is not improving as much as anticipated, with unemployment
remaining at a fairly high level for the area. The higher unemployment rate makes it even more difficult for
those with significant barriers to employment to achieve the goal of becoming employed as there is increased
competition from well qualified individuals for every open position.

Next Steps: Given the current economic challenges, the Health and Human Services Department (HHSD)
assumes the rate will maintain at 7.2%. HHSD will continue to contract with community social services
agencies to provide workforce development activities to those with significant barriers to work, including
individuals who are homeless and/or have criminal histories. The City-funded workforce development activities
include remedial education, English as a Second Language (ESL), General Educational Development (GED),
work readiness, training (short and long term), job development, and job placement. The Self-Sufficiency
Social Services Request for Proposal (RFP) includes transition out of poverty as one its major goals. Workforce
development activities are included under this goal, and as such, it is likely that these services will continue to
be funded by the City. As a result of the relationship developed with Workforce Solutions during last year’s
stimulus program, Neighborhood Center Social Workers continue to have a direct link for employment
referrals.


For more information contact Vince Cobalis, Assistant Director, Human Services Division at (512) 972-5011.




                                                        68
                                                                                    Health and Human Services

                          POVERTY RATE IN THE AUSTIN/TRAVIS COUNTY AREA 

Measure Description: This measure tracks the proportion of Austin/Travis County residents (or families) that
lives below the official poverty line defined by the federal government. For a family of four, household income
of less than $21,954 is considered poor.

Calculation Method: The percentage is reported annually by the U. S. Census Bureau.

FY 2009-10 Results: This metric is a community indicator rather than a goal that the Health and Human
Services Department actively manages or impacts. The poverty rate is established after the calendar year is
over, based on the Current Population Survey.


                                   Poverty Rate in the Austin/Travis County Area


        17.5%
        15.0%                                                                            16.2%
                     15.7%            15.2%             14.7%              14.8%
        12.5%
        10.0%
         7.5%
         5.0%                                                                             2.8%
         2.5%
         0.0%
                    2004-05          2005-06            2006-07           2007-08        2008-09


                                                      Result       Goal



Assessment of Results: The increase in the rate of poverty from FY 2007-08 to FY 2008-09 is an indicator that
the local economy was experiencing the effects of the nationwide recession, with the likelihood that more
individuals who had been living above the poverty line are now falling below the poverty line due to loss of job
or other loss of income. The increase in poverty has a direct impact on the demand for services to people
eligible for City assistance (200% or below poverty), which placed further stress on limited resources. The
poverty rate in the Austin/Travis County Area is lower than Harris County 17.2%, Bexar County 17.9%, and
Dallas County 18.8% (Source: U.S. Census Bureau).

Next Steps: Given current economic challenges, it is unlikely that the poverty rate will decline. HHSD will
continue to contract with social services agencies in the community to assist people living at 200% or below
poverty, including providing workforce development activities designed to help them transition out of poverty.

For more information contact Vince Cobalis, Assistant Director, Human Services Division at (512) 972-5011.




                                                        69
Health and Human Services




                            70
                                                  
                                                  
                                                  
                                                  
                                                  
                                                  
                                                  
                                       LIBRARY KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                   2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                           2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                    Target  Met?
                                                                                                     No 
Library usage per capita                                0.16    0.15     0.17    0.16    0.16               N/A 
                                                                                                   Target
                                                                                                     No 
Circulation per capita                                  4.77    4.91     5.13    5.48    5.57               N/A 
                                                                                                   Target
                                                                                                     No 
Visits per capita                                       4.61    4.74     5.06    4.81    4.75               N/A 
                                                                                                   Target
                                                                                                     No 
Internet users per capita                               1.26    1.39     1.6     1.17    1.01               N/A 
                                                                                                   Target
Materials expenditures per capita                        2.32    2.11    2.94     2.9    2.84       2.83 
                                                         Not     Not     Not 
Citizen satisfaction with quality of city libraries                              73%     73%        90% 
                                                       tracked tracked tracked
                                                         Not     Not     Not 
Citizen satisfaction with materials at libraries                                 70%     71%        87% 
                                                       tracked tracked tracked
                                AUSTIN PUBLIC LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 
                                FY2010 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 
                                                                                                           




 Director’s Message

 The mission of the Austin Public Library is to provide easy access to books and information for all ages, through
 responsive professionals, engaging programs, and state of the art technology in a safe and friendly environment.
 Our system consists of 20 branch libraries, the John Henry Faulk Central Library, the Austin History Center, and
 Recycled Reads (our new used book store). Our primary service areas include circulation, reference and
 information services, youth services, and the Austin History Center, which houses more than 1 million items
 documenting Austin’s history from 1839 to the present.

 Fiscal Year 2009-2010 was a successful year as demonstrated by the following snapshots of our activities:

        Over 1.4 million items were available to customers in a variety of formats including books, DVDs, music
           CDs, audiobooks on CD and in MP3 format, and E-books.
        More than 3.6 million customers visited our locations, and more than 4.3 million items were circulated.
        Over 149,000 reference questions were asked with 99% of customers getting the information they
           needed.
        Attendance at youth programs reached over 94,000.
        The Austin History Center processed over 118,000 archival items to be added to their collection.
        Austin Public Library web pages received more than 21 million hits.
        Customer satisfaction with the helpfulness of library staff exceeded 80%.

 Additionally, the City Council approved the Architectural Building Program for the New Central Library along with a
 revised funding plan of $120 million, and directed staff to begin design of the project that will make Austin the first
 city in the nation to create a central library that is truly a “Library of the Future”. As a “Library of the Future”,
 Austin’s new central library will open in 2015 with state-of-the art technologies, community gathering places, and
 mixtures of lively and quiet spaces in a sustainable building with collections displayed to encourage discovery.

 The Austin Public Library incorporated new “green practices” over the past year:

        Recycled Reads’ is an active participant in the City of Austin’s Zero Waste Plan, ensuring obsolete
          materials are handled in an environmentally responsible way; and keeping them out of landfills.
        We instituted an electronic advertising system for all locations using LCD screens to advertise and
          promote our programs and services, eliminating much of the need for printed materials.
        As part of the Library’s Climate Protection Plan, a “green initiative” committee was formed to investigate
          best practices and strategize actions the Library should take to achieve the City’s overarching goal of
          making all operations carbon-neutral by 2020.

 The Austin Public Library is committed to providing quality services by improving service delivery:

        Our Branch Services division was organized into 4 regions managed by a Regional Branch Operations
           Manager. The new structure assures more cost-effective service delivery by allocating resources
           regionally.
        Planning began for the creation of a state-of-the-art virtual library for our customers, with transparent
           access to library resources, databases, and Internet sites in a single search.
        Initial steps were taken to secure a contract to implement downloadable materials – the ability to stream
           and download music, movies, and books with your library card.
        LibSat, an online, web-based customer service measurement tool in order to obtain information and
           statistics to assist with data-driven decision making was initiated.

 The Austin Public Library‘s vision is to help make Austin a dynamic creative center and the most livable city in the
 country. Our goal is to expand access and empower citizens.

Brenda Branch
Director of Libraries




                                                          
                                                             71                           APL –                   
Library

                                         LIBRARY USAGE PER CAPITA  
                                                            
Measure Description: Library usage per capita is a standard indicator in the library industry. This measure was
chosen as a new key indicator in FY 2010-11 in conjunction with a new ranking system for public libraries, the
Index of Public Library Service, proposed by Library Journal in 2009. It uses only statistics that describe library
service outputs, such as visits, circulation, public Internet computer usage, and program attendance. By
dividing the total attendance by the population, the Library has a simple indicator of how much “repeat”
business it receives.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the total attendance at all library programs by the
corresponding full-purpose population figure.

FY 2009-10 Results: As this was a newly instituted key indicator for FY 2010-11, there was no FY 2009-10 goal
established for this measure. The FY 2009-10 actual result was 0.16. A goal of 0.17 has been established for
this measure in FY 2010-11.


                                                Library Usage Per Capita


          0.18
                                                           0.17
          0.17
                     0.16                                                    0.16           0.16
          0.16
                                      0.15
          0.15


          0.14


          0.13
                   2005-06           2006-07              2007-08           2008-09        2009-10


                                             Result      A goal was not established




Assessment of Results: Similar to customer visits, library usage can also be affected by the closure of library
locations. Budget funding was included in FY 2005-06 to reopen our branch libraries one day per week from
closures implemented in FY 2003-04. This operating schedule continued through FY 2007-08, and overall
library usage increased by 13% during this two-year period. Library usage counts come from two separate
categories: youth program attendees and adult/family program attendees. While youth library usage remained
relatively consistent between FY 2005-06 and FY 2007-08, increasing only 1%, adult/family library usage
increased 100% during the same period. Historically, the vast majority of adult/family programs had been
provided at the Faulk Central Library and Austin History Center. In early FY 2007-08, however, the Library
began a focused effort to provide more adult/family programs in branch libraries. The outcome of this effort
was a 7% increase in adult/family programs offered and an increase of 20% in adult/family library usage over
FY 2006-07. In FY 2008-09, however, this effort declined due to staffing and resource issues and adult/family
library usage has not seen any real growth in FY 2008-09 and FY 2009-10. Youth library usage decreased
approximately 4% between FY 2007-08 and FY 2009-10, primarily due to the reduction of 3.0 FTEs in the Youth
Services division as part of the FY 2009-10 Approved Budget. In FY 2008-09, total library usage decreased by
2% while the population increased by almost 4%, dropping library usage per capita by 6%. In FY 2009-10,
total library usage only decreased by 1%, while the population increased 1%, leaving library usage per capita
stable at 0.16.

The department is projecting a 7% increase in library usage in FY 2010-11 while full-purpose population is
projected to increase 1%, which would lead to a goal of library usage per capita at 0.17.

Next Steps: Since this measure was added as a new key indicator in FY 2010-11, the department plans to
continue using this key indicator in future years in order to build historical data for comparison and evaluation.

For more information contact Dana McBee, Library Support Services, at (512) 974-7433.

                                                          72
                                                                                                           Library

                                            CIRCULATION PER CAPITA 

Measure Description: Circulation per capita is a standard indicator in the library industry. In 2009, Library
Journal, a trade publication for the library industry, proposed a new ranking system for public libraries to
replace Hennen’s American Public Library Ratings, which had been challenged by library directors,
statisticians, and state librarians for its nontransparent methodology and arbitrary weighting of 15 statistical
measures from circulation to staffing to collection size. The new ranking system, called the Index of Public
Library Service, was designed to focus more transparently on ranking libraries based on their actual
performance. It uses only statistics that describe library service outputs, such as visits, circulation, public
Internet computer usage, and program attendance. It excludes resource inputs, such as staffing, collection
size, and expenditures, believing that inputs do not accurately measure library performance. The “per capita”
versions of the output statistics listed above provide simple indicators of how much “repeat” business a library
receives.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the total annual circulation from all library facilities
by the corresponding full-purpose population figure.

FY 2009-10 Results: As this was a newly instituted key indicator for FY 2010-11, there was no FY 2009-10 goal
established for this measure. The FY 2009-10 actual result was 5.57. A goal of 5.89 has been established for
this measure in FY 2011.


                                                Circulation per Capita


        6.00

                                                                                            5.57
                                                                             5.48
        5.50
                                                          5.13
                                     4.91
        5.00
                    4.77

        4.50


        4.00
                   2005-06           2006-07             2007-08            2008-09        2009-10


                                            Result      A goal was not established


Assessment of Results: Annual circulation for the Austin Public Library continues to experience significant
growth each year. Between FY 2005-06 and FY 2009-10, circulation increased 28%, while population increased
only 9%. According to the 2010 Public Library Data Service report, however, we remain ranked below the lower
quartile amount of 5.67 for our peer libraries.

The department is projecting a 7% increase in circulation in FY 2010-11 while full-purpose population is
projected to increase 1%, which would lead to a goal of 5.89 for circulation per capita.

Next Steps: Since this measure was added as a new key indicator in FY 2010-11, the department plans to
continue using this key indicator in future years in order to build historical data for comparison and evaluation.

For more information contact Dana McBee, Library Support Services, at (512) 974-7433.




                                                         73
Library

                                                VISITS PER CAPITA 
                                                               
Measure Description: Visits per capita is a standard indicator in the library industry. As with circulation per
capita, this measure was chosen as a new key indicator in FY 2010-11 in conjunction with a new ranking
system for public libraries, the Index of Public Library Service, proposed by Library Journal in 2009. It uses only
statistics that describe library service outputs, such as visits, circulation, public Internet computer usage, and
program attendance. The “per capita” versions of the output statistics listed above provide simple indicators
of how much “repeat” business a library receives.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the total annual visits at all library facilities by the
corresponding full-purpose population figure.

FY 2009-10 Results: As this was a newly instituted key indicator for FY 2010-11, there was no FY 2009-10 goal
established for this measure. The FY 2009-10 actual result was 4.75. A goal of 4.97 has been established for
this measure in FY 2010-11.


                                                      Visits per Capita


          6.00


          5.50


          5.00
                                                             5.06
          4.50                                                                   4.81        4.75
                                      4.74
                    4.61

          4.00
                   2005-06           2006-07                2007-08            2008-09     2009-10


                                             Result         A goal was not established




Assessment of Results: In FY 2005-06, budget funding was included to reopen all 20 branch libraries one day
per week from previous closures implemented in FY 2003-04. This operating schedule continued through FY
2007-08, and annual visits to all library locations increased 15% during this two-year period despite the
closure of several branch libraries for various amounts of time for remodeling or renovation. In FY 2008-09,
however, all branch libraries again began closing one day per week as they had in FY 2003-04 and FY 2004-05.
As a result, annual visits fell by about 2% where population increased approximately 4%. As a result, visits per
capita fell by 5% in FY 2008-09. Despite total visits remaining relatively consistent between FY 2008-09 and FY
2009-10, population increased by about 1%, leading to an overall decrease in FY 2009-10 visits per capita.

The department is projecting a 6% increase in visits in FY 2010-11 while full-purpose population is projected to
increase 1%, which would lead to a goal of 4.97 visits per capita.

Next Steps: Since this measure was added as a new key indicator in FY 2010-11, the department plans to
continue using this key indicator in future years in order to build historical data for comparison and evaluation.

For more information contact Dana McBee, Library Support Services, at (512) 974-7433.




                                                            74
                                                                                                          Library

                                        INTERNET USERS PER CAPITA
                                                           
Measure Description: Internet users per capita is a standard indicator in the library industry. As with the other
per capita indicators, this measure was chosen as a new key indicator in FY 2010-11 in conjunction with a new
ranking system for public libraries, the Index of Public Library Service, proposed by Library Journal in 2009. It
uses only statistics that describe library service outputs, such as visits, circulation, public Internet computer
usage, and program attendance. The “per capita” versions of the output statistics listed above provide simple
indicators of how much “repeat” business a library receives.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the total number of public Internet station users at
all library facilities by the corresponding full-purpose population figure.

FY 2009-10 Results: As this was a newly instituted key indicator for FY 2010-11, there was no FY 2009-10 goal
established for this measure. The FY 2009-10 actual result was 1.01. A goal of 1.09 has been established for
this measure in FY 2010-11.



                                              Internet Users per Capita


        2.00

        1.75                                             1.60
                                     1.39
        1.50
                    1.26
        1.25                                                                1.17
                                                                                           1.01
        1.00

        0.75

        0.50
                   2005-06           2006-07            2007-08            2008-09        2009-10

                                            Result      A goal was not established




Assessment of Results: Similar to customer visits, the number of public Internet station users is affected by the
closure of library locations. As discussed previously, budget funding was included in FY 2005-06 to reopen our
branch libraries one day per week from closures implemented in FY 2003-04. This operating scheduled
continued through FY 2007-08, and the number of customers using the public Internet stations in all library
facilities increased by 32% during this two-year period, despite the closure of several branch libraries for
varying amounts of time for remodeling or renovation. When all branch libraries again began closing one day
per week in FY 2008-09, the number of customers using the public Internet stations decreased 24%. Because
the population increased approximately 4% in FY 2008-09, Internet users per capita fell by 27%. In FY 2009-10,
the total number of public Internet station users again decreased by approximately 12%, while the population
increased approximately 1%. During FY 2009-10, the Howson Branch Library was closed for almost 7 months
and the Twin Oaks Branch Library was closed almost 3 months. The Howson Branch Library averaged
approximately 1,600 public Internet station users per month, and the Twin Oaks Branch Library averaged
approximately 2,700 public Internet station users per month.

The department is projecting an 8% increase in public Internet station users in FY 2010-11 while full-purpose
population is projected to increase 1%, which would lead to a goal of 1.09 Internet users per capita.

Next Steps: Since this measure was added as a new key indicator in FY 2010-11, the department plans to
continue using this key indicator in future years in order to build historical data for comparison and evaluation.

For more information contact Dana McBee, Library Support Services, at (512) 974-7433.




                                                         75
Library

                                  MATERIALS EXPENDITURES PER CAPITA 

Measure Description: Materials expenditures per capita is a standard key indicator in the library industry and
is reported via the Public Library Data Service (PLDS) Statistical Report. Published annually by the Public
Library Association (a division of the American Library Association), this report collects information from more
than 800 public libraries across the United States and Canada on finances, library resources, annual use
figures and technology. The measure can be used to compare expenditure levels over time or with other
jurisdictions.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the total annual expenditures for all material types
by the corresponding full-purpose population figure.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at $2.83 per capita. The Austin Public Library
exceeded this goal by $.01, at $2.84 per capita. In the 2010 PLDS Statistical Report (based on FY 2008-09
data), average materials expenditures for cities with populations between 500,000 and 999,999 were $3.9M;
materials expenditures for the Austin Public Library in that report were $2.2M. In the 2010 report, materials
expenditures per capita for the Austin Public Library were $2.90, which ranked below the lower quartile
amount of $2.96 for public libraries serving communities comparable to Austin.


                                        Materials Expenditures per Capita


          $4.00

          $3.50
                                                                            $2.98
                                                        $2.94                             $2.84
          $3.00

          $2.50       $2.32            $2.22
                                                        $2.93               $2.90          $2.83

          $2.00      $2.30
                                       $2.11
          $1.50

          $1.00
                     2005-06          2006-07          2007-08           2008-09          2009-10


                                                      Result      Goal




Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the department’s 5 year history of materials expenditures
per capita. This indicator increased from $2.32 in FY 2005-06 to $2.84 in FY 2009-10, an increase of 22%. In
FY 2007-08, the library did receive a significant increase in our materials budget, allowing the department to
gain some ground in this area, but still remaining far below our peer libraries. Because this indicator is
calculated using population figures, at a minimum the total materials budget must be increased each year in
direct proportion to the increases in population growth just to keep from falling further behind our peers.
Between FY 2008-09 and FY 2009-10, the materials budget decreased by 2%, while the population increased
by 1%.

The department is projecting a 24% increase in the total materials budget in FY 2010-11 while full-purpose
population is projected to increase 1%, which would lead to a goal of $3.49 for materials expenditures per
capita.

Next Steps: Continued investment in our materials budget is critical in our effort to gain ground and reach our
peer libraries. During these difficult economic times, most libraries nation-wide have experienced budget
reductions that are having a significant effect on their collection of materials and their operating hours. The
Austin Public Library, however, is fortunate that the City of Austin has determined that funding for library
services is a priority. It is critical for the City of Austin to keep libraries open to the community when demand
for library services continues to increase due to the recession felt nation-wide. Additionally, we must continue
to grow our collection as we look forward to the opening of the New Central Library in the next 4-6 years. The
Austin Public Library will continue analyzing this key indicator as part of the FY 2011-12 budget.

For more information contact Yolanda McKnight, Acquisitions Manager, at (512) 974-7476.


                                                       76
                                                                                                         Library

                        CITIZEN SATISFACTION WITH QUALITY OF CITY LIBRARIES 

Measure Description: Citizen satisfaction with quality of city libraries is a key indicator taken from the annual
City of Austin Citizen Survey and is a record of the number of favorable responses received. Since 2003, the
survey has been prepared and conducted by sources external to the City of Austin. A random sample of
addresses is selected from utility records and/or listings of city-limit zip codes and used as a representative
sample of the general population of the City.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated as the total number of “very satisfied” and “satisfied”
responses on the City of Austin Citizen Survey, expressed as a percentage of total responses. The measure
excludes those who left the question blank or reported “don’t know.”

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 90%. The Austin Public Library did not reach
this goal, with the actual outcome at 73%.


                                 Citizen Satisfaction with Quality of City Libraries


         95%
                                  90%                                            90%

         85%


                                                                                73%
         75%                      73%



         65%
                                2008-09                                         2009-10


                                                      Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: Based on direction from the City of Austin Budget Office, only 2 categories were used to
calculate the responses for this key indicator in the 2009 and 2010 surveys, satisfied and very satisfied, and
the neutral category was excluded. The amounts for these categories in 2009 and 2010 respectively were:
satisfied (45%, 43%); very satisfied (28%, 30%). If the neutral category of responses would have been used in
the 2009 and 2010 survey calculations, the actual results for this key indicator for those years would have
been 93% and 93% respectively. The much higher goals for 2009 and 2010 reflect the uncertainty as to
whether the no opinion or neutral category would be used in the calculation of this measure.

The department is projecting an outcome of 78% for this key indicator in FY 2010-11, an increase of 5% over
the FY 2009-10 result.

Next Steps: One of the questions asked in each survey is whether respondents have visited an Austin library
facility in the past 12 months. In the 2006 and 2007 surveys, this response averaged 59% for those replying
“yes” and 42% for those replying “no”. In the 2009 and 2010 surveys, this response averaged 74% for those
replying “yes” and 27% for those replying “no”. However, the percent of respondents who have given us
ratings of satisfied or very satisfied has remained at 73% over those same years. It is becoming increasingly
important for us to determine exactly what services customers want and need most, and target our resources
to meet those needs. In FY 2010-11, the Austin Public Library plans to implement a web-based customer
satisfaction survey system with comprehensive, real-time, on-demand data gathering and reporting
functionality. This system will allow us to continuously analyze customer needs and reprioritize staffing and
services to respond accordingly.

As the Austin Public Library will continue analyzing this key indicator as part of the FY 2011-12 budget and in
future years, it will be important to maintain consistency in the way this indicator is calculated (i.e., uniform
use of response categories) in order to make meaningful comparisons in future years.

For more information contact Dana McBee, Library Support Services, at (512) 974-7433. 




                                                         77
Library

                         CITIZEN SATISFACTION WITH MATERIALS AT LIBRARIES 

Measure Description: Citizen satisfaction with materials at libraries is a key indicator taken from the annual
City of Austin Citizen Survey and is a record of the number of favorable responses received. Since 2003, the
survey has been prepared and conducted by sources external to the City of Austin. A random sample of
addresses is selected from utility records and/or listings of city-limit zip codes and used as a representative
sample of the general population of the City.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated as the total number of “very satisfied” and “satisfied”
responses on the City of Austin Citizen Survey, expressed as a percentage of total responses. The measure
excludes those who left the question blank or reported “don’t know.”

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 87%. The Austin Public Library did not reach
this goal, with the actual outcome at 71%.


                                  Citizen Satisfaction with Materials at Libraries


          95%
                                  89%
                                                                                 87%

          85%




          75%                                                                   71%
                                 70%


          65%
                                2008-09                                        2009-10


                                                     Result        Goal




Assessment of Results: Based on direction from the City of Austin Budget Office, only 2 categories were used to
calculate the responses for this key indicator in the 2009 and 2010 surveys, satisfied and very satisfied, and
the neutral category was excluded. The amounts for these categories in 2009 and 2010 respectively were:
satisfied (44%, 44%); very satisfied (26%, 27%). If the neutral category of responses would have been used in
the 2009 and 2010 survey calculations, the actual results for this key indicator for those years would have
been 91% and 92% respectively. The much higher goals for 2009 and 2010 reflect the uncertainty as to
whether the no opinion or neutral category would be used in the calculation of this measure.

The department is projecting an outcome of 80% for this key indicator in FY 2010-11, an increase of 9% over
the FY 2009-10 result.

Next Steps: One of the questions asked in each survey is whether respondents have visited an Austin library
facility in the past 12 months. In the 2006 and 2007 surveys, this response averaged 59% for those replying
“yes” and 42% for those replying “no”. In the 2009 and 2010 surveys, this response averaged 74% for those
replying “yes” and 27% for those replying “no”. This change likely means that our efforts to publicize our
resources and promote our services have led to increased awareness of the library as a valuable City resource.
However, our goal is to continue to reach our non-users. In FY 2010-11, the Library will begin pursing a
contract for downloadable materials; spoken books, electronic books, audio books, and music. Our goal is to
bring in a whole new generation of technology users, who expect and demand access to information from
anywhere and in a variety of formats.

As the Austin Public Library will continue analyzing this key indicator as part of the FY 2011-12 budget and in
future years, it will be important maintain consistency in the way this indicator is calculated (i.e., uniform use
of response categories) in order to make meaningful comparisons in future years.

For more information contact Dana McBee, Library Support Services, at (512) 974-7433.  



                                                        78
                           
                           
                           
                           
                           
                           
                           
    NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
                    KEY MEASURE 
                                                                                                      2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                             2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                       Target  Met?
Total number of households / persons assisted through 
all services                                             4,857    7,080    8,722    6,058    8,573    8,815       
 
                                                                                            


                 NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
                                 FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 



Director’s Message

The economic recession has increased the number of households that need assistance and has placed new
burdens on Austin’s most vulnerable residents. At the same time, Austin is fortunate to expect continued
population growth due to a comparatively healthy employment base, relatively affordable living costs and an
enviable quality of life. Austin continues to experience changing demographics and economic dynamics that
highlight the growing demand for services and the need to serve its low income residents.

Community Investment
The Neighborhood Housing and Community Development Office (NHCD) received $15,928,600 from the U.S.
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in fiscal year 2009-10 through four formula grants: the
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnerships, Emergency Shelter Grant
(ESG), and Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA). The City has leveraged more than $13
million in private funding to maximize its financial resources with federal funding.

The City also continues to invest local dollars to supplement the resources provided by HUD, expending
$26,649,939 million in local funds to increase affordable housing development. Austin voters approved $55
million in General Obligation Bonds in November 2006 for the creation of affordable housing. These funds have
assisted 18,434 low- to moderate-income households.

Preservation Affordable Rental Housing
NHCD’s Rental Housing Development Assistance (RHDA) program provided funding to assist in the
preservation of at least 622 subsidized and market-rate affordable rental units throughout Austin, in its effort
to geographically disperse affordable housing.

Renter Assistance
On March 25, 2010, the Austin City Council passed a resolution directing the City Manager to give priority to
federal and local funding to permanent supportive housing (PSH) and to develop a comprehensive strategy for
the construction and operation of 350 permanent supportive housing units over the next four years. On
September 30, 2010, the City’s PSH strategy was presented to City Council. Implementation is underway to
achieve the 350-unit goal.

Homebuyer/Homeowner Assistance
Both the Housing Smarts Counseling program and the Down Payment Assistance program exceeded program
goals to assist low- to moderate-income individuals. The down payment assistance program served 85 first-
time homebuyers -- 170% of its annual goal. This was due to outreach efforts and infused federal funding
through the homebuyer tax credit program.

Housing Developer Assistance
During fiscal year 2009-10, RHDA has deployed more than $20 million for acquisition, new construction, and
rehabilitation. In FY 2009-10, the RHDA program exceeded its annual goal by approximately 16%. A major
factor for this success was the preservation of Project-based Section 8 housing units in East Austin.

Commercial Revitalization
The City and the Urban Renewal Agency (URA) continue to make progress in revitalizing East 11th and 12th
Streets, an effort that combines federal, local and private resources to improve the economic well-being and
quality of life in the neighborhood. Public and private partnerships with businesses, financial, and non-profit
communities are key to spurring quality investment, commercial development, and job creation throughout
the East 11th and 12th Streets Corridors.

Betsy Spencer
Director




                                                       79                                            NHCD 
Neighborhood Housing and Community Development
     TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS/PERSONS ASSISTED THROUGH ALL SERVICES PROVIDED BY 
                      NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Measure Description: The total number of households/persons assisted through all services Key Indicator
includes households served in all Neighborhood Housing and Community Development (NHCD) programs,
including Homeless/Special Needs, Renter Assistance, Homebuyer Assistance, Homeowner Assistance, Housing
Developer Assistance, Commercial Revitalization, and Small Business Assistance. This measure provides a
snapshot of the total impact of all NHCD programs on the community.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by summing the households served in all NHCD programs
annually.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was 8,815 households served. In FY 2009-10, NHCD served
8,573 households, which was under the goal by 242 households.



                      Total Number of Households/Persons Assisted Through All Services

     12,000
                                                        9,790
     10,000                                                                 8,993            8,815
                                      8,036
      8,000

      6,000        4,857
      4,000

      2,000        3,191              7,080             8,722               6, 058           8, 573
          0
                   2005-06           2006-07           2007-08              2008-09          2009-10



                                              Result                 Goal



Assessment of Results: As the graph above indicates, the overall number of households/persons assisted
through all services during FY 2009-10 was less than anticipated. Over the entire five-year period of
assessment, NHCD achieved 91% of the goal. NHCD attributes the number of households assisted to several
factors, which have driven both the demand for services as well as the supply of available funding to meet
community needs. The current economic recession and continued population growth in Austin have
contributed to gaps in affordable rental and ownership housing for Austin residents, leading to increased
demand for NHCD services. Over this five year period, NHCD has seen steady increases in number of
households served. In addition, NHCD has been able to expand services offered due to increased revenue
through the passage of the 2006 General Obligation Bonds for affordable housing, as well as strong support for
affordable housing initiatives by the Austin City Council as seen through support of the Housing Trust Fund,
Permanent Supportive Housing, and other initiatives. All of these factors have contributed to an increase in the
overall number of households assisted through NHCD programs.

Next Steps: The City’s strategy for housing and community development operates at a satisfactory pace given
economic constraints and the availability of resources. Affordable housing continues to be the highest priority
for the City as it relates to the use of the federal grants. The City continues to support job creation and
neighborhood revitalization as important economic development activities. The City recognizes that the need
for job creation opportunities will also increase, as the national and local economies continue to be volatile.
Availability to short- and long-term financial assistance programming will help develop and strengthen Austin’s
small and minority business community and stimulate the growth of better-paying jobs for minority- and low-
income residents.

For more information contact Rebecca Giello, Acting Assistant Director, at (512) 974-3045.




                                                       80
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                     PARKS AND RECREATION KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                        2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                                2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                         Target  Met?
                                                              Not     Not     Not                        No 
Citizen Satisfaction with the appearance of park grounds                              72%     70%                N/A 
                                                            tracked tracked tracked                     Target
                                                              Not     Not     Not                        No 
Percent of users satisfied with recreation services                                   75%     71%                N/A 
                                                            tracked tracked tracked                     Target
Percent of participants who indicate an increase of 
                                                             92%      96%     89%     88%     96%        95% 
environmental awareness 
                                                              Not 
Number of park acres per 1,000 population                             23.4    24.5    22.9    21.7       23.4 
                                                            tracked                                                  
                                                                                               

                               PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
                                   FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 
                   


Director’s Message
 
The Parks and Recreation Department’s (PARD) mission is to provide, protect and preserve a park system that
promotes quality recreational, cultural, and outdoor experiences for the Austin community.

Our primary service areas include community services; facility and park maintenance; and planning and
facility construction. PARD oversees more than 19,000 acres of land containing 196 parks, 15 preserves
(sanctuaries for native plants, native animals and natural features), 40 greenbelts (parkland on creeks and
canyons), 20 recreation centers, five public golf courses, three senior centers, three museums, the Dougherty
Arts Center, the Mexican American Cultural Center, the Austin Nature and Science Center, and 51 public pool
facilities.

Although Fiscal Year 2009-10 was a challenging year, the Parks and Recreation Department boasts of many
accomplishments, awards and recognitions, as demonstrated by the following snapshot:

          The City of Austin’s Park and Recreation Department received an overall satisfaction rating of 75%
           compared to the national average of 66% in the annual Citizen Survey
          The Department received a 77% satisfaction rating on the number of city parks
          “Austin Chronicle’s Best Of”:
                          Ladybird Lake-Best Bike Ride
                          Lions Municipal Golf Course-Best Golf Course
                          South Austin Tennis Center-Best Tennis Court
                          Barton Springs Pool-Best Swimming Pool & Best Teen Hangout

As you can see, the Parks and Recreation Department is committed to providing a variety of quality
recreational, cultural and leisure services to the citizens of Austin. Our successes are evident in the following
program utilization data:

          95%+ Customer satisfaction of our athletic program
          99% of participants reported an enhanced parks experience through Museum Services
          99% of users expressed satisfaction with Summer Youth Programs
          64,000+ meals were served to Austin’s seniors this year
          200,000+ rounds of golf were played
          97% of respondents rated the Garden Center as favorable

Patron and employee safety is a priority for the Parks and Recreation Department.          This is evident in the
following safety ratings:

          99% average safety rating for our pools
          65% of Citizen Survey respondents reported they “feel safe” in our parks

While we are happy with these results, this does not mean we are completely satisfied. We will continue to
work toward increased satisfaction by our community members. It is with new, innovative and creative ways of
doing business that the Department will continue its success in managing the public’s resources responsibly,
including being good stewards of our natural and built assets as well as operating with the utmost integrity
and ethics.

Sara L. Hensley, CPRP
Director




                                                         81               PARD ‐ Austin – A City Within A Park 
Parks and Recreation

                    CITIZEN SATISFACTION WITH THE APPEARANCE OF PARK GROUNDS 

Measure Description: This measure tracks citizen satisfaction with the appearance of park grounds in Austin
and is gathered from the Annual City of Austin Citizen Survey. The information provides an assessment of
citizen’s feelings about the appearance and upkeep of parks grounds by the Parks and Recreation Department
(PARD). The appearance of the parks grounds in Austin is a direct reflection of the community and the values
of the Citizens of Austin that hold their parks in high esteem. Having clean and attractive parks reduces crime
and vandalism, as well as promotes the usage of the parks and increases physical activity. In addition, having
clean and attractive parks reduces safety concerns in the park's infrastructure and increases the value of the
homes in those neighborhoods. To support our motto of "A City within a Park," the Citizens of Austin use and
depend on our park system and have high expectations of our staff and appearance of the parks grounds.

Calculation Method: This measure is the sum of “very satisfied” and “satisfied” responses divided by the total
number of respondents who reported an opinion. The measure excludes those who left the question blank or
reported “don’t know.”

FY 2009-2010 Results: In the 2010 City of Austin Citizen Survey, 70% of respondents were satisfied or very
satisfied with the appearance of park grounds in Austin. The Parks and Recreation Department did not have an
established goal for this measure in FY 2009-10. The goal for the 2011 survey is to have a steady improvement
of citizen satisfaction with the appearance, attractiveness, cleanliness and safety of our parks. Therefore, our
goal for 2011 is to have a satisfaction rate of 72%.


                        Citizen Satis faction Rating of the Appearance of Park Grounds in Aus tin


  100%

   90%

   80%
                            71%                                                 70%
   70%
   60%
                                                                                                        Result
   50%
                                                                                                        No Goal
   40%

   30%
   20%

   10%

    0%
                           2008-09                                            2009-10



Assessment of Result: In the last two survey years, the result for the appearance of park grounds in Austin is
above the national average of 62% satisfaction. The survey instrument is able to assess the subset of
responses from citizens who stated that they had visited an Austin park in the last year. The satisfaction
ratings among park users for 2009 and 2010 were similar to the ratings of all respondents, 70% and 71%
respectively in each survey year.

Even with a rating well above the national average, the Department and the City Council have taken steps to
further improve resources for park maintenance. For FY 2010-11, the Council repurposed funding for the Trail
of Lights Festival toward parks grounds maintenance. The Department is using those funds to add eight
additional full-time equivalent positions to the grounds maintenance program.

Next Steps: PARD will continue to provide maintenance to enhance the quality park grounds. The amount of
staff and equipment that is available to PARD has a direct correlation to the quality and level of service. In
addition, the Department will develop "best practices", improve technology and employ more efficiency in our
operations in order to make the most of the resources available.

For more information contact Troy Houtman, Grounds Maintenance Division Manager, (512) 974-9481.




                                                          82
                                                                                             Parks and Recreation

                         PERCENT OF USERS SATISFIED WITH RECREATION SERVICES 

Measure Description: This measure tracks the percent of users satisfied with recreation services and is
gathered from the Annual City of Austin Citizen Survey. The information provides an assessment of citizen’s
feelings about the recreational programs offered by the Parks and Recreation Department (PARD). PARD
serves a diversity of interests among its citizens by providing cultural, historic, artistic, aquatics, golf, and
other recreational programs that enhance quality of life. The level of citizen satisfaction with PARD’s
recreation services is important to measure as it is an indicator of citizen’s continued participation in the
future. In addition, satisfied citizens are more likely to recommend PARD’s recreation services to family and
friends. If satisfaction levels are low, it is an indicator for staff to identify areas of concern that need be
addressed and resolved.

Calculation Method: This measure is the sum of “very satisfied” and “satisfied” responses divided by the total
number of respondents who reported an opinion. The measure excludes those who left the question blank or
reported “don’t know.”

FY 2009-2010 Results: In the 2010 City of Austin Citizen Survey, 71% of respondents are satisfied with the
recreation services the Parks and Recreation Department offers.


                              Percent of Users Satisfied with Recreation Services


  100%


                               75%
    75%                                                                            71%



    50%



    25%



     0%
                              2008-09                                              2009-10

                                        Result        A goal was not established



Assessment of Result: Citizen Survey respondents were asked to grade the “overall quality of parks and
recreation programs offered by the Austin Parks Department.” The above chart illustrates the percent of
Citizen Survey respondents who were satisfied with Recreation Services in 2009 was 75% and in 2010, 71%.

Although this Citizen Survey question has been asked for several years, the Parks and Recreation Department
did not set a goal for this measure until in FY 2010-11. The goal for the 2011 survey is 70% satisfaction.

Next Steps: PARD will continue to enhance the quality of life of the citizens by offering recreational programs
throughout the department. The 23 recreation and senior centers will begin a community input process this
spring to determine the programming needs directly from users and nonusers alike. The process involves both
a written survey and public meetings to be held throughout the various recreation and senior centers. A
summary report is expected by June of 2011.

For more information contact Patrick Corona, Community Recreation Programs Division Manager, (512) 974-
6727.




                                                       83
Parks and Recreation

     PERCENT OF PARTICIPANTS WHO INDICATE AN INCREASE IN ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS 

Measure Description: One of the Parks and Recreation Department’s goals is to foster environmental
stewardship and preservation of the Department’s constructed and natural resources. It is important to
measure the number of program participants who report an increase in environmental awareness through
program involvement in order to demonstrate an increase in knowledge of natural science and the natural
world. The Department’s environmental awareness programs expose youth to fishing, teach adults how to
design native plant gardens for wildlife, provide children with caving and climbing challenges, introduce
participants to wild animals, and investigate invertebrates that live in streams. All of these activities contribute
to the underlying appreciation and increased knowledge of the environment.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the total positive responses on program evaluation
surveys by the total number of returned surveys.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal set each year is based on the mix of programming offered. Well-established
environmental programs set higher goals for awareness outcomes, while new programs set lower goals until
the program is refined. The overall goal for FY 2009-10 was 95%, and the achieved overall result was 96%.


               P e r ce nt o f P a r ticipa nts Who Indica te a n Incr e a s e in Env ir o nm e nta l A wa r e ne s s


  100%
                                          96%                                                                           96%
                94%                                                  94%                   93%
   95%
                                                                                                                        95%
                                          94%
   90%           92%                                                 89%
                                                                                            88%


   85%


   80%


   75%
               2005-06                  2006-07                  2007-08                  2008-09                   2009-10

                                                              R e s ult       Goal


Assessment of Result: The above chart illustrates that the programming does achieve, for most people, the
goal of learning about the natural world and becoming aware of the connections between people and the
environment. The Department believes the result improved this year over previous years because of programs
reinstated in response to demand, such as home school science, art and nature camps, parent and child
exploration, and family fun nights. Improved presentations were supported by the replacement of temporary
positions with full-time positions, ensuring better trained staff that has longevity.

Next Steps: Parks and Recreation Department will continue to focus on natural resource programming in years
to come and measure our customer’s take-home value of the programs in natural sciences.

For more information contact Margaret Russell, Program Manager, (512) 974-3867.




                                                                84
                                                                                         Parks and Recreation

                             NUMBER OF PARK ACRES PER  1,000 POPULATION   

Measure Description: This measure indicates the relationship between Austin’s population and the amount of
parkland available to the citizens. This measurement serves as a way to compare Austin with other similarly
sized cities throughout the U.S.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the most current city population into the number of
park acres within the city limits and multiplying by one thousand. The population number, which is 785,850, is
provided by the City Demographer. The acreage total is provided by the Department’s Planning and Design
Division Manager.

FY 2009-2010 Results: As of September of 2010, Parks and Recreation Department owned 17,036 acres of
parkland with a ratio of 21.7 acres per 1,000 population.


                               Num be r o f P a r k A cr e s P e r 1000 P o pula tio n

  30.0
                                            24.7                                           23.4
  25.0            23. 4                                               22. 9
                23.2                       24. 5                                          21. 7
  20.0                                                                22.7

  15.0

  10.0

    5.0

    0.0
                2006-07                   2007-08                    2008-09             2009-10

                                                      R e s ult      Goal




Assessment of Result: The above chart illustrates a historical perspective of the relationship between the
amounts of parkland to the population. The data demonstrates that the amount of parkland has not increased
at the same rate as population. Despite that, the City continues to have more than double the National
Recreation and Park Association recommended ratio of 10 acres per thousand population.

Next Steps: To maintain the high ratio of park land that the citizens have come to expect, the Department will
continue to explore ways of increasing the City’s number of park acres. The City generally acquires parkland
using three methods: General Obligations Bonds, parkland dedication and donations of land. The 2006 Bond
Program provided $20 million for parkland acquisition. In 2011, the Department is closing on a property in the
Gracey Woods Neighborhood area near MoPAC and Palmer Lane, and is in discussions on properties along the
East Riverside Drive Corridor. The Department is also finalizing acreage along the Colorado River east of US
183 which will increase the Colorado River Corridor Greenway. In addition, the Department is preparing a
system-wide needs assessment of park improvements and land acquisitions for the next General Bond
election.

For more information contact Ricardo Soliz, Division Manager, Planning and Design, (512) 974-9452.




                                                        85
Parks and Recreation




                       86
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                    AUSTIN TRANSPORTATION KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                         2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                                 2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                          Target  Met?
Percent of residents "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with      Not     Not     Not 
                                                                                     27.2%  27.4%         39%        
traffic flow on major city streets                           tracked tracked tracked
Percent of residents "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with      Not     Not     Not 
                                                                                      45%    44%          44% 
the signal timing on major streets                           tracked tracked tracked
Percent reduction in estimated vehicular travel time in 
                                                              9.8%    9.5%    9.4%     6.5%    8.7%        5% 
corridors and intersections studied 
Number of tickets issued                                     130,267 118,663 126,941 115,837  89,851  116,775        
                                                                                           


                             AUSTIN TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT 
                                 FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 



Director’s Message

This past year was one of change and new beginnings for the Austin Transportation Department (ATD). FY
2009-10 represented the first fully independent year for ATD, formed out of the Public Works and Watershed
Protection Departments.

ATD is comprised of nine activities: Inspection, Review, and Support, Strategic Transportation Planning,
Transportation Engineering, Traffic Signs, Arterial Management, Transportation Markings, Departmental
Support Services, Parking Management, and Vehicles for Hire. The focus of the department is to meet the
multimodal mobility needs of the community to relieve traffic congestion, improve citizen mobility and parking,
reducing the number of vehicle miles traveled within the city, expanding the use of alternative fuel vehicles,
and address environmental and energy related issues caused by transportation. At the direction of Council,
the Office of Special Events was established. In addition, ATD assumed the technical lead for regional
transportation coordination with the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, adding staff from the
former Neighborhood Planning and Zoning Department.

While adapting to numerous changes, the department was successful in meeting its mission to maintain a
safe, reliable, and sustainable transportation system. This success is best demonstrated by the following
achievements:
    •    ATD completed 100% replacement of its antiquated parking meter system in three months, which
         resulted in improved customer service, increased revenue, and reduced citations to customers.
    •    In partnership with Car2Go, ATD launched the largest public car-share pilot program in the United
         States. The City received a United States Environmental Protection Agency award for innovation in air
         quality.
    •    In partnership with the Texas Department of Transportation, the City financed and began the
         completion of the Loop1/US290 Interchange, a $10 million effort.
    •    ATD revised operating rules for special events, and facilitated over 150 individual special events.
    •    ATD achieved a safety record of no deaths within Austin’s right-of-way, for city and private
         construction activities.

ATD is committed to doing its part to make Austin the best managed and most livable city in the nation. We
understand that a healthy community must provide mobility options to its residents and businesses in a
variety of ways to maintain the economic strength of the region. We are committed to providing a safe,
reliable, and sustainable travel network.

Robert Spillar
Director of Transportation




                                                      87                                              ATD 
 
Austin Transportation                                      
                                                           
  PERCENT OF RESIDENTS “ SATISFIED”  OR “ VERY SATISFIED” WITH TRAFFIC FLOW ON MAJOR CITY 
                                                    STREETS 

Measure Description: The City of Austin Citizen Survey has been conducted since the late 1990’s. The main
objective of this survey is for City Officials to have a useable tool to assist in decision making for the City. It
offers information on residents’ perceptions, opinions, and usage of specific City divisions and services.
Satisfaction with traffic flow is an indirect indicator on how successful the city engineers have been in
identifying congested arterials or intersections and making necessary adjustments. Travel time is the best
indicator of how well traffic flows along any given arterial.

Calculation Method: This measure is the sum of “very satisfied” and “satisfied” responses divided by the total
number of respondents who reported an opinion. The measure excludes those who left the question blank or
reported “don’t know”.

FY 2009-10 Results: The satisfaction with the traffic flow remained at 27% in FY 2010.


              Per cent of Residents "Satisifed" or "Very Satisfied" with the Traffic Flow on
                                              Major Streets
    100%


      80%


      60%
                                 39%                                              39%
      40%


      20%                        27%                                               27%

       0%
                               2008-09                                          2009-10

                                                 Result             Goal


Assessment of Results: Citizen satisfaction with traffic flow in Austin is low. Although the national average of
major cities for traffic flow satisfaction is also low at 39%, Austin’s satisfaction is lower than this benchmark.
One of the possible reasons for citizens’ dissatisfaction with traffic flow might be due to the current system
not having the capability to notify staff about unusual congestion levels caused by accidents, stalled vehicles,
unusual traffic pattern, etc. In addition, the Austin Transportation Department follows the nationally
recommended practice of retiming traffic signals and arterials at least once every three years because the
quality of traffic flow and travel time degrade over time. However, once an arterial reaches its optimal travel
time, percentage of travel time improvements will be very flat. At this point, the goal is to maintain the optimal
travel time.

Next Steps: The City is looking at proposals for a new Advanced Traffic Management System, which will
provide crucial capabilities in monitoring and managing traffic in real-time. With the new system, unusual
congestions, unusual speeds, failed devices, will be detected and reported automatically. The system will also
would provide real-time information about traffic condition thru smart phones. This allows for a quick response
to various situations, and helps reduce traffic delays.

For more information contact Ali Mozdbar, Arterial Management Program, at (512) 974-4070.




                                                        88
                                                                                            Austin Transportation


  PERCENT INCREASE OF RESIDENTS “SATISFIED” OR “VERY SATISFIED” WITH THE TRAFFIC SIGNAL 
                                         TIMING ON MAJOR STREETS 

Measure Description: The City of Austin Citizen Survey has been conducted since the late 1990’s. The main
objective of this survey is for City Officials to have a useable tool to assist in decision making for the City. It
offers information on residents’ perceptions, opinions, and usage of specific City divisions and services.
Through the reduction in estimated vehicular travel time by the retiming of traffic signals, drivers will be able
to travel at the speed limit without any stops between the beginning and ending points of their trip.

Calculation Method: Citizens surveys are mailed and conducted over the telephone to a randomly selected
sample of households in both English and Spanish.

FY 2009-10 Results: The satisfaction with the signal timing on major streets decreased by one percent in FY
2009-10. This was equal to the departmental goal of 44%.


              Percent Increase of Residents "Satisfied" or "Ver y Satisfied" with the Traffic
                                    Signal Timing on Major Str eets
    100%


      80%


      60%
                                 45%                                              44%
      40%
                                 44%                                              44%

      20%

       0%
                               2008-09                                          2009-10

                                                 Result             Goal


Assessment of Results: Instead of waiting for a submitted citizen request to address signal issues, a proactive
preventative maintenance program was established, and the percent increase over the years is mainly the
result of that program. Site visits, which use to be performed annually, check all major components of the
traffic signal. Now, Traffic Signal Technicians perform site visits on a perpetual basis, which has led to the
review of intersections at least twice a year. As the preventive maintenance program expands, it is
anticipated that the number of signal malfunctions will continue to decrease, resulting in an increased level of
satisfaction by residents.

Next Steps: Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS) devices will be purchased and installed as part of the American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Stimulus Grant. When a traffic signal loses power during a power
outage or malfunction, the signal heads will darken, and the intersection becomes a four-way stop-controlled
intersection. The UPS devices provide continuous power to traffic signals in the event of a power failure, and
will be installed at intersections that experience the highest volume of traffic. They will provide approximately
two hours of power to the traffic signals, which would ideally be enough time for the power problem to be
corrected. The anticipation is that these new devices combined with additional tools, will not only manage
traffic more effectively, it will also provide critical tools to identify failures and make adjustments
automatically, which will result in an increased level of satisfaction by residents.

For more information contact Ali Mozdbar, Arterial Management Program, at (512) 974-4070.




                                                        89
Austin Transportation

                     PERCENT REDUCTION IN ESTIMATED VEHICULAR TRAVEL TIME 
                              IN CORRIDORS AND INTERSECTIONS STUDIED 
                                                          
Measure Description: Travel time is determined through the collection of travel time data over all the
synchronized arterials. Arterials, defined as high-capacity City streets and roads, are chosen at the beginning
of each year using a three-year-rotation schedule with each arterial being reevaluated at least once every
three years. Travel time is important because it is the indicator of how traffic flows along City streets and
roads while showing the level of fuel consumption and related air pollutant. The measure is a representation of
the average reduction in travel time a driver could experience, when traveling the analyzed arterials at the
end of the fiscal year compared to a similar trip being done at the beginning of the fiscal year.

Calculation Method: Travel time data is collected at the beginning of the year, before any changes or analysis
has taken place. After the arterials are analyzed and any appropriate changes are made, the travel time data
is recollected. The percent change in travel times between all the cumulative before data, are calculated in
relation to the travel times after the changes have been made.

FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 goal for this measure was established at 5.0%. ATD exceeded this goal by
3.7% due to the synchronization of signals taken over from the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT)
and subsystems combined into larger arterials. Examples of synchronized signals taken over include the
signals located along U.S. 183 and RM 620, U.S. 183 and Lakeline Mall, U.S. 183 and Lakeline Blvd, RM,
adjusted, and are now in coordination with the current traffic signal system resulting in significant
improvement on the related arterials. An example of a combined subsystem is the traffic signals along 7th
street. Upon completion of the 7th street construction project, all the signals east of IH-35 will be tied to the
signals west of IH35 resulting it one continuous synchronized system.


                 Percent Reduction in Estimated Vehicular Travel Time in Corridors and
                                          Intersections Studied
  12.0%
                 9.8%                9. 5%
  10.0%                                                      9. 4%
                                                                                                  8. 7%
    8.0%
                                                                             6.5%
    6.0%           5.0%                5.0%                   5.0%             5.0%                5.0%

    4.0%

    2.0%

    0.0%
               2005-06              2006-07              2007-08            2008-09             2009-10

                                                Result               Goal


Assessment of Results: The number of signals contained in all of the analyzed arterials was 280. Traffic signals
are analyzed each year on a three-year rotation basis, resulting in each signal being reevaluated at least once
every three years. The goal is to tie more groups of signals with each other to provide a smoother ride for
drivers over longer distances. The elimination of these “gaps” in the segments of signals helps greatly in the
reduction of travel time. Additionally, new technologies like more effective vehicle detection devices and
alternate timing sequences to help coordinate adjacent signals together more effectively are being explored.

Most arterials will have a percent reduction in line with the annual performance goal. However, for some
roadways the reduction in travel time may be greater if the roadways are maintained by two different
agencies, such as the City and Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), due to an ineffective and
uncoordinated signal timing system. The City has been working to upgrade and take charge of the operation
and maintenance of these types of traffic signals, which will result in a seamless synchronized system.

Next Steps: During FY 2007-08, the data collection method changed from a handheld device to equipment that
automatically transmits the positional data via a Global Positioning System (GPS) device. While designed to be
more accurate by removing the requirement of human involvement, there was a learning curve, which
required many updates to the software. The system is now able to produce the needed data faster, in-turn
allowing signal engineers more time to devote to evaluating the signals along each arterial.

For more information contact Ali Mozdbar, Arterial Management Program, at (512) 974-4070.
                                                      90
                                                                                           Austin Transportation

                                        NUMBER OF TICKETS ISSUED 

Measure Description: The metered parking area boundaries include 26th Street to the north, Barton Springs
Road to the south, Mopac to the west, and IH-35 to the east. The number of tickets issued by Parking
Enforcement Officers in a year is measured to track the productivity of the staff on each beat, which
encourages citizens to pay for parking and provides for the turnover of parking spaces. This measurement is
vital to the management of the parking system operations.

Calculation Method: Number of tickets issued per the citation information downloaded from each Parking
Enforcement Officer’s handheld ticket writer.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 116,775 tickets. The Austin Transportation
Department (ATD) issued 89,853 citations due to improved parking meter technology, which represents an
unanticipated benefit rather than an indicator of needed improvement.


                                          Number of Tickets Issued


    150,000
                   126,700            126,700             126,700           128,324
                                                                                                116,775
    120,000
                 130, 267                                126,941
                                     118, 663                              115, 837
                                                                                                89, 851
     90,000


     60,000


     30,000


          0
                   2005-06            2006-07             2007-08          2008-09            2009-10

                                                Result              Goal



Assessment of Results: The implementation of the new parking meter technology and the option to pay with a
credit card, not only provided more ways to pay, it also encouraged individuals to pay for the maximum time
allotted, which reduced the number of issued parking citations compared to last year. The reduction in
citations is indicative of an improved meter system and not a missed opportunity. This past year has seen the
addition of 1,200-metered spaces, a 25% expansion, without the need to add additional staff, indicating that
the system is being optimized for efficient operation. The number of citations issued is expected to remain the
same in future years, due to citizen familiarity with the parking system and an increased focus on
enforcement.

Next Steps: The deployment of nineteen Parking Enforcement Officers is being evaluated in order to provide
better management of on-street parking. The implementation of a vehicle-based system to recognize the need
to boot vehicles, allows a Parking Enforcement Officer to cover a larger territory with significantly fewer
keypad operations. This technology will allow the officers to focus on parking violations and trouble calls, such
as missing or improper parking signs. In addition, the use of another technology is being assessed to provide
better supporting documents for parking citations.

If extended hours in the downtown area approved by City Council, the number of citations issued will likely
increase.

For more information contact Steve Grassfield, Parking Enterprise Manager, at (512) 974-1489.




                                                         91
Austin Transportation




                        92
                             
                             
                             
                             
                             
                             
                             
       PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                    2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                            2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                     Target  Met?
Percent of inspections by the Planning and 
Development Review department performed within 24          90%     93%    96%     94%     90%        95%        
hours of request 
Percent of initial commercial building plan reviews 
completed within Land Development Code mandated            65%     63%    70%     71%     69%        80%        
time of 21 days 
Percent of on‐time initial new residential zoning reviews 29%      66%    69%     22%     65%        70%        
Number of neighborhood plans/rezoning adopted by 
                                                            0       5      2        2       4          4 
the City Council 
Number of neighborhood plan/rezoning scheduled on 
                                                            0       4      2        2       4          4 
Planning Commission agenda 
Percent of neighborhood planning participants satisfied  Not 
                                                                   60%    72%     72%     83%        70% 
with the neighborhood planning process                   tracked
                                                                                          


                          PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW 
                              FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 



Director’s Message

The Planning and Development Review Department (PDRD) is responsible for assisting property owners,
neighborhood and environmental organizations, business owners, City departments and other governmental
agencies with several planning and development activities. These activities include the creation and
implementation of the City’s new comprehensive plan, zoning services, historic preservation, annexation,
demographics, urban design services, and the One Stop Shop that supports land development consultation,
review, and inspections services. The department provides these services over a 620 square mile planning
area. PDRD provides support for ten boards and commissions, not including additional support for a variety of
City Council or Commission appointed subcommittees or task force groups. The department also provides
support for land-use related city code amendments and rule postings; training for developer agents,
neighborhood representatives and staff through its land use academy; and, maintains support to multiple
PDRD land use related-web sites and other electronic media, such as Facebook and Twitter.

Over the past fiscal year the Department has:
      Engaged over 10,000 participants in the creation of the Imagine Austin Comprehensive Plan.
      Adopted the West Austin, Windsor Road, North Lamar and Georgian Acres Neighborhood Plans.
      Received an 83.25% satisfaction rating from the neighborhood plan participants regarding the
       neighborhood planning process.
      Adopted the Waller Creek District Master Plan and the East Riverside Corridor Plan.
      Processed over 200 zoning or rezoning cases.
      Enacted the new Heritage Tree ordinance.
      Enacted new standards for remodel of one-family or two-family residential structures.
      Enacted the expansion of the Residential Design (McMansion) Standards in south Austin.
      Completed the remaining Vertical Mixed Use (VMU) Opt-in Opt-out process for the initial neighborhood
       areas that participated in the original ordinance.
      Adopted six technical building codes.
      Reviewed 500 building permits for compliance with historic zoning regulations.
      Processed 699 combined site and subdivision initial reviews within the 21 day review time.
      Reviewed 2,748 applications (site, subdivision, and other special review cases such as Barton springs
       zone operating permit, UST hazardous material permit, easement vacation applications, and general
       permits).
      Reviewed and processed 156 Zoning Board of Adjustment cases.
      Assisted over 11,000 walk-in customers for Residential Review and 28,346 for the Permit Center.
      Reviewed 6,871 applications in Residential Building Plan Review.
      Reviewed 94% of commercial zoning on time.
      Reviewed 316 new commercial construction applications.
      Processed 91,996 permits.
      Completed 150,228 building inspections, of which 90% were completed within 24 hours of request.
      Inspected 308 active site and subdivision projects.
      Completed 93% of tap inspections service requests within 7 days.
      Completed 91% of commercial sites environmental inspections.




Greg Guernsey
Director




                                                      93                                              PDR 
Planning and Development Review

PERCENT OF INSPECTIONS BY THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW DEPARTMENT PERFORMED 
                                       WITHIN  24 HOURS OF REQUEST 

Measure Description: The Building Inspection Division measures the percentage of inspections conducted
within 24 hours of scheduling in order to track construction delays that results in additional construction costs
to the customer. These inspections are for residential building, electrical, plumbing, mechanical, energy and
commercial building construction.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the number of building inspections conducted within
24 hours of request by the number of inspections requested.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was to achieve a 95% on time rate. The actual result was 90%,
which was 5% below the goal.


                               Annual Building Inspections Completed within 24 Hours

  100%                                                      95%
                                    95%                                        95%                95%
               90%
                                                            96%                94%
                 90%                 93%                                                          90%
    75%




    50%




    25%
               2005-06             2006-07                2007-08            2008-09            2009-10

                                                 Result             Goal



Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the combined total of residential and commercial
inspections performed within 24 hours as a percentage of the total inspections requested per fiscal year.

For FY 2009-10, Building Inspections performed 150,228 inspections with a 90% on time rate. Each inspector
performed an average of 16 inspections per day. This is a decrease from FY 2008-09, in which 177,854
inspections were performed with a 94% on time rate. Each inspector performed an average of 18.5
inspections per day.

In FY 2008-09, the division implemented a special inspections program which provides timed inspections for
home owners. Inspections are scheduled in specific time slots where each inspector is assigned 7 inspections
per day. The effect on the average inspections per day overall was a reduction of 2.5, which ultimately led to
fewer inspections being performed within 24 hours of request. The metric also suffered in FY 2008-09 and FY
2009-10 because attrition and turnover averaged 22%. Most of these were senior inspectors who retired. The
division is rebuilding and has hired 10 new inspectors.

Next Steps: The Building Inspection Division is in the process of adding a proposed special inspection program
for electrical type work in FY 2011-12. This would be modeled after the existing special inspections program
for plumbing and mechanical type work implemented in FY 2008-09. Unless additional staff are hired, the
percent of on-time reviews will continue to drop.

For more information contact Dan McNabb, Building Inspections Manager, at (512) 974-2752.




                                                       94
                                                                               Planning and Development Review

                PERCENT OF INITIAL COMMERCIAL BUILDING PLAN REVIEWS COMPLETED 
                    WITHIN LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE MANDATED TIME OF 21 DAYS  

Measure Description: This measure is the percentage of initial commercial building plan reviews completed
within the Land Development Code mandated time of 21 days. The goal of the Commercial Plan Review
Division has historically been 90% on-time reviews for the Land Development Code requirement of initial
submittals for new commercial buildings and commercial additions being reviewed within 21 days. The 21 day
timeline begins when all required plans, documents and review fees have been paid and/or submitted. Once all
applicable reviews are complete (i.e. building, mechanical, electrical, plumbing and fire) the initial review cycle
is complete.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the number of reviews completed within 21 days by
the total number of reviews completed within the time period.

FY 2009-10 Results: For FY 2009-10, Commercial Plan Review reduced the goal from 90% to 80% on-time
reviews of the Land Development Code mandated 21 day review to reflect historic performance. Commercial
Plan Review was successful 69% of the time.


             Percent of Initial Commercial Building Plan Reviews Completed within Land Development Code
                                                Mandated Time of 21 Days
  100%


    80%          90%                  90%                   90%                90%                        80%


    60%                                                     70%                71%                  69%
                 65%                  63%
    40%


    20%


     0%
               2005-06              2006-07                2007-08           2008-09              2009-10

                                                  Result             Goal



Assessment of Results: The graph shown above illustrates Commercial Plan Reviews inability to meet its goal of
completing 90%, or even 80%, of the 21-day reviews on time. This condition has existed since 2006, and
continues today.

Next Steps: Several factors contribute to the inability of the Commercial Plan Review Division to meet its goal
of completing 80% of the 21-day reviews on time:
       Dependence on other departments for their portion of the review.
       21-day reviews being 21 calendar days, as opposed to 21 business days (example: plans submitted on
        a Friday lose 6 days due to weekends.
       Staff turn over and an internal hiring freeze.

While most of the staffing issues have been addressed, the department is still holding one position vacant to
meet financial constraints. Until additional staff is provided, or the number of submittals decreases,
Commercial Plan Review will continue to fall short of its goal.

For more information contact J. B. Meier, Chief Plans Examiner, at (512) 974-2355.




                                                           95
Planning and Development Review

                   PERCENT OF ON‐TIME INITIAL NEW RESIDENTIAL ZONING REVIEWS 

Measure Description: “New Residential Zoning Reviews” are applications for new residential construction only.
These applications do not include applications for additions or remodels to existing homes. The Land
Development Code mandates review completion within 7 days of the filing of the application. This measure
tracks the department’s compliance with the code.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the total number of applications reviewed within the
seven day time period by the total number of applications received in a given time period.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 70%. The actual percentage achieved was
65%.


                              Percent of On-Time Initial New Residential Zoning Reviews


  100%
                                                            75%                  70%
    80%                              66%                                                          70%
                 90%

    60%                                                      69%
                                                                                                  65%
    40%                              60%

    20%          29%
                                                                                22%
     0%
               2005-06             2006-07                 2007-08            2008-09            2009-10

                                                  Result             Goal



Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the history of the performance measure in the last five
years. Although the economic market has been generally unstable, the housing market has been measurably
stable in the Austin area and application totals for FY 2009-10 have been consistently above FY 2008-09 totals.
The number of new on-time residential zoning reviews has gone from 1,355 to 1,785 which is a 24% increase.
Residential review is projecting the goal for FY 2010-11 to be 1,700, but given the results from FY 2009-10,
that goal will likely be adjusted upward.

Next Steps: The goal for the next fiscal year is staff retention. The residential review section staff has been
stable for approximately six months and several positions are upper level, Planner Senior titles, versus entry
level, Planner I and Planner II titles.   If staff retention remains at current levels, this will be directly and
positively correlated to an increase in the percentage of reviews performed on time.

For more information contact John McDonald, Principal Planner, Residential Review at 974-2728.




                                                        96
                                                                              Planning and Development Review
                                                          
              NUMBER OF NEIGHBORHOOD PLANS/REZONING ADOPTED BY CITY COUNCIL 

Measure Description: This measure tracks the departments’ progress toward fulfilling the Council directive for
all 57 urban core planning areas to have an adopted neighborhood plan/rezoning by 2014.

Calculation Method: This measure is simply a count of the number of plans that occurred in a given period.
The date the combined neighborhood plan/rezoning is adopted on third reading is the date used for calculating
when a plan document is adopted by City Council. Occasionally, a parcel on the Future Land Use Map or a re-
zoning will still be on second reading, but the date the document is adopted on third reading is the date used
for plan adoption.

FY 2009-10 Results: With the adoption of four additional plans in FY2009-10, 75%, or 43, of the urban core
planning areas have successfully adopted neighborhood/rezoning plans.



                          Number of Neighborhood Plans/Rezoning Adopted by City Council


  12
                                   10
  10           9
                                                                 8
    8

    6
                                                                               4                   4
    4                               5
                                                                                                  4
    2
                0                                            2                 2
    0
             2005-06             2006-07                2007-08             2008-09            2009-10

                                               Result                Goal




Assessment of Results: There have been significant barriers to achieving the Council directive. First, in 2006
there was a high turnover of neighborhood planners. It took awhile to get new planners hired, oriented, and
started working on new neighborhood plans. In 2010, the first plans created by new planners started to be
adopted. Second, planners were needed to work on the Imagine Austin Comprehensive Plan so no new plans
have been started since early 2009. As neighborhood plans underway were adopted, the planners transitioned
to the comprehensive plan. Despite these issues, the department expects to have all plans adopted by 2014.

Next Steps: In 2011, it is expected that the four planning areas currently working on their neighborhood plans
will have them adopted, which will bring the total plans adopted up to 47. Six planning areas in the urban core
remain without having had an opportunity to create a neighborhood plan, as well as four planning areas in the
South Lamar area where the planning process stopped. After the Imagine Austin Comprehensive Plan is
adopted it will take a year or two for future plans to be created and adopted due to the length of time it takes
to create a neighborhood plan.


For more information contact Carol Haywood, Comprehensive Planning, at (512) 974-7685.




                                                        97
Planning and Development Review

                        NUMBER OF NEIGHBORHOOD PLANS/REZONING SCHEDULED 
                                    ON PLANNING COMMISSION AGENDA 

Measure Description: This measure tracks the departments’ progress toward fulfilling the Council directive for
all 57 urban core planning areas to have an adopted neighborhood plan/rezoning by 2014. Before a plan goes
to Council, it first must be presented to the commission. Since the time span between commission
presentation and Council adoption can vary significantly, this measure can be useful in showing the
departments’ work toward meeting the Council directive.

Calculation Method: The date the combined neighborhood plan is first heard before Planning Commission is
used for this calculation.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal is for all urban core planning areas to have an adopted neighborhood plan by
2014. Currently, 75% of urban core planning areas have successfully adopted neighborhood/rezoning plans,
which is a significant improvement from the past several years.




                   Number of Neighborhood Plans/Rezoning Scheduled on Planning Commission Agenda


  12
                                    10
  10          9
                                                                8
   8

   6
                                                                              4                    4
   4
                                     4                                                             4
   2
               0                                            2                 2
   0
            2005-06               2006-07                2007-08           2008-09             2009-10

                                                Result              Goal




Assessment of Results: There have been significant barriers to achieving the Council directive. First, in 2006
there was a high turnover of neighborhood planners. It took awhile to get new planners hired, oriented, and
started working on new neighborhood plans. In 2010, the first plans created by new planners started to be
presented. Second, planners were needed to work on the Imagine Austin Comprehensive Plan so no new plans
have been started since early 2009. As neighborhood plans underway were adopted, the planners transitioned
to the comprehensive plan. Despite these issues, the department expects to have all plans adopted by 2014.

Next Steps: In 2011, it is expected that the four planning areas currently working on their neighborhood plans
will have them presented to the Planning Commission, which will bring the total plans presented up to 47. Six
planning areas in the urban core remain without having had an opportunity to create a neighborhood plan, as
well as four planning areas in the South Lamar area where the planning process stopped. After the Imagine
Austin Comprehensive Plan is adopted it will take a year or two for future plans to be created, presented and
adopted due to the length of time it takes to create a neighborhood plan.


For more information contact Carol Haywood, Comprehensive Planning, at (512) 974-7685.




                                                         98
                                                                                 Planning and Development Review

                   PERCENT OF NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING PARTICIPANTS SATISFIED 
                              WITH THE NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING PROCESS  

Measure Description: A notice announcing the final open house is mailed to each property owner and each
utility customer in a planning area toward the end of the planning process so that everyone can see the final
draft plan, future land use map, and proposed re-zonings. Included in this mailing is a link to a survey with a
question that asks how supportive they are of the planning process. Printed surveys are also available. Other
questions ask about their level of support for the neighborhood plan, how they participated in the process, how
they heard about planning meetings, how many meetings they attended, and if they have suggestions on how
to improve the planning process. The survey is conducted at the end of the planning process when people are
finding out that their property might be rezoned which is a time they are more likely to be unhappy.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the number of people who responded to the survey
as being very satisfied, satisfied, or neutral by the total number of people responding to the survey who
participated in the planning process. People who did not participate in the planning process are not included in
this calculation.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure is 70% of participants in the planning process not being
dissatisfied. In FY 2009-10 we achieved an 83.3% satisfaction rate.


                 Percent of Neighborhood Participants Satisfied with the Neighborhood Planning Process


        100.0%
                                                                                              83.3%
                                                72.0%
         80.0%          70.0%                                         72.0%

         60.0%                                  70.0%                  70.0%                  70.0%
                         60.0%
         40.0%

         20.0%

          0.0%
                        2006-07                2007-08               2008-09                2009-10


                                                         Result      Goal




Assessment of Results: In FY 2006-07, only 60% of participants reported being satisfied with the planning
process. This is largely attributed to the high turnover of neighborhood planners in 2006 which slowed down
the adoption of neighborhood plans. In 2007 new planners were hired, a facilitator and implementation planner
were added, and the planning process was evaluated. A pre-planning phase was added and a step-by-step
procedure was written so all new neighborhood plans would follow the same planning process. This allowed for
a transparent planning process and neighborhoods would know from the very start what steps would be
involved in the creation of their neighborhood plan.

The revised planning process was first used with the Central West Combined Neighborhood Plan which began
in 2007. Since it takes several years to create a neighborhood plan and the survey is conducted at the end of
the process, it was not until 2010 that the impact of the changes began to surface. The result is the percent of
people satisfied with the planning process has risen significantly from 60% in FY 2006-07 to 83% in FY 2009-
10.

Next Steps: It is expected there will be a slight rise in satisfaction in 2011 as a few more plans are adopted.
Because planners are needed to work on the Imagine Austin Comprehensive Plan, no new neighborhood plans
have been started since 2009. Therefore, in 2012 and 2013 there may not be data for this performance
measure to be calculated.

For more information contact Carol Haywood, Comprehensive Planning, at (512) 974-7685.



                                                         99
Planning and Development Review




                                  100
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                               PUBLIC WORKS KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                    2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                            2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                     Target  Met?
Percent of lane miles in fair to excellent condition      73     73.8     73.9    74.8     76.1      76.1 
Total number of lane miles of street preventative 
maintenance completed                                     590     618     604     690    954        763 
                                                          Not     Not                                      
Linear feet of sidewalks constructed 
                                                        tracked tracked   750     3925  25,250   20,000 
                                                          Not     Not 
Number of new bicycle miles constructed 
                                                        tracked tracked    18    25   24              35 
Percent of Projects that pass one‐year warranty 
inspection without significant construction deficiencies  100%  94%       88%   89%  95%             80% 
Percent of projects managed by Public Works that are 
completed within budget (appropriated funding)            95.70% 90%  100%  95.50%  100%            100% 
Percent of hours that warranted school crossing             Not     Not 
locations are covered                                     tracked tracked 100%  98%  99%            100% 
                                                                                               

                                  PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
                                  FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 

               
Director’s Message

Your Public Works Department provides a wide array of services, projects and
maintenance activities for Austin’s residents and businesses. Our four primary
service areas are street and bridge maintenance and repair; design and delivery of
capital improvement projects; planning and implementing bicycle and pedestrian
facilities and implementing the child safety program, including the school crossing
guard program.

Fiscal Year 2010 was a successful year in each of these areas, as demonstrated by
the following snapshots of our activities:

•   We completed 16,500 linear feet of sidewalk repairs, including 250 curb ramps.                                
•   Over 12% of the City’s pavement inventory was treated with a preventive                The Associated Builders 
    maintenance application.
                                                                                               and Contractors 
•   We constructed over 24 lane miles of new bicycle lanes.
                                                                                           Excellence presented its 
•   Over 95% of reported potholes were repaired within 48 business hours.
                                                                                           Construction Award to 
•   We trained 35,000 school children on safe practices for walking and bicycling to
                                                                                              PWD for the Davis 
    school.
                                                                                               Treatment Plant 
•   Several capital projects were completed, including the Great Northern Dam, the
    Twin Oaks Library, the Avery Ranch Firehouse, and numerous neighborhood                      Renovations 
    street reconstruction projects and utilities upgrades.
•   Work continued on many other significant projects, including Brazos Street reconstruction, Water
    Treatment Plant 4, the Public Safety Training Facility, and the Pfluger Bridge Extension.

Public Works is mindful of the impact of our activities on the environment and incorporates best “green
practices” in our activities. Our efforts to continue to be good stewards of the environment included the
following measures over the past year:

•   City facilities are designed to attain LEEDS certification.
•   Public Works incorporated and expanded use of recovered materials into its operations, including using
    recycled materials for the base under our new sidewalk construction and in our asphalt mix designs.
•   Conversion of our vehicle fleet to incorporate more fuel efficient, cleaner, and alternative fuels vehicles
    continued.
•   Measures to reduce emissions on construction projects and energy and water usage were initiated
    throughout the Department.

Accountability for resource use is taken seriously in Public Works, and the measure of our success is evident in
the following quantitative metrics:

•   In-house design was completed on over $75 million worth of construction projects
•   Project Management costs were less than 5% of the building project costs, exceeding industry standards.
•   Customer satisfaction for our Project Management services exceeded 90% on all parameters.
•   Resident satisfaction with the condition of neighborhood streets far exceeds national averages as
    measured by an external survey.

Public Works remains committed to improvement in the execution of its core businesses and continually seeks
suggestions and input on areas where services provided to you can be enhanced. Please let us know how we
are doing!

Howard S. Lazarus, PE
Director




                                                         101               PWD ‐ Your Department with a Heart! 
Public Works
                      PERCENT OF LANE MILES IN FAIR TO EXCELLENT CONDITION  
                                                         
Measure Description: The condition of the roadways in a community impacts mobility, commerce, and quality
of life for its residents and businesses. The appearance of the roadways also makes a statement about the
value of a community’s infrastructure and the commitment of the public to care for its transportation
investment.

Calculation Method: Data is collected from an annual street condition survey and is used to classify the
pavement condition. Streets rated as fair to excellent are considered satisfactory. To calculate the
percentage, the total number of lane miles of streets rated as satisfactory is divided by the lane miles in the
inventory. The City’s ultimate goal is to improve and maintain the percentage of the inventory rated as
satisfactory to at least 80% by the end of FY 2017-18.

FY 2009-10 Results: The Public Works Department (PWD) has made steady progress toward the 80% goal
since it was established in FY 2008-09.


                            Percent of Lane Miles in Fair to Excellent Condition


     90.0%
                  73.3%             73. 8%             73. 9%               75.8%           76.1%
     75.0%
                                      73.4%                 73.6%          74. 8%             76.1%
                  73. 0%
     60.0%

     45.0%

     30.0%

     15.0%

      0.0%
                 2005-06           2006-07             2007-08             2008-09         2009-10

                                              Result                Goal


Assessment of Results: An estimated 23.4 additional lane miles of overlay were completed in early FY 2009-10,
as a result of $1.4 million in federal stimulus grant funding and part of the FY 2008-09 contract not counted in
FY 2008-09, helped assist PWD to equal the FY 2009-10 condition rating goal. Street conditions have been
steadily improving over the years with the continued investment in aggressive street preventative
maintenance programs. Although the short term network trend for FY 2011-12 appears fairly flat, the current
strategy will result in a large improvement over the next few years with attainment of 80% by FY 2017-18.

Next Steps: Fugro Consultants Inc., a provider of geotechnical engineering services, is in the process of
collecting detailed condition data and new smoothness scores for the street network. Data collection is
expected to be complete in late February 2011. Funding from the 2010 transportation bond passed by the
voters will continue to fund reconstruction of the City’s “very poor” and “poor” rated streets leading to an
overall improvement in the street network condition.

For more information contact Ed Poppitt, Infrastructure Management Group, at (512) 974-8768.




                                                       102
                                                                                                   Public Works
          TOTAL NUMBER OF LANE MILES OF STREET PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE COMPLETED 
                                                         
Measure Description: Preventive maintenance (PM) of existing pavements extends the life of the surfaces and
reduces the amount of capital investment required on City streets each year. Overlaying, thin surface
treatments and crack sealing existing surfaces are the primary components of the Public Works Department
(PWD) PM program.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by summing the total number of lane miles that receive a
preventive maintenance method in order to extend the useful life of the street inventory.

FY 2009-10 Results: PWD exceeded its goal in FY 2009-10 by 191 lane miles and is projected to meet or exceed
its goal in FY 2010-11. Performance dipped in FY 2007-08 primarily due to the unavailability of asphalt on the
market.


                Total Number of Lane Miles of Street Preventive Maintenance Completed

                                                                                                 954
  1,000
                                                                               807
    800                                                     687
                                      650                                     690
                 590                                                                              763
    600
                                     618                    604
                  550
    400


    200

      0
               2005-06             2006-07              2007-08              2008-09           2009-10

                                               Result                 Goal



Assessment of Results: Recent budget increases have allowed for the completion of additional lane miles. In
conjunction with the purely preventative maintenance surface seals, which protect our long term investment in
the streets, overlays improve street conditions and smoothness of roads. The preventive maintenance
program is an integral part of the overall strategy to increase the number of satisfactory streets to over 85%,
while reducing the number of unsatisfactory streets by 800 lane miles by 2018.

Next Steps: Continued investment in a substantial street maintenance program is critical and is anticipated to
yield substantial improvements in the network conditions over the next five to seven years. Restructuring of
the milling and overlay team into two separate teams is planned and will allow for additional in-house capacity.
A second overlay team is also being considered within the next two to four years to further add to this
capacity.

For more information contact Ron Koehn, Neighborhood Connectivity Division, at (512) 974-8757.




                                                      103
Public Works
                                LINEAR FEET OF SIDEWALKS CONSTRUCTED 
                                                          
Measure Description: This measure calculates the number of linear feet of sidewalk constructed within the City.
The City complies with federal and state directives on accessibility for pedestrians and City at large. In addition
to achieving compliance with the federal American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA), sidewalk improvements
increase the quality of life for the community by expanding the available network and making travel safer and
easier.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by summing the total feet of non-accessible sidewalks, missing
sidewalks, and sidewalks in need of repair or replacement while ensuring they are ADA compliant.

FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 result was 5,250 feet greater than the goal of 20,000. The increases in
linear feet of sidewalks is due primarily to increased capital funding and the dedication of additional resources.
Through the implementation of efficient and cost effective construction methods and innovative contracting,
PWD has been able to gain more product per dollar spent and dramatically increase sidewalk output, which is
the amount in feet of sidewalks constructed.


                                    Linear Feet of Sidewalks Constructed


   30,000
                                                                                            25, 250
   25,000
                                                                                             20,000
   20,000

   15,000

   10,000
                                                             3, 925
    5,000                 750
                            0                                  0
        0
                         2007-08                             2008-09                         2009-10


                                                      Result             Goal



Assessment of Results: The increase in linear feet of accessible sidewalks reflects the City’s commitment to
addressing mobility and the day-to-day transportation network. The FY 2009-10 performance was a significant
increase over the prior two years, based in large part on an additional $5.0 million of capital budget funding
reallocated for sidewalks. Since this is a relatively new measure, the department will continue tracking and
analyzing the number of new feet added to ensure performance keeps pace with the budgeted goals set.

Next Steps: Continued investment in the sidewalk program is essential for continuing PWD’s effort on
addressing the new sidewalk inventory. As part of the City’s ADA Transition Plan, the recommended spending
for FY 2008-09 through FY 2013-14 in sidewalk funding is $5.0 million per year. This amount nearly doubles to
$9.0 million per year for FY 2014-15 through FY 2022-23. PWD also received additional capital funding through
the 2010 voter approved transportation bonds and funding initiatives for future fiscal years should yield
continued improvements and increases to the sidewalk system.

For more information contact Mark Cole, Neighborhood Connectivity Division, at (512) 974-7019.




                                                       104
                                                                                                   Public Works
                         NUMBER OF NEW BICYCLE ROUTE MILES CONSTRUCTED  
                                                         
Measure Description: The City of Austin Bicycle Master Plan has established the goal of increasing bicycle rider
ship to provide an alternative to the automobile as a means of transportation. Providing our citizens with
transportation choices not only addresses traffic congestion, but also has positive impacts on air quality and
promotes fitness and health. Bicycle lanes improve access and safety for cyclists of all abilities.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by summing the linear distance of all new bicycle route miles
installed annually within approximately ½ mile of all Austin neighborhoods.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10, 24 new bike miles were constructed which was less than the goal of 35.
Performance is largely reliant upon PWD’s street resurfacing program. It is expected that 20–25 miles of new
lanes can be added annually depending on the street resurfacing program. In years that focus primarily on
residential streets, which do not typically require bike lanes, goals will be harder to realized. In FY 2009-10,
PWD provided more work in residential areas, which reduced opportunities for adding new bicycle miles to the
transportation system.



                                 Number of New Bicycle Miles Constructed

    40

                                                                                         35
    30
                                                         25                             24
    20                 18

                        15
    10
                                                            10

      0
                      2007-08                           2008-09                        2009-10


                                               Result             Goal



Assessment of Results: PWD did not reach the goal of 35 new bike lane miles constructed largely due to
focusing on residential areas for the street resurfacing program. Additionally, PWD coordinates street
resurfacing with adding new bicycle lane miles as a more cost and work efficient method. The number of new
bicycle lanes installed each year is reaching a steady state. PWD expects the goal to be lowered and remain
at the 20-25 new miles annually for the next several years.

Next Steps: Continued investment in the bicycle program is critical and is anticipated to yield significant
improvements in the bicycle network, like the installation of bicycle transportation accommodations such as
bicycle lanes and shared use paths and bicycle parking. Attracting new bicycle riders, thereby increasing the
City's bicycle modal split for the workday commute, is consistent with the City Council approved goals of
raising the bicycle modal split to 2% by 2015 and 5% by 2020.

Bicycle parking is also an important part of increasing bicycle use city-wide; while we have a good
administrative policy and programs in place to assure new development provides adequate bike parking, we
also provide bicycle parking in the right of way, similar to the way on-street parking is provided for motor-
vehicles. As bicycle use increases the demands on budget and space requirements for the provision of
adequate bicycle parking will become increasingly challenging. The vision of Austin 2009 Bicycle Plan Update,
as established by the Street Smarts Task Force, is to “transform Austin into a world-class bicycling city.” This
can only be accomplished with continued funding and resources. The Plan recommends allocation of $3 million
per year for bicycle plan implementation.

For more information contact Annick Beaudet, Neighborhood Connectivity Division, at (512) 974-6505.




                                                      105
Public Works
    PERCENT OF PROJECTS THAT PASS ONE‐YEAR WARRANTY INSPECTION WITHOUT SIGNIFICANT 
                                      CONSTRUCTION DEFICIENCIES 
                                                        
Measure Description: The Public Works Department manages between $350 million and $400 million per year
in Capital Improvement Program (CIP) projects. This measures the percent of projects that pass the one-year
warranty inspection without significant construction deficiencies.

Calculation Method: The measure is calculated by subtracting the ratio of number of corrective action letters
with significant construction deficiencies to the total number of projects that are substantially completed at
the one year warranty inspection within a given year from one and then multiplying the result by 100%. The
goal has been set at 80% of projects reaching the one-year warranty without significant construction
deficiencies noted in a corrective action letter.

FY 2009-10 Results: PWD has met the 80% performance goal over the past five years.


            Percent of Projects that Pass One-year Warranty Inspection Without Significant
                                       Construction Deficiencies
                100%
  100%                               94%                                                         95%
                                                           88%              89%

   80%
                  80%                 80%                  80%               80%                  80%

   60%

   40%


   20%

     0%
               2005-06            2006-07              2007-08            2008-09             2009-10

                                              Result              Goal


Assessment of Results: This measure has tracked fairly consistently over the last three years, ranging from as
low as 88% in FY 2007-08 to as high as 100% in FY 2005-06, with every year exceeding the goal of 80%. While
this measure can be an indicator of CIP Inspectors’ performance, it is also influenced by the difficulty of the
project and factors outside of the control of the CIP inspections activity.

Next Steps: PWD is exploring increasing the percentage goal from 80% based on prior year performance and
historical analysis. But because the number of projects completed are typically around 40 annually, two to
three projects having significant problems can distort the percentage greatly. There is also currently an
initiative underway to define and improve Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for CIP Inspections. The
Department also plans to bring as well as bringing in a new FTE to assist in project closeout, which should
positively impact this measure.

For more information contact Patricia Wadsack, Project Management Division, at (512) 974-7199.




                                                     106
                                                                                                     Public Works
     PERCENT OF PROJECTS MANAGED BY PUBLIC WORKS THAT ARE COMPLETED WITHIN BUDGET 
                                          (APPROPRIATED FUNDING) 
                                                            
Measure Description: Projects managed by the Public Works Department (PWD) are typically funded through a
combination of operating revenues, bond proceeds, and federal/state grants provided by the project sponsors.
Cost and scope certainty in the delivery of these projects is essential to the sponsor agencies since these
funding sources are inflexible and additional funding is not likely. In order to ensure PWD is properly
managing the project, the percent of projects completed within budget must remain very high.

Calculation Method: The measure is calculated by taking the number of projects PWD manages that are
substantially completed within appropriated funding and dividing it by the total number of projects managed
that are substantially completed. The goal is set at 100% to reflect the degree of cost certainty required and
to ensure legal requirements regarding prohibitions on exceeded allocated funds are not violated.

FY 2009-10 Results: PWD met the 100% performance goal in FY 2009-10. Improvements in project manager
training, project cost-schedule tracking, and initial project scoping will contribute to continuing this high level
of performance. The goal for this key indicator will continue to be 100% every year.


                Percent of Projects Managed by Public Works that ar e Completed Within
                                     Budget (Appr opr iated Funding)
                   100.0%               100.0%                   100.0%          100.0%             100.0%
  100.0%

                                                               100. 0%                            100. 0%
                 95. 7%                                                         95. 5%
    80.0%                             90. 0%

    60.0%

    40.0%


    20.0%

     0.0%

                                                 Result                  Goal


Assessment of Results: PWD’s performance over the past three years has been consistent, and sufficient
controls are in place to ensure cost overruns are prevented. PWD conducts monthly and weekly capital budget
monitoring sessions, financial staff approves and tracks task orders, and reviews all requests for change
orders all contribute to maintaining this level of performance. Additionally, the construction marketplace has
been extremely competitive over the past eighteen months, providing pricing that averaged approximately
30% below estimates allowing the department to come in under budget in many cases. Current estimates now
reflect the more competitive pricing. While prices have risen on certain commodities in recent months,
indications are that costs will continue to stabilize over the next one to three years, again allowing the project
managers to prepare accurate estimates.

Next Steps: Continued investment in staff training and project controls systems will enhance PWD’s abilities to
maintain costs within the budgeted amounts.

For more information contact Louis Lindsey, Project Management Division, at (512) 974-7099.




                                                          107
Public Works
          PERCENT OF HOURS THAT WARRANTED SCHOOL CROSSING LOCATIONS ARE COVERED 
                                                         
Measure Description: Crossing Guard personnel are provided to help ensure that students and those
accompanying them can safely cross residential and arterial streets that are adjacent to school locations. The
crossing guards provide a visible presence and actively monitor traffic flow and pedestrian activity to ensure
that streets are crossed safely during morning and afternoon coverage hours. This measure compares the
need for crossing guards with the department’s ability to meet that need.

Calculation Method: This percentage is developed by calculating the number of monthly hours that locations
are left vacant divided by the total number of monthly hours required to cover all warranted locations, minus
100.

FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 goal for this measure is 100%.


                Percent of Hours that Warranted School Crossing Locations are Covered

                         100%                                100%                           100%
   100%
                       100%                                  98%                            99%
    80%

    60%

    40%

    20%

     0%
                       2007-08                              2008-09                       2009-10


                                                    Result            Goal



Assessment of Results: The number of hours that Crossing Guards provide coverage again reached 99%, which
is greater than last year but falls short of the 100% goal. One challenge the program had during FY 2009-10
was the opening of the Cap Metro Red Line Commuter Rail line. The City was requested to provide additional
coverage at rail line crossing points near school locations. When the Red Line started, PWD did supply
additional crossing guards when requested based on the proximity of a pedestrian travel path to the rail
tracks.

Next Steps: The City is pursuing additional funding authorization from the State Legislature to raise the vehicle
registration fees which help fund school crossing guards. The goal is to provide secure funding for the future
of this program to continue maintaining this level of performance.

For more information contact Chris Moore, School Safety Program, at (512) 974-7273.




                                                      108
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                                      
                     WATERSHED PROTECTION KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                           2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                               2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                            Target  Met?
                                                             Not     Not     Not                            No 
Citizen satisfaction with flood control efforts                                      63%        66%                  N/A 
                                                           tracked tracked tracked                         Target
Number of structures with reduced localized risk due to 
                                                            17      35      11      18      0     31                   
completed flood hazard projects 
Number of linear feet of unstable stream channel           Not 
                                                                   508     820  1,615  1,210  1,200 
stabilized                                               tracked
                                                           Not     Not     Not     Not 
Percent of City maintained ponds functioning properly                                     82.5%  90% 
                                                         tracked tracked tracked tracked 
                                                            
Gallons of pollutants recovered as a result of business 
                                                           778,529 775,782 751,053 555,426    1,469,154    500,000
inspections and spills response 
                                                               
                           WATERSHED PROTECTION DEPARTMENT 
                              FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 
                                            
             


                                                                                            

Director’s Message                                            

In 1991, the Austin City Council established the Drainage Utility to manage and fund the ongoing
maintenance and repair of the City’s creeks, drainage systems and water quality programs. These programs
are coordinated under the Watershed Protection Department whose mission is to protect lives, property and
the environment by reducing the impact of floods, erosion and water pollution. Services include increasing
flood hazard protection for the City’s roadways and structures, alerting the public of flood hazards during
inclement weather, water quality monitoring and pollution prevention, design of stream channel repairs to
prevent or restore eroded stream banks; and on-going assessment and maintenance of the City’s drainage
infrastructure.

In the past year, the Department has continued to utilize strategic partnerships and data driven decision
making to improve service delivery and performance. As in previous years, we have leveraged partnerships
within the City and with outside entities to deliver a bigger “bang for the buck” with our citizens’ dollars.
Data-driven decisions ensure that we utilize objective information to formulate our
education campaigns and policy recommendations. Below are highlights of some of
our accomplishments in FY 2009-10.

In our Environmental Resource Management program, which is primarily responsible
for our water quality services, we completed the restoration of Bull Creek District Park
reducing erosion and improving water quality. As part of our strategic partnerships
initiative, we collaborated with project teams Citywide to incorporate water quality
improvements and salamander protection into some of the City’s most significant CIP
projects. Our Infrastructure and Waterway Maintenance program removed 374 tons
of debris from Lady Bird Lake with 198 tons alone caused by Tropical Storm Hermine.


The Flood Hazard Mitigation program completed the upgrade of the Lakewood Drive          WPD’s “Scoop the 
low water crossing – the most frequently flooded low water crossing in Austin. Cars no   Poop” education 
longer have to drive through the creek, which reduces pollutants being discharged        campaign received 
into Bull Creek. In the Watershed Policy program, we began development of new
                                                                                         the 3CMA Award 
methodology to allow staff to provide problem score updates in the localized flood
hazard mitigation program. With Council approval, we revised the commercial              of Excellence
landscape ordinance requiring innovative designs to use rainfall for irrigation. We
also provided additional protection for Austin’s largest, most significant trees with Council approval of the
Heritage Tree Ordinance.

Our efforts also garnered a number of awards and kudos during the past year. Our Scoop the Poop campaign
received the City-County Communications and Marketing Association (3CMA) Award of Excellence, and our
coordination of Flood Awareness Week activities won the Bronze Quill Award from the Austin Chapter of the
International Association of Business Communicators.   Individual staff members were honored by groups
such as the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Texas Floodplain Management Association, and the
Association of Watershed and Stormwater Professionals.

Each of these accomplishments would not have been possible without the outstanding teamwork I see every
day. I am proud of the Watershed Protection staff and their achievements and look forward to another year of
successes delivering high quality services.




Victoria Li, P.E.
Director




                                                                                                     
                                                       109
Watershed Protection

                         CITIZEN SATISFACTION WITH FLOOD CONTROL EFFORTS 
                                                            
Measure Description: Citizen satisfaction with flood control efforts is a key indicator taken from the annual City
of Austin Citizen Survey and reports the total percentage of favorable responses received. The survey has
been prepared and conducted by sources external to the City of Austin. A random sample of addresses is
selected from listings of city-limit zip codes and used as a representative sample of the general population of
the City. Flood control is important because flooding is hazardous for people and property. Austin is in the
middle of Central Texas’ “flash flood alley” where there is a higher potential for high-magnitude flooding than
any other region of the United States.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated using the sum of the “very satisfied” and “satisfied” responses
divided by the total number of respondents who reported an opinion. This measure excludes those who left
the question blank or reported “don’t know”.

FY 2009-10 Results: Targets were not established for this measure in FY 2009-10; however, there will be
targets moving forward.


                                     Citizen Satisfaction with Flood Control Efforts



        90%

        80%

                                                                                       66%
        70%
                                  63%
        60%

        50%
                                2008-09                                            2009-10

                                   Result       A goal was not established for either year



Assessment of Results: For FY 2009-10, 66% of surveyed residents responded as “satisfied” or “very satisfied”
with the City’s flood control efforts. This is one of the highest levels of satisfaction for an environmental
service included in the survey. This is also a slight improvement from FY 2008-09 results of 63% satisfaction.
As more years of data are collected for this measure, the Department will be able to establish baseline levels
of satisfaction.

Next Steps: The department will continue implementation of projects and programs to reduce flood threats and
increase public outreach regarding flood safety awareness. Such projects include:

    •   Floodplain analyses,
    •   Identification of existing and potential flooding problems,
    •   Benefit/cost analyses of potential solutions, and
    •   Identification of future participants in the Regional Stormwater Management Program.


For more information contact Mapi Vigil, Managing Engineer of Watershed Engineering Division, at (512) 974-
3384.
 




                                                         110
                                                                                              Watershed Protection

    NUMBER OF STRUCTURES WITH REDUCED LOCALIZED FLOOD RISK DUE TO COMPLETED FLOOD 
                                     HAZARD IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS  
                                                          
Measure Description: This performance measure represents the Department’s efforts to reduce local flooding
conditions in order to protect lives and property. Improvement projects are planned, designed and constructed
to reduce local flood hazards for houses, commercial buildings and roadways that result from inadequacy or
lack of local (street) storm drain systems.
Calculation Method: To calculate this measure, a count is taken annually of the number of structures with
reduced localized flood risk due to completed flood hazard improvement projects.
FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 goal for this measure was 31 structures.             The Watershed Protection
Department did not complete any projects in FY 2009-10.


                Number of Structures with Reduced Localized Flood Risk Due to Completed Flood Hazard
                                               Improvement Projects


   60

                                    35                                          56
   40
                                                               40
                                                                                                           31
               17                                                               18
   20                                                     11
                                     20
                16                                                                                     0
    0
             2005-06              2006-07              2007-08               2008-09               2009-10

                                                    Result          Goal



Assessment of Results: The Localized Flood Hazard Mitigation (LFHM) program identified three projects that
would increase protection to 31 structures in FY 2009-10. All 3 of the projects experienced significant delays,
pushing project completion into FY 2010-11. Details by project are below.
Oaklawn Stormdrain Improvements Project
This project is a capital improvement project and had three primary reasons for not meeting the performance
measure goal of 18 structures with increased protection: 1) the completion of contract documents was delayed
because of the additional coordination needed to add water lines to the project; 2) change orders led to an
increase in the contract time allowed for the project; and 3) the contractor reached substantial completion on
November 16, 2010, six weeks after the adjusted completion date.
Rickey Drive Stormdrain Improvements Project
Watershed Protection planned the project to be designed and constructed by City staff. The reasons for not
meeting the performance measure goal of six structures with increased protection were: 1) upon acquiring the
construction permit, it was determined that the Department’s Field Operations Division (FOD) would not be
able to complete the portion of the project between existing houses located adjacent to a drainage easement;
2) the project was redesigned into a hybrid project with part of the project being constructed by a private
contractor and the remainder completed by FOD; and 3) the redesign also precipitated the need to replace a
wastewater line due to the close proximity of the new alignment of the stormdrain pipe.
Prince Valliant Drive Stormdrain Improvements Project
Watershed Protection planned the project to be designed and constructed by City staff. The reasons for not
meeting the performance measure goal of seven structures with increased protection were: 1) it was not
possible to use Austin Water Utility services for the water line relocations; and 2) a private contractor was
hired to make the water line adjustments so that the stormdrain system improvements could be completed.
The water line adjustments have been completed and the FOD has added this project to their schedule.
Next Steps: The Rickey Drive project helped identify an issue with the current drainage easement dedication
requirements in that they do not factor in proximity of adjacent structures or the depth of the proposed
infrastructure. LFHM has been working on revising drainage easement dedication requirements and anticipates
revised requirements to be published by the third quarter of FY 2010-11. The Watershed Protection
Department also plans to complete a comprehensive master assessment of storm drain infrastructure needs
city-wide. Historically, the LFHM has relied on reported flooding to prioritize capital improvement projects.
This initiative would enable staff to identify the capacity of the existing system and what improvements are
needed. However, the effort is contingent on the availability of funds.

For more information contact Mapi Vigil, Managing Engineer of Watershed Engineering Division, at (512) 974-
3384.
                                                   111
Watershed Protection

                 NUMBER OF LINEAR FEET OF UNSTABLE STREAM CHANNEL STABILIZED 


Measure Description: Stream channel stabilization is the process by which eroding stream banks are repaired
and/or reinforced. The stabilization projects are designed by staff in the Stream Restoration Program and
implemented by the Field Operations Division. The Stream Restoration Program’s objective is to create a
stable stream system that decreases property loss from erosion and increases the beneficial uses of our
waterways.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by summing all linear feet of unstable stream channel
stabilized monthly.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for FY 2009-10 was to stabilize 1,200 linear feet of stream banks. The Watershed
Protection Department exceeded this goal by 10 linear feet.


                            Number of Linear Feet of Unstable Stream Channel Stabilized
  2,000

                                                                          1,615
  1,600

                                                                                             1,210
  1,200
                                                                                           1,200
                                             820
    800                                                                 1,000
                    508
    400                                      500
                   500

      0
                  2006-07                  2007-08                    2008-09              2009-10
                                                      Result       Goal


Assessment of Results: Watershed Protection’s Infrastructure and Waterway Maintenance Program (also
known as the Field Operations Division) is responsible for maintaining the storm water conveyance system,
which consists of creeks and waterways and pipelines and structural controls. Since FY 2006-07, the Division
has stabilized 4,153 linear feet of stream channel (cumulative) despite having only one supervisor for two
erosion crews. The second crew was implemented in FY08. The FY 2009-10 number of linear feet stabilized
was smaller than FY 2008-09 due to larger, more complex projects in FY 2009-10. Although these projects
may result in fewer linear feet stabilized, they often require more layers of rock, which affects the amount of
time to complete a project as well as the number of projects completed.

Next Steps: The Division Manager plans to reorganize and restructure the Infrastructure and Waterway
Maintenance Program resources to better respond to the changing and evolving service needs and
requirements of the Department and City. A large part of the changes in service needs has been the result of
annexations and new development. That is, the Field Operations Division has taken on maintenance of the
storm water ponds in these areas, as well as maintenance of their drainage infrastructure. In addition, staff
will begin implementation of the Maximo work order management system in FY 2010-11 and anticipates that it
will affect the Program’s operations in a positive way. It is expected that there will be some initial
inefficiencies as staff learns to utilize the new software, but ultimately the system will enable better
understanding of operational activities and assist in planning and use of resources.


For more information contact Roxanne Jackson, Division Manager of Watershed Field Operations Division, at
(512) 974-1918.




                                                       112
                                                                                             Watershed Protection

                     PERCENT OF CITY MAINTAINED PONDS FUNCTIONING PROPERLY 
                                                            

Measure Description: The Infrastructure and Waterway Maintenance Program is responsible for maintaining
and rehabilitating water quality and detention ponds within residential subdivisions and on many City-owned
properties to ensure that they are operating properly and effectively providing water quality, flood protection,
and downstream erosion control in an efficient manner.

Calculation Method: Number of City maintained ponds that are functioning properly divided by the number of
City maintained ponds identified for routine inspections.

FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 goal for this measure is 90%. The Watershed Protection Department fell
short of this goal by 7.5%. This is a new performance measure so there is not data for prior years.


                                 Percent of City Maintained Ponds Functioning Properly


   100.0%
                                                                  90.0%
    80.0%
                                                               82.5%
    60.0%

    40.0%

    20.0%

     0.0%
                                                           2009-10

                                                         Result        Goal



Assessment of Results: The Pond Maintenance crews are now performing the heavy duty maintenance on all of
the General Fund City-owned ponds that were the responsibility of other City departments. The ponds acquired
from annexations and new developments increased the pond inventory from 786 to 800, representing an
increase of 2%. The three pond crews spent a significant amount of time and manpower addressing the newly
annexed and City-owned ponds that needed considerable amounts of work to ensure the facilities function as
designed. Additionally, the pond crews spent a substantial amount of time and manpower assisting the Lady
Bird Lake Cleanup crew, as it is extremely short handed and understaffed given the service demands
associated with the lake, excessive flood debris removal requirements (198 tons from September event), and
exceptionally high public of use of Lady Bird Lake, the trails and the surrounding public areas. As a result, the
goal of maintaining 90% of the ponds in satisfactory operating condition was not met. However, the three pond
crews were still able to ensure that 82.5% were operating satisfactorily by the end of the fiscal year, and in
most cases, the ponds that are still in need of work are functioning and providing water quality benefits, just
not at the most effective and efficient level.
Next Steps: The Division Manager plans to request additional personnel to meet the basic service level, but
will continue to evaluate operations and restructure the Infrastructure and Waterway Maintenance Program
resources to better respond to the changing and evolving service needs and requirements of the Department
and City. A large part of the changes in service needs has been the result of annexations and new
development. That is, the Field Operations Division has taken on maintenance of the stormwater ponds in
these areas and as well as maintenance of their drainage infrastructure. In addition, staff in the Pond
Maintenance activity will begin implementation of the Maximo work order management system in FY 2010-11
and anticipates that it will affect the operations in a positive way. It is expected that there will be some initial
inefficiencies as staff learns to utilize the new software, but ultimately the system will enable better
understanding of operational activities and assist in planning and use of resources.


For more information contact Roxanne Jackson, Division Manager of Watershed Field Operations Division, at
(512) 974-1918.




                                                         113
Watershed Protection

     GALLONS OF POLLUTANTS RECOVERED AS A RESULT OF BUSINESS INSPECTIONS AND SPILLS 
                                                      RESPONSE 
                                                              

Measure Description: This measure tracks the gallons of pollutants that have been prevented from entering the
City’s waterways by staff responding to hazardous and non-hazardous material spills and citizen pollution
complaints.

Calculation Method: This is a cumulative measure based on staff’s determination of the actual number of
gallons of pollutants that have been recovered during investigations, inspections, and emergency spills
responses. The number of gallons is estimated by calculating the average depth of the spill using a formula
that takes into account the type of product spilled.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 500,000 gallons of pollutants. The Watershed
Protection Department exceeded this goal by 969,000 gallons due to four large spills that accounted for
1,055,128 million gallons of the total gallons recovered in FY 2009-10.


             Gallons of Pollutants Recovered as a Result of Business Inspections and Spills Response (millions)



   1.6                                                                                                       1.5


   1.2                1.1                     1.1                     1.1                   1.1

                 .8                      .8                      .8
   0.8
                                                                                       .6

   0.4                                                                                                       .5


     0
              2005-06                2006-07                2007-08                2008-09                2009-10

                                                        Result              Goal


Assessment of Results: This demand driven measure represents one of the Department’s activities in its
mission of protecting lives, property, and the environment by reducing the impact of water pollution. Staff in
the Pollution Reduction and Reduction activity responds on a 24 hour basis to citizen pollution complaints and
emergency spills that often result in the release of hazardous materials into the environment. The group
works with responsible parties and remediation contractors on the immediate recovery of released materials.
Staff in this activity oversees any remediation activities necessary to restore impacted properties to pre-spill
conditions. In FY 2009-10, 1.5 million gallons and 494 cubic yards of pollutants were removed from the
environment as a result of 1,245 citizen pollution complaint investigations and emergency spill responses, as
well as 702 business inspections. Since the trend in previous years had resulted in actuals much less that 1.1
million, the goal was reduced to .5 million.

Next Steps: Operations in this activity rely heavily on inter-departmental cooperation, so it is important to
strengthen the section’s strategic partnerships with other departments. Staff plans to 1) create a service
agreement with the Austin Water Utility for a better coordinated response to water line breaks, wastewater
overflows, septic system leaks, etc.; 2) share contract/funding with the Austin Fire Department for a better
coordinated response to hazardous material incidents and abandoned chemicals in the City right-of-way; and
3) partner with Solid Waste Services on the development of a single service grease hauler contract for 6th
Street to improve grease storage and disposal issues.


For more information contact Sharon Cooper, Environmental Conservation Program Manager for the Pollution
Prevention and Reduction Program, at (512) 974-2448.




                                                           114
                                    
                                    
                                    
                                    
                                    
                                    
                                    
                 AUSTIN CONVENTION CENTER KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                  2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                         2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                   Target  Met?
Exhibition Hall Occupancy                             86.8%  85.2%     83.9%  86.9%  83.7%         75% 
Client Evaluation Ratings Summary: Convention Center  4.83;  4.48;     4.62;  4.59;  4.67; 
                                                                                                   4.25 
and Palmer Events Center                                4.89   4.83     4.72   4.72   4.71 
Percentage of Clients indicating they would schedule 
                                                      100.0% 100.0%    100.0% 95.2%  97.2%  90.0% 
another event at the Convention Center facilities 
Hotel Occupancy Tax Collections (millions)             $36.6  $42.2    $45.1    $41.2    $39.7    $42.2 
Convention Center Combined Funds Ending Balance 
                                                       $17.8  $19.7    $18.6    $18.5    $17.8    $11.3 
(millions) 
                          AUSTIN CONVENTION CENTER DEPARTMENT 
                                FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 
                
                                              
                                                                                               

Director’s Message                                   
 
The Austin Convention Center Department (ACCD) manages the Convention Center, Palmer Events Center,
and three garages. Staff is customer-oriented and a wide array of services is offered. Staff works closely with
clients to plan and book their event, and to meet their room set up, security, maintenance, IT, utility and
parking needs.
Many noteworthy achievements were realized during FY 2009-10, including:
           ACCD welcomed 12 new conventions to the Center for a total of 36,199 room nights.
           Dollar General Corporation held their annual convention at our facility this year. Upon completion of
           the event, the client expressed interest in future bookings.
           The U.S. National Guard booked the entire Convention Center. The conference was executed
           successfully due to extensive advance planning on the part of the security team.
           Earned a high Customer Satisfaction rating; a score of 4.69 was received on a 5.00 point scale.
           Began construction on a walkway to connect the north side 3rd and 4th floors of the Convention Center.
           The walkway will allow easier access for event attendees.
           Restructure the existing parking plan which will result in a conversion to an exit pay system and in a
           new variable parking rate structure to be implemented in FY 2010-11. An exit pay system will reduce
           wait times for vehicles entering the garage, which will improve traffic flow. The paid tiered structure
           will allow time tracking of parking usage and is expected to capture additional business.
           Completed a space reconfiguration to promote better communication between booking, sales, and
           event coordination staff.
Being an environmental leader within the industry is important to our organization and it helps to distinguish
us from our competitors. Significant strides were achieved, throughout the year, to move us closer to a silver
or higher rating in Leadership in Efficiency and Environmental Design (LEED). Accomplishments included:
           Recycled 33% of our waste, resulting in 383,000 lbs. of waste diverted from the landfill.
           Installed a composter compactor at Palmer Events Center.
           Completed prefunction area and exhibit hall lighting retrofits at the Convention Center and completed
           lighting upgrades at Palmer.
           Cut our energy use by 22%.
           Began partnering with Austin Energy to improve the efficiency of the PEC-HVAC software.
           De-commissioned chillers and eliminated CFC R 12 refrigerant use onsite.
           Performed a building commissioning to determine if systems are operating efficiently.
           Installed 600 LED fixtures in all our meetings rooms, thus eliminating mercury going to the landfill.
The Department also proactively works to be financially responsible. An on-going goal is to find better and
more cost-efficient ways to achieve the results we seek. Below are examples of process changes that reduced
expenditures and led to a 9% decrease in operating expenses from the previous fiscal year.
           Shifted work schedules to substantially reduce overtime and temporary labor costs.
           Realized a 15% expense savings in electrical expenses from LEED initiatives.
           Utilized Community Service help instead of contract temps.
           Utilized in-house staff to avoid contracting out various services.
           Analyzed each budgeted expenditure and pursued only essential services and items.
The department will continue to focus on self-improvement efforts so that we can remain a popular event
destination while increasing the positive economic impact to ACCD and the City.
 
Mark Tester
Director




                                                            115                                          
Austin Convention Center

                                      EXHIBITION HALL OCCUPANCY 


Measure Description: The Convention Center has five exhibit halls which provide 246,097 of column-free space
and seven ballrooms. The Exhibition Hall Occupancy measure tracks the number of days in the year that one
or more of the exhibit halls or ballrooms are rented by clients.

Calculation Method: The number of days that an exhibit hall or ballroom is occupied is divided by 365 days in
the year to determine the percentage of days occupied.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10 an 83.7% occupancy level was achieved, which is above the 75% occupancy
goal. In terms of days, one or more of the exhibit halls or ballrooms were occupied by clients 306 days out of
the year.


                                             Exhibition Hall Occupancy

     100%
                   86.8%             85.2%            83.9%              86.9%                83.7%
      75%                                                                                             Goal


      50%


      25%


        0%
                2005-06            2006-07            2007-08            2008-09              2009-10
                                                           Result



Assessment of Results: As depicted in the graph above, the occupancy levels have remained high over the
past five years, with minimal variation from year to year.

Next Steps: The Booking and Contracting division partners with the Austin Convention and Visitor’s Bureau to
maximize bookings for the Convention Center facility. These efforts will continue into the upcoming year, with
the goal of continuing the high percentage of occupancy that has been achieved in the past.


For more information contact Michele Gizelbach, Chief Financial Manager, at (512) 404-4054.




                                                     116
                                                                                          Austin Convention Center

                                 CLIENT EVALUATION RATING SUMMARY 
                                                          
                                                          
Measure Description: Achieving a high customer satisfaction rating is key to attracting repeat customers and is
vital to the positive financial health of the Austin Convention Center Department. In order to maintain a high
level of customer service, surveys of Convention Center Department clients and users are conducted on a
routine basis.

Calculation Method: The Customer Satisfaction Survey is automatically transmitted to all contacts in the
booking list from the booking system. Client survey collection and reporting is automated and handled by an
online application system by the Austin Convention Center Department Survey developed and maintained by
the Communications and Technology Management (CTM) department. To ensure the independence of the
data, hard copy responses to the survey are mailed directly to staff in the City Manager’s Office. The survey
identifies operational activity areas within the department and Customers are asked to rate each activity. The
ratings for the Convention Center and the Palmer Event Center are calculated by totaling the individual survey
rating for each specific category and dividing the total by the number of surveys in that category.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was set at 4.25 (5.0 scale) by the Convention Center Executive
team. The department exceeded this goal with a year to date (YTD) average at the Convention Center of 4.67,
at the Palmer Event Center of 4.71, with a departmental YTD average of 4.69.




                                        Client Evaluation Ratings Summary
   6.0



   5.0          4.83   4.89             4.83
                                                       4.62     4.72               4.72          4.67   4.71
                                                                            4.59
                                 4.48

         4.25                                                                                                  Goal
   4.0



   3.0
                 2005-06          2006-07               2007-08             2008-09              2009-10

                                            Convention Center    PEC




Assessment of Results: The client evaluation YTD average for FY 2009-10 showed a 0.6% increase over the
2008-09 level. The department YTD cleanliness of the facility average rating of 4.88 exceeds the department
goal. The Department has historically received higher ratings as depicted in the graph.

Next Steps: The Overall Customer satisfaction rating for the departments is being increased to 4.50 (5.0
scale). Convention Center Sales Department receives a quarterly report of the survey from the CTM
department. Individual event performance ratings along with the client comments from the survey are shared
with the Sales/Event staff and the Executive Team. This is used as a tool for continuous quality improvement.
The individual event performance ratings along with the client comments from the survey results will be used
to continually monitor the quality of service and ensure that the needs of the customer are being met.


For more information contact Michele Gizelbach, Chief Financial Manager, at (512) 404-4054.




                                                        117
Austin Convention Center

       PERCENTAGE OF  CLIENTS INDICATING THEY WOULD SCHEDULE ANOTHER EVENT AT THE 
                                         CONVENTION CENTER FACILITIES 
                                                              

Measure Description: Achieving a high customer satisfaction rating is key to attracting repeat business, which
increases departmental revenue. One of the questions asked on the department’s customer service survey is
whether the client would consider scheduling another event at the Austin Convention Center Department. This
measure tracks the results of those responses.

Calculation Method: The willingness to return question is one question on the Customer Satisfaction Survey.
The Customer Satisfaction Survey is automatically transmitted to all contacts in the booking list from the
booking system. To ensure the independence of the data, hard copy responses to the survey are mailed
directly to staff in the City Manager’s Office. The survey identifies operational activity areas within the
department and Customers are asked to rate each activity. The ratings for the Convention Center and the
Palmer Event Center are calculated by totaling the individual survey rating for each specific category and
dividing the total by the number of surveys in that category.

FY 2009-10 Results: In FY 2009-10, 97.2% of clients indicated that they would be willing to return to Austin
Convention Center Department (ACCD) facilities. This exceeded the 90% goal.



               P e r ce nta ge o f C lie nts Indica ting T he y W o uld Sche dule A no the r Ev e nt a t the
                                               C o nv e ntio n C e nte r Fa cilitie s


               100. 0%              100. 0%              100. 0%                                  97. 2%
  100%                                                                       95. 2%
         90%                                                                                                   Goal

   75%


   50%


   25%


    0%
               2005-06             2006-07              2007-08             2008-09              2009-10

                                                             Result



Assessment of Results: The FY 2009-10 results of 97.2% is slightly above the previous year’s result of 95.2%,
with both years surpassing the goal of 90%. Due to staff’s diligence in providing exemplary customer service,
the results of this measure are historically high.

Next Steps: In addition to analyzing the results of the responses received on the customer satisfaction surveys,
the Department schedules meetings with clients at the conclusion of their event to discuss their experiences
at ACCD facilities. The feedback provided is invaluable to assisting staff in providing the best possible facilities
and services for future events.


For more information contact Michele Gizelbach, Chief Financial Manager, at (512) 404-4054.




                                                           118
                                                                                            Austin Convention Center

                                   HOTEL OCCUPANCY TAX COLLECTIONS 
                                                              

Measure Description: A Hotel Occupancy Tax of 15 cents per dollar is accessed to hotel guests staying in Austin
hotels, which is collected by the hotels. The tax covers hotels, motels, and bed and breakfasts, as well as
condominiums, apartments, and houses rented for less than 30 consecutive days. The amount of revenue
received is a function of the number of rooms sold, occupancy levels and the room rates.

The State of Texas collects 6 cents of the hotel tax rate and the City of Austin collects 9 cents. The City’s 9
cent collection is distributed as follows: Convention Center 4.5 cents, Venue Project Fund 2 cents, Tourism and
Promotion Fund 1.45 cents and Cultural Arts 1.05 cents. Hotel Occupancy Tax collections represent
approximately 60% of the Convention Center facility revenue.

Calculation Method: The amounts depicted in the graph represent the City’s entire 9 cent collection of Hotel
Occupancy Tax. The taxes are remitted to the City of Austin Financial Services Department, who collect and
post the receipts to the respective funds.

FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 goal for this measure was $42.2 million. Collections fell $2.5 million, or 6%
short of this goal due to a continued sluggish economy. Receipts in FY 2009-10 were 3.5% lower than the
previous fiscal year.


                                      Hotel Occupancy Tax Collections (millions)

 $60

 $50                                                 $45.1                          $46.4
                              $42.2                              $42.6      $41.2              $39.7   $42.2
 $40      $36.6                         $35.8
                  $29.8
 $30

 $20

 $10
              2005-06           2006-07                2007-08                2008-09            2009-10

                                                   Result            Goal



Assessment of Results: The Occupancy Tax is dependant on trends within the leisure and travel industry, and is
therefore volatile in nature. In a strong economy, increases in the Hotel Tax collections can be significant, as
seen in FY 2006-07 and FY 2007-08. However, downturns in the economy can cause collections to decrease,
as experienced in FY 2008-09 and FY 2009-10. Collections were down 3.5% from the previous year, which is
more favorable than the 8.5% decrease from FY 2007-08 to FY 2008-09.

Next Steps: Indicators within the hotel industry, coupled with the fact that the Texas State Legislator will be in
session in FY 2010-11, has led to a projected increase of 6.9% in Hotel Occupancy Tax above the FY 2009-10
collections. Early in FY 2010-11, collections are higher than the same period in FY 2009-10.

Conventions and trade shows held at the Austin Convention Center facilities are a mechanism to attract out-of-
town visitors to the City of Austin and to stay in local hotels. The Austin Convention Center partners with the
Austin Convention and Visitor’s Bureau to attract clients with large numbers of room night bookings to
maximize the economic benefit. Because of the volatility and the significance of this revenue source to the
Convention Center, collection trends of this tax are very closely monitored.


For more information contact Michele Gizelbach, Chief Financial Manager, at (512) 404-4054.




                                                            119
Austin Convention Center

                       CONVENTION CENTER COMBINED FUNDS ENDING BALANCE 


Measure Description:     The Austin Convention Center Department is a self-sufficient, revenue generating
department that does not receive any funding from other City departments. Therefore, it is critical that an
ending balance be maintained that allows for funding of current as well as future needs. A strong ending
balance also provides a financial resource to mitigate fluctuations in the Hotel Occupancy Tax. This measure
depicts the ending balance for the Convention Center Operating and Tax Funds, which reflects the funds
available for use for the Convention Center facility. It does not include balances of the Palmer Event Center
and Garage, or the Venue Project Fund, since these funds are governed by different sets of bond covenants.

Calculation Method: The ending balance is calculated by summing the beginning balances and revenue, and
subtracting total requirements for the Convention Center Operating Fund and the Convention Center Tax
funds.

FY 2009-10 Results: The budgeted ending balance for the Convention Center funds was $11.3 million. The
actual ending balance was $17.8 million, which exceeded the goal by $6.5 million.


                                  Convention Center Combined Funds Ending Balance

                                $19.7
              $17.8                                $18.6             $18.5             $17.8
  $20

  $15

  $10

   $5

   $0
             2005-06           2006-07          2007-08            2008-09            2009-10
                                                   Result



Assessment of Results: Then Convention Center Combined Funds Ending Balance has remained at
approximately the same level over the past several years. The goal is to maintain a positive ending balance at
all times. This was achieved, despite significant losses in our largest revenue source, the Hotel Occupancy
Tax, during the last two fiscal years. Through extensive cost containment efforts, the department was able to
increase the FY 2009-10 ending balance above budget by $6.5 million. The individual components that led to
this increase follows:

   •    Beginning balance- The FY 2009-10 estimated beginning balance increased $2.8 million due to
        additional savings in FY 2008-09 above what was estimated for the year.
   •    Expenditures- Operational costs were $4.1 million less than budgeted. Reductions in spending were
        achieved through a line by line analysis of each activity. From this effort, the purchase of some items
        were downscaled or deleted, work schedules were re-engineered to reduce overtime, more work was
        performed by in-house staff, and less costly alternatives were pursued. Cost savings were also
        realized through implementation of certain Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)
        initiatives, such as energy efficient lighting upgrades.
   •    Revenue-Net revenue for the year was approximately $0.5 million less than budgeted due to
        decreased occupancy tax collections.

Next Steps: During the upcoming year, the goal will be to continue to maintain or build the Convention Center
ending balance. A healthy ending balance will provide financial resources in the event of future revenue losses
or other unforeseen circumstances. It may also allow for future building investments, so that the Center
remains competitive and can continue to maximize the positive economic impact to the community.

For more information contact Michele Gizelbach, Chief Financial Manager, at (512) 404-4054.




                                                     120
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                 AUSTIN ENERGY KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                       2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                               2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                        Target  Met?
Electricity System average interruption frequency           1.00    1.02     0.63     0.89     0.69     0.80           
Percentage of renewable energy in Austin Energy's 
                                                            6.0%    5.8%     6.6%     10.6%    9.6%    12.2%       
energy supply 
Customer Satisfaction Index                                  80      80       82       78       79      83         
                                                                                                       No 
Fuel Cost Average                                          3.178    2.912    3.655    3.371    3.446            N/A 
                                                                                                      Target
Credit rating for separate‐lien electric utility system 
                                                             A+      A+       A+       A+       A+       AA        
revenue bonds 
Equivalent Availability Factor of South Texas Nuclear 
                                                            95%     91%      96%      93%      91%      95%        
Plant 
                                                                                         

                                      AUSTIN ENERGY 
                               FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 
               




General Manager’s Message

Austin Energy is the City of Austin’s municipally owned and operated electric utility that provides retail
electric service to over 400,000 metered customers in a service area including 206 square miles within
the City and 231 square miles of surrounding Travis and Williamson counties. Austin Energy either
owns or has an ownership interest in a diverse mix of generation resources including coal, nuclear,
natural gas and renewable energy totaling 2,922.7 megawatts (MW) which includes about 450 MW of
purchased renewable power (primarily wind). Austin Energy owns electric delivery assets including
over 11,319 miles of distribution lines, 68 substations and 619 miles of transmission lines.

Fiscal year 2009-10 was a successful year as we continued to improve on our mission of delivering
clean, affordable, reliable energy and excellent customer service. Major accomplishments included:

   Energy Resource Plan to 2020 approved pending development of an affordability tool. This plan
    provides a framework for meeting a 35% renewable energy goal by 2020. Currently at 9.6%
    renewable energy.

   Continued excellent reliability performance, quality management and compliance initiatives.
       o Sand Hill Energy Center 100 MW peaking capacity online prior to summer load.
       o Consistent maintenance programs and investments in capital improvements. Average
           number of times a customer’s service was interrupted (SAIFI) was 0.69 (below the industry
           average of 0.80 interruptions) with an average duration (SAIDI) of 51.57 minutes (below a
           60 minute industry average). The number of faults on each transmission line per hundred
           miles of transmission line (SATLPI) was 1.78 faults compared to an industry average of 4.0
           faults.
       o Successfully passed Transmission Operator compliance audits by North American Electric
           Reliability (NERC) and Texas Reliability Entity (TRE).
       o Continued preparations for December 1 Nodal Market conversion.
       o Certifications by International Organization for Standardization (ISO 9001) Quality
           Management Program for Customer Care and Electric Service Delivery.

   Commitment to excellent customer service. Investment in a new Customer Care & Billing system
    to come on line in FY 2011 to help provide better service and more information to customers.
    Improved customer satisfaction from 78% to 79% using the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

   Maintained bond credit ratings. Standard and Poor’s rating agency reaffirmed its A+ rating for
    Electric Separate Lien Utility Revenue Bonds. Good credit ratings allow debt issuance at lower
    interest rates and thus help keep rates affordable.

   Planning and launch of rate review. Hired third party expertise needed to conduct a Cost of Service
    study and help with the rate review. We will develop a rate structure that keeps rates affordable as
    well as Austin Energy financially sound.

Larry Weis
General Manager




                                                                                                   AE 


                                                      121
Austin Energy

                       ELECTRICITY SYSTEM AVERAGE INTERRUPTION FREQUENCY  

Measure Description: This measure tracks the average number of times or frequency that a customer's electric
service is interrupted during the fiscal year and is an important indicator of the reliability of the system. This
measure is affected by conditions like as weather and equipment failure.

Calculation Method: The average is determined by dividing the total number of customers interrupted during
the fiscal year by the average number of customers served.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 0.8 interruptions. The FY 2009-10 actual was
0.69 interruptions, well under the goal.


                              Electricity System Average Interruption Frequency

         1.20

         1.00                                                                0.89
                      1.00              1.02
         0.80
                      0.80              0.80               0.80              0.80              0.80
         0.60                                                                                  0.69
                                                           0.63
         0.40

         0.20

         0.00
                    2005-06           2006-07             2007-08         2008-09            2009-10

                                                 Result           Goal



Assessment of Results: Austin Energy’s distribution reliability performance continues to beat industry averages
by almost 50%. Austin Energy experienced a particularly quiet weather year, which contributed to these
results. The annual system tree trimming maintenance cycle and targeted maintenance on AE’s electric
system components also contributed to these results. Austin Energy has outperformed the industry average
two out of the last three years.

FY 2005-06 and FY 2006-07 had numbers above the goal due to a higher number of weather related events
than Austin normally sees. Thunder storms combined with heavy winds and an ice event in each of the fiscal
years caused equipment failures and downed power lines which directly affected the performance in these
fiscal years.

The measure System Average Interruption Duration is an important component to this measure. It measures
the average number of minutes customers are without service during each outage. The goal for the average
interruption duration was established at 60 minutes with the industry standard at 90 minutes. The FY 2009-10
actual is 51.57 minutes, well under the goal.


Next Steps: Austin Energy will continue to pursue best operating and maintenance practices for its electric
delivery system to ensure reliability, supports its Excellent Customer Service Strategy. A reliable electric
delivery system is important to customer economics and customer satisfaction.

Austin Energy will continue with its tree trimming and maintenance programs in order to maintain reliability at
this level. The FY 2010-11 approved budget includes $64.3 million in operations and maintenance for the
Distribution and Transmission systems, as well as $81.5 million in capital improvements to ensure reliability
performance standards of the system continue to be met.

For more information contact David Wood, Vice President Electric Service Delivery, at (512) 322-6940.




                                                       122
                                                                                                 Austin Energy

              PERCENTAGE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY IN AUSTIN ENERGY’S ENERGY SUPPLY

Measure Description: This measures the percentage of renewable energy such as wind, solar, biomass, in
Austin Energy's total energy supply. Austin Energy’s generation resource plan has a goal of 35% renewable
energy in the portfolio by 2020.

Calculation Method: Total megawatts hours (MWh) of renewable energy either purchased in Purchase Power
Agreements (PPA's) or generated by Austin Energy divided by the total number of megawatt hours provided by
the energy supply.

FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 goal for this measure was established at 12.2 percent renewable energy.
The FY 2009-10 actual is 9.6%.


                      Percent of Renewable Energy in Austin Energy's Energy Supply
   14.0%

                                                                                               12.2%
   12.0%
                                                                        10.6%
   10.0%
                                               8.0%                                        9.6%
    8.0%                                                                 10.0%
                             7.0%
             6.0%
    6.0%                                                6.6%
                 6.0%               5.8%
    4.0%

    2.0%

    0.0%
                2005-06           2006-07             2007-08          2008-09            2009-10
                                               Result           Goal



Assessment of Results: As the chart above illustrates, the percentage of renewable energy for Austin Energy
decreased in FY 2009-10 from the prior year. Reasons for the decrease include a four and one half month
outage at one of the landfill sites and a slightly lower wind output from current purchased power wind
contracts. In addition, there was lower renewable energy than expected due to a delay in construction of a 30
megawatt (MW) solar farm on Austin Energy’s Webberville property from which renewable power will be
purchased. This solar plant should be on-line producing renewable energy by the end of calendar 2011.

Next Steps: Austin Energy has an Energy Resource Plan that addresses this goal. The original renewable
energy goal was adopted in 2007. In April 2010, City Council approved an Energy Resource Plan but delayed
implementation until affordability measures could be developed and approved by Council. February 17, 2011,
Council approved the implementation of the Austin Energy Resource, Generation, and Climate Protection Plan
to 2020, including an affordability goal. This Energy Resource Plan increases the percentage of renewable
energy in Austin Energy’s portfolio by 2020 to 35% from 30%.

Looking forward, Austin Energy has two purchase power agreements for renewable energy from a 30MW solar
farm on Austin Energy’s Webberville property expected on-line by the end of calendar 2011 and a 100MW
biomass energy plant being constructed in East Texas with a completion date in FY 2011-12. In FY 2010-11,
Austin Energy expects to increase the percentage of renewable energy by adding 123MW of additional wind
power capacity through a new purchase power agreement.

For more information contact Jackie Sargent, Senior Vice President Power Supply and Market Operations, at (512)
322-6491.

                                                         
                                                         
                                                         
                                                         



                                                      123
Austin Energy

                                                 CUSTOMER SATISFACTION INDEX 

Measure Description: The nationally recognized American Customer Satisfaction Index is used to measure and
then average the satisfaction levels of Austin Energy's three major customer segments - residential, small/mid-
sized commercial and key account (large commercial) customers.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by taking the number of positive responses to selected
questions on the American Customer Satisfaction Index compared to total number of surveys.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 83% positive responses. Actual performance
was 79% positive responses.

                                                   Customer Satisfaction Index
                                100%
                                                                                     82%       83%
                                        80%        80%                 82%
        Customer Satisfaction




                                75%     79%        80%                 81%
                                                                                     78%       79%


                                50%



                                25%



                                 0%
                                       2005-06    2006-07            2007-08        2008-09   2009-10

                                                            Result           Goal


Assessment of Results: The chart above illustrates Austin Energy’s continued commitment to customer
satisfaction. Overall satisfaction levels were lower in the last two years than previous years attributable in part
to the historic recession. However, there was improvement in FY 2009-10 over the prior year, increasing from
78% to 79%. This measure is important to see how the utility performs in the eyes of customers so the results
can be used for improvements.

Next Steps: Austin Energy will continually strive to improve customer satisfaction levels through continued
investment in our system, and workforce. Austin Energy is currently replacing its customer billing system
which will help provide more information to customers in a shorter period of time. This system is scheduled to
go online in 2011. Austin Energy continues to invest in generating and electric service delivery systems to
ensure that customers have the energy they need at all times. These will help to continue improving service
and customer satisfaction. Ongoing workforce investments will ensure that staff is adequately trained to
provide the best possible customer service.

For more information contact Jawana Gutierrez, Vice President Customer Care, at (512) 322-6596.




                                                                 124
                                                                                                                 Austin Energy

                                                          FUEL COST AVERAGE 

Measure Description: This measures the system annual average fuel cost, in cents per kilowatt-hour of
electricity produced.

Calculation Method: Average cost of fuel purchased divided by number of kilowatts generated.

FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 actual is a preliminary number based on un-audited fuel costs. The actual
fuel cost average will be released in the FY 2011-12 Proposed Budget. Using these preliminary numbers, the
fuel cost average for FY 2009-10 is 3.446 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh), an increase of 0.075 cents per kWh
from the prior year.

                                              Fuel Cost Average (Cents per Kilowatt Hour)
                              4.0

                              3.5
                                                                     3.655
    Cents per Kilowatt Hour




                              3.0                                                          3.371               3.446
                                    3.178
                              2.5                2.912

                              2.0

                              1.5

                              1.0

                              0.5

                              0.0
                                    2005-06     2006-07             2007-08               2008-09            2009-10*

                                                          Result             A goal was not established



                                                                             *2010 based on preliminary unaudited actual

Assessment of Results: For FY 2009-10, total fuel expenses were down by 1.1% yet total system generation
was also down by 3.2% compared to FY 2008-09, which attributed to the slight increase in the system average
fuel cost from 3.371 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh) to 3.446 cents per kWh. Other factors that affect the fuel
cost average are the mix of fuels in Austin Energy’s portfolio, as well as the market price for those fuels.
Though natural gas costs were lower in FY 2009-10, transportation costs for coal delivery increased. Wind
power continues to have high congestion costs, also causing total fuel costs to increase. This measure is
important as the cost of fuel directly affects customers’ bills.

Next Steps: Austin Energy will continue its fuel hedging program in order to maintain a stable fuel cost
average. One of the primary fuel sources, natural gas, continues to have favorable prices in the market.
Austin Energy expects the fuel cost average in FY 2010-11 to decrease due to these lower prices.

For more information contact Jackie Sargent, Senior Vice President Power Supply and Market Operations, at (512)
322-6491.




                                                                   125
Austin Energy

           CREDIT RATING FOR SEPARATE‐LIEN ELECTRIC UTILITY SYSTEM REVENUE BONDS 

Measure Description: Austin Energy bonds are rated for credit quality by Standard & Poor's for the electric
separate-lien electric utility system revenue bonds. A bond rating is a “grade” assigned by private
independent rating services (Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, and Fitch) that indicates the bonds' credit quality.
The ratings are the result of evaluations done by the rating agencies that measure an entity’s ability to repay
principal and interest on debt issued. The performance of the local economy, strength of financial and
administrative management, and various debt ratios are all considered when assigning a rating to an entity.
The rating indicating the highest credit-quality investment grade bonds is “AAA, and the lowest grade is “C,”
also known as “junk.” Investors utilize these ratings when deciding whether to purchase bonds issued by the
City of Austin. The higher the rating, the lower the risk to the investor, which results in a lower return to the
investor and a lower cost of borrowing for the issuer.

Calculation Method: Based on financial condition of the utility as seen by Standard & Poor's financial rating
agency.

FY 2009-10 Results: Standard & Poor’s confirmed the current A+ Positive Outlook for Austin Energy.




                     De bt                        2005-06        2006-07        2007-08        2008-09        2009-10


                                                      A+             A+             A+             A+             A+
 Utility revenue bonds – Electric separate lien
                                                  P o s itiv e   P o s itiv e   P o s itiv e   P o s itiv e   P o s itiv e


Assessment of Results: Austin Energy is pleased with these results, which will allow us to issue future debt
instruments at a significantly lower interest rate thus saving rate payer’s money. The FY 2009-10 actual rating
by Standard & Poor’s included the comments: “The ratings reflect our view of the general credit worthiness of
the system, which includes its diversified generation resource mix, competitive rates, strong liquidity, and a
service area that is not concentrated in revenue from its principal customers”. “The positive outlook reflects
our view of a long-term trend of strong financial performance”.

Next Steps: Austin Energy will continue to work on strengthening our financial position. We have undergone
financial review by Navigant Consulting, Inc., and a rate review underway, with the help of consultant RW
Beck. According to S&P, if Austin Energy restores financial performance to the historically strong level of the
past and maintains good levels of liquidity, a rating upgrade might be warranted in the future.

For more information contact Elaine Hart, Sr. Vice President, Finance and Corporate Services, at (512) 322-6558.




                                                         126
                                                                                                 Austin Energy

                EQUIVALENT AVAILABILITY FACTOR OF SOUTH TEXAS NUCLEAR PLANT 

Measure Description: This measures the number of hours the South Texas Nuclear (STP) plant's capacity is
available during the fiscal year.

Calculation Method: Total number of hours in the fiscal year to total number of hours the plant is at full
capacity.

FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 actual of 90.5% was lower than the goal of 95% due to a prolonged
planned outage and an unplanned outage at the plant.


                          Equivalent Availability Factor of South Texas Nuclear Plant



  100%              95.0%              95.0%                96.0%              95.0%              95.0%
              95.0%                91.0%              95.0%                93.0%
                                                                                               90.5%
   75%


   50%


   25%


    0%
               2005-06             2006-07            2007-08             2008-09             2009-10

                                                 Result         Goal




Assessment of Results: The FY 2009-10 actual results of 90.5% were lower than the target of 95% due to the
Fall 2009 planned outage lasting ten days longer than anticipated. Also, Unit 1 had a forced or unplanned
outage in the Spring 2010 due to control rod issues. Austin Energy was able to purchase power and ramp up
additional resources to meet the customer demands while this outage took place. STP is one of Austin
Energy’s most reliable generating sources and one of the least expensive. This measure is important as
prolonged outages will cause AE to have to rely on other more expensive generation resources which
ultimately affects customers’ bills.

Next Steps: Austin Energy will continue to work with the STP Nuclear Operating Company (plant operator) to
ensure that STP is available to help meet Austin’s electricity needs. Austin Energy owns 16% or 422
megawatts (MW) of Units 1 and 2. A reliable generation fleet enables Austin Energy to meet its customer’s
needs during peak demand times, improves the economic dispatch of the system's units, and provides
opportunities to increase revenues through off-system sales. The STP approved business plan for FY 2011-
2016 will balance fuel usage and boost generation from both units 1 and 2 which should improve this
performance measure back to the 95% range.

For more information contact Jackie Sargent, Senior Vice President Power Supply and Market Operations, at (512)
322-6491.




                                                     127
Austin Energy




                128
                                           
                                           
                                           
                                           
                                           
                                           
                                           
                          AUSTIN WATER UTILITY KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                         2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                                2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                          Target  Met?
Drinking water quality: turbidity                             0.1     0.1      0.1     0.08     0.09       0.1 
Wastewater Quality: Biological Oxygen Demand                 1.91    2.00     2.21     2.06     2.14      3.00 
Number of reported wastewater repeat overflows per 
                                                             2.36    1.25     1.25     0.72     0.38      2.00 
100 miles of sewer lines 
Percent of priority 1 and 1A leaks responded to within 3 
                                                            33.9%  40.4%  39.4%  42.4%  74.0%  75.0%                 
hours 
Peak day water usage as a percentage of water 
                                                            84.3%  63.7%  77.0%  80.0%  68.0%  80.0%                     
treatment system capacity 
Water consumption per capita per day: total and             190.25,  150.56,  170.27,  167.44,  135.41,  No 
                                                                                                                  N/A 
residential                                                 111.76 83.62  101.67 105.58  80.65  Target
Millions of gallons of reclaimed wastewater used for 
                                                            1,088    1,172    1,632    1,990    1,093    1,000 
beneficial purposes 
                                                            $0.671  $1.384  $1.699  $2.605  $4.412  $2.200 
Dollar amount of revenues recovered                                                                                      
                                                              mil     mil     mil     mil     mil     mil 
                                                              Not                                     No 
Number of findings on 10A permit for wild lands areas                 8       19      12      43                     
                                                            tracked                                 Target
Percent of dollars spent on CIP projects compared to CIP
                                                         79.01% 67.56% 89.70% 70.52%  67.30%  90.00%                 
spending plan 
                                                                                            


                                    AUSTIN WATER UTILITY 
                                 FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 



Director’s Message

The Austin Water Utility (AWU) provides water, wastewater, reclaimed water, conservation, and environmental
protection products and services for nearly a million customers over a 500-plus square mile service area.
Annually, the Utility’s two water treatment plants produce approximately 50 billion gallons of safe, reliable
drinking water and its two wastewater plants provide nearly 40 billion gallons of treated effluent for release
back into the Colorado River or for use in the growing reclaimed water system. The Utility also manages over
30 thousand acres of water quality and wildlife habitat protection lands in the Texas Hill Country.

The Year 2009-10 was a busy and productive year at Austin Water as demonstrated by the following
highlights:
- Our leak detection program investigated 15,040 valves, 7,380 hydrants and 720 miles of distribution main.
   From this investigation, 121 leaks were found and repaired. In addition, 23 miles of transmission lines were
   surveyed for leaks and 6 miles of condition assessment was performed.
- The Consumer Service Division has improved accurate meter readings for water consumption and trend
   analysis for metered consumption.
- Austin Water Utility’s customer satisfaction rate for Drinking Water Quality was 80% on the City-wide Citizen
   Survey, was above the 70% goal, was one of the highest numbers received on the survey, and is well above
   the national average of 69%.

The Austin Water Utility strives to protect the environment through sustainable practices. We also protect
public health and safety by providing high quality water services. Our efforts in these areas included the
following measures over the past year:
- In FY 2009-10, AWU initiated three programs that lay the foundation for significant reductions in Green
   House Gas (GHG) emissions. First, AWU’s initiation of an Asset Management Program represented a major
   step toward systematic GHG emissions reduction through improved life-cycle planning of capital
   improvements as well as operations and maintenance practices. Second, AWU began characterization of the
   energy demands of its largest energy-consuming activity, the drinking water distribution system, as a
   necessary first step toward optimizing this energy use. Finally, AWU adopted a departmental climate
   protection plan in concert with the citywide Climate Protection Program with specific goals and strategic for
   GHG reductions throughout AWU offices and operations.
- Potable water consumption was reduced across all sectors in FY 2009-10. Residential dropped by 18 gallons
   per capita per day (GPCD) and reductions in non-residential use lowered the total consumption system-wide
   by 32 GPCD from FY 2008-09. Some of the contributing factors were stage II water restrictions being
   implemented year round, water conservation program initiatives, wetter than normal weather conditions
   throughout the year and relatively weak economic conditions.
- Water quality indicated by the clarity of drinking water is consistently below the regulatory agencies’ permit
   level.
- Treated wastewater effluent quality is also consistently below the regulatory agencies’ permit level.
- A total of 0.38 reportable repeat wastewater overflows per 100 miles of sewer lines was well below the
   target of 2.0. This reduction is a reflection of the success of the Austin Clean Water Program that
   dominated the infrastructure-related CIP programs over the past few years.
- During FY 2009-10, the implementation of AWU’s CIP program includes projects aimed at improving the
   water distribution system’s capacity, pressure, and fire protection needs. AWU continues to evaluate
   distribution system infrastructure performance in the critical areas of capacity, pressure, water velocity,
   valve shutout access, and fire protection needs by constantly monitoring asset management, system
   planning, engineering, and analysis efforts. AWU’s on-going processes to effectively administer plan review
   and Service Extension processes are done to ensure system additions and improvements meet or exceed
   AWU’s design criteria for distribution infrastructure performance. The implementation of AWU’s CIP program
   includes projects aimed at improving the water distribution system’s performance capabilities mentioned
   above, to reduce root causes of distribution system leaks, improve leak repair response times, to respond to
   the demands of growth and to improve overall system reliability.

Accountability for resource use is taken seriously in the Austin Water Utility, and the measure of our success is
evident in the following metrics:
- Cost containment efforts were enacted during the year to reduce operations and maintenance costs.
  Vacant positions were held and reviewed by the Executive Team. Contractual services and commodity
  purchases were reviewed and larger items needed approval from the Director.
- As part of the January 2010 bond issuance, all the bond rating agencies confirmed our AA rating, showing
  the continued financial strength of AWU.
- The Utility was able to incorporate the use of Build America Bonds, an American Recovery and
  Reinvestment Act instrument that serves to reduce the overall interest rate for the bonds, in the November
  2010 Bond issuance.

                                                                                                       AWU 
                                                         129
                                        AUSTIN WATER UTILITY 
                                     FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 
                                                                                                




-   In FY 2009-10 the process of developing the CIP spending plan was restructured with the major emphasis
    being enhanced preliminary project planning, scope development, and cost estimating.

As you can see from the above summary of our accomplishments in FY 2009-10, the Austin Water Utility
remains committed to meeting our mission ‘to provide safe, reliable and high quality water services to our
customers’.

Greg Meszaros,
Director

 




 




                                                                                                   AWU 
                                                       130                                             
                                                                                             Austin Water Utility

                                  DRINKING WATER QUALITY: TURBIDITY 

Measure Description: One way of assessing drinking water quality is to examine its turbidity, Nephelometric
Turbidity Units (NTU), which indicate the measure of relative clarity of a liquid or measure the clearness of the
water. The greater the turbidity, the murkier the water, and it indicates that more suspended solids, like clay,
silt, plankton, industrial wastes, sewage, and bacteria, are possibly present. Austin Water Utility attempts to
achieve the lowest NTU possible, rather than barely meeting permit levels, to ensure the public safety of
potable drinking water. It is also an excellent measure of plant optimization to ensure maximum public health
protection. NTU’s of 1.0 or less generally are not detected by the naked eye.

Calculation Method: Finished water turbidity is measured at each Water Treatment Plant every 4 hours (2am,
6am, 10am, 2pm, 6pm, and 10pm). These readings are reported to Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality (TCEQ) for every four-hour period that the Water Treatment Plant is treating water. Maximum possible
readings of 186 are collected for each Water Treatment Plant that appears on the Monthly Operating Report
(MOR).

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 0.10. The Utility’s .09 NTU result was under
the Permit Level by .21 and the goal by .01. The lower the NTU means that the quality of water produced is
safer and it has remained below the permit level due to improvements in plant chemical monitoring, filtering
and treatment processes to ensure the internal goal is met.


                                         Drinking Water Quality: Turbidity


         0.40


         0.30


         0.20

                      0.10               0.10                 0.10              0.10              0.10
         0.10
                      0.10               0.10                 0.10             0.08               0.09

         0.00
                    2005-06            2006-07               2007-08          2008-09           2009-10


                                                    Result             Goal




Assessment of Results: TCEQ monitors the permit level for NTU at 0.3. Austin’s drinking water NTU of 0.09 is
well below the permit level. The Utility’s on-going continuous improvement efforts in plant maintenance,
operations, and treatment processes continue to provide consistent high quality drinking water to customers.

Next Steps: The City draws water from Colorado River into two water treatment plants: Davis and Ullrich.
Davis Water Treatment Plant constructed in 1954 and Ullrich Water Treatment Plant constructed in 1969. The
combined maximum capacities of the plants are 285 million gallons per day (MGD). The Austin Water Utility is
committed to producing high quality drinking water that surpasses regulatory standards and the low NTU
results help demonstrate our success in this critical area.

For more information contact Steven Carrico, Division Manager Treatment, at (512) 972-1818.




                                                      131
Austin Water Utility

                              WASTWATER QUALITY: BIOLOGICAL OXYGEN DEMAND 

Measure Description: One way of assessing the quality of treated wastewater effluent is to compare the actual
level of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), in milligrams per liter (mg/l), to the permit level mandated by the
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The
measure tracks the pollutants in the wastewater that treatment plants remove; a lower number represents
fewer pollutants re-entering the river. Fish, other animals, and plants in the river need oxygen to live and this
measure tracks AWU’s efforts at limiting the amount of oxygen using pollutants that re-enter the stream
through the release of treated effluent. Too many pollutants rob oxygen from the water in the river that is
needed by wildlife and plant life to ensure a healthy waterway downstream of Austin.

Calculation Method: Composite samples are collected each day by plant operator and submitted to Laboratory
Services for analysis. Laboratory Services enter results in Standardized Laboratory Information Management
(SLIM) database and generate a report for the discharge monitoring report. This information is sent to
Treatment Administration in a signed official report verifying proofed results. The monthly average values are
reentered into MS Excel for graphing and additional averaging calculations. Calculation methods are
developed in conjunction with and meet regulatory agency standards and are used to demonstrate effluent
quality that is released after treatment into the Colorado River.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 2.00 mgl. The Utility’s 2.14 BOD result was
2.86 below the Permit Level, .14 above the goal.


                                   Wastewater Quality: Biological Oxygen Demand


       6.00
       5.00
       4.00
       3.00            2.00             2.00                 2.21             2.06               2.14
       2.00
       1.00            1.91             2.00                 2.00             2.00               2.00

       0.00
                  2005-06              2006-07           2007-08             2008-09            2009-10


                                                    Result          Goal




Assessment of Results: Austin’s effluent quality measure Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) has consistently
been well below the permitted level. The permit level is 10.0 mg/l (monthly average) and 5.0 mg/l (yearly
average). Austin has two main wastewater treatment plants: South Austin Regional and Walnut Creek
Wastewater Treatment Plants. Both plants have a rated capacity of 75 mgd each. SAR and Walnut Creek
Wastewater Treatment Plants discharged approximately 100 mgd in FY 2009-10 of treated effluent to the
Colorado River. Additionally, these two plants provide treated effluent to the Utility’s Reclaimed water
program. Improvements are ongoing at these plants to continually adjust to rain patterns, floods, and
regulatory changes that aim at keeping released wastewater effluent at levels that will ensure that AWU is a
good steward of the cleanliness and health of the Colorado River downstream of Austin.

Next Steps: Austin Water Utility wastewater treatment program continues to provide the citizens of Austin and
the downstream users with the highest possible quality of treated wastewater effluent. Austin Water Utility’s
wastewater treatment program uses continuous improvement to identify opportunities for cost savings and
increased efficiencies while maintaining highest quality. Continue to provide the reclaimed water program with
treated effluent as the system expands.


For more information contact Orren West, Division Manager Treatment, at (512) 972-1957.




                                                      132
                                                                                           Austin Water Utility

                         NUMBER OF REPORTED WASTEWATER REPEAT OVERFLOWS  
                                      PER  100 MILES OF SEWER LINES 

Measure Description: This measure shows the number of reported Sanitary Sewer Overflows (SSOs) that
occurred from the same address for sewer service lines or the same section of wastewater main that previous
spills have come from. Reported SSOs are those overflows that originate from city-owned sewer components
and reach storm drains or waterways. Sewage that reaches storm drains or waterways can contaminate water
wells with disease causing agents and can cause other health hazards if people or pets come in contact with
the wastewater. It can also contaminate the raw water sources used by treatment plants making the addition
of extra chemicals necessary or requiring adjustments in treatment processes to ensure that the spread of
disease is prevented. This measure is an important indicator of the effectiveness of previous repairs and is
monitored by regulatory agencies. High numbers of repeat overflows indicate delays in making repairs,
possible poor repair practices, deteriorated pipelines, and potential enforcement actions by regulatory
agencies.

Calculation Method: Number of reported repeat overflows divided by miles of wastewater main.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at less than 2.0. The Utility’s .38 results for
overflows were 1.62 below the initial internal Goal. As noted below, the measure has steadily gone down due
to the success of the 5-year, $250 million dollar Austin Clean Water Program and indicates that the collection
system and emergency response procedures have made the Utility’s service area safer from the effects of
wastewater spills.


                               Number of Reported Wastewater Repeat Overflows
                                         per 100 Miles of Sewer Lines


                   3                  3                    3
      3.00
                  2.36
                                                                              2                2
      2.00
                                     1.25                  1.25
      1.00                                                                  0.72
                                                                                               0.38

      0.00
                 2005-06            2006-07               2007-08          2008-09          2009-10


                                                 Result             Goal




Assessment of Results: The number of reported repeat overflows has declined steadily as a result of upgrades
of wastewater main during the Austin Clean Water Program. In addition, the effectiveness of Austin Water
Utility SSO response procedures has reduced the impact of sewer main backups and the volume of overflows.
The use of contract construction services has allowed complex repair of defective wastewater piping to be
completed more quickly.

Next Steps: The goal for this measure is set at less than 1 SSO per 100 miles of sewer main for FY 2011-12.
Austin Water Utility is developing a system-wide condition assessment database for all wastewater mains
using TV inspection software and industry-standard condition ratings. This will be coupled with criticality
(consequence of failure) rankings and cost metrics for each sewer main and manhole to develop an asset
management plan for the collection system. The asset management plan will direct limited resources toward
the highest priority mains for rehabilitation or replacement and can be expected to reduce reportable SSOs,
including repeat SSOs as it is implemented. The plan will also be used to support funding requests to increase
the amount of the deteriorated system that can be addressed.

For more information contact Steven Schrader, P.E., Division Manager, at (512) 703-6635.




                                                     133
Austin Water Utility

                  PERCENT OF PRIORITY 1  & 1A LEAKS RESPONDED TO WITHIN 3 HOURS 

Measure Description: Response time for water leaks shows the amount of time required to respond to and
eventually repair water leaks in the distribution system. The measure shows the effectiveness of the process
to receive notice of, respond to, and eventually repair water leaks and, therefore, limit the loss of treated
drinking water and the related revenue.

Calculation Method: Number of water leaks responded to within 3 hours or less, divided by total number of
water leaks responses.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 75%. The Utility’s 74% result was below the
goal by 1%.


                               Percent of Priority 1 & 1A Leaks Responded to within 3 Hours



       100%
                        75%                 75%                  75%               75%           75%
        75%
                                                                                                74.0%
        50%

                                           40.4%                                  42.4%
                                                                39.4%
        25%            33.9%


          0%
                       2005-06            2006-07              2007-08           2008-09        2009-10


                                                      Result            Goal




Assessment of Results: Although the percentage of leaks in these categories did not meet the goal of 75% for
the year, there was a significant improvement from previous years. In particular, there was an improvement of
31.6% from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10. Budgetary concerns evaluated at mid-year, specifically premium time
(call back and overtime) expenditures caused work group to reevaluate response for 1A leaks after hour, while
maintaining goal for priority 1 response. This reevaluation and the implementation of a secondary goal of
repair of 1A leaks within 24 working hours caused slippage in meeting the yearly goal.

Next Steps: Work group will continue efforts to evaluate and weigh budgetary impacts during the FY 2010-11,
against the goal that has been set. The attention to these potentially high volume leaks will remain a priority
in future years as AWU continues its efforts to conserve this precious resource and more resources will also be
allotted to more quickly repair lower volume water leaks that have a priority level of 2 or more. Analysis of
personnel utilization continues to insure that operational needs are met for response to leaks in all categories.

For more information contact Nowell Mojica, Water Distribution Manager at (512) 972-1280.




                                                          134
                                                                                          Austin Water Utility

        PEAK DAY WATER USAGE AS A PERCENTAGE OF WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM CAPACITY 

Measure Description: This measure is the ratio of peak day water usage compared to water treatment system
capacity.

Calculation Method: The City’s peak day usage is divided by the water treatment system capacity. In FY 2009-
10, the peak day usage was 193 Million Gallons Day (MGD) and the water treatment system capacity was 285
MGD. This measure is calculated annually after the end of the fiscal year based on the City’s water treatment
system capacity and daily water usage data collected by the Austin Water Utility.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 80%. The Utility’s 68% result was 12% under
the goal.


                   Peak Day Water Usage as a Percentage of Water Treatment System Capacity

       100%
                    84.3%                80%                 80%               80%              80%

        75%
                                                            77.0%            80.0%
                      80%
                                                                                             68.0%
                                       63.7%
        50%


        25%


         0%
                   2005-06            2006-07              2007-08          2008-09          2009-10


                                                  Result            Goal




Assessment of Results: The ratio was 68% for the FY 2009-10. This peak day water usage as a percentage of
water treatment plants’ capacity meets and is actually below the goal of 80%. The lower percentage for FY
2009-10 compared to prior fiscal years is likely the result of a combination of factors, including additional
water savings due to conservation program implementation, weather impacts with periods of wetter than
normal conditions, and economic impacts.

Next Steps: Austin Water Utility continues to monitor this measure as an indicator of peak day water usage
compared to water treatment capacity.


For more information contact Teresa Lutes, P.E., Division Manager, at (512) 972-0179.




                                                      135
Austin Water Utility

             WATER CONSUMPTION PER CAPITA PER DAY:  (TOTAL AND RESIDENTIAL ONLY) 

Measure Description: Since total water consumption tends to increase as the population grows, per capita per
day water consumption numbers allow for meaningful comparison between water consumption in different
years. Residential water consumption reflects direct usage by the Austin Water Utility service area residents;
total water consumption reflects commercial and industrial usage etc. as well.

Calculation Method: Total water consumption per capita per day is calculated as follows: total water pumped at
AWU’s water treatment plants during a fiscal year is divided by an estimated average served area population
and then divided by 365 days. Residential consumption per capita per day is total water usage by residential
customers (obtained from the billing system) divided by an estimated average served single family residential
population and then divided by 365 days.

FY 2009-10 Results: The actual amounts noted on the graph below will serve as baselines for comparison in
future years for this measure.


                          Water Consumption Per Capital Per Day: (Total & Residential)


  200
                                                                                   167.44
              190.25
                                                              170.27
  150
                                   150.56                                                            135.41
                                                                                  105.58
  100
               111.76                                         101.67
                                                                                                     80.65
                                   83.62
    50


     0
              2005-06             2006-07             2007-08                2008-09           2009-10

                                        Residential Average       Total Average



Assessment of Results: Both total and residential consumption was significantly down in FY 2009-10. This result
can be explained by a confluence of factors, including but not limited to more rain than in the previous two
years, water conservation efforts, and weak economic conditions. Lower water consumption is a sign that
water conservation efforts mandated by the City Council are working as intended. At the same time, lower
consumption means lower revenues to Austin Water Utility, which presents its own set of challenges.

Next Steps: The City Council is committed to continuing water conservation. While weather conditions will
continue to fluctuate and impact water demand, the long term per capita water consumption is trending down.

For more information contact Drema Gross, Division Manager, Water Conservation, at (512) 974-2787.




                                                     136
                                                                                                   Austin Water Utility

                MILLIONS OF GALLONS OF RECLAIMED WASTEWATER USED FOR BENEFICIAL PURPOSE 

Measure Description: This measure shows the actual number of gallons of reclaimed water from wastewater
treatment processes that were used beneficially. It is important because it shows savings of treated drinking
water that could have been used for the purposes that the reclaimed water replaced. A higher number shows
that more treated drinking water was saved thereby increasing the impact of conservation efforts on source
depletion and saving drinking water treatment capacity.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by adding reclaimed water flows from the Balcones, Lost Creek,
Onion Creek, South Austin Regional, and Walnut Wastewater Treatment Plants.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 1,000 million gallons. The Utility’s 1,093
million gallons used was 93 million gallons over the goal.


                         Millions of Gallons of Reclaimed Wastewater Used For Beneficial Purpose


              2,500
                                                                                  1,991
              2,000
                                                                1,632
              1,500
   Millions




                        1,088             1,172
                                                                                                       1,093
              1,000
                                                                1,100            1,100
                        910                                                                             1,000
                                          910
               500

                 0
                       2005-06           2006-07             2007-08             2008-09              2009-10


                                                       Result           Goal




Assessment of Results: 1,093 million gallons of water was reclaimed for beneficial uses such as irrigation,
cooling, and toilet flushing. Reclaimed water beneficially reused during FY 2009-10 declined from the previous
two years. The decline can be attributed to cooler, wetter weather experienced during FY 2009-10, as
compared to the drought conditions encountered during FY 2007-08 and FY 2008-09.

Next Steps: Reclaimed water use grows by extending mains to large volume customers that are able to
convert a portion of their potable water use to the lower quality reclaimed water. Smaller customers along
main extensions are also afforded the opportunity to connect. Main extensions are funded through the Utility’s
Capital Improvement Program, with continued funding necessary for continued growth in the beneficial use of
reclaimed water.


For more information contact Dan Pedersen, P.E., Reclaimed Program Manager, at (512) 972-0074.




                                                         137
Austin Water Utility

                                       DOLLAR AMOUNT OF REVENUES RECOVERED 

Measure Description: This measure shows result of Austin Water Utility’s “revenue recovery efforts” or reviews
performed of customer accounts to identify stopped meters, incorrect billing set up, etc. Credit adjustments
are reductions to customer bills resulting from a variety of issues; the most predominant are customer water
leaks. For revenues, this measure is important because it is representative of the accuracy of meters and to
what extent the Utility should perform routine maintenance and repairs to be cost effective.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by totaling credit adjustment and revenue recovered.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at $2 million. The goal was exceeded by over
$2 million dollars for Total Revenue Recovery and just under $300,000 for Total Credit Adjustment.


                                               Dollar Amount of Revenues Recovered


              5
                                                                                                          $4.412
              4


              3
                                                                                            $2.825
   Millions




                           $2.141              $2.193                 $2.251
              2
                           $2.0                 $2.0                  $2.0                  $2.0               $2.0
                                                             $1.699             $2.605                     $2.298
              1                       $1.384
                  $0.671
              0
                      2005-06               2006-07              2007-08              2008-09              2009-10

                                    Total Revenue Recovery        Total Credit Adjustment          Goal




Assessment of Results: The most significant back bill amounts were for: slow or stopped meters ($2.6 million)
and correction of wastewater billing for commercial customers, from billing at a wastewater average to bill
wastewater based on actual water usage ($839,000). Approximately 95% of all commercial customers with the
potential for error in the wastewater billing methodology were reviewed in FY 2009-10. These two back bill
categories comprised 77% of all revenue recovered.

Next Steps: Continue to review usage anomalies for all meters 3” and larger, and expand focus to identify
services that are not being billed, due to human error, e.g. meter was set in field and not communicated to
Consumer Services to initiate billing, customer tied in to sewer services without notifying Utility, and other
account set up errors.

A focus for FY 2010-11 will be to review usage for apartment and condominium complexes and compare it to
occupancy statistics. This issue is important because of the impact to the customer if a back bill is necessary,
e.g. these business owners generally protest back billings issued by the Utility if they cannot recover the costs
from their residents/tenants.

Revenue from back billing for slow/stopped meters should decrease since the Utility’s Meter Shop has
increased efforts to test every meter 3” and larger at least once every two years. Additionally, revenue from
incorrect wastewater billing methodology will decrease as approximately 95% of accounts that could have
been set up incorrectly for wastewater billing have already been reviewed.


For more information contact Alice Flora, Consumer Services Manager at (512) 972-0041.




                                                                138
                                                                                             Austin Water Utility

                     NUMBER OF FINDINGS ON  10A PERMIT FOR WILDLANDS AREAS 

Measure Description: This measure tracks the number of Balcones Canyonlands Conservation Plan (BCCP)
Habitat Determinations completed for infrastructure projects as part of the Balcones Canyonlands
Conservation Plan. Numerous public service providers who manage infrastructure inside the BCCP permit area
mitigate their impacts to endangered species habitat through participation in BCCP’s mitigation. This
participation requires a determination of habitat loss, and either a debit against a permit holder’s mitigation
balance or collection of mitigation fees.

Calculation Method: Mitigation is determined through GIS evaluations of acres of habitat loss by class of
habitat. Applicants submit maps and descriptions of their habitat alteration plans. Wildland Conservation
division staff use this information on a GIS platform to assess what classes of habitat mitigation are required
and how many acres are required (to the nearest one-tenth acre).

FY 2009-10 Results: The actual amounts noted on the graph below will serve as baselines for comparison in
future years for this measure.


                               Number of Findings on 10A Permits for Wildlands Areas


       60

       50

       40
                                                                                                43
       30

       20
                                              19
       10
                                                                        12
                      8
        0
                   2006-07                  2007-08                   2008-09                2009-10


                                                   Result       A goal was not established




Assessment of Results: Request for habitat determinations from Public Service infrastructure managers are
growing significantly because of increased awareness by applicants and because of outreach by Wildland
Conservation Division staff.

Next Steps: Wildland Conservation Division staff will continue to provide BCCP compliance to public service
infrastructure managers. Additional outreach will be provided through the City’s One Stop Shop and training
through the Planning and Development Review Departments General Permit Reviewers.


For more information contact William Conrad, Div. Mgr. Environmental Conservation at (512) 972-1661.




                                                       139
Austin Water Utility

                                 PERCENT OF DOLLARS SPENT ON CIP PROJECTS  
                                      COMPARED TO CIP SPENDING PLAN 


Measure Description: The measure tracks CIP spending during each fiscal year as a percentage of the CIP
budget for that year. CIP spending affects both the issuance of debt and transfers of current revenue to CIP,
thus impacting rates, so it is important to try to spend CIP money as budgeted.

Calculation Method: CIP spent divided by CIP budgeted.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 90%. The Utility’s 67.3% was 22.7% below
the goal of 90%.


                                   Percent of Dollars Spent on CIP Projects
                                       Compared to CIP Spending Plan


                         90.00              90.00                90.00          90.00              90.00
       100.00


        75.00                                                  89.70
                       79.01
                                          67.56                                70.52              67.30
        50.00


        25.00


          0.00
                       2005-06           2006-07               2007-08        2008-09            2009-10


                                                      Result           Goal




Assessment of Results: The goal for this measure was 90%. Actual CIP expenditures were 67.3% of CIP
spending plan. The chart above illustrates the difficulty in predicting total CIP spending on CIP in a given year.
The projects tend to be complex multi-year projects, the costs of which vary significantly with changes in the
economy. Projects are often delayed due to logistical or design concerns, but once projects reach a certain
point in development, the funding must be in place to enter into major contracts for completion. Therefore,
budgeting must be conservatively high to ensure that projects are not delayed by funding issues. Major capital
spending also carries policy implications, which can cause change in timing while policy makers consider the
full impacts of projects as contracts for design and construction are brought forward. During economic
conditions such as those of the last few years, construction contracts often come in below budgets, affecting
the rate of spending without necessarily affecting the progress of the capital program.

Next Steps: The process of developing the CIP spending plan is being restructured. The plan is no longer
primarily the responsibility of the Financial Planning Section, but is now being developed by the Systems
Planning Division, with emphasis on improving preliminary project planning, scope development, and cost
estimating.

For more information contact Bob Butler, CPA, Utility Financial Manager, at (512) 972-0303.




                                                         140
                                                
                                                
                                                
                                                
                                                
                                                
                                                
                                    AVIATION KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                   2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                           2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                    Target  Met?
Score of customer service participants rank overall 
                                                        38%     44%      43%     53%     53%        47% 
satisfaction "Excellent" 
Non‐Airline revenue per enplaned passenger             $9.91  $10.12 $10.48 $10.88  $10.96  $11.09
Airline cost per enplaned passenger                    $7.35  $7.75  $7.78  $8.33  $8.45  $8.74 
Lost Time Injury Rate Per the Equivalent of 100 
                                                         1.4    2.39     1.3     1.29    0.66         0 
Employees 
                                                                                                 


                                    AVIATION DEPARTMENT 
                                  FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 



Director’s Message

Excellence in customer service - Austin style - is the business strategy of Austin-Bergstrom International
Airport. Together, the Aviation Department, airlines, tenants and travel community continually work to ensure
passenger safety and a convenient, friendly travel experience.

FY 2010 was a very successful year at ABIA; $13.4 million
was the net transfer to the capital fund, comparable to the
2008 profit levels. Along with a 2.6% increase in enplaned
passengers, operating revenue increased $3.3 million in
FY 2010, representing a 4.1% increase compared to FY
2009. The airline revenue increased $2.7 million, a 7.9%
increase compared to FY 2009, and the non-airline
revenue increased $1.5 million, a 3.4% increase compared
to FY 2009. In addition, our employees are committed to
controlling costs resulting in 8.3% savings in the 2010
operating expenses budget.

In FY 2010, ABIA was ranked the best airport in North
America by the Airport Service Quality (ASQ) passenger
survey of Airports Council International (ACI). Additionally,
the airport ranked second world-wide among airports its size: 5 – 15 million passengers. This recognition is an
indication of ABIA’s commitment to customer satisfaction and its strong ties with its business partners that
operate at the airport. In addition to being a top ranked airport, ABIA is one of the nine airports world-wide and
the only North American Airport to earn Airport Service Quality Assured Certification.

                                                      The lost time injury rate decreased significantly from 1.29
                                                      in FY 2009 to 0.656 in FY 2010. Management promotes and
                                                      emphasizes safety as part of the organization’s culture
                                                      through education and training.

                                                      Several capital projects were completed, including the new
                                                      airport security system, the airfield lighting improvements
                                                      and the east runway system perimeter road. Some other
                                                      projects are underway, including the new consolidated
                                                      rental car parking facility (CONRAC) that will enhance
                                                      customer service by adding 2,000 rental car parking
                                                      spaces and approximately 1,000 public parking spaces.
                                                      The remaining overnight apron project will provide
                                                      additional aircraft parking to prepare for additional growth.

                                                      Three new nonstop destinations were added in 2010 and
two airlines announced new air service in 2011.

The Aviation Department continues to use creative approaches to reduce its operating costs and generate
more non-airline revenue. With a staff that is committed to serving the community, the airport will continue to
focus on providing excellent customer service, “Austin style”.

Jim Smith
Executive Director




                                                               ABIA ‐ Excellence in customer service – Austin style 
                                                        141
Aviation
                                                           
                               SCORE OF CUSTOMER SERVICE PARTICIPANTS  
                               RANK OVERALL SATISFACTION “ EXCELLENT” 

Measure Description: The primary trade organization for airports, Airports Council International (ACI), conducts
rigorous customer satisfaction surveys at airports all around the globe. The ACI survey is a quality customer
service survey designed to evaluate what is important at the airport from the customers’ point of view. Overall
satisfaction, cleanliness, courtesy and helpfulness are some of the areas addressed in the ACI survey.

Calculation Method: The survey results are provided by ACI of North America. The number of participants who
scored ABIA as a “5 – Excellent” is taken as a percentage of the total number of participants.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 47%. The Airport exceeded that mark with a
final result of 53%.


                     Score of Customer Service Participants Rank Overall Satisfaction "Excellent"


  100%


    80%


    60%                                                                              53%                  53%
                                          44%                                                       47%
                                                               43%
                    38%
    40%


    20%


     0%
               2005-06              2006-07               2007-08               2008-09              2009-10

                                                        Goal   Result



Assessment of Results: A high customer service standard is the foundation on which Austin-Bergstrom
International Airport’s (ABIA) organizational culture is built, and that attitude has continued to deliver award
winning customer satisfaction. In 2009, ABIA was ranked the best airport in North America by the Airport
Service Quality (ASQ) passenger survey of ACI. Additionally, Austin’s airport ranked second world-wide among
airports its size: 5-15 passengers. The Airport Service Quality Survey rankings were based on the results of
over 275,000 questionnaires completed by passengers at 118 airports worldwide. The survey captures the
passengers’ perception of the quality of more than 30 aspects of service. The quality of experience for the
traveling public at an airport is weighed against costs incurred by the airlines when they are considering new
or expanded services and it is that quality service which allows ABIA to compete with lower cost alternatives.
In addition, ABIA is one of only nine airports world-wide and the only North American Airport to earn the ACI
Airport Service Quality Assured Certification. This certification benchmarks an airport’s service quality
management approach and practices against 20 industry best practice criteria.

Next Steps: The airport is committed to maintaining high customer service ratings. The FY 2010-11 goal for
this measure is 48%, an increase of 1% compared to the FY 2009-10 goal. Improving curb appeal and making
a great first impression is included in our FY 2010-11 goals. Also, the airport will invest $600,000 to add two
passenger screening lanes that will increase the convenience and the flow of the passengers through security
checkpoints by over 20%. The expansion of the screening checkpoints will better prepare the airport for future
passenger increases as well as alleviate current security line waits. A consolidated rental car parking facility
(CONRAC) is underway and will enhance customer service by adding 2,000 rental car parking spaces and
approximately 1,000 public parking spaces. A clean, safe, comfortable airport experience for travelers will
continue to be our priority

For more information contact David Arthur, Assistant Director of Finance, at (512) 530-6688.




                                                        142
                                                                                                              Aviation
                                                           
                             NON‐AIRLINE REVENUE PER ENPLANED PASSENGER 

Measure Description: This measure tells how much concession revenue is generated from each departing, or
enplaned, passenger. The goal of concession management is to ensure that travelers have a wide array of
concessions from which to choose and that the leases are negotiated to maximize the amount of revenue
received by the Airport Fund. This measure indicates Aviation's ability to maximize revenue from non-airline
services and consists of 1) parking revenue, 2) concessions such as rental cars, food and beverage, news and
gifts, advertising, airline catering, etc., and 3) rentals and fees for shuttle permits and cargo facilities, property
sales and miscellaneous revenue. Non-airline Revenue per Enplaned Passenger is an indicator which is a
function of revenue and enplanement trends. This measure links to the goal "Achieve superior financial
results” by reducing reliance on airline revenue.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the total revenue for Parking, Other Concessions,
and Other Rentals and Fees by the total enplaned passengers.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at $11.09. The Aviation Department fell short of
this goal by $0.13 or 1.2%.


                                     Non-Airline Revenue per Enplaned Passenger


   $12

   $10                                                                     $11.24 $10.88         $11.09 $10.96
                                         $10.12               $10.48
                    $9.91        $9.64                $9.92
    $8      $9.27


    $6

    $4

    $2

    $0
              2005-06               2006-07              2007-08               2008-09              2009-10

                                                       Goal   Result




Assessment of Results: As in FY 2008-09, the challenging economic environment of FY 2009-10 hurt non-airline
revenue per enplaned passenger as business and leisure passengers alike traveled on tighter budgets.
Although the target was not met, it increased 0.7% when compared to the same period in FY 2008-09. Year-to-
date, non-airline revenue totaled $46.7 million, 3.4% higher than FY 2008-09, and the number of enplaned
passengers increased 2.6% compared to FY 2008-09. The passenger increase along with 0.7% lower than
budgeted non-airline revenue resulted in the lower non-airline revenue per enplaned passenger of $10.96.

Next Steps: Increased emphasis on commercial development and non-airline revenue will be the focus for FY
2010-11. A five year goal was established to reduce our dependency on airline revenue by increasing non-
airline revenue to 60% of operating revenue by 2015. Also, one of the department’s goals is to develop a
commercial development plan by September 2011. New concessions will be introduced at the Airport, such as
Nuevo Leon, Hills Café, Saxon Pub, Ruta Maya and Thundercloud. These new restaurants will increase the FY
2010-11 non-airline revenue. Another goal for next year is to create a team to address parking issues and
maximize revenue.

For more information contact David Arthur, Assistant Director of Finance, at (512) 530-6688.




                                                        143
Aviation
                                                          
                                 AIRLINE COST PER ENPLANED PASSENGER 

Measure Description: This is a key indicator for the airport industry. This measure is a function of airport costs
and enplanement trends. There are two important components to this measure, landing fees and terminal
rent. The airlines’ landing fees are based on the estimated landed weight of commercial and cargo carriers and
are set to recover the City’s costs for the construction, operation, and maintenance of the airfield. Terminal
rents are paid by the airlines and are intended to recover the capital, operating, and maintenance costs
associated with the airlines’ use of the terminal. Since airlines are charged on a cost recovery basis for certain
expenses, this measure improves with lower airport operating costs as well as higher passenger traffic. This
number is very important to airlines when considering new or expanded service in Austin. Austin-Bergstrom
International Airport (ABIA) is considered a moderate cost airport.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by dividing the total revenue from airline customers by the
total enplaned passengers.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at $8.74. The goal was achieved by a margin of
3.3% with actual airline costs per enplaned passenger of $8.45.


                                        Airline Cost per Enplaned Passenger


  $10
               $8.25                                                          $8.33                $8.74
                                   $7.75                $7.78
    $8
                                                                                                  $8.45
                                                                               $7.91
               $7.35                $7.26                $7.26
    $6


    $4


    $2


    $0
              2005-06              2006-07              2007-08               2008-09            2009-10

                                                      Goal        Result




Assessment of Results: The FY 2009-10 airline cost per enplaned passenger of $8.45 is an increase of 1.4%
when compared to the same period for FY 2008-09 and is in line with projections.

For FY 2010-11, the landing fee was established at $3.22 per 1,000 pounds of gross aircraft landed weight.
Total landing fees of $18.8 million earned through September 2010 were $2.0 million, or 12.2%, higher than
the total landing fees earned through September 2009. At the end of the fiscal year, landing fee charges are
adjusted based on actual costs and landed weights throughout the year. This ensures proper payments and
provides for the recovery of all airfield expenses.

The total terminal rental and other fees of $17.2 million through September 2010 were $620,363, or 3.5%,
lower than the total fees earned in FY 2008-09. The method of calculating terminal rental rates is known as the
compensatory method and is specified in the airline use and lease agreement. Under this approach, the actual
costs and revenue for the portions of the terminal used by the airlines are reviewed and compared, following
the close of a fiscal year. Adjustments are made to reconcile any over/underpayments.

Next Steps: Aviation department is committed to controlling and maintaining moderate airline costs to attract
future business for the growing Austin air traveler market. One of the airport’s long term goals is to secure a
non-stop transatlantic service by October 2015. A five year goal was established to reduce our dependency on
airline revenue by decreasing airline revenue to 40% of the operating revenue by 2015. In order to reduce
airline costs in FY 2010-11, the airport implemented budgetary reductions in most of the commodities and
contractuals, resulting in a total savings of approximately $1.5 million.

For more information contact David Arthur, Assistant Director of Finance, at (512) 530-6688.



                                                       144
                                                                                                            Aviation
                                                           
                      LOST TIME INJURY RATE PER THE EQUIVALENT OF 100 EMPLOYEES

Measure Description: This measure examines the amount of time lost due to injury divided by the amount of
time which could be worked by 100 employees. The formula for this measure was created by the National
Safety Council and is an industry norm.

Calculation Method: To calculate this measure, the number of Lost Time Injuries times 200,000 hours is divided
by the total number of hours worked in the department.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at zero, which is the ideal. The actual rate was
0.66 which, while exceeding the goal, represents the lowest rate of the past five years.


                              Lost Time Injury Rate per the Equivalent of 100 Employees


   3.0
                                    2.39
   2.5

   2.0
                1.4
                                                              1.3               1.29
   1.5

   1.0                                                                                             0.66

   0.5
                 0                    0                       0                  0                   0
   0.0
              2005-06              2006-07              2007-08               2008-09             2009-10

                                                      Goal          Result




Assessment of Results: Continued training and emphasis on workplace safety resulted in a significant decrease
in the lost time injury rate for FY 2009-10 compared to the four preceding years. The target of zero is
consistently missed, but the nature and size of the organization make it very unlikely that the target will be
reached in any given year. The rate of injury decreased by nearly half from the preceding year indicating
substantially improved workplace safety. The incremental growth of the safety program, the advocates for
safety in key management positions, and the inclusion of safety training for each new employee during
orientation all contributed to these results.

Next Steps: The airport will continue to improve and expand the safety program and promote an emphasis on
safety as part of the organization’s culture through education, training, and advocacy. In FY 2010-11, Austin-
Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA) will start the implementation of the Safety Management System (SMS)
designed to identify hazards and associated risks within airport operations. As part of the SMS, ABIA has also
implemented a more rigorous hazard reporting program. New hazard reporting boxes and forms have been
placed by all of the ABIA safety boards. ABIA will implement a forklift and Aerial lift training programs that will
start in December 2010. A fall protection program is expected to be in place by early June 2011.

For more information contact Patti Edwards, Director of Operations and Security, at (512) 530-6366.




                                                        145
Aviation




           146
                                        
                                        
                                        
                                        
                                        
                                        
                                        
                          CODE COMPLIANCE KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                  2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                          2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                   Target  Met?
Average number of days from when Code Compliance 
                                                        4.5     8.8     3.6       2      5.7         2 
complaints are first reported until first response 
Total number of Code Compliance cases investigated    12,874 17,749 19,123 17,260  24,301  14,200
                                                                                                

                               CODE COMPLIANCE DEPARTMENT 
                                FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 




 
Director’s Message
 
The Code Compliance Department investigates reports of most code violations and ensures that the standards
required by City codes are met. Our primary focus involves: zoning enforcement, dangerous buildings,
housing, property abatement, and work without permit.

With the adoption of the new 2009 International Property Maintenance Code, code investigators underwent
intensive training to prepare for the new rules and amendments that apply to a larger base of properties.

The department also established a covert camera program to deter illegal dumping with ten units positioned
and monitored throughout the City of Austin.

In FY 2009-10 the department hosted the 1st annual Best Practices Roundtable for statewide Code Compliance
officials. The department also chaired the interdepartmental Public Assembly Code Enforcement (PACE)
taskforce.

The department participated in citywide events such as National Night Out, Juneteenth Celebration, and
Operation Clean Sweep. Staff also presented educational information to numerous neighborhood associations.

Fiscal Year 2009-10 yielded the following results in the performance of our core activities:

     Investigated 3,244 Dangerous Buildings and Housing cases.

     86.7% of Nuisance Abatement cases were brought into voluntary compliance.

     29.4 days was the average time from when Nuisance Abatement complaints were first reported until
      voluntary compliance or administrative or judicial transfer was attained.

     91 % percent of the zoning code complaints were responded to within 2 working days.


The Code Compliance Department is committed to preserving the health, safety, and welfare of the
community through education, cooperation, abatement, and enforcement.


William E. Rhodes, P.E.
Director




                                                        147            Code ‐ Preserving Austin’s Quality of Life 
Code Compliance

  AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS FROM WHEN CODE COMPLIANCE COMPLAINTS ARE FIRST REPORTED 
                                             UNTIL FIRST RESPONSE 

Measure Description: This measure tracks the average number of days from when all Code Compliance
complaints are first reported until first response. This measure is important because it reflects the
Department’s responsiveness to public complaints and is an indicator of what staffing levels are needed to
meet the needs of the growing community.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by taking the total number of days between the date complaint
is reported and the date an investigator responded divided by the total number of cases responded to during
the reporting period.

FY 2009-10 Results: Code Compliance investigators continue to respond to an increasing number of code
violation complaints including dangerous structures and work without permit at properties. Investment in
rehabilitation of older, existing housing stock and the development of new residential and commercial
infrastructure to accommodate population growth is a contributing factor to the dramatic increase in total
cases investigated. The process and workload is primarily complaint driven and the Department’s goal is to
respond to complaints received within 2 business days. Due to a 41% increase in volume of cases from FY
2008-09 to FY 2009-10 the 2 day average response was not met.


            Average Number of Days from When Code Compliance Complaints are First Reported Until First
                                                  Response


  10.0
                                     8.8
    9.0
    8.0
    7.0
                                                                                                    5.7
    6.0
    5.0         4.5
                                                          3.6
    4.0
    3.0                                                                        2.0
    2.0
    1.0         2.0                  2.0                  2.0                  2.0                  2.0
    0.0
              2005-06              2006-07              2007-08             2008-09              2009-10

                                                      Result      Goal



Assessment of Results: During FY 2009-10, the Department received a high volume of reports of nuisance
concerns from an anonymous caller. All calls must be investigated. This individual has reported over 5,000
complaints of high grass or weeds which have had a direct effect on initial response times; the majority of
these complaints were invalid.

Next Steps: A temporary employee has been retained to assist with investigating the bulk complaints that
continue to be received by an anonymous caller.

The Department will continue to work with 3-1-1, the City’s information hotline, to identify repeat callers and
develop policies and procedures to limit their impact on departmental efficiency.

The Department also plans to increase its outreach programs within the community by participating in city-
wide events, neighborhood meetings and recruiting business partners to help educate the public to decrease
the number of invalid complaints received.

For more information contact Keith Leach, CCD Division Manager, (512) 974-1979.




                                                      148
                                                                                                Code Compliance

                      TOTAL NUMBER OF CODE COMPLIANCE CASES INVESTIGATED 

Measure Description: This is a count of the total number of Code Compliance cases investigated. This measure
is important because it is a reflection of the volume of work per investigator and demand for services.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by summing the total number of Code Compliance cases
investigated, including zoning, dangerous buildings and housing, and nuisance abatement cases.

FY 2009-10 Results: Code Compliance investigators continue to respond to an increasing number of code
violation complaints including dangerous structures and work without permit at properties. The total number of
cases investigated in FY 2009-10 was 24,301.


                                Total Number of Code Compliance Cases Investigated


   30000
                                                                                                  24,301
   25000
                                                          19,123
   20000                             17,749                                   17,260

   15000         12,824
                                                                              14,200               14,200
   10000                                                  12,549
                 11,500              11,700
    5000

       0
                2005-06              2006-07             2007-08              2008-09             2009-10

                                                       Result      Goal



Assessment of Results: The number of cases reported and investigated by the Department increased by 7,041
cases, or 41%, from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10. Increased awareness of the Department’s services and ease of
reporting complaints via the City Hotline, 3-1-1, were contributing factors. Additionally, the abundant rainfall in
the summer of 2009 resulted in higher complaints of tall weeds. The Department has also received a high
volume of reports of nuisance concerns from an anonymous caller. This individual has reported over 5,000
complaints of high grass or weeds. The majority of these complaints were invalid.

In response to the increase, the Department took several actions. In coordination with 3-1-1, Code Compliance
implemented a frequent caller policy which restricted the number of calls per 24 hour period and eliminated
anonymous complaints. One temporary employee was hired to handle the bulk property abatement cases.
Other changes included realignment of support staff along with the implementation of a dedicated legal and
training workgroup. Increased activity established the need for a legal team that could expedite and
streamline the legal preparation for certain cases. Additionally, the majority of current Code Compliance
personnel have less than five years experience, and the implementation of on-going training programs such as
the Introduction to Property Abatement and the International Property Maintenance Code is a necessary
component for all Code investigators.

Next Steps: In FY 2009-10 the City Council adopted the International Property Maintenance Code (IPMC) which
expanded the Department’s capability to ensure properties meet minimum health and safety standards.
Included in the IPMC was the ability to monitor commercial structures. Four additional positions were
approved in the FY 2010-11 budget and will assist in responding to cases that result from the implementation
of the IPMC 2009 codes and regulations. The Department has plans to hire a neighborhood liaison who can
serve the citizens of Austin by helping them find solutions to their concerns related to code safety and quality
of life. The Department also plans to increase visibility within the community by participating in city-wide
events and neighborhood meetings and by seeking business partners that can help promote the mission of
Code Compliance. The Department will continue to explore viable options to integrate current existing
database management systems.

For more information contact Keith Leach, CCD Division Manager, (512) 974-1979.




                                                       149
Code Compliance




                  150
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
             ECONOMIC GROWTH AND REDEVELOPMENT SERVICES 
                           KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                            2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                                 2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                             Target  Met?
Number of new jobs created through economic               Not       Not 
                                                                            1,368  810  1,550  500 
development efforts                                    tracked tracked
Percentage of customers satisfied with Business 
                                                        100%  100%  100%  100%  100%  90% 
Solution Center Services 
Number of businesses assisted that show growth in one 
                                                          14        10        32        16         14         15 
or more growth indicator 
Number of contracted business development technical       Not       Not 
                                                                            1,449  1,746  1,594  1,400 
assistance hours delivered                             tracked tracked
Total audience members served through cultural 
                                                       4,486,084 3,876,475 3,878,939 3,502,873  4,888,947  4,100,000
contracts 
                                 ECONOMIC GROWTH AND  
                             REDEVELOPMENT SERVICES OFFICE  
                               FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT                                           



                                                    
Director’s Message
 
The Economic Growth and Redevelopment Service Office (EGRSO) strives to create a cultural and economic
environment that enhances the vitality of the community in a manner that preserves Austin’s character and
environment. EGRSO divisions include Economic Development, Redevelopment, Small Business Development
Program (SBDP), Music, Cultural Arts and Supports Service with a $9.8 million operating budget.

Fiscal Year 2009-10 was a success as demonstrated by the following year end accomplishments:

Redevelopment
o Executed Master Agreements and Easements with U.S. General Services Administration for Federal
   courthouse project and Austin Energy Control Center site with the assistance of CLMD-Real Estate.
o Completed the draft Downtown Austin Plan in partnership with WPDR.
o   Began the five-year Smart Grid Demonstration Project for homes and businesses at Mueller in partnership
   with Pecan Street Project and Catellus.
o   Accepted a $3.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development under the
   Federal Sustainable Communities Planning Grant Program.

Economic Development
o Negotiated 5 Firm Based Chapter 380 Agreements, Hangar Orthopedic, Facebook, Yingli Solar, LegalZoom,
   SunPower Corporation and Samsung, creating 2,000 new jobs and nearly $3.7 billion in capital investment.
o Received a $17,000 grant to enable the City of Austin to be marketed in five provinces of Thailand as part
   of the Creative Corridors Initiative between the Thai and U.S. Governments.

Small Business Development
o Coordinated ElevateAustin, a multi-departmental project that will work as a liaison between the City and
   the small business community.
o Drew 450 attendees at Getting Connected and nearly 650 attendees at Meet the Lender.
o SBDP Meet the Lender was awarded the “Bright Ideas Award” from The Ash Center for Democratic
   Governance and Innovation at Harvard University and nominated as an award finalist for “The
   Corporate/Nonprofit Partnership Award” from The Public Relations News.
o The 2010 International Economic Development Council (IEDC) Awards gave Honorable Mention to SBDP in
   the General Promotion Category, for Utility Bill Inserts.

Cultural Arts
o Awarded over $4.3 million in Cultural Contracts to 237 applicants reaching almost 5.8 million audience
    members, including over 2.25 million tourists.
o Completed 7 public art projects including Jolly-Ville Plateau Salamander at Reicher Ranch, Open Room
    Austin at Sand Beach Park, Austin Space Cruiser (Day) and Austin Space Cruiser (Night) at ABIA, La Fuente
    en Calle Segunda at Second Street District, LAB along the Lance Armstrong Bikeway, and Black Well at
    Twin Oaks Branch Library.
o CreateAustin Cultural Master Plan was endorsed by Austin City Council on June 24, 2010.
o The National Endowment for the Arts awarded the Cultural Arts Division a $35,000 grant for the Next Level
    Program and a State-wide Arts Conference with Texas Commission of the Arts.
o Two Art in Public Places projects, the “Giant Mushroom Forest by Bill Davenport and Bait Box by Buster
    Graybill, were awarded The 2010 Americans for the Arts Public Art Network award.

Music
o Creation of a Music Division within EGRSO
 
L. Kevin Johns,
    Director




                                                     151                                          EGRSO 
Economic Growth and Revelopment Services

            NUMBER OF NEW JOBS CREATED THROUGH ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS 

Measure Description: The purpose of the Economic Development Program is to encourage location and
expansion of businesses within the Desired Development Zone and increase the number of jobs created
through these economic development efforts. This is accomplished through implementing Chapter 380
agreements (economic development agreements), administering the Business Retention & Enhancement Loan
Program, local resolutions that support the Enterprise Zone designations for local projects that create and
retain jobs, as well as partnering with the State of Texas to utilize State level programs such as the Texas
Enterprise Fund and the Emerging Technology Fund.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated from the cumulative total of jobs created by businesses
locating or expanding within the Desired Development Zone during a fiscal year.

FY 2009-10 Results: The actual number of jobs created exceeded the FY 2009-10 goal of 500 reaching a total
of 1,550.



                           Number of Jobs Created Through Economic Development Efforts

  2,000

                                                                                          1,550
                       1,368
  1,500
                                                        1,170

  1,000                                                  810
                         668
                                                                                           500

    500


      0
                      2007-08                           2008-09                          2009-10

                                                     Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: Austin continued to lead the nation in terms of job growth for 2010. The Austin MSA
was ranked as the best performing job market in the U.S. among the 50 largest metros. Total non-farm payroll
jobs for the Austin MSA increased by 2.4%, a full percentage point higher than the 2nd best national job market.
Additionally, Austin continued to have one of the lowest unemployment rates in the nation. The most recent
figures show Austin’s unemployment rate at 6.4%, while that of the State of Texas shows an unemployment
rate of 8.1% and the U.S. at 9.6%.

Next Steps: As the global recession lingers, it is critical that the City continues it’s recruitment of new
businesses to Austin, while simultaneously working with existing businesses to help them expand locally. In
order to accomplish this, we will continue to work closely with the State leadership, the various local Chambers
of Commerce, and our existing businesses to market Austin as a suitable location for business expansion and
location.

Recent public private partnerships in these efforts include four new incentive agreements which will bring
1,350 new jobs to Austin by 2014. Taxes generated from these firms will produce a net $2.6 million
improvement in tax revenues plus substantial indirect consumer spending over 10 years from expansion of the
gross regional domestic product output.

For more information contact Brian Gildea, Economic Development Manager, at (512) 974-6381.




                                                      152
                                                                  Economic Growth and Revelopment Services

                                 PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS SATISFIED  
                              WITH BUSINESS SOLUTIONS CENTER SERVICES  

Measure Description: The Business Solutions Center provides customers with access to a variety of online
databases and subscription services for conducting business research, as well as one-on-one assistance from
SBDP staff on using these tools. This measure shows customer satisfaction with both the quality of the
resources available in the Business Solutions Center, and the quality of assistance received from staff.

Calculation Method: Business Solution Center customers are surveyed every six months to determine their
satisfaction level.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 90%. The goal was exceeded for the fifth
straight year.


                                        Percentage of Customers Satisfied
                                     with Business Solutions Center Services



                100%                100%                 100%                  100%             100%
  100%

                                                         90%                   90%              90%


   50%          65%                 65%




    0%
               2005-06             2006-07              2007-08                2008-09         2009-10

                                                     Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: The results indicate that customers are very satisfied because the resources and
assistance available in the Business Solutions Center are meeting important business needs. Small Business
Development Programs (SBDP) constantly explores for new services that will be valuable to customers, and
adds to the Business Solutions Center’s portfolio as opportunities arise. The fact that the Business Solutions
Center continues to receive perfect customer satisfaction ratings, combined with the continued growth in
customer visits, shows that value that small business owners receive from its services.

Next Steps: SBDP will continue to operate the Business Solutions Center and to offer a portfolio of services
that customers need. Also, new services will be added as opportunities arise. Examples include greater
Internet access to resources, extended service hours, and more opportunities to learn from successful, well-
established business owners.

For more information contact Vicky Valdez, EGRSO Small Business Administrator, at (512) 974-7620.




                                                     153
Economic Growth and Revelopment Services

                    NUMBER OF BUSINESSES ASSISTED THAT DEMONSTRATE GROWTH 
                                   IN ONE OR MORE GROWTH INDICATOR 

Measure Description: Business development services delivery should result in client businesses reporting that
they experienced growth in certain growth indicators. SBDP uses the following growth indicators to reflect the
effectiveness of its services: 1) increase in number of employees, 2) expansion in physical facility, 3) expanded
use of technology, 4) expansion of equipment used, 5) entry into a new or additional market.

Calculation Method: The data for this measure is gathered from two sources. First, SBDP’s technical assistance
service provider reports customers that experience growth in one of the indicators. Second, customers of all
SBDP services are surveyed annually to determine if they experienced growth in one of the growth indicators
during the previous 12 months.

FY 2009-10 Results: Fourteen businesses assisted displayed growth; the goal was missed by one.


                              Number of Businesses Assisted that Demonstrate Growth
                                         in One or More Growth Indicator


  35

  30
                                                          32
  25

  20                                                                          15                   15
                                                         15
  15                                10

  10
               14                                                             16                   14
    5
                                    10
    0
             2005-06              2006-07              2007-08              2008-09              2009-10

                                                     Result      Goal


Assessment of Results: Most of SBDP’s performance measures have demonstrated dramatic growth over the
past few years, despite the economic downturn experienced over the past two years. This is because SBDP’s
services help business owners find business opportunities or improve operational efficiency, which increase
the business’ ability to survive. Therefore, small businesses need SBDP services during a downturn as much as
during normal economic conditions.

The measure focuses specifically on growth that small businesses are more likely to achieve under normal
economic conditions, but less likely to achieve in difficult economic conditions. The results shown above reflect
the nation-wide trend of small businesses being unable to expand due to the poor state of the economy over
the past two years. Most small businesses have been struggling just to survive, and have not had favorable
opportunities to grow. Even as the economy improves business owners may continue to be reluctant to risk
available capital on expansions and purchases that would create growth. However, if the economy
demonstrates stable improvement over time, small businesses will achieve demonstrate more growth in the
growth indicators. The importance of this measure is the success it represents for the individual businesses.
Although the overall results have decreased with the economic downturn, the results show that some
businesses are still experiencing growth with the assistance of SBDP’s services.

One of the most common growth indicators achieved by small businesses is entry into a new or additional
market. This may be mean the business is selling new products or services, selling in new geographic
locations, or selling to a new type of customer, which can mean a significant increase in revenue for that
business. Another commonly achieved growth indicator is expansion in physical facility. This is usually not
possible unless the business is experiencing significant growth in customers and revenue. An expansion in
physical facility also often causes an expansion in the number of employees, particularly for restaurant or
retail businesses, since more employees may be needed to operate the expanded facility.

Next Steps: All of SBDP’s services contribute to customers’ ability to grow. SBDP will continue providing the
types and quality of services, as well as developing new services, that support small business owners’ ability
to grow. SBDP also intends to evaluate methodology used to gather data for this measure during 2011 to
determine if it can be improved.

For more information contact Vicky Valdez, EGRSO Small Business Administrator, at (512) 974-7620.
                                                   154
                                                                   Economic Growth and Revelopment Services

                    NUMBER OF CONTRACTED BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT TECHNICAL  
                                      ASSISTANCE HOURS DELIVERED 

Measure Description: EGRSO’s Small Business Development Program (SBDP) contracts with a service provider
to provide business development technical assistance to small business owners. The service provider works
one-one-one with customers on starting a business, writing a business plan, writing a marketing plan, financial
management, and preparing to apply for a business loan. This measure shows the demand business owners
and entrepreneurs have for this service.

Calculation Method: The number of hours of business development technical assistance reported by the
service provider and approved by SBDP. Hours are reported through SBDP’s in-house reporting database,
Service Provider Activity Reporting Database (SPARD).

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 1,400 hours. The goal was exceeded by 194
hours.


                                Number of Contracted Business Development Technical
                                            Assistance Hourse Delivered


  2,000
                                                         1,746
                                                                                           1,594
                       1,449                              1,400
  1,500                                                                                    1,400


  1,000                  900


    500


      0
                      2007-08                            2008-09                          2009-10

                                                       Result      Goal




Assessment of Results: In 2005-06, SBDP implemented a new model for delivering services to small businesses,
which included the technical assistance service. The initial contracts of the new model were awarded in 2005-
06 and SBDP began reporting the number of hours of technical assistance delivered in 2007-08.

The number of technical assistance hours delivered grew by approximately 300 hours from 2007-08 to 2008-
09. The number of technical assistance hours delivered served will steadily grow as more business owners
learn about the service. The decrease in hours from 2008-09 to 2009-10 was due to administrative changes to
the delivery and billing of services implemented by SBDP as cost savings measures in 2009 and 2010. The
number of hours delivered in 2008-09 would have been approximately 1,512 hours, if these changes had been
in effect for the full year. Adjusting the 2008-09 result to reflect 1,512 hours delivered shows that the number
of business development technical assistance hours delivered actually grew by 5% (82 hours) from 2008-09 to
2009-10.

Next Steps: The current contract provides a maximum of 1,700 hours of technical assistance delivered. SBDP’s
goal is to maximize the usage of this service, in FY 2010-11, by informing as many small business owners and
entrepreneurs as possible about the benefits of the service through outreach efforts and direct referral. SBDP
is also continually working with the service provider to improve the effectiveness of the service so that it
continues to meet customers’ ever-changing needs.

For more information contact Vicky Valdez, EGRSO Small Business Administrator, at (512) 974-7620.




                                                      155
Economic Growth and Revelopment Services

                TOTAL AUDIENCE MEMBERS SERVED THROUGH CULTURAL CONTRACTS 

Measure Description: The Economic Growth and Redevelopment Service Office provides Cultural Arts
programs for the Austin community by contracting with arts organizations for specific services. These
contracts referred to as Cultural Contracts provide resources to artistic and creative individuals and
organization to educate the public and to support the arts and creative industries in Austin. This measure
counts the number of citizens who benefited in some manner from one or more of the contracts.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by summing the total audience members served through
program receiving cultural contracts in a given year.

FY 2009-10 Results: The goal for this measure was established at 4,100,000. The Economic Growth and
Redevelopment Service Office exceeded this goal by 788,947.



                             Total Audience Members Served Through Cultural Contracts

   6,000,000

   5,000,000                          4,700,000          4,800,000
                   4,500,000
                                                                            4,050,000          4,888,947
   4,000,000     4,486,084                                                                     4,100,000
                                      3,876,475          3,878,939
   3,000,000                                                                3,502,873

   2,000,000

   1,000,000

          0
                   2005-06             2006-07              2007-08          2008-09            2009-10

                                                     Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates the department’s positive impact on the number of
audience members served with an increase of approximately 400,000 audiences members served over the
past 5 years. Members served increased 1,386,000 from 2009-2010. This increase may be a reflection on the
economy and disposable income available for arts and entertainment. The number of funded contractor’s has
increased thus increasing the amount of data collected and reported.             In addition, two fairly large
organizations with greater audience capacity have become contractors within the past 5 years. Also, the
population size of Austin has increased substantially with many re-locating to our area from other states during
the recession. An increase in population may relate to an increase in audience. Though the amount of hotel
motel tax has decreased over the last two years, non-profits continue to do more with less and get the word
out about their respective organizations and programs.

Over the last 5 years, the value of cultural contracts managed by the Cultural Arts Division has increased from
$3.6 million to more than $4.3 million annually, and the implementation of auxiliary funding programs, a
subset of cultural contracts funding implements in the last 5 years has generated between 30 to 50 additional
contracts, annually. The economic impact of art businesses in Austin is $2.2 billion. This Cultural Arts program
is an integral party of the strategy to increase artistic awareness in Austin.

Next Steps: Continue to educate our cultural contractors on their contributions to cultural tourism through
various workshops and information pieces. Funding for the Cultural Contracts is not included in the EGRSO
General Operating Budget. It comes from the dedicated Hotel/Motel Occupancy Tax fund. FY 2010-11 will be
the first year of a new two year application cycle. EGRSO received 241 applications for the Core Funding
Programs. Funding available for FY 2010-11 cultural contracts is estimated to be approximately $900,000 less
than FY 2009-10. Reductions and contract awards amounts have be recommended by the Austin Arts
Commission utilizing the matrix-based allocation method adopted by Council in August 2005.

For more information contact Megan Crigger, Acting Cultural Arts Division Administrator, at (512) 974-9312.




                                                      156
                                         
                                         
                                         
                                         
                                         
                                         
                                         
                       SOLID WASTE SERVICES KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                  2009‐10  Goal 
Measure Name                                          2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                   Target  Met?
Percent of Waste Stream Diverted by Solid Waste 
                                                        Not     Not 
Services Curbside and Household Hazardous Waste                       30.4%  36.1%  37.3%  37.1% 
                                                      tracked tracked
operations 
Average pounds of recycled materials collected per 
                                                       14.6    15.1     15.6    21.8    22.6       23.5 
customer account per pickup 
Average pounds of garbage per customer account per 
                                                       31.7    32.6     32.7    27.9     28        30.7 
week 
Lost Time Injury Rate Per the Equivalent of 100 
                                                        3.3     2.7     1.8      1.5     1.2        1.8 
Employees 
                                                                                             

                             SOLID WASTE SERVICES DEPARTMENT 
                                FY2010 PERFORMANCE REPORT 



 
Director’s Message

The Solid Waste Services Department provides a wide array of services to Austin’s residents and businesses.
Our primary business functions include: curbside trash, recycling, and yard trimmings collection; household
hazardous waste management; brush and bulk waste collection; litter collection; dead animal pickup and
disposal; and implementation of the Austin Zero Waste Master Plan.

Fiscal Year 2009-10 was a transitional year preparing the journey towards Zero Waste. In January 2009, the
City Council adopted the Zero Waste Strategic Plan, a policy plan committing Austin to a 90 percent reduction
in the amount of waste sent to area landfills by 2040. The Department contracted with HDR Engineering to
develop the Zero Waste Master Plan as an implementation roadmap. The department hosted several
stakeholder and public meetings to gain input for the development of the implementation strategies. The
Master Plan is expected to be presented to City Council in spring 2011.

The department also presented the first phase of the Universal Recycling Ordinance to City Council in October
2010, after two years of stakeholder negotiations and public meetings. With the unanimous approval of
Council, the department will begin developing implementation strategies.

In FY 2009-10 the department engaged in an RFP process for the contracting of recycling processing services
for the Single Stream recycling program. This 20-year agreement is expected to be completed soon and
presented to Council in February 2011.

Fiscal Year 2009-10 yielded the following success in the performance of our core activities:
     37.32% Diversion rate for Curbside and HHW Operations

       82,611 total tons diverted

       22.61 pounds of recycled material collected/household/collection week

       4.84 pounds of yard trimmings collected/household/collection week

     Reduced lost time injury rate to 1.17 per 100 employees.

As the department is responsible for its own fiscal sustainability, fiscal measures of success include the
following:
      $2.2 million cost savings from approved budget

       $1.6 million landfill disposal cost avoidance due to diversion programs

The Solid Waste Services Department is committed to the three legs of sustainability; fiscal responsibility,
social responsibility, and environmental stewardship.


Robert Gedert
Director




                                                        157               SWS ‐ Keeping Austin Clean and Green 
Solid Waste Services

   PERCENT OF WASTE STREAM DIVERTED BY SOLID WASTE SERVICES CURBSIDE AND HOUSEHOLD 
                                        HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS 

Measure Description: This measure shows the percent of materials collected at the curb by Solid Waste
Services (SWS) and received at the Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) facility that are recycled instead of
sent to the landfill. This measure will track the Department’s progress toward its long-term zero waste goal of
diverting at least 90% from landfills by 2040.

Calculation Method: Total tons of materials that are recycled or composted, divided by the sum of the total
tons of materials that are recycled, composted and landfilled. Materials recycled or composted include
traditional materials such as plastics, paper, cardboard, and aluminum collected from Single-Stream Recycling
program; brush and yard trimming materials; and materials such as paints, batteries, and anti-freeze collected
from the HHW drop-off facility.

FY 2009-10 Results: The actual diversion rate for SWS curbside and HHW operations for FY 2009-10 is 37.32%,
which is 0.62% over the goal of 37.09%.


                 P e r ce nt o f W a s te Str e a m Div e r te d by SW S C ur bs ide a nd HHW O pe r a tio ns


         50.0

                                                            36. 1                            37. 3
         40.0
                           30. 4
         30.0                                                                                37.1
                                                            32.7
                          29.5
         20.0


         10.0


          0.0
                         2007-08                          2008-09                          2009-10



                                                             R e s ult      Goal



Assessment of Results: The diversion rate increased slightly during FY 2008-09 as residential recycling set outs
increased. The residential participation rate has steadily increased since the introduction of Single-Stream
recycling service. Single-Steam Recycling provides customers with the ability to place a wider array of
recyclables into one 96-gallon cart. Through this program, customers are able to recycle plastics grades 1-7,
cardboard, paperboard, paper, aluminum, tin, and steel. The 37.32% diversion rate was a 3.41% increase over
the previous fiscal year and the FY 2009-10 goal of 37.09% was slightly exceeded. The low level of consumer
economic activity has affected the amount of packaging available to recycle. This two-year decline in the
economy is expected to improve in FY 2010-11 with a projected increase in consumer spending, which will
increase recyclables available for diversion collection.

Next Steps: Increased public education through several planned marketing campaigns will increase the amount
recycled per household as well as the percentage of households participating in recycling services. The
recently signed recycling processing contract allows for new materials such as milk cartons and other aseptic
containers to be added to the recycling program. In addition, public awareness will increase as the Zero Waste
Master Plan is presented to and approved by the Austin City Council. The recently adopted Universal Recycling
Ordinance (URO) will generate renewed interest in the multi-family and commercial business sectors,
increasing recycling and yard waste collections. The URO requires all commercial and multi-family properties
to provide recycling of paper, plastic, cardboard, aluminum and glass to their customers and tenants.
Properties will be phased in over a four year period. During FY 2010-11, businesses in the food service
industry, such as restaurants, bars, and grocery stores, will also be evaluating food scrap composting.

For more information contact Robert Gedert, SWS Director, at (512) 974-1926.




                                                            158
                                                                                             Solid Waste Services

   AVERAGE POUNDS OF RECYCLED MATERIALS COLLECTED PER CUSTOMER ACCOUNT PER PICKUP  

Measure Description: This measure describes the amount of recyclable materials produced by our customers.
Recycled materials consist of paper, aluminum, glass, tin, and plastics numbered 1 – 7. The measure is
indicative of the success of the Single-Stream Recycling Program, where different materials are collected in
one cart, and the efforts of the Department to educate customers on the diversion of recyclables from the
landfill.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by converting total tons of recyclables collected to pounds by
multiplying total tons by 2,000, then dividing that result by the total number of customer accounts to get
average pounds of recyclables collected per customer account per year. The annual amount is then divided by
the number of pickups in the reporting period.

FY 2009-10 Results: The FY 2009-10 goal for this measure was established at 23.46 average pounds of
recycled materials per customer. Solid Waste Services (SWS) projected an increase in the average pounds of
materials recycled per customer based on plans to increase public outreach and education as well as
expectations that development of the Department’s Master Plan would increase attention about Zero Waste.
Actual results came in at 22.61 average pounds per account per week, which is .85 pounds or 3.63% below the
goal.


                  Average Pounds of Recycled Materials Collected per Customer Account per Pickup


  35.0

  30.0

  25.0                                                                                             23.5
                                                                              21.8

  20.0                                                                                              22.6
                15.8                15.3                 15.6
                                                                              19.5
  15.0
                14.6                15.1                 15.5
  10.0
              2005-06             2006-07              2007-08              2008-09                2009-10

                                                     Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: Actual pounds collected were less than projected primarily due to the continuing
economic conditions which have curtailed consumer purchases and the discarded packaging. As economic
conditions have impacted consumer behavior, the amount of materials that would be available to be recycled
has decreased. Industry changes in products and packaging also impacts weight projections. For example,
plastics continue to replace glass in many market segments and consumers continue favoring digital media
over traditional newsprint. Therefore, decreases in total weights collected can be expected. Even though SWS
fell short of the projected goal, the average pounds of recycled materials collected per account has continued
to rise since FY 2008-09 with the implementation of Single-Stream recycling collection. Since FY 2005-06, the
average pounds of recycled materials collected per customer account per pick-up has increased by 55%. Once
the City secures a long-term vendor to process recyclables collected through the Single-Stream program and
increase the list of materials accepted by the program, the recycling rate will continue to rise.

Next Steps: Improving economic conditions and increased public education will help increase the weights of
recycled materials collected per pickup. Additionally, other initiatives such as adding new recyclable materials
to the existing program will also encourage and increase recyclable material diversion from area landfills.

For more information contact Melissa Prescott, Division Manager, at (512) 974-1944.




                                                      159
Solid Waste Services

                  AVERAGE POUNDS OF GARBAGE PER CUSTOMER ACCOUNT PER WEEK 

Measure Description: The measurement of average pounds of garbage per customer account per week is
indicative of the waste generation rates of our customers. The measurement includes both residential and the
small amount of commercial accounts that are serviced by the City of Austin Solid Waste Services Department.
The measure is important in the evaluation of the success of Zero Waste programs.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by converting total tons of garbage collected to pounds by
multiplying total tons by 2,000, then dividing that result by the total number of customer accounts to get
average pounds of garbage collected per customer account per year. The annual amount is then divided by
the number of weeks in the reporting period.

FY 2009-10 Results: To achieve Zero Waste, the Department’s goal is to reduce the average pounds of garbage
per customer account per week. In FY 2009-10, the Department collected an average of 27.99 pounds, which
is less than the established goal of 30.74 pounds. This indicates that the City is on the right track to achieving
Zero Waste and that customers are responding positively to the Department’s Zero Waste programs, outreach,
and education efforts.


                       A v e r a ge P o unds o f G a r ba ge pe r C us to m e r A cco unt pe r We e k


       40.0
                    32.1                   32. 6                 32. 7                 31.0             30.7
       35.0
       30.0         31. 7                  32.1                  31.5
       25.0                                                                            27. 9             28. 0
       20.0
       15.0
       10.0
        5.0
        0.0
                  2005-06               2006-07                2007-08               2008-09            2009-10



                                                           R esult        Goal



Assessment of Results: The above chart illustrates that the average amount of garbage collected per account
was slowly rising until FY 2008-09 when the implementation of Single-Stream recycling collection occurred.
Single-Steam Recycling provides customers with the ability to place a wider array of recyclables into one 96-
gallon cart. SWS collected an average of 32.72 pounds of garbage per account per week in FY 2007-08 and
27.90 pounds of garbage per account per week in FY 2008-09, which is a decrease of 14.73%. The amount
collected fell short of the projection due to the success of Single-Stream recycling collection, the increased
efforts to educate the public about waste reduction, as well as the continuing economic slump that has
affected Austin and the rest of the country. As consumer spending and purchasing has decreased, the amount
of possible waste that could have been generated has not materialized.

Next Steps: Improvements in economic conditions will lead to an increase in purchasing and consumption
which will result in increased amounts of waste collected by city crews and destined for the landfill. Increasing
the number of items that are accepted by the Single-Stream program, the cost of waste disposal and
continuing public education of recycling programs will help reduce waste disposal.

For more information contact Melissa Prescott, Division Manager, at (512) 974-1944.




                                                           160
                                                                                          Solid Waste Services

                     LOST TIME INJURY RATE PER THE EQUIVALENT OF 100 EMPLOYEES 

Measure Description: This key indicator measures the amount of time lost due to injury divided by the amount
of time which could be worked by 100 employees. This measure is important because it illustrates to
management that the safety policies and training implemented over the years have decreased the rate of
serious injuries and also reduced the number of days that employees miss as a result of injuries.

Calculation Method: This measure is calculated by taking the number of lost time injuries and multiplying it by
200,000 hours, then divide by the total number of hours worked in the department.

FY 2009-10 Results: The actual lost time injury rate for Solid Waste Services (SWS) was 1.17, which is under
the established goal of 1.75 by 33.14%.


                             Lost Time Injury Rate Per the Equivalent of 100 Employees


  4.0
  3.5          3.3

  3.0                               2.7
                                                        2.1                   2.1
  2.5                                                                                         1.8
  2.0
  1.5         2.1                   2.1
                                                          1.8
  1.0                                                                          1.5
                                                                                                  1.2
  0.5
  0.0
             2005-06             2006-07               2007-08               2008-09          2009-10

                                                     Result       Goal




Assessment of Results: Over the past five years, SWS Lost Time Injury Rate has declined 64.55%. This can be
attributed to changes in the safety culture of the Department. Management is communicating commitment to
providing a work environment free from potential hazards and to addressing unsafe work practices. Employee
and leadership engagement through three Safety Committees and monthly Supervisor Tailgate sessions
provide forums for employees and supervisors to actively participate in improving safety education and
training. Employees are expected to report all incidents and these reports are investigated with Safety
Professionals providing analysis and corrective actions to avoid future occurrences.

The perception of the importance of safety is on the rise. Between 2009 and 2010 the City of Austin Listening
to the Workforce survey shows an overall average increase of 12% in employee positive perception for all
eight Occupational Health and Safety categories. Employees are increasingly indicating that improvement in
training and information on how to prevent on-the-job injuries is happening.

Next Steps: Management is committed to allocating and providing the resources needed to promote and
implement effective safety and health practices for employees. Safety Professionals are committed to the
continuous improvement of safety and training programs and to serving the Department at all levels of the
organization to provide a work environment with zero potential hazards. The Safety Staff is developing and
revising training materials to meet the changing equipment and duties of the Department. With development
of safety programs through safety committees, supervisor safety tailgates, and the employee suggestion
program, the Department encourages employee participation to advise of ways to reduce hazards. The Safety
Committee Retreat and annual Road-e-o are team building events to encourage the Safety staff and
employees to work together. The Safety team continues to reach out to share safe work habits with
Department employees through gate checks and field audits.

For more information contact Ellen Jensen, Dept Occupational Safety Manager, at (512) 974-1998.




                                                       161
Solid Waste Services




                       162
                 APPENDIX OF CITYWIDE DASHBOARD MEASURES 
                                                                                                            2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                                  2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                             Target  Met?   # 
Citywide Dashboard: Public Safety 
Violent crime rate per 1,000 population                        5.15      5.40    5.22     5.23      5.00     5.29              46 
Property crime rate per 1,000 population                      58.57     63.41    59.45    62.45    60.02    63.35              47 
Total police response time for emergency and urgent 
calls 
                                                               7:51      8:09    8:04     7:53      6:53     7:35              50 
Percent of potentially life threatening calls responded to 
by Emergency Medical Services on‐scene in <10 minutes         80.2%  82.9%  85.7%  88.8%  90.1%              90%               24 
(city only) 
Percent of emergency incidents where the amount of 
time between call receipt and the arrival of the Austin        81%       82%     84%      86%       84%      85%               32 
Fire Department unit is 8 minutes or less 
Percent of structure fires confined to room of origin          80%       81%     84%      81%       82%      80%               33 
Citywide Dashboard: Community Services 
Total number of households/persons assisted through 
all services provided by Neighborhood Housing and             4,857     7,080    8,722    6,058    8,573    8,815              80 
Community Development 
Percent of animal shelter live outcomes                        49%       48%     56%      68%       72%      75%               58 
Number of homeless persons receiving case 
management who move into safe and stable housing 
                                                               496       519     562       691      670      515               60 
Number of immunizations given in the Shots for Tots 
                                                              41,464 48,563 62,949 37,133  42,905  48,000                      61 
clinics 
                                                                                                              No 
Library usage per capita                                       0.16      0.15    0.17     0.16      0.16             N/A       72 
                                                                                                            Target
                                                                Not     Not     Not                          No 
Citizen satisfaction with the appearance of park grounds                                  72%       70%              N/A       82 
                                                              tracked tracked tracked                       Target
Citywide Dashboard: Infrastructure Services 
Percent of inspections by the Planning and 
Development Review department performed within 24              90%       93%     96%      94%       90%      95%               94 
hours of request 
Percent of lane miles in fair to excellent condition          73.0%      73.8%  73.9%  74.8%  76.1%  76.1%                     102 
                                                               Not        Not     Not 
Citizen satisfaction with traffic flow on major city streets
                                                             tracked    tracked tracked
                                                                                        27.2%  27.4%  39.0%                    88 
Citywide Dashboard: Utilities/Major Business Enterprises 
Electricity System average interruption frequency              1.00      1.02    0.63     0.89      0.69     0.80              122 
Percentage of renewable energy in Austin Energy’s 
energy supply 
                                                               6.0%      5.8%    6.6%     10.6%     9.6%    12.2%              123 
Drinking water quality: turbidity                              0.10      0.10    0.10     0.08      0.09     0.10              137 
Percent of waste stream diverted by Solid Waste 
                                                               Not        Not 
Services curbside and Household Hazardous Waste 
                                                             tracked    tracked
                                                                                30.4%  36.1%  37.3%  37.1%                     158 
operations 
Citywide Dashboard: Economic and Financial Health 
Number of new jobs created through economic                    Not        Not 
development efforts                                          tracked    tracked
                                                                                1,368  810         1,550     500               130 
                                                               Aa1,       Aa1,  Aa1,    Aa1,        Aaa,    Aa1, 
                 GO Bonds: Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, 
City of          Fitch Investors 
                                                               AA+,       AA+,  AAA,  AAA,          AAA,    AAA,               21 
                                                               AA+        AA+    AA+    AA+         AAA     AA+ 
Austin’s Bond 
                 Combined Utility Revenue Bonds:                A1,       A1,    A1,                         A1, 
Ratings                                                                                A1, AA,     A1, AA, 
                 Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, Fitch             AA‐,       AA‐,   AA‐, 
                                                                                        AA‐         AA‐ 
                                                                                                            AA‐,               21 
                 Investors                                      AA‐       AA‐    AA‐                        AA‐ 

                                                               163
                     APPENDIX OF PUBLIC SAFETY KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                        2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                                2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                         Target  Met?   # 
Emergency Medical Services 
Percent of potentially life threatening calls responded to 
by Emergency Medical Services on‐scene in < 10              80.2%  82.9%  85.7%  88.8%  90.1%  90.0%                    24 
minutes (city only) 
Percent of EMS calls answered by EMS communications 
                                                            94.0%  94.0%  95.0%  95.0%  95.0%  95.0%                    25 
in less than 10 seconds 
Total number of EMS responses (units dispatched)            107,162 116,850 116,897 113,410  115,637  110,000           26 
Percent of patients with cardiac arrest from cardiac 
causes delivered to an appropriate medical facility with    28.2%  32.9%  31.4%  28.8%  31.9%  29.0%                    27 
a pulse 
Percent of patients with cardiac arrest from cardiac 
                                                            13.7%  12.1%  10.0%  10.9%  13.9%  10.5%                    28 
causes discharged from the hospital alive 
                Average minutes from call to delivery         Not       Not     Not 
                                                                                      41.39    40.20    40.00           29 
                cardiac (STEMI alert) patients at ER        tracked   tracked tracked
Critical Alert  Average minutes from call to delivery         Not       Not 
                                                                               36.20  34.04    34.15    33.50           29 
Patients        trauma alert patients at ER                 tracked   tracked
                Average minutes from call to delivery         Not       Not     Not 
                                                                                      37.51    37.47    37.00           29 
                stroke alert patients at ER                 tracked   tracked tracked
Twelve‐Month Collection Rate Percentage on Patient            Not 
                                                                      51.9%  51.6%  51.7%  48.1%  43.0%                 30 
Bills                                                       tracked
Fire 
Percent of emergency incidents where the amount of 
time between call receipt and the arrival of the Austin      81%       82%     84%      86%    84%       85%            32 
Fire Department units is 8 minutes or less 
Percent of structure fires confined to room of origin        80%       81%     84%      81%    82%       80%            33 
Number of fire deaths in the past 12 months                    8        8       1        6       4        6             34 
Percent of cardiac arrests with return of spontaneous 
                                                             33%       44%     42%      37%    41%       40%            35 
circulation after application of CPR or AED 
Percent of customers satisfied with the quality of AFD        Not     Not     Not 
                                                                                        90      90        90            36 
services                                                    tracked tracked tracked
Municipal Court 
Compliance Rate                                             79.69% 96.71% 84.79% 87.83%  99.44%  94.80%                 38 
                                                              Not     Not 
Percent of cases set on a docket within 60 days                             92.61% 96.12%  94.65%  75%                  39 
                                                            tracked tracked
Number of cases set on scheduled dockets and 
                                                            120,826 121,704 139,831 159,038  158,597  137,000           40 
appearing at walk‐in dockets 
Total number of cases filed                                 414,018 346,223 425,175 446,777  369,053  444,733           41 
Average age of terminated cases (days)                       214       292     261      252    268       260            42 
Percent of offenders who complete rehabilitative 
                                                            84.00% 90.29% 65.78% 72.89%  75.03%  85.00%                 43 
recommendations 
Level of customer satisfaction as indicated by Voice of                         Not 
                                                             83%       82%              87%    87%       80%            44 
the Customer survey                                                           tracked




                                                             164
                     APPENDIX OF PUBLIC SAFETY KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                        2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                               2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                         Target  Met?   # 
Police 
Violent crime rate per 1,000 population                     5.15    5.40     5.22     5.23     5.00      5.29           46 
Property crime rate per 1,000 population                   58.57    63.41    59.45    62.45   63.35 
                                                                                               60.02                    47 
                                                                                               No 
Part II crime rate per 1,000 population                     162    159    156    143    128          N/A                48 
                                                                                              Target
Percent of Part I crimes cleared                           13.4%  13.7%  13.9%  13.2%  12.2%  13.2%                     49 
Total police response time for emergency and urgent 
                                                            7:51    8:09     8:04     7:53     6:53      7:35           50 
calls 
Percent of residents who are satisfied with the overall      Not     Not     Not 
                                                                                      70%      74%       75%            51 
quality of police services                                 tracked tracked tracked
                                                                                                          No 
Rate of citizen complaints per 100,000 population           16.8    21.0     28.0     14.9     12.9              N/A    52 
                                                                                                        Target
Rate of traffic fatalities per 100,000 population           9.04    8.42     7.71     7.83     6.84      7.30           53 
Rate of serious‐injury‐producing collisions per 100,000 
                                                           17.94    14.50    12.71    12.01    10.97     9.24           54 
population 
Rate of DWI‐related fatalities per 100,000 population       3.53    2.90     2.43     2.61     2.97      3.10           55 
Average training hours per police employee                   43      52       50       53       45        37            56 




                                                            165
              APPENDIX OF COMMUNITY SERVICES KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                           2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                                 2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                            Target  Met?   # 
Health and Human Services 
Percent of animal shelter live outcomes                       49%     48%     56%     68%     72%    75%                   58 
Animals sheltered and euthanized per 100,000                 2,578;  2,809;  2,531;  2,164;  2,247;   No 
                                                                                                                    N/A    59 
population                                                   1,307  1,453  1,120  684         633  Target
Number of homeless persons receiving case 
                                                              496       519     562      691      670       515            60 
management who move into safe and stable housing 
Number of immunizations given at the Shots for Tots 
                                                             41,464 48,563 62,949 37,133  42,905  48,000                   61 
clinics 
Total Mortality Rate (all causes) in Travis County per         Not 
                                                                       750.6    750.6    759.0    761.3    733.9           62 
100,000                                                      tracked
Total Infant Mortality Rate in Travis Co. / 1,000 live         Not 
                                                                        6.1      5.5      6.0      4.9       5.5           63 
births                                                       tracked
Heart disease mortality rate in Austin/Travis County           Not       Not     Not 
                                                                                       166.5      164.4    166.5           64 
area                                                         tracked   tracked tracked
Average years of potential life lost in the Austin/Travis      Not       Not     Not 
                                                                                       19.67      19.46    19.67           65 
Co area                                                      tracked   tracked tracked
                                                               Not       Not     Not 
Obesity rate in the Austin/Travis County area                                          18.50      22.00    18.50           66 
                                                             tracked   tracked tracked
The incidence rate of HIV per 100,000 population               23.0      17.4    19.3   12.0         11.4 
                                                                                                  14.4                     67 
Unemployment rate for the Austin MSA                           3.8%      3.7%  4.5%  7.2%            6.0% 
                                                                                                  7.2%                     68 
                                                                                          Not yet     No 
Poverty rate in the Austin/Travis County area                15.2%  14.7%  14.8%  16.2%  available                  N/A    69 
                                                                                                    Target
Library 
                                                                                                             No 
Library usage per capita                                      0.16      0.15    0.17     0.16     0.16              N/A    72 
                                                                                                           Target
                                                                                                             No 
Circulation per capita                                        4.77      4.91    5.13     5.48     5.57              N/A    73 
                                                                                                           Target
                                                                                                             No 
Visits per capita                                             4.61      4.74    5.06     4.81     4.75              N/A    74 
                                                                                                           Target
                                                                                                             No 
Internet users per capita                                     1.26      1.39     1.6     1.17     1.01              N/A    75 
                                                                                                           Target
Materials expenditures per capita                              2.32    2.11    2.94       2.9     2.84      2.83           76 
                                                               Not     Not     Not 
Citizen satisfaction with quality of city libraries                                      73%      73%       90%            77 
                                                             tracked tracked tracked
                                                               Not     Not     Not 
Citizen satisfaction with materials at libraries                                         70%      71%       87%            78 
                                                             tracked tracked tracked
Neighborhood Housing and Community Development 
Total number of households / persons assisted through 
all services                                                 4,857     7,080    8,722    6,058    8,573    8,815           80 
 
Parks and Recreation 
                                                               Not     Not     Not                          No 
Citizen Satisfaction with the appearance of park grounds                                 72%      70%               N/A    82 
                                                             tracked tracked tracked                       Target
                                                               Not     Not     Not                          No 
Percent of users satisfied with recreation services                                      75%      71%               N/A    83 
                                                             tracked tracked tracked                       Target
Percent of participants who indicate an increase of 
                                                              92%       96%     89%      88%      96%       95%            84 
environmental awareness 
                                                               Not 
Number of park acres per 1,000 population                               23.4    24.5     22.9     21.7      23.4           85 
                                                             tracked                                                   


                                                              166
                  APPENDIX OF INFRASTRUCTURE KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                               2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                                 2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                                Target  Met?   # 
Austin Transportation 
Percent of residents "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with      Not     Not     Not 
                                                                                     27.2%  27.4%               39%            88 
traffic flow on major city streets                           tracked tracked tracked
Percent of residents "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with      Not     Not     Not 
                                                                                      45%    44%                44%            89 
the signal timing on major streets                           tracked tracked tracked
Percent reduction in estimated vehicular travel time in 
                                                              9.8%     9.5%     9.4%     6.5%      8.7%          5%            90 
corridors and intersections studied 
Number of tickets issued                                     130,267 118,663 126,941 115,837  89,851  116,775                  91 
Planning and Development Review 
Percent of inspections by the Planning and 
Development Review department performed within 24             90%      93%      96%      94%        90%         95%            94 
hours of request 
Percent of initial commercial building plan reviews 
completed within Land Development Code mandated               65%      63%      70%      71%        69%         80%            95 
time of 21 days 
Percent of on‐time initial new residential zoning reviews     29%      66%      69%      22%        65%         70%            96 
Number of neighborhood plans/rezoning adopted by 
                                                               0        5        2         2         4           4             97 
the City Council 
Number of neighborhood plan/rezoning scheduled on 
                                                               0        4        2         2         4           4             98 
Planning Commission agenda 
Percent of neighborhood planning participants satisfied        Not 
                                                                       60%      72%      72%        83%         70%            99 
with the neighborhood planning process                       tracked
Public Works 
Percent of lane miles in fair to excellent condition           73      73.8     73.9     74.8      76.1         76.1          102 
Total number of lane miles of street preventative 
                                                                                                                              103 
maintenance completed                                          590     618      604      690    954        763 
                                                               Not     Not                                        
Linear feet of sidewalks constructed                                                                                          104 
                                                             tracked tracked    750      3925  25,250   20,000 
                                                               Not     Not 
Number of new bicycle miles constructed                                                                                       105 
                                                             tracked tracked     18       25         24          35 
Percent of Projects that pass one‐year warranty 
                                                                                                                              106 
inspection without significant construction deficiencies  100%  94%             88%      89%        95%         80% 
Percent of projects managed by Public Works that are 
                                                                                                                              107 
completed within budget (appropriated funding)            95.70% 90%           100%  95.50%  100%              100% 
Percent of hours that warranted school crossing             Not     Not 
                                                                                                                              108 
locations are covered                                     tracked tracked      100%      98%        99%        100% 
Watershed Protection 
                                                            Not     Not          Not                            No 
Citizen satisfaction with flood control efforts                                          63%        66%                  N/A  110 
                                                          tracked tracked      tracked                         Target
Number of structures with reduced localized risk due to 
                                                             17      35          11       18         0           31           111 
completed flood hazard projects 
Number of linear feet of unstable stream channel            Not 
                                                                    508         820      1,615     1,210       1,200          112 
stabilized                                                tracked
                                                            Not     Not          Not     Not 
Percent of City maintained ponds functioning properly                                           82.5%           90%           113 
                                                          tracked tracked      tracked tracked 
                                                              
Gallons of pollutants recovered as a result of business 
                                                             778,529 775,782 751,053 555,426      1,469,154    500,000        114 
inspections and spills response 
                                                                 




                                                              167
               APPENDIX OF UTILITIES/MAJOR BUSINESS ENTERPRISES 
                                 KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                         2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                                2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                          Target  Met?   # 
Austin Convention Center 
Exhibition Hall Occupancy                             86.8%  85.2%            83.9%  86.9%  83.7%         75%               116 
Client Evaluation Ratings Summary: Convention Center  4.83;  4.48;            4.62;  4.59;  4.67; 
                                                                                                          4.25              117 
and Palmer Events Center                                4.89   4.83            4.72   4.72   4.71 
Percentage of Clients indicating they would schedule 
                                                      100.0% 100.0%           100.0% 95.2%  97.2%  90.0%                    118 
another event at the Convention Center facilities 
Hotel Occupancy Tax Collections (millions)             $36.6  $42.2           $45.1    $41.2    $39.7    $42.2              119 
Convention Center Combined Funds Ending Balance 
                                                       $17.8  $19.7           $18.6    $18.5    $17.8    $11.3              120 
(millions) 
Austin Energy 
Electricity System average interruption frequency       1.00   1.02            0.63    0.89     0.69      0.80              122 
Percentage of renewable energy in Austin Energy's 
                                                       6.0%  5.8%             6.6%     10.6%    9.6%     12.2%              123 
energy supply 
Customer Satisfaction Index                              80     80             82       78       79      83                 124 
                                                                                                        No 
Fuel Cost Average                                           3.178    2.912    3.655    3.371    3.446             N/A  125 
                                                                                                       Target
Credit rating for separate‐lien electric utility system 
                                                              A+      A+       A+       A+       A+        AA               126 
revenue bonds 
Equivalent Availability Factor of South Texas Nuclear 
                                                             95%     91%       96%     93%      91%       95%               127 
Plant 
Austin Water Utility 
Drinking water quality: turbidity                             0.1     0.1      0.1     0.08     0.09       0.1              131 
Wastewater Quality: Biological Oxygen Demand                 1.91    2.00      2.21    2.06     2.14      3.00              132 
Number of reported wastewater repeat overflows per 
                                                             2.36    1.25      1.25    0.72     0.38      2.00              133 
100 miles of sewer lines 
Percent of priority 1 and 1A leaks responded to within 3 
                                                            33.9%  40.4%  39.4%  42.4%  74.0%  75.0%                        134 
hours 
Peak day water usage as a percentage of water 
                                                            84.3%  63.7%  77.0%  80.0%  68.0%  80.0%                        135 
treatment system capacity 
Water consumption per capita per day: total and             190.25,  150.56,  170.27,  167.44,  135.41,  No 
                                                                                                                  N/A  136 
residential                                                 111.76 83.62  101.67 105.58  80.65  Target
Millions of gallons of reclaimed wastewater used for 
                                                             1088    1,172    1,632    1,990    1,093    1,000              137 
beneficial purposes 
                                                            $0.671  $1.384  $1.699  $2.605  $4.412  $2.200 
Dollar amount of revenues recovered                                                                                         138 
                                                              mil     mil     mil     mil     mil     mil 
                                                              Not                                     No 
Number of findings on 10A permit for wild lands areas                 8       19      12      43                            139 
                                                            tracked                                 Target
Percent of dollars spent on CIP projects compared to CIP
                                                         79.01% 67.56% 89.70% 70.52%  67.30%             90.00%             140 
spending plan 
Aviation 
Score of customer service participants rank overall 
                                                           38%    44%    43%    53%     53%               47%               142 
satisfaction "Excellent" 
Non‐Airline revenue per enplaned passenger                $9.91  $10.12 $10.48 $10.88  $10.96            $11.09             143 
Airline cost per enplaned passenger                       $7.35  $7.75  $7.78  $8.33  $8.45              $8.74              144 
Lost Time Injury Rate Per the Equivalent of 100 
                                                           1.4    2.39    1.3   1.29    0.66                0               145 
Employees 
  

                                                             168
          APPENDIX OF UTILITIES/MAJOR BUSINESS ENTERPRISES 
                            KEY MEASURES 
                                                                                                             2009‐10  Goal  Page 
Measure Name                                             2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09  2009‐10 
                                                                                                              Target  Met?   # 
Code Compliance 
Average number of days from when Code Compliance 
                                                           4.5        8.8       3.6        2         5.7        2           148 
complaints are first reported until first response 
Total number of Code Compliance cases investigated       12,874 17,749 19,123 17,260  24,301  14,200                        149 
Economic Growth and Redevelopment Services 
Number of new jobs created through economic                Not     Not 
                                                                         1,368            810      1,550       500          152 
development efforts                                      tracked tracked
Percentage of customers satisfied with Business 
                                                          100%      100%       100%      100%      100%        90%          153 
Solution Center Services 
Number of businesses assisted that show growth in one 
                                                           14         10        32         16        14         15          154 
or more growth indicator 
Number of contracted business development technical        Not     Not 
                                                                         1,449           1,746     1,594      1,400         155 
assistance hours delivered                               tracked tracked
Total audience members served through cultural 
                                                         4,486,084 3,876,475 3,878,939 3,502,873  4,888,947  4,100,000      156 
contracts 
Solid Waste Services 
Percent of Waste Stream Diverted by Solid Waste 
                                                           Not     Not 
Services Curbside and Household Hazardous Waste                          30.4%  36.1%  37.3%  37.1%                         158 
                                                         tracked tracked
operations 
Average pounds of recycled materials collected per 
                                                          14.6       15.1      15.6       21.8      22.6       23.5         159 
customer account per pickup 
Average pounds of garbage per customer account per 
                                                          31.7       32.6      32.7       27.9       28        30.7         160 
week 
Lost Time Injury Rate Per the Equivalent of 100 
                                                           3.3        2.7       1.8       1.5        1.2       1.8          161 
Employees 




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