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AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAM University of Massachusetts

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					                             AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAM


                               University of Massachusetts Amherst
                                     Amherst, Massachusetts


            Facility EEO-6 Identification Number:    25-1260-002221 008017

  Facility Dun & Bradstreet Identification Number:   04-6014838W

                    Inclusive Dates of the Update:   September 2000 to August 2001

                      Name of University System:     The University of Massachusetts

                Location of System Headquarters:     Boston, Massachusetts

                  System Chief Executive Officer:    William M. Bulger

                              Telephone Number:      (617) 287-7042

                            System EEO Official:     Kevin Barrett,
                                                     Associate Director of Human Resources

  System Dun & Bradstreet Identification Number:     107-906-854

System Headquarters EEO-6 Identification Number: 25-1250-00-8017




Program Completed By          ___________________________________________________
                                    Esther M.A. Terry, Associate Chancellor
                                    for Equal Opportunity and Diversity
                                    (413) 545-3464


Program Read and Approved By          _______________________________________________
                                      David K. Scott, Chancellor
                                      (413) 545-2211
                                                            TABLE OF CONTENTS

Affirmative Action Program ......................................................................................................................... i

Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity ................................................................................................. v

University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees Resolutions ...................................................................... 1

Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Policy ..................................................................................... 2

Chancellor's Statement on Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination ..................................................... 3

Statement by the Associate Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Diversity ........................................... 4

Internal and External Dissemination of the Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Policy............... 5

University of Massachusetts Amherst Organizational Structure ................................................................ 6

Responsibility for Implementation of the Affirmative Action Plan ........................................................... 7

Workforce Profile......................................................................................................................................... 9
      Workforce Change ........................................................................................................................ 14

Availability Estimates and Utilization Analysis ....................................................................................... 17
       Availability Estimates and Utilization Analysis for Non-Faculty Job Groups ........................... 17
       Faculty Availability Estimates and Utilization Analysis ............................................................. 20
       Comparison of the Diversity of the Non-Faculty Workforce ...................................................... 26
       Comparison of the Diversity of Tenure System Faculty ............................................................. 30

Goals ........................................................................................................................................................... 35
         Prior Year Goal Accomplishment ................................................................................................ 42

Employment Practices................................................................................................................................ 45
      Hires .............................................................................................................................................. 45
      Promotions and Transfers ............................................................................................................. 51
      Terminations ................................................................................................................................. 53

Identification of Problem Areas ................................................................................................................. 57

Programs to Eliminate Problems and Attain Goals................................................................................... 59

Reports from Chancellor's and Vice Chancellor's Areas .......................................................................... 63

Internal Audit and Reporting Systems....................................................................................................... 97

Program to Combat Sex Discrimination.................................................................................................... 98



                                                                                ii
Program to Combat Racism ..................................................................................................................... 100

Campus Support for Community Service Programs ............................................................................... 100

Consideration of Qualified Protected Category Group Members Not in Workforce ............................ 101

Program for Persons with Disabilities ..................................................................................................... 102

Affirmative Action for Veterans .............................................................................................................. 106

Program to Combat Discrimination on the Basis of Age ....................................................................... 106

Program to Combat Discrimination on the Basis of Sexual Orientation................................................ 107

Program to Combat Discrimination on the Basis of Religion ................................................................ 107

Grievance Procedures .............................................................................................................................. 107

APPENDICES

Appendix A: University of Massachusetts Amherst Organizational Chart............................................ 109

Appendix B: Protected Categories of Persons Requiring Equal Opportunity and Affirmative
          Action Efforts....................................................................................................................... 111

Appendix C: EEO-6 Job Categories and University Job Groups ........................................................... 112

Appendix D: Workforce Representation of Protected Group Members by EEO-6 Job
           Category Within Executive Area ....................................................................................... 114

Appendix E: Workforce Representation by Racial/Ethnic Origin and Gender by EEO-6 Job
            Category .............................................................................................................................. 120

Appendix F: Sexual Harassment Policy .................................................................................................. 121

Appendix G: Campus Offices, Agencies, Organizations, and Groups Directly Concerned with
            Community, Diversity, and Social Justice Issues (not including Recognized Student
            Organizations) .................................................................................................................... 132

Appendix H: Grievance Policy and Procedures ...................................................................................... 133




                                                                          iii
                                                               TABLES

1.    Workforce Representation of Protected Group Members by EEO-6 Category,
      3/31/00 ..................................................................................................................................... 9

2.    Workforce Representation of Protected Group Members by EEO-6 Job Category
      and University Job Group, 3/31/00 ........................................................................................ 10

3.    Diversity of Tenure System Faculty by School or College, 3/31/00 ..................................... 14

4.    Historical Workforce Comparison by EEO-6 Category, 1996-2000 ..................................... 15

5.    Non-Faculty Utilization Report, by University Job Group, 3/31/00...................................... 18

6.    Faculty Utilization Report, by Department/Program Within University Job
      Group, 3/31/00 ....................................................................................................................... 22

7.    Diversity of Non-Faculty Employees Workforce Comparison, 2000 v. 1999 ....................... 28

8.    Diversity of Tenure System Faculty Workforce Comparison, 2000 v. 1995......................... 32

9.    Non-Faculty Utilization, Expected Placements, and Annual Percentage
      Goal, by University Job Group, 2000-2001 ........................................................................... 36

10.   Faculty Utilization, Expected Hires, and Annual Percentage Goal by
      Department/Program, 2000-2001........................................................................................... 38

11.   Number and Characteristics of EAM and Professional/Non-Faculty Hires by
      University Job Group, 1999-2000.......................................................................................... 45

12.   Number and Characteristics of Faculty Hires by School or College, 1999-2000 .................. 46

13.   Composition of Tenure System Faculty Hires, Academic Year 1990-91
      to 1999-2000 .......................................................................................................................... 47

14.   Hire Rate and Determination of Adverse Impact, EAM, Faculty, and
      Professional/Non-Faculty Job Groups, 1999-2000 ................................................................ 49

15.   The Representation of Women and Minorities in Search Pools for EAM
      and Professional/Non-Faculty Positions, 1999-2000 ............................................................. 50

16.   Promotions and Transfers in Non-Faculty Job Groups, Selection of Protected
      Group Members, and Adverse Impact, 1997-2000 ................................................................ 52

17.   Termination Rate and Determination of Adverse Impact, by Gender and Minority
      Status Within University Job Group, 1999-2000 ................................................................... 55




                                                                     iv
       EQUAL OPPORTUNITY and DIVERSITY OFFICE

               305 Whitmore Administration Building
                    University of Massachusetts
                  Amherst, Massachusetts 01003

                           (413) 545-3464



                                  STAFF


Associate Chancellor                        - Esther M.A. Terry
   for Equal Opportunity
   and Diversity

Associate Director for                      - Gloria E. Ortiz
   Recruitment and Training

Americans with Disabilities Act             - Paul R. Appleby
  Compliance Officer

Director for Administrative                 - F. Ann Carr
    Data/Human Resources Liaison

Policy Researcher/Compliance                - Laurie J. Anastasia
    Analyst

Clerk IV                                    - Brenda Young

Clerk III                                   - Lori L. Prince

Clerk III                                   - Jamie Cimino




                                    v
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                                    vi
       UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS BOARD OF TRUSTEES RESOLUTIONS

             The Board of Trustees passed the following resolutions on November 26, 1985.

                                EQUAL OPPORTUNITY RESOLUTION

         The University of Massachusetts is firmly committed to ensuring equal opportunity at all levels
of the University. Accordingly, the Board of Trustees reaffirms that it is the policy of the University of
Massachusetts for every officer and employee to perform all official actions in full accord with the
Constitution and applicable laws and regulations of the United States and of the Commonwealth of
Massachusetts. The University's commitment to equal opportunity extends to the admission of
students, the provision of services by the University, and the selection of vendors who might provide
services or products to the University. In addition, the University affords equal employment
opportunities to all employees and applicants for employment regardless of race, color, religion, sex,
age, national origin, mental or physical disability or veteran status. Employment, promotion, demotion,
transfer, termination, and selection for training are based solely upon the requirements of the position
(T85-086A).

                                AFFIRMATIVE ACTION RESOLUTION

          The Board of Trustees, while recognizing that Affirmative Action is mandated by federal and
state law, reaffirms its own commitment to and support of this program.
          The University's Affirmative Action Program will continue to encompass positive steps. First,
it will take active efforts to achieve a representative workforce at all levels. Second, it will emphasize
the provision of opportunities for a student body which represents the minority, female, handicapped
and veteran populations. Third, in engaging vendors to service or supply the University, it will actively
seek out minority owned vendors.
          The Board of Trustees calls upon the President to take appropriate steps to implement and
monitor the University's Affirmative Action Program. The President will ensure timely reporting of
relevant material to the Board of Trustees (T85-087A).

                 The Board of Trustees passed the following statement on June 3, 1992.

            STATEMENT OF AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

         The University of Massachusetts recognizes that Affirmative Action is mandated by Federal
and State law and affirms its commitment to those laws.
         The University wholeheartedly supports and encourages the development of action programs
designed to promote the employment and advancement of women, Blacks, Hispanics, Asians, Native
Americans, persons with disabilities, and Vietnam-era Veterans as a means of assuring compliance
with the provisions of campus Affirmative Action plans.
         The University firmly supports the concept of equal opportunity without regard to an
individual’s race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, or veteran status
as it applies to his/her employment, admission to and participation in the University’s programs and
activities, provision of services, and selection of vendors who provide services or products to the
University (T92-034).




                                                      1
               AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AND NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY

         The University of Massachusetts Amherst prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color,
religion, creed, sex, age, marital status, national origin, mental or physical disability, veteran status, or
sexual orientation in any aspect of the access to, admission, or treatment of students in its programs and
activities, or in employment and application for employment. Furthermore, University policy includes
prohibitions of harassment of students and employees, i.e., racial harassment, sexual harassment, and
retaliation for filing complaints of discrimination.
         Affirmative action in employment is required for women; racial and ethnic minorities; special
disabled veterans, veterans of the Vietnam-era, and any other veterans who served on active duty
during a war or in a campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge had been authorized; and
individuals with disabilities in order to address underrepresentation in the workforce.
         Inquiries concerning applicable laws, regulations, and policies should be addressed to the Equal
Opportunity and Diversity Office, 305 Whitmore Administration Building, (413) 545-3464.
         The Associate Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Diversity, or designee, is also the Title
VI, Title IX, Section 504, and Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinator for the campus. This
person will provide information about the University's obligations with respect to the provisions of
nondiscrimination statutes including information about the requirement to provide program
accessibility for persons with disabilities.
         The University is committed to compliance with Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act
of 1964, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, Title I and Title II of the Civil Rights Act of 1991, the
Equal Pay Act of 1963, Executive Order 11246 (1965), Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972
and its regulations found at 34 C.F.R. part 106, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973,
the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Vietnam-era Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974, the
Age Discrimination Act of 1975, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, the Family and
Medical Leave Act of 1993, and with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapters 151B, 151C, and Chapter
149, all as amended. Inquiries regarding federal laws may also be directed to: Region I Director, Office
for Civil Rights, U.S. Dept. of Education, Room 222 McCormack P.O.C.H., Boston, MA 02109.
Inquiries regarding state laws may be directed to: Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination,
436 Dwight Street, Suite 220, Springfield, MA 01103.




Revised: November, 2000




                                                     2
                 CHANCELLOR’S STATEMENT ON AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
                           AND NONDISCRIMINATION


        Our goal is to achieve a campus where men and women of diverse groups come to understand
and appreciate the variety of perspectives which diversity makes possible. In pursuit of this goal we
seek to redress the imbalances described in this document. In achieving this objective we will also be
in compliance with state and federal policies in this area.
        Our commitment to equal opportunity means diligent efforts to protect students and employees
from discrimination based upon race, creed, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, marital status,
the presence of disabilities (unrelated to required tasks), status as a disabled or Vietnam-era veteran, or
sexual orientation.
        Our commitment to affirmative action means providing an opportunity to increase employment
of qualified persons from protected ethnic and racial groups, women, persons with disabilities,
Vietnam-era and special disabled veterans. This effort should be visible in our recruitment, hiring,
promotion, transfer, training, career development, compensation, benefits and termination decisions.
        I ask every member of the University of Massachusetts community on the Amherst campus to
join me in developing and implementing our 2000-2001 Affirmative Action Plan.


_________________________________                ____________________________________________
Date                                             David K. Scott
                                                 Chancellor




                                                    3
                      STATEMENT BY THE ASSOCIATE CHANCELLOR
                        FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AND DIVERSITY

        The information contained in the 2000-2001 Affirmative Action Plan demonstrates that the
Amherst Campus continues to make progress in its quest to become a truly diverse campus community.
Of note are a number of creative new programs, such as the Trends for Women in Science and
Technology (TWIST) program founded by staff and faculty in the College of Natural Sciences and
Mathematics and the College of Engineering. This program seeks to improve the recruitment and
retention of women in science and technology on the Amherst campus and beyond. Elsewhere on
campus, the Graduate School received a grant from the National Science Foundation to address the
shortage of underrepresented minority students receiving the Ph.D. in the sciences, mathematics and
engineering. The Northeast Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate at the University of
Massachusetts Amherst recruits, supports, and mentors underrepresented minority students interested in
academic careers in these fields. In like spirit, the School of Education has made special efforts in
developing outreach programs to serve minority communities and to strengthen the recruitment of
students of color, including project STRIDE (Springfield Teacher Recruitment to Increase Diversity in
Education), a collaborative program of the Amherst Campus, Springfield Technical Community
College, and the Springfield Public Schools.

        Certainly, we note these and all the other achievements presented in this report with great pride.
But we are keenly aware that the statistics also show that there are areas throughout the campus where
we have had little to no success in our attempts to create diversity. Wherever these difficult pockets
exist, we will increase our efforts and explore new strategies for change because we remain firm in our
conviction that diversity is necessary to a first-rate education in the new millennium.




________________________________                 _________________________________
Date                                             Esther M.A. Terry
                                                 Associate Chancellor for
                                                 Equal Opportunity and Diversity




                                                    4
                  INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL DISSEMINATION OF
           THE AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AND NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY

The following procedures are in effect to provide internal dissemination of the University of
Massachusetts Amherst Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Policy:

    • Personnel Manuals include a statement on affirmative action and nondiscrimination.

    • Nondiscrimination clauses are included in all union agreements; contractual provisions are
      included to guarantee that union agreements are nondiscriminatory.

    • Information regarding the Amherst campus Affirmative Action Program is published in The
      Campus Chronicle, a weekly campus newspaper.

    • Each department, division, school, and college receives a copy of the annual Affirmative
      Action Plan.

    • The Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office distributes the Affirmative Action and Equal
      Opportunity Grievance Policy and Procedures and the Sexual Harassment Policy.

The University of Massachusetts Amherst disseminates its policy externally through the following
procedures:

    • Recruitment sources are informed of the University's policy as requests are made to refer
      qualified women and minorities to the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

    • An equal employment opportunity clause is incorporated in all purchase orders, leases,
      contracts and subcontracts. It appears on all communications external to the University.

    • All recruitment advertisements placed in outside publications (e.g. newspapers, journals,
      magazines or newsletters) carry a standard University of Massachusetts Affirmative
      Action/Equal Opportunity statement, thus publicly disseminating our policy to a vast audience.

    • The Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Policy is included on the notice of Employment
      Opportunities, which is sent by the Employment Office on a weekly basis to minority and
      women's organizations, community agencies, agencies that serve veterans and the disabled, and
      other agencies concerned with employment opportunities.

    • Through its application form for prospective classified employees and by requesting voluntary
      self-identification of protected group status during search procedures for professional positions,
      the University of Massachusetts Amherst communicates the existence of its Affirmative Action
      Program.




                                                  5
                       UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST
                            ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

        The Chancellor of the University of Massachusetts Amherst is the executive officer charged by
the Board of Trustees with the responsibility for administering the University and its resources. The
Chancellor has broad powers and full responsibility for the educational program, as well as for the
business and fiscal functions of all aspects of the University. The Office of the Chancellor has
delegated to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost, the Vice Chancellor for
Administration and Finance, the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, the Vice Chancellor for
University Advancement, and the Vice Chancellor for Research oversight responsibility and
accountability for the respective areas to which they have been appointed. Ten deans have been
delegated significant responsibility for the academic and administrative functions of the schools and
colleges. See Appendix A for a summary of the organizational chart for the University of
Massachusetts Amherst.
        The University of Massachusetts Amherst operates under the principle of shared governance.
The Faculty Senate and the Student Government Association may make recommendations to the
administration concerning their respective constituencies and the governance of the campus.
        The majority of employees of the University of Massachusetts Amherst are represented by one
of seven unions. Union contracts currently in existence contain nondiscrimination clauses which
commit the parties to equal opportunity; in addition, these contracts contain language upholding
affirmative action. The unions include:

    • American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), Council 93,
      Local 1776, AFL/CIO - For service/maintenance and skilled craft personnel.
    • Graduate Employee Organization (GEO), Local 65, UAW -- for teaching assistants, research
      assistants, and graduate students with similar assignments.
    • International Brotherhood of Police Officers -- (IBPO-A) -- For police officers.
    • International Brotherhood of Police Officers -- (IBPO-B) -- For police sergeants.
    • The Massachusetts Society of Professors/Faculty Staff Union (MSP) -- For faculty members
      and librarians.
    • Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Local 509, AFL/CIO -- For non-faculty profes-
      sional personnel.
    • University Staff Association Affiliate of Massachusetts Teachers Association/NEA
      (USA/MTA/NEA) -- For secretarial/clerical and technical/paraprofessional personnel.




                                                 6
  RESPONSIBILITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF THE AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PLAN

The Chancellor shall:
    • Designate a senior-level staff person to direct the Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office and
      to develop the University of Massachusetts Amherst Affirmative Action Plan.
    • Ensure that appropriate sanctions are taken against any employee or student who violates the
      Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Policy of the University.
    • Oversee the development, implementation, and maintenance of procedures which conform to
      the University's Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Policy and the Affirmative Action
      Plan.

The Associate Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Diversity shall:
    • Direct the Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office and its staff.
    • Ensure that University policy, practices, procedures, and programs meet applicable federal and
      state AA/EO requirements.
    • Oversee the development and implementation of the Affirmative Action Program at the
      University of Massachusetts Amherst.
    • Serve as campus spokesperson on issues concerned with affirmative action and equal
      opportunity.

The Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office shall:
    • Administer internal discrimination grievance procedures and conduct investigations relative to
      affirmative action and equal opportunity complaints.
    • Administer the University Sexual Harassment Policy and provide advice and counsel to the
      campus community on all related issues.
    • Conduct outreach to campus personnel to increase and assess effectiveness of efforts in
      affirmative action and equal opportunity.
    • Develop and implement uniform affirmative action and equal opportunity policies and
      procedures for the entire campus.
    • Develop monitoring systems to assess recruitment efforts and the progress of campus programs
      toward affirmative action goals.
    • Establish record keeping systems to maintain adequate empirical data for monitoring
      affirmative action and equal opportunity efforts on the Amherst campus.
    • Prepare state, federal, and University system mandated reports.
    • Provide training programs for academic and non-academic managers regarding the role of
      affirmative action and equal opportunity on the Amherst campus.
    • Write all Affirmative Action Plans.

Vice Chancellors, Deans, Department Heads, Directors and Supervisors shall:
    • Address the goals and provisions of the Affirmative Action Plan within their respective units.
    • Cooperate with the Associate Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Diversity in the develop-
       ment and implementation of the Affirmative Action Plan.
    • Work toward developing an environment free from harassment and discrimination where
       students and employees live, work, and study.
    • Hear and resolve informal discrimination and sexual harassment complaints.




                                                 7
    • Provide information and guidance to departmental and division employees that will contribute
      to the effectiveness of the Affirmative Action Plan.

Affirmative Action Advisory Board shall:
     • Consult with and advise the Associate Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Diversity on
       matters related to affirmative action and equal opportunity.
     • Consult with the Provost and/or Chancellor on affirmative action, as requested.
     • Provide a forum for discussion of policy issues and review of medium or long-range
       affirmative action goals, strategies and implementation efforts.

University Employees shall:
    • Share responsibility for compliance with the Affirmative Action Plan.
    • Act in a manner that ensures an environment free from harassment or discrimination for all
       employees and students of the University.
    • Contribute to the effectiveness of the Affirmative Action Plan as appropriate to their positions
       and job assignments.

University Students shall:
    • Share responsibility for supporting an environment free from harassment or discrimination
       where students and employees live, work, and study.
    • Respect the rights of others in an academic environment and behave in accordance with the
       Code of Student Conduct (Trustee Document #T86-030C).




                                                  8
                                    WORKFORCE PROFILE


         The workforce was analyzed for its representation of women and minority group members
within each vice chancellor executive unit, major budgetary unit such as school/college or division, and
department or program budgetary unit. Workforce analysis reports, listing personnel in each
department in high to low wage order with job title enumerated as required by Title 41 Code of Federal
Regulations (CFR) 60-2.11(a), are available for review in the Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office.
Definitions of protected group categories used in the workforce analysis are provided in Appendix B of
this document. Statistics on racial/ethnic origin, disability and veteran status are based upon voluntary,
self-disclosed information.
         The workforce was analyzed using the EEO-6 classification system, which addresses the
requirements set forth in 41 CFR 60-2.11(b). The EEO-6 classification system contains seven
categories of personnel as follows: 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM), 2: Faculty, 3:
Professional/Non-Faculty, 4: Secretarial/Clerical, 5: Technical/Paraprofessional, 6: Skilled Crafts, and
7: Service/Maintenance. All job titles used at the University of Massachusetts Amherst are grouped
into EEO-6 categories and, within these, into job groups based on similarity in job content, wage rates,
and opportunity for advancement. A display of EEO-6 Categories, University job groups, and job
titles within groups is located in Appendix C.
         A summary analysis of the campus workforce by EEO-6 category, which includes the
representation of women, minorities, Vietnam-era veterans and veterans of other wars or military
campaigns, special disabled veterans, and individuals with disabilities follows in Table 1, Workforce
Representation of Protected Group Members by EEO-6 Category. The University of Massachusetts
Amherst workforce on 3/31/00 included 5,659 employees, excluding student and hourly employees.
Women represented 48.5% of the total workforce; minority group members represented 12.8%;
veterans, 5.6%; and people with disabilities, 0.9%. As compared to 1999, the size of the overall
workforce has increased slightly, and the representation of women has also increased slightly. The
percentage representation of minorities in the workplace decreased slightly and the number of disabled
employees remained essentially the same. Veterans, including Vietnam-era, special disabled veterans,
and veterans of other wars, campaigns and military excursions, comprise 5.6% of the UMass
workforce.

                                                    Table 1
             Workforce Representation of Protected Group Members by EEO-6 Category
                                              3/31/00
                                Total           Female               Minority          Veterans         Disabled
EEO-6 Category                   #         #             %       #           %     #           %    #           %

Executive/Admin./Managerial      113      47             41.6    16        14.2    14        12.4    3         2.7
Faculty                        1,469     447             30.4   203        13.8    75         5.1   10         0.7
Professional/Non-Faculty       1,592     862             54.1   203        12.8    62         3.9    5         0.3
Secretarial/Clerical           1,040     915             88.0    85         8.2    13         1.3    8         0.8
Technical/Paraprofessional       347     139             40.1    39        11.2    27         7.8    3         0.9
Skilled Crafts                   279      16              5.7    16         5.7    51        18.3    5         1.8
Service/Maintenance              819     317             38.7   162        19.8    77         9.4   14         1.7

TOTAL                          5,659    2,743            48.5   724        12.8   319         5.6   48         0.9




                                                          9
                                                                             Table 2

                                                Workforce Representation of Protected Group Members
                                                  by EEO-6 Job Category and University Job Group
                                                                      3/31/00
                                     Total                       Total                                 Asian/           Native
                                  Employees        Female      Minorities           Black          Pacific Islander   American       Hispanic    Veterans   Disabled
                                       #         #       %     #       %        #           %        #         %      #        %    #       %       #          #
EEO-6 Category 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM)

EAM A                                  8         2     25.0     3     37.5      2           25.0      0       0.0      0      0.0    1    12.5      2          0
EAM B                                 20         7     35.0     3     15.0      2           10.0      1       5.0      0      0.0    0     0.0      2          1
EAM C                                 39        19     48.7     5     12.8      5           12.8      0       0.0      0      0.0    0     0.0      1          0
EAM D                                 46        19     41.3     5     10.9      1            2.2      1       2.2      0      0.0    3     6.5      9          2

Category Total                       113        47     41.6   16      14.2     10            8.9      2       1.8      0      0.0    4     3.5     14          3

EEO-6 Category 2: Faculty

Tenure System Faculty               1,054      271     25.7   156     14.8     44            4.2    70        6.6      5      0.5   37     3.5     50          9
Other Faculty                         415      176     42.4    47     11.3     13            3.1    23        5.5      0      0.0   11     2.7     25          1

Category Total                      1,469      447     30.4   203     13.8     57            3.9    93        6.3      5      0.3   48     3.3     75         10

EEO-6 Category 3: Professional Non-Faculty

Administrative                       403       272     67.5   41      10.2     18            4.5    10        2.5      1      0.3   12     3.0     18          1
Education/Training                   345       224     64.9   60      17.4     28            8.1    13        3.8      5      1.5   14     4.1      8          2
Institutional Relations              120        81     67.5    7       5.8      4            3.3     2        1.7      0      0.0    1     0.8      2          0
Library Sciences                      57        38     66.7    3       5.3      1            1.8     1        1.8      0      0.0    1     1.8      3          0
Research/Post Doctorates             188        65     34.6   48      25.5      3            1.6    40       21.3      1      0.5    4     2.1      0          0
Medical Care                          39        29     74.4    2       5.1      1            2.6     0        0.0      1      2.6    0     0.0      2          1
Technical                            389       123     31.6   36       9.3      9            2.3    10        2.6      5      1.3   12     3.1     27          1
Professional Non-Faculty, Other       15        11     73.3    0       0.0      0            0.0     0        0.0      0      0.0    0     0.0      0          0
Allied Health                         36        19     52.8    6      16.7      3            8.3     2        5.6      0      0.0    1     2.8      2          0

Category Total                      1,592      862     54.1   203     12.8     67            4.2    78        4.9     13      0.8   45     2.8     62          5


                                                                               10
                                                                   Table 2 (continued)

                                                 Workforce Representation of Protected Group Members
                                                   by EEO-6 Job Category and University Job Group
                                                                       3/31/00
                                       Total                    Total                               Asian/           Native
                                    Employees      Female     Minorities         Black          Pacific Islander   American       Hispanic    Veterans   Disabled
                                        #        #       %    #       %     #            %        #         %      #        %    #       %       #          #
EEO-6 Category 4: Secretarial/Clerical

Administrative Support                206       192    93.2   15      7.3   11            5.3     1        0.5     2       1.0    1     0.5      0          0
Secretaries/Clerks/Typists            571       535    93.7   48      8.4   17            3.0    10        1.8     3       0.5   18     3.2      3          3
Data Entry Operator                    55        48    87.3    6     10.9    3            5.5     0        0.0     0       0.0    3     5.5      0          1
Financial Records                      63        59    93.7    5      7.9    3            4.8     2        3.2     0       0.0    0     0.0      0          1
Duplicating/Mail                       27         9    33.3    3     11.1    3           11.1     0        0.0     0       0.0    0     0.0      7          0
Library                                80        63    78.8    5      6.3    3            3.8     0        0.0     1       1.3    1     1.3      3          3
Sales                                  38         9    23.7    3      7.9    1            2.6     2        5.3     0       0.0    0     0.0      0          0

Category Total                      1,040       915    88.0   85      8.2   41            3.9    15        1.4     6       0.6   23     2.2     13          8

EEO-6 Category 5: Technical/Paraprofessional

Science & Other Technicians           188       71     37.8   10      5.3    2            1.1     6        3.2     0       0.0    2     1.1     15          3
Comp., Eng., & Related Tech.           37       10     27.0    1      2.7    0            0.0     1        2.7     0       0.0    0     0.0      5          0
Fire & Safety Officer                  12        2     16.7    0      0.0    0            0.0     0        0.0     0       0.0    0     0.0      1          0
Business & Related                     19       15     79.0    2     10.5    1            5.3     1        5.3     0       0.0    0     0.0      2          0
Health Services                        40       36     90.0   17     42.5    6           15.0     0        0.0     0       0.0   11    27.5      1          0
Protective Services                    51        5      9.8    9     17.7    6           11.8     0        0.0     0       0.0    3     5.9      3          0

Category Total                        347       139    40.1   39     11.2   15            4.3     8        2.3     0       0.0   16     4.6     27          3

EEO-6 Category 6: Skilled Crafts

Mech. & Repairers, Non-Suprv.          66        9     13.6    4      6.1    0            0.0     0        0.0     2       3.0    2     3.0      7          1
Skilled Crafts, Suprv.                 60        2      3.3    2      3.3    0            0.0     0        0.0     2       3.3    0     0.0     10          1
Construction Trades, Non-Suprv.       137        5      3.7    9      6.6    5            3.7     0        0.0     1       0.7    3     2.2     27          3
Plant & System Operation               16        0      0.0    1      6.3    0            0.0     0        0.0     0       0.0    1     6.3      7          0

Category Total                        279       16      5.7   16      5.7    5            1.8     0        0.0     5       1.8    6     2.2     51          5

                                                                            11
                                                                     Table 2 (continued)

                                                Workforce Representation of Protected Group Members
                                                  by EEO-6 Job Category and University Job Group
                                                                      3/31/00
                                    Total                        Total                               Asian/           Native
                                  Employees        Female      Minorities          Black         Pacific Islander   American       Hispanic    Veterans   Disabled
                                      #          #       %     #       %      #            %       #         %      #        %    #       %       #          #
EEO-6 Category 7: Service/Maintenance

Food Prep. & Serv., Non-Suprv.      173        112     64.7   57      33.0    8            4.6    43       24.9      1      0.6    5     2.9      5          0
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Non-Suprv.    421        133     31.6   77      18.3   16            3.8    37        8.8      2      0.5   22     5.2     51         10
Motor Vehicle Operators              12          0      0.0    0       0.0    0            0.0     0        0.0      0      0.0    0     0.0      1          0
Farming & Forestry                   11          0      0.0    0       0.0    0            0.0     0        0.0      0      0.0    0     0.0      1          1
Guards, Institutional                36          8     22.2    6      16.7    3            8.3     1        2.8      0      0.0    2     5.6      3          0
Food Prep. & Serv., Suprv.           40         16     40.0    4      10.0    1            2.5     2        5.0      0      0.0    1     2.5      1          1
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Suprv.         61         14     23.0    7      11.5    1            1.6     2        3.3      1      1.6    3     4.9     14          2
Departmental Assistant               65         34     52.3   11      16.9    0            0.0     4        6.2      0      0.0    7    10.8      1          0

Category Total                      819        317     38.7   162     19.8   29            3.5    89       10.9      4      0.5   40     4.9     77         14


GRAND TOTAL                        5,659      2,743    48.5   724     12.8   224           4.0   285        5.0     33      0.6   182    3.2    319         48




                                                                              12
      Representation of women in the various EEO-6 workforce categories continues to follow several
predicted patterns including the greatest representation of women in the secretarial/clerical workforce
(88.0%) and the smallest representation of women in the skilled crafts area (5.7%). Minorities are
employed in the greatest numbers as professional staff (n = 203, 12.8%) and faculty (n = 203, 13.8%);
minorities are least well represented in the skilled crafts area (n = 16, 5.7%). The greatest percentage
representation of veterans occurs in the skilled crafts area (n = 51, 18.3%). For more detail, see Table
2, Workforce Representation of Protected Group Members by EEO-6 Job Category and University Job
Group (pp. 10-12), which displays this information by University job group; included is a breakdown
by racial/ethnic origin.
      A further breakdown of workforce data is provided in the appendix section. Workforce
representation by executive area is provided in Appendix D, Workforce Representation of Protected
Group Members, by EEO-6 Job Category Within Executive Area. Workforce representation by gender
and racial/ethnic origin is presented in Appendix E, Workforce Representation by Racial/Ethnic Origin
and Gender by EEO-6 Job Category.
      The EEO-6 classification system includes six categories of non-faculty personnel. The
Executive, Administrative, Managerial (EAM) category is divided into four job groups, relative to the
extent of the position's direct decision-making authority, e.g., campus-wide or unit based. The
Professional/Non-Faculty category is divided into nine job groups based on job content as follows:
Administrative, Education/Training, Institutional Relations, Library Sciences, Research/Post-
Doctorates, Medical Care, Allied Health, Technical, and Other Professional. The remaining four EEO-
6 categories (Secretarial/Clerical, Technical/Paraprofessional, Skilled Crafts, and Service/Maintenance)
are divided into content specific job groups including job titles which reflect clear promotional
opportunity, e.g., Typist I, Typist II.
      There are two major job groups in the EEO-6 category of Faculty - Tenure System Faculty and
Other Faculty. Tenure System Faculty includes all tenured and tenure-track faculty; academic
department heads are normally included in this category. Other Faculty consists of non-tenure track
faculty including visiting faculty. Each department or program budgetary unit with one or more faculty
employees is considered a job subgroup. Due to the relatively small number of non-tenure system
faculty, data on Other Faculty is presented by school and college rather than by department.
      Table 3, Diversity of Tenure System Faculty by School or College, displayed on the next page,
shows the total number of tenured/tenure-track faculty, the number and percentage female, and the
number and percentage of minority group members within each academic area. Among the nine
schools and colleges, the representation of women faculty ranges from a low of 10.5% in the College of
Engineering to a high of 100% in the School of Nursing. The representation of minorities ranges from
a low of 10.0% in both the School of Nursing and the College of Food and Natural Resources, to a high
of 21.4% in the School of Education. However, the greatest number of women faculty (n = 86) and
minority faculty (n = 37) are found in the College of Humanities and Fine Arts.




                                                  13
                                            Table 3
                              Diversity of Tenure System Faculty
                                     by School or College
                                            3/31/00

                                                      Total          Female         Minority
School or College                                      #         #            %    #       %

College of Humanities & Fine Arts                     255       86       33.7      37     14.5
College of Natural Sciences & Mathematics             243       35       14.4      36     14.8
College of Social & Behavioral Sciences               167       53       31.7      21     12.6
School of Education                                    56       24       42.9      12     21.4
College of Engineering                                 95       10       10.5      18     19.0
College of Food & Natural Resources                   140       25       17.9      14     10.0
School of Management                                   43       10       23.3       9     20.9
School of Nursing                                      10       10      100.0       1     10.0
School of Public Health & Health Sciences              40       16       40.0       6     15.0
Other                                                   5        2       40.0       2     40.0

TOTAL                                                1,054     271       25.7     156     14.8




                                       Workforce Change

        The workforce was analyzed for changes in its composition by reviewing five years of data
generated using the Criterion Affirmative Action Management System. Table 4, Historical Workforce
Comparison by EEO-6 Category, presents summary annual workforce statistics for the 1996 through
2000 time period, and includes the total number of employees, the number and percent female, and the
number and percent minority, for each EEO-6 category.
        Overall, the workforce has increased in diversity from 1996 to 2000. The percentage of
minorities in the total workforce increased from 11.3% in 1996 to 12.8% in 2000. With the exception
of the EAM category, minority representation has improved in every EEO-6 workforce category, thus
indicating a broad change. Over this time period, the greatest numbers of minority employees were
added to the Faculty, Professional/Non-Faculty, and Service/Maintenance segments of the workforce.
The overall percentage of women in the workforce increased from 47.6% in 1996 to 48.5% in 2000.
For women, increases occurred in the EAM category, the Faculty, and in the Skilled Crafts area.
Women continued a majority presence among the Professional/Non-Faculty staff, and continued to
dominate the Secretarial/Clerical area.




                                                14
                                            Table 4

                       Historical Workforce Comparison by EEO-6 Category
                                            1996-2000

                                              Total           Female           Minority
EEO-6 Category                      Year       #         #          %         #        %
Executive/Admin./Managerial         2000      113       47         41.6       16      14.2
                                    1999      118       50         42.4       19      16.1
                                    1998      117       48         41.0       18      15.4
                                    1997      115       46         40.0       15      13.0
                                    1996      117       45         38.5       18      15.4
Faculty                             2000    1,469      447         30.4      203      13.8
                                    1999    1,434      430         30.0      194      13.5
                                    1998    1,395      414         29.7      184      13.2
                                    1997    1,399      390         27.9      184      13.2
                                    1996    1,377      376         27.3      173      12.6
Professional/Non-Faculty            2000    1,592      862         54.1      203      12.8
                                    1999    1,502      805         53.6      200      13.3
                                    1998    1,431      756         52.8      189      13.2
                                    1997    1,374      731         53.2      168      12.2
                                    1996    1,317      704         53.5      161      12.2
Secretarial/Clerical                2000    1,040      915         88.0       85          8.2
                                    1999    1,042      921         88.4       94          9.0
                                    1998    1,026      905         88.2       95          9.3
                                    1997    1,056      930         88.1       94          8.9
                                    1996    1,067      938         87.9       73          6.8
Technical/Paraprofessional          2000      347      139         40.1       39      11.2
                                    1999      357      152         42.6       42      11.8
                                    1998      350      151         43.1       47      13.4
                                    1997      330      143         43.3       41      12.4
                                    1996      333      145         43.5       35      10.5
Skilled Crafts                      2000      279       16             5.7    16          5.7
                                    1999      282       14             5.0    16          5.7
                                    1998      291       14             4.8    17          5.8
                                    1997      309       13             4.2    15          4.9
                                    1996      291       12             4.1    14          4.8
Service/Maintenance                 2000      819      317         38.7      162      19.8
                                    1999      832      322         38.7      154      18.5
                                    1998      805      311         38.6      144      17.9
                                    1997      858      337         39.3      143      16.7
                                    1996      855      332         38.8      130      15.2
GRAND TOTAL                         2000    5,659     2,743        48.5      724      12.8
                                    1999    5,567     2,694        48.4      719      12.9
                                    1998    5,415     2,599        48.0      694      12.8
                                    1997    5,441     2,590        47.6      660      12.1
                                    1996    5,357     2,552        47.6      604      11.3




                                              15
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                                    16
                                 AVAILABILITY ESTIMATES
                                 & UTILIZATION ANALYSIS

       Availability estimates for women and minorities were computed using the Criterion Affirmative
Action Management System (CAAMS), and in accordance with the eight-factor analysis described in
Title 41 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 60-2.11(b). A separate availability estimate was
developed for each non-faculty job group and for each faculty subgroup (department or program
budgetary unit).
       As set forth in CFR 60-2.11(b), a utilization analysis is a comparison of the availability
(percentage basis) of women and minorities with the current representation of women and minorities in
each workforce job group. Underutilization is defined as having fewer minorities or women in a
particular job group than would reasonably be expected by their availability. There are three tests
of underutilization considered valid by the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs: the 80%
rule, the one-person shortfall, and a standard deviation based test. For this analysis, underutilization
was determined based on a combination of the 80% rule and the one-person shortfall test. This works
as follows. First, the workforce is checked to see if representation equals or exceeds 80% of the
availability estimate. Second, in cases where the 80% rule is not met, the shortfall in persons is
calculated. If the shortfall is equal to or greater than one person, then underutilization is said to exist.
The standard deviation based test is not customarily used as it is permissible to use this test only when a
job group meets certain numerical criteria.
       Based on the 1990 census, it is estimated that 3.8% of the civilian labor force in Massachusetts is
disabled. Veterans, including Vietnam-era veterans and any other veterans who served on active duty
during a war, or in a campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge has been authorized,
comprise 12.6% of the civilian workforce. Federal regulations do not require that a utilization analysis
pertaining to the workforce representation of employees with disabilities and veterans be conducted,
nor have methods for such an analysis been developed. Therefore, a utilization analysis has not been
performed for these groups. As is the case with data on gender and ethnicity, data on disability and
veteran status is collected by the University through the voluntary, self-disclosure of the employee.
Summary statistics on the numbers of employees who are disabled or who are veterans are included in
various tables throughout the Affirmative Action Plan.

           Availability Estimates and Utilization Analysis For Non-Faculty Job Groups

         For non-faculty job groups, the 1990 Census data was used as the source for raw statistics on
the availability of women and minorities in the population and labor market. Depending on the usual
recruitment area for the specific job group, statistics for the local (Franklin, Hampden, and Hampshire
counties), state/regional (New England states), or national levels were used. Availability estimates
obtained through the eight-factor analysis process are also influenced by the composition of the
University's work force, as the presence of promotable and transferable women and minorities within
the organization is factored into the overall determination of availability.
         The utilization of non-faculty employees is reported in Table 5, Non-Faculty Utilization
Report, by University Job Group (pp. 18-19). This table displays the current composition of the
workforce with respect to the total number of employees, the number and percentage female, and the
number and percentage of minority group members; the availability estimate for female and minority




                                                    17
                                                                                                   Table 5

                                                               Non-Faculty Utilization Report, by University Job Group
                                                                                        3/31/00

                                                                                Current Workforce                                    Availability                Shortfall               Underutilized
                                                               Total             Female           Minority                          Fem      Min               Fem      Min              Fem      Min
                                                                #              #        %        #        %                          %         %                %        %
EEO-6 Category 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM)

EAM A*                                                           7             2            28.6          3           42.9          34.0          15.1           5.4                     No       No
EAM B                                                           20             7            35.0          3           15.0          41.4          14.3           6.4                     No       No
EAM C                                                           39            19            48.7          5           12.8          47.7          12.3                                   No       No
EAM D                                                           46            19            41.3          5           10.9          47.3          11.2           6.0           0.3       No       No

EEO-6 Category 3: Professional Non-Faculty

Administrative                                                 403           272            67.5         41           10.2          59.2          10.0                                   No       No
Education/Training                                             345           224            64.9         60           17.4          54.4          12.5                                   No       No
Institutional Relations                                        120            81            67.5          7            5.8          53.4           9.2                         3.4       No       Yes
Library Sciences                                                57            38            66.7          3            5.3          69.9           8.4           3.2           3.1       No       Yes
Research/Post Doctorates                                       188            65            34.6         48           25.5          31.5          14.6                                   No       No
Medical Care                                                    39            29            74.4          2            5.1          70.9          10.4                         5.3       No       Yes
Technical                                                      389           123            31.6         36            9.3          34.2          10.4           2.6           1.1       No       No
Professional Non-Faculty, Other                                 15            11            73.3          0            0.0          50.2          10.5                        10.5       No       Yes
Allied Health                                                   36            19            52.8          6           16.7          58.3          12.9           5.5                     No       No

EEO-6 Category 4: Secretarial/Clerical

Administrative Support                                         206           192            93.2         15            7.3          90.1           8.3                         1.0       No       No
Secretaries/Clerks/Typists                                     571           535            93.7         48            8.4          88.7          10.8                         2.4       No       Yes
Data Entry Operator                                             55            48            87.3          6           10.9          75.7          10.1                                   No       No
Financial Records                                               63            59            93.7          5            7.9          85.4           7.1                                   No       No
Duplicating/Mail                                                27             9            33.3          3           11.1          66.2           4.4          32.9                     Yes      No
Library                                                         80            63            78.8          5            6.3          79.6           7.7           0.8           1.4       No       No
Sales                                                           38             9            23.7          3            7.9          35.7          12.9          12.0           5.0       Yes      Yes

NOTE: Underutilization occurs when the workforce composition is less than 80% of the availability estimate and there is a one person or greater shortfall in the respective job group.
* The position of Chancellor is not included in the utilization analysis as the hiring decision for this position is made external to the campus.




                                                                                                        18
                                                                                           Table 5 (continued)

                                                               Non-Faculty Utilization Report, by University Job Group
                                                                                        3/31/00

                                                                                 Current Workforce                                   Availability                 Shortfall              Underutilized
                                                               Total              Female           Minority                         Fem      Min                Fem      Min             Fem      Min
                                                                #               #        %        #        %                         %         %                 %        %
EEO-6 Category 5: Technical/Paraprofessional

Science & Other Technicians                                    188             71           37.8         10             5.3         33.7           8.0                          2.7      No       Yes
Comp., Eng., & Related Tech.                                    37             10           27.0          1             2.7         43.2           5.9          16.2            3.2      Yes      Yes
Fire & Safety Officer                                           12              2           16.7          0             0.0         12.2           3.6                          3.6      No       No
Business & Related                                              19             15           79.0          2            10.5         78.7           7.3                                   No       No
Health Services                                                 40             36           90.0         17            42.5         83.1          19.2                                   No       No
Protective Services                                             51              5            9.8          9            17.7         11.6          14.7            1.8                    No       No

EEO-6 Category 6: Skilled Crafts

Mech. & Repairers, Non-Suprv.                                   66              9           13.6           4            6.1         14.0            8.0          0.4            1.9      No       Yes
Skilled Crafts, Suprv.                                          60              2            3.3           2            3.3          7.5            4.7          4.2            1.4      Yes      No
Construction Trades, Non-Suprv.                                137              5            3.7           9            6.6          5.9            6.9          2.2            0.3      Yes      No
Plant & System Operation                                        16              0            0.0           1            6.3         14.0            9.4         14.0            3.1      Yes      No

EEO-6 Category 7: Service/Maintenance

Food Prep. & Serv., Non-Suprv.                                 173           112            64.7         57            33.0         61.0          27.4                                   No       No
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Non-Suprv.                               421           133            31.6         77            18.3         34.0          19.4           2.4            1.1      No       No
Motor Vehicle Operators                                         12             0             0.0          0             0.0         10.5           6.1          10.5            6.1      Yes      No
Farming & Forestry                                              11             0             0.0          0             0.0         10.7           6.5          10.7            6.5      Yes      No
Guards, Institutional                                           36             8            22.2          6            16.7         18.0          14.2                                   No       No
Food Prep. & Serv., Suprv.                                      40            16            40.0          4            10.0         50.1          19.2          10.1            9.2      Yes      Yes
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Suprv.                                    61            14            23.0          7            11.5         25.0          12.6           2.0            1.1      No       No
Departmental Assistant                                          65            34            52.3         11            16.9         47.7          10.2                                   No       No

NOTE: Underutilization occurs when the workforce composition is less than 80% of the availability estimate and there is a one person or greater shortfall in the respective job group.




                                                                                                        19
workers (percentage basis), the shortfall between current utilization and the availability estimate
(percentage basis), and the determination of whether or not underutilization exists.
      Overall, the workforce was found to meet utilization standards for women in 29 of the 38 non-
faculty job groups. Women were utilized in all four Executive, Administrative, and Managerial (EAM)
job groups and in the entire Professional/Non-Faculty area. Women were utilized in all job groups
within the Secretarial/Clerical area with the exception of the Duplicating/Mail and Sales job groups. In
the Technical/Paraprofessional area, women were fully utilized with the exception of the Computer,
Engineering & Related Technicians job group. Women were underutilized in three Skilled Crafts job
groups: Skilled Crafts, Supervisory; Construction Trades, Non-Supervisory; and Plant & System
Operation. Women were underutilized in three Service/Maintenance job groups: Motor Vehicle
Operators; Farming & Forestry; and Food Preparation & Services, Supervisory.
      The workforce was found to meet utilization standards for minorities in 28 of 38 non-faculty job
groups. Minorities were fully utilized in all four EAM job groups. Minorities were underutilized in
four Professional/Non-Faculty job groups: Institutional Relations; Library Sciences; Medical Care; and
Other.         Minorities were underutilized in two Secretarial/Clerical job groups:
Secretaries/Clerks/Typists; and Sales. Minorities were utilized in the Technical/Paraprofessional
category with the exception of the Science & Other Technicians job group and the Computer,
Engineering, & Related Technology job group. Minorities were underutilized in one of four job groups
within Skilled Crafts (Mechanics & Repairers, Non-Supervisory). Minorities were underutilized in one
out of eight job groups in Service/Maintenance (Food Preparation & Services, Supervisory).

                      Faculty Availability Estimates and Utilization Analysis

          Availability data for faculty were drawn primarily from a composite of the National Research
Council's Survey of Earned Doctorates (1975-1991), which includes the gender and racial/ethnic
heritage of degree recipients. Only degrees granted to U.S. citizens and permanent residents are
included in the totals. The doctorates reported include research and applied-research doctorates in all
fields; professional degrees are not included in this source. Six departments in which the doctorate was
not the terminal degree for the majority of faculty were identified as follows: Afro-American Studies,
Art, Athletics, Journalism, Legal Studies, and Music & Dance. For these departments, as well as for
the School of Nursing, availability data were drawn from a multi-year (1960-1991) composite degree
table compiled by the University of Washington. In addition, census data was the source of faculty
availability data for administrative units, special programs, and units with no tenured/tenure-track
faculty.
          Using the National Research Council's list of specialties, the disciplinary composition of the
faculty in each academic department was identified by a survey conducted in 1991 by the AA/EO
Office. Availability estimates for faculty in each academic department were determined as follows:
the total number of degrees earned in the respective discipline(s) were summed for the time period and
the total percentage of degrees earned by women and minorities, respectively, were calculated. In cases
where the department identified a single discipline, these percentages equaled the availability estimate
for women and minorities, respectively. For departments which identified more than one discipline,
degrees in the relevant subdisciplines were also included. If a weighted formula for the disciplinary
composition of the department was provided to the AA/EO Office, this formula was used to produce
the departmental availability estimate. It should be noted that, for any department, weight factors can
be developed to reflect either the proportion of current faculty trained in each discipline or
subdiscipline or the department's anticipated future directions in hiring.




                                                  20
          The EEO-6 category Faculty is divided into two primary job groups: Tenure System Faculty
(tenured/tenure-track), and Other Faculty (non-tenure track). The Tenure System Faculty job group
includes a separate subgroup for each department or program budgetary unit where a tenured/tenure-
track faculty member is employed. Similarly, the Other Faculty job group includes departmental
subgroups. Due to the relatively small number of non-tenure system faculty, data for the job group
Other Faculty has been summarized by school and college. Statistics on the utilization of women and
minorities among the faculty are presented in Table 6, Faculty Utilization Report, by
Department/Program Within University Job Group, (pp. 22-25). This table displays the current
composition of the faculty with respect to the total number, the number and percentage female, and the
number and percentage of minority group members; the availability estimate for female and minority
faculty (percentage basis), the shortfall between current utilization and the availability estimate
(percentage basis), and the determination of whether underutilization exists.
          As of 3/31/00, there were 1,054 tenure system faculty members at the University of
Massachusetts Amherst; 271 (25.7%) were women and 156 (14.8%) were minority group members.
Using the definition of utilization as described in "Availability Estimates & Utilization Analysis", out
of the 64 subgroups of Regular Faculty of sufficient size for analysis, 28 (43.8%) were underutilized for
women and 13 (20.3%) were underutilized for minorities. There were three academic departments
without female faculty and ten departments without minority faculty members. The following 29
departments were found to meet utilization standards for both women and minority faculty: Art,
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Biostatistics & Epidemiology, Civil & Environmental
Engineering, Classics, Communication Disorders, Consumer Studies, Economics, Electrical &
Computer Engineering, Finance and Operations Management, Food Science, History, Journalism,
Labor Relations, Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning, Legal Studies, Management,
Marketing, Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, Nursing, Nutrition, Philosophy, Physics &
Astronomy, Plant & Soil Sciences, Political Science, Student Development, Teacher Education,
Theater and Women’s Studies.
          There were 415 non-tenure track faculty as of 3/31/00; 176 (42.4%) were women, and 47
(11.3%) were minority group members. The utilization analysis for non-tenure system faculty is
displayed at the school/college level in Table 6; see the section on "Other Faculty". A weighted
availability estimate was calculated for each school and college, by using the departmental availability
estimates weighted by the number of non-tenure track faculty in each of their departments. The
representation of women among the non-tenure system faculty was found to meet utilization standards
at the school/college level across all the deaneries. The representation of minorities among the non-
tenure system faculty was found to meet utilization standards in Humanities & Fine Arts, Natural
Sciences and Mathematics, the School of Education, and the College of Food & Natural Resources;
minorities were under-represented among the non-tenure system faculty in Engineering, Management,
Public Health & Health Sciences, Social & Behavioral Sciences, and Other.
          It should be noted that some of the faculty subgroups are very small in size; this is especially
true for the non-tenure track faculty. Achievement of diversity within these subgroups, therefore, may
be restricted by their small size.




                                                   21
                                                                                                    Table 6

                                                  Faculty Utilization Report, by Department/Program Within University Job Group
                                                                                       3/31/00

                                                                              Current Workforce                                        Availability                Shortfall                Underutilized
                                                           Total                   Female                        Minority            Fem         Min            Fem        Min             Fem        Min
                                                             #                  #          %               #             %            %           %              %           %
Tenure System Faculty                                     1054                 271        25.7            156           14.8

Chancellor                                                   1                    --           --           --            --              --          --            --           --          --           --
      Computing/Networking                                   1                    --           --           --            --              --          --            --           --          --           --
Academic Affairs                                          1053                  270          25.6         156           14.8
   Provost                                                   3                    1          33.3           2           66.7
 Fine Arts Center                                            1                    --           --           --            --              --          --            --           --          --           --
      Honors Program                                         1                    --           --           --            --              --          --            --           --          --           --
      UMass Extension                                        1                    --           --           --            --              --          --            --           --          --           --
   College of Humanities & Fine Arts                       255                   86          33.7          37           14.5
      Afro-American Studies                                 10                    1          10.0           8           80.0           45.0        17.0          35.0                      Yes           No
      Art                                                   27                   15          55.6           4           14.8           56.0         7.2           0.4                      No            No
      Asian Languages & Literatures                          4                    1          25.0           1           25.0           55.9        17.2          30.9                      Yes           No
      Classics                                               7                    2          28.6           0            0.0           38.9         1.8          10.3          1.8         No            No
      Comparative Literature                                11                    4          36.4           1            9.1           47.0        13.2          10.6          4.1         Yes           No
      English                                               51                   14          27.5           7           13.7           51.4         5.6          23.9                      Yes           No
      French & Italian                                      14                    6          42.9           2           14.3           62.1         8.6          19.2                      Yes           No
      Germanic Languages & Literatures                      11                    3          27.3           0            0.0           53.3         2.0          26.0          2.0         Yes           No
      History                                               35                   11          31.4           2            5.7           28.4         7.4                        1.7         No            No
      Journalism                                             6                    2          33.3           1           16.7           49.0        10.0          15.7                      No            No
      Judaic & Near Eastern Studies                          4                    0           0.0           1           25.0           43.0         8.1          43.0                      Yes           No
      Linguistics                                           12                    6          50.0           0            0.0           52.7        12.8           2.7         12.8         No            Yes
      Music & Dance                                         27                    7          25.9           1            3.7           48.0         8.0          22.1          4.3         Yes           Yes
      Philosophy                                            12                    3          25.0           0            0.0           21.2         4.9                        4.9         No            No
      Slavic Languages & Literatures                         1                    --           --           --            --             --          --            --           --          --            --
      Spanish & Portuguese                                  10                    3          30.0           6           60.0           56.5        40.6          26.5                      Yes           No
      Theater                                                9                    4          44.4           2           22.2           41.8         5.5                                    No            No
      Women's Studies                                        4                    4         100.0           1           25.0           44.4         5.8                                    No            No


NOTE: Underutilization occurs when the workforce composition is less than 80% of the availability estimate and there is a one person or greater shortfall in the respective job group. Data not reported for
      units with fewer than three employees.




                                                                                                        22
                                                                                            Table 6 (continued)

                                                  Faculty Utilization Report, by Department/Program Within University Job Group
                                                                                       3/31/00

                                                                              Current Workforce                                        Availability                Shortfall                Underutilized
                                                           Total                   Female                         Minority           Fem         Min            Fem        Min             Fem        Min
                                                            #                   #          %                 #               %        %           %              %           %
Tenure System Faculty

   College of Natural Sci. & Math.                         243                   35          14.4            36          14.8
      Biochemistry & Molecular Bio.                         14                    6          42.9             1           7.1          33.6         9.7                        2.6         No            No
      Biology                                               35                    8          22.9             3           8.6          39.2        16.4          16.3          7.8         Yes           Yes
      Chemistry                                             30                    3          10.0             2           6.7          21.4         9.8          11.4          3.1         Yes           No
      Computer Science                                      32                    4          12.5             4          12.5           8.7        18.2                        5.7         No            Yes
      Geosciences                                           22                    7          31.8             0           0.0          18.9         6.8                        6.8         No            Yes
      Mathematics & Statistics                              51                    4           7.8            15          29.4          17.0        10.6           9.2                      Yes           No
      Physics & Astronomy                                   47                    3           6.4             9          19.2           8.3        10.6           1.9                      No            No
      Polymer Science & Engineering                         12                    0           0.0             2          16.7          16.1        23.3          16.1          6.6         Yes           No
   College of Social & Behavioral Sci.                     167                   53          31.7            21          12.6
      Anthropology                                          16                    5          31.3             3          18.8          47.2         7.2          15.9                      Yes           No
      Communication                                         16                    5          31.3             3          18.8          41.7         8.9          10.4                      Yes           No
      Economics                                             24                    6          25.0             4          16.7          17.4        10.8                                    No            No
      Labor Relations Research Ctr.                          4                    2          50.0             0           0.0          33.9        10.6                       10.6         No            No
      Legal Studies                                          7                    2          28.6             1          14.3          26.0         9.0                                    No            No
      Political Science                                     24                    7          29.2             4          16.7          25.8        12.7                                    No            No
      Psychology                                            49                   20          40.8             2           4.1          48.5         8.6           7.7          4.5         No            Yes
      Sociology                                             27                    6          22.2             4          14.8          42.6        12.4          20.4                      Yes           No
   School of Management                                     43                   10          23.3             9          20.9
      Accounting & Info. Systems                            10                    1          10.0             1          10.0          31.9         9.3          21.9                      Yes           No
      Finance & Operations Mgmt.                            12                    2          16.7             3          25.0          17.5        18.5           0.8                      No            No
      Management                                            13                    5          38.5             3          23.1          32.4         9.3                                    No            No
      Marketing                                              8                    2          25.0             2          25.0          33.1        11.9            8.1                     No            No
   College of Engineering                                   95                   10          10.5            18          19.0
      Chemical Engineering                                  13                    1           7.7             2          15.4          21.3        15.1          13.6                      Yes           No
      Civil & Environmental Engin.                          24                    5          20.8             4          16.7           6.4        20.6                        3.9         No            No
      Electrical & Computer Engin.                          31                    2           6.5             6          19.4           4.6        21.7                        2.3         No            No
      Mechanical & Industrial Engin.                        27                    2           7.4             6          22.2           6.7        20.2                                    No            No

NOTE: Underutilization occurs when the workforce composition is less than 80% of the availability estimate and there is a one person or greater shortfall in the respective job group. Data not reported for
      units with fewer than three employees.



                                                                                                        23
                                                                                            Table 6 (continued)

                                                  Faculty Utilization Report, by Department/Program Within University Job Group
                                                                                       3/31/00
                                                                              Current Workforce                                        Availability                Shortfall                Underutilized
                                                           Total                   Female                          Minority          Fem         Min            Fem        Min             Fem        Min
                                                            #                   #          %                 #                %       %           %              %           %
Tenure System Faculty

  School of Public Health & Health Sci.                     40                   16          40.0             6           15.0
     Biostatistics & Epidem.                                 6                    3          50.0             0            0.0         47.8        13.5                       13.5         No            No
     Communication Disorders                                10                    7          70.0             2           20.0         58.9         7.7                                    No            No
     Community Health                                        7                    2          28.6             3           42.9         49.5        13.9          20.9                      Yes           No
     Environmental Health Sci.                               4                    0           0.0             1           25.0         29.0        12.9          29.0                      Yes           No
     Exercise Science                                        9                    2          22.2             0            0.0         42.6        11.6          20.4         11.6         Yes           Yes
     Nutrition                                               4                    2          50.0             0            0.0         68.4        16.2          18.4         16.2         No            No
  School of Nursing                                         10                   10         100.0             1           10.0         96.0         6.8                                    No            No
  School of Education                                       56                   24          42.9            12           21.4
     Educ. Policy, Resrch., & Admin.                        16                    4          25.0             3           18.8         48.3        14.0          23.3                      Yes           No
     Student Development                                    12                    6          50.0             4           33.3         48.3        14.0                                    No            No
     Teacher Education                                      28                   14          50.0             5           17.9         48.3        14.0                                    No            No
  College of Food & Natural Resources                      140                   25          17.9            14           10.0
     Administration-CFNR                                     1                    --           --             --            --           --          --             --           --         --            --
     Agri. Experiment Station                                1                    --           --             --            --           --          --             --           --         --            --
     Consumer Studies                                        4                    3          75.0             1           25.0         33.1        10.7                                    No            No
     Entomology                                             10                    2          20.0             2           20.0         30.7         7.7          10.7                      Yes           No
     Environmental Science                                   1                    --           --             --            --           --          --            --            --         --            --
     Food Science                                           11                    2          18.2             2           18.2         26.7        10.8           8.5                      No            No
     H.R.T.A.                                               16                    4          25.0             2           12.5         40.3        11.0          15.3                      Yes           No
     Landscape Arch. & Reg. Planning                        14                    3          21.4             1            7.1         27.3        13.4           5.9          6.3         No            No
     Microbiology                                           15                    2          13.3             1            6.7         35.5         9.4          22.2          2.7         Yes           No
     Natural Resources Conservation                         16                    1           6.3             1            6.3         14.3         8.2           8.0          1.9         Yes           No
     Plant & Soil Sciences                                  19                    2          10.5             2           10.5         14.7         7.3           4.2                      No            No
     Resource Economics                                     11                    1           9.1             0            0.0         13.6        10.1           4.5         10.1         No            Yes
     Sport Studies                                           9                    2          22.2             1           11.1         35.5        14.0          13.3          2.9         Yes           No
     Veterinary & Animal Sciences                           12                    3          25.0             1            8.3         34.0         9.5           9.0          1.2         Yes           No
  Research & Graduate Studies                                1                    --           --             --            --           --          --            --           --          --            --
     Environmental Institute                                 1                    --           --             --            --           --          --            --           --          --            --

NOTE: Underutilization occurs when the workforce composition is less than 80% of the availability estimate and there is a one person or greater shortfall in the respective job group. Data not reported for
      units with fewer than three employees.



                                                                                                        24
                                                                                      Table 6 (continued)

                                           Faculty Utilization Report, by Department/Program Within University Job Group
                                                                                3/31/00

                                                                              Current Workforce                                         Availability                Shortfall             Underutilized
                                                           Total                   Female                         Minority            Fem         Min            Fem        Min          Fem        Min
                                                            #                   #          %                 #               %         %           %              %           %
Other Faculty

College of Humanities & Fine Arts                           86                   37          43.0            15          17.4          49.5          9.6           6.5                   No        No
College of Natural Sciences & Math.                         75                   18          24.0            13          17.3          21.3         12.5                                 No        No
College of Social & Behavioral Sciences                     56                   19          33.9             2           3.6          35.3         11.2           1.4         7.6       No        Yes
School of Education                                         23                   16          69.6             3          13.0          48.3         14.0                       1.0       No        No
College of Engineering                                       8                    1          12.5             0           0.0          19.2         18.5           6.7        18.5       No        Yes
College of Food & Natural Resources                         55                   17          30.9             5           9.1          34.5         11.0           3.6         1.9       No        No
School of Management                                        24                   10          41.7             2           8.3          32.8         12.9                       4.6       No        Yes
School of Nursing                                           34                   33          97.1             2           5.9          95.6          6.8                       0.9       No        No
School of Public Health & Health Sci.                       15                   10          66.7             0           0.0          51.2         12.1                      12.1       No        Yes
Other                                                       39                   15          38.5             5          12.8          44.0         19.2           5.5         6.4       No        Yes

Totals                                                     415                  176          42.4            47          11.3




NOTE: Underutilization occurs when the workforce composition is less than 80% of the availability estimate and there is a one person or greater shortfall in the respective job group.
      The data for Other Faculty (non-tenure system) are summarized by school or college.




                                                                                                        25
                         Comparison of the Diversity of the Non-Faculty Workforce


        A one-year comparison of the diversity of the non-faculty workforce is presented in Table 7,
Diversity of Non-Faculty Employees Workforce Comparison, 2000 v. 1999 (pp. 28-29). This table
provides, by job group, the percentage of women and minorities in the non-faculty workforce and the
availability estimate for women and minorities, for 1999 and 2000. A workforce change indicator
(increase, decrease, no-change) provides a comparison of these statistics. Differences in availability
estimates (1999 v. 2000) are primarily due to yearly changes in the availability of women and
minorities in feeder job groups within the University.
        In total, the percentage of women in the non-faculty workforce remained the same, at 54.8%.
Changes in the percentage representation of women within the non-faculty job groups were observed as
follows: fourteen job groups increased in female representation, eighteen job groups decreased in
female representation, and six job groups remained the same. Women continued a strong presence
among the Executive/Administrative/Managerial staff, and are fully utilized in these job groups. The
representation of women increased in EAM job group B (Deans and major division heads) and
decreased slightly in EAM C (includes associate and assistant executive level positions) and EAM D
(major department heads). Women hold a majority of the Professional/Non-Faculty jobs (54.1%) and
continue to be fully utilized in these job groups. Women continue to dominate most of the
Secretarial/Clerical job groups. However, the representation of women in the Sales job group fell to
23.7%, and this job group is now underutilized for women. In the Technical/Paraprofessional category,
the overall representation of women declined from 42.6% in 1999 to 40.1% in 2000. A decline in
female representation was seen in the Computer, Engineering, & Related Technology job group. The
total number of women employed in Skilled Crafts increased from 14 in 1999 to 16 in 2000. An
increase was seen in the number of women employed in Mechanics & Repairers, Non-Supervisory and
in Skilled Crafts, Supervisory, from 1999 to 2000. There remain no women in the Plant & System
Operation area. The percentage of women in the overall Service/Maintenance category remained the
same between 1999 and 2000 at 38.7%. However, the following two job groups within this category
slipped into underutilization: Farming & Forestry and Food Preparation & Service, Supervisory, are
now underutilized for women.
        Overall, the representation of minorities in the non-faculty workforce declined slightly from
12.7% in 1999 to 12.4% in 2000. Between 1999 and 2000, minority representation increased in twelve
job groups, decreased in 19 job groups, and remained the same in seven job groups. Minority
representation within the Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM) category decreased from 16.1%
in 1999 to 14.2% in 2000, with three of the four job groups showing a decline in minority
representation. However, all EAM job groups remain utilized for minorities. Overall minority
representation decreased from 13.3% in 1999 to 12.8% in the Professional/Non-Faculty category; six
of the nine job groups saw some decrease in racial/ethnic diversity. Four professional job groups
(Library Sciences, Medical Care, Technical and Other) are now underutilized for minorities. Overall,
the representation of minorities within the Secretarial/Clerical category decreased from 9.0% in 1999 to
8.2% in 2000. Five job groups decreased in minority representation, and two of these are now
underutilized for minorities (Secretaries/Clerks/Typists; and Sales). The Administrative Support job
group increased from 6.3% minority in 1999 to 7.3% in 2000. This job group, which includes the
Clerk IV and Clerk V job titles, is now utilized for minorities. In the Technical/Paraprofessional
category, the overall representation of minorities decreased slightly from 11.8% in 1999 to 11.2% in
2000. The job group Computer, Engineering & Related Technology is now underutilized for
minorities. In the Skilled Crafts area, the overall percentage representation of minorities remained
stable at 5.7%, and three of four Skilled Crafts job groups continue to be utilized for minorities.
Although the job group Mechanics & Repairers, Non-Supervisory saw a slight increase in minority


                                                  26
representation, this job group is now underutilized for minorities, as the shortfall between the expected
and actual workforce representation for minorities now exceeds a one-person shortfall. The
representation of minorities in Service/Maintenance increased slightly, from 18.5% in 1999 to 19.8% in
2000. Five job groups increased in racial/ethnic diversity: Food Preparation & Services, Non-
Supervisory; Cleaning & Building Services, Non-Supervisory; Guards, Institutional; Cleaning &
Building Services, Supervisory; and Departmental Assistant.




                                                   27
                                                                         Table 7
                                                           Diversity of Non-Faculty Employees
                                                           Workforce Comparison, 2000 v. 1999
                                                               2000                                        1999                          Workforce
                                                Workforce               Availability         Workforce              Availability          Change
                                             Fem         Min          Fem         Min      Fem       Min          Fem         Min       2000 v. 1999
                                              %          %             %            %       %         %            %            %     Fem         Min
EEO-6 Category 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM)

EAM A                                        25.0       37.5          34.0       15.1      25.0     37.5          42.2       15.5          
EAM B                                        35.0       15.0          41.4       14.3      30.4     17.4          37.5       14.4         
EAM C                                        48.7       12.8          47.7       12.3      52.6     15.8          44.2       13.0         
EAM D                                        41.3       10.9          47.3       11.2      42.9     12.2          46.0       12.1         
                                                                                                                                                 
EEO-6 Category 3: Professional Non-Faculty                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                                 
Administrative                                67.5      10.2          59.2       10.0      68.1      9.4          60.0        9.8         
Education/Training                            64.9      17.4          54.4       12.5      65.2     17.1          53.3       12.6         
Institutional Relations                       67.5       5.8          53.4        9.2      59.1      8.6          53.2        9.8         
Library Sciences                              66.7       5.3          69.9        8.4      64.0      6.0          68.7        9.0         
Research/Post Doctorates                      34.6      25.5          31.5       14.6      35.6     27.1          31.5       14.7         
Medical Care                                  74.4       5.1          70.9       10.4      71.8     10.3          68.7       12.7         
Technical                                     31.6       9.3          34.2       10.4      30.9      9.8          33.6       10.8         
Professional Non-Faculty, Other               73.3       0.0          50.2       10.5      66.7     20.0          52.1       11.8         
Allied Health                                 52.8      16.7          58.3       12.9      59.5     13.5          62.4       12.9         
                                                                                                                                                 
EEO-6 Category 4: Secretarial/Clerical                                                                                                           
                                                                                                                                                 
Administrative Support                        93.2       7.3          90.1        8.3      93.2      6.3          91.9        8.6          
Secretaries/Clerks/Typists                    93.7       8.4          88.7       10.8      93.9      8.9          89.6       10.8         
Data Entry Operator                           87.3      10.9          75.7       10.1      87.5     16.1          77.9       11.8         
Financial Records                             93.7       7.9          85.4        7.1      93.2     10.2          85.3        8.2         
Duplicating/Mail                              33.3      11.1          66.2        4.4      34.6     11.5          67.1        7.4         
Library                                       78.8       6.3          79.6        7.7      80.5      7.8          82.0        9.5         
Sales                                         23.7       7.9          35.7       12.9      27.5     12.5          33.4       14.2         


                                                                                  28
                                                                    Table 7 (continued)
                                                            Diversity of Non-Faculty Employees
                                                            Workforce Comparison, 2000 v. 1999
                                                                2000                                        1999                          Workforce
                                                 Workforce               Availability         Workforce              Availability          Change
                                               Fem       Min           Fem         Min      Fem       Min          Fem         Min       2000 v. 1999
                                                %         %             %            %       %         %            %            %     Fem         Min
EEO-6 Category 5: Technical/Paraprofessional

Science & Other Technicians                    37.8       5.3          33.7        8.0      36.1      5.5          32.6        8.1         
Comp., Eng., & Related Tech.                   27.0       2.7          43.2        5.9      35.5      3.2          51.3        6.3         
Fire & Safety Officer                          16.7       0.0          12.2        3.6      16.7      0.0          13.2        4.7          
Business & Related                             79.0      10.5          78.7        7.3      68.8     12.5          80.6        8.0         
Health Services                                90.0      42.5          83.1       19.2      89.1     31.3          71.3       16.0         
Protective Services                             9.8      17.7          11.6       14.7       9.8     17.7          11.6       14.6          
                                                                                                                                                  
EEO-6 Category 6: Skilled Crafts                                                                                                                  
                                                                                                                                                  
Mech. & Repairers, Non-Suprv.                  13.6       6.1          14.0        8.0      14.0      6.0          15.2        7.9         
Skilled Crafts, Suprv.                          3.3       3.3           7.5        4.7       1.7      3.3           6.8        4.5         
Construction Trades, Non-Suprv.                 3.7       6.6           5.9        6.9       3.9      6.4           5.2        6.5         
Plant & System Operation                        0.0       6.3          14.0        9.4       0.0      6.3           8.1        7.8          
                                                                                                                                                  
EEO-6 Category 7: Service/Maintenance                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                                  
Food Prep. & Serv., Non-Suprv.                 64.7      33.0          61.0       27.4      62.8     30.0          60.1       25.6         
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Non-Suprv.               31.6      18.3          34.0       19.4      30.8     17.4          32.3       18.1         
Motor Vehicle Operators                         0.0       0.0          10.5        6.1       5.9      0.0          19.7        9.7         
Farming & Forestry                              0.0       0.0          10.7        6.5       0.0      0.0          13.8        8.5          
Guards, Institutional                          22.2      16.7          18.0       14.2      29.7     16.2          26.9       13.8         
Food Prep. & Serv., Suprv.                     40.0      10.0          50.1       19.2      40.4     14.9          48.5       19.7         
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Suprv.                   23.0      11.5          25.0       12.6      26.2      8.2          24.3       11.3         
Departmental Assistant                         52.3      16.9          47.7       10.2      51.5     14.7          47.7       10.2         




                                                                                   29
                      Comparison of the Diversity of Tenure System Faculty


     A five-year comparison of the diversity of the tenure system faculty is presented in Table 8,
Diversity of Tenure System Faculty Workforce Comparison, 2000 v. 1995 (pp. 32-34). Factors which
contribute to changes in the representation of women and minorities in the faculty workforce include
hiring and termination activity; organizational restructuring can also be a factor. Hiring activity
continued to be strong in 1999-00. A total of 46 tenure system faculty were hired; this included 20
women (43.5%) and eight minority group members (17.4%). Thirty-nine tenure system faculty
members terminated in 1999-00; 30.8% were women and 18.0% were minorities. Further information
on faculty personnel activity is included under Employment Practices (see p. 42).
     Over the five-year period, the representation of women among the tenure system faculty increased
from 21.8% in 1995 to 25.7% in 2000, and the representation of racial/ethnic minorities increased from
13.1% in 1995 to 14.8% in 2000. An increase in the representation of women among the tenure system
faculty occurred in eight schools and colleges: Humanities & Fine Arts, Natural Sciences &
Mathematics, Social & Behavioral Sciences, Education, Engineering, Food & Natural Resources,
Management, and Public Health & Health Sciences. Additionally, the representation of women
remained at 100% in the School of Nursing. The representation of minorities improved in seven
schools/colleges: Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Social & Behavioral Sciences, Education,
Engineering, Food & Natural Resources, Management and Nursing. Between 1995 and 2000, many
departments improved the percentage representation of women and minority group members among
their tenure system faculty. These changes are detailed in the following text.
     In Humanities & Fine Arts, the percentage of women faculty increased from 30.1% in 1995 to
33.7% in 2000, while the percentage of minority faculty decreased from 15.8% in 1995 to 14.5% in
2000. The following departments improved the percentage representation of women among their
tenure system faculty: Art, Classics, English, French & Italian, History, and Philosophy. Similarly,
minority representation improved in the following departments: Art, English, French & Italian,
Journalism, and Theater.
     In Natural Sciences & Mathematics, the representation of women faculty increased from 11.9% to
14.4% over this five-year period, while the percentage of minority faculty increased from 11.2% to
14.8%. The representation of tenure system women improved in the following departments:
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Biology, Geosciences, and Mathematics & Statistics. Minority
representation of tenure system faculty improved in every department within Natural Sciences &
Mathematics except for Geosciences.
     In Social & Behavioral Sciences, the representation of women faculty increased from 26.5% in
1995 to 31.7% in 2000, and the representation of minorities increased from 11.5% to 12.6%. Increases
of tenure system women occurred in five departments: Communication, Economics, Legal Studies,
Political Science, and Psychology. Minority representation in the tenure system faculty improved in
four departments: Communication, Economics, Psychology, and Sociology.
     In the School of Management, the percentage of tenure system women faculty increased from
17.8% in 1995 to 23.3% in 2000; minority faculty representation increased from 11.1% in 1995 to
20.9% in 2000. The representation of both female faculty and minority faculty (percentage basis)
improved in three of the four departments (Accounting & Information Systems, Finance & Operations
Management, and Marketing).
     In the College of Engineering, the percentage of tenure system women faculty doubled over this
five-year period, from 5.2% in 1995 to 10.5% in 2000; minority faculty representation crept up from
18.8% to 19.0% over this period. Female faculty representation improved in all four departments.
Minority faculty representation improved in Chemical Engineering and in the Department of
Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (percentage basis).


                                                 30
     The representation of women among the tenure system faculty in Public Health & Health Sciences
almost doubled over the five-year period, from 21.1% in 1995 to 40.0% in 2000. Minority
representation decreased slightly, from 15.8% in 1995 to 15.0% in 2000. Please note that departmental
data for Public Health & Health Sciences is not fully comparable over this five-year period, as the
School has experienced a reorganization which has included in part a recognition of three new
departments: Biostatistics & Epidemiology, Community Health, and Environmental Health Sciences.
     There was a positive change in the diversity of the tenure system faculty of the School of Nursing
over this period. In 1995 the School of Nursing had no minority tenure system faculty; minority
representation now stands at 10.0%. The School of Nursing continues to be all female.
     The School of Education became more diverse over the five-year period, as the percentage of both
women and minority faculty increased. The representation of women increased from 36.8% in 1995 to
42.9% in 2000, and the representation of minorities increased from 17.5% in 1995 to 21.4% in 2000.
The Department of Education Policy, Research & Administration increased its representation of both
women and minority faculty over the five-year period. The Department of Student Development and
Pupil Personnel Services increased in racial/ethnic diversity over the five years, but the percentage of
women faculty decreased. The representation of women faculty increased in Teacher Education &
Curriculum Studies, while the representation of minorities decreased slightly.
     The College of Food & Natural Resources has improved the diversity of its tenure system faculty
over the five-year period, as the percentage of women and minority faculty both increased. The
representation of women among the tenure system faculty increased from 17.2% in 1995 to 17.9% in
2000; minority representation increased from 8.3% to 10.0%. The following departments made
improvements in both female and minority faculty representation: Consumer Studies, Entomology, and
Hotel, Restaurant & Travel Administration. The percentage representation of women faculty increased
in Food Science, Natural Resources Conservation, Resource Economics, and Veterinary & Animal
Sciences. Additionally, the percentage representation of minority faculty increased in Landscape
Architecture & Regional Planning and Plant & Soil Sciences.




                                                  31
                                                                                        Table 8
                                                                          Diversity of Tenure System Faculty
                                                                          Workforce Comparison, 2000 v. 1995

                                                                                Workforce Composition                          Availability Estimate    Workforce Change
                                                                        2000                                    1995
                                                 Total            Female                Minority         Fem           Min        Fem        Min          Fem      Min
                                                   #           #          %           #        %          %             %          %         %
Tenure System Faculty                          1,054          271        25.7        156       14.8      21.8          13.1                                     
                                                                                                                                                                   
Chancellor                                1                     --        --           --        --        --             --         --         --                 
     Computing/Networking                 1                     --        --           --        --        --             --         --         --                 
Academic Affairs                      1,053                   270       25.6         156       14.8      21.9           13.2                               
  Provost                                 3                     1       33.3           2       66.7      50.0          100.0                               
     Fine Arts Center                     1                     --        --           --        --        --             --         --         --                 
     Honors Program                       1                     --        --           --        --        --             --         --         --                 
     UMass Extension                      1                     --        --           --        --        --             --         --         --                 
  College of Humanities & Fine Arts     255                    86       33.7          37       14.5      30.1           15.8                               
     Afro-American Studies               10                     1       10.0           8       80.0      20.0           90.0      45.0       17.0          
     Art                                 27                    15       55.6           4       14.8      42.3           11.5      56.0        7.2          
     Asian Languages & Literatures        4                     1       25.0           1       25.0      25.0           62.5      55.9       17.2           
     Classics                             7                     2       28.6           0        0.0      12.5            0.0      38.9        1.8          
     Comparative Literature              11                     4       36.4           1        9.1      44.4           11.1      47.0       13.2          
     English                             51                    14       27.5           7       13.7      21.8           10.9      51.4        5.6          
     French & Italian                    14                     6       42.9           2       14.3      40.0           13.3      62.1        8.6          
     Germanic Languages & Literatures    11                     3       27.3           0        0.0      27.3            0.0      53.3        2.0           
     History                             35                    11       31.4           2        5.7      25.0            8.3      28.4        7.4          
     Journalism                           6                     2       33.3           1       16.7      42.9           14.3      49.0       10.0          
     Judaic & Near Eastern Studies        4                     0        0.0           1       25.0       0.0           25.0      43.0        8.1           
     Linguistics                         12                     6       50.0           0        0.0      58.3            0.0      52.7       12.8          
     Music & Dance                       27                     7       25.9           1        3.7      26.5            5.9      48.0        8.0          
     Philosophy                          12                     3       25.0           0        0.0      15.4            0.0      21.2        4.9          
     Slavic Languages & Literatures       1                     --        --           --        --        --             --        --         --                  
     Spanish & Portuguese                10                     3       30.0           6       60.0      38.5           69.2      56.5       40.6          
     Theater                              9                     4       44.4           2       22.2      44.4           11.1      41.8        5.5           
     Women's Studies                      4                     4      100.0           1       25.0     100.0           25.0      44.4        5.8           
                                                                                                                                                                   
NOTE: Data not reported for units with fewer than three employees.




                                                                                               32
                                                                                 Table 8 (continued)
                                                                         Diversity of Tenure System Faculty
                                                                         Workforce Comparison, 2000 v. 1995

                                                                               Workforce Composition                         Availability Estimate    Workforce Change
                                                                        2000                                   1995
                                                 Total            Female                 Minority       Fem           Min       Fem        Min          Fem      Min
                                                  #             #        %           #              %    %            %          %         %
Tenure System Faculty

   College of Natural Sci. & Math.               243           35       14.4         36         14.8    11.9          11.2                                    
      Biochemistry & Molecular Bio.               14            6       42.9          1          7.1    30.8           0.0      33.6        9.7          
      Biology                                     35            8       22.9          3          8.6    18.0           5.1      39.2       16.4          
      Chemistry                                   30            3       10.0          2          6.7    12.1           3.0      21.4        9.8          
      Computer Science                            32            4       12.5          4         12.5    12.9           9.7       8.7       18.2          
      Geosciences                                 22            7       31.8          0          0.0    20.0           0.0      18.9        6.8          
      Mathematics & Statistics                    51            4        7.8         15         29.4     6.1          24.5      17.0       10.6          
      Physics & Astronomy                         47            3        6.4          9         19.2     7.6          15.1       8.3       10.6          
      Polymer Science & Engineering               12            0        0.0          2         16.7     0.0          13.3      16.1       23.3           
   College of Social & Behavioral Sci.           167           53       31.7         21         12.6    26.5          11.5                               
      Anthropology                                16            5       31.3          3         18.8    31.3          18.8      47.2        7.2           
      Communication                               16            5       31.3          3         18.8    28.6          14.3      41.7        8.9          
      Economics                                   24            6       25.0          4         16.7    20.0          12.0      17.4       10.8          
      Labor Relations Research Center              4            2       50.0          0          0.0    50.0           0.0      33.9       10.6           
      Legal Studies                                7            2       28.6          1         14.3    16.7          16.7      26.0        9.0          
      Political Science                           24            7       29.2          4         16.7    24.0          20.0      25.8       12.7          
      Psychology                                  49           20       40.8          2          4.1    31.1           2.2      48.5        8.6          
      Sociology                                   27            6       22.2          4         14.8    23.1          11.5      42.6       12.4          
   School of Management                           43           10       23.3          9         20.9    17.8          11.1                               
      Accounting & Info. Systems                  10            1       10.0          1         10.0     0.0           8.3      31.9        9.3          
      Finance & Operations Mgmt.                  12            2       16.7          3         25.0    15.4           7.7      17.5       18.5          
      Management                                  13            5       38.5          3         23.1    41.7          25.0      32.4        9.3          
      Marketing                                    8            2       25.0          2         25.0    12.5           0.0      33.1       11.9          
   College of Engineering                         95           10       10.5         18         19.0     5.2          18.8                               
      Chemical Engineering                        13            1        7.7          2         15.4     0.0           7.7      21.3       15.1          
      Civil & Environmental Engin.                24            5       20.8          4         16.7    10.0          20.0       6.4       20.6          
      Electrical & Computer Engin.                31            2        6.5          6         19.4     6.1          21.2       4.6       21.7          
      Mechanical & Industrial Engin.              27            2        7.4          6         22.2     3.3          20.0       6.7       20.2          

NOTE: Data not reported for units with fewer than three employees.




                                                                                                33
                                                                                 Table 8 (continued)
                                                                         Diversity of Tenure System Faculty
                                                                         Workforce Comparison, 2000 v. 1995

                                                                               Workforce Composition                          Availability Estimate    Workforce Change
                                                                        2000                                    1995
                                                 Total            Female                 Minority        Fem           Min       Fem        Min          Fem      Min
                                                  #             #        %           #              %     %            %          %         %
Tenure System Faculty

  School of Public Health & Health Sci.           40           16       40.0          6         15.0     21.1          15.8                                    
     Biostatistics & Epidem.                       6            3       50.0          0          0.0       --            --      47.8       13.5                  
     Communication Disorders                      10            7       70.0          2         20.0     33.3          22.2      58.9        7.7          
     Community Health                              7            2       28.6          3         42.9       --            --      49.5       13.9                  
     Environmental Health Sci.                     4            0        0.0          1         25.0       --            --      29.0       12.9                  
     Exercise Science                              9            2       22.2          0          0.0     16.7           0.0      42.6       11.6          
     Nutrition                                     4            2       50.0          0          0.0     33.0           0.0      68.4       16.2          
  School of Nursing                               10           10      100.0          1         10.0    100.0           0.0      96.0        6.8           
  School of Education                             56           24       42.9         12         21.4     36.8          17.5                               
     Educ. Policy, Research., & Admin.            16            4       25.0          3         18.8     18.2           9.1      48.3       14.0          
     Student Development                          12            6       50.0          4         33.3     57.1          21.4      48.3       14.0          
     Teacher Education                            28           14       50.0          5         17.9     34.4          18.8      48.3       14.0          
  College of Food & Natural Resources            140           25       17.9         14         10.0     17.2           8.3                               
     Administration-CFNR                           1            --        --          --          --       --            --        --         --                  
     Agri. Experiment Station                      1            --        --          --          --       --            --        --         --                  
     Consumer Studies                              4            3       75.0          1         25.0     66.7          16.7      33.1       10.7          
     Entomology                                   10            2       20.0          2         20.0     15.4          15.4      30.7        7.7          
     Environmental Science                         1            --        --          --          --       --            --        --         --                  
     Food Science                                 11            2       18.2          2         18.2      9.1          18.2      26.7       10.8          
     H.R.T.A.                                     16            4       25.0          2         12.5     21.4           0.0      40.3       11.0          
     Landscape Arch. & Reg. Planing               14            3       21.4          1          7.1     23.5           5.9      27.3       13.4          
     Microbiology                                 15            2       13.3          1          6.7     14.3          14.3      35.5        9.4          
     Natural Resources Conservation               16            1        6.3          1          6.3      5.0          10.0      14.3        8.2          
     Plant & Soil Sciences                        19            2       10.5          2         10.5     11.1           3.7      14.7        7.3          
     Resource Economics                           11            1        9.1          0          0.0      7.7           0.0      13.6       10.1          
     Sport Studies                                 9            2       22.2          1         11.1     42.9          14.3      35.5       14.0          
     Veterinary & Animal Sciences                 12            3       25.0          1          8.3     20.0          13.3      34.0        9.5          
  Research & Graduate Studies                      1            --        --          --          --       --            --                                       
     Environmental Institute                       1            --        --          --          --       --            --         --         --                 
NOTE: Data not reported for units with fewer than three employees.




                                                                                                34
                                               GOALS


      Having identified a job group as underutilized for minorities and/or women, a goal to remedy
under-representation must be established. An overall goal of the affirmative action plan is to eliminate
the underutilization of women and minorities in the workforce. 41 CFR 60-2.12(e) indicates that goals
"may not be rigid and inflexible quotas which must be met, but [rather] must be targets reasonably
attainable by means of applying every good faith effort to make all aspects of the entire affirmative
action program work." Goals for faculty are established at the department/program level. Goals for
non-faculty job groups are established at the job group level campus-wide. All hiring officials share
responsibility in reaching these affirmative action goals.
      Table 9, Non-Faculty Utilization, Expected Placements, and Annual Percentage Goal, by
University Job Group, 2000-2001 (pp. 36-37), provides a summary of utilization, expected placements,
and the annual percentage goal for non-faculty job groups. The number of expected placements
includes all hires, promotions and transfers of non-faculty employees that are projected to occur
between 4/1/00 and 3/31/01. Student and hourly employees are not included. The annual percentage
goal is equal to the protected group availability estimate, and is only displayed for underutilized job
groups. Hiring officials and search chairs may use this information to assist them in evaluating the
adequacy of applicant pools with respect to the representation of protected category applicants, and to
monitor their placement activities.
      Table 10, Faculty Utilization, Expected Hires, and Annual Percentage Goal, by
Department/Program 2000-2001 (pp. 38-41), provides a summary of utilization, expected hires, and the
annual percentage goal for hiring. The number of expected hires includes the total number of
replacements and new positions to be filled during academic year 2000-01. For tenured/tenure-track
faculty positions, the number of expected hires is based on preliminary search information for positions
to begin in academic year 2000-01. For non-tenure track faculty, the number of expected hires is based
on the number of terminations that occurred in 1999-00. However, due to the fluctuations that occur in
the hiring of non-tenure track faculty, this number is at best an approximation. The data for non-tenure
system faculty is summarized by school or college. Annual percentage goals are displayed for
underutilized groups only.
      Department heads and/or search committee chairs will normally be informed by the EO&D Office
when there are affirmative action goals for a position vacancy. For professional and faculty searches,
information concerning availability and utilization statistics is sent by EO&D to the search chair or
identified contact. One of the responsibilities of the search chair is to share this information with the
search committee, and to instruct the committee to give full consideration to qualified women and
minority candidates. For classified positions, vacancies in job groups where women or minorities are
under-represented can be targeted for special recruitment efforts. The department head or hiring
authority will be notified via memorandum from the EO&D Office when a position is designated as an
Affirmative Action Target Position. The purpose of the targeting process is to ensure that qualified
women and minority candidates receive full consideration, in accordance with contractual agreements,
for positions that fall within job groups that have been determined to be underutilized.




                                                   35
                                                                                                     Table 9

                                                      Non-Faculty Utilization, Expected Placements, and Annual Percentage Goal
                                                                         by University Job Group, 2000-2001


                                            Total             Female                                           Minority               Underutilized       Expected    Annual Percentage Goal
                                             #              #        %                                     #              %          Fem        Min      Placements     Fem          Min
EEO-6 Category 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM)

EAM A*                                                      7                   2           28.6           3           42.9           No           No        0
EAM B                                                      20                   7           35.0           3           15.0           No           No        1
EAM C                                                      39                  19           48.7           5           12.8           No           No        2
EAM D                                                      46                  19           41.3           5           10.9           No           No        3

EEO-6 Category 3: Professional Non-Faculty

Administrative                                           403                 272            67.5          41            10.2          No           No       63
Education/Training                                       345                 224            64.9          60            17.4          No           No       95
Institutional Relations                                  120                  81            67.5           7             5.8          No           Yes      34                       9.2
Library Sciences                                          57                  38            66.7           3             5.3          No           Yes      25                       8.4
Research/Post Doctorates                                 188                  65            34.6          48            25.5          No           No       80
Medical Care                                              39                  29            74.4           2             5.1          No           Yes       3                      10.4
Technical                                                389                 123            31.6          36             9.3          No           No       78
Professional Non-Faculty, Other                           15                  11            73.3           0             0.0          No           Yes       1                      10.5
Allied Health                                             36                  19            52.8           6            16.7          No           No        7

EEO-6 Category 4: Secretarial/Clerical

Administrative Support                                   206                 192            93.2          15             7.3         No            No       20
Secretaries/Clerks/Typists                               571                 535            93.7          48             8.4         No            Yes     112                      10.8
Data Entry Operator                                       55                  48            87.3           6            10.9         No            No       14
Financial Records                                         63                  59            93.7           5             7.9         No            No       13
Duplicating/Mail                                          27                   9            33.3           3            11.1         Yes           No        3           66.2
Library                                                   80                  63            78.8           5             6.3         No            No       39
Sales                                                     38                   9            23.7           3             7.9         Yes           Yes       3           35.7       12.9

NOTE: Workforce as of 3/31/00. Annual percentage goals are displayed for underutilized job groups.
      Placements include new hires, promotions and transfers.
 *   The position of Chancellor is not included in the utilization analysis as the hiring decision for this position is made external to the campus.



                                                                                                          36
                                                                                         Table 9 (continued)

                                                    Non-Faculty Utilization, Expected Placements, and Annual Percentage Goal
                                                                       by University Job Group, 2000-2001


                                                       Total                    Female                    Minority          Underutilized    Expected    Annual Percentage Goal
                                                        #                   #            %            #              %     Fem        Min   Placements     Fem          Min
EEO-6 Category 5: Technical/Paraprofessional

Science & Other Technicians                           188                  71            37.8        10           5.3      No        Yes       15                       8.0
Comp., Eng., & Related Tech.                           37                  10            27.0         1           2.7      Yes       Yes        2           43.2        5.9
Fire & Safety Officer                                  12                   2            16.7         0           0.0      No        No         1
Business & Related                                     19                  15            79.0         2          10.5      No        No         4
Health Services                                        40                  36            90.0        17          42.5      No        No        10
Protective Services                                    51                   5             9.8         9          17.7      No        No         5

EEO-6 Category 6: Skilled Crafts

Mech. & Repairers, Non-Suprv.                          66                   9            13.6        4               6.1   No        Yes        9                       8.0
Skilled Crafts, Suprv.                                 60                   2             3.3        2               3.3   Yes       No         4            7.5
Construction Trades, Non-Suprv.                       137                   5             3.7        9               6.6   Yes       No        18            5.9
Plant & System Operation                               16                   0             0.0        1               6.3   Yes       No         2           14.0

EEO-6 Category 7: Service/Maintenance

Food Prep. & Serv., Non-Suprv.                        173                112             64.7        57          33.0      No        No        45
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Non-Suprv.                      421                133             31.6        77          18.3      No        No        39
Motor Vehicle Operators                                12                  0              0.0         0           0.0      Yes       No         3           10.5
Farming & Forestry                                     11                  0              0.0         0           0.0      Yes       No         0           10.7
Guards, Institutional                                  36                  8             22.2         6          16.7      No        No        11
Food Prep. & Serv., Suprv.                             40                 16             40.0         4          10.0      Yes       Yes       10           50.1       19.2
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Suprv.                           61                 14             23.0         7          11.5      No        No        13
Departmental Assistant                                 65                 34             52.3        11          16.9      No        No        78



NOTE: Workforce as of 3/31/00. Annual percentage goals are displayed for underutilized job groups.
      Placements include new hires, promotions and transfers.




                                                                                                     37
                                                                                                  Table 10

                                                            Faculty Utilization, Expected Hires, and Annual Percentage Goal
                                                                                 by Department/Program
                                                                                        2000-2001

                                                          Total                         Female                      Minority               Underutilized           Expected   Annual Percentage Goal
                                                            #                      #              %            #            %             Fem         Min           Hires       Fem          Min
Tenure System Faculty                                    1054                    271             25.7        156           14.8

Chancellor                                                  1                      --            --            --            --
    Computing/Networking                                    1                      --            --            --            --             --            --
Academic Affairs                                         1053                    270           25.6          156           14.8                                      29
  Provost                                                   3                      1           33.3            2           66.7
     Fine Arts Center                                       1                      --            --            --            --             --            --
     Honors Program                                         1                      --            --            --            --             --            --
     UMass Extension                                        1                      --            --            --            --             --            --
  College of Humanities & Fine Arts                       255                     86           33.7           37           14.5                                       7
     Afro-American Studies                                 10                      1           10.0            8           80.0            Yes           No                      45.0
     Art                                                   27                     15           55.6            4           14.8            No            No
     Asian Languages & Literatures                          4                      1           25.0            1           25.0            Yes           Yes          2          55.9         17.2
     Classics                                               7                      2           28.6            0            0.0            No            No           1
     Comparative Literature                                11                      4           36.4            1            9.1            Yes           No                      47.0
     English                                               51                     14           27.5            7           13.7            Yes           No           1          51.4
     French & Italian                                      14                      6           42.9            2           14.3            Yes           No                      62.1
     Germanic Languages & Literatures                      11                      3           27.3            0            0.0            Yes           No                      53.3
     History                                               35                     11           31.4            2            5.7            No            No
     Journalism                                             6                      2           33.3            1           16.7            No            No
     Judaic & Near Eastern Studies                          4                      0            0.0            1           25.0            Yes           Yes          1          43.0          8.1
     Linguistics                                           12                      6           50.0            0            0.0            No            Yes                                  12.8
     Music & Dance                                         27                      7           25.9            1            3.7            Yes           Yes                     48.0          8.0
     Philosophy                                            12                      3           25.0            0            0.0            No            No           2
     Slavic Languages & Literatures                         1                      --            --            --            --             --            --
     Spanish & Portuguese                                  10                      3           30.0            6           60.0            Yes           No                      56.5
     Theater                                                9                      4           44.4            2           22.2            No            No
     Women's Studies                                        4                      4          100.0            1           25.0            No            No


NOTE: Workforce as of 3/31/00. Annual percentage goals are displayed for underutilized job groups. Data not displayed for units with fewer than three employees.




                                                                                                        38
                                                                                         Table 10 (continued)

                                                            Faculty Utilization, Expected Hires, and Annual Percentage Goal
                                                                                 by Department/Program
                                                                                        2000-2001

                                                           Total                       Female                       Minority               Underutilized           Expected   Annual Percentage Goal
                                                            #                      #             %             #               %          Fem         Min           Hires       Fem          Min
Tenure System Faculty

   College of Natural Sci. & Math.                         243                    35            14.4           36          14.8                                       7
      Biochemistry & Molecular Bio.                         14                     6            42.9            1           7.1            No            No
      Biology                                               35                     8            22.9            3           8.6            Yes           Yes          1          39.2         16.4
      Chemistry                                             30                     3            10.0            2           6.7            Yes           No                      21.4
      Computer Science                                      32                     4            12.5            4          12.5            No            Yes          1                       18.2
      Geosciences                                           22                     7            31.8            0           0.0            No            Yes          1                        6.8
      Mathematics & Statistics                              51                     4             7.8           15          29.4            Yes           No           1          17.0
      Physics & Astronomy                                   47                     3             6.4            9          19.2            No            No           1
      Polymer Science & Engineering                         12                     0             0.0            2          16.7            Yes           No           2          16.1
   College of Social & Behavioral Sci.                     167                    53            31.7           21          12.6                                       6
      Anthropology                                          16                     5            31.3            3          18.8            Yes           No           2          47.2
      Communication                                         16                     5            31.3            3          18.8            Yes           No           2          41.7
      Economics                                             24                     6            25.0            4          16.7            No            No
      Labor Relations Research Center                        4                     2            50.0            0           0.0            No            No
      Legal Studies                                          7                     2            28.6            1          14.3            No            No
      Political Science                                     24                     7            29.2            4          16.7            No            No
      Psychology                                            49                    20            40.8            2           4.1            No            Yes          1                        8.6
      Sociology                                             27                     6            22.2            4          14.8            Yes           No           1          42.6
   School of Management                                     43                    10            23.3            9          20.9
      Accounting & Info. Systems                            10                     1            10.0            1          10.0            Yes           No                      31.9
      Finance & Operations Mgmt.                            12                     2            16.7            3          25.0            No            No
      Management                                            13                     5            38.5            3          23.1            No            No
      Marketing                                              8                     2            25.0            2          25.0            No            No
   College of Engineering                                   95                    10            10.5           18          19.0                                       3
      Chemical Engineering                                  13                     1             7.7            2          15.4            Yes           No                      21.3
      Civil & Environmental Engin.                          24                     5            20.8            4          16.7            No            No           2
      Electrical & Computer Engin.                          31                     2             6.5            6          19.4            No            No
      Mechanical & Industrial Engin.                        27                     2             7.4            6          22.2            No            No           1

NOTE: Workforce as of 3/31/00. Annual percentage goals are displayed for underutilized job groups. Data not displayed for units with fewer than three employees.




                                                                                                       39
                                                                                         Table 10 (continued)

                                                            Faculty Utilization, Expected Hires, and Annual Percentage Goal
                                                                                 by Department/Program
                                                                                        2000-2001

                                                           Total                        Female                       Minority              Underutilized           Expected   Annual Percentage Goal
                                                            #                      #             %             #                %         Fem         Min           Hires       Fem          Min
Tenure System Faculty

  School of Public Health & Health Sci.                     40                    16           40.0             6           15.0
     Biostatistics & Epidem.                                 6                     3           50.0             0            0.0           No            No
     Communication Disorders                                10                     7           70.0             2           20.0           No            No
     Community Health                                        7                     2           28.6             3           42.9           Yes           No                      49.5
     Environmental Health Sci.                               4                     0            0.0             1           25.0           Yes           No                      29.0
     Exercise Science                                        9                     2           22.2             0            0.0           Yes           Yes                     42.6         11.6
     Nutrition                                               4                     2           50.0             0            0.0           No            No
  School of Nursing                                         10                    10          100.0             1           10.0           No            No           1
  School of Education                                       56                    24           42.9            12           21.4                                      4
     Educ. Policy, Research., & Admin.                      16                     4           25.0             3           18.8           Yes           No           1          48.3
     Student Development                                    12                     6           50.0             4           33.3           No            No           1
     Teacher Education                                      28                    14           50.0             5           17.9           No            No           2
  College of Food & Natural Resources                      140                    25           17.9            14           10.0                                      1
     Administration-CFNR                                     1                     --            --             --            --            --            --
     Agri. Experiment Station                                1                     --            --             --            --            --            --
     Consumer Studies                                        4                     3           75.0             1           25.0           No            No
     Entomology                                             10                     2           20.0             2           20.0           Yes           No           1          30.7
     Environmental Science                                   1                     --            --             --            --            --            --
     Food Science                                           11                     2           18.2             2           18.2           No            No
     H.R.T.A.                                               16                     4           25.0             2           12.5           Yes           No                      40.3
     Landscape Arch. & Reg. Planning                        14                     3           21.4             1            7.1           No            No
     Microbiology                                           15                     2           13.3             1            6.7           Yes           No                      35.5
     Natural Resources Conservation                         16                     1            6.3             1            6.3           Yes           No                      14.3
     Plant & Soil Sciences                                  19                     2           10.5             2           10.5           No            No
     Resource Economics                                     11                     1            9.1             0            0.0           No            Yes                                  10.1
     Sport Studies                                           9                     2           22.2             1           11.1           Yes           No                      35.5
     Veterinary & Animal Sciences                           12                     3           25.0             1            8.3           Yes           No                      34.0
  Research & Graduate Studies                                1                     --            --             --            --
     Environmental Institute                                 1                     --            --             --            --            --            --

NOTE: Workforce as of 3/31/00. Annual percentage goals are displayed for underutilized job groups. Data not displayed for units with fewer than three employees.



                                                                                                      40
                                                                                        Table 10 (continued)

                                                            Faculty Utilization, Expected Hires, and Annual Percentage Goal
                                                                                 by Department/Program
                                                                                        2000-2001

                                                           Total                      Female                     Minority        Underutilized    Expected   Annual Percentage Goal
                                                            #                     #              %          #               %   Fem         Min    Hires       Fem          Min
Other Faculty

College of Humanities & Fine Arts                           86                   37             43.0        15          17.4    No         No       60
College of Natural Sciences & Math.                         75                   18             24.0        13          17.3    No         No       35
College of Social & Behavioral Sciences                     56                   19             33.9         2           3.6    No         Yes      50                       11.2
School of Education                                         23                   16             69.6         3          13.0    No         No       10
College of Engineering                                       8                    1             12.5         0           0.0    No         Yes      10                       18.5
College of Food & Natural Resources                         55                   17             30.9         5           9.1    No         No       55
School of Management                                        24                   10             41.7         2           8.3    No         Yes      25                       12.9
School of Nursing                                           34                   33             97.1         2           5.9    No         No       30
School of Public Health & Health Sci.                       15                   10             66.7         0           0.0    No         Yes       5                       12.1
Other                                                       39                   15             38.5         5          12.8    No         Yes      90                       19.2

TOTAL                                                     415                   176             42.4        47          11.3                       370




NOTE: Workforce as of 3/31/00. Annual percentage goals are displayed for underutilized areas.
     The data for Other Faculty (non-tenure system) are summarized by school or college.




                                                                                                       41
                                 Prior Year Goal Accomplishment


          Accomplishment of prior year goals is normally assessed by observing the current workforce
representation of job groups which had been underutilized for women or minorities in the previous
year. Generally, when the representation of women or minority group members meets or exceeds 80%
of the availability estimate or there is less than a one-person shortfall, the job group is no longer
underutilized, and the goal has been achieved. Additionally, a prior year annual percentage goal for the
hiring of women or minorities can be met when placements into the job group for the one-year review
period have met the corresponding availability estimate.
          Overall, the representation of women among the faculty increased from 30.0% in 1999 to
30.4% in 2000. The percentage of women among the tenure system faculty increased from 25.4% to
25.7% over this one-year period, and the percentage of women non-tenure system faculty remained at
42.4%. The overall percentage of minority faculty increased from 13.5% in 1999 to 13.8% in 2000,
and the percentage of minority tenure system faculty increased from 14.6% to 14.8%. The percentage
of minorities among the non-tenure system faculty increased from 10.6% in 1999 to 11.3% in 2000.
          The following is an analysis of prior year goal accomplishment for the tenure system faculty;
statistics for faculty placements are based on new hires to the tenure-track. There was a total of 46
tenure system faculty hired during academic year 1999-00. Women comprised twenty of these hires
(43.5%), and eight minority group members were hired (17.4%).
          Affirmative action hiring goals for women were met in a number of areas for the tenure system
faculty. Based upon the 1999-00 Affirmative Action Plan, there were 27 academic departments that
had hiring goals for tenure system women faculty. Of these 27, eleven hired new tenure system faculty
during the 1999-00 academic year. Of these eleven departments, six hired at least one woman faculty
member. In Humanities & Fine Arts, the English department hired two women faculty members and
met its annual hiring goal for women. In Social & Behavioral Sciences, the departments of
Communication and Psychology each hired two female faculty members, while the Department of
Sociology hired one female faculty member. The Psychology department is now utilized for women
faculty, while Communication and Sociology each met their respective annual hiring goals for women.
The Department of Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering hired a female faculty member
and met its annual hiring goal for women faculty. In Public Health & Health Sciences, a woman
faculty member was hired in the Department of Exercise Science, thus meeting their annual hiring goal
for women faculty. The School of Management made no tenure system hires during academic year
1999-00. In the School of Education, the Department of Educational Policy, Research &
Administration hired a woman tenure-track faculty member, thus meeting its annual hiring goal for
women faculty.
          No affirmative action hiring goals for tenure system minority faculty were met last year.
Based upon the 1999-00 Affirmative Action Plan, there were eight academic departments that had
hiring goals for minority faculty. Of these eight, three departments made no tenure system hires for
academic year 1999-00 (Biology, Geosciences, and Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning). Of
the five departments that made a faculty hire (Chemistry, Computer Science, Polymer Science &
Engineering, Psychology, and Resource Economics), none hired a minority group member. Looking
ahead to academic year 2000-01, the Biology department has hired a minority faculty member, thus
meeting this hiring goal in the following year.
          The representation of women among the non-tenure track faculty remained at 42.4% in 2000.
Due to the small numbers of non-tenure track faculty at the department level, these data are
summarized by School or College. In 1999, women were fully utilized across the deaneries in non-
tenure track faculty positions, thus there were no hiring goals for women among the non-tenure track
faculty for this past year. In 1999, minorities were underutilized in non-tenure track positions in four


                                                  42
deaneries (Engineering, Food & Natural Resources, Management, and “Other”). As of 3/31/00, the
number of minority non-tenure track faculty in CFNR had increased from three to five, and the number
of minority non-tenure track faculty in the School of Management had increased from one to two. An
increase in racial/ethnic diversity was also seen among non-tenure track faculty organizationally
located outside the nine deaneries (includes Administrative Offices, Academic Administration and
Academic Support). The number of minority non-tenure track faculty in this area increased from two
in 1999 to five in 2000. There remained no minority non-tenure track faculty in the College of
Engineering.
          The following is an analysis of prior year goal accomplishment for the professional and
classified staff. Placement data for professional staff is based on full-time positions filled through the
search process. Due to full utilization in the prior year, there were no hiring goals this past year for
women or minorities in the Executive, Administrative and Managerial category.                      In the
Professional/Non-Faculty category, there was one job group with hiring goals for minorities (Library
Sciences). This hiring goal was met during the 1999-00 year.
          Affirmative action goals were achieved in several areas among the classified staff. In the
Secretarial/Clerical category, the percentage of minorities in Administrative Support increased from
6.3% to 7.3% and this job group is now utilized for minorities. In the Skilled Crafts area, a second
woman is now working in the Skilled Crafts, Supervisory job group; thus this job group met its hiring
goal for women. In the Cleaning/Building Services area within the Service/Maintenance category, the
representation of minority supervisors increased from 8.2% in 1999 to 11.5% in 2000; this job group is
now utilized for minorities.
          Please also refer to the Employment Practices section which documents the University's good
faith efforts to achieve affirmative action goals through placement activity.




                                                   43
This page is intentionally blank.




                                    44
                                            EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES


          A summary of employment practices, including hiring, promotion, transfer, and termination
activity, follows for the University workforce.

                                                         Hires

         EAM and professional/non-faculty hires are normally made using a search committee and
public announcement, including paid advertising, in the appropriate recruitment area. The decision to
recruit campus-wide, locally, regionally, or nationally, depends on such factors as job title and salary
range, advertising budget, and availability of an appropriate pool of qualified applicants. The EO&D
Office approves waivers of the normal search process on a case-by-case basis, based on departmental
need, length of appointment, union guidelines, and affirmative action considerations. Waivers of the
search process for faculty appointments are generally granted for appointments necessitated by
immediate demands due to over-enrollment, faculty exchanges, visiting faculty appointments, and part-
time and temporary appointments. Refer to Search Procedures: Faculty & Professional Staff.
         Between 4/1/99 and 3/31/00, 184 full-time EAM and professional/non-faculty positions were
filled by searches; women filled 95 of these positions (51.6%), and 24 positions (13.0%) were filled by
minority group members. Please refer to Table 11, Number and Characteristics of EAM and
Professional/Non-Faculty Hires by University Job Group, 1999-2000. Fifteen part-time positions were
filled by searches; 11 women were hired (73.3%) and two minority group members were hired
(13.3%).

                                                     Table 11
                    Number and Characteristics of EAM and Professional/Non-Faculty
                                   Hires by University Job Group
                                              1999-2000
                                            Full-Time                                Part-Time
                                    Search              Waiver              Search               Waiver
Job Group                     Total Fem    Min    Total Fem    Min    Total Fem    Min     Total   Fe     Min
                                                                                                   m
EAM A                            0     -       -     0      -     -    0      -     -        0     -      -
EAM B                            0     -       -     0      -     -    0      -     -        0     -      -
EAM C                            0     -       -     0      -     -    0      -     -        0     -      -
EAM D                            2     0       0     0      -     -    0      -     -        0     -      -
Administrative                  16     4       2     5      5     0    2      1     0        2     1      1
Education/Training              55    37      12    14     12     2    6      5     1       29    21      3
Institutional Rel.              24    20       0    10      6     0    1      0     0        4     2      0
Library                          8     6       1     1      1     0    0      -     -        3     3      0
Research/Post-Doct.             17     4       3   112     38    40    0      -     -       42    20      6
Medical Care                     2     2       0     0      -     -    1      1     0        0     -      -
Technical                       56    20       5    19      8     1    5      4     1        5     3      0
Other                            0     -       -     0      -     -    0      -     -        3     2      0
Allied Health                    4     2       1     2      2     0    0      -     -        7     6      0

TOTAL                         184     95      24   163     72    43   15    11      2      95     58      10
Source: EO&D Search and Waiver Databases.




                                                          45
        A total of 163 full-time positions were filled by a search waiver; 72 of these were obtained
for female candidates (44.2%), and 43 (26.4%) were obtained for minority candidates. A total of
95 part-time positions were filled by a waiver of search; 58 women (61.1%) and 10 minorities
(10.5%) were hired.
        Information on faculty hiring activity is presented in Table 12, Number and Characteristics
of Faculty Hires by School or College, 1999-2000. From 4/1/99 - 3/31/00, a total of 62 full-time
faculty positions were searched; an additional 35 part-time positions were searched. In 28 of the
62 full-time searches (45.2%), a woman was appointed; fifteen minority group faculty members
(24.2%) were hired into full-time positions through the search process. Thirty of the 35 part-time
faculty members hired via the search process were women (85.7%), and two were minorities
(5.7%).
        A total of 57 full-time and 216 part-time faculty appointments were made using a waiver
of search, 4/1/99 - 3/31/00. Women were appointed to 26 of the 57 full-time positions (45.6 %),
and 94 of the 216 part-time positions (43.5%) filled through the waiver process. Minorities were
appointed to 11 of the 57 full-time positions (19.3%), and 23 of the 216 part-time positions
(10.7%) that were filled by waiver of search.

                                                         Table 12

                                        Number and Characteristics of Faculty Hires
                                                  by School or College
                                                       1999-2000
                                                 Full-Time                                  Part-Time
                                      Search                 Waiver                Search                 Waiver
School or College               Total Fem        Min   Total Fem       Min   Total Fem      Min   Total    Fem     Min

Humanities & Fine Arts           19         11    6     13        7     4      3       1     0     48       21      5
Natural Sci. & Math.             16          2    5     13        2     2      0       -     -     18        9      9
Social & Behavioral Sci.          8          6    2      5        1     1      0       -     -     50       17      1
Education                         3          1    0      4        3     1      0       -     -     12        9      1
Engineering                       5          3    2      2        1     0      0       -     -      9        1      0
Food & Natural Res.               5          2    0      4        0     2      0       -     -     47       14      4
Management                        1          0    0      2        1     0      4       2     1      9        5      2
Nursing                           0          -    -      7        7     0     28      27     1     13       13      1
Public Hlth. & Hlth. Sci.         3          2    0      4        3     0      0       -     -      4        2      0
Other                             2          1    0      3        1     1      0       -     -      6        3      0
TOTAL                            62         28   15     57        26   11     35      30     2    216       94     23
Source: EO&D Search and Waiver Databases.


         Historical information on tenure system faculty hiring is presented in Table 13,
Composition of Tenure System Faculty Hires, Academic Year 1990-91 to 1999-2000 (p. 47). For
each of the last ten years, the following information is provided: the total number of hires, the
number (and percentage) of women hired, and the number (and percentage) of racial/ethnic
minority group members hired. Over the last decade, out of a total of 352 tenure system faculty
hires, 141 (40.1%) were women, and 87 (24.7%) were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.




                                                             46
                                                                              Table 13

                                                         Composition of Tenure System Faculty Hires
                                                            Academic Year 1990-91 to 1999-2000

 Academic Year                  Total Hires                              Total Women                                             Total Minority
                                     #                            #                           %                            #                      %

     1990-91                        23                           13                          56.5                          9                      39.1
     1991-92                          5                            3                         60.0                          4                      80.0
     1992-93                        23                           11                          47.8                          3                      13.0
     1993-94                        77                           26                          33.7                        24                       31.2
     1994-95                        25                           11                          44.0                          7                      28.0
     1995-96                        38                           15                          39.5                          8                      21.0
     1996-97                        30                             7                         23.3                          7                      23.3
     1997-98                        40                           15                          37.5                        10                       25.0
     1998-99                        45                           20                          44.4                          7                      15.6
     1999-00                        46                           20                          43.5                          8                      17.4


NOTE: Over the last decade, out of a total of 352 tenure system faculty hires, 141 (40.1%) were women, and 87 (24.7%) were members of a
      racial/ethnic minority group.


EO&D: June, 2000




                                                                                  47
The Employment Office, a department within Human Resources, accepts applications from current
classified employees and off-campus applicants, administers qualifying tests, and processes
notices of position vacancies, including producing and distributing the "yellow sheet" for on-
campus position announcements, and the "buff sheet" for off-campus recruitment in accordance
with the collective bargaining agreements covering those employees. For off-campus applicants,
the Employment Office forwards rosters of qualified applicants to the hiring official; the rosters
are determined by a computerized matching of the requisite skills for the position as identified by
the hiring official and applicant qualifications as self-identified by the applicants. On-campus
applicants are referred according to union guidelines.
         Collective bargaining agreements require that qualified internal applicants be considered
before applications from external persons are evaluated, unless the position is underutilized for
women or minorities and targeted by the EO&D Office for special consideration of qualified
applicants from the underutilized group(s). When a position is targeted, applicant flow is altered
so that applications from underutilized group members are considered before those of other
applicants.
         The EO&D Office targeted 35 classified vacancies in underrepresented job groups
between 4/1/99 and 3/31/00. Out of these 35 vacancies, 6 searches were canceled and 6 positions
were still unfilled at the time of the report. Six of the remaining 23 positions (26.1%) were
successfully filled by a qualified applicant from an under-represented group. Two minority males,
one minority female, and three White females were hired as a result of this selection process.
         Table 14, Hire Rate and Determination of Adverse Impact, EAM, Faculty, and
Professional/Non-Faculty Job Groups, 1999 - 2000 (p. 49) examines the selection rate for women
and minorities among searches conducted for full-time EAM, faculty and professional/non-faculty
positions. This table displays the total number of hires made, the total hire rate (number of
applicants selected/total number of applicants), gender-specific hire rates, determination of adverse
impact, (male rate vs. female rate), the non-minority hire rate, the minority hire rate, and
determination of adverse impact (non-minority rate vs. minority rate). Evidence of adverse impact
occurs when the protected class hire rate is less than 80% of the non-protected class hire rate.
However, differences in selection rate may not constitute adverse impact where the differences are
based on small numbers and are not statistically significant, or where special recruiting or other
programs cause the pool of minority or female candidates to be atypical of the normal pool of
applicants from that group (CFR 60-3.4 (D)). Therefore, in job groups where there was evidence
of adverse impact, the shortfall between the actual number of female or minority hires and the
expected number of these hires (based on the applicant pool composition) was calculated. If the
shortfall was less than one person, this was also noted.
         Between 4/1/99 and 3/31/00, 246 persons were hired into full-time EAM, faculty and
professional/non-faculty positions filled though the search process. An analysis of gender-specific
hire rates revealed that females were hired at a rate less than 80% of the male rate in three job
groups (EAM B, Administrative, and Allied Health); this difference was greater than a one-person
shortfall in one job group (Administrative). Minorities were hired at a rate less than 80% of the
non-minority hiring rate in four job groups. In one of these job groups (Research/Post-doctorates)
this difference exceeded a one-person shortfall. In two job groups (EAM D and Institutional
Relations) this difference did not exceed a one-person shortfall. In the fourth job group (Medical
Care) there were no minority applicants for full-time positions.




                                                   48
                                                                                                  Table 14

                                                                 Hire Rate and Determination of Adverse Impact
                                                              EAM, Faculty, and Professional/Non-Faculty Job Groups
                                                                                   1999-2000

                                               Total                Total                 Male                 Female             Adverse          Non-Minority          Minority   Adverse
Job Group                                    # of Hires            (%) Rate             (%) Rate              (%) Rate            Impact             (%) Rate            (%) Rate   Impact

EAM A                                              0                   -                    -                     -                -                         -               -       -
EAM B                                              0                   -                    -                     -                -                         -               -       -
EAM C                                              0                   -                    -                     -                -                         -               -       -
EAM D                                              2                 3.8                  5.1                   0.0                +                       3.9             0.0       +
Tenure System Faculty                             42                 1.4                  1.1                   2.1               No                       1.4             1.6      No
Other Faculty                                     20                 2.5                  1.8                   4.1               No                       2.5             2.6      No
Administrative                                    16                 7.0                  9.2                   4.0               Yes                      6.5            13.3      No
Education/Training                                55                 8.6                  8.3                   8.7               No                       7.5            16.7      No
Institutional Relations                           24                 8.2                  4.1                  10.2               No                       8.5             0.0       +
Library Sciences                                   8                16.7                 14.3                  17.7               No                      15.6            33.3      No
Research/Post Doctorates                          17                 6.8                  6.5                   8.3               No                      11.3             2.4      Yes
Medical Care                                       2                16.7                  0.0                  18.2               No                      16.7             0.0      **
Technical                                         56                24.5                 23.4                  26.7               No                      24.1            29.4      No
Professional Non-Fac., Other                       0                   -                    -                     -                -                         -               -       -
Allied Health                                      4                 5.4                  9.5                   3.8                +                       4.4            16.7      No


NOTE: Includes all full-time positions filled through the search process. Evidence of adverse impact occurs when the protected class hire rate is less than 80% of the
     non-protected class hire rate. Hire rate is based on number of hires compared to number of applicants for each job group.


Source: EO&D Search Database
+ Actual vs. expected number of hires (based on applicant pool composition) represents less than a one person shortfall.
** No protected category applicants.




                                                                                                         49
                                                                                 Table 15

                                                The Representation of Women and Minorities in Search Pools
                                                     For EAM and Professional/Non-Faculty Positions
                                                                        1999-2000

                                                                                     Female                           Minority
                                           Number                       Search                Availability   Search              Availability
                                             of                          Pool                  Estimate       Pool                Estimate
Job Group                                   Hires                         %                       %            %                     %

EAM A                                         0                             -                       -           -                      -
EAM B                                         0                             -                       -           -                      -
EAM C                                         0                             -                       -           -                      -
EAM D                                         2                          26.4                    47.3         1.9                   11.2
Administrative                               16                          43.2                    59.2         6.6                   10.0
Education/Training                           55                          66.1                    54.4        11.2                   12.5
Institutional Relations                      24                          67.0                    53.4         3.4                    9.2
Library Sciences                              8                          70.8                    69.9         6.3                    8.4
Research/Post Doctorates                     17                          19.3                    31.5        50.2                   14.6
Medical Care                                  2                          91.7                    70.9         0.0                   10.4
Technical                                    56                          32.8                    34.2         7.4                   10.4
Professional Non-Fac., Other                  0                             -                       -           -                      -
Allied Health                                 4                          71.6                    58.3         8.1                   12.7




NOTE: Includes full-time positions filled through the search process.
Source: EO&D Search Database




                                                                                   50
Information on applicant pool representation of females and minorities in EAM and
Professional/Non-faculty job groups is presented in Table 15, The Representation of Women and
Minorities in Search Pools for EAM and Professional/Non-Faculty Positions, 1999 - 2000 (p. 50).
An applicant pool analysis revealed that the representation of women in the pools equaled or
exceeded availability estimates in five of the nine job groups in which searches for full-time positions
were conducted. Representation of minority group applicants in the pools equaled or exceeded the
availability estimates in only one of the nine job groups.

                                        Promotions and Transfers

         Each semester, the Office of Institutional Research and Planning reports to the University on
the status of faculty employment using files from the Human Resources Management Information
System (HRMIS). The Fall 1999 Faculty Positions Report indicated that there were 177 faculty on
tenure track including 74 women (41.8%) and 43 minority group members (24.3%). During 1999-00, a
total of 28 faculty were reviewed for tenure (see Section 4.9 of the Academic Personnel Policy, Doc.
T76-081 for a discussion of eligibility requirements). Tenure decision outcomes were as follows:

                                        Tenure Decisions 1999-00

                                TOTAL           FEMALE        MINORITY

                Positive           26             12               4
                Negative            2              1               1

                TOTAL              28             13               5


        Of the 26 faculty awarded tenure, 12 are women, including ten White women and two Hispanic
women. Fourteen male faculty were awarded tenure, including 12 White males and two Asian men.
        As of Fall 1999, there were 636 full professors among the permanent faculty. Of these, 117
were women (18.4%) and 76 (12.0%) were members of a minority group. Promotion in rank decisions
were made for 40 faculty members during academic year 1999-00. Criteria for determining eligibility
for promotion to the next faculty rank are contained in Section 4.6 of the Academic Personnel Policy,
Doc. T76-081. Nineteen faculty were promoted to the rank of full professor, including five women
(26.3%). No minority faculty were promoted to full professor during academic year 1999-00. Twenty-
one faculty were promoted to the rank of associate professor, including 10 women (47.6%) and four
minority group members (19.1%).
        For EAM and professional staff, a promotion is defined as a bona fide change in duties and
responsibilities which constitutes an advancement to a job with greater duties and responsibilities. For
positions which fall under the Salary Administration Program, an increase in position level is requisite
to a promotion. A transfer occurs when there is a change in primary department affiliation without a
change in job title, or when there is a move from one job to another with equivalent duties and
responsibilities. For classified staff, a promotion is defined as an appointment to a position of a higher
job grade or to a professional position. A transfer is defined as a change in job title without a change in
job grade or a change in primary departmental affiliation without a change in job title.




                                                    51
                                                                  Table 16

                                 Promotions and Transfers in Non-Faculty Job Groups,
                              Selection of Protected Groups Members, and Adverse Impact
                                                       1997-2000

                                                 Total       Female         Female       Adverse       Minority Minority            Adverse
Job Group                                         #             %           Avail %      Impact          %      Avail %             Impact
EAM A                                             1            0.0           25.7          +           100.0     14.8                 No
EAM B                                             2           50.0           36.1          No             0.0    13.0                 +
EAM C                                             9           33.3           47.4         Yes             0.0    11.3                Yes
EAM D                                            19           47.4           50.2          No           15.8     10.3                 No
Administrative                                  136           72.1           66.1          No           11.8     10.3                 No
Education/Training                               94           77.7           68.4          No           21.3     15.7                 No
Institutional Relations                          52           76.9           69.3          No           13.5      7.2                 No
Library Sciences                                 32           81.3           66.6          No             9.4     5.6                 No
Research/Post Doctorates                         20           35.0           37.3          No           15.0     20.1                Yes
Medical Care                                      7           85.7           74.4          No           14.3      5.1                 No
Technical                                       131           33.6           37.6          No           11.5      8.8                 No
Professional Non-Faculty, Other                   5           20.0           50.3         Yes           40.0      7.1                 No
Allied Health                                     2           50.0           52.8          No             0.0    16.7                 +
Administrative Support                          113           92.0           90.7          No           10.6      8.0                 No
Secretaries/Clerks/Typists                      315           94.3           91.2          No           10.2     10.2                 No
Data Entry Operator                              27           81.5           86.8          No           11.1      9.0                 No
Financial Records                                36           94.4           88.4          No           11.1      8.4                 No
Duplicating/Mail                                  1          100.0           93.7          No             0.0     8.4                 +
Library                                          97           78.4           79.4          No             8.3     7.3                 No
Sales                                            20           45.0           34.4          No             0.0    13.3                Yes
Science & Other Technicians                      69           18.8           31.0         Yes             2.9     5.7                Yes
Comp., Eng., & Related Tech.                     18           33.3           42.7         Yes             0.0     5.4                 +
Fire & Safety Officer                             2            0.0           13.7          +              0.0     7.2                 +
Business & Related                               11           72.7           79.3          No             9.1     8.2                 No
Health Services                                  10           60.0           87.3         Yes           30.0     10.9                 No
Protective Services                               2            0.0            9.8          +              0.0    17.7                 +
Mech. & Repairers, Non-Suprv.                    64           12.5           14.2          No           14.1      7.9                 No
Skilled Crafts, Suprv.                           57            0.0            7.5         Yes             5.3     4.7                 +
Construction Trades, Non-Suprv.                 133            3.0            6.3         Yes             9.0     6.9                 No
Plant & System Operation                          4            0.0           18.1          +              0.0     8.3                 +
Food Prep. & Serv., Non-Suprv.                  185           53.0           63.8          No           34.6     32.6                 No
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Non-Suprv.                221           32.1           38.7          No           17.7     21.2                 No
Motor Vehicle Operators                          18            5.6           10.5          +              0.0     6.1                Yes
Farming & Forestry                                7            0.0            7.5          +              0.0     4.2                 +
Guards, Institutional                            15           66.7           22.9          No             0.0    16.8                Yes
Food Prep. & Serv., Suprv.                       42           45.2           50.0          No           35.7     19.3                 No
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Suprv.                     45           28.9           25.0          No           11.1     12.5                 No
Departmental Assistant                            2           50.0           52.3          No             0.0    16.9                 +

NOTE: Evidence of adverse impact in promotions and transfers occurs when the representation of protected class members falls below
80% of the availability estimate. Availability estimates are based on the composition of feeder job groups within the University.
Promotion/transfer rate is based on the number of promotions and transfers into and within each job.
SOURCE: Employee job movement data based on a three year history: 4/1/97-3/31/00.
+ Difference is less than a one person shortfall.




                                                                       52
Summary statistics for promotions and transfers among non-faculty employees are contained in Table
16, Promotions and Transfers in Non-Faculty Job Groups, Selection of Protected Group Members, and
Adverse Impact, 1997-2000 (p. 52). This information is derived from the historical employee job
movement monitoring data available on HRMIS and downloaded to CAAMS. The data contained in
Table 16 represent a three year period (4/1/97 to 3/31/00).
      Evidence of adverse impact in promotions and transfers occurs when the representation of
protected class members falls below 80% of the availability estimate. Job group availability estimates
are based on the composition of the feeder job groups within the university. For women, there was
evidence of adverse impact for promotions and transfers in 13 job groups. For six of these job groups,
the number of promotions and transfers that women received differed from the expected number (based
on availability in feeder job groups) by less than a one-person shortfall. In seven job groups (EAM C;
Professional, Other; Science & Other Technicians; Computer, Engineering & Related Technicians;
Health Services; Skilled Crafts, Supervisory; and Construction Trades, Non-Supervisory) the number
of promotions and transfers that women received differed from the expected number by more than a
one-person shortfall. For minorities, there was evidence of adverse impact in promotion and transfer in
sixteen job groups. For ten of these job groups, the number of promotions and transfers that minorities
received differed from the expected number (based on availability in feeder job groups) by less than a
one-person shortfall. In six job groups (EAM C; Research/Post Doctorates; Sales; Science & Other
Technicians; Motor Vehicle Operators; and Guards, Institutional) the difference was more than a one-
person shortfall.

                                             Terminations

      Terminations from the workforce between 4/1/99 and 3/31/00, including voluntary resignations
and involuntary separations, were analyzed by job group across the campus. Table 17, Termination
Rate and Determination of Adverse Impact, by Gender and Minority Status Within University Job
Group, 1999-2000 (p. 55), reports the termination rate for women and minorities. The job group
termination rate is calculated by identifying the job group total at the beginning of the period, adding
the new hires into the job group during the period, then dividing the number of terminations from the
job group during the period by the job group total at the end of the period.
      For termination activity, evidence of adverse impact occurs when the non-protected class
termination rate is less than 80% of the protected class termination rate. However, differences in
termination rate may not constitute adverse impact where the differences are based on small numbers
and are not statistically significant. Where there was evidence of adverse impact, the difference
between the actual number of terminations and the expected number of terminations (based on job
group composition) was calculated. Only when this difference equaled or exceeded a one-person
shortfall was adverse impact indicated for the job group.
      An analysis of gender-specific termination rates revealed that males terminated from the
workforce at a rate less than 80 percent of the female rate in sixteen job groups. In eleven of these job
groups the difference was equal to or greater than a one-person shortfall. These job groups were:
EAM C; Education/Training; Library Sciences; Technical; Professional, Other; Allied Health; Library;
Science & Other Technicians; Guards, Institutional; Food Preparation & Services, Supervisory; and
Cleaning/Building Services, Supervisory.
      The non-minority termination rate was less than 80 percent of the minority termination rate in
sixteen job groups. The difference between the expected and the actual number of terminations was
equal to or greater than a one-person shortfall in five groups: Research/Post Doctorates; Technical;
Secretaries/Clerks/Typists; Data Entry Operator; and Financial Records.
      An analysis of the reason for termination in job groups where there was evidence of adverse
impact revealed that the great majority of the terminations in the affected group were voluntary, or due


                                                   53
to completion of contract. A common reason for voluntary termination is retirement. Involuntary
terminations occurred within the following job groups where adverse impact was present:
Education/Training; Secretaries/Clerks/Typists; Data Entry Operators; and Institutional Guards. In
each case, there was a clear articulation of the reason why the involuntary termination was necessary.




                                                 54
                                                  Table 17
                            Termination Rate and Determination of Adverse Impact
                          by Gender and Minority Status Within University Job Group
                                                 1999-2000

                                                Total       Total         Male     Female     Adverse     Non-Min.    Minority   Adverse
Job Group                                         #       Rate (%)    Rate (%)    Rate (%)     Impact     Rate (%)    Rate (%)   Impact
EAM A                                             0          0.0         0.0         0.0         No         0.0          0.0       No
EAM B                                             0          0.0         0.0         0.0         No         0.0          0.0       No
EAM C                                             4         10.5         0.0        20.0         Yes       12.5          0.0       No
EAM D                                             4          7.8        10.0         4.8         No         6.7         16.7        +
Tenure System Faculty                            39          3.6         3.3         4.3         No         3.5          4.3       No
Other Faculty                                   384         49.9        49.6        50.1         No        50.5         44.2       No
Administrative                                   22          5.4         9.0         3.7         No         5.4          5.3       No
Education/Training                               76         18.3        12.3        21.2         Yes       18.0         19.7       No
Institutional Relations                          20         14.6        23.5         9.3         No        14.1         22.2        +
Library Sciences                                  4          7.0         0.0        10.5         Yes        5.7         25.0        +
Research/Post Doctorates                         79         30.3        29.4        31.9         No        27.7         37.1       Yes
Medical Care                                      1          2.4         0.0         3.2          +         0.0         25.0        +
Technical                                        50         12.1        10.9        14.6         Yes       11.3         19.5       Yes
Professional Non-Faculty, Other                   3         14.3         0.0        23.1         Yes       16.7          0.0       No
Allied Health                                     9         19.6        11.1        25.0         Yes       20.0         16.7       No
Administrative Support                            8          4.1        23.1         2.8         No         3.8          8.3        +
Secretaries/Clerks/Typists                       53          8.1        19.0         7.4         No         7.7         12.1       Yes
Data Entry Operator                               9         14.1        11.1        14.5         No        10.9         33.3       Yes
Financial Records                                 6          9.1         0.0         9.8          +         6.7         33.3       Yes
Duplicating/Mail                                  0          0.0         0.0         0.0         No         0.0          0.0       No
Library                                           6          7.6         0.0         9.5         Yes        6.8         16.7        +
Sales                                             2          4.9         3.4         8.3          +         5.6          0.0       No
Science & Other Technicians                      11          5.6         4.0         8.5         Yes        5.4          9.1        +
Comp., Eng., & Related Tech.                      0          0.0         0.0         0.0         No         0.0          0.0       No
Fire & Safety Officer                             0          0.0         0.0         0.0         No         0.0          0.0       No
Business & Related                                0          0.0         0.0         0.0         No         0.0          0.0       No
Health Services                                  16         21.3        25.0        20.9         No        23.1         17.4       No
Protective Services                               4          7.4         6.3        16.7          +         6.8         10.0        +
Mech. & Repairers, Non-Suprv.                     2          3.8         4.4         0.0         No         2.0         33.3        +
Skilled Crafts, Suprv.                            3          5.0         5.1         0.0         No         5.2          0.0       No
Construction Trades, Non-Suprv.                   7          4.4         4.6         0.0         No         4.7          0.0       No
Plant & System Operation                          2         11.1        11.1         0.0         No        11.8          0.0       No
Food Prep. & Serv., Non-Suprv.                   10          4.9         6.5         4.0         No         5.7          3.2       No
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Non-Suprv.                 16          3.6         3.9         3.0         No         3.9          2.6       No
Motor Vehicle Operators                           1          5.9         0.0       100.0          +         5.9          0.0       No
Farming & Forestry                                1         11.1        11.1         0.0         No        11.1          0.0       No
Guards, Institutional                             6         13.6         9.7        23.1         Yes       13.5         14.3       No
Food Prep. & Serv., Suprv.                        2          4.3         0.0        10.5         Yes        2.5         14.3        +
Cleaning/Bldg. Serv., Suprv.                      6          9.5         4.3        25.0         Yes        8.9         14.3        +
Departmental Assistant                          115         66.1        71.9        60.0         No        70.8         43.3       No

NOTE: Evidence of adverse impact occurs when the non-protected class termination rate is less than 80% of the protected class
       termination rate. Termination rate is based on number of terminations compared to the number of incumbents in each job group.
      + Less than a one person shortfall.




                                                                     55
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                                    56
                           IDENTIFICATION OF PROBLEM AREAS


                                    Effects of Fiscal Constraints

         For most of the 1990’s, the Amherst campus has experienced slow or non-existent yearly
growth in the size of its overall workforce. Between 1999 and 2000, there was a slight increase in
the total workforce (1.7%). Progress towards achieving affirmative action goals is promoted by
adequate placement opportunities. Hiring for tenure system faculty continued to be healthy after a
precipitous decline in the early nineties. Forty-five new tenure system faculty were hired in 1998-99,
and 46 were hired for academic year 1999-00. See Table 13, Composition of Tenure System Faculty
Hires, for historical information on faculty hiring. Over the last decade (1990-91 to 1999-00), out of
a total of 352 tenure system faculty hires, 141 (40.1%) were women, and 87 (24.7%) were members
of a racial/ethnic minority group.

                                           Applicant Pools

        Increased diversity in selection requires diversity in the pool of qualified applicants. An
analysis of applicant pools for EAM and professional/non-faculty searches revealed that the
representation of females in the pools equaled or exceeded the corresponding availability estimate in
five of nine job groups in which more than one search for a full-time position was conducted
(Education/Training, Institutional Relations, Library Sciences, Medical Care, and Allied Health). In
three job groups (EAM D, Administrative, and Research/Post-Doctorates) the overall composition of
the respective search pool for females was less than 80% of the corresponding availability estimate.
Representation of minority group applicants in these same pools equaled or exceeded the availability
estimates in only one of the nine job groups (Research/Post-Doctorates). In seven job groups (EAM
D, Administrative, Institutional Relations, Library Sciences, Medical Care, Technical, and Allied
Health), the overall minority composition of the respective search pool was less than 80% of the
corresponding availability estimate. Please refer to Table 15, The Representation of Women and
Minorities in Search Pools. The diversity of on-campus applicant pools is limited by current
workforce representation of protected group members. To ensure equal opportunity and promote
affirmative action, the EO&D Office reviews plans for the advertisement of all faculty and
professional/non-faculty searches, and will provide information on recruitment resources upon
request. As part of the search documentation outlined in Search Procedures: Faculty and
Professional Staff, a statistical analysis is conducted for each search. If the bona fide applicant pool
and/or interview pool does not approximate the corresponding availability estimate, an explanation of
what action was taken by the appointing authority to address this issue is requested.

                                           Training Needs

        While Chancellor Scott has reinforced the expectation that promoting employee development
is an essential supervisory responsibility, it is still the case that employees, particularly classified
employees, have difficulty obtaining release time to take job related classes or attend training. This
ongoing issue has been identified by many constituents including the Faculty Senate Council on the
Status of Women, the Labor/Management Workplace Education Advisory Council and in the context
of departmental focus group sessions and a campus wide needs assessment survey.
        In addition to release time restrictions, the campus does not adequately integrate workplace
learning and training into its performance management systems. Consequently, employees do not
have an understanding that ongoing learning, about diversity and other workplace skills, is part of


                                                  57
their job expectations and will be considered in their evaluations. As such, many of the workshops
and classes offered to the campus, particularly those that are diversity related, are undersubscribed.
This suggests that more needs to be done by managers and supervisors to incorporate training into
performance expectations by highlight the importance of training, helping employees transfer their
learning back to their job and recognizing employees who take the initiative to increase their
diversity related understanding and skills.
       Often diversity related problems involve supervisory relationships. The Administration and
Finance executive area has made it an expectation of performance that all of its supervisory staff
participate in the core level of the Supervisory Leadership Development Program. However, unless
the rest of the campus follows this lead, it is unlikely that supervisors will be able to effectively
supervise a diverse workforce and the problem of “toxic supervision”, as identified in the Ombuds
Office report, will not be rectified.

                     Workforce Under-Representation in the Skilled Crafts

         Women and minorities continued to be under-represented in the Skilled Crafts area. Women
were underutilized in three of four Skilled Crafts job groups in 2000 (Skilled Crafts, Supervisory;
Construction Trades, Non-Supervisory; and Plant & System Operation). Minorities were
underutilized in one of the four Skilled Crafts job groups (Mechanics & Repairers, Non-Supervisory
job group). Although minority representation passed the utilization threshold in three of four Skilled
Crafts job groups, minority representation is still below the respective availability estimate for each
of these job groups.
         To help address issues of access, the Apprenticeship Program in the Physical Plant was re-
instituted last year. This program offers opportunities for advancement in the trades to traditionally
under-represented populations. This program provides training for employees from under-
represented groups to become journeymen/women in the construction trades. Currently, there are
three apprentices in the program: two carpenter apprentices (one male, one female), and one plumber
apprentice (one male). Applicant profiles for an HVAC apprentice are currently being reviewed by
the Apprenticeship Committee for selection. Job descriptions have been approved for two new
apprentice trades: welder and mason. These apprentice positions will be posted in the future.




                                                  58
                PROGRAMS TO ELIMINATE PROBLEMS & ATTAIN GOALS


                                           Hiring Procedures

         One of the ways that the campus seeks to provide opportunity is through its active monitoring
of the search process. The Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office (EO&D) reviews recruitment
plans and advises search committees and hiring authorities on matters related to affirmative action
and equal opportunity. Guidelines on how to incorporate affirmative action principles into the search
process are included in the campus’ Search Procedures: Faculty and Professional Staff; this
document is distributed to all hiring authorities, and is also available on the EO&D Web site
(http://www.umass.edu/eod). These procedures outline recruitment activity for selecting qualified
individuals for administrative, faculty and professional/non-faculty positions at the University. One
of the goals of these procedures is that hiring officials identify the EO&D Office as technical
assistants and not as regulators in recruiting activity. The recruitment strategy proposed includes
more interaction between the EO&D Office, the hiring official, and the search committee at the
beginning of the recruitment process to better insure creative and effective announcement of the
position vacancy to generate more diverse pools of qualified applicants.
         The Professional Search Procedures requires notice to the EO&D Office if the pool of
qualified, bona fide applicants does not approximate availability and the hiring unit or campus is
underrepresented with respect to protected group members. After considering what steps may be
taken to address the under-representation identified in the pool of qualified applicants, the hiring
official or designee may accept the pool, identify additional activities to improve the pool, or may
close the search. It is anticipated that such improved monitoring by the hiring official (or designee)
will encourage more attention to the importance of widespread, creative recruitment.
         In June 1981, the Amherst campus and the four unions for classified employees (AFSCME,
USA/MTA/NEA, IBPO [A and B Units]) entered into contractual agreements which allowed for
some deviation from the otherwise negotiated procedure for hiring and promoting employees. Under
the contractual agreements, vacancies where protected categories are underrepresented in the job
group can be targeted for special recruitment efforts. The targeting process has been included in
collective bargaining agreements since its inception in 1981.
         The targeting process begins when the EO&D Office, upon receiving notification of the
vacancy, determines that the vacancy is in an underutilized job group according to the Affirmative
Action Plan. The EO&D Office initiates the targeting process by sending a memorandum, which
designates the position as an Affirmative Action Target Position, to the originating department head,
along with a copy to the Personnel Administrator and the bargaining unit involved. The hiring
authority must consult with the Employment Office to be advised on the specific procedures to
follow in filling the targeted position. To ensure adequate documentation of the search process, the
Employment Office has directed special attention to compliance with the requirement to complete the
Applicant Profile Summary Sheet on which the hiring official documents the outcome for protected
group and all off-campus applicants. In addition, the EO&D Office requires a memorandum from
the hiring authority stating the reason for rejection of protected class applicants for targeted positions.
         In 1998 the University replaced its testing program for clerical employment with QWIZ, a
software system that evaluates applicants’ office and business skills using automated testing. QWIZ
offers self-administered computerized testing in the following areas: data entry, office automation,
primary skills, and secretarial/clerical skills. QWIZ Testing replaced a more limited battery of
“paper and pencil” and typewriter based testing that had been in place at the University for almost
thirty years. QWIZ Testing meets legal and professional standards, and test fairness studies
demonstrate that these tests are unbiased with respect to race and sex.


                                                    59
                                        Sexual Harassment

        As a result of reviews undertaken by several campus groups, our Sexual Harassment Policy
now has been modified in these important ways: 1) It expands the number of individuals to whom
allegations of sexual harassment can be reported (these individuals to be called First Responders); 2)
It provides for campus volunteers to serve as advocates; 3) It removes lawyers from the process
except in criminal cases. The Chancellor’s Executive Advisory Committee (CEAC) has approved
these modifications.
        First Responder Training was carried out during the month of January; and a schedule for
training advocates is scheduled to begin in the next few weeks. From a list comprised of faculty,
professional and classified staff a core group will be trained to act as Peer Educators. These Peer
Educators will receive a three-day training from which they will each emerge prepared to conduct
one two-hour sexual harassment workshop per month for one year. We look forward to this
expanding awareness of the devastating effects of sexual harassment as a means of routing it out of
our university environment.
        Full implementation of the modified plan is underway.

                                    Training and Development

        The Training and Development Unit provides education, training, resources and development
opportunities for all faculty, staff and administrative professionals through three interrelated
programs: Employee Training, Organization Development and Labor/Management Workplace
Education. Each program contributes to the unit’s goals of promoting awareness of the benefits
offered by an increasingly diverse workforce and fostering workplaces which are effective,
empowering, creative and multicultural.
        The Employee Training Program offers workshops, seminars and short courses in the areas of
Diversity in the Workplace, Managing and Supervising, Tools for Workplace Effectiveness, Personal
Wellness and UMass General Information.
        During FY'00, fourteen workshops were offered under the Diversity in the Workplace
category. Some examples of the topics covered are Cross-Cultural Communication; Muslim and
Jewish Holidays; Men, Women and Communication; and a Diversity Film Series. A total of 37
employees attended these workshops. In addition to offering diversity specific sessions, all
workshop facilitators presenting programs are expected, no matter what their topic, to incorporate
diverse perspectives into their training.
        The Employee Training Program continues to develop the Supervisory Leadership
Development Program (SLDP) which provides supervisors and managers with a number of skills and
competencies that support diversity and employee development in a changing workplace. The SLDP
uses a competency model as a framework for two distinct levels of training: Core and Emergent . The
competencies include Communicator, Organizer, Mentor, Mediator, Evaluator, and Team Builder
(COMMET).
        The eleven week Core Competency Certificate Series, for first time and front line
supervisors, is based on the COMMET curriculum. Each of the six competency areas directly
addresses issues of diversity and assists supervisors with developing an appreciation for and
understanding of the impact of gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, ability, age,
and class differences in the workplace.
        The Emergent Supervisory Leadership Development Series presents an in-depth
continuation of the competency model as introduced in the Core Series. Several workshops are
offered in each competency area which have diversity as a major foci. These include Cross Cultural
Communication, Men and Women Communicating, Challenges of Women Supervisors, Effective


                                                 60
Team Leadership, Diverse Teams at Work, Conflict Management, Resolving Team Conflicts,
Performance Management, Nurturing Mentoring Relationships, and Creating a Safe and Respectful
Workplace.
         The SLDP also offers supervisors individual support for challenges in the workplace,
especially as they are challenged by issues of diversity. Coaching and consultation services and a
support network of supervisors to discuss common issues over lunch, are additional services
provided.
         The Organizational Development Program offers customized training as well as professional
organizational development consultation services to departments. In FY’00, customized training,
specifically in the area of Workplace Diversity, was delivered to 14 departments with a total of 259
employees participating in these sessions. This year there was a particular focus on Customer Service
In a Multicultural Society. This workshop, which was offered as one part of a three part Customer
Service Certificate Series, was offered to employees in nine different departments. In addition to
training focused specifically at diversity topics, it continues to be our practice to integrate diversity
education into all of our customized training.
         During this past year, the Organizational Development program began work with two client
organizations on comprehensive diversity audits. The audits include gathering information about how
effective these organizations have been in bringing diversity into the workplace. The audits will
gather information from staff, customers, student workers and other client organizations. Both
organizations intend to use the data to establish new organizational strategic plans or initiatives in the
diversity area.
         The Labor/Management Workplace Education Program (LMWEP) provides courses for
classified employees that enhance and develop English-fluency for non-native speakers, writing,
math, critical thinking, leadership, and communication skills and sponsors other labor/management
initiatives. During FY ’00, LMWEP continued to give high priority to diversity initiatives in its
classes, programs, and services both on and off campus. Examples of off-campus services include: a
LMWEP site in Easthampton that provides ESOL classes for non-English-speaking adults in that
community; a LMWEP site in Springfield that provides a writing skills course to low-income, racial
minority employees of a nursing home; a site in Huntington that focuses on adults in need of literacy;
and several LMWEP sites in Franklin and Hampshire county that provide workplace education
services to low income at risk youth.
         Program highlights for LMWEP during FY '00 include a successful continuation of the
worker-initiated and produced WMUA radio program: UpFront. The program aired weekly
throughout the year with its ongoing focus on social justice and diversity. Programming included a
special four part series on African-American Women activists, in conjunction with a Women’s
Studies class with the same focus. Upfront also highlighted affirmative action issues and concerns,
disabilities model programs, African-American history month, third world labor and prison
exploitation and their links to race and class, as well as issues of violence and civility both on and off
campus. Class issues included poverty, affordable housing, and educational opportunity and equity.
UpFront’s entire thrust has been to involve graduate and undergraduate students, staff, and faculty, as
well as the larger community, in dialogue about social justice and diversity.
         Courses offered through LMWEP’s “Next Steps” component included two semester-long
courses in spring and fall called “Enough Is Enough” – a reflection, dialogue, and problem-solving
class around what to do when faced with racism, classism, homophobia, sexism, and the like. “Next
Steps” also held a summer film series for staff on women in the workplace that addressed sexism, as
well as racism and classism. Like all the Next Steps classes, these provided ongoing opportunities
for dialogue and building bridges across the community.
         In the fall, LMWEP, in collaboration with many campus agencies, supported campus-wide
events that showcased words and pictures by survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault,


                                                   61
workplace violence, and gay-bashing (underwritten by an award from the Chancellor's Counsel on
Community, Diversity and Social Justice).
        During the spring, classified employees from the LMWEP Advanced Writing class prepared
for their latest publication, "Writing our Lives: We Are More Than You See V." A reading was
scheduled for September 2000 to celebrate classified staff- a group that is all too often invisible on
campus.
        Throughout this period, LMWEP was involved in the second year of a two-year research
project that examined the impact of the changing workplace (and the effects of both immigration and
welfare reform) on adult learners (with findings to be forwarded to U.S. Department of Education).
As expected, diversity and social justice concerns surfaced as the collected data was analyzed. In
conjunction with four other western Mass sites, the UMass group worked throughout the spring on
drafts of the analysis. A final report is expected early into FY ’01.
        Training and Development supports Affirmative Action efforts on this campus through the
hiring of a diverse staff, providing a range of supervisory leadership development opportunities with
diversity as a major focus, offering a wide range of classes and workshops dealing with identity and
differences, working with individual departments on diversity related concerns and supporting and
sponsoring special projects which help promote an appreciation for diversity and social justice both
and off campus.




                                                 62
          REPORTS FROM CHANCELLOR'S & VICE CHANCELLOR'S AREAS


        The Associate Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Diversity invited the senior
administrators to report on activities related to affirmative action, equal opportunity and diversity
during 1999-2000, including recruitment and retention efforts for women and minority faculty, staff,
and students, and to describe plans for 2000-01. Their responses follow:


                                         Chancellor’s Area

        Published in May 1996, Strategic Action, Towards A Commonwealth of Learning, articulated
Chancellor David K. Scott’s philosophical and fiscal framework for carrying out the institution’s
comprehensive strategic plan for the next six years. The document was based upon an extensive
community-based planning process that included the work of over a 1,000 individuals involved with
six Task Forces and seven Working Groups. Specific goals related to affirmative action were
articulated in Strategic Action.      Additionally, Strategic Action included approximately ten
overarching guiding principles. The guiding principle related to affirmative action is stated below:

       Guiding Principle – To foster diversity and multiculturalism, valuing the richness
       and differences of individuals and cultures, yet affirming our common humanity.

Diversity of Entering Class

          In the fall of 2000, Strategic Action- A Six-Year Retrospective was shared with the
community. The report highlighted the accomplishments achieved under the plan and assessed the
progress made towards 20 major goals. Two of those goals related directly to affirmative action. The
first is listed below:

      Entering first class reflects the diversity of college prepared high school seniors

Trends – 1994-2000

        The table below illustrates the positive     trends in recruitment and retention of ALANA
students over the past 6 years. Using 1994 as a      reference point, there has been an increase of 1.5
points (from 15.3% to 16.8%) in the ALANA            population in the incoming class. In the entire
undergraduate population, the increase between        1994 and 2000 was 5.2 points (from 12.6% to
17.3%).

                                Strategic Action                                  Reference
                                                                  FY96-00           Point   FY94-00
Fiscal Year          1996     1997    1998    1999        2000    Change            1994    Change
ALANA %
    First-Year        17.2%   20.7%   20.8%   19.1%       16.8%    -0.4 pts.          15.3% +1.5 pts.
    Undergraduate     14.8%   16.3%   17.3%   17.8%       17.8%    +3.0 pts.          12.6% +5.2 pts.




                                                     63
Comparison of diversity of Massachusetts college-prepared high schools seniors with the incoming
class

        In 1998, the year for which most recent data are available, 15.5% of the college-prepared
high school seniors were ALANA students. The table below compares the percent of ALANA
students in the incoming class with the 15.5% benchmark.

                  •1998 Entering Class – 20.8%     - Exceed benchmark by 5.3%
                  •1999 Entering Class – 19.1%     - Exceed benchmark by 3.6%
                  •2000 Entering Class – 16.8%     - Exceed benchmark by 1.3%
                  •2001 Entering Class – 16.8%     - Exceed benchmark by 1.3%

       The graph below sets the context to view population diversity in the larger context of national
census data, state data and a detailed breakdown for the classes of 1998, 1999 and 2000.




                                   Population Diversity
                         United States, Massachusetts, UMass Amherst


                        US Population (1990)                                                     24.8%



          Massachusetts Population (1990)                            11.6


                                                                                         21.6%
  Mass. High School Population (1998-99)

      Mass. High School Graduates (1998)                                           18.4%

                                                                                                 African American
      Mass. HS Grads 4-Yr. College (1998)                                    15.5%
                                                                                                 Hispanic
                                                                                   19.1%         Asian American
     UMass Amherst Entering Class (1998)
                                                                                                 Native American

     UMass Amherst Entering Class (1999)                                         16.8%



     UMass Amherst Entering Class (2000)                                         16.8%



                                                   0      5     10          15     20      25        30     35      40
                                                                                 Percent




                                                 64
Gender Equity

       The second major Strategic Action goal related to Affirmative Action was to:

      Achieve gender equity without compromising men’s sports

The University of Massachusetts continues to remain among the nation’s elite leaders in its
commitment to Title IX, while maintaining a program that provides opportunities for all student-
athletes, both men and women.
        In the summer of 1993, under the direction of Athletic Director Bob Marcum, UMass
undertook a self-study, using the Office of Civil Rights’ Investigator Manual. The result of this
study was the implementation of an aggressive Five-Year Plan for Compliance, which was
completed in the spring of 1997. Its level of success was recognized by USA Today as a national
leader in Title IX compliance.
        Although that plan has been completed for well over three years, UMass has remained
committed to continue in a positive direction toward achieving proportionality. This past year, the
total number of female athletes participating for the year reached 409 athletes. UMass ranks first in
the Atlantic 10 in the number of female varsity sports offered and in athletic participation
opportunities for women.
        In 1998-99, the total commitment in scholarship dollars rose to a record total of $1,818,416.
UMass ranks among the top 10 schools in Division I-AA in the amount of scholarship dollars for
women.
        The continued achievements of all the women’s teams have represented a major part in the
school’s overall success. In 1999-2000, UMass won the women’s title in the Atlantic 10
Commissioner’s Cup race for the fourth time and is the only school in the conference to have won
the award since it was instituted in 1996-97.

                        Hanes-Atlantic 10 Women’s Commissioner’s Cup
                                  1999-2000 Final Standings

                       Team                                   Points

                       1. MASSACHUSETTS                       95.0
                       2. Virginia Tech                       81.0
                       3. Rhode Island                        64.5
                       4. Temple                              62.5
                       5. Dayton                              55.5
                       6. St. Joseph’s                        52.5
                       7. George Washington                   51.0
                       8. La Salle                            41.5
                       9. Xavier                              40.5
                       10. Duquesne                           35.5
                       11. St. Bonaventure                    29.0
                       12. Fordham                            24.5




                                                 65
American Council on Education Fellows Program

       One of the programs identified for support in Strategic Action, was the ACE Fellowship
Program.

        “In order to prepare a new generation of administrators with more women, people of color
        and underrepresented groups, we need to create opportunities for more people to be involved
        in administration. We shall continue our participation in the American Council on
        Education programs to bring more scholars into administration.”

         The ACE Fellowship Program is recognized as the premier management development
program in higher education. Annually, approximately thirty fellowships are awarded through a
rigorous and highly competitive national competition. Among numerous professional development
activities, Fellows spend a year at a host institution in a mentoring relationship with the institution’s
president.
         Over the course of Strategic Action, the University of Massachusetts Amherst hosted three
ACE Fellows:

        Fellow, Year on the Amherst Campus, Home Institution

        Francisco Marmolejo, 1994-1995, Universidad De Las
        Americas, A.C., Mexico City

        Susan Awbrey, 1995-1996, Oakland University

        Carlos Vargas-Aburto, 1997-1998, Kent State University

        Nominated by the University were:

        Fellow, Year, Host Institution

        Javier Cevallos, 1996-1997, Wesleyan University

        Elizabeth Dale, 1999-2000, University of Delaware

        Linda Nolan, 2000-2001, Arizona State University

Chancellor David K. Scott was recognized at the 2000 ACE Annual Meeting as one of only 30
chancellors for mentoring five or more ACE Fellows.

                                      Office of Human Relations

         Supporting the overarching goal stated above, the role of the Office of Human Relations
(OHR) is to facilitate institutional problem solving aimed at improving the campus climate and
furthering community, diversity and social justice issues. The staff focuses on improving
institutional policies and procedures, increasing the responsiveness of campus departments to human
relations issues, monitoring the human relations climate, and coordinating a broad range of
organizational, educational, policy and program interventions.


                                                   66
       A full-time director, a full-time office manager, a graduate student intern, three
undergraduate interns, and four part-time undergraduate students staffed OHR. Initiatives
undertaken during the 1999-2000 academic year included:

Chancellor’s Counsel on Community, Diversity and Social Justice.           OHR coordinated support
activities for the Counsel and its committees, completing the following:

      Organized and administered the eighth year of the annual "RFP" Small Grants Program
       which funds collaborative campus projects aimed at increased understanding of community,
       diversity and/or social justice issues. Twenty proposals were submitted which resulted in
       twelve awards totaling nearly $16,000. OHR provided administrative support to some RFP
       recipients who requested it. Additionally, OHR staff assisted groups that submitted excellent
       program ideas that were not funded in finding other sources of support.

      Organized a reception at the Chancellor’s House for previous RFP Small Grants recipients.

      OHR Director served as member of the University Resource Network Steering Committee, a
       committee of the Counsel concerned with improving the quality of life, learning and work on
       the campus, especially for undergraduates. This committee produced:

          Eleven public discussions held on alternate Wednesdays at noon regarding advising,
           social justice, diversity and community issues

          The University Advising Collaborative, which evolved from previous years’
           undergraduate advising conferences. The Collaborative group provided ongoing case
           supervision to a campus-wide group of advisors over the past year. The collaborative is
           co-sponsored by Counseling and Academic Assessment and OHR.

Learning Communities Network. Learning Communities align student’s co-curricular and
academic experiences in living or working environments. Initially launched at the Learning
Communities Conference on February 5, 1999, the Learning Communities Network has produced a
continuing series of events and products during the past year:

      A luncheon presentation to faculty, students and staff interested in learning communities by
       renown educator Parker Palmer (September 19, 1999).

      Resource and information sharing programs for different types of learning communities
       (October 5, 1999 and March 3, 2000).

      In support of Strategic Action, a comprehensive plan was developed for increasing the
       quantity and quality of learning communities for undergraduates.

New Approach to Community, Diversity and Social Justice. During the past academic year, the
campus continued implementation of recommendations contained in a 1998 Chancellor's Counsel
report entitled, “A New Approach to Promoting Community, Diversity and Social Justice.”
Implementation is guided by a campus-wide Community, Diversity and Social Justice (CDSJ) Team
of faculty, students and staff appointed by the Chancellor. The CDSJ Team works closely with
external consultants with expertise in creating systems change in large organizations. Key elements



                                                 67
of the New Approach Effort include an integration of CDSJ issues with campus mission and making
the campus orientation to these issues information-driven, results-oriented, locally-focused,
accountability-based, and proactively-managed. A primary objective is to move responsibility for
addressing these issues down to the departmental level. During 1999-2000, the CDSJ Team refined
plans to develop teams in each of five executive areas during the following year. These executive
area teams will conduct assessments in each division regarding CDSJ issues, identify areas of needed
change, plan and implement change strategies, monitor progress and evaluate results.
        The OHR Director serves as one member of the CDSJ Team and also serves on its
Coordinating Group.

Julian Bond presentation. OHR played a key role in co-sponsoring, planning and funding this tone-
setting event with student groups and other administrative offices (October 13, 1999).

Jackson Katz presentation. In the wake of a series of sexual assaults in the fall of 1999, OHR
coordinated arrangements for a speech by Jackson Katz ‘83. Katz addressed the topic, “What Men
Can Do To Prevent Sexual Violence,” speaking to a standing room only crowd in the Campus Center
Auditorium (December 1, 1999).

Campus Violence Prevention Initiative (CVPI). In response to the overwhelmingly positive
response to the Jackson Katz speech, OHR worked with the Dean of Students, the Communications
Department, Public Safety, Everywoman’s Center and the Men’s Resource Center to propose and
fundraise for a follow-up pilot program on the campus. CVPI adopted Jackson Katz’ Mentors in
Violence Prevention (MVP) model in which male employees are trained to lead workshops for
undergraduate students utilizing a male-on-male gender violence prevention approach. A key
element of the workshops is the discussion of scenarios to prepare undergraduate males to intervene
as bystanders in incidents of potential or actual gender violence. Training programs for volunteer
employee educators were held (February 28 and 29, 2000). By the end of the spring semester, more
than two hundred undergraduate men had attended these workshops.

Hate Graffiti Education Program. Based on climate research completed in 1998 which showed a
rise in the incidence of hate graffiti on campus, OHR collaborated with the Northwestern District
Attorney’s Office, Public Safety, Campus Transit, Housing Services and Publications to produce and
distribute an attractive educational poster about the legal consequences for hate graffiti (January of
1999). The design of the poster and an associated “Stop Hate Crimes Now” button was appropriate
for use not just on the campus, but for all 46 towns and cities in Hampshire and Franklin Counties.
Currently the poster is displayed in most campus buildings and on all public transportation buses
serving the campus in both Franklin and Hampshire counties. A small button with a “Stop Hate
Crimes Now” logo taken from the poster has also been widely distributed.
         During ‘99-‘00, posters and buttons were redistributed to all residence halls at the beginning
of each semester. The results of this campaign have been to raise awareness of the legal
consequences of hate graffiti, to increase campus concern and outrage when hate graffiti occurs, and
to dramatically increase the reporting rate of hate graffiti.
          An incident of hate graffiti in Gorman on the first weekend of the ‘99-‘00 school year
brought a strong response from students on campus and in response the Student Government
Associated decided to sponsor a Hate Crimes Awareness Week during the week (November 1, 1999).
OHR helped to coordinate, fund and publicize this weeklong series of speakers and events. Due to
continuing requests, OHR had made the artwork for the hate graffiti poster available to several
colleges and high schools so they may customize the poster for their use.



                                                  68
Peer Education Project on Sexual Harassment. Project Pulse Surveys over the years have
continued to reveal that a high proportion of undergraduate females experience sexually harassing
behaviors from other undergraduates, but only one-half of them could actually identify those
behaviors as sexual harassment. Sexually harassing behaviors not only create a “chilly” climate for
undergraduate women, but according to recent Supreme Court decisions, also constitute a serious
source of legal liability under Title IX.
        Recent 1998 Project Pulse surveys reveal statistically significant declines in several forms of
peer-to-peer sexual harassment among undergraduates, declines that appear directly attributable to
this program. During the past year, a doctoral student from the School of Education has been
conducting further evaluation research to assess this link.

Silvia Hurtado Diverse Democracy Study. The OHR Director was asked this year to serve on the
UMass campus team for this ten-campus, three-year, longitudinal study that assesses the impact of
diversity practices on all students. More specifically, this study examines the impact of diversity
practices on the cultural competence of students and on their potential ability to function in a
democratic society. The OHR Director’s role is to coordinate the collection of information on
campus practices that contribute to the cultural and civic competence of undergraduates. Participation
on this team also involves attending periodic conferences with representatives from the other nine
campuses.

Human Relations Council. Comprised of representatives from each area of campus administration,
this group is convened by the OHR director every other Wednesday morning throughout the
academic year. Its primary purpose is to promote lateral sharing of management-level information
about human relations issues, to discuss specific incidents and identify opportunities to develop
coordinated and proactive campus actions prior to escalation to a crisis.

Ongoing evaluation research regarding campus climate. With the completion of triennial Project
Pulse Surveys of undergraduates for Racial and Ethic Issues, in spring 1999 the OHR Director
worked closely with SARIS staff to prepare the “decade” report. The decade report compares
current surveys with two previous ones in order to examine changes in campus climate during the
1990's. These campus climate surveys are posted on the SARIS web site and gained national
recognition this past year when they were included in the University of Maryland’s Diversity Web
listings of helpful institutional practices regarding diversity.

Racial and Ethnic Identity Education Program. OHR provided financial and logistical support to
three pilot projects aimed at exploring issues of racial and ethnic identity in for-credit courses in
residential settings:
        - A one semester course aimed at increasing the retention rate of undergraduate men of
             color
        - A first-year entry seminar for undergraduates in Gorman, a residence hall where one-
             third of the students are students of color
        - A class in which students develop presentations in multiracial teams to present to their
             peers in the residence halls as part of regular educational programming

Specific Activities planned for 2000-01:

      Continue as a member of the CDSJ Team and its Coordinating Group; continue to provide
       administrative, communications and budgetary support for the second year of the New



                                                  69
       Approach Project as it creates additional teams in each executive area; serve as a member of
       the Chancellor’s Area Team for the New Approach Project

      Continue as a member of the Hurtado study team and serve as the coordinator for collecting
       information about campus practices.

      Serve as the campus liaison for the Harvard Campus Ethnic Diversity Research Project,
       another effort to examine diversity practices at 140 colleges and universities; also serve on
       the national advisory board for this study.

      Continue efforts to create tone-setting events and programs regarding issues of community,
       diversity and social justice.

      Continue efforts aimed at increasing the quality and quantity of Learning Communities for
       first-year students, including grant-writing efforts that would extend this powerful retention-
       enhancing program to serve students of color and also integrate Learning Communities with
       the new General Education Curriculum. These initiatives included creating a synergistic
       union between the Multicultural Advisory Board and the Commission on Civility in Human
       Relations; reflecting the diversity of Massachusetts college-bound seniors in the incoming
       first year class; participating in American Council on Education leadership development
       programs and fulfilling the institution’s objectives in gender equity in intercollegiate
       athletics.

      Collaborate with SARIS to review the results of the 1999 GLBT Issues Survey, re-administer
       and interpret the fall 2000 Anti-Semitism Project Pulse Survey, and develop “decade” reports
       examining changes in campus climate during the 1990's.

      Work with the Provost’s Office, Training and Development and other departments to
       improve the information, resources and support to academic heads and chairs necessary for
       them to manage and respond effectively to issues of community, diversity and social justice,
       including incidents of illegal discrimination and harassment.

      Continue providing administrative support for the Chancellor’s Counsel on Community,
       Diversity and social justice and its several committees.

      Continue collaboration with the Psychology, Sociology, Education and other departments and
       schools in creating research opportunities for graduate students aimed at assessing campus
       climate and specific interventions designed to improve it.

                                          Ombuds Office

       Established by the Board of Trustees in 1969, the Ombuds Office opened in 1971. Mandated
to "assist any petitioner in the procurement of a just settlement of a grievance,"
 the Ombuds Office staff works to ensure fair and equitable treatment in matters of concern or
grievance. Depending on the problem, the Ombuds Office mediates disputes, facilitates
communication, investigates claims of unfair treatment or erroneous procedure, listens, advises, and
makes recommendations. Initial inquiries are treated confidentially and no action is taken or names
used without the permission of the complainant. The Ombuds Office provides information about and



                                                 70
referral to grievance procedures; often the Office is utilized as an alternative to existing formal
grievance procedures. The Ombuds Office also manages the existing academic grievance and
academic honesty procedures.
         The Ombuds Office has a role in providing advice and assistance to members of the
University community concerned with possible violations of the University's Sexual Harassment
Policy. The Office distributes the brochure Stopping Sexual Harassment and provides informational
workshops on sexual harassment for University departments and programs upon request. It will
continue to work with other members of the campus community to examine ways to improve the
current Sexual Harassment Policy. In addition, the Ombuds Office is committed to various
initiatives to deal with other forms of harassment and violence in the various workplaces.


                              Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

                                               Provost

        I am pleased to report that last year the University successfully recruited thirty-six new
faculty. As always, departments were encouraged to search for new hires with Affirmative Action
obligations as a priority. The results of recruitments are as follows:
                                         Caucasian Males:              12
                                         Caucasian Females:            13
                                         Minority Males:                7
                                         Minority Females:              4

                                 College of Humanities & Fine Arts

        In your memo you ask us for reports of the activities of the College regarding recruitment and
retention of minority and women faculty and staff during 1999-2000. I believe, once again, our
College has excelled in our effort to recruit and maintain minority and women faculty, and hope the
following illustrates the point.

Hiring

       Last year, the College recruited in Asian Languages and Literatures, Classics, English, Judaic
and Near Eastern Studies, and Philosophy. Of the six full-time faculty members appointed last year
two were women, and one was a member of a minority group. In the College, six out of eighteen of
the Department Heads or Chairs are women, and three are members of a minority group. Of three
counter-offers made to faculty, two were to females or minority group members. The College has
always tried to appoint and retain such faculty and staff and will continue to do so.

Discretionary Funds

        Of the monies available to departments which Deans can use as discretionary money to aid
faculty and programs in teaching and scholarship, the overwhelming percentage went to women and
minorities in FY00.
        Of nearly $262,788 spent on TA’s and Fellows from this office, $201,000 went to minorities
(includes support for minorities in Afro-Am, Spanish & Portuguese, and Theater). Of approximately
$45,600 which went as aid to faculty for teaching and scholarship, all went either to minority or



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women faculty members, or to programs with a heavy emphasis on multicultural programming (Art,
Asian Studies, English, German, Music, Spanish, and Women’s Studies).

Individual Items

       Teaching assistantships were once again awarded for specific multicultural projects, foreign
exchange programs and the Multicultural Film Festival.

                             College of Natural Sciences & Mathematics

         During the 1999-2000 academic year, our five tenure-track hires included one woman and
one minority. A woman joined the Department of Mathematics and Statistics as an assistant
professor. She is a statistician whose main research interests include the application of Bayesian
statistical methods in artificial intelligence and machine learning, and reasoning under uncertainty.
The Astronomy department hired an assistant professor who is a minority; this individual has been
recognized as one of the most promising young American radio astronomers.
         A major new effort to improve the recruitment and retention of women in science and
technology has been launched during this time period, called TWIST: Trends for Women in Science
and Technology. TWIST is:

 -   an open forum for faculty, staff, and students to discuss issues related to women being attracted
     to and staying in technical disciplines;
 -   an organizing body for events that address these issues;
 -   a catalyst and advisory body for grass roots programs to attract and support women in these
     disciplines;
 -   a vehicle for allowing the good things on this campus to shine, in the context of women in the
     technical disciplines.

        Founded by staff and faculty in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and the
College of Engineering, the focus of TWIST will be the UMass Amherst campus, although the events
will be promoted to the Five College Community.
        TWIST events planned for 2000-2001 include supporting a visit and talk by Kathie Olsen,
top-ranking female scientist at NASA (October 5, 2000). The group also won outside support for a
CRA-W/Lucent Distinguished Lecture, which will take place November 16, 2000. An invited
woman speaker will discuss strategies for succeeding in the male-dominated fields of science, math,
engineering and technology. The group also sponsors a variety of informal events such as a brown-
bag lunch to foster discussion of issues related to recruitment and retention of women scientists.
        The College is working at all levels to create the best possible learning environment for all of
our students. The Northeast Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate at the University
of Massachusetts recruits, supports and mentors underrepresented minority students interested in
academic careers so they may pursue Ph.D.s in science, mathematics and engineering. This major
intercollege grant (from the National Science Foundation, $2.5M over 5 years) is spearheaded by
CNSM faculty Peter Hepler (Biology), Sandra Petersen (Biology), and Donald St. Mary
(Mathematics and Statistics). Ties with minority feeder schools throughout New England have been
developed, and the first students in the program worked in labs in the College during the summer of
2000.
        Faculty from the cross-disciplinary program in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
received a $255,000 award from a new National Science Foundation program, Undergraduate
Mentoring in Environmental Biology (UMEB). The goal of the UMEB program is to prepare


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students, particularly those from underrepresented groups, for careers in environmental biology.
Because of the proven effectiveness of long-term mentoring, students will be recruited early in their
careers and will remain in the program until they finish their bachelor’s degrees. Entering UMEB
Scholars will be a mix of UMass freshmen or sophomores and community college students (Holyoke,
Roxbury, Springfield Technical, and Greenfield). Community college students will then transfer to a
Five College program to finish their degree. At least half of these students will be African-American
or Hispanic. Matching funds key to the success of the proposal came from the College of Natural
Sciences and Mathematics.
The local chapter of Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) runs its website through
Mathematics and Statistics, and its email through the Chemistry Department, where the current
president is a graduate student. The purpose of WISE is to create an interdepartmental forum in
which women can get to know each other primarily as scientists. Through bi-monthly social
gatherings and seminars by invited speakers from UMass and beyond, this interdisciplinary network
also explores women's issues such as climate in the workplace, balancing career and family, and
recruitment and retention of women in science. Future goals include implementation of mentoring
programs to form links between the undergraduate, graduate and professional level of women in
science.

                             College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

         While all departments in the college continue to support the recruitment and retention of
  minority and women faculty and staff whenever possible, here are some specific examples relevant
  to the Recruitment and Retention Report for 99-00/00-01:
         The Department of Anthropology was successful in hiring two female Assistant Professors.
  The department is also working closely with the Graduate School to recruit and retain more
  ALANA students. In the fall of 1999, out of 81 graduate students, 54 were female, sixteen were
  ALANA students, and eight were international students.
         The Department of Communication once again made critical contributions to
  multiculturalism and diversity. This past year the department hired a female Mexican-American
  Assistant Professor. The faculty of eighteen now includes eight women and ten men (the ratio will
  be equal after next year), and four members of minority groups.
         The Economics department hired two female faculty members and was able to obtain
  opportunity fellowships for three minority graduate students in the Ph.D. program. They also
  recruited an African-American to their alumni board. The board plays a very important role in the
  department, providing internships and shadowing opportunities to students as well as general career
  guidance and mentoring.
         The Political Science department hired an Asian female Assistant Professor, and as part of
the effort to expand the number of minority students in the Public Policy and Administration
Program, the Program has become a member of the Public Policy and International Affairs
Fellowship Program (PPIA). Through PPIA, the Master's Program in Public Policy and
Administration has access to a pool of highly qualified minority students who are interested in
pursuing careers in public policy and administration.

                                      College of Engineering

        The College of Engineering continues to have success in recruiting women to the faculty. Of
the five faculty hired for 2000-01, two were women. One was hired in Chemical Engineering and the
other in Electrical & Computer Engineering. As a result of these hires, this fall women make up
12.5% of the teaching faculty. We have also hired two African Americans to staff our Minority


                                                 73
Engineering Program, a program whose emphasis is the recruitment and retention of
underrepresented minorities. In 2000-01 we plan to search for thirteen new faculty, and will continue
to make every effort to recruit more minorities as well as women.
         With regard to graduate student recruitment, the Chemical Engineering department continued
to recruit from traditionally black colleges and universities in an attempt to attract qualified African
American graduate students. A graduate student in Chemical Engineering is this year's recipient of
the General Electric Fellowship, which was established in the College to support a minority student
in his or her graduate studies. The Civil & Environmental Engineering department has an NSF grant
which provides research experience for undergraduates. The departments of Electrical & Computer
Engineering and Mechanical & Industrial Engineering continue to identify potential minority
applicants from a national pool through the National Physical Science Consortium, the ETS Minority
Locator Service, and other sources provided through the UMass Office of Graduate Student
Recruitment and Retention.
         The College was the prime mover in applying to the GEM Consortium last year. The
Consortium provides graduate fellowships to underrepresented students and students can only receive
funding if they attend ad GEM member institution. The University was accepted for membership,
and we have a minority graduate student in Chemical Engineering who is now receiving funding.
         The College will also benefit from a five-year grant from the Minority Graduate Education
Initiative of the NSF. The grant will fund $2.5 million towards the development of a program to
increase the number of underrepresented students enrolled in doctoral programs in science, math, and
engineering.
         In addition to the graduate fellowships described above, the College also receives minority
undergraduate scholarships from several companies, including GE, EDS, and Raytheon.
Furthermore, the College of Engineering, along with the College of Natural Sciences and
Mathematics, was awarded a $220,000 NSF grant in January 2000 to assist "economically
disadvantaged" students. The two colleges geared the proposal to assist students transferring into
engineering, mathematics and computer science majors from community colleges. Fifty scholarships
in the amount of $2500 each will be awarded to students this year (2000-01) and next year (2001-02).
Besides financial assistance, the students receiving these scholarships also receive support in a
variety of ways including a one-credit seminar designed to aid in their retention.
         The College has two long-term programs in place concerned with the retention and
recruitment of minorities and women: the Minority Engineering Program and the Women in
Engineering Program. Hamilton Standards supports a summer research program for both women and
minorities. This year seven students participated; three of them were women.

                               College of Food and Natural Resources

        I am pleased to report on the recruitment and retention of minority and women faculty in the
College of Food and Natural Resources for FY00, as well as plans for FY01.
        We had only two faculty hires during 1999-2000. A White male was hired at the assistant
professor level in a planned search, and a White female was hired at the lecturer level in a search to
replace a lecturer who resigned at the end of the fall semester. We also hired a White female
professional staff assistant.
        Of our five tenure and promotion cases, two were White females and two were Asian males.
Of our five promotions to full professor, one was a White female.
        I am concerned that with such limited faculty recruiting last FY, we were unable to make
significant strides in adding to College diversity. We do anticipate searching for a half dozen faculty
hires for FY01, and so with aggressive attention to generating a diverse candidate pool, I am in hopes
that we can make progress toward our goal of a more balanced College.


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                                        School of Education

        The School of Education continues its efforts to act on its commitment to recruit, hire, and
retain a strong, diverse body of faculty, students, and staff. The School’s personnel profile
(regarding women and racial and ethnic minorities) has slightly improved over the past several years.
Of the 73 faculty in the School of Education during 1999-2000, there were 34 women (including 5
temporary faculty appointments) and 17 racial minorities (9 women). The School of Education hired
three tenure-track faculty in Fall 1999: one female Assistant Professor in the area of Policy Studies;
one male Assistant Professor in the area of Education Finance; one male Assistant Professor in
Leadership and Policy. One female Visiting Assistant Professor in the area of Adult Literacy (one-
year appointment); one African American male Lecturer in the area of English as a Second Language
(one-year appointment); and one female Assistant Professor in the areas of Early Childhood and
Elementary Education (one-year appointment) were also hired for the 1999-2000 academic year. In
addition, the School successfully completed negotiations for two male and two female tenure-track
faculty hires (which includes three replacement positions) for Fall 2000: one female Assistant
Professor in the area of Educational Technology; one female Assistant Professor in the area of
Elementary Education; one male Assistant Professor (African American) in the area of School
Counselor Education; and one male Assistant Professor (Latino) in the area of Program and Policy
Evaluation. We expect to conduct formal searches for three tenure-track faculty replacements next
year, which will actively pursue candidates from underrepresented groups.
        With regard to staff recruitment in the School of Education, one female professional staff
position was hired as Coordinator of General Physical Education in our Department of Teacher
Education and Curriculum Studies; and one male professional staff position was hired as Research
Coordinator in the Center for Education Policy within the Department of Educational Policy,
Research and Administration.
        The School of Education recognizes the need to increase minority representation of educators
to teach the diverse population in our schools and communities and is committed to increasing the
number of minority students pursuing undergraduate degree programs in elementary, secondary, and
early childhood education. Our efforts have been geared toward increasing retention rates of
minority students pursuing a career in Education and increasing efforts to interest minorities in
becoming professional educators. In a profession where minority interest has been relatively low, the
challenge to recruit and retain strong undergraduate and graduate students remains constant.
        The School of Education has made special efforts in developing outreach programs to serve
minority communities and to strengthen our recruitment of students of color:

•      A concurrent admission agreement was developed with Springfield Technical Community
       College. Our two institutions coordinate a program for the transfer of Liberal Arts students
       to the School of Education. Project S.T.R.I.D.E. (Springfield Teacher Recruitment to
       Increase Diversity in Education) is a collaborative program of the University of
       Massachusetts Amherst, Springfield Technical Community College, and the Springfield
       Public Schools. It was designed to provide access to teacher certification programs for
       individuals in Springfield and to increase the diversity of the public school workforce in
       Massachusetts. Undergraduate students enrolled in the program complete a two-year
       Associate’s degree at Springfield Technical Community College and transfer to the
       University of Massachusetts Amherst to finish a Bachelor of Arts degree and teacher
       certification program in Early Childhood, Elementary or Secondary Education. It is our hope
       this model will be used to develop other admission agreements with other two-year colleges.




                                                 75
•      180 Days in Springfield is an urban school-based route to earning a Master’s degree in
       Education (M.Ed.) and teacher certification in approximately twelve months. This School of
       Education project features two semesters of integrated teaching and graduate study on-site in
       a Springfield public middle or high school (Chestnut Accelerated Middle School and Central
       High School). Additional summer coursework enables candidates to complete the M.Ed.
       Participants earn Provisional Certification in their subject field at the middle or high school
       level, are eligible for Inter-State Compact Certification reciprocity, and meet requirements
       for the M.Ed.

        In the spring of 1999, the School of Education Scholarships and Awards Program was
established to benefit School of Education students. This program is made possible through the
generous support of alumni/ae and friends of the School who have made annual or endowed gifts to
provide scholarship support to our students. Several scholarships/awards (The Camby Scholarship,
The Janice Camby Endowed Scholarship, The Ennis William Cosby Leadership Award, and The
School of Education Diversity Fund) are specifically identified for underrepresented populations,
students of economically disadvantaged backgrounds or students with learning differences. Seven
scholarships/awards were given during the 1999/2000 academic year. In addition, each year, the
School of Education uses discretionary funds to support Minority Student Assistantships. Two and
one-half assistantships were allocated to Project S.T.R.I.D.E.
        A new tenure-track faculty member (African-American male) was allocated funds for
graduate student support to assist with research efforts. Four tenure-track female faculty members
(one Asian and three Caucasian) and four tenure-track male faculty members (one African American
and three Caucasian) received double the faculty allocation for conference/research travel. Further,
two non-tenure track female (Latina and Caucasian) faculty members and one tenured female
(Hispanic) faculty member were allocated additional funds for research and for conference/research
travel.
        The School of Education remains committed to providing access to quality education in a
multicultural learning environment. Toward that end, we are currently working to improve our
faculty and student diversity and actively recruiting students for our Teacher Preparation Programs.
Our commitment to the promotion of such diverse perspectives will continue to enrich the quality of
discourse within the School, on this campus, and throughout the community and Commonwealth.

                                       School of Management

         During academic year 1999-2000, the Isenberg School of Management did not recruit any
new tenure system faculty. We did not replace one non-tenure system faculty member, a Caucasian
male, who retired. For the current academic year we replaced one non-tenure system faculty
member, a Caucasian male, with a Caucasian male. We expect to recruit one tenure system faculty
member in 2000-2001.
         In the summer of 2000, for the third consecutive year, the School conducted a program to
interest high school students of color in attending UMass and the Isenberg School. Twenty students
about to enter their second and third years of high school attended a one-week program at the school.
         There was one professional position converted to full-time, and one new professional
position added. Both were filled by Caucasian females.

                                          School of Nursing

       This past year our efforts at supporting research activities of diverse faculty included:



                                                  76
          Sponsoring a booth at the Massachusetts Chapter of the National Association of Hispanic
           Nurses Conference in March in which two of our faculty attended.
          Sponsoring a faculty member to meet with a nurse consultant at the Department of Health
           & Human Services in Washington DC in July, regarding a Nursing Diversity Grant.
          Sponsoring a faculty member to attend the UPENN Summer Nursing Research
           Conference in May.
          Sponsoring a faculty member to attend a grant writing workshop in Washington DC in
           January 2000.
          The School of Nursing sponsored the First Annual ALANA Students Dinner in May, and
           key faculty and staff were invited to attend.

        The School of Nursing (SON) currently has a tenure track faculty search open for four
positions. The advertisement specifically encourages women and minorities to apply. The ad was
placed in the following publications: The Nurse Practitioner, Journal of School Health, American
Journal of Public Health, Minority Nurse Newsletter, Journal of National Black Nurses Association,
The Chronicle of Higher Education, and Archives of Psychiatric Nursing.
        The School of Nursing has an active Committee on Diversity, which provides leadership and
strategies for implementing programs that support SON diversity. This committee includes both
students and faculty. Highlights from the 1999-2000 report include:

          Developed First Annual School of Nursing Diversity Award.
          Obtained 100 free subscriptions to the Minority Nurse journal.
          Sponsored 23 students to attend the Massachusetts Chapter of the National Association of
           Hispanic Nurses Conference.
          Began collecting and disseminating information on scholarships, mentoring and
           internships for students.
          Reviewed SON admission process and implications for ALANA students.
          Developed a resource booklet with information on scholarships, organizations and
           publications for minority students.

                            School of Public Health and Health Sciences

        The School of Public Health and Health Sciences had fewer hiring opportunities this year;
however, two new faculty positions were filled. An African American woman was hired as a lecturer
in the Department of Communication Disorders beginning September 2000. She comes to us from
the University of California Los Angeles. There is a new female assistant professor in the
Department of Nutrition. She has a strong record of research and practice in nutrition education, and
her work will complement the ongoing programs of the department and school.
        As in the past, our commitment to increasing diversity within the school remains high.

                                         University Library

Accomplishments and Progress

      Under the leadership of the Diversity and Outreach Committees (with membership from both
       professional and nonprofessional job families), the Library continued to educate staff about
       diversity issues, and in making the Library welcoming and accessible to a diverse
       community.


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      Created and posted a welcome sign in multiple languages in the front lobby of DuBois.

      Assisted in getting two handicapped parking spaces for library patrons.

      Received an $8000 federally funded Connecting Cultures Library Services and Technology
       Act grant through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. As a result the
       Library sponsored five events which advanced the multicultural work of the Library. The
       events were:

          Telling our Story: Oral History in the African American Community
          Pleneros de la Salud
          Being True to Your Voice and Breaking Through the Information Divide
          ALANA Library Career Dinner
          Multilingual Poetry Fest

      With funds from a grant from The Chancellor's Counsel on Community, Diversity and Social
       Justice produced Spanish and Chinese translations of several selected library handouts.

      With funds from a grant from The Chancellor's Counsel on Community, Diversity and Social
       Justice a member of the Library staff conducted a "roving educator series" of 24 workshops
       on learning disabilities for various groups on campus including Physical Plant, the Ombud's
       Office, Whitmore Administrative Office, and others.

      Sent two representatives from the Library to the Big 12 Plus Libraries "Diversity Now"
       conference in Austin, Texas. At the conference, the library's representatives learned about
       minority mentoring programs, minority recruitment techniques, and what other libraries are
       doing to recruit and retain minority librarians.

      Developed a diversity statement to include in job advertisements for professional positions.

Recruitment and Retention of Staff

                  New Hires                                 Promotions/Reclassifications

Women                         12                  Women                                    13
People of Color                3                  People of Color                           2
People with Disabilities       0                  People with Disabilities                  0

Plans for Coming Year

      The Outreach Committee will continue with an ambitious calendar of events including
       several targeted to the Library's multicultural community. These include:

          Bambazo (November 2000) - Puerto Rican music history and performance workshop
          Asian American Event (TBA)
          ALANA Career Night (March 2001) - recruitment event to attract students to Library
           careers



                                                 78
      Continue educational efforts by inviting the Association of Research Libraries' Director of
       Diversity Initiatives to the Library; investigate a language barrier workshop with the
       International Center, and an ally-building workshop for Library staff.

      Conduct Customer Service Workshops, including a multicultural communications module,
       during summer 2001 for Library staff.

      Conduct a workshop on the Professional Librarian search process to educate staff and learn
       how staff can assist in recruiting minority candidates.


                               Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs

        The Student Affairs executive area comprises three clusters -- Enrollment Services, Student
Affairs, and Campus Activities, each headed by an assistant or associate Vice Chancellor. Several
departments report directly to the Vice Chancellor, in effect forming a fourth, smaller cluster. In
support of the University's goal to become a multicultural campus, Student Affairs provides a
number of services and programs which further the cause of affirmative action for both employees
and students. The following paragraphs serve only to highlight the range and variety of activities,
which occurred this year.
        This year, Student Affairs continued to participate in the campus wide effort to initiate
systemic change in the campus racial climate. This project began with the Counsel on Community
Diversity and Social Justice. Student Affairs is active in the campus wide group and has formed a
Student Affairs subcommittee.
        In the area of employment, the executive area actively supports campus affirmative action
goals and policies. In Housing Services and Public Safety, both of which employ large numbers of
people in entry-level positions and where there is frequent turnover, we have been able to make and
maintain over time gains in the representation of minorities and women. The unusual diversity of the
staff in Residence Life contributes to students’ sense of the campus commitment to being a
multicultural community.
        Housing Services and Public Safety continue to require diversity training for their employees
on an on-going basis. Other agencies in Student Affairs provide such training on a more ad hoc
basis. This year, as in other years, various departments have sponsored and/or presented employee
workshops and seminars focusing on issues such as racism, sexism, sexual harassment, anti-
Semitism, and ableism, as well as encouraged employees to take advantage of training offered
through the Staff Training and Development Office.
        Campus Activities provides space and support for a great number of student run and student
sponsored programs. The Student Government Association provides financial assistance to student
groups for the programming, much of which adds to the diversity of our multicultural campus.
During the 1999-2000 academic year, Registered Student Organizations sponsored more than 100
ethnic/cultural events with the assistance of Campus Activities. These included the collaboration of
the Black Student Union with Auxiliary Services and University Advancement to bring Julian Bond
to campus, the inclusion of Ruben Blades as part of the Something Every Friday series, the Magic
Triangle Jazz series sponsored by WMUA, the Holiday Craft Fair that includes an extremely
culturally diverse group of artisans, several diverse productions of UMass Theater, the Students of
Color Leadership conference sponsored by the Office of ALANA Affairs in October, the Annual
Kwanzaa Celebration sponsored by the Malcolm X Center, the Multicultural Campus Calendar, the




                                                 79
Annual Black History Month Social, Asian Night sponsored by the Asian American Student
Association, and many others.
         Students and staff in Campus Activities again worked together to put on the Student
Leadership Conference for the leaders of student organizations. This is designed to develop skills in
conflict resolution, time management, team building, decision making and organizational
development. The Student Government Association actively supports the campus commitment to
diversity through its financial support of the African Student Association, AHORA, Asian American
Student Association, Black Student Union, Boricuas Unidos, Cape Verdean Student Alliance, Casa
Dominicana, Haitian American Student Association, Hillel, and the Korean Student Association in
addition to support for individual programs. The Office of ALANA Affairs sponsors the ALANA
Lecture Series increasing awareness of the University community. As part of the training that it
offers to its student legal assistants every Friday, the Student Legal Services Office this year included
a review of the Rodney King case, and a showing of “Skin Deep” followed by a discussion of its
relationship to both affirmative action and the climate on this campus.
         Campus Activities also supports the seven cultural centers on campus -- the Latin American
Cultural Center, the Dr. Josephine White Eagle Cultural Center, the Anacoana Cultural Center, the
Malcolm X Center, the Martin Luther King Jr. Cultural Center, the United Asian Cultural Center and
the Sylvan Cultural Center. These centers provide community outreach, cultural celebration and
programming, as well as advocacy. For example, the work of the Dr. Josephine White Eagle Center
this past year included sponsoring the annual welcome dinner, Nikkomo Celebration and UMass
Powwow; community outreach trips to native communities in New England; sponsoring traditional
crafts instruction; providing advocacy, tutoring and mentoring for students; assisting with course and
curriculum development for Native Studies classes; consulting for non-Native faculty who are
teaching Native courses; assisting the Native American Student Support Services (NASSS) with
Native freshman orientation; and working to co-sponsor with NASSS a writing workshop for
students. Although the focus of the Center is on Native American students, the Center also serves
other students of color, low income students, and other students who may be taking Native Studies
courses or who happen to have developed a relationship with the community. Over the years, the
Center has provided services to African, Caribbean, Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Lebanese, Jewish,
GLBT, German and white American students.
         Housing Services, part of the Student Affairs cluster, provides a particularly noteworthy and
comprehensive training program for its employees. All new staff attend a four-hour diversity
training workshop and a workshop on sexual harassment. This year a Wellness Conference for
employees included a classism workshop.
         Also a part of Housing Services, Residence Life had as a central goal, “To continue to
incorporate multiculturalism into the work and focus of the Residence Life Department.” Toward
that end, Residence Life continued to hire quality diverse staff, reviewed the statement on
multiculturalism for Residence Life, provided an orientation to diversity for all new Residence
Directors, Assistant Residence Directors, and Resident Assistants during August Training, offered
educational programs focused on multicultural issues to students through campus, and provided
support and space for students through the Special Interest Residential Programs such as Nuance
(multicultural), Harambee (African heritage), Kanonhsesne (Native American), Asian/Asian
American, and Two in Twenty (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and allies). Among other
programs, Residence Life also offered specific sessions on ableism and cross-cultural
communication.
         Each year, Residence Life also sponsors many programs designed specifically for students
that take place within the residence halls. This past year, they included a number of programs that
engaged students in discussion of issues of diversity. Residence Life helped sponsor celebrations in
recognition of various religious holidays and workshops to promote the awareness of women’s issues


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such as breast cancer and self-defense. Overall, there were more than 200 multicultural awareness
programs with presenters and/or discussions and over 2,800 more passive programs involving poster
campaigns, bulletin board displays and the like.
        Other departments in the Student Affairs cluster have also contributed a number of programs
and activities. Disability Services staff have presented workshops on the Americans with Disabilities
Act through Staff Training and Development and work with individual departments upon request.
This past year, Disability Services sponsored a support group for women of color with disabilities
called “We Are Able” and worked with the Department of Environmental Management on a biking
program for people with disabilities. Veterans Assistance and Counseling Services continues to
provide outreach on veterans' services and ongoing liaison with Veteran Agents in neighboring
communities and Veterans Administration Medical Centers. The Stonewall Center creates visibility
and services for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community. The Center provides a
variety of services and programs, including: a library, a monthly cafe series, a weekly seminar,
information and referral, a speaker’s bureau, and other educational and cultural programs.
        Everywoman's Center continues to provide many services and advocacy programs for both
University and community women. Everywoman's Center staff made presentations on campus, in
local schools, and in the community on sexual assault, relationship violence, economic issues for
women, and many other topics. Two initiatives this past year were the Multilingual Volunteer
Interpreter’s Project that provides interpreting services for victims/survivors of sexual assault whose
primary language is not English and the Women of Color Leadership Network (WOCLN) that
provides support and advocacy for woman of color. WOCLN’s services and programs include a
reception, retreat, a mentor series and 14-week leadership training for undergraduate students. This
past year, EWC also offered on-going support groups for survivors of sexual assault, survivors of
child sexual assault, women with bipolar disorder and adult daughters of alcoholics. The Center also
offered sexual assault and violence prevention workshops specifically designed for diverse
audiences, including communities of color, the GLBT community, males, people with disabilities
and teens.
        In the Fall semester 1999, a new interdisciplinary course on the History of Black/Jewish
Relations in the United States was offered thanks to the combined efforts of the Office of Jewish
Affairs and the Office of Human Relations. Also during fall of 1999, a major exhibition on the
history of African Americans and American Jews, entitled “Bridges and Boundaries” was shown in
the University Gallery. This exhibition is a collaboration between The Jewish Museum (New York)
and the NAACP and portrays the history of these two social groups through paintings, photographs,
posters, sculpture and other media. The Office of Jewish Affairs was the principal organizer of this
exhibition. The second annual multicultural Freedom Seder was held in April 2000. The Black
Student Union, the Jewish Student Union and the Office of Jewish Affairs collaborated on this Seder
that was attended by more than 70 Jewish and ALANA students. The Office of Jewish Affairs and
the Muslim Students Association continued an ongoing collaboration to co-facilitate an annual
workshop on “Muslim and Jewish Holidays,” which is offered through Training and Development.
In addition, the Office of Jewish Affairs works hard to reach out to diverse communities, often by co-
sponsoring educational programs such as “Kindle the Fire,” an interfaith dialogue on spirituality.
        University Health Services continues to work to increase access and outreach to diverse
communities. This year, 40 people attended eight sessions of supervisory training. Four of these
sessions focused on various aspects of enhanced supervision in a diverse environment. Mental
Health Services continues to attempt to be culturally competent in its clinical care and to look at
ways to improve the accessibility of services.
        In the Enrollment Services cluster this year, Admissions began to use the new admissions
procedure that is consistent with current legal guidelines on affirmative action. In order to support
effective recruitment and enhance the population of targeted students in Western Massachusetts who


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apply for admission under this new policy, Enrollment Services created a new position, Outreach
Coordinator. This position will enable the University to expand its outreach efforts beyond those
formerly undertaken by the SUMMA program in collaboration with the Committee for the Collegiate
Education of Black and other Minority Students (CCEBMS), the Bilingual Collegiate Program
(BCP), the United Asia Learning Resource Center (UALRC), and Native American Student Support
(NASS). The Talent Search Program and other outreach efforts by the BCP, CCEBMS, UALRC,
and NASS will complement the efforts of the Outreach Coordinator. All of these efforts increase the
representation of students of color in our student body. These support programs offer a broad
spectrum of academic support and advocacy that aids the campus in recruiting, retaining, and
graduating students of color. The programs also provide tutorials, academic and general advising
and the opportunity for a small group of each entering class to gain the skills they need to master the
four-year course of study. This past year, UALRC reached out to the Hmong community. The
Hmong are the tribal people of Laos who supported the United States during the Vietnamese War
and were afterwards badly persecuted by the Khmer Rouge for this role. UALRC was successful in
recruiting five students from this population and plans to continue this effort next year, particularly in
Springfield and Fitchburg.
        The New Students Program, part of the Enrollment Services cluster, continues to include a
pro-active program to increase awareness of the University’s multicultural and diverse community
for incoming first-year students. The program includes a short video of candid interviews with
current students discussing their personal experiences with the issues of stereotypes and ethnicity; a
diversity awareness seminar offered twice during each of the ten two-day sessions; and a variety of
program activities designed acquaint new students with the diversity of the entering class. Also part
of Enrollment Services, the Career Network’s recruiting programs have helped to ensure that
students have equal access to internships, paid co-ops and permanent jobs.
        For a number of years, the Student Affairs Research and Information Systems Office has
conducted telephone surveys of students in an effort to establish the kind and frequency of different
types of harassment. During this year, the surveys conducted included, among others, those looking
at racial and ethnic issues for our students, both graduate and undergraduate. For many years, the
Cycles Survey has gathered data from students at each of the Five Colleges. This year responses
were broken out by racial groups to improve understanding of the data collected.


                           Vice Chancellor for Administration & Finance

        The executive area of Administration and Finance is comprised of eight divisions which
provide the internal and external constituents of the University of Massachusetts Amherst with the
highest quality services in the most supportive and cost effective manner. In contributing to fulfilling
the campus' mission of Teaching, Research and Public Service, Administration and Finance is
responsible for the development, stewardship and enhancement of its human, fiscal, environmental,
and physical resources. In the fulfillment of its responsibilities, the executive area supports the
University's commitment to diversity and multiculturalism through activities that foster a climate
which respects differences, provide for the training of staff, actively support Affirmative Action,
sponsor activities which celebrate different cultures, and assist minority and women owned
businesses through the procurement process.
        Divisions in Administration and Finance continue to focus attention on multiculturalism and
issues of diversity in their recruitment efforts by insuring that position advertisements reach a broad,
varied audience and questioning prospective candidates regarding their understanding of and
commitment to Affirmative Action and diversity.



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         The Apprenticeship Program in the Physical Plant provides opportunities for advancement in
the trades to traditionally under-represented populations. This program provides training for under-
represented employees to become journeymen/women in the construction trades. There are currently
three apprentices in the programs and an additional position is currently in the selection process.
Two additional positions have recently been approved for filling.
         The formal linkages between Auxiliary Services and the minority programs (CCEBMS, BCP,
and ALANA) created to improve the diversity of the student workforce continue to show results.
Many minority students have been hired in the retail operations as well as administration and
Summer Conference Housing. In collaboration with the New Students Program, Auxiliary Services
continues to provide students who come through CCEBMS, BCP, ALANA or other minority
programs with information and assistance in gaining employment in Auxiliary Services. The result of
these efforts is reflected in the progress made in diversifying the student workforce in the Campus
Center/Student Union. Of the 86 students employed in the University Store, 33% are members of a
racial/ethnic minority group.
         The executive area continues its emphasis on supervisory/leadership development (SLD) by
insuring that anyone who supervises other employees attends some level of supervisory training.
Issues of diversity are integrated into the training discussions of communicating, team building,
mentoring and evaluating staff. So far over 175 A&F supervisory staff have attended SLD training.
         Diversity training continues at the division level both as an integrated topic in regular training
programs and as distinct workshops. In the coming year, Auxiliary Services will engage the Kaleil
Jamison Group to present diversity workshops in the division.
         Human Resources continues to provide strong support for the data needs associated with
Affirmative Action reporting requirements. The Payroll Office provides data entry and support for
the Employee Job Movement Monitoring (EJM) database, an historical adjunct to the Human
Resources Management Information Systems (HRMIS). EJM data is downloaded to the Criterion
Affirmative Action Management System (CAAMS) and is used by the Equal Opportunity and
Diversity Office to produce required affirmative action reports.
         The Training and Development Unit provides education, training, resources and development
opportunities for all faculty, staff and administrative professionals through three interrelated
programs: Employee Training, Organizational Development and Labor/Management Workplace
Education. It supports Affirmative Action efforts on the campus through providing a range of
supervisory leadership development opportunities with diversity as a major focus, offering a wide
range of classes and workshops dealing with identity and differences, working with individual
departments on diversity-related concerns and supporting and sponsoring special projects which help
promote an appreciation for diversity and social justice both on and off campus.
         During FY 00, fourteen workshops were offered in the Employee Training Program under the
Diversity in the Workplace category. A total of 37 employees attended these workshops. In addition
to offering diversity specific sessions, all workshop facilitators presenting programs are expected, no
matter what their topic, to incorporate diverse perspectives into their training.
         The Employee Training Program continues to develop the Supervisory Leadership
Development Program (SLDP) which provides supervisors and managers with a number of skills and
competencies at core, emergent and enhanced levels that support diversity and employee
development in a changing workplace. The SLDP also offers supervisors individual support in the
workplace, especially as they are challenged by issues of diversity. Coaching and consultation
services, a support network of supervisors to discuss common issues over lunch, and self-directed
learning packets on a variety of topics, including diversity in the workplace, are additional services
provided.
         The Organizational Development Program offers customized training to departments as well
as professional organizational development consultation services. Customized training specifically in


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the area of Workplace Diversity has been delivered to fourteen departments with a total of 259
employees participating in FY 00. In addition to training focused specifically on diversity topics, the
practice of integrating diversity education into all customized training continues.
         During this past year, the Organizational Development program began work with two client
organizations on comprehensive diversity audits. The audits include gathering information about how
effective these organizations have been in bringing diversity into the workplace. The audits will
gather information from staff, customers, student workers and other client organizations. Both
organizations intend to use the data to establish new organizational strategic plans or initiatives in the
diversity area.
         The Labor/Management Workplace Education Program (LMWEP) provides courses for
classified employees that enhance and develop English-fluency for non-native speakers, writing,
math, critical thinking, leadership, and communication skills and sponsors other labor/management
initiatives. LMWEP continued to give high priority to diversity initiatives in its classes, programs,
and services both on and off campus. Highlights for LMWEP during FY 00 include a very successful
continuation of the worker-initiated and produced WMUA radio program, UpFront, a weekly
program which focuses on social justice and diversity and a two-year research project to examine the
impact of the changing workplace and the effects of both immigration and welfare reform on adult
learners. During the spring, classified employees from the LMWEP Advanced Writing class read
from their latest publication, "Writing Our Lives: We Are More Than You See V".
         In the fall, LMWEP, in collaboration with many campus agencies, supported campus-wide
events that showcased words and pictures by survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault,
workplace violence, and gay-bashing (underwritten by an award from the Chancellor's Counsel on
Community, Diversity and Social Justice).
         The Procurement Departments on the Amherst, Boston and Worcester campuses have
participated in a Small Business and Minority/Woman-owned Business Purchasing Program as far
back as 1967. During FY 00, the Amherst Campus alone purchased approximately $5.2 million in
goods and services through this program through the public bid system and purchase orders issued by
University departments. The campuses also participate in “reverse trade shows”, which educate
small businesses on how to do business with large public institutions. Facilities Planning contracted
over $8 million in construction contracts through the public bidding process with minority/women
owned businesses.
         In addition to fulfilling its role as steward of the campus’ physical plant, the executive area
maintains its emphasis on meeting the needs of those members of the campus community who have
disabilities. For example, the Vice Chancellor continues to support the Architectural Access Board
and many A&F divisions are intimately involved in insuring that the physical accessibility needs of
campus constituents are being addressed in a planned manner.
         The Campus Center/Student Union Complex continues to act as a center for multicultural
activities on campus. Auxiliary Services assists in this process by providing facilities, multicultural
food offerings, and access to services and resources which enhance multiculturalism on the campus.
Linkages with campus departments such as Residential Arts have resulted in multicultural programs
in the Dining Halls for students throughout the academic year.
         Administration and Finance began the process of implementing the campus' new approach to
community, diversity and social justice (CDSJ) during this period. The A&F Council, a group of
around 40 of A&F's senior managers, met three times between May, 2000 and September, 2000 to
gain an understanding of CDSJ and determine how best to integrate the concepts, ideals and
strategies associated with CDSJ into the A&F organization. Linda Marchesani, Training and
Development, Bailey Jackson, Dean of the School of Education and Mark Chesler from Ramos
Associates, assisted the Council in its work.



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        The executive area of Administration and Finance remains committed to Affirmative Action
goals and to fostering a climate open to diversity. In the coming year, we will continue to stress the
education and training which addresses the issues of diversity and oppression and to provide
employment opportunities for women and minorities.


                          Vice Chancellor for University Advancement

         The primary mission of University Advancement (UA) is to develop private resources, both
philanthropic and volunteer, engage advocates, and enhances the image and identity of the
University. This mission guides the University’s fund raising activities, legislative and community
relations, alumnae programs, and communications and marketing efforts. UA staff work to ensure
effective communication between the University and its various constituencies. The Office of the
Vice Chancellor for University Advancement works with all University departments in the
institution’s drive toward creating a contemporary land grant university, strengthening research
capacity, increasing excellence in teaching and learning, and removing barriers to ensure access for
all to a quality higher education.
         Ongoing efforts are made to recruit women and minorities for all job postings within the
division. All advertisements for professional positions within University Advancement are sent to
the Affirmative Action offices at the other four campuses and the other state universities in New
England as well as the employment offices at a select group of predominantly black colleges.

University News Office

         The News Office works closely with national, state, and local media to provide accurate,
positive coverage of the University’s goals, achievements, and realities on a wide range of topics,
including affirmative action and equal opportunity.
         During the past year, the News Office wrote and disseminated many press releases, helped
arrange press coverage, and advised faculty, staff, and students on various initiatives that led to
stories in the media portraying the campus’s commitment to multiculturalism and diversity.
         A few of these efforts are listed below:

   Handled extensive media coverage of campus security issues, highlighting many initiatives
    aimed at educating the campus community about preventing sexual violence.

   Placement of opinion pieces by Sut Jhally, communication, and alumnus Jackson Katz (founder
    of Mentors in Violence Prevention), on how professional wrestling encourages violence in young
    boys (Globe); and how sexism, not mob mentality, was to blame for Central Park attacks (LA
    Times).

   Publicity for a variety of events occurring during Black History Month.

   Press release and assistance for coverage announcing the establishment of the R. W. Bromery
    Fund to support minority students, preferably African Americans, bring minority guest lecturers
    to campus, and help fund undergraduate fieldwork, within the Geosciences department.

   Placement in the Boston Globe of an opinion piece by a UMass economist on the economic
    penalties imposed on non-traditional couples.


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   Publicity for a discussion by Afro-American studies professor John Bracey and education
    professor Marianne Adams about relations between blacks and Jews at the campus’s hosting of
    the traveling exhibit about the subject, “Bridges and Boundaries.”

   Assistance to Everywoman’s Center in publicizing its support groups and other initiatives.

   Assistance to reporters in identifying campus experts for comment on stories concerning gender,
    sexual orientation, multiculturalism, diversity, discrimination, and other related issues.

    The above are just a few examples of the people, programs, and research publicized by the News
Office that show the excellence, breadth, and depth of the University’s commitment to multi-
dimensional diversity and the advancement of women, people of color, and other members of
traditionally underrepresented groups on campus. All of the items resulted in articles that appeared in
various broadcast and/or print media.

UMass Magazine

       UMass Magazine continues its active policy of seeking and developing coverage of women,
people of color, and other members of traditionally underrepresented groups. Their representation in
our pages does, in fact, exceed the representation of those groups among our readership; but there is
always genuine news value in these articles and photos.

The Campus Chronicle

        Throughout the year, The Campus Chronicle reports on issues related to affirmative action,
equal opportunity, multiculturalism and diversity. As part of its regular coverage, the Chronicle also
publishes hundreds of news articles, feature stories and photographs highlighting the contributions
and achievements of all segments of the campus community, including women and people of color.
The Chronicle also serves as an important source of publicity for multicultural events and programs
within the Five College community.
        The following articles pertaining to affirmative action and diversity issues appeared in The
Campus Chronicle between September 1999 and August 2000:

September
New WORLD Theater announces season schedule
(Peter) D’Errico discusses issues affecting indigenous peoples: Meets Dutch activists,
        attends UN meetings
TransAfrica leader to keynote 3-day affirmative action teach-in (Randall Robinson)
Teaching activist Parker Palmer connects with faculty, student groups during visit
Project MosaiK focuses on developing student leadership within multicultural
        communities
A letter to the provost: On diversity and multiculturalism, by the Academic Deans

October
Affirmative action teach-in (2 photos)
Deans’ stand on diversity applauded: letter by Ellsworth Barnard
Bilingual Collegiate Program to mark 25th anniversary
Indian culture celebrated at Festival of Lights performance (w/2 photos)



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Mental Health staff deplore racist graffiti: letter by E. Bruce Bynum
Library programs mark Latino Heritage Month

November
Minority recruitment efforts backed by NSF: $2.5m award aids recruitment in technical fields
       (w/photo)
Forms of assistance: Program helps ESL students applying to college (Irene Starr)
Scholars visit to inaugurate Asian American Studies Speaker Series

December
Men must counteract violence against women: letter by Dan Gerber
‘In Memory of Brandon’ focuses on transgender issues and culture
R.W. Bromery Fund established: Fund aimed at supporting minorities in Geosciences
Chancellor issues reminder on holiday displays
Alumnus encourages non-violent men to support women and each other (Jackson Katz)
Photo: A pair of handicapped parking slots have been added on the northwest side of the Du Bois
       Library near Machmer Hall (Sherer)

January
Center (for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies) announces grant awards to faculty and
        graduate students (Alexandrina DuChamps, Leda Cooks)
New associate director joins library system (Phelix Hanible)
Revised admissions policy de-emphasizes test scores
Admissions shift backed
Alumnus Jester Hairston dies at 98: Actor-composer helped preserve Negro spirituals

February
Performances, films, social events mark Black History Month (w/photo)
Writer Sandra Jackson-Opoku visits campus: Bateman Alumni Scholar gives public
        lecture during stay
Library exhibits focus on black women
“Civil Sex” examines life of gay, black activist Bayard Rustin
“Vagina Monologues” helps promote efforts to end violence against women
Multicultural Film Festival examines “Human Rights and the Millennium”
Chancellor’s Counsel requests funding proposals for programs
Community in Asian American studies is forum topic
(Jose) Mestre named to task force on physics education
Faculty study Native Americans, New England public history (Marla Miller, Alice Nash)

March
Wideman receives double honors: Story wins O. Henry Award: UVA conference focuses on literary
        works (w/photo)
Project aims to nurture disadvantaged students in math, science and engineering
(Doris) Bargen keynotes Yale conference on Asian women
Forum explores racial gap in test scores
(Sonia) Nieto wins international Rockefeller fellowship, US book award
CISA hosts ‘Race, Politics and National Belonging’ forum
Conference focuses on issues facing GLBT college students
Take Our Daughters to Work Day programs set for April 27


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Photo: Women’s Studies assistant professor Alex Deschamps speaks at the Student
       Union Gallery as part of an International Women’s Day event on March 8

April
Campus pioneers method to accommodate learning disabilities
Recognizing learning disabilities
Lawyer (Mary Bonauto) in Vermont same-sex couple case to speak
UMass Press title wins Triangle Award
William Julius Wilson to deliver Kaplan Lecture
History Department weighs in on how Civil War monuments should portray slavery,
        states’ rights
(M. Idali) Torres speaks at women’s studies research center

May
Scholar explains standardized test barrier for blacks
‘Color of law’ discussed at symposium
ALANA application steady under new admissions system
(Murugapan) Muthukumar named to Barrett Chair in Polymer Science
(Willie L.) Hill elected to lead national conference
New WORLD Theater given $100k grant

June
(Jeffrey) Wolfman organizes black philanthropy conference
Chancellor’s counsel funds 15 program proposals
Ex-staffer sues over handling of sexual harassment case: Former supervisor at UHS also named
(Linda) Nolan tapped as ACE Fellow
Bright Moments Festival, Jazz in July bring music to area

July
Bright Moments takes center stage July 20-22
Link between physical activity and gestational diabetes studied: Campus researcher
       focuses on Hispanic women in region

August
(Prashant) Shenoy receives NSF CAREER award

Publications Office

        The Publications Office works with Photographic Services and University departments to
design publications that reflect the University’s commitment to cultural diversity and affirmative
action. Its publications are instrumental in the recruitment and retention of women and minority
students and provide information about special programs and services available to historically
underserved groups on campus.
        The director actively seeks minority vendors to bid on projects. During the period September
1999 through August 2000, two new women-owned printing vendors were identified and added to
the University's bid list.
        The University Editor ensures that the Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity statement
is included in all appropriate University publications and helps offices communicate in clear,
inclusive, and non gender-specific language.


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Photographic Services

         Photographic Services is responsible for providing compelling images that reflect the
University's commitment to diversity and affirmative action through it's teaching, research and
institutional outreach activities.
         During the 1999-2000 year, Photographic Services contributed to a variety of published
material that reflects the diversity within the UMass Community. The following are some highlights
from the past year:

Asian Dance                                        MIE
Classics                                           Engineering
VIP                                                Communication Disorders
Nursing                                            Synergy
AfroAm Studies                                     MBA Brochure
Center for Teaching                                ContEduc
Labor Relations                                    Communication Studies
STA                                                Int’l Programs
Native American Brochure                           Library
Theater                                            Comp. Science

Government and Community Relations

         The Office of State Government Relations monitors state legislation pertaining to personnel
matters such as employee benefits and collective bargaining procedures. This could include
proposals that would impact affirmative action and equal opportunity requirements, although most
legislation of this sort is determined at the federal level.
         The Office of Community Relations serves as the principal liaison between the University
and communities throughout western Massachusetts. Our alliances with other campus departments
such as University Outreach, the Office of Community Service, and our own campus COMEC
campaign help us assist a broad range of populations. This past year our focus has been to expand
University resources to previously under-served communities and human service providers in the
rural hill towns. In addition, the Office continues to partner with the Office of Outreach in
maintaining and expanding University initiatives in urban areas such as Springfield and Holyoke.
         Community Relations also coordinates the annual UMass Caring and Sharing COMEC
campaign, an employee drive to raise awareness of, and funds for hundreds of agencies working to
improve the quality of life for residents in our region. FY99 surpassed all expectations for COMEC
in number of dollars raised and was the highest fundraiser of all other Massachusetts state agencies.

Development Office

        The Development Office has continued its commitment to increase the number of minorities
working in the University’s fund-raising program. The Development office continues to help raise
funds for various minority programs throughout the campus.

Alumni Relations Office/Alumni Association

      The Alumni Relations Office supported $60,000 in grants to student organizations this year.
Among the grant recipients were the Black Student Union, the Stonewall Center (GLBT), Asian
American Students Association, the Leadership Network, the Bilingual Collegiate Program, Faculty


                                                 89
Senate Council on the Status of Women, Everywoman's Center, Alternative Spring Break, and the
University Dancers. The many programs and activities sponsored by the Alumni Association
involved diverse student populations.

Visitor Relations

        The national visitors center association, of which we are a charter member, solicits and shares
strategies concerning diversity matters affecting visitors centers. We, in turn, share such information
with Admissions and Tour Services.


                    Vice Chancellor for Research and Economic Development

        The Office of Vice Chancellor for Research distributes support for research and scholarly
activity to faculty, students and staff while emphasizing opportunities, which also promote diversity
and inclusion. A summary of some of this support during FY 99-00 includes:

Program Development and Support

   Support for curriculum development and public service effort of the MIE department in reaching
    out to the Lemelson Assistive Technology Development Center (LATDC) at Hampshire College,
    and the Adaptive Design Services (ADS) in Northampton, which will directly benefit the
    disabled community in the four counties in Western Massachusetts and across the state.

   Support for a forum to explore ways in which the University of Massachusetts can provide policy
    assistance to the Pioneer Valley's two principal cities, and to better connect the resources of the
    University to provide direct policy assistance to the cities of Springfield and Holyoke. To this
    end, we propose to plan and implement a two-day Forum, to take place in the spring of 2001, on
    the role of Public Higher Education Institutions in Urban Revitalization. The anticipated
    outcomes of the Forum include an increased awareness and understanding of existing university-
    city public policy partnerships across the U.S., how local cities and the University of
    Massachusetts Amherst can benefit from such partnerships, and which institutional relationships
    are most effective for providing policy assistance to the cities of Springfield and Holyoke.

Institutional Grant Matching

        The Office of Vice Chancellor for Research provides funds to cost share on grants and
contracts from government, industry and foundation sources. This cost sharing has made possible
many grants supporting diversity and multi-cultural issues during FY 1999-00. Some of these are:

   Matching funds to foundation support for the New World Theater

   Match for USAID grants supporting education reform in Uganda.

   Support for a Computer Science Department grant promoting involvement of women and girls in
    science.




                                                  90
   Match to Communications Disorders in support of a grant to study children who speak Black
    English.

                                         Graduate School

        The Graduate School includes the Graduate Dean’s Office, the Offices of Graduate
Admissions, Graduate Records, Degree Requirements and Graduate Registrar, the Office of Graduate
Recruitment and Retention and the Graduate Assistantship and Fellowship Office. The mission of
the Graduate School is to advocate, enhance, and support graduate education and the research,
scholarship, teaching, academic outreach and economic development associated with graduate level
work. The Graduate Dean oversees all graduate programs on the Amherst Campus and by working
with the Graduate Faculty, Graduate Program Directors, and the academic deans, ensures that all
courses and programs maintain the highest academic standards.
        During 1999-2000 the Graduate School continued to make important contributions in
supporting and advancing graduate education and scholarly activities of graduate students, faculty
and staff from diverse and underrepresented groups. A summary of these activities are noted below:

Related Professional Activities of the Graduate Dean

Awards and Recognition
 Delegation Leader, Speech-language Pathology delegation to New Zealand/Australia, Citizens
  Ambassador Program, 2000.
 Images of Influence Award, Western Massachusetts, March 2000.

Activities for the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS)
 Advisory Committee on Minorities in Graduate Education, appointed 1998-2000.
 Executive Committee Northeast Association of Graduate Schools

Other Pertinent Activities
 Co-Principal Investigator NSF/AGEP ($2,500,000) Univ. of Mass, 1999-2004.
 Chancellor's Task Force on Undergraduate Admissions, 1999-2000.

Program Enhancement and Support

   Support for Graduate Residence program "Around the World in 30 Days" bringing together all
    the cultural diversity represented by our graduate student body.
   Support for the Asian American Task Force
   Support for talk by Nobel Peace Prize winner Jody Williams to speak about social justice and
    civil rights causes around the world.
   Support for the Learning Circle for Students of Color
   Support for summer interns in the Afro-Am Department
   Supported travel and hosting costs for the recruitment of students from underrepresented groups
    for four departments.
   Support of Affirmative Action Teach-in through Women's Studies Department
   Supported a TA for the Learning Disabilities Project.
   Supported the Women of Color Institute within the Everywomen’s Center.
   Funded an internship position at the Graduate Women’s Network.



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                   Northeast Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate




       The Northeast Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate at the University of
       Massachusetts recruits, supports, and mentors underrepresented minority students interested in
       academic careers so they may pursue Ph.D. in science, mathematics or engineering and become college
       and university faculty.


         In October of 1999, the Graduate School received a grant from the National Science
Foundation to address the shortage of underrepresented minority students receiving Ph.D. in the
sciences, mathematics, and engineering (SME). The Northeast Alliance at UMass-Amherst (initially
known as the Minority Graduate Education Program) collaborates with other members of the
Northeast Alliance to foster underrepresented minority students as they progress through higher
education in SME. Working closely with Partner Institutions, the Alliance prepares undergraduates
for the graduate school application process. Qualified students who pursue a Ph.D. at Alliance
Institutions are offered financial support and supportive mentoring to ensure that their graduate
school experience is a rewarding one. Students are encouraged to consider entering the professoriate
once they have received their Ph.D.s.
    The Northeast Alliance at UMass Amherst:

   Has a staffed administrative SME Recruitment and Retention Unit within the Graduate School
    directed toward increasing diversity on college and university faculties and among SME
    professionals
   Supports graduate students through multi-year stipend packages and fellowships in an integrated
    program of teaching and research
   Assists graduate students in the development of professional skills by providing comprehensive
    mentoring, skills workshops, and subject area seminars
   Supports UMass degree program faculty and staff in their diversity efforts through workshops for
    mentors and by providing advice and resources
   Is reviewing the University's admissions criteria so that they will reflect a balanced contribution
    of quantitative and non-quantitative variables that predict success
   Runs a summer undergraduate research program to help undergraduates experience research in
    an active setting and to support recruitment efforts
   Has "Diversity Teams" of faculty, students and alumni who visit the Partner Institutions to
    encourage undergraduates in SME programs to consider pursuing Ph.D.
   Brings undergraduates and faculty from Partner Institutions to campus for recruiting visits


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   Has a faculty exchange program to strengthen faculty and undergraduate exposure to research at
    Partner Institutions
   Collaborates with other programs and institutions to share resources and best practices

        The University of Massachusetts Amherst leads the Northeast Alliance for Graduate
Education and the Professoriate. The Northeast Alliance meets quarterly to encourage close
collaboration among the Alliance Institutions. Other members of the Alliance are: Boston
University; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Pennsylvania State University; and Rutgers, The
State University of New Jersey. The National Science Foundation provides base funding for the
Alliance. For activities at UMass Amherst, the University of Massachusetts Amherst provides
additional funds through the Graduate School and the degree programs.
        In its start-up year, the Northeast Alliance’s accomplishments included:

       Establishment of working relationships with and among Partner Institutions and Alliance
        Institutions via
             o Visits to Partners
             o Visits by Partners to UMass Amherst
             o Meetings with the Alliance
             o A joint meeting with Alliance and Partners
       Funding of one Alliance Dissertation Fellow in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
       Recruitment of three Alliance Fellows for AY00-01 in Electrical and Computer Engineering,
        Microbiology, and Neurosciences and Behavior
       A visit to campus by Dr. Claude Steele, Professor and Chair of Stanford University’s
        Psychology Department, and presentation of a seminar on why groups that are expected to do
        badly on standardized tests, do badly on those tests
       Initiation of a Mentoring Task Force
       Initiation of an Admissions Task Force
       Enrollment of undergraduates and graduate students in New England Board of Higher
        Education’s Mentoring Workshop for Minority Scientists and Engineers, Cambridge MA;
        transportation to conference in UMass vans
       Presentation by Director of workshop for SEEDS mentors at Ecological Society of America’s
        Annual Meeting
       Attendance by Director at the Council of Graduate Schools’ Summer Workshop 2000
       Telephone follow-up by graduate students to potential SME graduate students from
        Recruiting Fairs
       Participation in Graduate School Open House at UMass Amherst
       Participation in Graduate Fair at UMass Amherst
       Summer Program for Undergraduate Research (SPUR)
             o Independent student laboratory research projects and poster presentations
             o Laboratory exchanges
             o Workshops/seminars:
                      Cultural and nutritional history from human skeletons
                      Genometrics
                      How to break a large research project into manageable pieces
                      How graduate school is different from undergraduate school
                      How to apply to graduate schools/Diversity issues in graduate education
                      How to mesh a professional/academic life with a personal life
                      Team building


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             o Field trips to explore
                    Marine organisms used in medical research (Marine Biological Laboratories,
                        Woods Hole MA) and the natural history of whales
                    Behind the scenes at a world-class science museum (Museum of Science,
                        Boston MA), the tall ships, and downtown Boston
                    Collection and distribution of clean drinking water to a major metropolitan
                        area (Quabbin Reservoir, Belchertown MA)

For more information, please see our website at http://www.umass.edu/gradschool/AGEP.

                          Office of Graduate Student Recruitment and Retention

         OGSRR was involved in several national recruitment projects. Project 1000 is a Hispanic
name exchange of 71 graduate institutions. GOALS is a national minority recruitment effort in
industrial and labor relations. The National Physical Science Consortium consists of graduate
institutions, industry, and the government, who collaboratively provide doctoral education the
physical sciences for African-American, American Indian, Hispanic, and female graduate students.

ALANA Admissions

       Approximately fifteen percent (n=617) of the applicants for fall 1999 were students of color.
Of these, 242 were accepted and 126 enrolled in degree programs. The acceptance rate for ALANA
applicants was 39.2% and the percentage enrolled was 52.1%. This compares to the total Graduate
School acceptance rate of 29.8% and percentage enrolled of 44.9%.

ALANA Enrollment

        There was a total of 511 U.S. graduate students of color enrolled during fall 1999 (14.7% of
the U.S. graduate enrollment). Over half (55.6%) are working on doctoral degrees, and an additional
6.5% are enrolled in masters/doctoral programs; 39.9% are enrolled in master’s programs. By ethnic
group, there were 159 African-American, 187 Hispanic, 143 Asian American, 18 American Indian,
and 4 Cape Verdean graduate students.

ALANA Funding

        For 1999-00, 319 ALANA graduate students (primarily not on program fee, or non-degree
status, or in off-campus programs) were funded. The actual number of students funded was 4.5%
higher than the previous year. The total amount of funding increased from $3,005,366 to $3,355,123,
an 11.6 % increase. Of the total number of students with appointments, 46.3% were teaching
stipends, 35.7% were for research, and 17.8 % had fellowships.

ALANA Graduation

        For 1999-00, 129 graduate degrees/certificates were awarded to ALANA graduate students
during the three graduation periods. For the School of Education, six were Ed.D.s and twenty-six
were M.Ed.s. Seventy-five ALANA students earned other master’s degrees, and twenty-two were

NOTE: Race/ethnicity is voluntary and by self-report. Percentages are based on U.S. citizens (or immigrants) who
      reported.



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awarded Ph.D.s in Anthropology, Astronomy, Chemistry, Communication Disorders, Economics,
English, Food Science, Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Molecular and Cellular Biology,
Neuroscience Physics, Polymer Science and Engineering, Psychology and Management.
        Since 1980, 1,977 degrees have been awarded to ALANA graduate students. A comparison
of the last 20 years shows that students not in education, many who were originally funded by
OGSRR, have earned master’s degrees and 323 Ph.D.s.
        The July 2000 issue of Black Issues in Higher Education listed the top 100 producers of
doctoral degrees by ethnicity. For the category, “All Minorities,” the University placed #57.

Support Activities

         The Annual Welcoming Reception for First-Year ALANA Graduate Students was held on
registration day. This reception introduces students to the University and its resources in an informal
setting that encourages and promotes an exchange of ideas among students, faculty, and staff.
         The Office offered various seminars throughout the year, including “How to Survive the First
Year,” and two sessions on “Sailing through the Dissertation/Theses Checking Process.” In addition,
the Director and Assistant Director conducted several “Going to Graduate School” workshops to
current UMass undergraduate students.

       Recruitment trips were made to Rutgers University, Princeton University, Framingham State
University, Jackson State University, Boston University, Northeastern University, and all of the
CGS/GRE Forums: Boston, New York, Chicago and Long Beach.

                                   International Graduate Students

         International graduate students contribute in a large measure to the University’s commitment
to promote cultural diversity and pluralism on campus. As teachers and researchers, international
graduate students play an important role in bringing global perspective to their classes and serve as
excellent role models for all undergraduate students. It is important to realize that international
students are probably the most significant resource that the campus has for creating a truly diverse
environment. Their interaction with the University community promotes tolerance and a greater
degree of commitment to social justice. During the past year, the Graduate School took several
initiatives to meet the needs and enhance the experience of international graduate students on
campus.

International Graduate Teaching Assistant Communication Program

        The International Graduate Teaching Assistant Communication Program offered by the
Graduate School to first-time international teaching assistant (ITAs) continued to help ITAs in
acquiring English Language intelligibility. The program not only benefits international graduate
teaching assistants in carrying out their responsibilities as teaching assistants, it also assists in
enhancing their communication skills in every aspect of their academic lives and future endeavors.

Reception for Incoming International Graduate Students

       The Graduate School continued to host a reception to welcome new incoming international
graduate students to the University. This event has been greatly helpful to students in their initial
adjustment to American culture. It gives them an opportunity to share and exchange ideas and



                                                  95
thoughts with other students and faculty in an informal setting and to get acquainted with the
University community. This past year, over 250 international graduate students attended the function.

Cross-cultural Workshops

      To address the special needs of international graduate teaching assistants, the Graduate
School continued to offer workshops on cross-cultural teaching issues and cross-cultural
communication to first-time international teaching assistants.

Handbook for Graduate Program Directors for International Graduate Students

        The handbook, published in 1997, has been very helpful to the Graduate Program Directors
in responding to the needs and concerns of international graduate students.

Graduate School Plans for 2000-2001

        In the coming year, we will continue to build on the present strengths of the programs,
maintain high quality, and pursue vigorously an even stronger role of women and underrepresented
groups in the advancement of research, teaching and scholarship.




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                      INTERNAL AUDIT AND REPORTING SYSTEMS


         The Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office has developed an internal audit and reporting
system which relies on collaboration with other University divisions in order to meet affirmative
action reporting requirements. These divisions include the University Information Systems (UIS);
Human Resources; and the Office of Institutional Research and Planning and the Provost's Office
within Academic Affairs. In place are the following systems: the Criterion Affirmative Action
Reporting System (CAAMS), the Human Resources Management Information System (HRMIS), and
two applicant tracking systems.
         Installed in 1984, HRMIS is a comprehensive employee database maintained by Human
Resources. On-line employee data is available through the Terminal Application Process System
(TAPS). Historical employee information (i.e. hires, terminations, promotions and transfers) is
available through the employee job movement adjunct to the HRMIS system. Selected employee
data is extracted from HRMIS by UIS and downloaded, so that EO&D staff can access employee
data necessary for affirmative action reporting via CAAMS. In addition, specialized affirmative
action reports are available through UIS.
         CAAMS is a comprehensive, sophisticated affirmative action reporting system which is
operated by EO&D staff. It provides automated availability and utilization statistics and produces all
of the data required for a compliant affirmative action plan. CAAMS has been used to produce the
statistics reflected in Affirmative Action Plan data tables beginning with the 1992-93 AAPlan. In
1995, the University system upgraded to CAAMS for Windows, and EO&D staff received training
on the new software. The Windows version of CAAMS offers a friendlier interface between the user
and the system as well as some enhanced reporting capabilities. Beginning with the 1995-96
Affirmative Action Plan, CAAMS for Windows has been used to produce reports.
         The Applicant Tracking System, a module of HRMIS, provides an applicant flow database
for classified positions. This system identifies internal and external applicants for position
requisitions. The qualifications of external applicants are matched to the minimum qualifications of
specific position vacancies to identify pools of bona fide applicants for further consideration by
hiring officials; internal applicants are referred according to Union guidelines. Applicant outcome
reports are available through the UIS.
         The EO&D Office maintains the Professional Applicant Tracking System for faculty and
professional/non-faculty positions. This system enables the EO&D Office to retrieve and analyze
information about recruitment and hiring practices for faculty and professional staff, including
whether or not there is adverse impact on women and minorities in the hiring process.
         In addition to the above, the EO&D Office utilizes information provided by the Provost's
Office regarding faculty promotion and tenure. The Faculty Positions Report, produced by the
Office of Institutional Research, also provides a useful resource for information on the faculty.
         The Affirmative Action Advisory Board meets three times each semester. The Board advises
the Chancellor on an ad hoc basis as the need arises, and reports to its respective constituencies on
issues related to affirmative action and equal opportunity.




                                                 97
                      PROGRAM TO COMBAT SEX DISCRIMINATION


         It is the policy of the University that no person shall on the basis of sex, be denied the
benefits, or be subjected to discrimination in any aspect of employment or in the admission and
treatment of students, as required by federal and state laws and regulations. The University's
commitment to equal opportunity includes but is not limited to the following areas: recruitment,
training, hiring, salary, termination, working conditions, upgrading, promotions, fringe benefits, job
classifications, retirement, and leave.
         The University does not utilize wage schedules related to or based on the sex of the
employees. Employees of both sexes have equal access to any available job they are qualified to
perform. Bargaining agents, union representatives, contractors, vendors, and all entities with whom
the University maintains contractual agreements have been informed of this nondiscriminatory
policy. Further, such agreements between the University and these groups are to be consistent with
the University's affirmative action guidelines.
         In Massachusetts, sex is precluded as a criteria for admission to any program or course of
study leading to a degree beyond a bachelor's degree (GL 151C). The University of Massachusetts
regulations strictly prohibit discrimination in the admission and treatment of students, both
undergraduate and graduate, based on gender.

                                   Family-Related Leave Policies

         It is the University's policy to offer employment to qualified individuals regardless of their
parental status. The employee may utilize sick leave credits for family illness. Sick leave is granted,
at the discretion of the appointing authority, to an employee when the spouse, domestic partner, child
or parent of either an employee or his/her spouse, or relative living in the immediate household of an
employee, is ill. In addition, every full-time or regular part-time employee who has completed the
probationary period, or if there is no probationary period, has been employed for at least three
consecutive months, may be granted family leave, an unpaid leave of absence (with some
exceptions), for a period not exceeding ten weeks, for the need to care for, or make arrangements for
the care of, the employee's spouse, parent, grandparent, grandchild or relative living in the same
household. Similarly, parental leave, an unpaid leave of absence, may be granted for the need to care
for, or make arrangements for the care of, a minor dependent child of the employee.
         Pregnancy and childbirth are considered to be conditions which may temporarily disable
female employees. It is the University's position that pregnant women may continue working as long
as they are able to perform the job satisfactorily. The staff member or faculty person and her
supervisor or department chairperson are each expected to give consideration to safe working
conditions and practices during pregnancy.
         Every full-time or regular part-time employee who has completed the probationary period, or
if there is no probationary period, has been employed for at least three consecutive months, shall be
granted a maternity or adoptive leave without pay for a period of eight weeks providing that the
request for such leave is made at least two weeks in advance of the expected departure date. If an
employee has accrued sick leave or vacation credits at the commencement of the maternity or
adoptive leave, the employee may use such leave credits for which she/he may be eligible. Members
of two unions (AFSCME and USA/MTA) are eligible for five days of paid maternity/adoptive leave.
SEIU union members may be eligible for paid maternity/adoptive leave under their Sick Leave Bank
guidelines.
         The employee is eligible for reinstatement to the same or similar position without loss of the
employment benefits to which she/he was entitled on the date the leave commenced, providing that


                                                  98
nothing occurs during the leave which would otherwise have terminated her/his employment with the
University under existing law, rule or regulation.
         Upon the expiration of a maternity or adoptive leave, additional leave may be granted at the
discretion of the CEO. The leave shall be unpaid unless the employee chooses to use any accrued
vacation, personal leave or compensatory time to cover this period of absence. The period of unpaid
leave shall not be included in any computation of contractual benefits, rights or advantages.
         The University observes all provisions of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) of
1993. Under this act, eligible employees (those who have been employed for at least twelve months
in total, and have worked at least 1250 hours during the year preceding the leave) are entitled to 12
weeks of unpaid leave per year under particular circumstances that are critical to the life of a family.
Leave may be taken: upon the birth of the employee's child; upon the placement of a child with the
employee for adoption or foster care; when the employee is needed to care for a child, spouse, or
parent who has a serious health condition; or when the employee is unable to perform the functions
of his or her position because of a serious health condition. FMLA leave may run concurrently with
other leaves for which the employee is eligible.
         Employees also have available to them up to 24 hours of additional leave benefits within a 12
month period under the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Small Necessities Leave Act enacted in
1998. The purpose of the leave is to afford employees the opportunity to accompany a child or an
elderly relative to routine medical appointments or to attend educational meetings at a child’s school.
The leave shall be unpaid unless the employee chooses to use any accrued vacation, personal leave,
sick time, or compensatory time to cover this period of absence.

                                     Sexual Harassment Policy

        “The University of Massachusetts Amherst is committed to providing faculty, staff and
students with an environment where they may pursue their careers or studies without being sexually
harassed.” Consistent with this policy statement, the University of Massachusetts Amherst has
established procedures for making fair, prompt, and reliable determinations of whether or not sexual
harassment has occurred and for resolving sexual harassment complaints. These procedures are
described in Appendix F, Sexual Harassment Policy (October, 1986.)
        The Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office assumes responsibility for implementation of
this policy, and provides advice, assistance, and training on issues related to sexual harassment.
Informational materials, including videotapes, are readily available for use by the campus
community. In addition, EO&D Office staff are available to conduct workshops on request.
        The Office is also committed to monitoring the current policy for its effectiveness and will
make recommendations for policy or procedural changes as the need arises.
        See also “Sexual Harassment” under Programs to Eliminate Problems & Attain Goals.

                                           Nepotism Policy

         More than one member of an immediate family may be employed by the University on the
Amherst campus. Each such employee shall receive insurance benefits and privileges consistent with
the appointment held. No officer or employee of the University may participate in decisions
affecting the appointment, tenure, promotion, or other condition of employment at the University of a
relative, except under such circumstances as the President of the University may determine as
warranting waiver of this prohibition in the best interest of the University, consistent with the
provisions of Mass. G.L. c. 268A and Trustee Document T72-029. For all purposes involving the
application of this rule concerning the employment of relatives of existing personnel, a “relative” is
defined as parent, spouse, child, stepchild, sibling, parent-in-law or sibling-in-law.


                                                  99
                               PROGRAM TO COMBAT RACISM


        The University is committed to combating racism in any form within the campus community.
The University’s commitment to combat racism is in part demonstrated by the existence of numerous
offices, agencies, organizations, and task forces, not including recognized student organizations,
which address human relations issues including racism (Appendix G). The establishment of
awareness events, such as Black History Month, Holocaust Memorial Week, and Native American
Week, the Cultural Centers, and the activities to affirm the Student Union as a multicultural center
will continue, as will the administrative leadership to celebrate ethnic diversity by scholarly lecturers
and artist visits. The Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office, in conjunction with other appropriate
offices on campus, will vigorously investigate and take appropriate action in cases where
discrimination based on racism occurs. The EO&D Office is available to provide training on racism
and related issues.


              CAMPUS SUPPORT FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAMS

         As a land grant institution, the University of Massachusetts Amherst has a long history of
helping the Commonwealth meet the economic objective of increasing employment opportunities for
all citizens including women and other protected group members, both within and outside of the
University community.
         UMass Extension is an academic outreach unit of the University of Massachusetts Amherst
offering four major programs from the College of Food and Natural Resources (CFNR) and the
School of Public Health and Health Sciences (SPHHS). Specifically, the Nutrition Education
Program in SPHHS works with low-income individuals and families to provide knowledge and skills
that enable them to make informed choices about healthy diets, reduce risks of food-borne illness and
chronic disease, and manage food resources efficiently. Nutrition educators, recruited from the local
community, are trained to provide intensive instruction in basic nutrition, meal planning, and food
resource management skills to low-income families with children. The 4-H Youth and Family
Development Program in CFNR works with young people, ages six through eighteen to help them
develop leadership and life skills while strengthening their family orientation through parenting and
resource management education. A special focus of this work is with youth in low-income urban
communities.
         The Office of Economic Development participates actively in the Partners for Economic
Development, the Mass Venture Center, and the Massachusetts Small Business Development Center.
The Office of Economic Development also consults with faculty working on the cutting edge of their
technologies who are interested in starting businesses. The increase in employment in the immediate
University region has resulted almost exclusively from the growth of faculty-initiated businesses.
There are more than twenty successful companies at this time, which have created over 600 jobs in
the past eight years. The Director of the Office of Economic Development is a woman who actively
encourages the entrepreneurial activity of women and minorities in the course of her participation in
regional boards.
         University Advancement recently hired a new Director of Community Relations who will
serve as the liaison between the University and the surrounding towns. The Director maintains
ongoing communication with our neighbors and town governments in the area to address issues of
mutual concern and foster good relationships.
         The Campus Beautification Committee, an ad hoc group formed through a partnership
between Chancellor David Scott, Dr. Kathleen Scott and the UMass Alumni Association, meets


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regularly to plan beautification programs that will involve the entire campus community, including
our surrounding towns.
        The Special Events Office in University Advancement operates a Speaker’s Bureau through
which the University’s faculty and staff offer their knowledge and expertise on a wide variety of
topics to public schools and service organizations across the state. There is no cost for this service.
        The Minority Engineering Program (MEP) recruits students from African American, Native
American, Hispanic, and Cape Verdean ethnic backgrounds, which are traditionally underrepresented
in the field of engineering. Recruitment activities introduce and attract students from high schools
and community colleges to the Minority Engineering Program in the College of Engineering. MEP
provides personal and academic support to participating students to increase their retention and
graduation rate.
        The Center for Organizational and Community Development within the School of Education
has focused its attention and activities on newcomer and refugee organizations which support ethnic
minority group members in developing employment skills and empowerment through self-
sufficiency. Ethnically diverse individuals (i.e. Southern Asians and Latinos) participate in
University of Massachusetts sponsored community action programs.
        Everywoman’s Center (EWC) provides a range of services to the diverse cultural and
linguistic populations of Hampshire County. Services include: an extensive information and referral
system including general, health, legal, political and social resources for women; short-term personal
counseling, assessments, referrals and support groups; 24-hour comprehensive services for
victims/survivors of sexual assault and battering including interpretation services and services for
teens; educational workshops and trainings on issues of violence against women and women's
empowerment; prevention education programs for teens; cultural, educational and social
programming and support services for women of color. All services are free and confidential. EWC
also offers a job bank book for the tri-county area, and a free lending library.
        EWC offers training, volunteer and internship opportunities across all of its programs,
including a 50 hour training resulting in state certification as a rape crisis counselor or community
educator. EWC is committed to hiring a culturally and linguistically diverse staff.
        While it primarily addresses the career counseling and job placement needs of students and
alumni of the University, the Campus Career Network houses a career library and job notices that are
also available to community residents.


               CONSIDERATION OF QUALIFIED PROTECTED CATEGORY
                      GROUP MEMBERS NOT IN WORKFORCE

         The University actively recruits qualified protected category group members to join the
workforce by using paid advertising in newspapers and professional publications and unpaid position
announcements widely distributed to referral agencies; job skill specific, gender specific, or ethnicity
specific professional organizations; institutions of higher education and professional conferences.
The hiring official determines how the announcement of position vacancy will be made, subject to
collective bargaining agreements and budgetary constraints and the urgency of filling the position.
The Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office provides mailing lists and other advertising sources on
request. When necessary, the EO&D Office will require that the hiring authority expand his/her
advertising sources to insure that applicants for protected categories have access to announcements.
         Whether to recruit campus-wide, locally, regionally, or nationally depends on such factors as
job title and salary range, advertising budget, and availability of an appropriate pool of qualified
applicants.



                                                  101
a. Campus-wide Searches are implemented when there is no readily identifiable person within the
   respective area promotable or transferable into the position* and there is a good likelihood of
   finding qualified individuals representative of the appropriate availability pool who are currently
   employed within other schools or departments on campus. On-campus searches are open only to
   qualified University non-student employees. Advertisements for the position must be attached to
   the “Classified Employment Opportunities” sheet (“Yellow Sheet”) and published in the Campus
   Chronicle.

b. Local Searches are conducted for many entry-level professional positions and part-time faculty
   positions. Local searches for non-faculty positions will also be advertised on campus as an
   attachment to the “Classified Employment Opportunities” sheet. Advertisements for local
   searches should be placed in media that serve Hampshire, Hampden, and Franklin counties.

c. Regional Searches are used for most professional/non-faculty positions and non-tenure track
   positions which can be filled without national recruitment. It is suggested that advertisements be
   placed within publications which serve the major metropolitan areas in New England.

d. National Searches are generally used for tenured and tenure-track faculty, high-level
   administrative positions, and positions for which applicants have been traditionally difficult to
   recruit. Advertisements are usually placed in national publications and specialty journals.
   Position announcements are usually sent to institutions of higher education known to produce
   qualified applicants, including historically Black institutions. Personal letters and telephone calls
   to seek nominations are encouraged. National professional associations may be contacted;
   notices may be posted at professional meetings.

        All position announcements include an AA/EO statement. Applicants are invited to identify
protected group status which can contribute to the enhancement of the application, when the job
group is underrepresented by a particular protected group(s).


                        PROGRAM FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

                            Policy Regarding Individuals With Disabilities

         The University of Massachusetts Amherst recognizes that the employment of individuals
with disabilities is in the University’s best interests, by utilizing employment skills possessed by such
individuals as well as in meeting an important social and educational responsibility. The University
will take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified persons with disabilities;
the University will practice nondiscrimination in the admission of qualified persons with disabilities
to its programs. The University will make reasonable accommodations for physical and mental
disabilities of employees and applicants for employment consistent with the qualifications required to
perform the essential elements of a job. Academic adjustments necessary to accommodate
individuals in programs or applicants for such programs will be made when appropriate.




* Refer to the campus Promotion and Lateral Transfer Policy, 11/23/83.


                                                      102
         As part of its efforts on behalf of persons with disabilities, the University will continue its
efforts to insure that:

   1. All applicants will be considered on the basis of their qualifications regardless of their
      physical or mental characteristic(s);
   2. All procedures will be reviewed to enable fair and equitable treatment for all applicants,
      employees, and students;
   3. Record keeping practices for known applicants and employees with disabilities will conform
      to the affirmative action requirements of the U.S. Department of Labor guidelines;
   4. Physical examinations and qualifications will be geared specifically to state law and the actual
      requirements of the opportunity for which the applicant is being considered. Such
      examinations will be performed only if required of all applicants for a given position;
   5. The University will not reduce the amount of compensation offered because of any disability
      income, pension, or other benefit an applicant or employee receives from another source when
      the University offers employment or promotion to individuals with disabilities;
   6. Guidelines provided by state and federal agencies relative to the employment of persons with
      disabilities will be explained to search committees;
   7. Responses to requests for reasonable accommodations will be handled on a case-by-case basis
      and in keeping with the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

                 Reasonable Accommodation and Academic Adjustment Policy

         The University recognizes its obligation to provide access for individuals with disabilities.
When requested, reasonable accommodations are provided for qualified individuals with disabilities
to enable successful performance in various employment settings. The University will also provide
academic adjustments for qualified students with disabilities when requested and when such
adjustments are appropriate. Requests for information concerning reasonable accommodation and
academic adjustments, the existence and location of services, activities, and facilities that are
accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities should be directed to the EO&D Office,
Disability Services, Learning Disabilities Support Services, or the Program for Students with
Psychological and Medical Disabilities, whichever is most appropriate.
         A document has been developed to address issues related to the Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA). This document, entitled “Procedures for Responding to Requests for Accommodations
Required Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)”, establishes procedures for employees
with disabilities who are requesting accommodations in the workplace and also for students with
disabilities who require academic adjustments or other classroom-related accommodations. An
important feature of classroom-related accommodations is the development of an expedited
grievance procedure when there is disagreement regarding such situations. Copies of this new
document are available from the ADA Compliance Officer in Equal Opportunity & Diversity.

                               Interpreting the Legal Requirements

        The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990, define an individual with a disability as any person who has a physical or mental impairment
which substantially limits one or more major life activities, has a record of such impairment, or is
regarded as having such an impairment.
        The Associate Chancellor for Equal Opportunity and Diversity has been assigned as the “503
and 504 Coordinator” as well as the “Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Coordinator.” To
assist the Associate Chancellor in these responsibilities, an ADA Compliance Officer has been


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appointed to the EO&D staff. The ADA Compliance Officer is responsible for the day-to-day
operation and coordination of all campus-wide efforts for prospective students, applicants for
employment, and current students and employees who are disabled.
        The EO&D Office also works cooperatively with the Training and Development Program in
the Human Resources Division to provide ADA training for University employees and supervisors.
The briefing provided by the EO&D Office to search committees includes information on policy and
procedures for hiring and accommodating persons with disabilities. The EO&D Office also works in
close coordination with the Director of Disability Services in the Division of Student Affairs as well
as with the Director of Learning Disabilities Support Services and the Director of the Program for
Students with Psychological and Medical Disabilities in the Division of Academic Affairs.

                                         Disability Services

         Disability Services works to ensure that reasonable and effective accommodations and
support services are in place for students with documented physical, auditory, vision, and /or chronic
disabilities. In order to identify the accommodations and determine the appropriate and available
resources for these accommodations, students are strongly urged to meet with a Consumer Manager
during the application process.
         Advocacy, counseling and support are provided at all levels of academic and administrative
programs and services, including but not limited to: admissions, orientation, housing, transit,
enrollment management, class/lab assistants, note-taking, communication, campus access, adaptive
equipment, advising, and other non-personal areas.
         Consumer Managers are skilled in the field of disability services at the postsecondary level,
as well as being highly knowledgeable in disability issues, law, and resources, and are available to
meet with prospective and interested students, parents and/or guidance counselors.
         Disability Services is open year-round, Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Appointments
can be made by calling the office, telephone 413-545-0892 V/TTY. Those who need sign language
or oral interpreters can also call 413-545-0892 V/TTY in advance to request interpreting services for
the day of appointment or campus visit.

                         Office of Learning Disabilities Support Services

        LDSS, part of the Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support Center (UAASC), is a
support service at the university for all students with documented learning disabilities. Students are
eligible for our services if they can document their learning disability with the appropriate diagnostic
evidence. LDSS does not service students whose primary diagnosis is that of Attention Deficit
Disorder.     These students should seek assistance from the Program for Students with
Psychological/Medical Disabilities.
        Once students are approved for services they are assigned a Case Manager. The Case
Managers work individually with the students to develop an Individualized Written Plan on which
accommodations are based. Students with learning differences are encouraged to maintain regular
contact with LDSS. Maintaining good contact allows the staff to support the students in a variety of
ways.
        Case Managers help students notify faculty about recommended accommodations.
Accommodations could include extended time for exams, extended time for assignments, books on
tape, note-takers, prepared materials before class or alternate test format. LDSS also assists students
by locating tutor services.




                                                  104
       LDSS takes an interdisciplinary approach to servicing students with learning differences. If
you should have questions or wish to make an appointment please contact the office for assistance.
LDSS is located at 321 Berkshire House, phone (413) 545-4602.

                   Program for Students with Psychological/Medical Disabilities

        The Program for Students with Psychological/Medical Disabilities is a support service at the
University of Massachusetts Amherst for certain students with documented psychological or central
nervous system disabilities or Attention Deficit Disorder. Students are eligible for services if they
have current documentation from an expert in the field of a diagnosed impairment which
substantially limits their ability to learn. [Prospective students and parents should be aware that the
legal standards governing disability status and accommodations in postsecondary education differ
significantly from those pertaining to education at the secondary level.]
        Eligible students will be assigned a Case Manager who will work with them to translate the
functional limitations of their documented disability into requests for reasonable accommodations in
their coursework and other education-related activities. Other clinical case management services
available to enrolled students are academic support; informal needs, skills, and mental status
assessments; assistance in setting academic and personal goals; referrals to other appropriate support
services; liaison, when needed, with any other mental health provider involved; and consultation with
specific faculty and staff.
        All interested students or prospective students are encouraged to contact the P/MD Program
to set up an Informational Session. The P/MD Program is located at 119 Berkshire House, phone
(413) 577-2457.

                                      Employees with Disabilities

         Employees who request workplace accommodations directly related to a disability and to the
requirements of the job are encouraged to register with one of the disability support programs on
campus. If the disability is of a psychological nature, the employee is referred to the Program for
Students with Psychological and Medical Disabilities at 123 Berkshire House. Employees with
disabilities other than psychological impairments are directed to Disability Services at 231 Whitmore
Administration Building.
         Staff from these programs are qualified to evaluate documentation submitted by the
employee to determine eligibility under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and further to
recommend specific workplace accommodations that would be appropriate in these situations.

                                Elimination of Architectural Barriers

         In 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was enacted into law. As one part of
compliance with this legislation, the University was required to complete a transition plan which
would illustrate the steps to be taken to improve the structural accessibility of its facilities in order to
ensure that all the programs operated by the University were accessible to individuals with
disabilities.
         Over 200 facilities at the University were surveyed to determine the modifications needed to
meet accessibility requirements. A Transition Plan Working Group then developed a Transition Plan
for the University, using both the building survey information and a listing of University programs
which had been developed and prioritized by the Campus Architectural Access Board. A copy of the
Transition Plan is available for review at the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity (EO&D).



                                                    105
        The Transition Plan will be monitored and reviewed periodically by the Architectural Access
Board in regards to available funding and current accessibility needs. In addition to its responsibility
to monitor the completion of projects recommended in the Transition Plan, the Architectural Access
Board also has the responsibility to review and approve plans for new buildings and structural
modifications to existing buildings to ensure that the University is providing access to its programs as
required by the ADA.


                           AFFIRMATIVE ACTION FOR VETERANS

                                                Policy

        The University of Massachusetts Amherst will not discriminate against any employee or
applicant for employment because he or she is a disabled veteran, a Vietnam-era veteran, or any
other veteran who served on active duty during a war or in a campaign or expedition for which a
campaign badge has been authorized. Furthermore, the University of Massachusetts Amherst agrees
to take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified special disabled veterans,
veterans of the Vietnam era, or any other veteran who served on active duty during a war or in a
campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge has been authorized, consistent with the
Provisions of the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, as amended.

                                             Procedures

         Accommodation to Physical and Mental Limitations. The University makes reasonable
accommodations to the physical and mental limitations of disabled veterans.
         Compensation. The University does not reduce the compensation offered to a veteran
because she or he receives disability income, pension or other benefits as a result of military service.
         Recruitment and Outreach. Vacancy announcements are sent weekly to the Department of
Employment & Training in Northampton, Massachusetts. The University sends written notification
to all subcontractors, vendors, and suppliers that it takes seriously its requirement to provide
affirmative action to protected groups of veterans.
         Reporting. The University completes the annual VETS-100 report, and files it with the
Office of Veterans’ Employment and Training Service, U.S. Department of Labor.
         Support Services. Veteran’s Assistance and Counseling Services (413-545-0939) assists
veteran students with gaining access to vocational rehabilitation, tuition exemption, health care, and
other services for which the individual veteran may be eligible.
         Workforce Representation. Campus-wide representation of veterans and persons with
disabilities including disabled veterans is monitored by the EO&D Office.


          PROGRAM TO COMBAT DISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE

         The University prohibits discrimination on the basis of age in any aspect of the access to,
admission, or treatment of students in its programs and activities; or in employment and application
for employment consistent with the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as amended,
and state law. Language which prohibits discrimination based on age is contained in University
affirmative action policies, statements and nondiscrimination clauses contained in collective
bargaining agreements. To prevent the consideration of age in the applicant selection process for
classified positions, applicant age is not provided to hiring officials on applicant profile summaries.


                                                  106
Hiring officials are informed through the Search Procedures: Faculty & Professional Staff that any
pre-employment inquiry pertaining to age is unfair and illegal.


                PROGRAM TO COMBAT DISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS
                           OF SEXUAL ORIENTATION

        The University, by including sexual orientation in its nondiscrimination statement, does not
endorse a particular lifestyle, nor does it require preferential treatment or affirmative action for those
with a particular sexual orientation. Discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is prohibited by
Massachusetts General Law 151 B, Section 4 and University policy.
        It is important to note that language which prohibits discrimination based on sexual
orientation is contained in the MSP, USA/MTA, AFSCME, SEIU, and GEO contracts. The Code of
Student Conduct clearly prohibits students from harassing other members of the campus community
on the basis of sexual orientation. The Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office, in conjunction with
other appropriate offices on campus, will vigorously investigate and take appropriate action in cases
where discrimination based on sexual orientation occurs.
        The campus community will be informed annually of its obligation concerning
nondiscrimination through published media.


       PROGRAM TO COMBAT DISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF RELIGION

        The University prohibits discrimination against employees or applicants for employment and
in the admission or treatment of students because of religion or national origin. The University
provides reasonable accommodation for religious observance. Each benefited employee receives
three or more personal days a year to accommodate, among other things, religious practices.
Employees may also use annual leave to observe religious holidays that are not legal holidays. Other
requests for religious accommodation will be honored so long as they do not cause undue hardship in
carrying out the university mission nor violate the rights of other employees.


                                   GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

         The University has established a system of grievance procedures to address complaints of
alleged discrimination based on race, sex, sexual orientation, color, religion, creed, age, marital
status, national origin, veteran status, and disability. Grievants are encouraged to resolve complaints
informally by working with the relevant parties and administrators. The Ombuds Office and the
Dean of Students Office together with the EO&D Office are available to assist in this resolution
process. Formal charges of discrimination should be directed to the campus EO&D Office, 305
Whitmore Administration Building, (413) 545-3464. A copy of the University’s Grievance Policy
and Procedures is included in Appendix H.
         The University has a separate Sexual Harassment Grievance Procedure to address complaints
of sexual harassment, and provides both informal and formal methods for complaint resolution.
Informal attempts may involve consultations at the department level, or mediation through the
Ombuds Office, or other appropriate agency. Complaints involving students as respondents would
normally be handled through the Dean of Students Office, under the Code of Student Conduct.
Formal charges of sexual harassment should be directed to the EO&D Office. The Sexual
Harassment Policy is included in Appendix F.


                                                   107
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                                    108
             Appendix A


UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST
   ORGANIZATIONAL UNIT SUMMARY




                109
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                                    110
                                              Appendix B

                 PROTECTED CATEGORIES OF PERSONS REQUIRING
              EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EFFORTS


   Native American/Alaskan Native. Persons having origins in any of the original peoples of North
    America, and who maintain cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community
    recognition.

   Asian/Pacific Islander. Persons having origins in the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian sub-
    continent or Pacific Islands. These areas include, China, Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands,
    Samoa, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Sikkim, and Bhutan.

   Black, not of Hispanic Origin. Persons having origins in any of the Black racial groups in Africa.

   Hispanic. All persons of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central American, South American, or
    other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. Persons who may have adopted the spanish
    culture but are not otherwise of Spanish origin are to be treated according to their racial identity.

   Women.

   Disabled. A person who (1) has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or
    more of such person's major life activities, (2) has a record of such an impairment, or (3) is
    regarded as having such an impairment. "Life activities" are defined as those which affect
    employability. "Substantially limits" means the degree that the impairment affects employability.

   Vietnam-era Veteran. A veteran, any part of whose active military, navel or air service was
    during the period 8/5/64 through 5/7/75, who (1) served on active duty for a period of more than
    180 days and was discharged or released therefrom with other than a dishonorable discharge, or (2)
    was discharged or released from active duty because of a service connected disability.

   Special Disabled Veteran. (1) a veteran who is entitled to compensation under the laws
    administered by the Veterans Administration for a disability (a) rated at 30% or more, or (b) rated
    at 10% or 20% in the case of a veteran who has been determined under 38 U.S.C. § 1506 to have a
    serious employment handicap, or (2) a person who was discharged or released from active duty
    because of a service-connected disability.

   Other Veteran. Any other veteran who served on active duty during a war or in a campaign or
    expedition for which a campaign badge has been authorized.

   Persons Age 40 and above. (Equal Employment Opportunity Only)

   Gay, Lesbian & Bisexual. (Equal Employment Opportunity Only)

NOTE: Information regarding membership in protected categories is based on voluntary,
      self-disclosed information.




                                                  111
                                                                    Appendix C

                           EEO-6 JOB CATEGORIES AND UNIVERSITY JOB GROUPS


EEO-6 CATEGORY 1                                    EEO-6 CATEGORY 3                             PROFESSIONAL NON FACULTY-NOT
EXECUTIVE/ADMINISTRATIVE/                           PROFESSIONAL NON-FACULTY                     OTHERWISE SPECIFIED
MANAGERIAL (EAM)                                                                                 STAFF ASSISTANT
                                                                                                 STAFF ASSOCIATE
                                                    ADMINISTRATIVE
EAM-A                                               AA/EO, AUDITORS, BUDGET,                     ALLIED HEALTH
CHANCELLOR                                          CONTROLLERS, FISCAL                          DENTAL, MENTAL HEALTH,
DEPUTY CHANCELLOR                                   MANAGEMENT,                                  OPTOMETRY, PHARMACY,
PROVOST                                             GRANTS/CONTRACTS, HUMAN                      PHYSICAL THERAPY
VICE CHANCELLOR                                     RESOURCES, PROGRAM
                                                    ADMINISTRATORS, PURCHASING,
EAM-B                                               RETAIL MANAGERS                              EEO-6 CATEGORY 4
DEAN                                                                                             SECRETARIAL/CLERICAL
MAJOR DIVISION HEAD                                 EDUCATION/TRAINING
                                                    ATHLETIC COACHES, COUNSELORS,
EAM-C                                               DAYCARE, PLACEMENT,                          ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT
ASSOCIATE DEAN                                      RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION, SPECIAL               ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT I, II
ASSISTANT DEAN                                      SERVICES, TRAINERS                           ASSISTANT MANAGER
ASSOCIATE PROVOST                                                                                CLERK IV, V
ASSOCIATE VICE CHANCELLOR                           INSTITUTIONAL RELATIONS                      INFORMATION OFFICER I
ASSISTANT VICE CHANCELLOR                           CONFERENCE SERVICES,                         REPRODUCTIVE SERVICES
EXECUTIVE LEVEL ADMINISTRATOR                       DEVELOPMENT, EDITORS,                         SUPERVISOR
                                                    FUNDRAISING, PUBLICATIONS,                   STOREKEEPER IV
EAM D                                               SPECIAL EVENTS
MAJOR DEPARTMENT HEAD                                                                            SECRETARIES, CLERKS, TYPISTS
                                                    LIBRARY SCIENCES                             CLERICAL ASSISTANT
                                                    LIBRARIAN II-V                               CLERK I-III
EEO-6 CATEGORY 2                                                                                 COMMUNICATION DISPATCHER II
FACULTY                                             RESEARCH/POST-DOCTORATES                     MEDICAL RECORDS CLERK
                                                    POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH                        MEDICAL SECRETARY
                                                    ASSOCIATE                                    STATISTICAL CLERK I
TENURE SYSTEM FACULTY,                              RESEARCH FELLOW                              STENOGRAPHER I, II
 BY DEPARTMENTA                                     SENIOR POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH                 TELEPHONE OPERATOR I, II
PROFESSOR                                           ASSOCIATE                                    TYPIST I, II
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR                                 SENIOR RESEARCH FELLOW
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR                                                                              DATA ENTRY OPERATORS
INSTRUCTOR                                          MEDICAL CARE                                 EDP ENTRY OPERATOR I-III
                                                    NURSES AND MEDICAL DOCTORS
OTHER FACULTY,                                                                                   FINANCIAL RECORDS
 BY DEPARTMENTB                                     TECHNICAL                                    BOOKKEEPER I, II
LECTURER                                            ANALYSTS, ARCHITECTS,                        RECEIVING TELLER I, II
VISITING PROFESSOR                                  COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS, DPC,
VISITING ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR                        ENGINEERS, FINE ARTS CENTER                  DUPLICATING, MAIL
VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR                        OPERATIONS, LABORATORY,                      MAIL CLERK II, III
                                                    OPERATORS, TECHNICIANS                       OFFSET DUPL. MACHINE OPERATOR
                                                                                                  I, II




A
    Includes Department Chair/Head and Division Head
B
    Includes post-retirement faculty and non-tenure-track faculty

NOTE: Job group divisions are based on the nature of job content and do not imply a hierarchy.




                                                                       112
LIBRARY                        EEO-6 CATEGORY 6                   BAKER I
LIBRARY ASSISTANT I-III        SKILLED CRAFTS                     COOK I
LIBRARIAN I                                                       DIETARY WORKER I
                                                                  DINING ROOM ATTENDANT
SALES                          MECHANICS & REPAIRERS, NON-        HEAD DISHROOM ATTENDANT
SALES CLERK I-III              SUPERVISORY
STOREKEEPER II, III            ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN I           CLEANING & BUILDING SERVICES,
ACCOMMODATION CLERK I, II      LOCKSMITH                          NON-SUPERVISORY
                               MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN I, II       FACILITY SERVICE WORKER I, II
                               MAINTENANCE WORKER                 GAMES MANAGER
EEO-6 CATEGORY 5               MOTOR EQUIPMENT MECHANIC           JANITOR
TECHNICAL/PARAPROFESSIONAL     RECREATION FACILITIES REPAIRER     LAUNDERER I
                               TRADESWORKER                       MAINTAINER I
                                                                  SKILLED LABORER
SCIENCE & OTHER TECHNICIANS    SKILLED CRAFTS, SUPERVISORS
ANIMAL CARETAKER I, II         ASBESTOS ABATEMENT WORKER II       MOTOR VEHICLE OPERATORS
AUDIO-VISUAL EQUIPMENT         ASST. PLUMBER & STEAMFITTER        CHAUFFEUR
 TECHNICIAN I, II               FOREMAN                           MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT
DESIGN ILLUSTRATOR             CARPENTER II                        OPERATOR
EXTENSION TECHNICIAN           CHIEF PLANNER & ESTIMATOR          MOTOR TRUCK DRIVER
GRAPHIC ARTS TECHNICIAN I      CONTROL SYSTEMS SPECIALIST
LABORATORY ASSISTANT           ELECTRICIAN II                     FARMING & FORESTRY
LABORATORY TECHNICIAN I        ELEVATOR REPAIRMAN                 ASSISTANT TO FARM
PHOTO TECHNICIAN I             INST. MAINTENANCE FOREMAN           SUPERINTENDENT
RESEARCH ASSISTANT             MAINTENANCE WORKING FOREMAN        FARM SUPERINTENDENT
RESEARCH ASSOCIATE             MASON FOREMAN                      FARM WORKER I, II
TECHNICAL ASSISTANT I, II      METAL WORKER II                    HORSEMAN
TECHNICAL SPECIALIST I, II     MOTOR EQUIPMENT MECHANIC II-IV     HEAD OF GROUNDS SERVICE
                               PAINTER II                          SECTION
COMPUTER, ENGINEERING &        PLUMBER & STEAMFITTER II           SUPERINTENDENT OF GROUNDS
RELATED TECHNICIANS
ASST MANAGER, COMPUTER         CONSTRUCTION TRADES, NON-          GUARDS, INSTITUTIONAL
 OPERATORS                     SUPERVISORY                        INSTITUTIONAL SECURITY OFFICER
CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATOR         APPRENTICE I-IV                     I-III
DRAFTSMAN                      ASBESTOS ABATEMENT WORKER I        HEAD PARKING GARAGE
EDP PROGRAMMER I-III           CARPENTER I                         ATTENDANT
EDP SYSTEMS ANALYST III        ELECTRICIAN I                      PARKING CONTROL OFFICER I, II
ELECTRONIC COMPUTER OPERATOR   FLOOR COVERING INSTALLER &         PARKING GARAGE ATTENDANT
 I, II                          REPAIRER I, II                    PARKING METER SERVICE
ENGINEERING AIDE I             HEATING, VENTILATING, AIR COND.,    ATTENDANT
                                & REFRIG. MECHANIC
FIRE & SAFETY OFFICER          MASON                              FOOD PREPARATION & SERVICES,
FIRE & SAFETY OFFICER          METAL WORKER I                     SUPERVISORY
                               PAINTER I                          ASST. FOODS MANAGER
BUSINESS & RELATED             PLUBMER & STEAMFITTER I            BAKER II
ACCOUNTANT I-III               SIGN PAINTER & LETTERER I          COOK II, III
BUYER I, II                    STEAMFITTER                        DINING HALL SUPERVISOR
                               UPHOLSTERER                        HEAD BAKER
HEALTH SERVICES                                                   SNACK BAR MANAGER
DENTAL ASSISTANT               PLANT & SYSTEM OPERATION
DIETICIAN I                    FIRST CLASS POWER PLANT            CLEANING & BUILDING SERVICES,
NURSING ASSISTANT I, II         ENGINEER                          SUPERVISORY
NUTRITION AIDE                 POWER PLANT ATTENDANT              ACCOM. SRV. NIGHT MANAGER
PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT   SECOND CLASS POWER PLANT           CUSTODIAL AREA SUPERVISOR
SUPERVISOR, NUTRITION AIDE      ENGINEER                          HOUSING OPEARTIONS ASST.
X-RAY TECHNICIAN I             STEAM FIREMAN I, II                LAUNDERER II, III
                               WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT         MAINTAINER II, III
PROTECTIVE SERVICES             OPERATOR                          SUPERV. OF ACCOM. SERVICES
UNIV POLICE LIEUTENANT                                            SUPERVISOR OF JANITORS
UNIV POLICE OFFICER
UNIV POLICE SERGEANT           EEO-6 CATEGORY 7                   DEPARTMENTAL ASSISTANT
                               SERVICE/MAINTENANCE                DEPARTMENTAL ASSISTANT


                               FOOD PREPARATION & SERVICES,
                               NON-SUPERVISORY
                               ASSISTANT SNACK BAR MANAGER




                                              113
                                                                            Appendix D

                                               WORKFORCE REPRESENTATION OF PROTECTED GROUP MEMBERS
                                                    BY EEO-6 JOB CATEGORY WITHIN EXECUTIVE AREA
                                                                       3/31/00

EXECUTIVE AREA: Chancellor
                                  Total                         Total                                  Asian/        American
                               Employees         Female       Minorities              Black         Pacific Isldr.     Indian      Hispanic    Veteran Disabled
                                    #          #       %      #       %           #           %      #        %      #        %    #      %       #       #
EEO-6 Category 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM)

Total                                    9       3   33.3     1      11.1         1       11.1        0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0     0        0

EEO-6 Category 2: Faculty

Total                                    7       3   42.9     0       0.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0     0        0

EEO-6 Category 3: Professional Non-Faculty

Total                              187          69   36.9     19     10.2         7           3.8     6        3.2   1       0.5   5     2.7     3        1

EEO-6 Category 4: Secretarial/Clerical

Total                                55         44   80.0     7      12.7         1           1.8     3        5.5   1       1.8   2     3.6     0        0

EEO-6 Category 5: Technical/Paraprofessional

Total                                10          2   20.0     0       0.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0     0        0

EEO-6 Category 6: Skilled Crafts

Total                                17          1    5.9     0       0.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0     1        0

EEO-6 Category 7: Service/Maintenance

Total                                16          9   56.3     0       0.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0     1        0

GRAND TOTAL                        301         131   43.5     27      9.0         9           3.0     9        3.0   2       0.7   7     2.3     5        1




                                                                                114
                                                                      Appendix D (continued)

                                               WORKFORCE REPRESENTATION OF PROTECTED GROUP MEMBERS
                                                    BY EEO-6 JOB CATEGORY WITHIN EXECUTIVE AREA
                                                                       3/31/00

EXECUTIVE AREA: Academic Affairs
                                  Total                          Total                                  Asian/        American
                               Employees         Female        Minorities              Black         Pacific Isldr.     Indian      Hispanic    Veteran Disabled
                                    #          #       %       #       %          #            %      #        %      #        %    #      %       #       #
EEO-6 Category 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM)

Total                                38         19   50.0      5      13.2         5       13.2        0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0     1        1

EEO-6 Category 2: Faculty

Total                              1,459       444   30.4     203     13.9        57           3.9    93        6.4   5       0.4   48    3.3    31       10

EEO-6 Category 3: Professional Non-Faculty

Total                               799        442   55.3      97     12.2        19           2.4    51        6.4   5       0.6   22    2.8    16        0

EEO-6 Category 4: Secretarial/Clerical

Total                               527        491   93.2      29      5.5        14           2.7     3        0.6   2       0.4   10    1.9     3        4

EEO-6 Category 5: Technical/Paraprofessional

Total                               150         73   48.7      24     16.0         7           4.7     6        4.0   0       0.0   11    7.3     4        2

EEO-6 Category 6: Skilled Crafts

Total                                    6       0    0.0      0       0.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0     1        0

EEO-6 Category 7: Service/Maintenance

Total                                47         22   46.8      4       8.5         0           0.0     4        8.5   0       0.0   0     0.0     0        0

GRAND TOTAL                        3,026     1,491   49.3     362     12.0       102           3.4   157        5.2   12      0.4   91    3.0    56       17




                                                                                115
                                                                      Appendix D (continued)

                                               WORKFORCE REPRESENTATION OF PROTECTED GROUP MEMBERS
                                                    BY EEO-6 JOB CATEGORY WITHIN EXECUTIVE AREA
                                                                       3/31/00

EXECUTIVE AREA: Administration & Finance
                                  Total                          Total                                  Asian/        American
                               Employees         Female        Minorities              Black         Pacific Isldr.     Indian      Hispanic    Veteran Disabled
                                    #          #       %       #       %          #            %      #        %      #        %    #      %       #       #
EEO-6 Category 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM)

Total                                28          7   25.0      2       7.2         1           3.6     1        3.6   0       0.0   0     0.0     6        1

EEO-6 Category 3: Professional Non-Faculty

Total                               196         76   38.8      18      9.2         8           4.1     7        3.6   1       0.5   2     1.0    15        1

EEO-6 Category 4: Secretarial/Clerical

Total                               245        187   76.3      22      9.0        12           4.9     4        1.6   1       0.4   5     2.1     8        3

EEO-6 Category 5: Technical/Paraprofessional

Total                                83         16   19.3      1       1.2         0           0.0     1        1.2   0       0.0   0     0.0    12        1

EEO-6 Category 6: Skilled Crafts

Total                               205         10    4.9      13      6.4         5           2.4     0        0.0   4       2.0   4     2.0    26        5

EEO-6 Category 7: Service/Maintenance

Total                               556        198   35.6     108     19.4        20           3.6   63       11.3    2       0.4   23    4.1    37       10

GRAND TOTAL                        1,313       494   37.6     164     12.5        46           3.5   76         5.8   8       0.6   34    2.6   104       21




                                                                                116
                                                                     Appendix D (continued)

                                               WORKFORCE REPRESENTATION OF PROTECTED GROUP MEMBERS
                                                    BY EEO-6 JOB CATEGORY WITHIN EXECUTIVE AREA
                                                                       3/31/00

EXECUTIVE AREA: University Advancement
                                  Total                         Total                                  Asian/        American
                               Employees         Female       Minorities              Black         Pacific Isldr.     Indian      Hispanic     Veteran Disabled
                                    #          #       %      #       %          #            %      #        %      #        %    #      %        #       #
EEO-6 Category 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM)

Total                                    4       1   25.0     0       0.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   0      0.0     1        0

EEO-6 Category 3: Professional Non-Faculty

Total                                77         53   68.8     6       7.8         6           7.8     0        0.0   0       0.0   0      0.0     2        0

EEO-6 Category 4: Secretarial/Clerical

Total                                34         33   97.1     1       3.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   1      3.0     0        1

EEO-6 Category 5: Technical/Paraprofessional

Total                                    5       3   60.0     1      20.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   1     20.0     0        0

GRAND TOTAL                        120          90   75.0     8       6.7         6           5.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   2      1.7     3        1




                                                                               117
                                                                      Appendix D (continued)

                                               WORKFORCE REPRESENTATION OF PROTECTED GROUP MEMBERS
                                                    BY EEO-6 JOB CATEGORY WITHIN EXECUTIVE AREA
                                                                       3/31/00

EXECUTIVE AREA: Student Affairs
                                  Total                          Total                                  Asian/        American
                               Employees         Female        Minorities              Black         Pacific Isldr.     Indian      Hispanic     Veteran Disabled
                                    #          #       %       #       %          #            %      #        %      #        %    #      %        #       #
EEO-6 Category 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM)

Total                                28         16   57.2      8      28.6         3       10.7        1        3.6   0       0.0   4     14.3     3        1

EEO-6 Category 3: Professional Non-Faculty

Total                              292         203   69.5      63     21.6        27           9.3   14         4.8   6       2.1   16     5.5     7        3

EEO-6 Category 4: Secretarial/Clerical

Total                              152         134   88.2      25     16.5        13           8.6     5        3.3   2       1.3   5      3.3     0        0

EEO-6 Category 5: Technical/Paraprofessional

Total                                89         37   41.6      13     14.6         8           9.0     1        1.1   0       0.0   4      4.5     0        0

EEO-6 Category 6: Skilled Crafts

Total                                51          5    9.8      3       5.9         0           0.0     0        0.0   1       2.0   2      3.9     6        0

EEO-6 Category 7: Service/Maintenance

Total                              199          88   44.2      50     25.1         9           4.5   22       11.1    2       1.0   17     8.6     9        4

GRAND TOTAL                        811         483   59.6     162     20.0        60           7.4   43         5.3   11      1.4   48     5.9    25        8




                                                                                118
                                                                                   Appendix D (continued)

                                                      WORKFORCE REPRESENTATION OF PROTECTED GROUP MEMBERS
                                                           BY EEO-6 JOB CATEGORY WITHIN EXECUTIVE AREA
                                                                              3/31/00

EXECUTIVE AREA: Research & Graduate Studies
                                  Total                                       Total                                  Asian/        American
                               Employees         Female                     Minorities              Black         Pacific Isldr.     Indian      Hispanic        Veteran Disabled
                                    #          #       %                    #       %          #            %      #        %      #        %    #      %           #       #
EEO-6 Category 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM)

Total                                        6            1          16.7   0       0.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0         0        0

EEO-6 Category 2: Faculty

Total                                        3            0           0.0   0       0.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0         0        0

EEO-6 Category 3: Professional Non-Faculty

Total                                      41            19          46.4   0       0.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0         3        0

EEO-6 Category 4: Secretarial/Clerical

Total                                      27            26          96.3   1       3.7         1           3.7     0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0         0        0

EEO-6 Category 5: Technical/Paraprofessional

Total                                      10             8          80.0   0       0.0         0           0.0     0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0         0        0

EEO-6 Category 7: Service/Maintenance

Total                                        1            --           --   --           --    --            --    --         --   --       --   --         --     --      --

GRAND TOTAL                                88            54          61.4   1       1.1         1           1.1     0        0.0   0       0.0   0     0.0         3        0


NOTE: Data not reported for units with fewer than three employees.




                                                                                              119
                                                                             Appendix E

                                          WORKFORCE REPRESENTATION BY RACIAL/ETHNIC ORIGIN AND GENDER
                                                            BY EEO-6 JOB CATEGORY
                                                                     3/31/00

                                                               Male                                                                       Female
                     Total                                Asian/          Native                                                      Asian/           Native
                   Employees    Total       Black      Pacific Isldr.   American           Hispanic    Total         Black         Pacific Isldr.    American      Hispanic
                       #          #       #       %     #        %      #       %          #      %     #        #           %      #        %       #       %     #      %
EEO-6 Category 1: Executive/Administrative/Managerial (EAM)

Total                   113          7       4     3.5    1      0.9    0      0.0     2         1.8    9       6            5.3    1       0.9     0       0.0   2      1.8

EEO-6 Category 2: Faculty

Total                 1,469        144    38       2.6   73      5.0    3      0.2     30        2.1   59       19           1.3   20       1.4     2       0.1   18     1.2

EEO-6 Category 3: Professional Non-Faculty

Total                 1,592        101    34       2.1   43      2.7    4      0.3     20        1.3   102      33           2.1   35       2.2     9       0.6   25     1.6

EEO-6 Category 4: Secretarial/Clerical

Total                 1,040         15       7     0.7    2      0.2    3      0.3     3         0.3   70       34           3.3   13       1.3     3       0.3   20     1.9

EEO-6 Category 5: Technical/Paraprofessional

Total                   347         17       9     2.6    4      1.2    0      0.0     4         1.2   22       6            1.7    4       1.2     0       0.0   12     3.5

EEO-6 Category 6: Skilled Crafts

Total                   279         16       5     1.8    0      0.0    5      1.8     6         2.2    0       0            0.0    0       0.0     0       0.0   0      0.0

EEO-6 Category 7: Service/Maintenance

Total                   819         96    20       2.5   42      5.1    4      0.5     30        3.7   66       9            1.1   47       5.7     0       0.0   10     1.2

GRAND TOTAL           5,659        396   117       2.1 165       2.9    19     0.3     95        1.7   328     107           1.9 120        2.1     14      0.3   87     1.5



                                                                                     120
                                              Appendix F

                                University of Massachusetts Amherst

                                 SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY


                                               Preamble

       The University of Massachusetts Amherst is committed to providing faculty, staff and students
with an environment where they may pursue their careers or studies without being sexually harassed.
Sexual harassment, as here defined, is a violation of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. For the
purposes of this policy, it is defined as follows:

             Unwelcomed sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or
             physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when: 1)
             submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or
             condition of an individual's employment or academic work; or 2) submission
             to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for
             employment or academic decisions affecting such individual; or 3) such
             conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an
             individual's work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or
             offensive working or academic environment.

In determining whether an alleged incident constitutes sexual harassment, those entrusted with
administering this policy will look at the totality of the circumstances, such as the nature of the sexual
advances and the context in which the alleged incidents occurred. The determination of a suitable
penalty will be made from a finding of fact on a case-by-case basis and from any record of previous
sexual harassment by the respondent.

                                               Procedure

       The Office of Affirmative Action will be responsible for administering this policy and its
procedures. The Director of Affirmative Action will serve as Chair of the Sexual Harassment Hearing
Board. The University's Vice Chancellors will see that all supervisors on the Amherst campus receive
information and training concerning sexual harassment and the responsibilities of supervisors when
complaints are received.


                                          I. Purpose and Scope

        This grievance procedure is intended to provide a fair, prompt and reliable determination about
whether the University's sexual harassment policy has been violated. It is available to anyone who, at
the time of the alleged harassment, was either employed by or enrolled at the University of
Massachusetts Amherst. No University employee or student is exempt from the jurisdiction of this
policy.




                                                   121
        In most instances, the complainant will be the victim of the alleged harassment. However, the
University reserves the right to initiate a formal complaint against an employee or student when the
alleged victim is unwilling or unable to serve as a complainant, but is willing and able to serve as a
witness. The Chair of the Sexual Harassment Board will determine when the University should press
charges against a respondent and, in such instances, the Chair, with the approval of the Chancellor, will
designate who will present the University's case.

        As in any grievance procedure, justice requires that the legal rights as well as the right to
academic freedom of the complainant and the respondent be fully assured. The University will make
every effort to protect these rights and will undertake no action that threatens or compromises them.

        This procedure is not intended to impair or limit the right of anyone to seek a remedy available
under state or federal law. A complainant may file a complaint with an external agency to meet state
and federal agency deadlines without jeopardizing his or her right to a University hearing. However, if
a complainant seeks relief outside the University, the University will not be obliged to continue
processing a grievance while the case is being considered by an outside agency or court.

         If the respondent in a formal grievance is an undergraduate student, the Dean of Students will
be notified, and a hearing process as described in the undergraduate Code of Student Conduct will be
initiated. Graduate student respondents will be referred to the Dean of the Graduate School (or his or
her designee) who will provide a hearing process analogous to the one described in the undergraduate
Code of Student Conduct.

        If the respondent is a member of the Chancellor's Staff, the Chancellor will serve the role
described for the respondent's Vice Chancellor in this procedure.


                               II. The Sexual Harassment Hearing Board

        The Chancellor will appoint a Sexual Harassment Hearing Board of twenty-five members, each
for a term of three years which may be renewed. The members will include at least: four faculty
members, four members of the professional staff, four classified employees, four undergraduate
students, and four graduate students. The Director of the Office of Affirmative Action will chair the
board. Within ten working days of receiving a formal complaint, the Chair will name three members
from the Board to constitute the Hearing Panel. At least one member of each Panel will be drawn from
the complainant's and respondent's respective constituencies (that is, graduate or undergraduate student,
faculty member, professional staff, or classified employee). The Chair will designate one member to
serve as the Presiding Officer.

        The members of the panel will act at all times to preserve confidentiality. Once each year, new
panel members will participate in a workshop designed to educate them about the issues encompassing
sexual harassment as well as to the procedures for conducting a sexual harassment hearing which are
described below.




                                                  122
                                             III. Deadlines

        A complainant will have twelve months following an incident to file a complaint unless he or
she can show good reason (as determined by the Chair of the Sexual Harassment Board) for having that
deadline waived. The people charged with administering this process will endeavor to meet all
deadlines, but failure to do so will not prevent the process from continuing. The complainant or the
respondent must demonstrate to the Chair's satisfaction some prejudice stemming from a delay before
this process will be stopped. Deadlines cited in this document are intended to serve as outside limits
for actions to occur. In the interest of the parties concerned, all matters should be handled as
expeditiously as possible.

       If a respondent fails to answer a charge or to participate in a hearing concerning sexual
harassment, his or her Vice Chancellor will be notified of that fact by the Chair of the Sexual
Harassment Board. Failure to respond to a charge or to appear at a hearing will be considered a breach
of an employee's or student's responsibility. Furthermore, a respondent will not prevent this process
from proceeding by his or her silence or absence. Failure to respond may result in the hearing
proceeding solely on the basis of the complainant's testimony and evidence.

        A complainant may withdraw a charge after it has been filed, provided the respondent agrees to
the withdrawal.


                                             IV. Retaliation

         No individual will be penalized by the University or by any person for participating in the
procedures described here. Since retaliation is a violation of federal Civil Rights law concerning sexual
harassment, any act of retaliation directed against either a complainant or a respondent will be subject
to this grievance procedure. Complaints of retaliation should be addressed to the Chair of the Sexual
Harassment Board, who will advise the grieving party of his or her rights in this manner. The
Affirmative Action Office will assist the victim of retaliation in preparing a complaint which will then
be processed in the same manner as a sexual harassment complaint.


                                          V. Informal Process

       Persons with sexual harassment complaints are encouraged to consult first with the Affirmative
Action Office to learn about the options and resources available to them.

        In some circumstances informal resolution of a complaint (prior to filing a grievance) may be
more satisfactory than directly proceeding to a formal grievance. Agencies for informal resolutions
may include, but are not limited to, any one or more of the following: consultation and action at the
department level; mediation through the Ombuds Office, the Mediation Project or any other appropriate
agency; advice and assistance of legal counsel; advice and assistance of the Department of Public
Safety.




                                                  123
                                        VI. Filing a Complaint

        Any individual who chooses to file a formal sexual harassment complaint should do so in the
Affirmative Action Office within twelve months of the incident. The Office will advise complainants
about the formal grievance procedure as well as possible sanctions and forms of relief. When
appropriate, the Office may also recommend counseling or other support services which provide victim
assistance.

        The Office will maintain a record of all complaints received, including complainants' and
respondents' names, and the outcome of proceedings, including sanctions imposed. At the end of every
academic year the Office will prepare an annual report of statistics and relevant commentary for the
Executive Vice Chancellor. As far as possible, the report will contain no information which could lead
to identification of the parties. The annual report will be available to faculty, staff and students upon
request to the Executive Vice Chancellor.


                                         VII. Formal Procedure

       A complainant may file a formal complaint immediately or may do so after efforts to reach an
informal settlement prove unsuccessful.

        The complaint will be written on a standard form by the complainant with the assistance of the
Affirmative Action Office; it will state clearly and concisely the complainant's description of the
incident; it will also indicate any remedy sought. The complaint must be signed by the complainant.
Remaining neutral, the Office will send the respondent a copy of the complaint within five working
days after it is received. A copy of the complaint will also be sent to the respondent's Vice Chancellor.

        The respondent will have ten working days to respond in writing. The Affirmative Action
Office will be available to assist with the preparation of the response to the complaint. This statement,
written on a standard form, will contain full and specific responses to each claim in the complaint,
admitting, denying or explaining the complainant's allegations. The respondent must sign his or her
statement which will then be appended to the original complaint. Within three working days, the
Affirmative Action Office will forward both statements to the complainant, the respondent, the
respondent's Vice Chancellor, and the Chair of the Sexual Harassment Board.

        There will be two modes of resolution for formal complaints. A complaint may be settled
through mediation or through a hearing. If the complainant and respondent agree to pursue mediation,
they will be referred to the Ombudsperson. Remaining neutral, the Ombudsperson will consult and
advise both the complainant and the respondent about the mediation process. If the Ombudsperson
perceives any conflict of interest in the case, or upon request of either party, the Ombudsperson will
name an alternate mediator who is acceptable to all parties.

         If the mediation results in a mutually acceptable agreement, copies of the agreement will be
forwarded to the Affirmative Action Office. If the mediation does not result in an agreement, the case
will be returned to the Affirmative Action Office for a hearing.




                                                  124
         When a hearing is requested, the Chair of the Sexual Harassment Board will name three
members from the Board to constitute a Hearing Panel within ten working days after receiving the
request.


                                       VIII. The Hearing Panel

        Before a Hearing Panel is convened, each party to the proceeding will have the right to object
to the appointment of any panel member on the grounds that that member's participation would
jeopardize the party's right to a fair and reliable hearing. The Chair of the Sexual Harassment Board
will determine whether objections have merit and will judge whether a panel member will be seated.

        Before any case is heard by the Hearing Panel, the complainant and the respondent, along with
their advocates (if desired, in accordance with Section IX), will meet with the Presiding Officer of the
Hearing Panel to attempt to clarify the issues and to define the areas of disagreement. To encourage a
fair and focused hearing, the Presiding Officer will notify the Hearing Panel at the start of the
proceedings about the points of agreement and disagreement.

        The Hearing Panel will hear testimony and consider evidence related to the complaint. The
panel will determine whether the University policy on sexual harassment has been violated, and, if so,
will recommend appropriate penalty and relief to the Chair of the Sexual Harassment Board.


                   Duties and Powers of the Presiding Officer and the Hearing Panel

       The Presiding Officer will:

            1. ensure an orderly presentation of all evidence;

            2. ensure that the proceedings are accurately recorded; and

            3. see that a fair and impartial decision based on the issues and evidence presented at the
               hearing is issued by the Hearing Panel no later than ten working days after the
               conclusion of the hearing or, when written arguments are submitted, ten working days
               after their submission.

       The Hearing Panel will:

            1. conduct a fair and impartial hearing which ensures all the rights of all parties involved;

            2. define issues of contention;

            3. receive and consider all relevant evidence which reasonable people customarily rely
               upon in the conduct of serious business;




                                                  125
            4. ask relevant questions of the complainant, respondent, and any witness if needed to
               elicit information which may assist the Hearing Panel in making a decision;

            5. ensure that the complainant and respondent have full opportunity to present their claims
               orally or in writing, and to present witnesses and evidence which may establish their
               claims;

            6. continue the hearing to a subsequent date if necessary to permit either party to produce
               additional evidence, witnesses, or other relevant materials;

            7. change the date, time or place of the hearing on its own motion or for good reason
               shown by either party, and with due notice to all parties;

            8. permit both parties to submit written arguments within ten working days from the
               conclusion of the hearing;

            9. rule by majority vote on all questions of fact, interpretations of rules, regulations and
               policies, recommendations for penalties and relief, and any requests that are made
               during the hearing.

The Hearing Panel may consult with University Counsel or have his or her assistance at the hearing.


                                           IX. The Hearing

        The Hearing is intended to provide an opportunity to determine whether University policy has
been violated. Both parties will be given a full and fair hearing. The proceeding, although formal, is
not a court proceeding and the Hearing Panel will not be bound by the procedures and rules of evidence
of a court of law. In most instances, complainants and respondents will be expected to speak for
themselves. The Hearing Panel will hear and admit evidence which it believes is pertinent to the case.

       The Hearing Panel will conduct its hearings by the following procedures:

            1. Unless otherwise agreed by a majority of the Panel, a closed hearing will be held within
               ten working days after the Hearing Panel has been appointed.

            2. The complainant and respondent will have the opportunity to hear all testimony, to
               examine all evidence, to respond to any testimony, and to present evidence and
               witnesses which advance arguments relevant to the issues in contention.

            3. Each party will have the right to be accompanied and advised by two people at any
               stage of the proceedings one or both may be an attorney. However, advisors will not
               address the Hearing Panel directly except in special cases, and with permission of the
               Panel.




                                                 126
             4. If either party is a member of a collective bargaining unit, the advisors mentioned
                above may, upon the request of the party, be representatives of his or her union.
                However, neither party will be required to be advised by a union representative. When
                there is no request for union representation by a member of a union, the union will be
                notified that a hearing has been scheduled and will be allowed to send an observer.

             5. The hearing will be recorded on tape by the Hearing Panel and the tapes will become
                the property of the University. Subsequently, either party may have supervised access
                to the tapes by application to the Director of Affirmative Action.

The proceedings before the Hearing Panel will be as follows:

             1. The Presiding Officer will read the charge(s) and ask the respondent to either admit or
                challenge the allegation(s).

             2. The complainant may present a brief opening statement, followed by the same from the
                respondent.

             3. The Hearing Panel will give each party the opportunity to present all relevant evidence.

             4. Each party may make a concluding statement to the Hearing Panel.

             5. If either party wishes to submit any written argument after the hearing, he or she will
                notify the Presiding Officer within two working days after the hearing. The written
                argument will be submitted within ten working days after the hearing's conclusion.
             6. A Hearing Panel, by a majority vote of its members, may make other rules concerning
                the procedure of a hearing which it deems appropriate and consistent with this Sexual
                Harassment Policy.


                                     X. Decision of the Hearing Panel

        After all the evidence and testimony is presented, the Hearing Panel will convene for private
deliberations to determine whether the University's policy on sexual harassment has been violated. If
the panel finds that the policy has not been violated, that fact will be registered in all University records
pertaining to the case in the Ombuds Office, the Office of Affirmative Action, and the office of the
respondent's Vice Chancellor. If it has been violated, the Hearing Panel will prepare findings and will
recommend a penalty for the respondent and relief for the complainant. The findings of fact as well as
the recommended penalty and relief will be based solely on the testimony and evidence presented at the
hearing.

        The penalty should reflect the severity of the harassment. The penalties may include, but will
not be limited to, any one or combination of the following: verbal admonition, written warning placed
in the respondent's personnel file, probation, suspension without pay, demotion, removal from
administrative duties within a department, and dismissal. The Hearing Panel may also make
appropriate recommendations, such as professional counseling, and may recommend relief for the
complainant which reinstates and restores, as much as possible, the aggrieved party.




                                                    127
         The Hearing Panel will forward its findings and recommended penalty and relief to the Chair of
the Sexual Harassment Board. The Chair of the Sexual Harassment Board will review the
recommended penalty and any University records of the respondent's past sexual harassment violations.
The Chair will adjust the Hearing Panel's recommended penalty to take into account any record of
previous sexual harassment by the respondent. Any revision of the penalty, along with written reasons
for the revision, will be affixed to the Hearing Panel's decision.

        Within three working days after receiving the Panel's findings and recommendation, the Chair
of the Sexual Harassment Board will forward these, a record of the hearing, and any recommended
adjustment of the penalty to the respondent's Vice Chancellor. The Vice Chancellor will render his or
her written decision to the complainant, the respondent, and the Chair of the Sexual harassment Board
no later than fifteen working days after receiving the complete record of the hearing. The Vice
Chancellor will be responsible for determining and implementing both the penalty and relief. The Vice
Chancellor's determination of penalty and relief (including the dates by which each will be
implemented) will also be submitted in writing to the complainant, the respondent, and the Chair of the
Sexual Harassment Board.


                                              XI. Review

         Within ten working days after the complainant and the respondent receive a written copy of the
Vice Chancellor's decision, the respondent, the complainant or the Chair of the Sexual Harassment
Board may request a review by submitting a written petition to the Executive Vice Chancellor. (When
the respondent is an employee in Academic Affairs, the Chancellor will review the decision.) The
petition will set forth in detail the specific grounds upon which review is sought. The Executive Vice
Chancellor will forward a copy of the petition to the Chair of the Sexual Harassment Board, the
Hearing Panel, and both parties. The Executive Vice Chancellor will review the record of the case--the
taped record of the hearing, documents considered by the Panel, the Panel's findings and
recommendations, and any record of previous offenses--and may modify or vacate a Vice Chancellor's
decision. The Executive Vice Chancellor may, for example, decide that the Panel's findings are
unsupported by a preponderance of evidence, or that some aspect of the process violated an individual's
legal rights, academic freedom, or these procedures.

        The Executive Vice Chancellor may: a) affirm or revise the decision of the Vice Chancellor; or
b) request specific findings from the Panel; or c) remand the case to the Chair of the Sexual Harassment
Board for a new hearing. In the course of review, the Executive Vice Chancellor may consult with
University Counsel who will have access to the complete record of the case.

        The Executive Vice Chancellor will render a written decision within fifteen working days after
receipt of the petition for review, the decision of the Vice Chancellor, and the complete record of the
Hearing Panel. The Executive Vice Chancellor's decision will be sent to the Vice Chancellor, the
complainant, the respondent, the Hearing Panel, and the Chair of the Sexual Harassment Board. The
Executive Vice Chancellor's decision will constitute final University disposition of the matter.




                                                  128
                                             VII. Records

       Records of all formal mediations, hearings and reviews will be kept by the Office of
Affirmative Action. The records will be available to:

       •    the Chair of the Sexual Harassment Board,
       •    the Ombudsperson,
       •    a respondent's Vice Chancellor,
       •    the Executive Vice Chancellor, or
       •    the Chancellor

a) when determining an appropriate procedure or penalty for a subsequent sexual harassment
complaint, or b) when a complaint of retaliation is made, or c) when a decision is reviewed, or d) when
a respondent is a candidate for a supervisory position.

       The records will also be available to University Counsel if needed for any proceeding related to
these policies or procedures, whether internal to the University or in any judicial or administrative
proceeding in which the University, its trustees, officers, employees or agents are a party.


                                       XIII. Standard of Proof

        A violation of this sexual harassment policy will be found only where there is a preponderance
of evidence that a violation has occurred. The Hearing Panel, the Vice Chancellors and the Executive
Vice Chancellor will be bound to make their determinations based on this standard of proof.




AA & EO 10/86




                                                 129
                           Addendum to the Sexual Harassment Policy


I. Definition and Examples of Sexual Harassment

       Under the University Sexual Harassment Policy and consistent with federal and state law
sexual harassment is defined as follows:

       Unwelcomed sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or
       physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when: 1) submission
       to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an
       individual’s employment or academic work; or 2) submission to or rejection of such
       conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or academic decisions
       affecting such individual; or 3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of
       unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or creating an
       intimidating, hostile or offensive working or academic environment.

        While it is not possible to list all those circumstances that may constitute sexual harassment
the following are examples of conduct which, if unwelcome, may constitute sexual harassment
depending upon the totality of the circumstances, including the severity of the conduct and its
pervasiveness:

   Unwelcome sexual advances, whether they involve physical touching or not;
   Sexual epithets, jokes, written or oral references to sexual conduct, gossip regarding one’s sex
    life; comment on an individual’s body, comment about an individual’s sexual activity,
    deficiencies, or prowess;
   Displaying sexually suggestive objects, pictures, cartoons;
   Unwelcome leering, whistling, brushing against the body, sexual gestures, suggestive or insulting
    comments;
   Inquiries into one’s sexual experiences; and
   Discussion of one’s sexual activities.

II. Complaints of Sexual Harassment

        Complaints of sexual harassment may be lodged with your supervisor, department head, or
other appropriate supervisory/administrative individuals in your department.

        Complaints may also be brought to the attention of staff in the Equal Opportunity and
Diversity Office, 305 Whitmore Building, 545-3464, who can advise you of the relevant options and
procedures.

III. State and Federal Remedies

       In addition, if you believe you have been subjected to sexual harassment, you may file a
formal complaint with either or both of the government agencies set forth below.




                                                 130
1.      EEOC
        United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
        1 Congress Street, 10th Floor, Room 1001
        Boston, MA 02114
        (617) 565-3200

2.      MCAD
        Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination

        Boston Office:
        One Ashburton Place, Room 601
        Boston, MA 02108
        (617) 727-3990

        Springfield Office:
        436 Dwight Street, Room 220
        Springfield, MA 01103
        (413) 739-2145




11/96




                                        131
                                                Appendix G
   Campus Offices, Agencies, Organizations, and Groups Directly Concerned with Community,
     Diversity, and Social Justice Issues (not including Recognized Student Organizations)

Affirmative Action Advisory Board
ALANA Caucus
Bilingual Collegiate Program (BCP)
Bilingual Collegiate Program Advisory Board
Center for Diversity and Development/Housing Services
Center for Teaching
Chancellor's Counsel on Community, Diversity, and Social Justice
Chancellor's Task Force on Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Matters
Chancellor's Task Force on Jewish Awareness and Anti-Semitism
Committee for the Collegiate Education of Black and Other Minority Students (CCEBMS)
Committee for the Collegiate Education of Black and Other Minority Students Advisory Board
Community Disorders Unit/Public Safety
Cultural Centers: (Anacaona Cultural Center, Martin Luther King Center, Malcolm X Center, Josephine
White Eagle Center, United Asian Cultural Center, Latin American Cultural Center)
Disability Services
Enrollment Services
Everywoman's Center (EWC)
Everywoman's Center Advisory Board
Faculty Senate Council on the Status of Minorities
Faculty Senate Council on the Status of Women
Faculty Senate Council on Student Affairs and University Life
Graduate Student Recruitment and Retention
Hispanic Faculty and Staff Association
Human Relations Council
Human Relations Forums
Jewish Faculty and Staff Group
Learning Disability Support Services (LDSS)
Multicultural Conflict Resolution Team
Office of ALANA Affairs
Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity
Office of Human Relations
Office of Jewish Affairs
Office of Multicultural Programs, Fine Arts Center
Ombuds Office
Program for Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Concerns
Program for Students with Psychological and Medical Disabilities
Religious Affairs Committee
Residence Life/Housing Services
Social Justice Education Program
Training and Development
United Asian Learning and Resource Center (UALRC)
UALRC Advisory Board
University Observers




                                               132
                                              Appendix H

                                University of Massachusetts Amherst

                           GRIEVANCE POLICY AND PROCEDURES


                                              Introduction

The Amherst campus of the University of Massachusetts is committed in policy, principle, and practice
to maintain an environment which is divest of illegal discriminatory behavior and which provides equal
opportunity for all persons regardless of race, color, religion, creed, sex, age, marital status, national
origin, mental or physical disability, veteran status, or sexual orientation. This commitment is
consistent with federal and state laws and University policy. A major responsibility emanating from
this commitment is the provision of a fair, effective, and efficient mechanism that rectifies or eliminates
policies, practices, and actions that are discriminatory, lack provision for due process, or mitigate
against the Amherst campus' affirmative action efforts.

Outlined on the following pages are the procedures to be used in filing a grievance alleging
discrimination and a violation of the University's policies prohibiting such behavior. Questions
regarding details of this procedure should be addressed to the Equal Opportunity and Diversity
(EO&D) Office, Room 305 Whitmore.

In addition to this grievance procedure the EO&D Office has responsibility for the sexual harassment
grievance procedure which is a separate and distinct process.

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination and therefore a violation of federal and state laws
and University regulations. Sexual harassment is defined as:

                Unwelcomed sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other
                verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual
                harassment when: 1) submission to such conduct is made either
                explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's
                employment or academic work; 2) submission to or rejection of such
                conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or
                academic decisions affecting such individual; or 3) such conduct has
                the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's
                work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive
                working or academic environment.

For information regarding the Sexual Harassment Grievance Procedure, or if you or someone you
know has been sexually harassed on the Amherst campus, contact the EO&D Office.




                                                   133
                   I. Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Grievance Policy

Definition

A grievance is an actual or perceived cause for protest or complaint arising out of some perceived or
actual harm due to some action taken by the University or member(s) of the University community.
This alleged action has the impact of imposing on the individual his or her legal rights, or has the
impact of imposing on an individual's right to pursue an education or the right to work at the University
of Massachusetts without fear or intimidation. An affirmative action and equal opportunity grievance
alleges that this action caused the complainant to be treated differently on the basis of race, sex, color,
religion, creed, sex, age, marital status, national origin, mental or physical disability, veteran status, or
sexual orientation in violation of federal or state laws. In addition, the University of Massachusetts
Amherst specifically prohibits the differential treatment of employees, students, applicants for student
status or employment on the basis of political belief or affiliation, and membership or nonmembership
in any organization.

A grievance alleging discrimination is a written complaint submitted to the EO&D Office by
employees, applicants for employment, graduate students, or undergraduate students. Discrimination
charges may be brought by individuals, a group of individuals, or individuals on behalf of another
individual or group. A charge of discrimination must be filed with the EO&D Office in a written and
signed statement by the complainant detailing the facts related to the allegations of discrimination no
later than one calendar year from the alleged discriminatory act.

        Discriminatory behavior usually falls into two categories:

        1.      Discrimination Based on Disparate Treatment - Defined as treating some people less
                favorably than others because of the factors listed above. Intent to discriminate is
                important and sometimes can be inferred from the fact of differences of treatment.

        2.      Discrimination Based on Disparate Impact - Involves practices that fall more harshly
                on one group than another and cannot be justified by business necessity. (The intent to
                discriminate need not be shown in this case.)


                     II. Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Procedures
                                      for the Amherst Campus

The grievance process is intended to investigate and where possible resolve complaints of alleged
discrimination against prospective employees, employees, prospective students, and students involved
at the Amherst campus. The guidelines below are to be used by the EO&D Office to enable all
University complainants to use the grievance process to resolve the initiating problem without fear of
retaliation. These procedures are intended to ensure that the EO&D Office will conduct a thorough
impartial investigation of all allegations of discrimination. The procedures should aid complainants
and the University representatives in arriving at just resolutions.




                                                    134
The EO&D grievance process is comprised of two procedures - the formal procedure and the informal
procedure.


A. Informal Procedure

       1.     Informal Resolution of Dispute

              a.        In an attempt to encourage prompt resolution of potential grievances, any of the
                        parties involved may request the intervention of the EO&D Office to resolve
                        the matter informally. The EO&D Office will attempt to resolve the matter
                        informally with the administrators closest to and best able to discuss the
                        situation. Informal resolution attempts will not have precedential value nor will
                        any statements or efforts made to resolve the matter informally have prejudicial
                        effect on any formal grievances.

              b.        The EO&D Office may initiate a review in the absence of a request by the
                        allegedly aggrieved party but only on the basis of significant evidence.

              c.        Informal attempts at settlement will not extend beyond thirty calendar days
                        without the written agreement of all parties. If the complainant requests an
                        attempt at informal settlement, then he or she will not be free to make a formal
                        complaint with the office until an informal settlement is proposed or the thirty
                        days have elapsed whichever comes first.

B. Formal Procedure

       1. Initiation of Formal Internal Complaint

              a.        An individual or group of individuals may initiate a formal complaint by
                        detailing the factors related to the allegations of discrimination in a written and
                        signed statement.

              b.        These allegations are filed with the EO&D Office, 305 Whitmore Building.
                        The telephone number is (413) 545-3464. The Office will acknowledge receipt
                        of each complaint within 5 working days from the time the complaint is
                        received. The complainant will be called in for an interview within 15 working
                        days.

              c.        At the interview the complainant(s) is informed of the steps to be taken to
                        resolve the specific complaint; the complainant then reviews the charge for
                        accuracy; and signs the initiation of complaint form.

              d.        The charge is served on the respondent and the vice chancellor or executive
                        officer of the respondent's unit in which this alleged act of discrimination is
                        said to have occurred within 20 working days from the initial receipt of the
                        complaint.




                                                   135
               e.      Data and documents from the parties, and rebuttal statements from the
                       respondent are to be submitted to the EO&D Office within 20 working days
                       from the date the charge is served.

       2. Investigation Process

               a.      Investigation may include interview of witnesses, review and comparative
                       analysis of data and documents, and may take up to 45 working days from the
                       time of receipt of the position statement from the respondent.

               b.      Written finding(s) of fact is made by the EO&D Office and is sent within 15
                       working days of the conclusion of the investigation to the complainant, the
                       respondent, and the University Legal Counsel; each of whom have an
                       opportunity to submit rebuttals to the finding(s) of fact within 10 working days.

               c.      The EO&D Office may initiate an investigation into any apparent
                       discrimination issue identified out of the investigation of a charge filed with it.

       3.      Resolution of Complaints

               a.      The EO&D Office prepares a written report of each formal investigation. It
                       includes pertinent information related to the specific discrimination complaint,
                       including finding(s) of fact. This report will make a recommendation to the
                       appropriate vice chancellor or executive officer for settling the complaint.

                       Copies will be send to the complainant and the respondent. The report will be
                       issued within 10 working days of receipt of all material referenced above.

               b.      The appropriate vice chancellor or executive officer will respond to the EO&D
                       Office's letter of finding(s) within 10 working days and that response will be
                       sent to the Director of the EO&D Office. The response will accept, reject, or
                       modify the recommendation of the EO&D Office.

               c.      Within 5 working days of receipt of the response of the vice chancellor or
                       executive officer, the EO&D Office will send a letter of notification to the
                       complainant and to the respondent outlining the University's position.


                              III. Scope of Resolution of Complaints

Acceptable resolutions of a discrimination complaint must be made in accordance with federal, state,
and University of Massachusetts Amherst Affirmative Action policies, and federal and state statutes
and regulations.




                                                  136
                                             IV. Appeals

A complainant dissatisfied with the University's resolution may seek redress by appeal to a state or
federal compliance agency. Filing a complaint with the EO&D Office does not deny a person the right
to file with outside agencies. These outside agencies and the issues they investigate are as follows:

A. Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD)

Under Chapter 151B, Massachusetts General Laws Annotated, it is unlawful to discriminate against a
person(s) on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, handicapping
condition, veteran status, or sexual orientation. The MCAD, a state agency, monitors discrimination in
the areas of housing, employment, loans, and educational opportunities. Any person claiming to be
aggrieved by an alleged unlawful practice may file a complaint with this agency. The offices to contact
are:


       Springfield Office:
       Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination
       436 Dwight Street, Suite 220
       Springfield, MA 01103
       413/739-2145

       Central Office:
       Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination
       One Ashburton Place, Room 601
       Boston, MA 02108
       617/727-3990


B. Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP)/ Department of Labor

On October 5, 1978, President Carter signed Executive Order 12086. This order is the most recent
amendment to Executive Order 11246. It gives OFCCP the compliance responsibility for equal
opportunity programs previously assigned to eleven other federal agencies. This agency monitors
discrimination in employment and in educational institutions (including hiring, upgrading, salaries,
fringe benefits, training, and other conditions of employment) on the basis of race, color, religion,
national origin, or sex. The local office to contact is:


       Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs
       U.S. Department of Labor
       William R. Cotter Federal Building
       135 High Street, Room 311
       Hartford, CT 06103
       860/240-4277




                                                 137
C. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)

The EEOC monitors discrimination in employment under Title VII which prohibits discrimination in
employment (including hiring, upgrading, salaries, fringe benefits, training, and other conditions of
employment) on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin or sex. The EEOC places great
emphasis on employment practices which classify jobs as "male" or "female" or which maintain
separate line of progression based on sex where this would adversely affect any employee. The local
office to contact is:


       U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
       Boston District Office
       10th Floor, Room 1001
       1 Congress Street
       Boston, MA 02114
       617/565-3200

D. Office for Civil Rights (OCR)/U.S. Department of Education

The OCR monitors: 1) Title IX, which specifies prohibitions against discrimination on the basis of sex
in educational programs; 2) the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which prohibits discrimination based on
handicap in areas related to employment, program accessibility, and student programs. Anyone who
has a complaint relating to sex discrimination or discrimination based on personal impairment may
contact:


       Office for Civil Rights, Region I
       U.S. Department of Education
       Room 222
       John W. McCormack Post Office and Courthouse
       Boston, MA 02109-4557
       617/223-9667


                            V. Procedures Related to Complaints Filed
                                  Outside the University System

A.     Notification of external complaints are usually sent by the outside agencies directly to the
       Chancellor's Office to the attention of the EO&D Office. A copy of the complaint is then sent
       to the appropriate vice chancellor or executive officer and the University Legal Counsel for
       their information.

B.     Responses to compliance agencies' queries are submitted to the EO&D Office by the
       appropriate parties closest to the alleged problem. The Chancellor, in consultation with the
       EO&D Office, University Legal Counsel, and the appropriate administrators, will determine
       the University's position vis-a-vis the complaint. The EO&D Office will typically investigate
       and coordinate, with assistance of the University Legal Counsel, the responses to the outside
       agency and advise the University administrators who present the University's position to the
       agency.


                                                 138
C.      Any determination or resolution of these complaints is made by the appropriate vice chancellor
        or executive officer in whose area the complaint has been filed, usually after consultation with
        the EO&D Office and the University Legal Counsel.

D.      All legal matters are handled by the University Legal Counsel in consultation with the vice
        chancellor or executive officer in whose area the complaint has been placed, and the Director of
        EO&D.


                                            VI. Retaliation

        In accordance with federal regulations, the University is required to take all necessary steps to
ensure that "no person intimidates, threatens, coerces, or discriminates against any individual for the
purpose of interfering with the filing of a complaint, furnishing information, or assisting or
participating in any manner in an investigation, compliance review, hearing, or any other activity
related to the administration of...the Federal, State, or local laws requiring equal employment
opportunity." Therefore, the following policy is made known for information and dissemination.

                The University will not take retaliatory or punitive action against any
                individual who alleges discriminatory practices by the administration.
                Charges of harassment or retaliation will be expeditiously and
                vigorously investigated by the University's administration in
                conjunction with appropriate in-house groups such as Faculty
                Grievance Committee, Ombudsperson, Union representatives and
                persons responsible for Affirmative Action grievances.

                If the University determines that retaliatory or punitive action has been
                taken against an individual who alleges discriminatory practices by the
                administration, the University will take action which may include
                sanctions from verbal reprimand to dismissal. Such action will depend
                upon the existing law, regulations, and procedures which govern the
                disposition of such matter. In all cases, where possible, the person who
                has suffered the retaliation or punitive action will be offered redress.



                                                                        Chancellor's Policy
                                                                        June 1979


EO&D 7/86; Revised 10/96.




                                                  139

				
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