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MONDAY_ NOVEMBER 7TH

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									ENG 102—April 8, 2008




    “One Perfect Rose”
        ENG 102 Film Series
► Allscreenings in 302 Buhl auditorium
► Sign-up sheets on bulletin board:
   Wednesday, April 9
     ►5:00: The Piano Lesson
     ►8:00: A Doll’s House
   Saturday, April 12
     ►10:00: Antigone
     ►1:00: Piano Lesson
     ►4:00 Madame Butterfly
        ENG 102 Film Series
► Sunday,   April 13
    7:00: Oedipus
► Tuesday, April 15
    5:00: Oedipus
    8:00: A Doll’s House
► Saturday, April 19
    10:00: Piano Lesson
    1:00: O
    4:00 Othello
Announcements & Reminders
► Hand   in final version of drama paper in
  folder with draft & peer editor’s
  suggestion sheet.
► Be sure to go to required appointment
  at Writing Center.
    No later than 1 day before the last
     paper is due: Monday, April 21.
     ►13   days. (Paper due on 22nd).
Announcements & Reminders
► Readings   for Thursday: “Those Winter
  Sundays,” 700, “My Father’s Love
  Letters,” 701-702 & “Woodchucks,” 651.
► Quiz covering fragments, fused
  sentences, comma splices, other comma
  errors & dangling modifiers on the 10th.
    Will be asked to identify & correct
     errors in a paragraph.
           Paper Guidelines
► Next paper: Comparison of 2 poems in LWP
   Draft due April 17
   Final version due Apr. 22.
► Requirements for paper:
   At least 750 words.
   At least 2 documented quotations from
    each poem.
     ►List in citation line number(s) quoted
      instead of page number(s).
             Paper Guidelines
    Signal phrase before each quotation.
    Analysis after each quotation
      ►Relating quotation to point of para.
    Include a Works Cited/References list including
     2 poems.
► Select 2 poems that have a lot in common or
  VERY interesting differences.
    Sample comparison of 2 poems in handout.
    Sample comparison of 2 novels in RG, ch. 63e.
             Sample Paper
► Review  Dr. R’s sample
  comparison-contrast
  paper about 2 poems
► Read “Ozymandius,”
  p. 590.
► Ask questions about
  “Unknown Citizen,”
  p. 503.
► Examine thesis,
  structure &
  formatting of paper.
                   Commas
► Any questions about comma reading or
  exercises in MyCompLab?
► Quiz covering fragments, fused sentences,
  comma splices, other comma errors &
  dangling modifiers on the 10th.
   Will be asked to identify & correct errors in a
    paragraph.
► Practice   exercise: work in groups of 2 or 3.
             What Is Poetry?
► Comesfrom ancient Greek ποίησις/poiesis,
 which means creating or making.
   Often defined as “compressed language.”
   “The best words in their best order” Coleridge.
   Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary: “writing
    that formulates a concentrated imaginative
    awareness of experience in language chosen
    and arranged to create a specific emotional
    response through meaning, sound, and
    rhythm.”
   Poetry can be playful, like riddles. See next
    slide.
ENG 102—April 10, 2008




       Woodchuck
        ENG 102 Film Series
► All screenings in 302 Buhl auditorium
► Sign-up sheets on bulletin board:
   Saturday, April 12
     ►10:00: Antigone
     ►1:00: Piano Lesson
     ►4:00 Madame Butterfly
   Sunday, April 13
     ►7:00: Oedipus
   Tuesday, April 15
     ►5:00: Oedipus
     ►8:00: A Doll’s House
        ENG 102 Film Series
► Saturday,   April 19
   10:00: Piano Lesson
   1:00: O
   4:00 Othello
► Be sure to go to required appointment at
  Writing Center.
   No later than 1 day before the last
    paper is due: Monday, April 21.
    ►13   days. (Paper due on 22nd).
Announcements & Reminders
► Read   for Tuesday: more animal poems
     “lesson of the moth,” 614
     “Traveling through the Dark,” 697-98
      “Black Snake,” 698-99
     “Pied Beauty,” 603
     “Design,” 614
     “The Lamb” & “The Tiger,” 583-84
     “The Flea,” 580.
           Paper Guidelines
► Next paper: Comparison of 2 poems in LWP
   Draft due Thursday, April 17
   Final version due April 22.
► Requirements for paper:
   At least 750 words.
   At least 2 documented quotations from
    each poem.
     ►List in citation line number(s) quoted
      instead of page number(s).
             Paper Guidelines
    Signal phrase before each quotation.
    Analysis after each quotation
      ►Relating quotation to point of para.
    Include a Works Cited/References list including
     2 poems.
► Select 2 poems that have a lot in common or
  VERY interesting differences.
    Sample comparison of 2 poems in handout.
    Sample comparison of 2 novels in RG, ch. 63e.
                    Quiz
► Put away books & papers.
► Write name on sheet.
► Write answers on sheet.
► Correct errors
    Make only minor changes in wording.
► When finished, hand in sheet.
► While waiting for others to finish, review
  poems assigned so far.
                             “Metaphors”
                            by Sylvia Plath
•      I'm a riddle in nine syllables,
•      An elephant, a ponderous house,
•      A melon strolling on two tendrils*.
•      O red fruit, ivory, fine timbers!
•      This loaf's big with its yeasty rising.
•      Money's new-minted in this fat purse.
•      I'm a means, a stage, a cow in calf.
•      I've eaten a bag of green apples,
•      Boarded the train there's no getting off.
•   *Merriam-Webster Online “1 : a leaf, stipule, or stem modified into a slender spirally coiling
    sensitive organ serving to attach a climbing plant to its support 2 : something suggestive of a
    tendril <creeping tendrils of fog>”
                  Poetry
► Does  poetry have to rhyme?
► Is poetry scary? Why or Why not?
► LWP, pp. 495-500, reading & writing about
  poetry.
► Think about which passage in that reading
  that taught you something about poetry
  that you didn’t know before.
► Review guidelines for reading poems,
  pp. 497-98 (list).
        “Digging” Into Poetry
► Seamus   Heaney, “Digging,” 665:
   Read the poem out loud.
   Discuss how Heaney uses digging as a
    metaphor for writing.
   Then write a paragraph for the “ing” word
    (present participle) that you would use as a
    metaphor for writing.
   Share your own metaphor with a classmate,
    then with the class.
                Woodchuck Defined
►   “A medium sized (16"-27", stout mammal with short,
    powerful legs, and a medium-long, bushy, flattened
    tail. Head is broad, fur tends to be long and
    coarse. Generally grayish brown, but much
    variation. Woodchucks (also called groundhogs or whistle
    pigs) are found throughout the eastern and midwestern
    U.S., as well as throughout all of northern Canada. Similar
    species live in the western U.S. (maramot). Woodchucks
    often live on forest edges near expansive pasture. They
    build burrows, but spend a lot of time feeding on a variety
    of plants above ground. Often a pest near gardens. Lots
    of predators eat them, and their burrow building often
    makes suitable homes for other species, like skunks ,
    foxes, weasels, opossums, and rabbits [and cats].”
    (campus.murraystate.edu/academic/faculty/howard.whiteman/field/mammals/
    woodchuck.html)
              Poetry
►Read  & discuss poems in chapter.
►Poems originally shared orally & still
 are:
  TUES. “Woodchucks,” 651
  “My Papa’s Waltz,” p. 501
  “Those Winter Sundays,” 700,
  “My Father’s Love Letters,” 701-
   702
      Poems for Discussion
 “Go, Lovely
  Rose,” p. 504
 “One Perfect
  Rose,” pp. 504-
  05.
 “Easter Wings,”
  pp. 582.

								
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